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Sample records for angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

  1. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA) tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF), flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A), FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using canine-specific primer sets. Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF) was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the other tumors. We established 6 xenograft canine HSA

  2. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa....... Not is a homeobox containing gene that regulates the formation of the notochord in chordates, while Cdx (caudal) is a ParaHox gene involved in the formation of posterior tissues of various animal phyla. The T. transversa homolog, TtrNot, is expressed in the ectoderm from the beginning of gastrulation until...... formation. TtrNot expression is absent in unfertilized eggs, in embryos prior to gastrulation, and in settled individuals during and after metamorphosis. Comparison with the expression patterns of Not genes in other metazoan phyla suggests an ancestral role for this gene in gastrulation and germ layer...

  3. Msx homeobox gene family and craniofacial development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SYLVIA ALAPPAT; ZUN YI ZHANG; YI PING CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrate Msx genes are unlinked,homeobox-containing genes that bear homology to the Drosophila muscle segment homeobox gene.These genes are expressed at multiple sites of tissue-tissue interactions during vertebrate embryonic development.Inductive interactions mediated by the Msx genes are essential for normal craniofacial,limb and ectodermal organ morphogenesis,and are also essential to survival in mice,as manifested by the phenotypic abnormalities shown in knockout mice and in humans.This review summarizes studies on the expression,regulation,and functional analysis of Msx genes that bear relevance to craniofacial development in humans and mice.

  4. Homeobox Genes in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Klein, David C;

    2013-01-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine gland responsible for nocturnal synthesis of melatonin. During early development of the rodent pineal gland from the roof of the diencephalon, homeobox genes of the orthodenticle homeobox (Otx)- and paired box (Pax)-families are expressed and are essential for......-deficient mice and studies on development of the retinal photoreceptor; the pinealocyte and retinal photoreceptor share features not seen in other tissues and are likely to have evolved from the same ancestral photodetector cell....

  5. Impact of homeobox genes in gastrointestinal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox genes, including HOX and non-HOX genes, have been identified to be expressed aberrantly in solid tumors. In gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, most studies have focused on the function of non-HOX genes including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 1 (CDX1) and CDX2. CDX2 is a crucial factor in the development of pre-cancerous lesions such as Barrett’s esophagus or intestinal metaplasia in the stomach, and its tumor suppressive role has been investigated in colorectal cancers. Recently, several HOX genes were reported to have specific roles in GI cancers; for example, HOXA13 in esophageal squamous cell cancer and HOXB7 in stomach and colorectal cancers. HOXD10 is upregulated in colorectal cancer while it is silenced epigenetically in gastric cancer. Thus, it is essential to examine the differential expression pattern of various homeobox genes in specific tumor types or cell lineages, and understand their underlying mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the available research on homeobox genes and present their potential value for the prediction of prognosis in GI cancers. PMID:27729732

  6. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu...

  7. Dispersal of NK homeobox gene clusters in amphioxus and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Luke, Graham N.; L Filipe C Castro; McLay, Kirsten; Bird, Christine; Coulson, Alan; Holland, Peter W. H.

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster genome has six physically clustered NK-related homeobox genes in just 180 kb. Here we show that the NK homeobox gene cluster was an ancient feature of bilaterian animal genomes, but has been secondarily split in chordate ancestry. The NK homeobox gene clusters of amphioxus and vertebrates are each split and dispersed at two equivalent intergenic positions. From the ancestral NK gene cluster, only the Tlx–Lbx and NK3–NK4 linkages have been retained in chordates. Thi...

  8. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Himanshu Mishra; Shweta Saran

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes are compared between genomes in an attempt to understand the evolution of animal development. The ability of the protist, Dictyostelium discoideum, to shift between uni- and multicellularity makes this group ideal for studying the genetic changes that may have occurred during this transition. We present here the first genome-wide classification and comparative genomic analysis of the 14 homeobox genes present in D. discoideum. Based on the structural alignment of the homeodomains, they can be broadly divided into TALE and non-TALE classes. When individual homeobox genes were compared with members of known class or family, we could further classify them into 3 groups, namely, TALE, OTHER and NOVEL classes, but no HOX family was found. The 5 members of TALE class could be further divided into PBX, PKNOX, IRX and CUP families; 4 homeobox genes classified as NOVEL did not show any similarity to any known homeobox genes; while the remaining 5 were classified as OTHERS as they did show certain degree of similarity to few known homeobox genes. No unique RNA expression pattern during development of D. discoideum emerged for members of an individual group. Putative promoter analysis revealed binding sites for few homeobox transcription factors among many probable factors.

  9. Structure of homeobox-leucine zipper genes suggests a model for the evolution of gene families.

    OpenAIRE

    Schena, M; Davis, R W

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes are present in both plants and animals. Homeobox-leucine zipper genes, however, have been identified thus far only in the small mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This observation suggests that homeobox-leucine zipper genes evolved after the divergence of plants and animals, perhaps to mediate specific regulatory events. To better understand this gene family, we isolated several sequences containing the homeobox-leucine zipper motif and carried out a comparative analysis of ni...

  10. Expression of homeobox genes in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilla, Marta; Chang, Isabelle; Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; Omura, Masayo

    2016-10-01

    Homeobox genes constitute a large family of genes widely studied because of their role in the establishment of the body pattern. However, they are also involved in many other events during development and adulthood. The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) is an excellent model to study neurogenesis in the adult nervous system. Analyses of homeobox genes during development show that some of these genes are involved in the formation and establishment of cell diversity in the MOE. Moreover, the mechanisms of expression of odorant receptors (ORs) constitute one of the biggest enigmas in the field. Analyses of OR promoters revealed the presence of homeodomain binding sites in their sequences. Here we characterize the expression patterns of a set of 49 homeobox genes in the MOE with in situ hybridization. We found that seven of them (Dlx3, Dlx5, Dlx6, Msx1, Meis1, Isl1, and Pitx1) are zonally expressed. The homeobox gene Emx1 is expressed in three guanylate cyclase(+) populations, two located in the MOE and the third one in an olfactory subsystem known as Grüneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nasal cavity. The homeobox gene Tshz1 is expressed in a unique patchy pattern across the MOE. Our findings provide new insights to guide functional studies that aim to understand the complexity of transcription factor expression and gene regulation in the MOE. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2713-2739, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27243442

  11. Homeobox genes in mammary gland development and neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both normal development and neoplastic progression involve cellular transitions from one physiological state to another. Whereas much is being discovered about signal transduction networks involved in regulating these transitions, little progress has been made in identifying the higher order genetic determinants that establish and maintain mammary cell identity and dictate cell type-specific responses to mammotropic signals. Homeobox genes are a large superfamily of genes whose members function in establishing and maintaining cell fate and cell identity throughout embryonic development. Recent genetic and expression analyses strongly suggest that homeobox genes may perform similar functions at specific developmental transition points in the mammary gland. These analyses also suggest that homeobox genes may play a contributory or causal role in breast cancer

  12. Two steps in the evolution of Antennapedia-class vertebrate homeobox genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kappen, C. (Christian); Schughart, K; Ruddle, F H

    1989-01-01

    Antennapedia-class vertebrate homeobox genes have been classified with regard to their chromosomal locations and nucleotide sequence similarities within the 183-base-pair homeobox domain. The results of these comparisons support the view that in mammals and most likely the vertebrates, four clusters of homeobox genes exist that were created by duplications of an entire primordial gene cluster. We present evidence that this primordial cluster arose by local gene duplications of homeoboxes that...

  13. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  14. Homeobox genes in the rodent pineal gland: roles in development and phenotype maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, Martin F.; Rohde, Kristian; Klein, David C.; Møller, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine gland responsible for nocturnal synthesis of melatonin. During early development of the rodent pineal gland from the roof of the diencephalon, homeobox genes of the orthodenticle homeobox (Otx)- and paired box (Pax)-families are expressed and are essential for normal pineal development consistent with the well-established role that homeobox genes play in developmental processes. However, the pineal gland appears to be unusual because strong homeobox gene e...

  15. Homeobox Genes and Melatonin Synthesis: Regulatory Roles of the Cone-Rod Homeobox Transcription Factor in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Rohde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating cAMP response element-based circadian melatonin production.

  16. Ancient homeobox gene loss and the evolution of chordate brain and pharynx development : deductions from amphioxus gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Butts, Thomas; Holland, Peter W. H.; Ferrier, David Ellard Keith

    2010-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode a large superclass of transcription factors with widespread roles in animal development. Within chordates there are over 100 homeobox genes in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus and over 200 in humans. Set against this general trend of increasing gene number in vertebrate evolution, some ancient homeobox genes that were present in the last common ancestor of chordates have been lost from vertebrates. Here, we describe the embryonic expression of four amphioxus de...

  17. Homeobox Genes and Melatonin Synthesis: Regulatory Roles of the Cone-Rod Homeobox Transcription Factor in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Rohde; Morten Møller; Martin Fredensborg Rath

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processe...

  18. Homeobox genes: a molecular link between development and cancer Genes homeobox: uma relação molecular entre o desenvolvimento e o câncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Daumas Nunes

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes are regulatory genes encoding nuclear proteins that act as transcription factors, regulating aspects of morphogenesis and cell differentiation during normal embryonic development of several animals. Vertebrate homeobox genes can be divided in two subfamilies: clustered, or HOX genes, and nonclustered, or divergent, homeobox genes. During the last decades, several homeobox genes, clustered and nonclustered ones, were identified in normal tissue, in malignant cells, and in different diseases and metabolic alterations. Homeobox genes are involved in the normal teeth development and in familial teeth agenesis. Normal development and cancer have a great deal in common, as both processes involve shifts between cell proliferation and differentiation. The literature is accumulating evidences that homeobox genes play an important role in oncogenesis. Many cancers exhibit expression of or alteration in homeobox genes. Those include leukemias, colon, skin, prostate, breast and ovarian cancers, among others. This review is aimed at introducing readers to some of the homeobox family functions in normal tissues and especially in cancer.Os genes homeobox são genes reguladores que codificam proteínas nucleares as quais atuam como fatores de transcrição, regulando vários aspectos da morfogênese e da diferenciação celular durante o desenvolvimento embrionário normal de diversos animais. Os genes homeobox de vertebrados podem ser subdivididos em duas famílias: os agrupados, ou HOX, e os não agrupados, ou divergentes. Durante as últimas décadas, vários genes homeobox, agrupados e não agrupados, foram identificados em tecidos normais, em células malignas e em diferentes doenças e condições metabólicas. Os genes homeobox estão envolvidos, por exemplo, no desenvolvimento normal do dente e em agenesias dentárias de ocorrência familiar. O desenvolvimento normal e o câncer têm muito em comum, já que ambos envolvem prolifera

  19. Phylogeny of the Insect Homeobox Gene (Hox) Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangeeta Dhawan; K. P. Gopinathan

    2005-01-01

    The homeobox (Hox) genes form an evolutionarily conserved family encoding transcription factors that play major roles in segmental identity and organ specification across species. The canonical grouping of Hox genes present in the HOM-C cluster of Drosophila or related clusters in other organisms includes eight "typical" genes,which are localized in the order labial (lab), proboscipedia (pb), Deformed (Dfd),Sex combs reduced ( Scr), Antennapedia (Antp), Ultrabithorax (Ubx), abdominalA (abdA), and AbdominalB (AbdB). The members of Hox cluster are expressed in a distinct anterior to posterior order in the embryo. Analysis of the relatedness of different members of the Hox gene cluster to each other in four evolutionarily diverse insect taxa revealed that the loci pb/Dfd and AbdB, which are farthest apart in linkage, had a high degree of evolutionary relatedness, indicating that pb/Dfd type anterior genes and AbdB are closest to the ancestral anterior and posterior Hox genes, respectively. The greater relatedness of other posterior genes Ubx and abdA to the more anterior genes such as Antp and Scr suggested that they arose by gene duplications in the more anterior members rather than the posterior AbdB.

  20. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Mansi; Larroux, Claire; Lu, Daniel R; Mohanty, Kareshma; Chapman, Jarrod; Degnan, Bernard M; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-01-01

    LIM homeobox (Lhx) transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons) indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In Nematostella, Lhx gene expression is correlated with neural

  1. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degnan Bernard M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM homeobox (Lhx transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. Results We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. Conclusions The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In

  2. Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Peter W H

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540-515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient 'through-gut' with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. A variety of ecological, environmental, genetic, and developmental factors have been proposed as possible triggers and correlates of the Cambrian explosion, and it is likely that a combination of factors were involved. Here, I focus on a set of developmental genetic changes and propose these are part of the mix of permissive factors. I describe how ANTP-class homeobox genes, which encode transcription factors involved in body patterning, increased in number in the bilaterian stem lineage and earlier. These gene duplications generated a large array of ANTP class genes, including three distinct gene clusters called NK, Hox, and ParaHox. Comparative data supports the idea that NK genes were deployed primarily to pattern the bilaterian mesoderm, Hox genes coded position along the central nervous system, and ParaHox genes most likely originally specified the mouth, midgut, and anus of the newly evolved through-gut. It is proposed that diversification of ANTP class genes played a role in the Cambrian explosion by contributing to the patterning systems used to build animal bodies capable of high-energy directed locomotion, including active burrowing. PMID:26605046

  3. Comprehensive analysis of animal TALE homeobox genes: new conserved motifs and cases of accelerated evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    TALE homeodomain proteins are an ancient subgroup within the group of homeodomain transcription factors that play important roles in animal, plant, and fungal development. We have extracted the full complement of TALE superclass homeobox genes from the genome projects of seven protostomes, seven deuterostomes, and Nematostella. This was supplemented with TALE homeobox genes from additional species and phylogenetic analyses were carried out with 276 sequences. We found 20 homeobox genes and 4 pseudogenes in humans, 21 genes in mouse, 8 genes in Drosophila, and 5 genes plus one truncated gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apart from the previously identified TALE classes MEIS, PBC, IRO, and TGIF, a novel class is identified, termed MOHAWK (MKX). Further, we show that the MEIS class can be divided into two families, PREP and MEIS. Prep genes have previously only been described in vertebrates but are lacking in Drosophila. Here we identify orthologues in other insect taxa as well as in the cnidarian Nematostella. In C. elegans, a divergent Prep protein has lost the homeodomain. Full-length multiple sequence alignment of the protostome and deuterostome sequences allowed us to identify several novel conserved motifs within the MKX, TGIF, and MEIS classes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed fast-evolving PBC class genes; in particular, some X-linked PBC genes in nematodes are subject to rapid evolution. In addition, several instances of gene loss were identified. In conclusion, our comprehensive analysis provides a defining framework for the classification of animal TALE homeobox genes and the understanding of their evolution.

  4. The Homeobox Genes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Insights into Their Spatio-Temporal Expression Dynamics during Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Hench

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes play crucial roles for the development of multicellular eukaryotes. We have generated a revised list of all homeobox genes for Caenorhabditis elegans and provide a nomenclature for the previously unnamed ones. We show that, out of 103 homeobox genes, 70 are co-orthologous to human homeobox genes. 14 are highly divergent, lacking an obvious ortholog even in other Caenorhabditis species. One of these homeobox genes encodes 12 homeodomains, while three other highly divergent homeobox genes encode a novel type of double homeodomain, termed HOCHOB. To understand how transcription factors regulate cell fate during development, precise spatio-temporal expression data need to be obtained. Using a new imaging framework that we developed, Endrov, we have generated spatio-temporal expression profiles during embryogenesis of over 60 homeobox genes, as well as a number of other developmental control genes using GFP reporters. We used dynamic feedback during recording to automatically adjust the camera exposure time in order to increase the dynamic range beyond the limitations of the camera. We have applied the new framework to examine homeobox gene expression patterns and provide an analysis of these patterns. The methods we developed to analyze and quantify expression data are not only suitable for C. elegans, but can be applied to other model systems or even to tissue culture systems.

  5. Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensman, H.; Goransson, H.; Leuchowius, K.J.; Stromberg, S.; Ponten, F.; Isaksson, A.; Rutteman, G.R.; Heldin, N.; Pejler, G.; Hellmen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas Journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 0167-6806 (Print) 1573-7217 (Online) Issue Volume 118, Number 2 / November, 2009 Category Preclinical Study DOI 10.1007/s10549-008-0

  6. Ontogenetic expression of the Otx2 and Crx homeobox genes in the retina of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Morin, Fabrice; Shi, Qiong;

    2007-01-01

    Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail. This conf......Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail....... This confirmed the presence of Otx2 mRNA in both the embryonic retinal pigment epithelium and the developing neural retina. During development, the expression of Otx2 persists in the pigment epithelium, whereas Otx2 expression of the neural retina becomes progressively restricted to the outer nuclear layer...... in the developing and mature mammalian retina....

  7. The Lhx9 homeobox gene controls pineal gland development and prevents postnatal hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Møller, Morten; Fu, Cong; Clokie, Samuel J.; Zykovich, Artem; Steven L Coon; Klein, David C.; Rath, Martin F.

    2014-01-01

    Lhx9 is a member of the LIM homeobox gene family. It is expressed during mammalian embryogenesis in the brain including the pineal gland. Deletion of Lhx9 results in sterility due to failure of gonadal development. The current study was initiated to investigate Lhx9 biology in the pineal gland. Lhx9 is highly expressed in the developing pineal gland of the rat with transcript abundance peaking early in development; transcript levels decrease postnatally to nearly undetectable levels in the ad...

  8. Linkage localization of TGFB2 and the human homeobox gene GLX1 to chromosome 1q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, D.Y.; Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Purchio, A.F. (Oncogen, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    We have identified genetic variation within two human genes, transforming growth factor-[beta]2 (TGFB2) and the homeobox gene HB24 (HLX1). Reported here are four human RFLPs and SSCPs for TGFB2 in humans and gorillas. In addition, we describe an RFLP and a SSCP for HLX1. We propose that HLX1 is the human homologue of the mouse homeobox gene Hlx based on extensive sequence homology between the genes and the close proximity of both genes to TGFB2 in their respective species. We also report the chromosomal localization of HLX1 to the long arm of human chromosome 1. Finally, utilizing the polymorphisms described for TGFB2 and HLX1, we have been able to localize these genes within a framework map of the distal long arm of chromosome 1 and to study the linkage relationship between these two genes. Pairwise linkage analysis shows that these two genes are linked, with a recombination fraction of 3.1% and a lod score of 14.49. 27 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  10. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

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    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  11. A single homeobox gene triggers phase transition, embryogenesis and asexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Nelly A; Katz, Aviva; Pereman, Idan; Decker, Eva L; Ohad, Nir; Reski, Ralf

    2016-01-18

    Plants characteristically alternate between haploid gametophytic and diploid sporophytic stages. Meiosis and fertilization respectively initiate these two different ontogenies(1). Genes triggering ectopic embryo development on vegetative sporophytic tissues are well described(2,3); however, a genetic control of embryo development from gametophytic tissues remains elusive. Here, in the moss Physcomitrella patens we show that ectopic overexpression of the homeobox gene BELL1 induces embryo formation and subsequently reproductive diploid sporophytes from specific gametophytic cells without fertilization. In line with this, BELL1 loss-of-function mutants have a wild-type phenotype, except that their egg cells are bigger and unable to form embryos. Our results identify BELL1 as a master regulator for the gametophyte-to-sporophyte transition in P. patens and provide mechanistic insights into the evolution of embryos that can generate multicellular diploid sporophytes. This developmental innovation facilitated the colonization of land by plants about 500 million years ago(4) and thus shaped our current ecosystems.

  12. The LIM class homeobox gene lim5: implied role in CNS patterning in Xenopus and zebrafish.

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    Toyama, R; Curtiss, P E; Otani, H; Kimura, M; Dawid, I B; Taira, M

    1995-08-01

    LIM homeobox genes are characterized by encoding proteins in which two cysteine-rich LIM domains are associated with a homeodomain. We report the isolation of a gene, named Xlim-5 in Xenopus and lim5 in the zebrafish, that is highly similar in sequence but quite distinct in expression pattern from the previously described Xlim-1/lim1 gene. In both species studied the lim5 gene is expressed in the entire ectoderm in the early gastrula embryo. The Xlim-5 gene is activated in a cell autonomous manner in ectodermal cells, and this activation is suppressed by the mesoderm inducer activin. During neurulation, expression of the lim5 gene in both the frog and fish embryo is rapidly restricted to an anterior region in the developing neural plate/keel. In the 2-day Xenopus and 24-hr zebrafish embryo, this region becomes more sharply defined, forming a strongly lim5-expressing domain in the diencephalon anterior to the midbrain-forebrain boundary. In addition, regions of less intense lim5 expression are seen in the zebrafish embryo in parts of the telencephalon, in the anterior diencephalon coincident with the postoptic commissure, and in restricted regions of the midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord. Expression in ventral forebrain is abolished from the 5-somite stage onward in cyclops mutant fish. These results imply a role for lim5 in the patterning of the nervous system, in particular in the early specification of the diencephalon.

  13. Regulation of dorsal-ventral patterning: the ventralizing effects of the novel Xenopus homeobox gene Vox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J E; von Dassow, G; Kimelman, D

    1996-06-01

    The formation of the dorsal-ventral axis in Xenopus laevis is elicited by a signaling cascade on the dorsal side of the embryo initiated by cortical rotation. These early developmental events impart an initial axial polarity to the embryo. By the time gastrulation occurs, the embryo has established opposing dorsal and ventral regulatory regions. Through a dynamic process, the embryo acquires a definitive pattern that reflects the distribution of future cell fates. Here we present a novel homeobox gene, Vox, whose expression reflects this dynamic process. Vox is first expressed throughout the embryo and subsequently eliminated from the notochord and neural plate. Ectopic expression of Vox demonstrates that the normal function of this gene may be to suppress dorsal genes such as Xnot and chordin, and induce ventral and paraxial genes such as Bmp-4 and MyoD. Ectopic expression of BMP-4 ventralizes embryos and positively regulates the expression of Vox, suggesting that these genes are components of a reciprocal regulatory network. PMID:8674411

  14. Chick homeobox gene cDlx expression demarcates the forebrain anlage, indicating the onset of forebrain regional specification at gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghjid, S; Siddiqui, M A

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a chick homeobox-containing gene, cDlx, which shows greater than 85% homology to the homeodomain of other vertebrate Distal-less genes. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies reveal that cDlx expression is developmentally regulated and is tissue specific. In particular, the developmental expression pattern is characterized by an early appearance of cDlx transcript in the prospective forebrain region of gastrulating embryos. During neurulation, cDlx is consistently expressed in a spatially restricted domain in the presumptive ventral forebrain region of the neural plate that will give rise to the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis. Our data support the notion that members of the Dlx gene family are part of a homeobox gene code in forebrain pattern formation and suggest that regional specification of the forebrain occurs at much earlier stages than previously thought. The homeobox gene cDlx may thus play a role in defining forebrain regional identity as early as gastrulation.

  15. The GRF10 homeobox gene regulates filamentous growth in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anup K; Wangsanut, Tanaporn; Fonzi, William A; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2015-12-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and can cause life-threatening infections. Filamentous growth is critical in the pathogenicity of C. albicans, as the transition from yeast to hyphal forms is linked to virulence and is also a pivotal process in fungal biofilm development. Homeodomain-containing transcription factors have been linked to developmental processes in fungi and other eukaryotes. We report here on GRF10, a homeobox transcription factor-encoding gene that plays a role in C. albicans filamentation. Deletion of the GRF10 gene, in both C. albicans SN152 and BWP17 strain backgrounds, results in mutants with strongly decreased hyphal growth. The mutants are defective in chlamydospore and biofilm formation, as well as showing dramatically attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression of the GRF10 gene is highly induced during stationary phase and filamentation. In summary, our study emphasizes a new role for the homeodomain-containing transcription factor in morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  16. A mutant homeobox gene created six-rowed spike in barley domestication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased seed production has been a common goal during the domestication of cereal crops. Early cultivators of barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) selected a phenotype with a six-rowed spike that stably produced three times the usual grain number during domestication. We isolated the SIX-ROWED SPIKE 1 (Vrs1) from barley by chromosome walking. We discovered that Vrs1 encodes a homeodomain leucine zipper I-class protein (HD-ZIP I), a potential transcription factor. RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the Vrs1 is expressed only in lateral spikelet primordia. Sequencing alleles of 54 six-rowed mutant lines revealed a single amino acid substitution in 22 lines, creation of a new stop codon in 12 lines, a nucleotide substitution in the conserved splicing site in 3 lines, a frameshift mutation by a deletion in 5 lines, complete deletion of the gene region in 7 lines, and no DNA changes throughout the coding region with no gene expression detected in the remaining 5 lines. We found three haplotypes among six-rowed barley revealing loss-of-function mutation of the homeobox gene Vrs1. We found that two of them independently originated from two different type two-rowed barleys, but origin of the remaining one six-rowed allele remained unclear. (author)

  17. Regulation, overexpression, and target gene identification of Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) - a class-I KNOX gene in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ameya S; Kondhare, Kirtikumar R; Rajabhoj, Mohit P; Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Tejashree; Ravindran, Nevedha; Habib, Farhat; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Banerjee, Anjan K

    2016-07-01

    Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) is a KNOX-I (Knotted1-like homeobox) family gene in potato that is orthologous to Shoot Meristemless (STM) in Arabidopsis. Despite numerous reports on KNOX genes from different species, studies in potato are limited. Here, we describe photoperiodic regulation of POTH15, its overexpression phenotype, and identification of its potential targets in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena). qRT-PCR analysis showed a higher abundance of POTH15 mRNA in shoot tips and stolons under tuber-inducing short-day conditions. POTH15 promoter activity was detected in apical and axillary meristems, stolon tips, tuber eyes, and meristems of tuber sprouts, indicating its role in meristem maintenance and leaf development. POTH15 overexpression altered multiple morphological traits including leaf and stem development, leaflet number, and number of nodes and branches. In particular, the rachis of the leaf was completely reduced and leaves appeared as a bouquet of leaflets. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of 35S::GUS and two POTH15 overexpression lines identified more than 6000 differentially expressed genes, including 2014 common genes between the two overexpression lines. Functional analysis of these genes revealed their involvement in responses to hormones, biotic/abiotic stresses, transcription regulation, and signal transduction. qRT-PCR of selected candidate target genes validated their differential expression in both overexpression lines. Out of 200 randomly chosen POTH15 targets, 173 were found to have at least one tandem TGAC core motif, characteristic of KNOX interaction, within 3.0kb in the upstream sequence of the transcription start site. Overall, this study provides insights to the role of POTH15 in controlling diverse developmental processes in potato. PMID:27217546

  18. Expression of one sponge Iroquois homeobox gene in primmorphs from Suberites domuncula during canal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perović, Sanja; Schröder, Heinz C; Sudek, Sebastian; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A; Batel, Renato; Stifanić, Mauro; Müller, Isabel M; Müller, Werner E G

    2003-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) represent the evolutionary oldest multicellular animals. They are provided with the basic molecules involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We report here the isolation and characterization of a complementary DNA from the sponge Suberites domuncula coding for the sponge homeobox gene, SUBDOIRX-a. The deduced polypeptide with a predicted Mr of 44,375 possesses the highly conserved Iroquois-homeodomain. We applied in situ hybridization to localize Iroquois in the sponge. The expression of this gene is highest in cells adjacent to the canals of the sponge in the medulla region. To study the expression of Iroquois during development, the in vitro primmorph system from S. domuncula was used. During the formation of these three-dimensional aggregates composed of proliferating cells, the expression of Iroquois depends on ferric iron and water current. An increased expression in response to water current is paralleled with the formation of canal-like pores in the primmorphs. It is suggested that Iroquois expression is involved in the formation of the aquiferous system, the canals in sponges and the canal-like structures in primmorphs.

  19. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Felix

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is

  20. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Daniel A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2010-04-01

    Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi) leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi) animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation) to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is required for

  1. A conserved cluster of three PRD-class homeobox genes (homeobrain, rx and orthopedia in the Cnidaria and Protostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Maureen E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are a superclass of transcription factors with diverse developmental regulatory functions, which are found in plants, fungi and animals. In animals, several Antennapedia (ANTP-class homeobox genes reside in extremely ancient gene clusters (for example, the Hox, ParaHox, and NKL clusters and the evolution of these clusters has been implicated in the morphological diversification of animal bodyplans. By contrast, similarly ancient gene clusters have not been reported among the other classes of homeobox genes (that is, the LIM, POU, PRD and SIX classes. Results Using a combination of in silico queries and phylogenetic analyses, we found that a cluster of three PRD-class homeobox genes (Homeobrain (hbn, Rax (rx and Orthopedia (otp is present in cnidarians, insects and mollusks (a partial cluster comprising hbn and rx is present in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. We failed to identify this 'HRO' cluster in deuterostomes; in fact, the Homeobrain gene appears to be missing from the chordate genomes we examined, although it is present in hemichordates and echinoderms. To illuminate the ancestral organization and function of this ancient cluster, we mapped the constituent genes against the assembled genome of a model cnidarian, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, and characterized their spatiotemporal expression using in situ hybridization. In N. vectensis, these genes reside in a span of 33 kb with the same gene order as previously reported in insects. Comparisons of genomic sequences and expressed sequence tags revealed the presence of alternative transcripts of Nv-otp and two highly unusual protein-coding polymorphisms in the terminal helix of the Nv-rx homeodomain. A population genetic survey revealed the Rx polymorphisms to be widespread in natural populations. During larval development, all three genes are expressed in the ectoderm, in non-overlapping territories along the oral-aboral axis, with distinct

  2. Lim homeobox genes in the Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi: the evolution of neural cell type specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons David K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous systems are thought to be important to the evolutionary success and diversification of metazoans, yet little is known about the origin of simple nervous systems at the base of the animal tree. Recent data suggest that ctenophores, a group of macroscopic pelagic marine invertebrates, are the most ancient group of animals that possess a definitive nervous system consisting of a distributed nerve net and an apical statocyst. This study reports on details of the evolution of the neural cell type specifying transcription factor family of LIM homeobox containing genes (Lhx, which have highly conserved functions in neural specification in bilaterian animals. Results Using next generation sequencing, the first draft of the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been generated. The Lhx genes in all animals are represented by seven subfamilies (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, Islet, Lhx2/9, Lhx6/8, and LMO of which four were found to be represented in the ctenophore lineage (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, and Islet. Interestingly, the ctenophore Lhx gene complement is more similar to the sponge complement (sponges do not possess neurons than to either the cnidarian-bilaterian or placozoan Lhx complements. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, the Lhx gene expression patterns were examined and found to be expressed around the blastopore and in cells that give rise to the apical organ and putative neural sensory cells. Conclusion This research gives us a first look at neural cell type specification in the ctenophore M. leidyi. Within M. leidyi, Lhx genes are expressed in overlapping domains within proposed neural cellular and sensory cell territories. These data suggest that Lhx genes likely played a conserved role in the patterning of sensory cells in the ancestor of sponges and ctenophores, and may provide a link to the expression of Lhx orthologs in sponge larval photoreceptive cells. Lhx genes were later co-opted into patterning more

  3. Muscle segment homeobox genes direct embryonic diapause by limiting inflammation in the uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Bartos, Amanda; Li, Yingju; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jegga, Anil; Murata, Shigeo; Hirota, Yasushi; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-06-11

    Embryonic diapause (delayed implantation) is a reproductive strategy widespread in the animal kingdom. Under this condition, embryos at the blastocyst stage become dormant simultaneously with uterine quiescence until environmental or physiological conditions are favorable for the survival of the mother and newborn. Under favorable conditions, activation of the blastocyst and uterus ensues with implantation and progression of pregnancy. Although endocrine factors are known to participate in this process, the underlying molecular mechanism coordinating this phenomenon is not clearly understood. We recently found that uterine muscle segment homeobox (Msx) transcription factors are critical for the initiation and maintenance of delayed implantation in mice. To better understand why Msx genes are critical for delayed implantation, we compared uterine proteomics profiles between littermate floxed (Msx1/Msx2f/f) mice and mice with uterine deletion of Msx genes (Msx1/Msx2d/d) under delayed conditions. In Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri, pathways including protein translation, ubiquitin-proteasome system, inflammation, chaperone-mediated protein folding, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were enriched, and computational modeling showed intersection of these pathways on inflammatory responses. Indeed, increases in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and inflammation conformed to proteotoxic and ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri under delayed conditions. Interestingly, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor bortezomib further exacerbated ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri with aggravated inflammatory response, deteriorating rate of blastocyst recovery and failure to sustain delayed implantation. This study highlights a previously unrecognized role for Msx in preventing proteotoxic stress and inflammatory responses to coordinate embryo dormancy and uterine quiescence during embryonic diapause.

  4. Curcumin downregulates homeobox gene NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cell LNCaP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-na ZHANG; Chun-xiao YU; Peng-ju ZHANG; Wei-wen CHEN; An-li JIANG; Feng KONC; Jing-ti DENG; Jian-ye ZHANG; Charles YF YOUNG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To elucidate the effect and the mechanisms of curcumin on the expression of the human homeobox gene NKX3.1 in the prostate cancer cell LNCaP. Methods:The expression change of NKX3.1 in cells incubated with varying concentrations of curcumin was observed by Western blotting and RT-PCR. A dual luciferase reporter assay was used to test the effect of curcumin on the activity of the NKX3.11040 bp promoter. Curcumin-treated cells disposed to a designated amount of androgen analog R 1881 and the androgen receptor (AR) antagonist flutamide,then the expression of NKX3.1 or the activity of the NKX3.1 promoter were inves-tigated by Western blotting or reporter gene assay, respectively. Finally, Western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay were performed to demonstrate the effect of curcumin on the expression of AR and its binding activity to the androgen response element (ARE). Results: Curcumin downregulated the ex-pression of NKX3.1 and the activity of the NKX3.1 1040 bp promoter in LNCaP cells. R1881 increased the expression of NKX3.1, and theAR antagonist flutamide decreased the expression of NKX3.1 in LNCaP cells, while curcumin could inhibit androgen-AR mediated induction of NKX3.1 expression. Curcumin decreased the expression of AR and the binding activity to ARE directly. Conclusion: Curcumin could downregulate NKX3.1 expression in LNCaP cells. It could also inhibit the androgen-AR mediated induction of NKX3.1 expression by downregulating AR expression and blocking its DNA binding activity.

  5. Class I Homeobox Genes, "The Rosetta Stone of the Cell Biology", in the Regulation of Cardiovascular Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Class I homeobox genes (Hox in mice and HOX in humans), encode for 39 transcription factors and display a unique genomic network organization mainly involved in the regulation of embryonic development and in the cell memory program. The HOX network controls the aberrant epigenetic modifications involving in the cell memory program. In details, the HOX cluster plays a crucial role in the generation and evolution of several diseases: congenic malformation, oncogenesis, metabolic processes and deregulation of cell cycle. In this review, I discussed about the role of HOX gene network in the control of cardiovascular development.

  6. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Human Homeobox Gene Nkx3.1 Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-LiJIANG; Jian-YeZHANG; CharlesYOUNG; Xiao-YanHU; Yong-MeiWANG; Zhi-FangLIU; Mei-LanHAO

    2004-01-01

    Nkx3.1 is a prostate-specific homeobox gene related strongly to prostate development and prostate cancer. To study its regulation of transcription, 1.06 kb 5′ flanking region of Nkx3.1 gene and its 5′ deletion mutants (861,617,417 and 238 bp) were obtained by PCR and cloned into pGL3-basic, a promoter-less luciferase reporter vector, to examine their promoter activities driving the reporter gene transcription, pRL-TK, a Renilla luciferase reporter vector was used as internal control, and pGL3-control and pGL3-basic were used as positive and negative control respectively. The promoter activities were determined by dual-luciferase reporter assay 48h after pGL3 constructs were cotransfected with pRL-TK into prostate cancer cell LNCaP. The results showed that dual-luciferase reporter assay (M/M2) of pGL3-1.06kb cotransfection with pRL-TK was 2.7, which was about 1.5-fold higher than that of pGL3-control cotransfection with pRL-TK and 50-fold higher than that of pGL3-basic cotransfection with pRL-TK. The results also showed that the relative activities (M1/M2) were 0.71, 0.84, 0.44 and 2.07 respectively for pGL3-861bp, pGL3-617bp, pGL3-417bp, pGL3-238bp, the last one still had 80% promoter activity compared with pGL3-1.06kb, which showed that deletion from 1.06kb to 238 bp had small effects on promoter activity. The conclusion was that the 238bp fragment containing a TATA box and two CAAT boxes had strong promoter activity. However, the deletion from 1.06kb to 861bp reduced activity 3.8-fold while the deletion from 417bp to 238bp enhanced activity 4.7-fold, which indicated that these deleted sequences might contain some important positive or negative regulatory elements. It will be important to identify the elements within the Nkx3.1 promoter that contribute to regulation of the gene transcription in the future studies.

  7. A novel repressor-type homeobox gene, ved, is involved in dharma/bozozok-mediated dorsal organizer formation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Nojima, Hideaki; Yabe, Taijiro; Hibi, Masahiko; Hirano, Toshio

    2002-10-01

    Dharma/Bozozok (Dha/Boz) is a homeodomain protein containing an Engrailed homology (Eh) 1 repressor motif. It is important in zebrafish dorsal organizer formation. Dha/Boz interacted with a co-repressor Groucho through the Eh1 motif. Expression of a Dha/Boz fused to the transcriptional activator VP16 repressed dorsal axis formation and the expression of organizer genes but led to the dorsal expansion of expression of the homeobox gene vox/vega1, indicating that Dha/Boz functions as a transcriptional repressor for dorsal axis formation. We also isolated a novel homeobox gene, ved, whose expression was negatively regulated by dha/boz. ved's sequence and expression profile were similar to those of vox/vega1 and vent/vega2. Like Vox/Vega1 and Vent/Vega2, Ved acted as a transcriptional repressor. The combined inhibition of ved, vox/vega1, and vent/vega2, by antisense morpholino injection, strongly dorsalized the embryos and elicited ventral expansion of organizer gene expression, compared with the effect of inhibiting each of these genes alone. These results suggest that ved is a target for the repressor Dha/Boz. Ved functions redundantly with vox/vega1 and vent/vega2 to restrict the organizer domain.

  8. Dysregulation of the homeobox transcription factor gene HOXB13: role in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decker B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brennan Decker1,2, Elaine A Ostrander1 1Cancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer (PC is the most common noncutaneous cancer in men, and epidemiological studies suggest that about 40% of PC risk is heritable. Linkage analyses in hereditary PC families have identified multiple putative loci. However, until recently, identification of specific risk alleles has proven elusive. Cooney et al used linkage mapping and segregation analysis to identify a putative risk locus on chromosome 17q21-22. In search of causative variant(s in genes from the candidate region, a novel, potentially deleterious G84E substitution in homeobox transcription factor gene HOXB13 was observed in multiple hereditary PC families. In follow-up testing, the G84E allele was enriched in cases, especially those with an early diagnosis or positive family history of disease. This finding was replicated by others, confirming HOXB13 as a PC risk gene. The HOXB13 protein plays diverse biological roles in embryonic development and terminally differentiated tissue. In tumor cell lines, HOXB13 participates in a number of biological functions, including coactivation and localization of the androgen receptor and FOXA1. However, no consensus role has emerged and many questions remain. All HOXB13 variants with a proposed role in PC risk are predicted to damage the protein and lie in domains that are highly conserved across species. The G84E variant has the strongest epidemiological support and lies in a highly conserved MEIS protein-binding domain, which binds cofactors required for activation. On the basis of epidemiological and biological data, the G84E variant likely modulates the interaction between the HOXB13

  9. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Human Homeobox Gene Nkx3.1 Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Li JIANG; Jian-Ye ZHANG; Charles YOUNG; Xiao-Yan HU; Yong-Mei WANG; Zhi-Fang LIU; Mei-Lan HAO

    2004-01-01

    Nkx3.1 is a prostate-specific homeobox gene related strongly to prostate development andprostate cancer. To study its regulation of transcription, 1.06 kb 5 ′ flanking region of Nkx3.1 gene and its5 ′deletion mutants (861,617, 417 and 238 bp) were obtained by PCR and cloned into pGL3-basic, apromoter-less luciferase reporter vector, to examine their promoter activities driving the reporter genetranscription, pRL-TK, a Renilla luciferase reporter vector was used as internal control, and pGL3-controland pGL3-basic were used as positive and negative control respectively. The promoter activities were deter-mined by dual-luciferase reporter assay 48 h after pGL3 constructs were cotransfected with pRL-TK intoprostate cancer cell LNCaP. The results showed that dual-luciferase reporter assay (M1/M2) of pGL3-1.06 kbcotransfection with pRL-TK was 2.7, which was about 1.5-fold higher than that of pGL3-control cotrans-fection with pRL-TK and 50-fold higher than that of pGL3-basic cotransfection with pRL-TK. The resultsalso showed that the relative activities (M1/M2) were 0.71, 0.84, 0.44 and 2.07 respectively for pGL3-861 bp,pGL3-617 bp, pGL3-417 bp, pGL3-238 bp, the last one still had 80% promoter activity compared with pGL3-1.06 kb, which showed that deletion from 1.06 kb to 238 bp had small effects on promoter activity. Theconclusion was that the 238 bp fragment containing a TATA box and two CAAT boxes had strong promoteractivity. However, the deletion from 1.06 kb to 861 bp reduced activity 3.8-fold while the deletion from 417bp to 238 bp enhanced activity 4.7-fold, which indicated that these deleted sequences might contain someimportant positive or negative regulatory elements. It will be important to identify the elements within theNkx3.1 promoter that contribute to regulation of the gene transcription in the future studies.

  10. Characterization of homeobox genes reveals sophisticated regionalization of the central nervous system in the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Focareta

    Full Text Available Cephalopod mollusks possess a number of anatomical traits that often parallel vertebrates in morphological complexity, including a centralized nervous system with sophisticated cognitive functionality. Very little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying patterning of the cephalopod embryo to arrive at this anatomical structure. Homeodomain (HD genes are transcription factors that regulate transcription of downstream genes through DNA binding, and as such are integral parts of gene regulatory networks controlling the specification and patterning of body parts across lineages. We have used a degenerate primer strategy to isolate homeobox genes active during late-organogenesis from the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. With this approach we have isolated fourteen HD gene fragments and examine the expression profiles of five of these genes during late stage (E24-28 embryonic development (Sof-Gbx, Sof-Hox3, Sof-Arx, Sof-Lhx3/4, Sof-Vsx. All five genes are expressed within the developing central nervous system in spatially restricted and largely non-overlapping domains. Our data provide a first glimpse into the diversity of HD genes in one of the largest, yet least studied, metazoan clades and illustrate how HD gene expression patterns reflect the functional partitioning of the cephalopod brain.

  11. Canine uterine bacterial infection induces upregulation of proteolysis-related genes and downregulation of homeobox and zinc finger factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnvi Hagman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial infection with the severe complication of sepsis is a frequent and serious condition, being a major cause of death worldwide. To cope with the plethora of occurring bacterial infections there is therefore an urgent need to identify molecular mechanisms operating during the host response, in order both to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention and to identify biomarkers for disease. Here we addressed this issue by studying global gene expression in uteri from female dogs suffering from spontaneously occurring uterine bacterial infection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis showed that almost 800 genes were significantly (p2-fold in the uteri of diseased animals. Among these were numerous chemokine and cytokine genes, as well as genes associated with inflammatory cell extravasation, anti-bacterial action, the complement system and innate immune responses, as well as proteoglycan-associated genes. There was also a striking representation of genes associated with proteolysis. Robust upregulation of immunoglobulin components and genes involved in antigen presentation was also evident, indicating elaboration of a strong adaptive immune response. The bacterial infection was also associated with a significant downregulation of almost 700 genes, of which various homeobox and zinc finger transcription factors were highly represented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these finding outline the molecular patterns involved in bacterial infection of the uterus. The study identified altered expression of numerous genes not previously implicated in bacterial disease, and several of these may be evaluated for potential as biomarkers of disease or as therapeutic targets. Importantly, since humans and dogs show genetic similarity and develop diseases that share many characteristics, the molecular events identified here are likely to reflect the corresponding situation in humans afflicted by similar disease.

  12. Pathways for Epidermal Cell Differentiation via the Homeobox Gene GLABRA2: Update on the Roles of the Classic Regulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Qing; Takashi Aoyama

    2012-01-01

    Recent plant development studies have identified regulatory pathways for epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.Interestingly,some of such pathways contain transcriptional networks with a common structure in which the homeobox gene GLABLA2 (GL2) is downstream of the transactivation complex consisting of MYB,bHLH,and WD40 proteins.Here,we review the role of GL2 as an output device of the conserved network,and update the knowledge of epidermal cell differentiation pathways downstream of GL2.Despite the consistent position of GL2 within the network,its role in epidermal tissues varies; in the root epidermis,GL2 promotes non-hair cell differentiation after cell pattern formation,whereas in the leaf epidermis,it is likely to be involved in both pattern formation and differentiation of trichomes.GL2 expression levels act as quantitative factors for initiation of cell differentiation in the root and leaf epidermis; the quantity of hairless cells in non-root hair cell files is reduced by g/2 mutations in a semi-dominant manner,and entopically additive expression of GL2 and a heterozygous g/2 mutation increase and decrease the number of trichomes,respectively.Although few direct target genes have been identified,evidence from genetic and expression analyses suggests that GL2 directly regulates genes with various hierarchies in epidermal cell differentiation pathways.

  13. 同源盒基因家族在神经系统中的研究进展%Progress of homeobox gene family in nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文文; 贾秀红

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox gene family encode a kind of transcription regulatory factors,which can specifically combine and regulate target genes,control embryonic development,cell proliferation and differentiation.Several subfamilies of homeobox gene famiy are associated with the early stage of differentiation and development of nervous system,whose abnormal expression explain the occurrence and development of nervous system diseases.Further study between homeobox gene family and nervous system can help to prevent and treat that diseases.%同源盒基因家族编码一类转录调节因子,能特异地结合并调控靶基因,控制胚胎发育及细胞增殖分化.该家族中的多个亚家族与神经系统的早期分化发育密切相关,它们的异常表达参与了神经系统疾病的发生发展.研究同源盒基因家族与神经系统的关系,有利于预防神经系统异常分化发育和疾病的发生,为探索治疗相关疾病提供新途径.

  14. Amplification, analysis and chromosome mapping of novel homeobox-containing and homeobox-flanking sequences in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国振; 严长杰; 翟文学; 何平; 杨江; 李小兵; 朱立煌

    1999-01-01

    Homeobox genes, widely distributed among animal and plant kingdoms, play an important role in developmental process. Several homeobox conserved fragments were amplified by PCR and the flanking regions were also obtained by an LM-PCR procedure. Sequencing and Southern analysis showed that they belong to a homeobox gene family of rice. Six homeobox-containing fragments were mapped on the molecular linkage map of rice. They were located on chromosomes 3, 4 and 7 respectively. It is noteworthy that there are 4 homeobox fragments located on rice chromosome 3 and the result is also consistent with the comparative genomics between rice and maize.

  15. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9-16.9%; P-value T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways.

  16. Characterization of wheat Bell1-type homeobox genes in floral organs of alloplasmic lines with Aegilops crassa cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murai Koji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alloplasmic wheat lines with Aegilops crassa cytoplasm often show homeotic conversion of stamens into pistils under long-day conditions. In the pistillody-exhibiting florets, an ectopic ovule is formed within the transformed stamens, and female sterility is also observed because of abnormal integument development. Results In this study, four wheat Bell1-like homeobox (BLH genes were isolated and named WBLH1 to WBLH4. WBLH1/WBLH3/WBLH4 expression was observed in the basal boundary region of the ovary in both normal pistils and transformed stamens. WBLH2 was also strongly expressed in integuments not only of normal ovules in pistils but also of the ectopic ovules in transformed stamens, and the WBLH2 expression pattern in the sterile pistils seemed to be identical to that in normal ovules of fertile pistils. In addition, WBLH1 and WBLH3 showed interactions with the three wheat KNOX proteins through the BEL domain. WBLH2, however, formed a complex with wheat KNOTTED1 and ROUGH SHEATH1 orthologs through SKY and BEL domains, but not with a wheat LIGULELESS4 ortholog. Conclusions Expression of the four WBLH genes is evident in reproductive organs including pistils and transformed stamens and is independent from female sterility in alloplasmic wheat lines with Ae. crassa cytoplasm. KNOX-BLH interaction was conserved among various plant species, indicating the significance of KNOX-BLH complex formation in wheat developmental processes. The functional features of WBLH2 are likely to be distinct from other BLH gene functions in wheat development.

  17. The homeobox gene MEIS1 is methylated in BRAFp.V600E mutated colon tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Dihal (Ashwin); A. Boot (Arnoud); E.H.J. van Roon (Eddy); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Fariña-Sarasqueta (Arantza); M. Fiocco (Marta); E.C.M. Zeestraten (Eliane); P.J.K. Kuppen (Peter); H. Morreau (Hans); T. van Wezel (Tom); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of colorectal cancer (CRC) can occur both via gene mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as via epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation. Site-specific methylation in CRC regulates expression of tumor-associated genes. Right-sided colon tumors more f

  18. microRNA-309 targets the Homeobox gene SIX4 and controls ovarian development in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Kokoza, Vladimir A; Li, Ming; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2016-08-16

    Obligatory blood-triggered reproductive strategy is an evolutionary adaptation of mosquitoes for rapid egg development. It contributes to the vectorial capacity of these insects. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying reproductive processes is of particular importance. Here, we report that microRNA-309 (miR-309) plays a critical role in mosquito reproduction. A spatiotemporal expression profile of miR-309 displayed its blood feeding-dependent onset and ovary-specific manifestation in female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Antagomir silencing of miR-309 impaired ovarian development and resulted in nonsynchronized follicle growth. Furthermore, the genetic disruption of miR-309 by CRISPR/Cas9 system led to the developmental failure of primary follicle formation. Examination of genomic responses to miR-309 depletion revealed that several pathways associated with ovarian development are down-regulated. Comparative analysis of genes obtained from the high-throughput RNA sequencing of ovarian tissue from the miR-309 antagomir-silenced mosquitoes with those from the in silico computation target prediction identified that the gene-encoding SIX homeobox 4 protein (SIX4) is a putative target of miR-309. Reporter assay and RNA immunoprecipitation confirmed that SIX4 is a direct target of miR-309. RNA interference of SIX4 was able to rescue phenotypic manifestations caused by miR-309 depletion. Thus, miR-309 plays a critical role in mosquito reproduction by targeting SIX4 in the ovary and serves as a regulatory switch permitting a stage-specific degradation of the ovarian SIX4 mRNA. In turn, this microRNA (miRNA)-targeted degradation is required for appropriate initiation of a blood feeding-triggered phase of ovarian development, highlighting involvement of this miRNA in mosquito reproduction. PMID:27489347

  19. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. Results We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. Conclusions RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid

  20. Distal-less homeobox genes of insects and spiders: genomic organization, function, regulation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Piel, William H; Monteiro, Antónia

    2016-06-01

    The Distal-less (Dll) genes are homeodomain transcription factors that are present in most Metazoa and in representatives of all investigated arthropod groups. In Drosophila, the best studied insect, Dll plays an essential role in forming the proximodistal axis of the legs, antennae and analia, and in specifying antennal identity. The initiation of Dll expression in clusters of cells in mid-lateral regions of the Drosophila embryo represents the earliest genetic marker of limbs. Dll genes are involved in the development of the peripheral nervous system and sensitive organs, and they also function as master regulators of black pigmentation in some insect lineages. Here we analyze the complete genomes of six insects, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Homo sapiens, as well as multiple Dll sequences available in databases in order to examine the structure and protein features of these genes. We also review the function, expression, regulation and evolution of arthropod Dll genes with emphasis on insects and spiders. PMID:26898323

  1. Functional and hierarchical interactions among zebrafish vox/vent homeobox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardelli, Claudio N; Pozzoli, Ombretta; Sordino, Paolo; Matassi, Giorgio; Cotelli, Franco

    2004-07-01

    The vertebrate Vox/Vent family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in the establishment of the dorsoventral (DV) axis, by repressing organizer genes such as bozozok/dharma, goosecoid, and chordino. In Danio rerio (zebrafish), members of the vox/vent gene family (vox/vega1, vent/vega2, and ved) are thought to share expression patterns and functional properties. Bringing novel insights in the differential activity of the zebrafish vox/vent genes, we propose a critical role for the ved gene in DV patterning of vertebrate embryos. ved is not only expressed as a maternal gene, but it also appears to function as a repressor of dorsal factors involved in organizer formation. At early- and mid-gastrula stage, ved appears to be finely controlled by antagonist crosstalks in a complex regulatory network, involving gradients of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity, dorsal factors, and vox/vent family members. We show that ved transcripts are ventrally restricted by BMP factors such as bmp2b, bmp7, smad5, and alk8, and by dorsal factors (chd and gsc). Alteration of ved expression in both vox and vent deletion mutants and vox and vent mRNAs-injected embryos, suggests that vox and vent function downstream of BMP signaling to negatively regulate ved expression. This inhibitory role is emphasized by a vox and vent redundant activity, compared with single gene effects. PMID:15188434

  2. Functional and hierarchical interactions among zebrafish vox/vent homeobox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardelli, Claudio N; Pozzoli, Ombretta; Sordino, Paolo; Matassi, Giorgio; Cotelli, Franco

    2004-07-01

    The vertebrate Vox/Vent family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in the establishment of the dorsoventral (DV) axis, by repressing organizer genes such as bozozok/dharma, goosecoid, and chordino. In Danio rerio (zebrafish), members of the vox/vent gene family (vox/vega1, vent/vega2, and ved) are thought to share expression patterns and functional properties. Bringing novel insights in the differential activity of the zebrafish vox/vent genes, we propose a critical role for the ved gene in DV patterning of vertebrate embryos. ved is not only expressed as a maternal gene, but it also appears to function as a repressor of dorsal factors involved in organizer formation. At early- and mid-gastrula stage, ved appears to be finely controlled by antagonist crosstalks in a complex regulatory network, involving gradients of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity, dorsal factors, and vox/vent family members. We show that ved transcripts are ventrally restricted by BMP factors such as bmp2b, bmp7, smad5, and alk8, and by dorsal factors (chd and gsc). Alteration of ved expression in both vox and vent deletion mutants and vox and vent mRNAs-injected embryos, suggests that vox and vent function downstream of BMP signaling to negatively regulate ved expression. This inhibitory role is emphasized by a vox and vent redundant activity, compared with single gene effects.

  3. The homeobox genes vox and vent are redundant repressors of dorsal fates in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Y; Gates, M A; Melby, A E; Kimelman, D; Schier, A F; Talbot, W S

    2001-06-01

    Ventralizing transcriptional repressors in the Vox/Vent family have been proposed to be important regulators of dorsoventral patterning in the early embryo. While the zebrafish genes vox (vega1) and vent (vega2) both have ventralizing activity in overexpression assays, loss-of-function studies are needed to determine whether these genes have distinct or redundant functions in dorsoventral patterning and to provide critical tests of the proposed regulatory interactions among vox, vent and other genes that act to establish the dorsoventral axis. We show that vox and vent are redundant repressors of dorsal fates in zebrafish. Mutants that lack vox function have little or no dorsoventral patterning defect, and inactivation of either vox or vent by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides has little or no effect on the embryo. In contrast, embryos that lack both vox and vent function have a dorsalized phenotype. Expression of dorsal mesodermal genes, including chordin, goosecoid and bozozok, is strongly expanded in embryos that lack vox and vent function, indicating that the redundant action of vox and vent is required to restrict dorsal genes to their appropriate territories. Our genetic analysis indicates that the dorsalizing transcription factor Bozozok promotes dorsal fates indirectly, by antagonizing the expression of vox and vent. In turn, vox and vent repress chordin expression, restricting its function as an antagonist of ventral fates to the dorsal side of the embryo. Our results support a model in which BMP signaling induces the expression of ventral genes, while vox and vent act redundantly to prevent the expression of chordin, goosecoid and other dorsal genes in the lateral and ventral mesendoderm. PMID:11493559

  4. The Homeobox Gene MEIS1 Is Methylated in BRAFp.V600E Mutated Colon Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dihal, Ashwin A.; Boot, Arnoud; van Roon, Eddy H.; Schrumpf, Melanie; Fariña-Sarasqueta, Arantza; Fiocco, Marta; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom; Boer, Judith M.

    2013-01-01

    Development of colorectal cancer (CRC) can occur both via gene mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as via epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation. Site-specific methylation in CRC regulates expression of tumor-associated genes. Right-sided colon tumors more frequently have BRAFp.V600E mutations and have higher methylation grades when compared to left-sided malignancies. The aim of this study was to identify DNA methylation changes associated with BRAFp.V600E mutation status. We performed methylation profiling of colon tumor DNA, isolated from frozen sections enriched for epithelial cells by macro-dissection, and from paired healthy tissue. Single gene analyses comparing BRAFp.V600E with BRAF wild type revealed MEIS1 as the most significant differentially methylated gene (log2 fold change: 0.89, false discovery rate-adjusted P-value 2.8*10-9). This finding was validated by methylation-specific PCR that was concordant with the microarray data. Additionally, validation in an independent cohort (n=228) showed a significant association between BRAFp.V600E and MEIS1 methylation (OR: 13.0, 95% CI: 5.2 - 33.0, P<0.0001). MEIS1 methylation was associated with decreased MEIS1 gene expression in both patient samples and CRC cell lines. The same was true for gene expression of a truncated form of MEIS1, MEIS1D27, which misses exon 8 and has a proposed tumor suppression function. To trace the origin of MEIS1 promoter methylation, 14 colorectal tumors were flow-sorted. Four out of eight BRAFp.V600E tumor epithelial fractions (50%) showed MEIS1 promoter methylation, as well as three out of eight BRAFp.V600E stromal fractions (38%). Only one out of six BRAF wild type showed MEIS1 promoter methylation in both the epithelial tumor and stromal fractions (17%). In conclusion, BRAFp.V600E colon tumors showed significant MEIS1 promoter methylation, which was associated with decreased MEIS1 gene expression. PMID:24244575

  5. vox homeobox gene: a novel regulator of midbrain-hindbrain boundary development in medaka fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Peter; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-03-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is one of the key organizing centers of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Its patterning is governed by a well-described gene regulatory network (GRN) involving several transcription factors, namely, pax, gbx, en, and otx, together with signaling molecules of the Wnt and Fgf families. Here, we describe the onset of these markers in Oryzias latipes (medaka) early brain development in comparison to previously known zebrafish expression patterns. Moreover, we show for the first time that vox, a member of the vent gene family, is expressed in the developing neural tube similarly to CNS markers. Overexpression of vox leads to profound changes in the gene expression patterns of individual components of MHB-specific GRN, most notably of fgf8, a crucial organizer molecule of MHB. Our data suggest that genes from the vent family, in addition to their crucial role in body axis formation, may play a role in regionalization of vertebrate CNS. PMID:26965282

  6. Gastrointestinal differentiation marker Cytokeratin 20 is regulated by homeobox gene CDX1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Carol W M; Wong, Newton A; Liu, Ying;

    2009-01-01

    CDX1 is a transcription factor that plays a key role in intestinal development and differentiation. However, the downstream targets of CDX1 are less well defined than those of its close homologue, CDX2. We report here the identification of downstream targets of CDX1 using microarray gene-expressi...

  7. Isolation, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human Nkx6.1 gene (NKX6A), a new pancreatic islet homeobox gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Permutt, M.A.; Veile, R. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Nkx6.1 (gene symbol NKX6A), a new member of the NK homeobox gene family, was recently identified in rodent pancreatic islet 13-cell lines. The pattern of expression suggested that this gene product might be important for control of islet development and/or regulation of insulin biosynthesis. We now report cloning of human NKX6A, characterization of its genomic structure, and its chromosomal localization. The predicted protein of human NKX6A contained 367 amino acids and had 97% identity to the hamster protein. The highly conserved NK decapeptide and homeodomain regions were identical between human and hamster, suggesting functional importance of these domains. The coding region spanned approximately 4.8 kb and was composed of three exons. The gene was localized to four CEPH {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} yeast artificial chromosome clones (914B4, 951G9, 981D6, and 847133), and a nearby polymorphic marker (D4S1538) on chromosome 4 was identified <1270 kb from the gene. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we also determined that NKX6A maps to 4q21.2-q22. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV. Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were

  9. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  10. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hwa Jang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30% had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70% had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  11. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from the hig...

  12. Retinoic acid down-regulates the expression of EmH-3 homeobox-containing gene in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikko, E; Van de Vyver, G; Richelle-Maurer, E

    2001-06-01

    The effects of retinoic acid (RA), a common morphogen and gene expression regulator in vertebrates, were studied in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri, both on morphogenesis and on the expression of EmH-3 homeobox-containing gene. At 0.3 microM, RA had no noticeable influence on sponge development, slightly up-regulating EmH-3 expression. In contrast, in sponges reared in 10, 8 microM and to a lesser extent 2 microM RA, there was a strong down-regulation of EmH-3 expression after hatching. This induced modifications in cell composition and morphology, greatly disturbing normal development. Archaeocytes kept the features found in newly hatched sponges while choanocytes and a functional aquiferous system were completely absent. The inhibition of morphogenesis and down-regulation of EmH-3 expression were reversible when sponges were no longer subjected to RA. After RA removal, EmH-3 expression returned to the high values found in untreated sponges, archaeocytes differentiated into choanocytes and sponges achieved a normal development. These results clearly show that, in freshwater sponges, the most primitive metazoan, RA may also act as a morphogen, regulating the expression of a homeobox-containing gene. They demonstrate that the expression of EmH-3 is necessary for the differentiation of archaeocytes into choanocytes and hence for the formation of a complete functional aquiferous system.

  13. Regulation and functions of the lms homeobox gene during development of embryonic lateral transverse muscles and direct flight muscles in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patterning and differentiation of developing musculatures require elaborate networks of transcriptional regulation. In Drosophila, significant progress has been made into identifying the regulators of muscle development and defining their interactive networks. One major family of transcription factors involved in these processes consists of homeodomain proteins. In flies, several members of this family serve as muscle identity genes to specify the fates of individual muscles, or groups thereof, during embryonic and/or adult muscle development. Herein, we report on the expression and function of a new Drosophila homeobox gene during both embryonic and adult muscle development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The newly described homeobox gene, termed lateral muscles scarcer (lms, which has yet uncharacterized orthologs in other invertebrates and primitive chordates but not in vertebrates, is expressed exclusively in subsets of developing muscle tissues. In embryos, lms is expressed specifically in the four lateral transverse (LT muscles and their founder cells in each hemisegment, whereas in larval wing imaginal discs, it is expressed in myoblasts that develop into direct flight muscles (DFMs, which are important for proper wing positioning. We have analyzed the regulatory inputs of various other muscle identity genes with overlapping or complementary expression patterns towards the cell type specific regulation of lms expression. Further we demonstrate that lms null mutants exhibit reduced numbers of embryonic LT muscles, and null mutant adults feature held-out-wing phenotypes. We provide a detailed description of the pattern and morphology of the direct flight muscles in the wild type and lms mutant flies by using the recently-developed ultramicroscopy and show that, in the mutants, all DFMs are present and present normal morphologies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified the homeobox gene lms as a new muscle identity gene

  14. Hahb-10, a sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene, is regulated by light quality and quantity, and promotes early flowering when expressed in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Eva C; Dezar, Carlos A; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Chan, Raquel L

    2005-12-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper proteins constitute a family of transcription factors found only in plants. Expression patterns of the sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene Hahb-10 (Helianthus annuus homeobox-10), that belongs to the HD-Zip II subfamily, were analysed. Northern blots showed that Hahb-10 is expressed primarily in mature leaves, although expression is clearly detectable in younger leaves and also in stems. Considerably higher expression levels were detected in etiolated seedlings compared with light-grown seedlings. Induction of Hahb-10 expression was observed when seedlings were subjected to treatment with gibberellins. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express Hahb-10 under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter show special phenotypic characteristics such as darker cotyledons and planar leaves. A reduction in the life cycle of about 25% allowing earlier seed collection was also observed, and this phenomenon is clearly related to a shortened flowering time. When the number of plants per pot increased, the difference in developmental rate between transgenic and non-transformed individuals became larger. After gibberellin treatment, the relative difference in life cycle duration was considerably reduced. Several light-regulated genes have been tested as possible target genes of Hahb-10. One of them, PsbS, shows a different response to illumination conditions in transgenic plants compared with the response in wild-type plants while the other genes behave similarly in both genotypes. We propose that Hahb-10 functions in a signalling cascade(s) that control(s) plant responses to light quality and quantity, and may also be involved in gibberellin transduction pathways. PMID:16215272

  15. Characterization of Rice Homeobox Genes, OsHOX22 and OsHOX24, and Over-expression of OsHOX24 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Suggest their Role in Abiotic Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna eBhattacharjee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox transcription factors are well known regulators of plant growth and development. In this study, we carried out functional analysis of two candidate stress-responsive HD-ZIP I class homeobox genes from rice, OsHOX22 and OsHOX24. These genes were highly upregulated under various abiotic stress conditions at different stages of rice development, including seedling, mature and reproductive stages. The transcript levels of these genes were enhanced significantly in the presence of plant hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA, auxin, salicylic acid and gibberellic acid. The recombinant full-length and truncated homeobox proteins were found to be localized in the nucleus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay established the binding of these homeobox proteins with specific DNA sequences, AH1 (CAAT(A/TATTG and AH2 (CAAT(C/GATTG. Transactivation assays in yeast revealed the transcriptional activation potential of full-length OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 proteins. Homo- and hetero-dimerization capabilities of these proteins have also been demonstrated. Further, we identified putative novel interacting proteins of OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 via yeast-two hybrid analysis. Over-expression of OsHOX24 imparted higher sensitivity to stress hormone, ABA, and abiotic stresses in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants as revealed by various physiological and phenotypic assays. Microarray analysis revealed differential expression of several stress-responsive genes in transgenic lines as compared to wild-type. Many of these genes were found to be involved in transcriptional regulation and various metabolic pathways. Altogether, our results suggest the possible role of OsHOX22/OsHOX24 homeobox proteins as negative regulators in abiotic stress responses.

  16. Characterization of Rice Homeobox Genes, OsHOX22 and OsHOX24, and Over-expression of OsHOX24 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Suggest Their Role in Abiotic Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Khurana, Jitendra P; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors are well known regulators of plant growth and development. In this study, we carried out functional analysis of two candidate stress-responsive HD-ZIP I class homeobox genes from rice, OsHOX22, and OsHOX24. These genes were highly up-regulated under various abiotic stress conditions at different stages of rice development, including seedling, mature and reproductive stages. The transcript levels of these genes were enhanced significantly in the presence of plant hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA), auxin, salicylic acid, and gibberellic acid. The recombinant full-length and truncated homeobox proteins were found to be localized in the nucleus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay established the binding of these homeobox proteins with specific DNA sequences, AH1 (CAAT(A/T)ATTG) and AH2 (CAAT(C/G)ATTG). Transactivation assays in yeast revealed the transcriptional activation potential of full-length OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 proteins. Homo- and hetero-dimerization capabilities of these proteins have also been demonstrated. Further, we identified putative novel interacting proteins of OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 via yeast-two hybrid analysis. Over-expression of OsHOX24 imparted higher sensitivity to stress hormone, ABA, and abiotic stresses in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants as revealed by various physiological and phenotypic assays. Microarray analysis revealed differential expression of several stress-responsive genes in transgenic lines as compared to wild-type. Many of these genes were found to be involved in transcriptional regulation and various metabolic pathways. Altogether, our results suggest the possible role of OsHOX22/OsHOX24 homeobox proteins as negative regulators in abiotic stress responses. PMID:27242831

  17. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifan; Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Nelson, Jessica C; Abe, Namiko; Gordon, Patricia; Lloret-Fernandez, Carla; Maicas, Miren; Flames, Nuria; Mann, Richard S; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Hobert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation program of the cholinergic AIY interneuron class. Using a panel of different terminal differentiation markers, including neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides, we show that ttx-3 also controls the terminal differentiation program of two additional, distinct neuron types, namely the cholinergic AIA interneurons and the serotonergic NSM neurons. We show that the type of differentiation program that is controlled by ttx-3 in different neuron types is specified by a distinct set of collaborating transcription factors. One of the collaborating transcription factors is the POU homeobox gene unc-86, which collaborates with ttx-3 to determine the identity of the serotonergic NSM neurons. unc-86 in turn operates independently of ttx-3 in the anterior ganglion where it collaborates with the ARID-type transcription factor cfi-1 to determine the cholinergic identity of the IL2 sensory and URA motor neurons. In conclusion, transcription factors operate as terminal selectors in distinct combinations in different neuron types, defining neuron type-specific identity features.

  18. A role for BMP-induced homeobox gene MIXL1 in acute myelogenous leukemia and identification of type I BMP receptor as a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Aaron; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong; Wei, Caimiao; Guindani, Michele; Lu, Yue; Liang, Shoudan; St John, Lisa S; Molldrem, Jeff; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2014-12-30

    Mesoderm Inducer in Xenopus Like1 (MIXL1), a paired-type homeobox transcription factor induced by TGF-β family of ligands is required for early embryonic specification of mesoderm and endoderm. Retrovirally transduced Mixl1 is reported to induce acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with a high penetrance. But the mechanistic underpinnings of MIXL1 mediated leukemogenesis are unknown. Here, we establish the protooncogene c-REL to be a transcriptional target of MIXL1 by genome wide chromatin immune precipitation. Accordingly, expression of c-REL and its downstream targets BCL2L1 and BCL2A2 are elevated in MIXL1 expressing cells. Notably, MIXL1 regulates c-REL through a zinc finger binding motif, potentially by a MIXL1-Zinc finger protein transcriptional complex. Furthermore, MIXL1 expression is detected in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) AML samples in a pattern mutually exclusive from that of HOXA9, CDX2 and HLX suggesting the existence of a core, yet distinct HOX transcriptional program. Finally, we demonstrate MIXL1 to be induced by BMP4 and not TGF-β in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Consequently, MIXL1 expressing AML cells are preferentially sensitive to the BMPR1 kinase inhibitor LDN-193189. These findings support the existence of a novel MIXL1-c REL mediated survival axis in AML that can be targeted by BMPR1 inhibitors. (MIXL1- human gene, Mixl1- mouse ortholog, MIXL1- protein). PMID:25544748

  19. The C. elegans nuclear receptor gene fax-1 and homeobox gene unc-42 coordinate interneuron identity by regulating the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and other neuron-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Bruce; Ebert, Bryan; Carmean, Nicole; Weber, Katherine; Clever, Sheila

    2005-11-01

    The fax-1 gene of the nematode C. elegans encodes a conserved nuclear receptor that is the ortholog of the human PNR gene and functions in the specification of neuron identities. Mutations in fax-1 result in locomotion defects. FAX-1 protein accumulates in the nuclei of 18 neurons, among them the AVA, AVB, and AVE interneuron pairs that coordinate body movements. The identities of AVA and AVE interneurons are defective in fax-1 mutants; neither neuron expresses the NMDA receptor subunits nmr-1 and nmr-2. Other ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits are expressed normally in the AVA and AVE neurons. The unc-42 homeobox gene also regulates AVA and AVE identity; however, unc-42 mutants display the complementary phenotype: NMDA receptor subunit expression is normal, but some non-NMDA glutamate receptor subunits are not expressed. These observations support a combinatorial role for fax-1 and unc-42 in specifying AVA and AVE identity. However, in four other neuron types, fax-1 is regulated by unc-42, and both transcriptional regulators function in the regulation of the opt-3 gene in the AVE neurons and the flp-1 and ncs-1 genes in the AVK neurons. Therefore, while fax-1 and unc-42 act in complementary parallel pathways in some cells, they function in overlapping or linear pathways in other cellular contexts, suggesting that combinatorial relationships among transcriptional regulators are complex and cannot be generalized from one neuron type to another.

  20. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  1. Ancient expansion of the hox cluster in lepidoptera generated four homeobox genes implicated in extra-embryonic tissue formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferguson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths. Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria, with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks.

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Plant-specific Zinc Finger-Homeobox and Mini Zinc Finger Gene Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Claude W.dePamphilis; Hong Ma

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger-homaodomain proteins (ZHD) are present in many plants;however,the evolutionary history of the ZHD gene family remains largely unknown.We show here that ZHD genes are plant-specific,nearly all intronless,and related to MINI ZINC FINGER (MIF) genes that possess only the zinc finger.Phylogenetic analyses of ZHD genes from representative land plants suggest that non-seed plant ZHD genes occupy basal positions and angiosperm homologs form seven distinct clades.Several clades contain genes from two or more major angiosperm groups,including eudicots,monocots,magnoliids,and other basal angiosperms,indicating that several duplications occurred before the diversification of flowering plants.In addition,specific lineages have experienced more recent duplications.Unlike the ZHD genes,&fiFs are found only from seed plants,possibly derived from ZHDs by loss of the homeodomain before the divergence of seed plants.Moreover,the MIF genes have also undergone relatively recent gene duplications.Finally,genome duplication might have contributed substantially to the expansion of family size in angiosperms and caused a high level of functional redundancy/overlap in these genes.

  3. In vitro effects of zinc and folic acid on the expressions of Neurogenin 3, Kruppel-like factor 4, c-Myc, Nanog, Nestin and POU class 5 homeobox 1 genes

    OpenAIRE

    Zehra Dilsad Coban; Sefik Guran; Atmaca Sahin Sagaltici

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Genes are regulated at multiple levels by using nutritional factors during neurogenesis and gliogenesis in brain development. Folic acid (FA)and zinc regulate the expressions of some genes which participate in brain development as nutritional factors. So, we aimed to find the effect of FA and zinc on the expression levels of neurogenin 3 (NGN3), Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4), c-Myc, nanog, POU class 5 homeobox 1-Pou5F1 (Oct4), and Nestin in mouse fetal brain tissue in neural plate p...

  4. A novel role of BELL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH, in floral patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Patibanda, Varun; Smith, Harley M S

    2009-02-01

    Flowers are determinate shoots comprised of perianth and reproductive organs displayed in a whorled phyllotactic pattern. Floral organ identity genes display region-specific expression patterns in the developing flower. In Arabidopsis, floral organ identity genes are activated by LEAFY (LFY), which functions with region-specific co-regulators, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) and WUSCHEL (WUS), to up-regulate homeotic genes in specific whorls of the flower. PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) are redundant functioning BELL1-like homeodomain proteins that are expressed in shoot and floral meristems. During flower development, PNY functions with a co-repressor complex to down-regulate the homeotic gene, AGAMOUS (AG), in the outer whorls of the flower. However, the function of PNY as well as PNF in regulating floral organ identity in the central whorls of the flower is not known. In this report, we show that combining mutations in PNY and PNF enhance the floral patterning phenotypes of weak and strong alleles of lfy, indicating that these BELL1-like homeodomain proteins play a role in the specification of petals, stamens and carpels during flower development. Expression studies show that PNY and PNF positively regulate the homeotic genes, APETALA3 and AG, in the inner whorls of the flower. Moreover, PNY and PNF function in parallel with LFY, UFO and WUS to regulate homeotic gene expression. Since PNY and PNF interact with the KNOTTED1-like homeodomain proteins, SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and KNOTTED-LIKE from ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA2 (KNAT2) that regulate floral development, we propose that PNY/PNF-STM and PNY/PNF-KNAT2 complexes function in the inner whorls to regulate flower patterning events. PMID:19082619

  5. A novel role of BELL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH, in floral patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Patibanda, Varun; Smith, Harley M S

    2009-02-01

    Flowers are determinate shoots comprised of perianth and reproductive organs displayed in a whorled phyllotactic pattern. Floral organ identity genes display region-specific expression patterns in the developing flower. In Arabidopsis, floral organ identity genes are activated by LEAFY (LFY), which functions with region-specific co-regulators, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) and WUSCHEL (WUS), to up-regulate homeotic genes in specific whorls of the flower. PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) are redundant functioning BELL1-like homeodomain proteins that are expressed in shoot and floral meristems. During flower development, PNY functions with a co-repressor complex to down-regulate the homeotic gene, AGAMOUS (AG), in the outer whorls of the flower. However, the function of PNY as well as PNF in regulating floral organ identity in the central whorls of the flower is not known. In this report, we show that combining mutations in PNY and PNF enhance the floral patterning phenotypes of weak and strong alleles of lfy, indicating that these BELL1-like homeodomain proteins play a role in the specification of petals, stamens and carpels during flower development. Expression studies show that PNY and PNF positively regulate the homeotic genes, APETALA3 and AG, in the inner whorls of the flower. Moreover, PNY and PNF function in parallel with LFY, UFO and WUS to regulate homeotic gene expression. Since PNY and PNF interact with the KNOTTED1-like homeodomain proteins, SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and KNOTTED-LIKE from ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA2 (KNAT2) that regulate floral development, we propose that PNY/PNF-STM and PNY/PNF-KNAT2 complexes function in the inner whorls to regulate flower patterning events.

  6. The homeobox gene MEIS1 is methylated in BRAF (p.V600E mutated colon tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin A Dihal

    Full Text Available Development of colorectal cancer (CRC can occur both via gene mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as via epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation. Site-specific methylation in CRC regulates expression of tumor-associated genes. Right-sided colon tumors more frequently have BRAF (p.V600E mutations and have higher methylation grades when compared to left-sided malignancies. The aim of this study was to identify DNA methylation changes associated with BRAF (p.V600E mutation status. We performed methylation profiling of colon tumor DNA, isolated from frozen sections enriched for epithelial cells by macro-dissection, and from paired healthy tissue. Single gene analyses comparing BRAF (p.V600E with BRAF wild type revealed MEIS1 as the most significant differentially methylated gene (log2 fold change: 0.89, false discovery rate-adjusted P-value 2.8*10(-9. This finding was validated by methylation-specific PCR that was concordant with the microarray data. Additionally, validation in an independent cohort (n=228 showed a significant association between BRAF (p.V600E and MEIS1 methylation (OR: 13.0, 95% CI: 5.2 - 33.0, P<0.0001. MEIS1 methylation was associated with decreased MEIS1 gene expression in both patient samples and CRC cell lines. The same was true for gene expression of a truncated form of MEIS1, MEIS1 D27 , which misses exon 8 and has a proposed tumor suppression function. To trace the origin of MEIS1 promoter methylation, 14 colorectal tumors were flow-sorted. Four out of eight BRAF (p.V600E tumor epithelial fractions (50% showed MEIS1 promoter methylation, as well as three out of eight BRAF (p.V600E stromal fractions (38%. Only one out of six BRAF wild type showed MEIS1 promoter methylation in both the epithelial tumor and stromal fractions (17%. In conclusion, BRAF (p.V600E colon tumors showed significant MEIS1 promoter methylation, which was associated with decreased MEIS1 gene expression.

  7. Aristaless related homeobox gene, Arx, is implicated in mouse fetal Leydig cell differentiation possibly through expressing in the progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Miyabayashi

    Full Text Available Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage.

  8. Suppression of the homeobox gene HDTF1 enhances resistance to Verticillium dahliae and Botrytis cinerea in cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Lu Long; Li Xu; Keith Lindsey; Xianlong Zhang; Longfu Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Development of pathogen-resistant crops, such as fungus-resistant cotton, has significantly reduced chemical application and improved crop yield and quality. However, the mechanism of resistance to cotton pathogens such as Verticillium dahliae is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterized a cotton gene (HDTF1) that was isolated following transcriptome profiling during the resistance response of cotton to V. dahliae. HDTF1 putatively encodes a homeodomain transcription factor, and its expression was found to be down-regulated in cotton upon inoculation with V. dahliae and Botrytis cinerea. To characterise the involvement of HDTF1 in the response to these pathogens, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to generate HDTF1-silenced cotton. VIGS reduction in HDTF1 expression significantly enhanced cotton plant resistance to both pathogens. HDTF1 silencing resulted in activation of jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling and JA accumulation. However, the silenced plants were not altered in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) or the expression of marker genes associated with SA signaling. These results suggest that HDTF1 is a negative regulator of the JA pathway, and resistance to V. dahliae and B. cinerea can be engineered by activation of JA signaling.

  9. Malformation of cortical and vascular development in one family with parietal foramina determined by an ALX4 homeobox gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Marcelo; Valente, Kette D; Sugayama, Sofia S M; Kim, Chong Ae

    2004-01-01

    Vascular and cortical anomalies have been found in a family with parietal foramina type 2 (PFM2), which is determined by the ALX4 gene. It is believed that ALX4 has a bone-restricted expression. We report a case of PFM with age-related size variation in a 4-year-old boy, as well as in his mother, aunt and grandfather. MR imaging of the child demonstrates prominent malformations of cortical (polymicrogyric cortex with an unusual infolding pattern) and vascular development (persistence median prosencephalic vein), associated with high tentorial incisure periatrial white matter changes. PMID:15569759

  10. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Long; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Takimoto, Aki; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-ichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Miura, Shigenori; Adachi, Taiji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1) and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870) physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2), but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at various stages of

  11. Induction and patterning of trunk and tail neural ectoderm by the homeobox gene eve1 in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Carlos; Maegawa, Shingo; Weinberg, Eric S; Wilson, Stephen W; Dawid, Igor B; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2010-02-23

    In vertebrates, Evx homeodomain transcription factor-encoding genes are expressed in the posterior region during embryonic development, and overexpression experiments have revealed roles in tail development in fish and frogs. We analyzed the molecular mechanisms of posterior neural development and axis formation regulated by eve1. We show that eve1 is involved in establishing trunk and tail neural ectoderm by two independent mechanisms: First, eve1 posteriorizes neural ectoderm via induction of aldh1a2, which encodes an enzyme that synthesizes retinoic acid; second, eve1 is involved in neural induction in the posterior ectoderm by attenuating BMP expression. Further, eve1 can restore trunk neural tube formation in the organizer-deficient ichabod(-/-) mutant. We conclude that eve1 is crucial for the organization of the antero-posterior and dorso-ventral axis in the gastrula ectoderm and also has trunk- and tail-promoting activity.

  12. Timing the generation of distinct retinal cells by homeobox proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Decembrini

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The reason why different types of vertebrate nerve cells are generated in a particular sequence is still poorly understood. In the vertebrate retina, homeobox genes play a crucial role in establishing different cell identities. Here we provide evidence of a cellular clock that sequentially activates distinct homeobox genes in embryonic retinal cells, linking the identity of a retinal cell to its time of generation. By in situ expression analysis, we found that the three Xenopus homeobox genes Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are initially transcribed but not translated in early retinal progenitors. Their translation requires cell cycle progression and is sequentially activated in photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. Furthermore, by in vivo lipofection of "sensors" in which green fluorescent protein translation is under control of the 3' untranslated region (UTR, we found that the 3' UTRs of Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are sufficient to drive a spatiotemporal pattern of translation matching that of the corresponding proteins and consistent with the time of generation of photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. The block of cell cycle progression of single early retinal progenitors impairs their differentiation as photoreceptors and bipolar cells, but is rescued by the lipofection of Xotx5b and Xvsx1 coding sequences, respectively. This is the first evidence to our knowledge that vertebrate homeobox proteins can work as effectors of a cellular clock to establish distinct cell identities.

  13. 人矮小同源盒基因在身材矮小中的研究进展%Research development of short stature homeobox containing gene in short stature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢理玲

    2014-01-01

    Children short stature is pediatric endocrine disease.It has now been confirmed that short stature homeobox gene(SHOX gene)deletion and mutation are the molecular genetic basis of children Leri-Weill syndrome,Turner syndrome,idiopathic short stature and other short stature phenotype.SHOX gene defect has obvious heterogeneity in clinical phenotype.Early detection of SHOX gene defects provides important reference value and guiding significance for short stature diagnosis and treatment.%儿童身材矮小是儿科内分泌常见病,现已证实人矮小同源盒基因(SHOX基因)的缺失和突变是儿童Leri-Weill综合征、Turner综合征及特发性身材矮小和其他具有矮小表型疾病的分子遗传学基础,SHOX基因缺陷的临床表型具有明显的异质性,早期发现SHOX基因的缺陷对矮小症的诊断和治疗具有重要的参考价值和指导意义.

  14. ASYMMETRIC-LEAVES2 and an ortholog of eukaryotic NudC domain proteins repress expression of AUXIN-RESPONSE-FACTOR and class 1 KNOX homeobox genes for development of flat symmetric leaves in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanako Ishibashi

    2012-01-01

    Leaf primordia form around the shoot apical meristem, which consists of indeterminate stem cells. Upon initiation of leaf development, adaxial-abaxial patterning is crucial for appropriate lateral expansion, via cellular proliferation, and the formation of flat symmetric leaves. Many genes that specify such patterning have been identified, but regulation by upstream factors of the expression of relevant effector genes remains poorly understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2 and AS1 play important roles in repressing transcription of class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX genes and leaf abaxial-determinant effector genes. We report here a mutation, designated enhancer of asymmetric leaves2 and asymmetric leaves1 (eal, that is associated with efficient generation of abaxialized filamentous leaves on the as2 or as1 background. Levels of transcripts of many abaxial-determinant genes, including ETTIN (ETT/AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3, and all four class 1 KNOX genes were markedly elevated in as2 eal shoot apices. Rudimentary patterning in as2 eal leaves was suppressed by the ett mutation. EAL encodes BOBBER1 (BOB1, an Arabidopsis ortholog of eukaryotic NudC domain proteins. BOB1 was expressed in plant tissues with division potential and bob1 mutations resulted in lowered levels of transcripts of some cell-cycle genes and decreased rates of cell division in shoot and root apices. Coordinated cellular proliferation, supported by BOB1, and repression of all class 1 KNOX genes, ETT/ARF3 by AS2 (AS1 and BOB1 might be critical for repression of the indeterminate state and of aberrant abaxialization in the presumptive adaxial domain of leaf primordia, which might ensure the formation of flat symmetric leaves.

  15. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4) Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard; Hardt, Michael; Scheuermann, Petra; Freick, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4) gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA) and 289 White Galloway (WGA) cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed. PMID:26076463

  16. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4 Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram Brenig

    Full Text Available Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4 gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA and 289 White Galloway (WGA cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed.

  17. In vitro effects of zinc and folic acid on the expressions of Neurogenin 3, Kruppel-like factor 4, c-Myc, Nanog, Nestin and POU class 5 homeobox 1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Dilsad Coban

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Genes are regulated at multiple levels by using nutritional factors during neurogenesis and gliogenesis in brain development. Folic acid (FAand zinc regulate the expressions of some genes which participate in brain development as nutritional factors. So, we aimed to find the effect of FA and zinc on the expression levels of neurogenin 3 (NGN3, Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4, c-Myc, nanog, POU class 5 homeobox 1-Pou5F1 (Oct4, and Nestin in mouse fetal brain tissue in neural plate phase at gestational day 7 (GD7and in fetal brain tissue at GD20. Methods: All the tissues were cultured primarily. FA and zinc solutions were added. Real time-polymerase chain reaction was performed in RNA obtained from in each sample. Results: FA has no effect on GD7 mouse neural plate tissue and GD20 mouse fetal brain tissue. Zinc has no effect on GD7 mouse neural plate tissue. Zinc increased the expressions of NGN3, Klf4, nanog, Nestin, and Oct4 genes on GD20 mouse fetal brain tissue. Conclusion: This in vitro study represents that zinc is important in the expressions of NGN3, Klf4, Nanog, Nestin, and Oct4 genes in the late phase of pregnancy. The stimulator effect of Zinc on the expression levels of these genes may show us the possible role of zinc in fetal brain development in the late phase of pregnancy. [J Exp Integr Med 2015; 5(2.000: 75-80

  18. A knotted1-like homeobox protein regulates abscission in tomato by modulating the auxin pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    KD1, a gene encoding a KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX transcription factor is known to be involved, in tomato, in ontogeny of the compound leaf. KD1 is also highly expressed in both leaf and flower abscission zones. Reducing abundance of transcripts of this gene in tomato, using both virus induced gene sile...

  19. The ocular retardation (or{sup J}) mouse has an ochre mutation in the homeobox gene Chx10: Direct evidence for Chx10 as a major determinant of retinal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnes, R.R.; Novak, J.; Ploder, L. [Genetics Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The recessive mutation or causes microphthalmia, progressive destruction of the retina, and absence of the optic nerve. There is a significant disruption of neuroretinal differentiation and layer formation, and the number of proliferating retinal progenitor cells is dramatically reduced (by 45% at E10 & 90% at E16). To identify the or gene, we localized the or{sup J} allele (in strain 129 mice) to chromosome 12. We then positioned or by a backcross between or{sup J} and Mus castaneus, defining the distances D12Mit91-14cM-or-4cM-D12Mit6, and placing or in the same interval of chromosome 12 as Chx10. No recombinants were obtained between or and Chx10 in 170 informative progeny, establishing close linkage and making Chx10 a candidate gene for or. On the basis of its expression pattern, we proposed that Chx10 confers neuroretinal identity on the early retinal progenitors of the developing eye, and participates in retinal lamination. To allow mutation analysis of Chx10, we cloned the strain 129 Chx10 gene (5 coding exons over {approximately}30 kb). Multiple PCR amplifications and direct sequencing of axon 3 of or{sup J} mice revealed a homozygous mutation (TAC {yields} TAA) (not present in strain 129 controls) that converts Tyr 29 of the homeobox to a premature stop; this result was confirmed by restriction analysis of the PCR products, since the mutation destroys an Accl site. We conclude that (1) mutations in Chx10 cause murine ocular retardation, (2) the Chx10 homeodomain protein has a critical role in mammalian retinal formation, possibly as a transcription regulator of neuroblast differentiation and division, and (3) CHx10 mutations may cause microphthalmia in man.

  20. Over-expression of the Hybrid Aspen Homeobox PttKN1 Gene in Red Leaf Beet Induced Altered Coloration of Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanle XU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available PttKN1 (Populus tremula × tremuloides KNOTTED1 gene belongs to the KNOXI gene family. It plays an important role in plant development, typically in meristem initiation, maintenance and organogenesis, and potentially in plant coloration. To investigate the gene functions further, it was introduced into red leaf beet by the floral dip method mediated via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The transformants demonstrated typical phenotypes as with other PttKN1 transformants. These alterations were very different from the morphology of the wild type. Among them, morphological modification of changed color throughout the entire plant from claret of wild type to yellowish green was the highlight in those transgenic PttKN1-beet plants. The result of spraying selection showed that the PttKN1-beet plants had kanamycin resistance. PCR assay of the 35S-Promoter, NPTII and PttKN1 gene, PCR-Southern analysis of the NPTII and PttKN1 gene showed that the foreign PttKN1 gene had successfully integrated into the genome of beet plant. Furthermore, the results of RT-PCR analysis showed that the gene was ectopic expressed in transgenic plants. These data suggested that there is a correlation between the ectopic expression of PttKN1 gene and morphological alterations of beet plants. Pigment content assay showed that betaxanthins concentrations shared little difference between wild type and transgenic lines, while betacyanins content in transgenic plants was sharply decreased, indicating that the altered plant coloration of the transgenic beet plants may be caused by the changed betacyanins content. The tyrosinase study suggested that the sharply decreased of betacyanins content in transgenic plants was caused via the decreased tyrosinase level. Therefore, the reason for the altered plant coloration may be due to partial inhibition of betacyanin biosynthesis that was induced via the pleiotropic roles of PttKN1 gene.

  1. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the Homeobox hex Gene from KunMing Mouse%小鼠同源异型盒基因hex的克隆与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉芬; 高学军; 任德全; 许丽敏

    2011-01-01

    Hex (haematopoietically expressed homeobox, hex)gene has important function in vertebrate development. To study the function of hex gene in mammary gland development, the total RNA was extracted,hex gene was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into pMD18-T in the study. The results indicated that the open reading frame of hex gene was 816 bp in length which could encode 271 amino acids, was 30 kD molecular weight. There was complete similarity with the sequence published from GenBank. The homology of amino acids were 69.8%-97.0% with chicken, human, rat, xenopus and zebrafish. The phylogenetic tree of Hex protein from different species proved that there were seven differences in amino acid sequence between mouse and rat. HEX protein was conserved in sequence, it had important function in evolution.%同源异型盒基因hex在动物个体发育过程中具有重要的作用.为了解小鼠hex基因在乳腺发育中的作用,研究中提取细胞总RNA,采用RT-PCR方法扩增hex基因,并克隆到pMD18-T载体后测序.结较保守,表明在进化中具有重要的作用.结果表明:小鼠的hex基因开放阅读框由816个核苷酸组成.编码271个氨基酸,相对分子质量为30 kD.与已发表的小鼠该基因序列完全一致.与禽类、人和其他动物相比氨基酸序列的同源性在69.8%~97.0%之间.进化树显示,小鼠与大鼠的hex基因在同一分支内,只有7个氨基酸的差异,该蛋白在物种的进化中较保守,标明在进化中具有重要的作用.

  2. XLMR in MRX families 29, 32, 33 and 38 results from the dup24 mutation in the ARX (Aristaless related homeobox gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Andrée

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked mental retardation (XLMR is the leading cause of mental retardation in males. Mutations in the ARX gene in Xp22.1 have been found in numerous families with both nonsyndromic and syndromic XLMR. The most frequent mutation in this gene is a 24 bp duplication in exon 2. Based on this fact, a panel of XLMR families linked to Xp22 was tested for this particular ARX mutation. Methods Genomic DNA from XLMR families linked to Xp22.1 was amplified for exon 2 in ARX using a Cy5 labeled primer pair. The resulting amplicons were sized using the ALFexpress automated sequencer. Results A panel of 11 families with X-linked mental retardation was screened for the ARX 24dup mutation. Four nonsyndromic XLMR families – MRX29, MRX32, MRX33 and MRX38 – were found to have this particular gene mutation. Conclusion We have identified 4 additional XLMR families with the ARX dup24 mutation from a panel of 11 XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. This finding makes the ARX dup24 mutation the most common mutation in nonsyndromic XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. As this mutation can be readily tested for using an automated sequencer, screening should be considered for any male with nonsyndromic MR of unknown etiology.

  3. Characterization of chicken octamer-binding proteins demonstrates that POU domain-containing homeobox transcription factors have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petryniak, B.; Postema, C.E.; McCormack, W.T.; Thompson, C.B. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA)); Staudt, L.M. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The DNA sequence motif ATTTGCAT (octamer) or its inverse complement has been identified as an evolutionarily conserved element in the promoter region of immunoglobulin genes. Two major DNA-binding proteins that bind in a sequence-specific manner to the octamer DNA sequence have been identified in mammalian species--a ubiquitously expressed protein (Oct-1) and a lymphoid-specific protein (Oct-2). During characterization of the promoter region of the chicken immunoglobulin light chain gene, the authors identified two homologous octamer-binding proteins in chicken B cells. when the cloning of the human gene for Oct-2 revealed it to be a member of a distinct family of homeobox genes, they sought to determine if the human Oct-2 cDNA could be used to identify homologous chicken homeobox genes. Using a human Oct-2 homeobox-specific DNA probe, they were able to identify 6-10 homeobox-containing genes in the chicken genome, demonstrating that the Oct-2-related subfamily of homeobox genes exists in avian species. DNA sequence analysis revealed it to be the chicken homologue of the human Oct-1 gene. Together, the data show that the POU-containing subfamily of homeobox genes have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution, apparently as a result of selection for their DNA-binding and transcriptional regulatory properties.

  4. MEIS and PBX homeobox proteins in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, A. P. G.; de Graeff, P.; Geerts, D.; ten Hoor, K. A.; Hollema, H.; van der Sluis, T.; Hofstra, R. M. W.; de Bock, G. H.; de Jong, S.; van der Zee, A. G. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2007-01-01

    Three amino-acid loop extension (TALE) homeobox proteins MEIS and PBX are cofactors for HOX-class homeobox proteins, which control growth and differentiation during embryogenesis and homeostasis. We showed that MEIS and PBX expression are related to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines.

  5. Effects of 9-cis retinoic acid on human homeobox gene NKX3.1 expression in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP%9-顺维甲酸对前列腺癌细胞系LNCaP中同源盒基因NKX3.1表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.L.Jiang; P.J.Zhang; W.W.Chen; W.W.Liu; C.X.Yu; X.Y.Hu; X.Q.Zhang; J.Y.Zhang

    2006-01-01

    目的:研究9-顺维甲酸对前列腺癌细胞系LNCaP中同源盒基因NKX3.1表达的调节作用.方法:采用流式细胞术、反转录PCR和Western Blot技术检测9-顺维甲酸对LNCaP细胞周期及NKX3.1表达的影响;构建和转染NKX3.1启动子-报告基因质粒及其缺失突变体,通过报告基因活性测定,鉴定NKX3.1启动子中受9顺-维甲酸调控的区域.结果:通过转染及报告基因检测,发现9-顺维甲酸在LNCaP细胞中可明显提高NKX3.1启动子的活性;RT-PCR和WesternBlot结果显示,9-顺维甲酸可提高NKX3.1 mRNA和蛋白的表达,并呈剂量依赖性;通过启动子缺失突变分析,发现NKX3.1基因上游-936至-921区明显受9-顺维甲酸诱导调节;流式细胞术分析细胞周期的结果显示,9-顺维甲酸可阻止LNCaP细胞于G1期,减少G2/M期细胞.结论:9-顺维甲酸作为诱导分化剂可阻止LNCaP细胞于G1期,减少细胞有丝分裂,并明显上调前列腺特异的抑癌基因NKX3.1的表达.%Aim: To study the regulatory effects of 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) on the expression of human homeobox gene NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Methods: Flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the effects of 9-cis RA on NKX3.1 expression and cell cycle of LNCaP cells. To identify a regulatory region within the NKX3.1 promoter contributing to the regulation induced by 9-cis RA,we have constructed an NKX3.1 promoter-reporter plasmid, pGL3-1040bp, and its 5'-deletion mutants, which were transfected into LNCaP cells with treatment of 9-cis RA in indicated concentrations. Results: With the treatment of 9-cis RA, the NKX3.1 promoter activity was increased in reporter gene assay and NKX3.1 expression was enhanced at both mRNA and protein levels in LNCaP cells. We found that the region between -936 and -921 in the upstream of NKX3.1 gene involved the inducible regulation by 9-cis RA treatment. In flow cytometry, 9-cis RA

  6. Homeobox family Hoxc localization during murine palate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Azumi; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Imura, Hideto; Natsume, Nagato; Sugahara, Toshio; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Homeobox genes play important roles in craniofacial morphogenesis. However, the characteristics of the transcription factor Hoxc during palate formation remain unclear. We examined the immunolocalization patterns of Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 in palatogenesis of cleft palate (Eh/Eh) mice. On the other hand, mutations in the FGF/FGFR pathway are exclusively associated with syndromic forms of cleft palate. We also examined the immunolocalization of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 to clarify their relationships with Hoxc in palatogenesis. Some palatal epithelial cells showed Hoxc5 labeling, while almost no labeling of mesenchymal cells was observed in +/+ mice. As palate formation progressed in +/+ mice, Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 were observed in medial epithelial seam cells. Hoxc5 and Hoxc6 were detected in the oral epithelium. The palatal mesenchyme also showed intense staining for Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 with progression of palate formation. In contrast, the palatal shelves of Eh/Eh mice exhibited impaired horizontal growth and failed to fuse, resulting in a cleft. Hoxc5 was observed in a few epithelial cells and diffusely in the mesenchyme of Eh/Eh palatal shelves. No or little labeling of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 was detected in the cleft palate of Eh/Eh mice. These findings suggest that Hoxc genes are involved in palatogenesis. Furthermore, there may be the differences in the localization pattern between Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6. Additionally, Hoxc distribution in palatal cells during palate development may be correlated with FGF signaling. (228/250 words) © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society.

  7. Timing and Scope of Genomic Expansion within Annelida: Evidence from Homeoboxes in the Genome of the Earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarycz, Allison S; Nossa, Carlos W; Putnam, Nicholas H; Ryan, Joseph F

    2015-12-10

    Annelida represents a large and morphologically diverse group of bilaterian organisms. The recently published polychaete and leech genome sequences revealed an equally dynamic range of diversity at the genomic level. The availability of more annelid genomes will allow for the identification of evolutionary genomic events that helped shape the annelid lineage and better understand the diversity within the group. We sequenced and assembled the genome of the common earthworm, Eisenia fetida. As a first pass at understanding the diversity within the group, we classified 363 earthworm homeoboxes and compared them with those of the leech Helobdella robusta and the polychaete Capitella teleta. We inferred many gene expansions occurring in the lineage connecting the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Capitella and Eisenia to the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA. Likewise, the lineage leading from the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to the leech H. robusta has experienced substantial gains and losses. However, the lineage leading from Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to E. fetida is characterized by extraordinary levels of homeobox gain. The evolutionary dynamics observed in the homeoboxes of these lineages are very likely to be generalizable to all genes. These genome expansions and losses have likely contributed to the remarkable biology exhibited in this group. These results provide a new perspective from which to understand the diversity within these lineages, show the utility of sub-draft genome assemblies for understanding genomic evolution, and provide a critical resource from which the biology of these animals can be studied.

  8. Identification of trench oil by real-time PCR for the HOXC6 gene in homeobox family%以同源异形盒家族HOXC6基因为靶标荧光PCR鉴定地沟油的方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨冬燕; 杨永存; 李浩; 耿艺介; 张倩; 吴双; 邓平建

    2013-01-01

    目的:以动物源性的同源异形盒家族 HOXC6基因为靶标建立地沟油鉴定方法。方法:通过基因数据库的筛查、比对及特异性验证,筛选确定以动物源性的同源异形盒家族HOXC6基因为靶标,采用实时荧光PCR方法对正常植物油和地沟油进行鉴定。结果:6个已知来源的地沟油样品全部被鉴定为地沟油,而8个正常食用植物油全部被鉴定为非地沟油。结论:与课题组前期建立的采用针对多个动物物种特异性基因的PCR鉴定方法相比,该研究建立的方法在有效提高检测灵敏度的同时,不但避免了先后扩增多个基因片段的繁琐,同时降低了PCR污染的风险,提高了检测结果的准确性。%Objective:To develop a specific identification method for trench oil by HOXC6 gene amplification. Methods:Though the steps of genebank screening, comparison and specific verification, the HOXC6 gene in homeobox family is determined as the target to identify the trench oil from normal vegetable oil using real-time PCR. Results:6 trench oil samples were accurately identified from 8 edible vegetable oil samples. Conclusion:Compared with the former research established by our group, the novel method effectively improves the detection sensitivity and accuracy. At the same time, it not only avoids the complication from multiple amplification, but also reduces the risk of PCR contamination.

  9. Homeobox transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) correlates with good prognosis in breast cancer patients and induces apoptosis in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lanigan, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    The homeobox-containing transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) plays an important role in mammary gland development. However, the clinical implications of Msx2 expression in breast cancer are unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the potential clinical value of Msx2 as a breast cancer biomarker and to clarify its functional role in vitro.

  10. Angiogenesis-associated dermatoses and their treatment with traditional Chinese medicine%血管生成相关性皮肤病及其中药治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萍; 郑敏

    2008-01-01

    血管生成与一些皮肤病,如皮肤光老化、银屑病、寻常痤疮、酒渣鼻等密切相关,其发病机制主要为血管生成刺激因子和抑制因子的失衡,导致血管异常增生.很多中药成分能通过影响血管调控因素调节血管生成,从而有效地治疗一些与血管生成相关的皮肤病.探究中药影响血管生成的作用机制,将为血管增生性皮肤病提供新的治疗靶点.%Angiogenesis is closely associated with numerous skin disorders, such as photoaging, psoriasis, acne vulgaris, acne rosacea, and so on. It's mainly induced by the disequilibrium of angiogenesis-stimulating and-inhibiting factors, which can be affected by a great many of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). So, TCMs may be effective in the treatment of angiogenesis-associated dermatoses. To explore the mechanism underlying the influence of TCMs on angiogenesis will provide new therapeutic targets for angiogenesis-associated dermatoses.

  11. Cut-like Homeobox 1 (CUX1) Regulates Expression of the Fat Mass and Obesity-associated and Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator-interacting Protein-1-like (RPGRIP1L) Genes and Coordinates Leptin Receptor Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigopoulos, George; LeDuc, Charles A.; Cremona, Maria L.; Chung, Wendy K.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2011-01-01

    The first intron of FTO contains common single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with body weight and adiposity in humans. In an effort to identify the molecular basis for this association, we discovered that FTO and RPGRIP1L (a ciliary gene located in close proximity to the transcriptional start site of FTO) are regulated by isoforms P200 and P110 of the transcription factor, CUX1. This regulation occurs via a single AATAAATA regulatory site (conserved in the mouse) within the FTO intronic region associated with adiposity in humans. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs8050136 (located in this regulatory site) affects binding affinities of P200 and P110. Promoter-probe analysis revealed that binding of P200 to this site represses FTO, whereas binding of P110 increases transcriptional activity from the FTO as well as RPGRIP1L minimal promoters. Reduced expression of Fto or Rpgrip1l affects leptin receptor isoform b trafficking and leptin signaling in N41 mouse hypothalamic or N2a neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Leptin receptor clusters in the vicinity of the cilium of arcuate hypothalamic neurons in C57BL/6J mice treated with leptin, but not in fasted mice, suggesting a potentially important role of the cilium in leptin signaling that is, in part, regulated by FTO and RPGRIP1L. Decreased Fto/Rpgrip1l expression in the arcuate hypothalamus coincides with decreased nuclear enzymatic activity of a protease (cathepsin L) that has been shown to cleave full-length CUX1 (P200) to P110. P200 disrupts (whereas P110 promotes) leptin receptor isoform b clustering in the vicinity of the cilium in vitro. Clustering of the receptor coincides with increased leptin signaling as reflected in protein levels of phosphorylated Stat3 (p-Stat3). Association of the FTO locus with adiposity in humans may reflect functional consequences of A/C alleles at rs8050136. The obesity-risk (A) allele shows reduced affinity for the FTO and RPGRIP1L transcriptional activator P110, leading to the

  12. Role of Homeobox Genes in Tooth Morphogenesis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Suryadeva, Sreevalli; Khan, Mohammadi Begum

    2015-01-01

    In oral cavity, disturbances due to genetic alterations may range from lack of tooth development to morphological defects. Due to technical advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology, valuable information regarding dentofacial growth could be studied in detailed manner. This helped us to explain the aetiology and pathogenesis of many dentofacial disorders. The success in treatment lies first in determining the aetiology of tooth anomalies and finally differentiating the effect of g...

  13. Control of plant architecture by distinctive TALE homeobox gene interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, D.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, transcription factor (TF)-based network is a widely used mechanism to regulate fundamental developmental processes. Both animals and plants utilize three-amino-acid-loop-extension (TALE) homeodomain (HD) transcription factors to subdivide their body plan. In animals, MEIS/PBC TF heter

  14. Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Peter W. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540–515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient ‘through-gut’ with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. ...

  15. Mox homeobox expression in muscle lineage of the gastropod Haliotis asinina: evidence for a conserved role in bilaterian myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, V F; Degnan, B M

    2002-04-01

    Mox homeobox genes are expressed during early vertebrate somitogenesis. Here we describe the expression of Has-Mox, a Mox gene from the gastropod Haliotis asinina. Has-Moxis expressed in the trochophore larva in paraxial mesodermal bands. During larval development, Has-Mox expression remains restricted to mesodermal cells destined to form adult muscle in the foot. This restricted expression of Has-Mox in Haliotis is similar to that observed for vertebrate Mox genes, suggesting a conserved role in myogenesis in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. In contrast, Mox is not expressed in muscle lineages in the ecdysozoan representatives Caenorhabditis elegans or Drosophila; the C. elegansgenome has lost Mox altogether. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer Link server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00427-002-0223-6.

  16. A homeobox protein Phx1 regulates long-term survival and meiotic sporulation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ji-Yoon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the phx1+ (pombe homeobox gene was initially isolated as a multi-copy suppressor of lysine auxotrophy caused by depletion of copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD. Overproduction of Phx1 increased the synthesis of homocitrate synthase, the first enzyme in lysine biosynthetic pathway, which is labile to oxidative stress. Phx1 has a well conserved DNA-binding domain called homeodomain at the N-terminal region and is predicted to be a transcription factor in S. pombe. However, its role has not been revealed in further detail. Here we examined its expression pattern and the phenotype of its null mutant to get clues on its function. Results Fluorescence from the Phx1-GFP expressed from a chromosomal fusion gene demonstrated that it is localized primarily in the nucleus, and is distinctly visible during the stationary phase. When we replaced the N-terminal homeobox domain of Phx1 with the DNA binding domain of Pap1, a well-characterized transcription factor, the chimeric protein caused the elevation of transcripts from Pap1-dependent genes such as ctt1+ and trr1+, suggesting that Phx1 possesses transcriptional activating activity when bound to DNA. The amount of phx1+ transcripts sharply increased as cells entered the stationary phase and was maintained at high level throughout the stationary phase. Nutrient shift down to low nitrogen or carbon sources caused phx1+ induction during the exponential phase, suggesting that cells need Phx1 for maintenance function during nutrient starvation. The Δphx1 null mutant showed decreased viability in long-term culture, whereas overproduction of Phx1 increased viability. Decrease in long-term survival was also observed for Δphx1 under N- or C-starved conditions. In addition, Δphx1 mutant was more sensitive to various oxidants and heat shock. When we examined sporulation of the Δphx1/Δphx1 diploid strain, significant decrease

  17. Homeobox transcription factors are required for conidiation and appressorium development in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seryun Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate development of conidia and appressoria is critical in the disease cycle of many fungal pathogens, including Magnaporthe oryzae. A total of eight genes (MoHOX1 to MoHOX8 encoding putative homeobox transcription factors (TFs were identified from the M. oryzae genome. Knockout mutants for each MoHOX gene were obtained via homology-dependent gene replacement. Two mutants, DeltaMohox3 and DeltaMohox5, exhibited no difference to wild-type in growth, conidiation, conidium size, conidial germination, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity. However, the DeltaMohox1 showed a dramatic reduction in hyphal growth and increase in melanin pigmentation, compared to those in wild-type. DeltaMohox4 and DeltaMohox6 showed significantly reduced conidium size and hyphal growth, respectively. DeltaMohox8 formed normal appressoria, but failed in pathogenicity, probably due to defects in the development of penetration peg and invasive growth. It is most notable that asexual reproduction was completely abolished in DeltaMohox2, in which no conidia formed. DeltaMohox2 was still pathogenic through hypha-driven appressoria in a manner similar to that of the wild-type. However, DeltaMohox7 was unable to form appressoria either on conidial germ tubes, or at hyphal tips, being non-pathogenic. These factors indicate that M. oryzae is able to cause foliar disease via hyphal appressorium-mediated penetration, and MoHOX7 is mutually required to drive appressorium formation from hyphae and germ tubes. Transcriptional analyses suggest that the functioning of M. oryzae homeobox TFs is mediated through the regulation of gene expression and is affected by cAMP and Ca(2+ signaling and/or MAPK pathways. The divergent roles of this gene set may help reveal how the genome and regulatory pathways evolved within the rice blast pathogen and close relatives.

  18. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyan Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren and Flos Carthami (Honghua are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4. Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1 blank, (2 model, (3 control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg, (4 THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg, and (5 Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD (8.50 g/kg. Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR, Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways.

  19. Origins and Evolution of WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Protein Family in Plant Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaibin Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX is a large group of transcription factors specifically found in plants. WOX members contain the conserved homeodomain essential for plant development by regulating cell division and differentiation. However, the evolutionary relationship of WOX members in plant kingdom remains to be elucidated. In this study, we searched 350 WOX members from 50 species in plant kingdom. Linkage analysis of WOX protein sequences demonstrated that amino acid residues 141–145 and 153–160 located in the homeodomain are possibly associated with the function of WOXs during the evolution. These 350 members were grouped into 3 clades: the first clade represents the conservative WOXs from the lower plant algae to higher plants; the second clade has the members from vascular plant species; the third clade has the members only from spermatophyte species. Furthermore, among the members of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, we observed ubiquitous expression of genes in the first clade and the diversified expression pattern of WOX genes in distinct organs in the second clade and the third clade. This work provides insight into the origin and evolutionary process of WOXs, facilitating their functional investigations in the future.

  20. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis

  1. Expansion of the Hox gene family and the evolution of chordates.

    OpenAIRE

    Pendleton, J W; Nagai, B K; Murtha, M T; Ruddle, F H

    1993-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode DNA-binding transcription regulators that participate in the formation of embryonic pattern or contribute to cell-type specificity during metazoan development. Homeobox genes that regulate axial patterning and segmental identity (Hox/HOM genes) share a conserved clustered genomic organization. Mammals have four clusters that have likely arisen from the duplication of a single ancestral cluster. The number of Hox-type genes in other deuterostomes was estimated by using a ...

  2. Pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 expression and significance in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Liu; Shan-Miao Gou; Chun-You Wang; He-Shui Wu; Jiong-Xin Xiong; Feng Zhou

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the correlations of Pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 with pancreatic cancer characteristics,incluling pathological grading, TNM grading, tumor metastasis and tumor cell proliferation.METHODS: Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect PDX-1 mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer tissue and normal pancreatic tissue. The expression of PDX-1 protein was measured by Western blot and immunohistochemistry.Immunohistochemistry was also used to detect proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Correlations of PDX-1 with pancreatic cancer characteristics, including pathological grading, TNM grading, tumor metastasis and tumor cell proliferation, were analyzed by using χ2 test.RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry showed that 41.1% of pancreatic cancers were positive for PDX-1 expression,but normal pancreatic tissue except islets showed no staining for PDX-1. In consistent with the result of imunohistochemistry, Western blot showed that 37.5% of pancreatic cancers were positive for PDX-1. RT-PCR showed that PDX-1 expression was significantly higher in pancreatic cancer tissues than normal pancreatic tissues (2-3.56 ± 0.35 vs 2-8.76 ± 0.14, P< 0.01). Lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01), TNM grading (P < 0.05), pathological grading (P < 0.05) and tumor cell proliferation (P < 0.01) were significantly correlated with PDX-1 expression levels.CONCLUSION: PDX-1 is re-expressed in pancreatic cancer, and PDX-1-positive pancreatic cancer cells show more malignant potential compared to PDX-1-negative cells. Therefore, PDX-1-positive cells may be tumor stem cells and PDX-1 may act as alternate surface marker of pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  3. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cheng, Jung-Chien [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Huang, He-Feng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Leung, Peter C.K., E-mail: peter.leung@ubc.ca [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  4. MicroRNA-99 family members suppress Homeobox A1 expression in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Chen

    Full Text Available The miR-99 family is one of the evolutionarily most ancient microRNA families, and it plays a critical role in developmental timing and the maintenance of tissue identity. Recent studies, including reports from our group, suggested that the miR-99 family regulates various physiological processes in adult tissues, such as dermal wound healing, and a number of disease processes, including cancer. By combining 5 independent genome-wide expression profiling experiments, we identified a panel of 266 unique transcripts that were down-regulated in epithelial cells transfected with miR-99 family members. A comprehensive bioinformatics analysis using 12 different sequence-based microRNA target prediction algorithms revealed that 81 out of these 266 down-regulated transcripts are potential direct targets for the miR-99 family. Confirmation experiments and functional analyses were performed to further assess 6 selected miR-99 target genes, including mammalian Target of rapamycin (mTOR, Homeobox A1 (HOXA1, CTD small phosphatase-like (CTDSPL, N-myristoyltransferase 1 (NMT1, Transmembrane protein 30A (TMEM30A, and SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin subfamily A member 5 (SMARCA5. HOXA1 is a known proto-oncogene, and it also plays an important role in embryonic development. The direct targeting of the miR-99 family to two candidate binding sequences located in the HOXA1 mRNA was confirmed using a luciferase reporter gene assay and a ribonucleoprotein-immunoprecipitation (RIP-IP assay. Ectopic transfection of miR-99 family reduced the expression of HOXA1, which, in consequence, down-regulated the expression of its downstream gene (i.e., Bcl-2 and led to reduced proliferation and cell migration, as well as enhanced apoptosis. In summary, we identified a number of high-confidence miR-99 family target genes, including proto-oncogene HOXA1, which may play an important role in regulating epithelial cell proliferation and

  5. Effects of supraphysiologic concentration glucose on pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 expression and insulin secretion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Chang-qing; DENG Hong-ming; HUANG Yun

    2007-01-01

    @@ The islet transcription factor pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1, also known as insulin promoter factor-1 or IPF-1) is an orphan homeodomain protein that plays an important role in the development, proliferation,differentiation and maturation of pancreatic cells.

  6. EVEN-SKIPPED HOMEOBOX 1 controls human ES cell differentiation by directly repressing GOOSECOID expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalisz, Mark; Winzi, Maria Karin; Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine;

    2012-01-01

    TGFß signaling patterns the primitive streak, yet little is known about transcriptional effectors that mediate the cell fate choices during streak-like development in mammalian embryos and in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we demonstrate that cross-antagonistic actions of EVEN-SKIPPED HOMEOBOX 1...

  7. Identification of Novel HLA-A*24:02-Restricted Epitope Derived from a Homeobox Protein Expressed in Hematological Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Matsushita

    Full Text Available The homeobox protein, PEPP2 (RHOXF2, has been suggested as a cancer/testis (CT antigen based on its expression pattern. However, the peptide epitope of PEPP2 that is recognized by cytotoxic T cells (CTLs is unknown. In this study, we revealed that PEPP2 gene was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia cells and some other hematological malignancies. This gene was also expressed in leukemic stem-like cells. We next identified the first reported epitope peptide (PEPP2(271-279. The CTLs induced by PEPP2(271-279 recognized PEPP2-positive target cells in an HLA-A*24:02-restricted manner. We also found that a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, could enhance PEPP2 expression in leukemia cells but not in blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. The cytotoxic activity of anti-PEPP2 CTL against leukemic cells treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was higher than that directed against untreated cells. These results suggest a clinical rationale that combined treatment with this novel antigen-specific immunotherapy together with demethylating agents might be effective in therapy-resistant myeloid leukemia patients.

  8. Nuclear localization of Obox4 is dependent on its homeobox domain

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Geon Tae; Lee, Kyung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Objective Oocyte-specific homeobox 4 (Obox4) is preferentially expressed in oocytes and plays an important role in the completion of meiosis of oocytes. However, the Obox4 expression pattern has not been reported yet. In this study, we investigated the subcellular localization of Obox4 using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expression system. Methods Three regions of Obox4 were divided and fused to the GFP expression vector. The partly deleted homeodomain (HD) regions of Obox4 were al...

  9. Aristaless-Like Homeobox protein 1 (ALX1) variant associated with craniofacial structure and frontonasal dysplasia in Burmese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Erdman, Carolyn A; Grahn, Robert A; Hamilton, Michael J; Carter, Michael J; Helps, Christopher R; Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara

    2016-01-15

    Frontonasal dysplasia (FND) can have severe presentations that are medically and socially debilitating. Several genes are implicated in FND conditions, including Aristaless-Like Homeobox 1 (ALX1), which is associated with FND3. Breeds of cats are selected and bred for extremes in craniofacial morphologies. In particular, a lineage of Burmese cats with severe brachycephyla is extremely popular and is termed Contemporary Burmese. Genetic studies demonstrated that the brachycephyla of the Contemporary Burmese is a simple co-dominant trait, however, the homozygous cats have a severe craniofacial defect that is incompatible with life. The craniofacial defect of the Burmese was genetically analyzed over a 20 year period, using various genetic analysis techniques. Family-based linkage analysis localized the trait to cat chromosome B4. Genome-wide association studies and other genetic analyses of SNP data refined a critical region. Sequence analysis identified a 12bp in frame deletion in ALX1, c.496delCTCTCAGGACTG, which is 100% concordant with the craniofacial defect and not found in cats not related to the Contemporary Burmese. PMID:26610632

  10. Aristaless-Like Homeobox protein 1 (ALX1) variant associated with craniofacial structure and frontonasal dysplasia in Burmese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Erdman, Carolyn A; Grahn, Robert A; Hamilton, Michael J; Carter, Michael J; Helps, Christopher R; Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara

    2016-01-15

    Frontonasal dysplasia (FND) can have severe presentations that are medically and socially debilitating. Several genes are implicated in FND conditions, including Aristaless-Like Homeobox 1 (ALX1), which is associated with FND3. Breeds of cats are selected and bred for extremes in craniofacial morphologies. In particular, a lineage of Burmese cats with severe brachycephyla is extremely popular and is termed Contemporary Burmese. Genetic studies demonstrated that the brachycephyla of the Contemporary Burmese is a simple co-dominant trait, however, the homozygous cats have a severe craniofacial defect that is incompatible with life. The craniofacial defect of the Burmese was genetically analyzed over a 20 year period, using various genetic analysis techniques. Family-based linkage analysis localized the trait to cat chromosome B4. Genome-wide association studies and other genetic analyses of SNP data refined a critical region. Sequence analysis identified a 12bp in frame deletion in ALX1, c.496delCTCTCAGGACTG, which is 100% concordant with the craniofacial defect and not found in cats not related to the Contemporary Burmese.

  11. A role for the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 in schizophrenia: Convergent evidence from animal and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Albertsen Malt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with diverse mental and somatic symptoms. The molecular mechanisms leading from genes to disease pathology in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies have shown that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with specific diseases are enriched in the recognition sequences of transcription factors that regulate physiological processes relevant to the disease. We have used a bottom-up approach and tracked a developmental trajectory from embryology to physiological processes and behavior and recognized that the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1 possesses properties of particular interest for schizophrenia. NKX2-1 is selectively expressed from prenatal development to adulthood in the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, lungs, skin, and enteric ganglia, and has key functions at the interface of the brain, the endocrine-, and the immune system. In the developing brain, NKX2-1-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into distinct subclasses of forebrain GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. The transcription factor is highly expressed in mature limbic circuits related to context-dependent goal-directed patterns of behavior, social interaction and reproduction, fear responses, responses to light, and other homeostatic processes. It is essential for development and mature function of the thyroid gland and the respiratory system, and is involved in calcium metabolism and immune responses. NKX2-1 interacts with a number of genes identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. We suggest that NKX2-1 may lie at the core of several dose dependent pathways that are dysregulated in schizophrenia. We correlate the symptoms seen in schizophrenia with the temporal and spatial activities of NKX2-1 in order to highlight promising future research areas.

  12. Homeobox A7 increases cell proliferation by up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanase Toshihiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox (HOX genes encode transcription factors, which regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. The deregulation of HOX genes is frequently associated with human reproductive system disorders. However, knowledge regarding the role of HOX genes in human granulosa cells is limited. Methods To determine the role of HOXA7 in the regulation and associated mechanisms of cell proliferation in human granulosa cells, HOXA7 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR expressions were examined in primary granulosa cells (hGCs, an immortalized human granulosa cell line, SVOG, and a granulosa tumor cell line, KGN, by real-time PCR and Western blotting. To manipulate the expression of HOXA7, the HOXA7 specific siRNA was used to knockdown HOXA7 in KGN. Conversely, HOXA7 was overexpressed in SVOG by transfection with the pcDNA3.1-HOAX7 vector. Cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay. Results Our results show that HOXA7 and EGFR were overexpressed in KGN cells compared to hGCs and SVOG cells. Knockdown of HOXA7 in KGN cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and EGFR expression. Overexpression of HOXA7 in SVOG cells significantly promoted cell growth and EGFR expression. Moreover, the EGF-induced KGN proliferation was abrogated, and the activation of downstream signaling was diminished when HOXA7 was knocked down. Overexpression of HOXA7 in SVOG cells had an opposite effect. Conclusions Our present study reveals a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating granulosa cell proliferation via the regulation of EGFR. This finding contributes to the knowledge of the pro-proliferation effect of HOXA7 in granulosa cell growth and differentiation.

  13. Hypothalamic neurosecretory and circadian vasopressinergic neuronal systems in the blind cone-rod homeobox knock out mouse (Crx(-/-) ) and the 129sv wild type mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Møller, Morten

    2013-01-01

    circadian AVP-rhythm. We have in this study of the brown 129sv mouse and the visual blind cone-rod homeobox gene knock out mouse (Crx(-/-) ) with degeneration of the retinal rods and cones, but a preserved non-image forming optic system, studied the temporal Avp-expression in both the neurosecretory...... at late day time and nadir during the dark in both the Crx(-/-) and the wild type mouse. None of the magnocellular neurosecretory neurons exhibited a diurnal vasopressin expression. Light stimulation of both genotypes during the dark period did not change the Avp-expression in the SCN. This shows that Avp......-expression in the mouse SCN is independent of Crx-regulated photoreceptor systems. J. Comp. Neurol., 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  14. Isolation of Hox cluster genes from insects reveals an accelerated sequence evolution rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Hadrys

    Full Text Available Among gene families it is the Hox genes and among metazoan animals it is the insects (Hexapoda that have attracted particular attention for studying the evolution of development. Surprisingly though, no Hox genes have been isolated from 26 out of 35 insect orders yet, and the existing sequences derive mainly from only two orders (61% from Hymenoptera and 22% from Diptera. We have designed insect specific primers and isolated 37 new partial homeobox sequences of Hox cluster genes (lab, pb, Hox3, ftz, Antp, Scr, abd-a, Abd-B, Dfd, and Ubx from six insect orders, which are crucial to insect phylogenetics. These new gene sequences provide a first step towards comparative Hox gene studies in insects. Furthermore, comparative distance analyses of homeobox sequences reveal a correlation between gene divergence rate and species radiation success with insects showing the highest rate of homeobox sequence evolution.

  15. Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 protein is a novel beta-cell-specific autoantigen for type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Wu; Koya, Vijay; Li, Yi; Donelan, William; Lin, Peng; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) protein is a key transcription factor involved in the regulation of insulin gene expression that is expressed at high levels in the beta-cells of the pancreatic islets. We asked whether Pdx1 is a target of anti-islet autoimmunity in type I diabetes (T1D). Pdx1 autoantibodies (PAAs) were detected in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using ELISA, western blotting, and radioimmunoprecipitation of [(35)S]-labeled insulinoma cell line-derived Pdx1 protein. PAAs were detected as early as at 5 weeks of age, and generally peaked before the onset of clinically overt diabetes in diabetes-prone female NOD mice. Levels declined substantially after the onset of diabetes. PAAs were not detected in the sera of NOD-scid, C57BL/6, or BALB/c mice. The titers of PAAs in NOD mouse sera were as high as 1/93 750 by ELISA. The fine specificity of PAAs was determined by western blotting using a series of truncated recombinant Pdx1 proteins. The immunodominant epitopes were located to the C-terminus of the Pdx1 (p200-283) in NOD mice. PAAs also were detected in sera from human T1D patients, but the major epitopes were localized to amino acids 159-200 as well as the same region (p200-283) recognized by PAAs from NOD mice. Using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, the p83 fragment of Pdx1 specifically stimulated proliferation of splenic T cells from recent-onset diabetic NOD mice. The presence of PAAs in prediabetic NOD mice and human T1D patients, and Pdx1-specific T-cell proliferation in NOD mice provide a strong rationale for further investigation of the pathogenic role of immune responses against Pdx1 in T1D.

  16. Recombinant lentivirus with enhanced expression of caudal-related homeobox protein 2 inhibits human colorectal cancer cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sai; Sun, Xue-Jun; Zheng, Jian-Bao; Qi, Jie; Chen, Nan-Zheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Guang-Bing; Liu, Dong; Yu, Jun-Hui; Lu, Shao-Ying; Wang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Caudal-related homeobox protein 2 (CDX2), a tumor suppressor in the adult colon, is overexpressed under a non-cancer specific cytomegalovirus promoter in certain tumor cells; furthermore, non-specific expression of CDX2 may result in aberrant side effects in normal cells. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter is active in the majority of cancer cells but not in normal cells. Hypoxia is a key feature of solid tumors, and targeted genes may be significantly upregulated by five copies of hypoxia-response elements (HREs) under hypoxic conditions. However, the effect of CDX2 overexpression, as controlled by five copies of HREs and the hTERT promoter, on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, a recombinant lentivirus containing the CDX2 gene under the control of five HREs and the hTERT promoter was generated. An immunofluorescence assay was used to detect CDX2 expression by the 5 HhC lentivirus, whereas an MTT assay was used to detect the effects of CoCl2 on the viability of LoVo cells. Western blot analysis was conducted in order to determine the relative ratios of recombinant CDX2 protein to the internal control β-actin, following 5 HhC/LoVo cell culture under normoxic and hypoxic conditions (100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 µmol/l CoCl2) for 24 h, then for 12, 24 or 36 h with the optimal concentration (300 µmol/l) of CoCl2. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to determine the transcription of recombinant CDX2 mRNA following culture of 5 HhC/LoVo cells under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Finally, a cloning assay was used to detect the proliferative ability of 5 HhC/LoVo and 5 Hh cells. High CDX2 expression was observed in hTERT-positive LoVo cells under hypoxic conditions, an effect which was mimicked by treatment with CoCl2 to inhibit LoVo cell proliferation in vitro. High expression of CDX2 therefore provides a promising strategy for the

  17. The Role of Placental Homeobox Genes in Human Fetal Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Murthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal growth restriction (FGR is an adverse pregnancy outcome associated with significant perinatal and paediatric morbidity and mortality, and an increased risk of chronic disease later in adult life. One of the key causes of adverse pregnancy outcome is fetal growth restriction (FGR. While a number of maternal, fetal, and environmental factors are known causes of FGR, the majority of FGR cases remain idiopathic. These idiopathic FGR pregnancies are frequently associated with placental insufficiency, possibly as a result of placental maldevelopment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of abnormal placental development in idiopathic FGR is, therefore, of increasing importance. Here, we review our understanding of transcriptional control of normal placental development and abnormal placental development associated with human idiopathic FGR. We also assess the potential for understanding transcriptional control as a means for revealing new molecular targets for the detection, diagnosis, and clinical management of idiopathic FGR.

  18. The Lhx9 homeobox gene controls pineal gland development and prevents postnatal hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Møller, Morten; Fu, Cong;

    2015-01-01

    stalk are also reduced in size. Although the brains of neonatal Lhx9 (-/-) mutant mice appear normal, severe hydrocephalus develops in about 70 % of the Lhx9 (-/-) mice at 5-8 weeks of age; these observations are the first to document that deletion of Lhx9 results in hydrocephalus and as such indicate...... that Lhx9 contributes to the maintenance of normal brain structure. Whereas hydrocephalus is absent in neonatal Lhx9 (-/-)mutant mice, the neonatal pineal gland in these animals is hypoplastic. Accordingly, it appears that Lhx9 is essential for early development of the mammalian pineal gland...... and that this effect is not secondary to hydrocephalus....

  19. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Felix, Daniel A.; A. Aziz Aboobaker

    2010-01-01

    Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planaria...

  20. Expression of the homeobox genes OTX2 and OTX1 in the early developing human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen B; Lutterodt, Melissa C; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2010-01-01

    , and choroid plexus, with a minor expression in the basal telencephalon. The expression of OTX2 in the hippocampal anlage was strong, with no expression in the adjacent neocortex. Contrarily, the OTX1 expression was predominantly located in the proliferative zones of the neocortex. At later stages, the OTX2...

  1. Selective activation of tumor growth-promoting Ca2+ channel MS4A12 in colon cancer by caudal type homeobox transcription factor CDX2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Christoph

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colon cancer-associated MS4A12 is a novel colon-specific component of store-operated Ca2+ (SOC entry sensitizing cells for epidermal growth factor (EGF-mediated effects on proliferation and chemotaxis. In the present study, we investigated regulation of the MS4A12 promoter to understand the mechanisms responsible for strict transcriptional restriction of this gene to the colonic epithelial cell lineage. DNA-binding assays and luciferase reporter assays showed that MS4A12 promoter activity is governed by a single CDX homeobox transcription factor binding element. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing of intestine-specific transcription factors CDX1 and CDX2 and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP in LoVo and SW48 colon cancer cells revealed that MS4A12 transcript and protein expression is essentially dependent on the presence of endogenous CDX2. In summary, our findings provide a rationale for colon-specific expression of MS4A12. Moreover, this is the first report establishing CDX2 as transactivator of tumor growth-promoting gene expression in colon cancer, adding to untangle the complex and conflicting biological functions of CDX2 in colon cancer and supporting MS4A12 as important factor for normal colonic development as well as for the biology and treatment of colon cancer.

  2. The pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein PDX-1 regulates the ductal specific keratin 19 through the degradation of MEIS1 and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes von Burstin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreas organogenesis is the result of well-orchestrated and balanced activities of transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role in the development and function of the pancreas, both in the maintenance of progenitor cells and in determination and maintenance of differentiated endocrine cells. However, the activity of homeobox transcription factors requires coordination with co-factors, such as PBX and MEIS proteins. PBX and MEIS proteins belong to the family of three amino acid loop extension (TALE homeodomain proteins. In a previous study we found that PDX-1 negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of the ductal specific keratin 19 (Krt19. In this study, we investigate the role of different domains of PDX-1 and elucidate the functional interplay of PDX-1 and MEIS1 necessary for Krt19 regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that PDX-1 exerts a dual manner of regulation of Krt19 transcriptional activity. Deletion studies highlight that the NH(2-terminus of PDX-1 is functionally relevant for the down-regulation of Krt19, as it is required for DNA binding of PDX-1 to the Krt19 promoter. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of PBX. Second, we provide insight on how PDX-1 regulates the Hox co-factor MEIS1 post-transcriptionally. We find specific binding of MEIS1 and MEIS2 to the Krt19 promoter using IP-EMSA, and siRNA mediated silencing of Meis1, but not Meis2, reduces transcriptional activation of Krt19 in primary pancreatic ductal cells. Over-expression of PDX-1 leads to a decreased level of MEIS1 protein, and this decrease is prevented by inhibition of the proteasome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data provide evidence for a dual mechanism of how PDX-1 negatively regulates Krt19 ductal specific gene expression. These findings imply that transcription factors may efficiently regulate target gene expression through diverse, non

  3. Cdx2反转录病毒载体的构建及转染膀胱上皮细胞的研究%Construction of human caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 retrovoral vector and transfection of urothelium cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林明恩; 邓毕华; 吕夷松; 荣禄; 姚友生

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 plays an important role in the development of epithelium in digestive tract, especial y the smal intestine and colon. OBJECTIVE:To construct the retroviral expression vector of pLNCX2-caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2, and to observe the effect of in vitro transfection of pLNCX2-caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 in intestinal metaplasia. METHODS:Gene recombinant technology was employed to clone human caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 gene to the retroviral expression vector of pLNCX2, then identified with enzyme digestion and sequencing and packed to the PA317 cells. The plasmids were transfect in urothelium cells, real-time PCR and western blot were used to detect the expressions of caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2, vil in and liverintestin-cadherin at the protein and mRNA levels. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The retroviral vector pLNCX2-caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 was successful y constructed. The levels of caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 protein and mRNA expressions in bladder urothelium celltransfected with pLNCX2-caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 were higher than that in control. And the over-expression of caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 could up-regulate the levels of vil in and liverintestin-cadherin expressions. Interestingly, specific changes of intestine-like cells were seen in the bladder urothelium cells transfected by pLNCX2-caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2. Over-expression of caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 can activate the caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 of urothelium cells and induce intestinal epithelial differentiation, thus inducing the development of cystitis glanduaris.%背景:尾侧型同源转录因子2在消化道尤其是小肠与结肠上皮的发育中起到关键作用。  目的:构建尾侧型同源转录因子2反转录病毒表达载体pLNCX2-Cdx2

  4. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation. PMID:24740923

  5. Barley NARROW LEAFED DWARF1 encoding a WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 3 (WOX3) regulates the marginal development of lateral organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takanori; Tanaka, Shin-Ya; Masumoto, Yuuki; Nobori, Naoya; Ishii, Hiroto; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Tanisaka, Takatoshi; Taketa, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is the fourth most-produced cereal in the world and is mainly utilized as animal feed and malts. Recently barley attracts considerable attentions as healthy food rich in dietary fiber. However, limited knowledge is available about developmental aspects of barley leaves. In the present study, we investigated barley narrow leafed dwarf1 (nld1) mutants, which exhibit thin leaves accompanied by short stature. Detailed histological analysis revealed that leaf marginal tissues, such as sawtooth hairs and sclerenchymatous cells, were lacked in nld1, suggesting that narrowed leaf of nld1 was attributable to the defective development of the marginal regions in the leaves. The defective marginal developments were also appeared in internodes and glumes in spikelets. Map-based cloning revealed that NLD1 encodes a WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 3 (WOX3), an ortholog of the maize NARROW SHEATH genes. In situ hybridization showed that NLD1 transcripts were localized in the marginal edges of leaf primordia from the initiating stage. From these results, we concluded that NLD1 plays pivotal role in the increase of organ width and in the development of marginal tissues in lateral organs in barley. PMID:27436952

  6. Expression level of CDX2 gene in acute myeloid leukemia and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆瀆

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression and clinical significance of Caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2(CDX2) gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Methods Real time quantitative PCR(RQ-PCR) was used to test the expression level of CDX2 gene in 108 de novo AML patients and the clinical features

  7. LIM homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 inhibits skeletal muscle differentiation in part via transcriptional activation of Msx1 and Msx2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, Yusaku; Tanaka, Kiyoko; Kitajima, Kenji; Tanegashima, Kosuke; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Hara, Takahiko

    2015-02-15

    LIM homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 is known to be an important regulator of neuronal development, homeostasis of hair follicle stem cells, and self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells; however, its function in skeletal muscle development is poorly understood. In this study, we found that overexpression of Lhx2 completely inhibits the myotube-forming capacity of C2C12 cells and primary myoblasts. The muscle dedifferentiation factors Msx1 and Msx2 were strongly induced by the Lhx2 overexpression. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Lhx2 in the developing limb buds of mouse embryos resulted in a reduction in Msx1 and Msx2 mRNA levels, suggesting that they are downstream target genes of Lhx2. We found two Lhx2 consensus-binding sites in the -2097 to -1189 genomic region of Msx1 and two additional sites in the -536 to +73 genomic region of Msx2. These sequences were shown by luciferase reporter assay to be essential for Lhx2-mediated transcriptional activation. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Lhx2 is present in chromatin DNA complexes bound to the enhancer regions of the Msx1 and Msx2 genes. These data demonstrate that Msx1 and Msx2 are direct transcriptional targets of Lhx2. In addition, overexpression of Lhx2 significantly enhanced the mRNA levels of bone morphogenetic protein 4 and transforming growth factor beta family genes. We propose that Lhx2 is involved in the early stage of skeletal muscle development by inducing multiple differentiation inhibitory factors.

  8. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lin; CHEN Zhijuan; XU Mingyu; LIN Shengguo; WANG Lu

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla.The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  9. New insights into somatic embryogenesis: leafy cotyledon1, baby boom1 and WUSCHEL-related homeobox4 are epigenetically regulated in Coffea canephora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovanny I Nic-Can

    Full Text Available Plant cells have the capacity to generate a new plant without egg fertilization by a process known as somatic embryogenesis (SE, in which differentiated somatic cells can form somatic embryos able to generate a functional plant. Although there have been advances in understanding the genetic basis of SE, the epigenetic mechanism that regulates this process is still unknown. Here, we show that the embryogenic development of Coffea canephora proceeds through a crosstalk between DNA methylation and histone modifications during the earliest embryogenic stages of SE. We found that low levels of DNA methylation, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 change according to embryo development. Moreover, the expression of LEAFY cotyledon1 (LEC1 and BABY BOOM1 (BBM1 are only observed after SE induction, whereas WUSCHEL-related homeobox4 (WOX4 decreases its expression during embryo maturation. Using a pharmacological approach, it was found that 5-Azacytidine strongly inhibits the embryogenic response by decreasing both DNA methylation and gene expression of LEC1 and BBM1. Therefore, in order to know whether these genes were epigenetically regulated, we used Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. It was found that WOX4 is regulated by the repressive mark H3K9me2, while LEC1 and BBM1 are epigenetically regulated by H3K27me3. We conclude that epigenetic regulation plays an important role during somatic embryogenic development, and a molecular mechanism for SE is proposed.

  10. The Lotus japonicus ndx gene family is involved in nodule function and maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Gustafsen, Camilla; Jensen, Dorthe Bødker;

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the function of the ndx homeobox genes during the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, two Lotus japonicus ndr genes were expressed in the antisense orientation under the control of the nodule-expressed promoter Psenod12 in transgenic Lotus japonicus plants. Many of the transformants obtained...

  11. Repression of interferon-γexpression in T cells by prosperorelated Homeobox protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linfang Wang; Jianmei Zhu; Shifang Shan; Yi Qin; Yuying Kong; Jing Liu; Yuan Wang; Youhua Xie

    2008-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a major proinflammatory effector and regulatory cytokine produced by activated T cells and NK cells. IFN-γ has been shown to play pivotal roles in fundamental immunological processes such as inflammatory reactions,cell-mediated immunity and autoimmunity. A variety of human disorders have now been linked to irregular IFN-γ expression. In order to achieve proper IFN-γ-mediated immunological effects,IFN-γ expression in T cells is subject to both positive and negative regulation. In this study,we report for the first time the negative regulation of IFN-γ expression by Prospero-related Homeobox (Prox1). In Jurkat T cells and primary human CD4+ T cells,Proxl expression decreases quickly upon T cell activation,concurrent with a dramatic increase in IFN-γ expression.Reporter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Proxl associates with and inhibits the transcription activity of IFN-γ promoter in activated Jurkat T cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay demonstrated a direct binding between Proxl and the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ),which is also an IFN-γ repressor in T cells. By introducing deletions and mutations into Proxl,we show that the repression of IFN-γ promoter by Prox1 is largely dependent upon the physical interaction between Prox1 and PPARγ. Furthermore,PPARγ antagonist treatment removes Prox1 from IFN-γ promoter and attenuates repression of IFN-γ expression by Prox1. These findings establish Prox1 as a new negative regulator of IFN-γ expression in T cells and will aid in the understanding of IFN-γ transcription regulation mechanisms.

  12. Identification of a putative nuclear export signal motif in human NANOG homeobox domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We found the putative nuclear export signal motif within human NANOG homeodomain. ► Leucine-rich residues are important for human NANOG homeodomain nuclear export. ► CRM1-specific inhibitor LMB blocked the potent human NANOG NES-mediated nuclear export. -- Abstract: NANOG is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in pluripotent stem cells and tumorigenic cells. To understand how nuclear localization of human NANOG is regulated, the NANOG sequence was examined and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif (125MQELSNILNL134) was found in the homeodomain (HD). To functionally validate the putative NES motif, deletion and site-directed mutants were fused to an EGFP expression vector and transfected into COS-7 cells, and the localization of the proteins was examined. While hNANOG HD exclusively localized to the nucleus, a mutant with both NLSs deleted and only the putative NES motif contained (hNANOG HD-ΔNLSs) was predominantly cytoplasmic, as observed by nucleo/cytoplasmic fractionation and Western blot analysis as well as confocal microscopy. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of the putative NES motif in a partial hNANOG HD only containing either one of the two NLS motifs led to localization in the nucleus, suggesting that the NES motif may play a functional role in nuclear export. Furthermore, CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor LMB blocked the hNANOG potent NES-mediated export, suggesting that the leucine-rich motif may function in CRM1-mediated nuclear export of hNANOG. Collectively, a NES motif is present in the hNANOG HD and may be functionally involved in CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  13. Inducible overexpression of porcine homeobox A10 in the endometrium of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Rui-yi; WU Di; ZHAO Chang-zhi; CHEN Shang-shang; XIAO Qian; LI Xin-yun; ZHAO Shu-hong

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox A10 (HOXA10) is a wel-known transcription factor that plays an important role in directing endometrial differ-entiation and establishing the conditions required for implantation. Interestingly, the expression level ofHOXA10 may be associated with litter size. To study the effects of the porcineHOXA10 promoter fragment on the expression ofHOXA10 genein vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse model using pronuclear microinjection, and measured the expression of HOXA10 in the endometrium. There was no difference in the expression level ofHOXA10 between transgenic and wild-type mice in the absence of hormone stimulation. However, folowing treatment with progesterone and estradiol benzoate, the expression level ofHOXA10 was signiifcantly increased in transgenic mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Fur-thermore, the litter size of transgenic females was larger than that of wild-type females (7.02±1.73vs. 6.48±1.85;P=0.14). Moreover, the difference of litter size was greater in the later parities (7.33±1.62vs. 6.37±2.02; P=0.08) compared with the ifrst parity (6.76±1.81vs. 6.61±1.67;P=0.77) between transgenic and wild-type mice. Therefore, our transgenic mouse model provides exciting insights regarding the actions ofHOXA10 and its hormone-inducible promoterin vivo. The present study offers valuable proof of principle to develop transgenic pigs with a hormone-inducible promoter regulatingHOXA10 to alter litter size.

  14. Reverse Genetic Analysis of Transcription FactorOsHox9, a Member of Homeobox Family, in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Li-ping; SHEN Ao; GAO Zhi-chao; LI Zheng-long; SUN Qiong-lin; LI Ying-ying; LUAN Wei-jiang

    2014-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors participate in the growth and development of plants by regulating cell differentiation, morphogenesis and environmental signal response. To reveal the functions of these transcription factors in rice, we constructed the RNAi vectors ofOsHox9, a member of homeobox family, and analyzed the function ofOsHox9 using reverse genetics. The plant height and tillering number of RNAi transgenic plants decreased compared with those of wild-type plants. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed thatOsHox9 expression reduced in the transgenic plants with phenotypic variance, whereas that in the transgenic plants without phenotypic variance was similar to that in the wild-type plants. This result suggests that the phenotypes of the transgenic plants were caused by RNAi effects. The tissue-specificity ofOsHox9 expression indicated that it was expressed in different organs, with high expression in stem apical meristem and young panicles. Subcelular location ofOsHox9 demonstrated that it was localized on the cell membrane.

  15. Iroquois homeobox transcription factor (Irx5) promotes G1/S-phase transition in vascular smooth muscle cells by CDK2-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Bacanamwo, Methode; Anderson, Leonard M

    2016-08-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx5) gene is essential in embryonic development and cardiac electrophysiology. Although recent studies have reported that IRX5 protein is involved in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, little is known about the role of IRX5 in the adult vasculature. Here we report novel observations on the role of IRX5 in adult vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Comparative studies using primary human endothelial cells, VSMCs, and intact carotid arteries to determine relative expression of Irx5 in the peripheral vasculature demonstrate significantly higher expression in VSMCs. Sprague-Dawley rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon catherization, and the presence of IRX5 was examined by immunohistochemistry after 2 wk. Results indicate markedly elevated IRX5 signal at 14 days compared with uninjured controls. Total RNA was isolated from injured and uninjured arteries, and Irx5 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Results demonstrate a significant increase in Irx5 expression at 3-14 days postinjury compared with controls. Irx5 genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies using thymidine and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assays resulted in modulation of DNA synthesis in primary rat aortic VSMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27(kip1)), E2F transcription factor 1 (E2f1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) expression in Irx5-transduced VSMCs compared with controls. Subsequently, apoptosis was observed and confirmed by morphological observation, caspase-3 cleavage, and enzymatic activation compared with control conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that Irx5 plays an important role in VSMC G1/S-phase cell cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. PMID:27170637

  16. Hox and ParaHox Genes in Evolution, Development and Genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David E.K. Ferrier

    2011-01-01

    @@ The discovery of the homeobox motif and its presence in each gene of the Hox clusters revolutionized the fields of developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology (1, 2), providing a rapid entrance into investigating the mechanisms of development of almost any animal taxon as well as dramatically altering conceptions on the extent of genetic conservation across the animal kingdom.

  17. Expression of caudal-related homeobox transcription factor caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 in intestinal-type carcinoma%CDX2基因与肠型胃癌关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武洋; 辛彦

    2007-01-01

    根据Lauren分型,胃癌分为肠型和弥漫型胃癌两种.肠型胃癌经历了正常胃黏膜、肠上皮化生到异型增生再到肠型胃癌的多步骤、多阶段逐渐发展的过程.肠道特异性转录因子(caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2,CDX2),对肠黏膜上皮的发育及保持其形态起着重要作用.正常情况下其产物特异的表达于小肠和结肠上皮中.迄今的研究发现,CDX2基因的异常表达与胃黏膜肠上皮化生和肠型胃癌的发生密切相关.

  18. Otx2 Gene Deletion in Adult Mouse Retina Induces Rapid RPE Dystrophy and Slow Photoreceptor Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Béby; Michael Housset; Nicolas Fossat; Coralie Le Greneur; Frédéric Flamant; Pierre Godement; Thomas Lamonerie

    2010-01-01

    Background : Many developmental genes are still active in specific tissues after development is completed. This is the case for the homeobox gene Otx2, an essential actor of forebrain and head development. In adult mouse, Otx2 is strongly expressed in the retina. Mutations of this gene in humans have been linked to severe ocular malformation and retinal diseases. It is, therefore, important to explore its post-developmental functions. In the mature retina, Otx2 is expressed in three cell type...

  19. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  20. Expression of the Otx2 homeobox gene in the developing mammalian brain: embryonic and adult expression in the pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Muñoz, Estela; Ganguly, Surajit;

    2006-01-01

    similar to that of Otx2, although there was a distinct lag in time of onset. Otx2 protein was identified in pineal extracts and found to be localized in pinealocytes. Total pineal Otx2 mRNA did not show day-night variation, nor was it influenced by removal of the sympathetic input, indicating...

  1. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios eStergiopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs, promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibits astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs, differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis.

  2. The homeobox protein CEH-23 mediates prolonged longevity in response to impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludivine Walter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that perturbations of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC can cause extended longevity in evolutionarily diverse organisms. To uncover the molecular basis of how altered METC increases lifespan in C. elegans, we performed an RNAi screen and revealed that three predicted transcription factors are specifically required for the extended longevity of mitochondrial mutants. In particular, we demonstrated that the nuclear homeobox protein CEH-23 uniquely mediates the longevity but not the slow development, reduced brood size, or resistance to oxidative stress associated with mitochondrial mutations. Furthermore, we showed that ceh-23 expression levels are responsive to altered METC, and enforced overexpression of ceh-23 is sufficient to extend lifespan in wild-type background. Our data point to mitochondria-to-nucleus communications to be key for longevity determination and highlight CEH-23 as a novel longevity factor capable of responding to mitochondrial perturbations. These findings provide a new paradigm for how mitochondria impact aging and age-dependent diseases.

  3. Homeobox B9 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas and promotes tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyi [Department of General Surgery, Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, No. 8 Sanba Square, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dlleidong@126.com [Department of Laparoscopic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, No. 193 Lianhe Street, Shahekou District, Dalian 116001 (China); Xing, Rong [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Dalian Medical University, No. 9 Lvshunnan Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Wang, Li; Luan, Fengming; Yao, Chenhui [Department of General Surgery, Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, No. 8 Sanba Square, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Ji, Xuening [Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, No. 6 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Bai, Lizhi, E-mail: dllizhibai@126.com [Department of Emergency, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, No. 6 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation in HCC cells. - Abstract: HomeoboxB9 (HOXB9), a nontransforming transcription factor that is overexpressed in multiple tumor types, alters tumor cell fate and promotes tumor progression. However, the role of HOXB9 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development has not been well studied. In this paper, we found that HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. We investigated HOXB9 expression and its prognostic value for HCC. HCC surgical tissue samples were taken from 89 HCC patients. HOXB9 overexpression was observed in 65.2% of the cases, and the survival analysis showed that the HOXB9 overexpression group had significantly shorter overall survival time than the HOXB9 downexpression group. The ectopic expression of HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells; whereas the knockdown of HOXB9 produced an opposite effect. HOXB9 also modulated the tumorigenicity of HCC cells in vivo. Moreover, we found that the activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation activities. The results provide the first evidence that HOXB9 is a critical regulator of tumor growth factor in HCC.

  4. MicroRNA-196b regulates the homeobox B7-vascular endothelial growth factor axis in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine How

    Full Text Available The down-regulation of microRNA-196b (miR-196b has been reported, but its contribution to cervical cancer progression remains to be investigated. In this study, we first demonstrated that miR-196b down-regulation was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS for cervical cancer patients treated with combined chemo-radiation. Secondly, using a tri-modal approach for target identification, we determined that homeobox-B7 (HOXB7 was a bona fide target for miR-196b, and in turn, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was a downstream transcript regulated by HOXB7. Reconstitution of miR-196b expression by transient transfection resulted in reduced cell growth, clonogenicity, migration and invasion in vitro, as well as reduced tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation in vivo. Concordantly, siRNA knockdown of HOXB7 or VEGF phenocopied the biological effects of miR-196b over-expression. Our findings have demonstrated that the miR-196b/HOXB7/VEGF pathway plays an important role in cervical cancer progression; hence targeting this pathway could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the future management of this disease.

  5. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  6. In vitro pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe whether pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro.METHODS: Rat pancreatic tissue was submitted to digestion by collegenase, ductal epithelial cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and then cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 3-5 passages, the cells were incubated in a six-well plate for 24 h before transfection of recombination plasmid XIHbox8VP16. Lightcycler quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of PDX-1 and insulin mRNA in pancreatic epithelial cells. The expression of PDX-1 and insulin protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Insulin secretion was detected by radioimmunoassay. Insulinproducing cells were detected by dithizone-staining.RESULTS: XIHbox8 mRNA was expressed in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PDX-1 and insulin mRNA as well as PDX-1 and insulin protein were significantly increased in the transfected group. The production and insulin secretion of insulin-producing cells differentiated from pancreatic ductal epithelial cells were higher than those of the untransfected cells in vitro with a significant difference (1.32 ± 0.43 vs 3.48 ± 0.81, P < 0.01 at 5.6 mmol/L; 4.86 ± 1.15 vs 10.25 ± 1.32, P < 0.01 at 16.7 mmol/L).CONCLUSION: PDX-1 can differentiate rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro.In vitro PDX-1 transfection is a valuable strategy for increasing the source of insulin-producing cells.

  7. Metformin Restrains Pancreatic Duodenal Homeobox-1 (PDX-1) Function by Inhibiting ERK Signaling in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G; Yu, J; Wang, A; Liu, S-H; Sinnett-Smith, J; Wu, J; Sanchez, R; Nemunaitis, J; Ricordi, C; Rozengurt, E; Brunicardi, F C

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most potent and perilous diseases known, with a median survival rate of 3-5 months due to the combination of only advanced stage diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic options. Metformin (1,1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the leading drug used for type 2 diabetes mellitus, emerges as a potential therapy for PDAC and other human cancers. Metformin exerts its anticancer action via a variety of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK)- dependent and/or AMPK-independent mechanisms. We present data here showing that metformin downregulated pancreatic transcription factor pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1), suggesting a potential novel mechanism by which metformin exerts its anticancer action. Metformin inhibited PDX-1 expression at both protein and mRNA levels and PDX-1 transactivity as well in PDAC cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was identified as a PDX-1-interacting protein by antibody array screening in GFP-PDX-1 stable HEK293 cells. Co-transfection of ERK1 with PDX-1 resulted in an enhanced PDX-1 expression in HEK293 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoprecipitation/Western blotting analysis confirmed the ERK-PDX-1 interaction in PANC-1 cells stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). EGF induced an enhanced PDX-1 expression in PANC-1 cells and this stimulation was inhibited by MEK inhibitor PD0325901. Metformin inhibited EGF-stimulated PDX-1 expression with an accompanied inhibition of ERK kinase activation in PANC- 1 cells. Taken together, our studies show that PDX-1 is a potential novel target for metformin in PDAC cells and that metformin may exert its anticancer action in PDAC by down-regulating PDX-1 via a mechanism involving inhibition of ERK signaling.

  8. The homeobox transcription factor Even-skipped regulates acquisition of electrical properties in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Andrea H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While developmental processes such as axon pathfinding and synapse formation have been characterized in detail, comparatively less is known of the intrinsic developmental mechanisms that regulate transcription of ion channel genes in embryonic neurons. Early decisions, including motoneuron axon targeting, are orchestrated by a cohort of transcription factors that act together in a combinatorial manner. These transcription factors include Even-skipped (Eve, islet and Lim3. The perdurance of these factors in late embryonic neurons is, however, indicative that they might also regulate additional aspects of neuron development, including the acquisition of electrical properties. Results To test the hypothesis that a combinatorial code transcription factor is also able to influence the acquisition of electrical properties in embryonic neurons we utilized the molecular genetics of Drosophila to manipulate the expression of Eve in identified motoneurons. We show that increasing expression of this transcription factor, in two Eve-positive motoneurons (aCC and RP2, is indeed sufficient to affect the electrical properties of these neurons in early first instar larvae. Specifically, we observed a decrease in both the fast K+ conductance (IKfast and amplitude of quantal cholinergic synaptic input. We used charybdotoxin to pharmacologically separate the individual components of IKfast to show that increased Eve specifically down regulates the Slowpoke (a BK Ca2+-gated potassium channel, but not Shal, component of this current. Identification of target genes for Eve, using DNA adenine methyltransferase identification, revealed strong binding sites in slowpoke and nAcRα-96Aa (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. Verification using real-time PCR shows that pan-neuronal expression of eve is sufficient to repress transcripts for both slo and nAcRα-96Aa. Conclusion Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Eve

  9. Antagonistic roles for KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes in patterning the land plant body plan following an ancient gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumizu, Chihiro; Alvarez, John Paul; Sakakibara, Keiko; Bowman, John L

    2015-02-01

    Neofunctionalization following gene duplication is thought to be one of the key drivers in generating evolutionary novelty. A gene duplication in a common ancestor of land plants produced two classes of KNOTTED-like TALE homeobox genes, class I (KNOX1) and class II (KNOX2). KNOX1 genes are linked to tissue proliferation and maintenance of meristematic potentials of flowering plant and moss sporophytes, and modulation of KNOX1 activity is implicated in contributing to leaf shape diversity of flowering plants. While KNOX2 function has been shown to repress the gametophytic (haploid) developmental program during moss sporophyte (diploid) development, little is known about KNOX2 function in flowering plants, hindering syntheses regarding the relationship between two classes of KNOX genes in the context of land plant evolution. Arabidopsis plants harboring loss-of-function KNOX2 alleles exhibit impaired differentiation of all aerial organs and have highly complex leaves, phenocopying gain-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Conversely, gain-of-function KNOX2 alleles in conjunction with a presumptive heterodimeric BELL TALE homeobox partner suppressed SAM activity in Arabidopsis and reduced leaf complexity in the Arabidopsis relative Cardamine hirsuta, reminiscent of loss-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Little evidence was found indicative of epistasis or mutual repression between KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes. KNOX proteins heterodimerize with BELL TALE homeobox proteins to form functional complexes, and contrary to earlier reports based on in vitro and heterologous expression, we find high selectivity between KNOX and BELL partners in vivo. Thus, KNOX2 genes confer opposing activities rather than redundant roles with KNOX1 genes, and together they act to direct the development of all above-ground organs of the Arabidopsis sporophyte. We infer that following the KNOX1/KNOX2 gene duplication in an ancestor of land plants, neofunctionalization led to evolution of antagonistic biochemical

  10. Effect of anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides homeobox B2 on the proliferation and expression of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘旭盛; 张晓

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of homeobox B2 (HOXB2) antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asodn) on the proliferation and expression of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs).   Methods: Various concentrations of HOXB2 asodn modified by thiophosphate transfected the induction of liposome into HUVECs. MTT and RT-PCR methods were employed to determine the effect of different concentrations of asodn on the endothelial proliferation and the expression level of HOXB2 mRNA.   Results: After the transfection of HOXB2 asodn, the endothelial proliferation was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion. Simultaneously, the expression of HOXB2 mRNA decreased significantly.   Conclusions: HOXB2 plays an important role in the proliferation of endothelia.

  11. Evidence for intron length conservation in a set of mammalian genes associated with embryonic development

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-10-05

    Abstract Background We carried out an analysis of intron length conservation across a diverse group of nineteen mammalian species. Motivated by recent research suggesting a role for time delays associated with intron transcription in gene expression oscillations required for early embryonic patterning, we searched for examples of genes that showed the most extreme conservation of total intron content in mammals. Results Gene sets annotated as being involved in pattern specification in the early embryo or containing the homeobox DNA-binding domain, were significantly enriched among genes with highly conserved intron content. We used ancestral sequences reconstructed with probabilistic models that account for insertion and deletion mutations to distinguish insertion and deletion events on lineages leading to human and mouse from their last common ancestor. Using a randomization procedure, we show that genes containing the homeobox domain show less change in intron content than expected, given the number of insertion and deletion events within their introns. Conclusions Our results suggest selection for gene expression precision or the existence of additional development-associated genes for which transcriptional delay is functionally significant.

  12. Further elucidation of the genomic structure of PAX3, and identification of two different point mutations within the PAX3 homeobox that cause Waardenburg syndrome type 1 in two families.

    OpenAIRE

    Lalwani, A K; Brister, J. R.; Fex, J; Grundfast, K. M.; Ploplis, B; San Agustin, T B; Wilcox, E R

    1995-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigmentary disturbances. Previous work has linked the disease to PAX3 on chromosome 2, and several mutations within the highly conserved paired-box and octapeptide motifs, but not the homeobox, have been reported. In this report, we have used the published cDNA sequence to further define the genomic structure of PAX3, using inverse PCR. We have identified exon/intron boundaries between exons 5 a...

  13. Further elucidation of the genomic structure of PAX3, and identification of two different point mutations within the PAX3 homeobox that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.B.; Wilcox, E.R. [National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigmentary disturbances. Previous work has linked the disease to PAX3 on chromosome 2, and several mutations within the highly conserved paired-box and octapeptide motifs, but not the homeobox, have been reported. In this report, we have used the published cDNA sequence to further define the genomic structure of PAX3, using inverse PCR. We have identified exon/intron boundaries between exons 5 and 6 and between exons 6 and 7. Further, we have identified the first two mutations within the homeobox in two different families with type 1 Waardenburg syndrome. The first is a point mutation (G{yields}T) at the first base of exon 6, which substitutes phenylalanine for valine. In another family, we have identified a point mutation (C{yields}G) within the homeobox, in exon 6, which substitutes a glycine for arginine at a highly conserved site. The homeodomain is important in binding of DNA and in effecting transcriptional control. These mutations likely result in structural change within the homeodomain that either change the DNA-binding specificity of the homeodomain or reduce the affinity of the PAX3 protein for DNA. These homeodomain mutations should aid in elucidating the role of the homeodomain in the function of the PAX3 protein. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK287639 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287639 J065078H11 AF287967.1 AF287967 Homo sapiens homeobox B7 (HOXB7) gene, partial cds; and home...obox B6 (HOXB6), homeobox B5 (HOXB5), homeobox B4 (HOXB4), and homeobox B3 (HOXB3) genes, complete cds. PRI 0.0 0 ...

  15. TARGET Researchers Identify Mutations in SIX1/2 and microRNA Processing Genes in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    TARGET researchers molecularly characterized favorable histology Wilms tumor (FHWT), a pediatric renal cancer. Comprehensive genome and transcript analyses revealed single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in microRNA processing genes (15% of FHWT patients) and Sine Oculis Homeobox Homolog 1/2 (SIX1/2) genes (7% of FHWT patients). SIX1/2 genes play a critical role in renal development and were not previously associated with FHWT, thus presenting a novel role for SIX1/2 pathway aberrations in this disease.

  16. Expression of KxhKN4 and KxhKN5 genes in Kalanchoë blossfeldiana "Molly" results in novel compact plant phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Laura, Marina; Borghi, Cristina;

    2011-01-01

    to modify plant architecture appears evident. In this work, the full length cDNA of five KNOX (KN) genes were sequenced from K. x houghtonii, a viviparous hybrid. Two constructs with the coding sequence of the class I and class II homeobox KN genes, KxhKN5 and KxhKN4, respectively, were overexpressed...... in the commercially important ornamental Kalanchoe¨ blossfeldiana ‘Molly’. Furthermore, a post-transcriptional gene silencing construct was made with a partial sequence of KxhKN5 and also transformed into ‘Molly’. Several transgenic plants exhibited compact phenotypes and some lines had a relative higher number...

  17. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, F.; Bhattacharya, A; Nelson, J. C.; N. Abe; P. Gordon; Lloret-Fernandez, C.; Maicas, M; Flames, N.; Mann, R S; Colon-Ramos, D. A.; Hobert, O.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation pr...

  18. Developmental and daily expression of the Pax4 and Pax6 homeobox genes in the rat retina: localization of Pax4 in photoreceptor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Bailey, Michael J; Kim, Jong-So;

    2009-01-01

    in the foetal eye. Histological analysis revealed that Pax4 mRNA is exclusively expressed in the retinal photoreceptors, whereas Pax6 mRNA and protein are present in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer of the mature retina. In the adult retina, Pax4 transcripts exhibit a diurnal rhythm...

  19. A neuroanatomical and physiological study of the non-image forming visual system of the cone-rod homeobox gene (Crx) knock out mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Rath, Martin F; Lund-Andersen, Casper;

    2010-01-01

    that the retinohypothalamic projection to the SCN and the central optic pathways were similar in both animals. Telemetric monitoring of the running activity and temperature revealed that both the Crx(-/-)and wild type mouse exhibited diurnal rhythms with a 24-h period, which could be phase changed by light. However, power...

  20. The human insulin receptor substrate-1 gene (IRS1) is localized on 2q36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Masaki; Matsufuji, Senya; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Furusaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Teruji (Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Inazawa, J.; Nakamura, Yusuke (Cancer Institute, Tokyo (Japan)); Ariyama, Takeshi (Kyoto Prefactural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)); Wands, J.R. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The chromosomal localization of some of the genes participating in the insulin signaling pathway is known. The insulin and insulin receptor genes have been mapped to chromosomes 11 and 19, respectively. To identify the chromosomal localization of the human IRS1 gene, the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was employed with Genomic Clone B-10. A total of 50 metaphase cells exhibiting either single or double spots of hybridization signals were examined. Among them, 32 showed the specific signals on 2q36. Therefore, the authors assigned the human IRS1 gene to 2q36. The genes for homeobox sequence (HOX4), fibronectin 1, alkaline phosphatase (intestinal), transition protein 1, villin 1, collagen (type IV), Waardenburg syndrome (type 1), alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and glucagon have been localized in the vicinity of the IRS1 gene.

  1. Fine-tuning the onset of myogenesis by homeobox proteins that interact with the Myf5 limb enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Daubas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal myogenesis in vertebrates is initiated at different sites of skeletal muscle formation during development, by activation of specific control elements of the myogenic regulatory genes. In the mouse embryo, Myf5 is the first myogenic determination gene to be expressed and its spatiotemporal regulation requires multiple enhancer sequences, extending over 120 kb upstream of the Mrf4-Myf5 locus. An enhancer, located at −57/−58 kb from Myf5, is responsible for its activation in myogenic cells derived from the hypaxial domain of the somite, that will form limb muscles. Pax3 and Six1/4 transcription factors are essential activators of this enhancer, acting on a 145-bp core element. Myogenic progenitor cells that will form the future muscle masses of the limbs express the factors necessary for Myf5 activation when they delaminate from the hypaxial dermomyotome and migrate into the forelimb bud, however they do not activate Myf5 and the myogenic programme until they have populated the prospective muscle masses. We show that Msx1 and Meox2 homeodomain-containing transcription factors bind in vitro and in vivo to specific sites in the 145-bp element, and are implicated in fine-tuning activation of Myf5 in the forelimb. Msx1, when bound between Pax and Six sites, prevents the binding of these key activators, thus inhibiting transcription of Myf5 and consequent premature myogenic differentiation. Meox2 is required for Myf5 activation at the onset of myogenesis via direct binding to other homeodomain sites in this sequence. Thus, these homeodomain factors, acting in addition to Pax3 and Six1/4, fine-tune the entry of progenitor cells into myogenesis at early stages of forelimb development.

  2. Systems genetics reveals key genetic elements of drought induced gene regulation in diploid potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Muijen, Dennis; Anithakumari, A M; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, C Gerard

    2016-09-01

    In plants, tolerance to drought stress is a result of numerous minor effect loci in which transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the observed phenotypes. Under severe drought conditions, a major expression quantitative trait loci hotspot was identified on chromosome five in potato. A putative Nuclear factor y subunit C4 was identified as key candidate in the regulatory cascade in response to drought. Further investigation of the eQTL hotspots suggests a role for a putative Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 in relation to drought in potato. Genes strongly co-expressed with Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 were plant growth regulators responsive to water deficit stress in Arabidopsis thaliana, implying a possible conserved mechanism. Integrative analysis of genetic, genomic, phenotypic and transcriptomic data provided insights in the downstream functional components of the drought response. The abscisic acid- and environmental stress-inducible protein TAS14 was highly induced by severe drought in potato and acts as a reliable biomarker for the level of stress perceived by the plant. The systems genetics approach supported a role for multiple genes responsive to severe drought stress of Solanum tuberosum. The combination of gene regulatory networks, expression quantitative trait loci mapping and phenotypic analysis proved useful for candidate gene selection. PMID:27353051

  3. LATHYROIDES, Encoding a WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox1 Transcription Factor, Controls Organ Lateral Growth, and Regulates Tendril and Dorsal Petal Identities in Garden Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Li Zhuang; Mike Ambrose; Catherine Rameau; Lin Weng; Jun Yang; Xiao-He Hu; Da Luo; Xin Li

    2012-01-01

    During organ development,many key regulators have been identified in plant genomes,which play a conserved role among plant species to control the organ identities and/or determine the organ size and shape.It is intriguing whether these key regulators can acquire diverse function and be integrated into different molecular pathways among different species,giving rise to the immense diversity of organ forms in nature.In this study,we have characterized and cloned LATHYROIDES (LATH),a classical locus in pea,whose mutation displays pleiotropic alteration of lateral growth of organs and predominant effects on tendril and dorsal petal development.LATH encodes a WUSCHEL-related homeobox1 (WOX1) transcription factor,which has a conserved function in determining organ lateral growth among different plant species.Furthermore,we showed that LATH regulated the expression level of TENDRIL-LESS (TL),a key factor in the control of tendril development in compound leaf,and LATH genetically interacted with LOBED STANDARD (LST),a floral dorsal factor,to affect the dorsal petal identity.Thus,LATH plays multiple roles during organ development in pea:it maintains a conserved function controlling organ lateral outgrowth,and modulates organ identities in compound leaf and zygomorphic flower development,respectively.Our data indicated that a key regulator can play important roles in different aspects of organ development and dedicate to the complexity of the molecular mechanism in the control of organ development so as to create distinct organ forms in different species.

  4. Antagonistic roles for KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes in patterning the land plant body plan following an ancient gene duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Furumizu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neofunctionalization following gene duplication is thought to be one of the key drivers in generating evolutionary novelty. A gene duplication in a common ancestor of land plants produced two classes of KNOTTED-like TALE homeobox genes, class I (KNOX1 and class II (KNOX2. KNOX1 genes are linked to tissue proliferation and maintenance of meristematic potentials of flowering plant and moss sporophytes, and modulation of KNOX1 activity is implicated in contributing to leaf shape diversity of flowering plants. While KNOX2 function has been shown to repress the gametophytic (haploid developmental program during moss sporophyte (diploid development, little is known about KNOX2 function in flowering plants, hindering syntheses regarding the relationship between two classes of KNOX genes in the context of land plant evolution. Arabidopsis plants harboring loss-of-function KNOX2 alleles exhibit impaired differentiation of all aerial organs and have highly complex leaves, phenocopying gain-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Conversely, gain-of-function KNOX2 alleles in conjunction with a presumptive heterodimeric BELL TALE homeobox partner suppressed SAM activity in Arabidopsis and reduced leaf complexity in the Arabidopsis relative Cardamine hirsuta, reminiscent of loss-of-function KNOX1 alleles. Little evidence was found indicative of epistasis or mutual repression between KNOX1 and KNOX2 genes. KNOX proteins heterodimerize with BELL TALE homeobox proteins to form functional complexes, and contrary to earlier reports based on in vitro and heterologous expression, we find high selectivity between KNOX and BELL partners in vivo. Thus, KNOX2 genes confer opposing activities rather than redundant roles with KNOX1 genes, and together they act to direct the development of all above-ground organs of the Arabidopsis sporophyte. We infer that following the KNOX1/KNOX2 gene duplication in an ancestor of land plants, neofunctionalization led to evolution of antagonistic

  5. Study of duplication 24bp of ARX gene among patients presenting a Mental Retardation with a syndromic and non syndromic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mental Retardation (MR) is the most frequent handicap. It touches 3% of the general population. The genetic causes of this handicap account for 40% of these cases. ARX gene (Aristaless related homeobox gene) belongs to the family of the genes homeobox located in Xp22.1. It is considered as the most frequently muted gene after the FMR1 gene. It is implicated in various forms of syndromic and nonsyndromic MR. Several types of mutation were identified on the level of this gene, including deletions/insertions, duplications, missense and nonsense mutations, responsible for a wide spectrum of phenotypes. The goal of this work is to seek the most frequent change of gene ARX: duplication 24pb (at the origin of an expansion of the field poly has protein ARX in the position 144-155AA) among Tunisian boys presenting in particular family forms of non specific MR, sporadic forms of non specific MR like certain patients presenting a West syndrome.To prove the duplication of 24 Pb, we used in this work the Pcr technique. The change of duplication 24pb was not found in our series, this could be explained by the low number of cases family studied (38 families) and by the absence of connection studies accusing a mode of transmission related to X chromosome in particular for the sporadic cases. (Author)

  6. Transcriptional profiling of type 1 diabetes genes on chromosome 21 in a rat beta-cell line and human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Karlsen, A.E.; Hagedorn, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    likely candidate genes influencing beta-cell function in this region. Two array-based approaches were used, a rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1alphabeta) overexpressing pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and treated with interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) as well as human pancreatic islets stimulated...... with a mixture of cytokines. Several candidate genes with likely functional significance in T1D were identified. Genes showing differential expression in the two approaches were highly similar, supporting the role of these specific gene products in cytokine-induced beta-cell damage. These were genes involved...... in cytokine signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, defense responses and apoptosis. The analyses, furthermore, revealed several transcription factor binding sites shared by the differentially expressed genes and by genes demonstrating highly similar expression profiles with these genes. Comparable findings...

  7. Gene expression microarray analysis of the spinal trigeminal nucleus in a rat model of migraine with aura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruozhuo Liu; Shengyuan Yu; Fengpeng Li; Enchao Qiu

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression can trigger migraine with aura and activate the trigeminal vascular system. To examine gene expression profiles in the spinal trigeminal nucleus in rats following cortical spreading depression-induced migraine with aura, a rat model was established by injection of 1 M potassium chloride, which induced cortical spreading depression. DNA microarray analysis revealed that, compared with the control group, the cortical spreading depression group showed seven upregulated genes-myosin heavy chain 1/2, myosin light chain 1, myosin light chain (phosphorylatable, fast skeletal muscle), actin alpha 1, homeobox B8, carbonic anhydrase 3 and an unknown gene. Two genes were downregulated-RGD1563441 and an unknown gene. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and bioinformatics analysis indicated that these genes are involved in motility, cell migration, CO2 /nitric oxide homeostasis and signal transduction.

  8. Palmitic acid increase levels of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 and p38/stress-activated protein kinase in islets from rats maintained on a low protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Vanessa C; Reis, Marise A B; Latorraca, Márcia Q; Ferreira, Fabiano; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrízio; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C

    2006-12-01

    A severe reduction in insulin release in response to glucose is consistently noticed in protein-deprived rats and is attributed partly to the chronic exposure to elevated levels of NEFA. Since the pancreatic and duodenal transcription factor homeobox 1 (PDX-1) is important for the maintenance of beta-cell physiology, and since PDX-1 expression is altered in the islets of rats fed a low protein (LP) diet and that rats show high NEFA levels, we assessed PDX-1 and insulin mRNA expression, as well as PDX-1 and p38/stress activated protein kinase 2 (SAPK2) protein expression, in islets from young rats fed low (6%) or normal (17%; control) protein diets and maintained for 48 h in culture medium containing 5.6 mmol/l glucose, with or without 0.6 mmol/l palmitic acid. We also measured glucose-induced insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Insulin secretion by isolated islets in response to 16.7 mmol/l glucose was reduced in LP compared with control rats. In the presence of NEFA, there was an increase in insulin secretion in both groups. At 2.8 mmol/l glucose, the metabolism of this sugar was reduced in LP islets, regardless of the presence of this fatty acid. However, when challenged with 16.7 mmol/l glucose, LP and control islets showed a severe reduction in glucose oxidation in the presence of NEFA. The PDX-1 and insulin mRNA were significantly higher when NEFA was added to the culture medium in both groups of islets. The effect of palmitic acid on PDX-1 and p38/SAPK2 protein levels was similar in LP and control islets, but the increase was much more evident in LP islets. These results demonstrate the complex interrelationship between nutrients in the control of insulin release and support the view that fatty acids play an important role in glucose homeostasis by affecting molecular mechanisms and stimulus/secretion coupling pathways. PMID:17181874

  9. Hydrocephalus caused by conditional ablation of the Pten or beta-catenin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtoshi Akihira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the roles of Pten and β-Catenin in the midbrain, either the Pten gene or the β-catenin gene was conditionally ablated, using Dmbx1 (diencephalon/mesencephalon-expressed brain homeobox gene 1-Cre mice. Homozygous disruption of the Pten or β-catenin gene in Dmbx1-expressing cells caused severe hydrocephalus and mortality during the postnatal period. Conditional deletion of Pten resulted in enlargement of midbrain structures. β-catenin conditional mutant mice showed malformation of the superior and inferior colliculi and stenosis of the midbrain aqueduct. These results demonstrate that both Pten and β-Catenin are essential for proper midbrain development, and provide the direct evidence that mutations of both Pten and β-catenin lead to hydrocephalus.

  10. Fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto affects the dietary response in mouse white adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Justiina Ronkainen; Tuija J. Huusko; Raija Soininen; Eleonora Mondini; Francesca Cinti; Mäkelä, Kari A.; Miia Kovalainen; Karl-Heinz Herzig; Marjo-Riitta Järvelin; Sylvain Sebert; Savolainen, Markku J.; Tuire Salonurmi

    2015-01-01

    Common variants of human fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto have been linked with higher body mass index, but the biological explanation for the link has remained obscure. Recent findings suggest that these variants affect the homeobox protein IRX3. Here we report that FTO has a role in white adipose tissue which modifies its response to high-fat feeding. Wild type and Fto-deficient mice were exposed to standard or high-fat diet for 16 weeks after which metabolism, behavior and white a...

  11. Using the Developmental Gene Bicoid to Identify Species of Forensically Important Blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Hwan Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying species of insects used to estimate postmortem interval (PMI is a major subject in forensic entomology. Because forensic insect specimens are morphologically uniform and are obtained at various developmental stages, DNA markers are greatly needed. To develop new autosomal DNA markers to identify species, partial genomic sequences of the bicoid (bcd genes, containing the homeobox and its flanking sequences, from 12 blowfly species (Aldrichina grahami, Calliphora vicina, Calliphora lata, Triceratopyga calliphoroides, Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya pinguis, Phormia regina, Lucilia ampullacea, Lucilia caesar, Lucilia illustris, Hemipyrellia ligurriens and Lucilia sericata; Calliphoridae: Diptera were determined and analyzed. This study first sequenced the ten blowfly species other than C. vicina and L. sericata. Based on the bcd sequences of these 12 blowfly species, a phylogenetic tree was constructed that discriminates the subfamilies of Calliphoridae (Luciliinae, Chrysomyinae, and Calliphorinae and most blowfly species. Even partial genomic sequences of about 500 bp can distinguish most blowfly species. The short intron 2 and coding sequences downstream of the bcd homeobox in exon 3 could be utilized to develop DNA markers for forensic applications. These gene sequences are important in the evolution of insect developmental biology and are potentially useful for identifying insect species in forensic science.

  12. Identification of a Positive Cis-Element Upstream of Human NKX3.1 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Li JIANG; Peng-Ju ZHANG; Xiao-Yan HU; Wei-Wen CHEN; Feng KONG; Zhi-Fang LIU; Hui-Qing YUAN; Jian-Ye ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    NKX3.1 is a prostate-specific homeobox gene related to prostate development and prostate cancer. In this work, we aimed to identify precisely the functional cis-element in the 197 bp region (from -1032 to -836 bp) of the NKX3.1 promoter (from -1032 to +8 bp), which was previously identified to present positive regulatory activity on NKX3.1 expression, by deletion mutagenesis analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). A 16 bp positive cis-element located between -920 and -905 bp upstream of the NKX3.1 gene was identified by deletion mutation analysis and proved to be a functional positive cis-element by EMSA. It will be important to further study the functions and regulatory mechanisms of this positive cis-element in NKX3.1 gene expression.

  13. The HOX-5 and surfeit gene clusters are linked in the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, L; Huxley, C; Hogan, B; Evans, T; Fried, M; Duboule, D; Lehrach, H

    1990-04-01

    Using an interspecies backcross, we have mapped the HOX-5 and surfeit (surf) gene clusters within the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2. While the HOX-5 cluster of homeobox-containing genes has been localized to chromosome 2, bands C3-E1, by in situ hybridization, its more precise position relative to the genes and cloned markers of chromosome 2 was not known. Surfeit, a tight cluster of at least six highly conserved "housekeeping" genes, has not been previously mapped in mouse, but has been localized to human chromosome 9q, a region of the human genome with strong homology to proximal mouse chromosome 2. The data presented here place HOX-5 in the vicinity of the closely linked set of developmental mutations rachiterata, lethargic, and fidget and place surf close to the proto-oncogene Abl, near the centromere of chromosome 2.

  14. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  15. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  16. HLXB9 gene expression, and nuclear location during in vitro neuronal differentiation in the SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Giovanna Leotta

    Full Text Available Different parts of the genome occupy specific compartments of the cell nucleus based on the gene content and the transcriptional activity. An example of this is the altered nuclear positioning of the HLXB9 gene in leukaemia cells observed in association with its over-expression. This phenomenon was attributed to the presence of a chromosomal translocation with breakpoint proximal to the HLXB9 gene. Before becoming an interesting gene in cancer biology, HLXB9 was studied as a developmental gene. This homeobox gene is also known as MNX1 (motor neuron and pancreas homeobox 1 and it is relevant for both motor neuronal and pancreatic beta cells development. A spectrum of mutations in this gene are causative of sacral agenesis and more broadly, of what is known as the Currarino Syndrome, a constitutional autosomal dominant disorder. Experimental work on animal models has shown that HLXB9 has an essential role in motor neuronal differentiation. Here we present data to show that, upon treatment with retinoic acid, the HLXB9 gene becomes over-expressed during the early stages of neuronal differentiation and that this corresponds to a reposition of the gene in the nucleus. More precisely, we used the SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cell line as an in vitro model and we demonstrated a transient transcription of HLXB9 at the 4th and 5th days of differentiation that corresponded to the presence, predominantly in the cell nuclei, of the encoded protein HB9. The nuclear positioning of the HLXB9 gene was monitored at different stages: a peripheral location was noted in the proliferating cells whereas a more internal position was noted during differentiation, that is while HLXB9 was transcriptionally active. Our findings suggest that HLXB9 can be considered a marker of early neuronal differentiation, possibly involving chromatin remodeling pathways.

  17. Fat accumulation in differentiated brown adipocytes is linked with expression of Hox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Smita; Rajput, Yudhishthir S; Barui, Amit K; Sharma, Rajan; Datta, Tirtha K

    2016-03-01

    Homeobox (Hox) genes are involved in body plan of embryo along the anterior-posterior axis. Presence of several Hox genes in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) is indicative of involvement of Hox genes in adipogenesis. We propose that differentiation inducing agents viz. isobutyl-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), indomethacin, dexamethasone (DEX), triiodothyronine (T3) and insulin may regulate differentiation in brown adipose tissue through Hox genes. In vitro culture of brown fat stromalvascular fraction (SVF) in presence or absence of differentiation inducing agents was used for establishing relationship between fat accumulation in differentiated adipocytes and expression of Hox genes. Relative expression of Pref1, UCP1 and Hox genes was determined in different stages of adipogenesis. Presence or absence of IBMX, indomethacin and DEX during differentiation of proliferated pre-adipocytes resulted in marked differences in expression of Hox genes and lipid accumulation. In presence of these inducing agents, lipid accumulation as well as expression of HoxA1, HoxA5, HoxC4 &HoxC8 markedly enhanced. Irrespective of presence or absence of T3, insulin down regulates HoxA10. T3 results in over expression of HoxA5, HoxC4 and HoxC8 genes, whereas insulin up regulates expression of only HoxC8. Findings suggest that accumulation of fat in differentiated adipocytes is linked with expression of Hox genes.

  18. Effects of amelogenins on angiogenesis-associated processes of endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almqvist, S; Kleinman, H K; Werthén, M;

    2011-01-01

    To study the effects of an amelogenin mixture on integrin-dependent adhesion, DNA synthesis and apoptosis of cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and angiogenesis in an organotypic assay....

  19. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundeberg Joakim

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox. These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin.

  20. Circadian Dynamics of the Cone-Rod Homeobox (CRX) Transcription Factor in the Rat Pineal Gland and Its Role in Regulation of Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferase (AANAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Rovsing, Louise; Ho, Anthony K;

    2014-01-01

    , which is transferred into daily changes in CRX protein. The study further shows that the sympathetic innervation of the pineal gland controls the Crx rhythm. By use of adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA gene knockdown targeting Crx mRNA in primary rat pinealocyte cell culture, we here show...

  1. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-08-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible.

  2. The FSHD-associated repeat, D4Z4, is a member of a dispersed family of homeobox-containing repeats, subsets of which are clustered on the short arms of the acrocentric chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, R.; Wright, T.J.; Clark, L.N.; Hewitt, J.E. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-10

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is in autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder that maps to human chromosome 4q35. FSHD is tightly linked to a polymorphic 3.3-kb tandem repeat locus, D4Z4. D4Z4 is a complex repeat: it contains a novel homeobox sequence and two other repetitive sequence motifs. In most sporadic FSHD cases, a specific DNA rearrangement, deletion of copies of the repeat at D4Z4, is associated with development of the disease. However, no expressed sequences from D4Z4 have been identified. We have previously shown that there are other loci similar to D4Z4 within the genome. In this paper we describe the isolation of two YAC clones that map to chromosome 14 and that contain multiple copies of a D4Z4-like repeat. Isolation of cDNA clones that map to the acrocentric chromosomes and Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids show that there are similar loci on all of the acrocentric chromosomes. D4Z4 is a member of a complex repeat family, and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids shows an organization into distinct subfamilies. The implications of this work in relation to the molecular mechanism of FSHD pathogenesis is discussed. We propose the name 3.3-kb repeat for this family of repetitive sequence elements. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Myc and Miz-1 have coordinate genomic functions including targeting Hox genes in human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varlakhanova Natalia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A proposed role for Myc in maintaining mouse embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency is transcriptional repression of key differentiation-promoting genes, but detail of the mechanism has remained an important open topic. Results To test the hypothesis that the zinc finger protein Miz-1 plays a central role, in the present work we conducted chromatin immunoprecipitation/microarray (ChIP-chip analysis of Myc and Miz-1 in human ES cells, finding homeobox (Hox genes as the most significant functional class of Miz-1 direct targets. Miz-1 differentiation-associated target genes specifically lack acetylated lysine 9 and trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (AcH3K9 and H3K4me3 9 histone marks, consistent with a repressed transcriptional state. Almost 30% of Miz-1 targets are also bound by Myc and these cobound genes are mostly factors that promote differentiation including Hox genes. Knockdown of Myc increased expression of differentiation genes directly bound by Myc and Miz-1, while a subset of the same genes is downregulated by Miz-1 loss-of-function. Myc and Miz-1 proteins interact with each other and associate with several corepressor factors in ES cells, suggesting a mechanism of repression of differentiation genes. Conclusions Taken together our data indicate that Miz-1 and Myc maintain human ES cell pluripotency by coordinately suppressing differentiation genes, particularly Hox genes. These data also support a new model of how Myc and Miz-1 function on chromatin.

  4. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paired-like homeobox-containing gene Ehox plays a role in embryonic stem cell differentiation and is highly expressed in the developing placenta and thymus. To understand the mechanisms of regulation of Ehox gene expression, the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene was isolated from a mouse BAC library. 5'-RACE analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site 130 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Transient transfection with a luciferase reporter gene under the control of serially deleted 5'-flanking sequences revealed that the nt -84 to -68 region contained a positive cis-acting element for efficient expression of the Ehox gene. Mutational analysis of this region and oligonucleotide competition in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the presence of a CCAAT box, which is a target for transcription nuclear factor Y (NFY). NFY is essential for positive gene regulation. No tissue-specific enhancer was identified in the 1.9-kb 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene. Ehox is expressed during the early stages of embryo development, specifically in Brain at 9.5 dpc, as well as during the late stages of embryo development. These results suggest that NFY is an essential regulatory factor for Ehox transcriptional activity, which is important for the post-implantation stage of the developing embryo

  5. [Role of meristem-specific genes of plants in formation of genetic tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutova, L A; Dodueva, I E

    2007-01-01

    In higher plants, homeobox genes of the KNOX and WOX subfamilies plays a key role in maintenance of the pool of stem cells, regulate proliferation, and prevent cell differentiation. It has been shown that meristem-specific genes are regulated by phytohormones and affect their metabolism, specifically that of cytokinins. Plant tumors are widely used as a model for studying the genetic control of cell division and differentiation. The tumors induced by pathogens and genetic tumors, whose development depends on the plant genotype, are distinguished. The changes in the levels of expression of genes--regulators of cell cycle, meristem-specific genes, and genes controlling metabolism and transmission of the signal of phytohormones were described on tumors of different origin. The mechanisms underlying tumor formation in plants and animals were shown to be similar, specifically as concerns the relationship between the genes--cell cycle regulators and tumorigenesis. In plants, transcriptional factors of the subfamily KNOX have similarity in structure and, supposedly, common origin with transcriptional factors MEIS in animals, which are very active in neoplastic cells. The review presents the characteristics of KNOX and WOX transcriptional factors, their functions in meristem development, and interaction with the plant hormonal system. The role of homeodomain-containing transcriptional factors in tumorigenesis in plants and animals is discussed. The role of meristem-specific genes and phytohormones in tumorigenesis is discussed on the example of genetic tumors obtained by mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana and tumors in the radish inbred lines.

  6. Transcriptional networks driving enhancer function in the CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2012-09-01

    A critical cis-regulatory element for the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene is located in intron 11, 100 kb distal to the promoter, with which it interacts. This sequence contains an intestine-selective enhancer and associates with enhancer signature proteins, such as p300, in addition to tissue-specific TFs (transcription factors). In the present study we identify critical TFs that are recruited to this element and demonstrate their importance in regulating CFTR expression. In vitro DNase I footprinting and EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) identified four cell-type-selective regions that bound TFs in vitro. ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) identified FOXA1/A2 (forkhead box A1/A2), HNF1 (hepatocyte nuclear factor 1) and CDX2 (caudal-type homeobox 2) as in vivo trans-interacting factors. Mutation of their binding sites in the intron 11 core compromised its enhancer activity when measured by reporter gene assay. Moreover, siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown of CDX2 caused a significant reduction in endogenous CFTR transcription in intestinal cells, suggesting that this factor is critical for the maintenance of high levels of CFTR expression in these cells. The ChIP data also demonstrate that these TFs interact with multiple cis-regulatory elements across the CFTR locus, implicating a more global role in intestinal expression of the gene.

  7. HOX Gene Promoter Prediction and Inter-genomic Comparison: An Evo-Devo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla A. Endriga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes direct the anterior-posterior axis of the body plan in eukaryotic organisms. Promoter regions upstream of the Hox genes jumpstart the transcription process. CpG islands found within the promoter regions can cause silencing of these promoters. The locations of the promoter regions and the CpG islands of Homeo sapiens sapiens (human, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee, Mus musculus (mouse, and Rattus norvegicus (brown rat are compared and related to the possible influence on the specification of the mammalian body plan. The sequence of each gene in Hox clusters A-D of the mammals considered were retrieved from Ensembl and locations of promoter regions and CpG islands predicted using Exon Finder. The predicted promoter sequences were confirmed via BLAST and verified against the Eukaryotic Promoter Database. The significance of the locations was determined using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Among the four clusters, only promoter locations in cluster B showed significant difference. HOX B genes have been linked with the control of genes that direct the development of axial morphology, particularly of the vertebral column bones. The magnitude of variation among the body plans of closely-related species can thus be partially attributed to the promoter kind, location and number, and gene inactivation via CpG methylation.

  8. Regulation of Silk Genes by Hox and Homeodomain Proteins in the Terminal Differentiated Silk Gland of the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeharu Takiya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The silk gland of the silkworm Bombyx mori is a long tubular organ that is divided into several subparts along its anteroposterior (AP axis. As a trait of terminal differentiation of the silk gland, several silk protein genes are expressed with unique regional specificities. Most of the Hox and some of the homeobox genes are also expressed in the differentiated silk gland with regional specificities. The expression patterns of Hox genes in the silk gland roughly correspond to those in embryogenesis showing “colinearity”. The central Hox class protein Antennapedia (Antp directly regulates the expression of several middle silk gland–specific silk genes, whereas the Lin-1/Isl-1/Mec3 (LIM-homeodomain transcriptional factor Arrowhead (Awh regulates the expression of posterior silk gland–specific genes for silk fiber proteins. We summarize our results and discuss the usefulness of the silk gland of Bombyx mori for analyzing the function of Hox genes. Further analyses of the regulatory mechanisms underlying the region-specific expression of silk genes will provide novel insights into the molecular bases for target-gene selection and regulation by Hox and homeodomain proteins.

  9. SNP-SNP interaction network in angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been shown to be associated with prostate cancer development. The majority of prostate cancer studies focused on individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs while SNP-SNP interactions are suggested having a great impact on unveiling the underlying mechanism of complex disease. Using 1,151 prostate cancer patients in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS dataset, 2,651 SNPs in the angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness were evaluated. SNP-SNP interactions were primarily assessed using the two-stage Random Forests plus Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (TRM approach in the CGEMS group, and were then re-evaluated in the Moffitt group with 1,040 patients. For the identified gene pairs, cross-evaluation was applied to evaluate SNP interactions in both study groups. Five SNP-SNP interactions in three gene pairs (MMP16+ ROBO1, MMP16+ CSF1, and MMP16+ EGFR were identified to be associated with aggressive prostate cancer in both groups. Three pairs of SNPs (rs1477908+ rs1387665, rs1467251+ rs7625555, and rs1824717+ rs7625555 were in MMP16 and ROBO1, one pair (rs2176771+ rs333970 in MMP16 and CSF1, and one pair (rs1401862+ rs6964705 in MMP16 and EGFR. The results suggest that MMP16 may play an important role in prostate cancer aggressiveness. By integrating our novel findings and available biomedical literature, a hypothetical gene interaction network was proposed. This network demonstrates that our identified SNP-SNP interactions are biologically relevant and shows that EGFR may be the hub for the interactions. The findings provide valuable information to identify genotype combinations at risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer and improve understanding on the genetic etiology of angiogenesis associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  10. Construction Of An Optimized Lentiviral Vector Containing Pdx-1 Gene For Transduction Of Stem Cells Towards Gene Therapy Diabetes Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahmati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Nowadays, most of gene therapy protocols are performed by lentiviral vectors. One of the most important factors which is involved in pancreas development and transcription of insulin gene is pancreatic & duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1 transcription factor. The goal of this study was to optimize a lentiviral construct, containing pdx-1 gene, to transfect stem cells towards gene therapy of type-1 diabetes. Methods: In this experimental study, first, the pdx-1 gene was multiplied by PCR from pcDNA3.1-pdx-1 and cloned into pTG19-T vector. Then, pdx-1 was subcloned on upstream of IRES-EGFP gene into IRES2-EGFP vector. At the next step, the cloned parts of IRES-EGFP and pdx-1 were isolated and cloned into the lentiviral expression vector pSINTREM in upstream of TRE-CMV gene. After sequencing, final construct was transfected into HEK 293 cells and gene expression of pdx-1 was evaluated using flow cytometry analysis and reverse fluorescent microscopy. Results: Flow cytometry results and inverted fluorescent microscopy observing showed that pdx-1 and GFP genes are expressed in cells transfected with final recombinant construct. Conclusion: Regarding the design of this construct, to ensure long time expression with higher in vivo and in vitro expression efficiency for stem cells and also use of Tet on induced optimized system, it seems that the current construct can be among the best ones to transfect stem cells. Key words: Gene therapy, Diabetes, Stem cells

  11. Capsicum annuum homeobox 1 (CaHB1) is a nuclear factor that has roles in plant development, salt tolerance, and pathogen defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Yoon, Joonseon [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seou1 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyung Ja [Screening Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hyun A; Kwon, Suk-Yoon [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yusung, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doil, E-mail: doil@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seou1 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •The CaHB1 is a nuclear factor, belonging to HD-Zip proteins. •SA and ET, as signal molecules, modulate CaHB1-mediated responses. •Overexpression of CaHB1 in tomato resulted in a thicker cell wall. •CaHB1-transgenic tomato confers resistance to Phytophthora infestans. •CaHB1 enhanced tolerance to saline stress in tomato. -- Abstract: Homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family proteins are unique to plants, but little is known about their role in defense responses. CaHB1 is a nuclear factor in peppers, belonging to subfamily II of HD-Zip proteins. Here, we determined the role of CaHB1 in the defense response. CaHB1 expression was induced when pepper plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici, a plant pathogen to which peppers are susceptible, or environmental stresses such as drought and salt stimuli. CaHB1 was also highly expressed in pepper leaves following application of SA, whereas ethephon and MeJA had a moderate effect. To further investigate the function of CaHB1 in plants, we performed gain-of-function study by overexpression of CaHB1 in tomato. CaHB1-transgenic tomatoes showed significant growth enhancement including increased leaf thickness and enlarged cell size (1.8-fold larger than control plants). Microscopic analysis revealed that leaves from CaHB1-transgenic plants had thicker cell walls and cuticle layers than those from controls. Moreover, CaHB1-transgenic plants displayed enhanced resistance against Phytophthora infestans and increased tolerance to salt stress. Additionally, RT-PCR analysis of CaHB1-transgenic tomatoes revealed constitutive up-regulation of multiple genes involved in plant defense and osmotic stress. Therefore, our findings suggest roles for CaHB1 in development, salt stress, and pathogen defense.

  12. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  13. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  14. Expression analyses of the genes harbored by the type 2 diabetes and pediatric BMI associated locus on 10q23

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    Zhao Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that one of the key type 2 diabetes (T2D loci identified by GWAS exerts its influence early on in life through its impact on pediatric BMI. This locus on 10q23 harbors three genes, encoding hematopoietically expressed homeobox (HHEX, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE and kinesin family member 11 (KIF11, respectively. Methods We analyzed the impact of adipogeneis on the mRNA and protein expression levels of these genes in the human adipocyte Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS cell line in order to investigate which could be the culprit gene(s in this region of linkage disequilibrium. Results Following activation of differentiation with a PPARγ ligand, we observed ~20% decrease in IDE, ~40% decrease in HHEX and in excess of 80% decrease in KIF11 mRNA levels when comparing the adipocyte and pre-adipocyte states. We also observed decreases in KIF11 and IDE protein levels, but conversely we observed a dramatic increase in HHEX protein levels. Subsequent time course experiments revealed some marked changes in expression as early as three hours after activation of differentiation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the expression of all three genes at this locus are impacted during SGBS adipogenesis and provides insights in to the possible mechanisms of how the genes at this 10q23 locus could influence both adipocyte differentiation and susceptibility to T2D through insulin resistance.

  15. A human ESC model for MLL-AF4 leukemic fusion gene reveals an impaired early hematopoietic-endothelial specification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clara Bueno; Agustin F Femández; Mario F Fraga; Inmaculada Moreno-Gimeno; Deborah Burks; Maria del Carmen Plaza-Calonge; Juan C Rodríguez-Manzaneque; Pablo Menendez; Rosa Montes; Gustavo J Melen; Verónica Ramos-Mejia; Pedro J Real; Verónica Ayllón; Laura Sanchez; Gertrudis Ligero; Iván Gutierrez-Aranda

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-AF4 fusion gene is a hallmark genomic aberration in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in inants.Although it is well established that MLL-AF4 arises prenatally during human development,its effects on hematopoieric development in utero remain unexplored.We have created a human-specific cellular system to study early hemato-endothelial development in MLL-AF4-expressing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Functional studies,clonal analysis and gene expression profiling reveal that expression of MLL-AF4 in hESCs has a phenotypic,functional and gene expression impact.MLL-AF4 acts as a global transcriptional activator and a positive regulator of homeobox gene expression in hESCs.Functionally,MLL-AF4 enhances the specification of hemogenic precursors from hESCs but strongly impairs further hematopoietic commitment in favor of an endothelial cell fate.MLL-AF4 hESCs are transcriptionally primed to differentiate towards hemogenic precursors prone to endothelial maturation,as reflected by the marked upregulation of master genes associated to vascular-endothelial functions and early hematopoiesis.Furthermore,we report that MLL-AF4 expression is not sufficient to transform hESC-derived hematopoietic cells.This work illustrates how hESCs may provide unique insights into human development and further our understanding of how leukemic fusion genes,known to arise prenatally,regulate human embryonic hematopoietic specification.

  16. Genetic Transformation of Transcription Factor (35S-oshox4 Gene into Rice Genome and Transformant Analysis of hpt Gene by PCR and Hygromycin Resistance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INEZ HORTENZE SLAMET-LOEDIN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Global warming, climate change and crop extensification in marginal dryland areas are related to long dry season and water deficit. The water availability is an important factor in improving plant production. Application of drought tolerant rice cultivars is one of several options that might be used. Genetic engineering at the level of transcription factors is particularly promising strategy to develop drought tolerant rice varieties. Transcription factors regulate a wide range of target genes in which of them contribute to stress tolerance. HD Zip genes are transcription factor that potential in the adaptation of plants to some environment stresses including water deficit. HD-ZIP oshox4 (oryza sativa homeobox gene controlled by 35S promotor is inserted into pCAMBIA 1300 vector with hpt (hygromycin gene as a selectable marker. The aim of this research is to obtain transgenic rice plant from transformation with 35S-oshox4 plasmid, segregation analysis of marker gene (hpt by PCR method at T0 and T1 generation, and hygromycin resistance analysis of seeds. Recombinant plasmid was transformed into rice genome of IRAT 112 and rojolele cultivars using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The results showed that transformation efficiency of IRAT 112 is 5.7-13.6% and 26-66,7% for rojolele. While regeneration efficiency for IRAT 112 is 4.7-43.7% and 23-44.1% for rojolele. The result of hygromycin resistance test at T1 seeds were obtained 14 lines cv. rojolele segregation Mendelian for hpt gene. The PCR analysis using specific primers for hpt gene at the parent (T0 from 14 lines showed that 7 lines contain the gene. At the second generation (T1, PCR analysis using hpt primers showed that 3 from 4 lines were followed Mendelian segregation pattern by the presence of specific band.

  17. Immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honjo, T. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Alt, F.W. (Columbia Univ., Dobbs Ferry, NY (USA). Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK))

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of WOX Gene Family in Rice,Sorghum,Maize,Arabidopsis and Poplar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Jie Zong; Jianhua Liu; Jinyuan Yin; Dabing Zhang

    2010-01-01

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox(WOX)genes form a large gene family specifically expressed in plants.They are known to play important roles in regulating the development of plant tissues and organs by determining cell fate.Recent available whole genome sequences allow us to do more comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the WOX genes in plants.In the present study,we identified 11 and 21 WOXs from sorghum(Sorghum bicolor)and maize(Zea mays),respectively.The 72 WOX genes from rice(Oryza sativa),sorghum,maize,Arabidopsis(Arabidopsis thaliana)and poplar(Populus trichocarpa)were grouped into three well supported clades with nine subgroups according to the amino acid sequences of their homodomains.Their phylogenetic relationship was also supported by the observation of the motifs outside the homodomain.We observed the variation of duplication events among the nine sub-groups between monocots and eudicots,for instance,more gene duplication events of WOXs within subgroup A for monocots,while,less for dicots in this subgroup.Furthermore,we observed the conserved intron/exon structural patterns of WOX genes in rice,sorghum and Arabidopsis.In addition,WUS(Wuschel)-box and EAR(the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression)-like motif were observed to be conserved among several WOX subgroups in these five plants.Comparative analysis of expression patterns of WOX genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggest that the WOX genes play conserved and various roles in plants.This work provides insights into the evolution of the WOX gene family and is useful for future research.

  19. Identification of regeneration-associated genes after central and peripheral nerve injury in the adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Gary A

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that neurons of the peripheral nervous system have the capacity to regenerate a severed axon leading to functional recovery, whereas neurons of the central nervous system do not regenerate successfully after injury. The underlying molecular programs initiated by axotomized peripheral and central nervous system neurons are not yet fully understood. Results To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration in the nervous system, differential display polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify differentially expressed genes following axotomy of peripheral and central nerve fibers. For this purpose, axotomy induced changes of regenerating facial nucleus neurons, and non-regenerating red nucleus and Clarke's nucleus neurons have been analyzed in an intra-animal side-to-side comparison. One hundred and thirty five gene fragments have been isolated, of which 69 correspond to known genes encoding for a number of different functional classes of proteins such as transcription factors, signaling molecules, homeobox-genes, receptors and proteins involved in metabolism. Sixty gene fragments correspond to genomic mouse sequences without known function. In situ-hybridization has been used to confirm differential expression and to analyze the cellular localization of these gene fragments. Twenty one genes (~15% have been demonstrated to be differentially expressed. Conclusions The detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes in different lesion paradigms provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and may lead to the identification of genes which play key roles in functional repair of central nervous tissues.

  20. ARX基因突变及相关疾病的研究进展%Research progress on ARX gene mutations and related diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱小妹; 王艺

    2012-01-01

    ARX(aristaless- related homeobox)基因位于人类X染色体短臂(Xp22.13),包含5个外显子,其编码的蛋白质(ARX蛋白)含有562个氨基酸,该蛋白质为转录调节因子,调节大脑的发育.ARX基因突变与多种疾病相联系,如X连锁婴儿痉挛症、X连锁的肌阵挛性癫痫伴随强直状态和智力障碍、X连锁的非特异性精神发育迟滞、早期婴儿肌阵挛脑病、Partington综合征、Proud综合征等.目前国外已有大量关于ARX基因突变及相关疾病的病例报道和研究.此文将对ARX基因突变及相关疾病的研究进展作一综述.%ARX (aristaless- related homeobox ) gene is located on the short arm of the human X chromosome (Xp22.13 ).It contains five exons and encodes ARX protein,which contains 562 amino acids and regulates the brain development as a protein transcription factor.ARX gene mutations are associated with many diseases,such as X-linked Infantile Spasms Syndrome,X-linked myoclonic epilepsy with spasticity and intellectual disability,non-specific X-linked mental retardation,early infantile myoclonic encephalopathy,Partington syndrome,Proud syndrome,and hydranencephaly with ambiguous genitalia,etc.Currently there are a large number of case reports and studies on the ARX gene mutation and its related

  1. TG-interacting Factor (TGIF) Downregulates SOX3 Gene Expression in the NT2/D1 Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marija Mojsin; Jelena Popovic; Natasa Kovacevic Gruiicic; Milena Stevanovic

    2012-01-01

    SOX3 is a member of the Sox gene family implicated in brain formation and cognitive function.It is considered to be one of the earliest neural markers in vertebrates,playing a role in specifying neuronal fate.Recently,we have established the first link between TALE (threeamino-acid loop extension) proteins,PBX1 (pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox 1) and MEIS1 (myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1homologue),and the expression of the human SOX3 gene.Here we present the evidence that TGIF (TG-interacting factor) is an additional TALE superfamily member involved in the regulation of human SOX3 gene expression in NT2/D1 cells by direct interaction with the consensus binding site that is conserved in primate orthologue promoters.Functional analysis demonstrated that mutation of the TGIF binding site resulted in the activation of SOX3 promoter.TGIF overexpression downregulates SOX3 promoter activity and decreases endogenous SOX3 protein expression in both uninduced and refinoic acid (RA)-induced NT2/D1 cells.Up to now,this is the first transcription factor identified as a negative regulator of SOX3 gene expression.The obtained results further underscore the significance of TALE proteins as important transcriptional regulators of SOX3 gene expression.

  2. Involvement of hormones and KNOXI genes in early Arabidopsis seedling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucek, Premysl; Klíma, Petr; Reková, Alena; Brzobohatý, Bretislav

    2007-01-01

    Plant hormones control plant development by modulating the expression of regulatory genes, including homeobox-containing KNOXI genes. However, much remains to be elucidated about the interactions involved. Therefore, hormonal regulation of KNOXI gene expression was investigated using hormone applications and an inducible transgenic ipt expression system to increase endogenous cytokinin (CK) levels. Treatments with auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, ethylene, and gibberellin (GA) did not result in ectopic expression of the BP (BREVIPEDICELLUS) gene. However, BP expression was strongly reduced by ABA, increased by auxin treatment (correlating with the initiation of lateral root meristems, which strongly express BP), and did not significantly respond to short-term treatments with the other hormones in whole seedlings. Following short-term ipt activation, organ-specific differential regulation of KNOXI gene expression was observed. While several KNOXI genes were transiently up-regulated to low levels, STM was selectively repressed (especially at low light) in hypocotyls. In cotyledons, activation of CK-responsive genes preceded ipt induction, suggesting that CKs are transported more rapidly than the inducing agent (dexamethasone). Long-term increases in CK levels induced raised levels of several KNOXI transcripts in hypocotyls, correlating with the radial expansion of vascular tissues, the main domains of KNOXI gene expression, suggesting that CKs had little effect on KNOXI promoter activity. No alterations in hormone sensitivity were observed in a bp null mutant. Constitutive BP overexpression caused reductions in the length and number of lateral roots, while the primary root remained unaffected. The transgenic seedlings displayed weak, but significant, alterations in sensitivity to ABA, CK, and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. PMID:17951601

  3. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 μg of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research highlights: → Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. → The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. → The results could potentially be used

  4. MSX1 gene and nonsyndromic oral clefts in a Southern Brazilian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonsyndromic oral clefts (NSOC) are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans. The etiology of NSOC is complex, involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several genes that play a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis have been associated with clefting. For example, variations in the homeobox gene family member MSX1, including a CA repeat located within its single intron, may play a role in clefting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MSX1 CA repeat polymorphism and NSOC in a Southern Brazilian population using a case-parent triad design. We studied 182 nuclear families with NSOC recruited from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in Southern Brazil. The polymorphic region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by using an automated sequencer. Among the 182 families studied, four different alleles were observed, at frequencies of 0.057 (175 bp), 0.169 (173 bp), 0.096 (171 bp) and 0.67 (169 bp). A transmission disequilibrium test with a family-based association test (FBAT) software program was used for analysis. FBAT analysis showed overtransmission of the 169 bp allele in NSOC (P=0.0005). These results suggest that the CA repeat polymorphism of the MSX1 gene may play a role in risk of NSOC in populations from Southern Brazil

  5. MSX1 gene and nonsyndromic oral clefts in a Southern Brazilian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.T. [Laboratório de Medicina Genômica, Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduaçãoo em Saúde da Criança e do Adolescente, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kowalski, T.W. [Laboratório de Medicina Genômica, Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Collares, M.V.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Cirurgia, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, Departamento de Cirurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Félix, T.M. [Laboratório de Medicina Genômica, Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduaçãoo em Saúde da Criança e do Adolescente, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Serviço de Genética Médica, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, Serviço de Genética Médica, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-10

    Nonsyndromic oral clefts (NSOC) are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans. The etiology of NSOC is complex, involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several genes that play a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis have been associated with clefting. For example, variations in the homeobox gene family member MSX1, including a CA repeat located within its single intron, may play a role in clefting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MSX1 CA repeat polymorphism and NSOC in a Southern Brazilian population using a case-parent triad design. We studied 182 nuclear families with NSOC recruited from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in Southern Brazil. The polymorphic region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by using an automated sequencer. Among the 182 families studied, four different alleles were observed, at frequencies of 0.057 (175 bp), 0.169 (173 bp), 0.096 (171 bp) and 0.67 (169 bp). A transmission disequilibrium test with a family-based association test (FBAT) software program was used for analysis. FBAT analysis showed overtransmission of the 169 bp allele in NSOC (P=0.0005). These results suggest that the CA repeat polymorphism of the MSX1 gene may play a role in risk of NSOC in populations from Southern Brazil.

  6. MSX1 gene and nonsyndromic oral clefts in a Southern Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.T. Souza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic oral clefts (NSOC are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans. The etiology of NSOC is complex, involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several genes that play a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis have been associated with clefting. For example, variations in the homeobox gene family member MSX1, including a CA repeat located within its single intron, may play a role in clefting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MSX1 CA repeat polymorphism and NSOC in a Southern Brazilian population using a case-parent triad design. We studied 182 nuclear families with NSOC recruited from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in Southern Brazil. The polymorphic region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by using an automated sequencer. Among the 182 families studied, four different alleles were observed, at frequencies of 0.057 (175 bp, 0.169 (173 bp, 0.096 (171 bp and 0.67 (169 bp. A transmission disequilibrium test with a family-based association test (FBAT software program was used for analysis. FBAT analysis showed overtransmission of the 169 bp allele in NSOC (P=0.0005. These results suggest that the CA repeat polymorphism of the MSX1 gene may play a role in risk of NSOC in populations from Southern Brazil.

  7. Hypoxanthine deregulates genes involved in early neuronal development. Implications in Lesch-Nyhan disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, R J; Puig, J G

    2015-11-01

    Neurological manifestations in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) are attributed to the effect of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency on the nervous system development. HPRT deficiency causes the excretion of increased amounts of hypoxanthine into the extracellular medium and we hypothesized that HPRT deficiency related to hypoxanthine excess may then lead, directly or indirectly, to transcriptional aberrations in a variety of genes essential for the function and development of striatal progenitor cells. We have examined the effect of hypoxanthine excess on the differentiation of neurons in the well-established human NTERA-2 cl.D1 (NT2/D1) embryonic carcinoma neurogenesis model. NT2/D1 cells differentiate along neuroectodermal lineages after exposure to retinoic acid (RA). Hypoxanthine effects on RA-differentiation were examined by the changes on the expression of various transcription factor genes essential to neuronal differentiation and by the changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine, adenosine and serotonin receptors (DRD, ADORA, HTR). We report that hypoxanthine excess deregulate WNT4, from Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and engrailed homeobox 1 gene and increased TH and dopamine DRD1, adenosine ADORA2A and serotonin HTR7 receptors, whose over expression characterize early neuro-developmental processes. PMID:25940910

  8. TALE homeodomain proteins regulate site-specific terminal differentiation, LCE genes and epidermal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ben; Brown, Stuart J; Avilion, Ariel A; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Sully, Katherine; Akinduro, Olufolake; Murphy, Mark; Cleary, Michael L; Byrne, Carolyn

    2011-05-15

    The epidermal barrier varies over the body surface to accommodate regional environmental stresses. Regional skin barrier variation is produced by site-dependent epidermal differentiation from common keratinocyte precursors and often manifests as site-specific skin disease or irritation. There is strong evidence for body-site-dependent dermal programming of epidermal differentiation in which the epidermis responds by altering expression of key barrier proteins, but the underlying mechanisms have not been defined. The LCE multigene cluster encodes barrier proteins that are differentially expressed over the body surface, and perturbation of LCE cluster expression is linked to the common regional skin disease psoriasis. LCE subclusters comprise genes expressed variably in either external barrier-forming epithelia (e.g. skin) or in internal epithelia with less stringent barriers (e.g. tongue). We demonstrate here that a complex of TALE homeobox transcription factors PBX1, PBX2 and Pknox (homologues of Drosophila Extradenticle and Homothorax) preferentially regulate external rather than internal LCE gene expression, competitively binding with SP1 and SP3. Perturbation of TALE protein expression in stratified squamous epithelia in mice produces external but not internal barrier abnormalities. We conclude that epidermal barrier genes, such as the LCE multigene cluster, are regulated by TALE homeodomain transcription factors to produce regional epidermal barriers.

  9. Identification of novel SHOX target genes in the developing limb using a transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja U Beiser

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the human short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX has been identified in several disorders characterized by reduced height and skeletal anomalies such as Turner syndrome, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and Langer mesomelic dysplasia as well as isolated short stature. SHOX acts as a transcription factor during limb development and is expressed in chondrocytes of the growth plates. Although highly conserved in vertebrates, rodents lack a SHOX orthologue. This offers the unique opportunity to analyze the effects of human SHOX expression in transgenic mice. We have generated a mouse expressing the human SHOXa cDNA under the control of a murine Col2a1 promoter and enhancer (Tg(Col2a1-SHOX. SHOX and marker gene expression as well as skeletal phenotypes were characterized in two transgenic lines. No significant skeletal anomalies were found in transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Quantitative and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that Tg(Col2a1-SHOX, however, affected extracellular matrix gene expression during early limb development, suggesting a role for SHOX in growth plate assembly and extracellular matrix composition during long bone development. For instance, we could show that the connective tissue growth factor gene Ctgf, a gene involved in chondrogenic and angiogenic differentiation, is transcriptionally regulated by SHOX in transgenic mice. This finding was confirmed in human NHDF and U2OS cells and chicken micromass culture, demonstrating the value of the SHOX-transgenic mouse for the characterization of SHOX-dependent genes and pathways in early limb development.

  10. Identification of novel SHOX target genes in the developing limb using a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiser, Katja U; Glaser, Anne; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Scholl, Isabell; Röth, Ralph; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Karperien, Marcel; Marchini, Antonio; Richter, Wiltrud; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the human short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) has been identified in several disorders characterized by reduced height and skeletal anomalies such as Turner syndrome, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and Langer mesomelic dysplasia as well as isolated short stature. SHOX acts as a transcription factor during limb development and is expressed in chondrocytes of the growth plates. Although highly conserved in vertebrates, rodents lack a SHOX orthologue. This offers the unique opportunity to analyze the effects of human SHOX expression in transgenic mice. We have generated a mouse expressing the human SHOXa cDNA under the control of a murine Col2a1 promoter and enhancer (Tg(Col2a1-SHOX)). SHOX and marker gene expression as well as skeletal phenotypes were characterized in two transgenic lines. No significant skeletal anomalies were found in transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Quantitative and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that Tg(Col2a1-SHOX), however, affected extracellular matrix gene expression during early limb development, suggesting a role for SHOX in growth plate assembly and extracellular matrix composition during long bone development. For instance, we could show that the connective tissue growth factor gene Ctgf, a gene involved in chondrogenic and angiogenic differentiation, is transcriptionally regulated by SHOX in transgenic mice. This finding was confirmed in human NHDF and U2OS cells and chicken micromass culture, demonstrating the value of the SHOX-transgenic mouse for the characterization of SHOX-dependent genes and pathways in early limb development. PMID:24887312

  11. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2016-06-21

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4 This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  12. Adenoviral delivery of the EMX2 gene suppresses growth in human gastric cancer.

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    Jie Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EMX2 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila empty spiracles homeobox gene that has been implicated in embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest possible involvement of EMX2 in human cancers; however, the role of EMX2 in carcinogenesis needs further exploration. RESULTS: In this study, we reported that down-regulation of EMX2 expression was significantly correlated with EMX2 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. Restoring EMX2 expression using an adenovirus delivery system in gastric cancer cell lines lacking endogenous EMX2 expression led to inhibition of cell proliferation and Wnt signaling pathway both in vitro and in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo. In addition, we observed that animals treated with the adenoviral EMX2 expression vector had significantly better survival than those treated with empty adenoviral vector. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that EMX2 is a putative tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer. The adenoviral-EMX2 may have potential as a novel gene therapy for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

  13. Adenoviral Delivery of the EMX2 Gene Suppresses Growth in Human Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Mo, Minli; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Zhe; Sheng, Qing; Mu, Hang; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Li, Hui; He, Biao; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2012-01-01

    Background EMX2 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila empty spiracles homeobox gene that has been implicated in embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest possible involvement of EMX2 in human cancers; however, the role of EMX2 in carcinogenesis needs further exploration. Results In this study, we reported that down-regulation of EMX2 expression was significantly correlated with EMX2 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. Restoring EMX2 expression using an adenovirus delivery system in gastric cancer cell lines lacking endogenous EMX2 expression led to inhibition of cell proliferation and Wnt signaling pathway both in vitro and in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo. In addition, we observed that animals treated with the adenoviral EMX2 expression vector had significantly better survival than those treated with empty adenoviral vector. Conclusion Our study suggests that EMX2 is a putative tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer. The adenoviral-EMX2 may have potential as a novel gene therapy for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:23029345

  14. Characterisation of the promoter region of the zebrafish six7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivenes, O; Seo, H C; Fjose, A

    2000-04-25

    The Drosophila homeobox gene sine oculis and its murine homologue Six3 have both been shown to have regulatory functions in eye and brain development. In zebrafish, three Six3-related genes with conserved expression during early eye and head formation have been identified. One of these, six7, is first expressed at the gastrula stage in the involuting axial mesoderm, and later in the overlying neuroectoderm from which the forebrain and optic primordium develop. To elucidate the mechanisms regulating six7 expression, we isolated a 2.7-kb fragment of the 5'-flanking region. Three sequentially deleted fragments of this upstream region were used to produce GFP reporter constructs for analysis of tissue-specific expression in zebrafish embryos. The results show that a 625-bp upstream fragment is sufficient to direct strong expression of the reporter during gastrulation and early neurulation. The proximal part of the promoter contains binding sites for various constitutive transcription factors and an additional upstream element that was shown to be critical in directing expression to the anterior region of the zebrafish brain.

  15. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn2+ or Cd2+. We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  16. Pdx-1 or Pdx-1-VP16 protein transduction induces β-cell gene expression in liver-stem WB cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubreil Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx-1 or Pdx-1-VP16 gene transfer has been shown to induce in vitro rat liver-stem WB cell conversion into pancreatic endocrine precursor cells. High glucose conditions were necessary for further differentiation into functional insulin-producing cells. Pdx-1 has the ability to permeate different cell types due to an inherent protein transduction domain (PTD. In this study, we evaluated liver-to-pancreas conversion of WB cells following Pdx-1 or Pdx-1-VP16 protein transduction. Findings WB cells were grown in high glucose medium containing Pdx-1 or Pdx-1-VP16 recombinant proteins for two weeks. β-like cell commitment was analysed by RT-PCR of pancreatic endocrine genes. We found that WB cells in high glucose culture spontaneously express pancreatic endocrine genes (Pdx-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Kir6.2. Their further differentiation into β-like cells expressing genes related to endocrine pancreas development (Ngn3, NeuroD, Pax4, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pdx-1 and β-cell function (Glut-2, Kir6.2, insulin was achieved only in the presence of Pdx-1(-VP16 protein. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Pdx-1(-VP16 protein transduction is instrumental for in vitro liver-to-pancreas conversion and is an alternative to gene therapy for β-cell engineering for diabetes cell therapy.

  17. Comprehensive Identification of Sexual Dimorphism-Associated Differentially Expressed Genes in Two-Way Factorial Designed RNA-Seq Data on Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica.

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    Kelsey Caetano-Anolles

    Full Text Available Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica reach sexual maturity earlier, breed rapidly and successfully, and cost less and require less space than other birds raised commercially. Given the value of this species for food production and experimental use, more studies are necessary to determine chromosomal regions and genes associated with gender and breed-differentiation. This study employed Trinity and edgeR for transcriptome analysis of next-generation RNA-seq data, which included 4 tissues obtained from 3 different breeding lines of Japanese quail (random bred control, heavy weight, low weight. Differentially expressed genes shared between female and male tissue contrast groups were analyzed to identify genes related to sexual dimorphism as well as potential novel candidate genes for molecular sexing. Several of the genes identified in the present study as significant sex-related genes have been previously found in avian gene expression analyses (NIPBL, UBAP2, and other genes found differentially expressed in this study and not previously associated with sex-related differences may be considered potential candidates for molecular sexing (TERA, MYP0, PPR17, CASQ2. Additionally, other genes likely associated with neuronal and brain development (CHKA, NYAP, as well as body development and size differentiation (ANKRD26, GRP87 in quail were identified. Expression of homeobox protein regulating genes (HXC4, ISL1 shared between our two sex-related contrast groups (Female Brain vs. Male Brain and Ovary vs. Testis indicates that these genes may regulate sex-specific anatomical development. Results reveal genetic features of the quail breed and could allow for more effective molecular sexing as well as selective breeding for traits important in commercial production.

  18. Otx2 gene deletion in adult mouse retina induces rapid RPE dystrophy and slow photoreceptor degeneration.

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    Francis Béby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many developmental genes are still active in specific tissues after development is completed. This is the case for the homeobox gene Otx2, an essential actor of forebrain and head development. In adult mouse, Otx2 is strongly expressed in the retina. Mutations of this gene in humans have been linked to severe ocular malformation and retinal diseases. It is, therefore, important to explore its post-developmental functions. In the mature retina, Otx2 is expressed in three cell types: bipolar and photoreceptor cells that belong to the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, a neighbour structure that forms a tightly interdependent functional unit together with photoreceptor cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conditional self-knockout was used to address the late functions of Otx2 gene in adult mice. This strategy is based on the combination of a knock-in CreERT2 allele and a floxed allele at the Otx2 locus. Time-controlled injection of tamoxifen activates the recombinase only in Otx2 expressing cells, resulting in selective ablation of the gene in its entire domain of expression. In the adult retina, loss of Otx2 protein causes slow degeneration of photoreceptor cells. By contrast, dramatic changes of RPE activity rapidly occur, which may represent a primary cause of photoreceptor disease. CONCLUSIONS: Our novel mouse model uncovers new Otx2 functions in adult retina. We show that this transcription factor is necessary for long-term maintenance of photoreceptors, likely through the control of specific activities of the RPE.

  19. Transcriptional factor DLX3 promotes the gene expression of enamel matrix proteins during amelogenesis.

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    Zhichun Zhang

    Full Text Available Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3 is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease.

  20. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  1. Antenatal maternal long-term hypoxia: acclimatization responses with altered gene expression in ovine fetal carotid arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Goyal

    Full Text Available In humans and other species, long-term hypoxia (LTH during pregnancy can lead to intrauterine growth restriction with reduced body/brain weight, dysregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF, and other problems. To identify the signal transduction pathways and critical molecules, which may be involved in acclimatization to high altitude LTH, we conducted microarray with advanced bioinformatic analysis on carotid arteries (CA from the normoxic near-term ovine fetus at sea-level and those acclimatized to high altitude for 110+ days during gestation. In response to LTH acclimatization, in fetal CA we identified mRNA from 38 genes upregulated >2 fold (P2-fold (P<0.05. The major genes with upregulated mRNA were SLC1A3, Insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding protein 3, IGF type 2 receptor, transforming growth factor (TGF Beta-3, and genes involved in the AKT and BCL2 signal transduction networks. Most genes with upregulated mRNA have a common motif for Pbx/Knotted homeobox in the promoter region, and Sox family binding sites in the 3' un translated region (UTR. Genes with downregulated mRNA included those involved in the P53 pathway and 5-lipoxygenase activating proteins. The promoter region of all genes with downregulated mRNA, had a common 49 bp region with a binding site for DOT6 and TOD6, components of the RPD3 histone deacetylase complex RPD3C(L. We also identified miRNA complementary to a number of the altered genes. Thus, the present study identified molecules in the ovine fetus, which may play a role in the acclimatization response to high-altitude associated LTH.

  2. Pdx1 inactivation restricted to the intestinal epithelium in mice alters duodenal gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin; Fang, Rixun; Davis, Corrine; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Null mutant mice lacking the transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) are apancreatic and survive only a few days after birth. The role of Pdx1 in regulating intestinal gene expression has therefore yet to be determined in viable mice with normal pancreatic development. We hypothesized that conditional inactivation of Pdx1 restricted to the intestinal epithelium would alter intestinal gene expression and cell differentiation. Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice with intestine-specific Pdx1 inactivation were generated by crossing a transgenic mouse strain expressing Cre recombinase, driven by a mouse villin 1 gene promoter fragment, with a mutant mouse strain homozygous for loxP site-flanked Pdx1. Pdx1 protein is undetectable in all epithelial cells in the intestinal epithelium of Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice. Goblet cell number and mRNA abundance for mucin 3 and mucin 13 genes in the proximal small intestine are comparable between Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre and control mice. Similarly, Paneth cell number and expression of Paneth cell-related genes Defa1, Defcr-rs1, and Mmp7 in the proximal small intestine remain statistically unchanged by Pdx1 inactivation. Although the number of enteroendocrine cells expressing chromogranin A/B, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip), or somatostatin (Sst) is unaffected in the Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice, mRNA abundance for Gip and Sst is significantly reduced in the proximal small intestine. Conditional Pdx1 inactivation attenuates intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity in the duodenal epithelium, consistent with an average 91% decrease in expression of the mouse enterocyte IAP gene, alkaline phosphatase 3 (a novel Pdx1 target candidate), in the proximal small intestine following Pdx1 inactivation. We conclude that Pdx1 is necessary for patterning appropriate gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells of the proximal small intestine. PMID:19808654

  3. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  4. Gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mota Biosca, Anna

    1992-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases.

  5. Evolution of the Hox gene complex from an evolutionary ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Walter J; Kloter, Urs; Suga, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we consider the question of how the ordered clusters of Hox genes arose during evolution. Since ordered Hox clusters are found in all major superphyla, we have to assume that the Hox clusters arose before the Cambrian "explosion" giving rise to all of these taxa. Based on his studies of the bithorax complex (BX-C) in Drosophila Lewis considered the ground state to be the mesothoracic segment (T2) since the deletion of all of the genes of the BX-C leads to a transformation of all segments from T3 to A8/9 (the last abdominal segment) into T2 segments. We define the developmental ground state genetically, by assuming that loss-of-function mutants lead to transformations toward the ground state, whereas gain-of-function mutants lead to homeotic transformations away from the ground state. By this definition, T2 also represents the developmental ground state, if one includes the anterior genes, that is, those of the Antennapedia complex. We have reconstructed the evolution of the Hox cluster on the basis of known genetic mechanisms which involve unequal crossover and lead from an urhox gene, first to an anterior and a posterior gene and subsequently to intermediate genes which are progressively inserted, between the anterior and posterior genes. These intermediate genes are recombinant due to unequal crossover, whereas the anterior and posterior genes are not affected and therefore had the longest time to diverge from the urhox gene. The molecular phylogenetic analysis strongly supports this model. We consider the ground state to be both developmental and evolutionary and to represent the prototypic body segment. It corresponds to T2 and is specified by Antennapedia or Hox6, respectively. Experiments in the mouse also suggest that the ground state is a thoracic segment. Evolution leads from the prototypic segment to segmental divergence in both the anterior and posterior direction. The most anterior head and tail segments are specified by homeobox genes

  6. [Language gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The human capacity for acquiring speech and language must derive, at least in part, from the genome. Recent advance in the field of molecular genetics finally discovered 'Language Gene'. Disruption of FOXP2 gene, the firstly identified 'language gene' causes severe speech and language disorder. To elucidate the anatomical basis of language processing in the brain, we examined the expression pattern of FOXP2/Foxp2 genes in the monkey and rat brains through development. We found the preferential expression of FOXP2/Foxp2 in the striosomal compartment of the developing striatum. Thus, we suggest the striatum, particularly striosomal system may participate in neural information processing for language and speech. Our suggestion is consistent with the declarative/ procedural model of language proposed by Ullman (1997, 2001), which the procedural memory-dependent mental grammar is rooted in the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and the declarative memory-dependent mental lexicon is rooted in the temporal lobe. PMID:17432197

  7. Endocrine disrupting chemical, bisphenol-A, induces breast cancer associated gene HOXB9 expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Paromita; Bhan, Arunoday; Hussain, Imran; Ansari, Khairul I; Bobzean, Samara A; Pandita, Tej K; Perrotti, Linda I; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2016-09-30

    HOXB9 is a homeobox-containing gene that plays a key role in mammary gland development and is associated with breast and other types of cancer. Here, we demonstrate that HOXB9 expression is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol (E2), in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) induces HOXB9 expression in cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF7) as well as in vivo in the mammary glands of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Luciferase assay showed that estrogen-response-elements (EREs) in the HOXB9 promoter are required for BPA-induced expression. Estrogen-receptors (ERs) and ER-co-regulators such as MLL-histone methylase (MLL3), histone acetylases, CBP/P300, bind to the HOXB9 promoter EREs in the presence of BPA, modify chromatin (histone methylation and acetylation) and lead to gene activation. In summary, our results demonstrate that BPA exposure, like estradiol, increases HOXB9 expression in breast cells both in vitro and in vivo through a mechanism that involves increased recruitment of transcription and chromatin modification factors. PMID:27182052

  8. Genome-wide identification, classification and analysis of HD-ZIP gene family in citrus, and its potential roles in somatic embryogenesis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Chai, Li-Jun; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2015-12-10

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factors, which belong to a class of Homeobox proteins, has been reported to be involved in different biological processes of plants, including growth and development, photomorphogenesis, flowering, fruit ripening and adaptation responses to environmental stresses. In this study, 27 HD-Zip genes (CsHBs) were identified in Citrus. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and characteristics of individual gene or protein, the HD-Zip gene family in Citrus can be classified into 4 subfamilies, i.e. HD-Zip I, HD-Zip II, HD-Zip III, and HD-Zip IV containing 16, 2, 4, and 5 members respectively. The digital expression patterns of 27 HD-Zip genes were analyzed in the callus, flower, leaf and fruit of Citrus sinensis. The qRT-PCR and RT-PCR analyses of six selected HD-Zip genes were performed in six citrus cultivars with different embryogenic competence and in the embryo induction stages, which revealed that these genes were differentially expressed and might be involved in citrus somatic embryogenesis (SE). The results exhibited that the expression of CsHB1 was up-regulated in somatic embryo induction process, and its expression was higher in citrus cultivars with high embryogenic capacity than in cultivars recalcitrant to form somatic embryos. Moreover, a microsatellite site of three nucleotide repeats was found in CsHB1 gene among eighteen citrus genotypes, indicating the possible association of CsHB1 gene to the capacity of callus induction.

  9. Genome-wide identification, classification and analysis of HD-ZIP gene family in citrus, and its potential roles in somatic embryogenesis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Chai, Li-Jun; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2015-12-10

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factors, which belong to a class of Homeobox proteins, has been reported to be involved in different biological processes of plants, including growth and development, photomorphogenesis, flowering, fruit ripening and adaptation responses to environmental stresses. In this study, 27 HD-Zip genes (CsHBs) were identified in Citrus. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and characteristics of individual gene or protein, the HD-Zip gene family in Citrus can be classified into 4 subfamilies, i.e. HD-Zip I, HD-Zip II, HD-Zip III, and HD-Zip IV containing 16, 2, 4, and 5 members respectively. The digital expression patterns of 27 HD-Zip genes were analyzed in the callus, flower, leaf and fruit of Citrus sinensis. The qRT-PCR and RT-PCR analyses of six selected HD-Zip genes were performed in six citrus cultivars with different embryogenic competence and in the embryo induction stages, which revealed that these genes were differentially expressed and might be involved in citrus somatic embryogenesis (SE). The results exhibited that the expression of CsHB1 was up-regulated in somatic embryo induction process, and its expression was higher in citrus cultivars with high embryogenic capacity than in cultivars recalcitrant to form somatic embryos. Moreover, a microsatellite site of three nucleotide repeats was found in CsHB1 gene among eighteen citrus genotypes, indicating the possible association of CsHB1 gene to the capacity of callus induction. PMID:26232336

  10. WOX13-like genes are required for reprogramming of leaf and protoplast cells into stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Keiko; Reisewitz, Pascal; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Friedrich, Thomas; Ando, Sayuri; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Tamada, Yosuke; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kurata, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Masaki; Deguchi, Hironori; Rensing, Stefan A; Werr, Wolfgang; Murata, Takashi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Laux, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Many differentiated plant cells can dedifferentiate into stem cells, reflecting the remarkable developmental plasticity of plants. In the moss Physcomitrella patens, cells at the wound margin of detached leaves become reprogrammed into stem cells. Here, we report that two paralogous P. patens WUSCHEL-related homeobox 13-like (PpWOX13L) genes, homologs of stem cell regulators in flowering plants, are transiently upregulated and required for the initiation of cell growth during stem cell formation. Concordantly, Δppwox13l deletion mutants fail to upregulate genes encoding homologs of cell wall loosening factors during this process. During the moss life cycle, most of the Δppwox13l mutant zygotes fail to expand and initiate an apical stem cell to form the embryo. Our data show that PpWOX13L genes are required for the initiation of cell growth specifically during stem cell formation, in analogy to WOX stem cell functions in seed plants, but using a different cellular mechanism.

  11. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  12. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Two Mouse Models of Autism: Transcriptome Profiling of the BTBR and En2−/− Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Corradi, Zelia; Monsorno, Katia; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria L.; Bozzi, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Genomic studies identified common pathological processes underlying the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of ASD, and transcriptome analyses revealed that gene networks involved in synapse development, neuronal activity, and immune function are deregulated in ASD. Mouse models provide unique tools to investigate the neurobiological basis of ASD; however, a comprehensive approach to identify transcriptional abnormalities in different ASD models has never been performed. Here we used two well-recognized ASD mouse models, BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) and Engrailed-2 knockout (En2−/−), to identify conserved ASD-related molecular signatures. En2−/− mice bear a mutation within the EN2 transcription factor homeobox, while BTBR is an inbred strain with unknown genetic defects. Hippocampal RNA samples from BTBR, En2−/− and respective control (C57Bl/6J and En2+/+) adult mice were assessed for differential gene expression using microarrays. A total of 153 genes were similarly deregulated in the BTBR and En2−/− hippocampus. Mouse phenotype and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed on BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Pathways represented in both BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal DEGs included abnormal behavioral response and chemokine/MAP kinase signaling. Genes involved in abnormal function of the immune system and abnormal synaptic transmission/seizures were significantly represented among BTBR and En2−/− DEGs, respectively. Interestingly, both BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal DEGs showed a significant enrichment of ASD and schizophrenia (SCZ)-associated genes. Specific gene sets were enriched in the two models: microglial genes were significantly enriched among BTBR DEGs, whereas GABAergic/glutamatergic postsynaptic genes, FMRP-interacting genes and epilepsy-related genes were significantly enriched among En2

  13. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into insulin-producing cells promoted by Nkx2.2 gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Shiroi; Shigehiko Ueda; Yukiteru Ouji; Ko Saito; Kei Moriya; Yuko Sugie; Hiroshi Fukui; Shigeaki Ishizaka; Masahide Yoshikawa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a genetically altered embryonic stem (ES) cell line to generate insulin-producing cells in vitro following transfer of the Nkx2.2 gene.METHODS: Hamster Nkx2.2 genes were transferred into mouse ES cells. Parental and Nkx2.2-transfected ES cells were initiated toward differentiation in embryoid body (EB)culture for 5 d and the resulting EBs were transferred to an attached culture system. Dithizone (DTZ), a zincchelating agent known to selectively stain pancreatic beta cells, was used to detect insulin-producing cells.The outgrowths were incubated in DTZ solution (final concentration, 100 μg/mL) for 15 min before being examined microscopically. Gene expression of the endocrine pancreatic markers was also analyzed by RT-PCR. In addition, insulin production was determined immunohistochemically and its secretion was examined using an ELISA.RESULTS: DTZ-stained cellular clusters appeared after approximately 14 d in the culture of Nkx2.2-transfected ES cells (Nkx-ES cells), which was as much as 2 wk earlier, than those in the culture of parental ES cells (wt-ES). The frequency of DTZ-positive cells among total cultured cells on day 28 accounted for approximately 1.0% and 0.1% of the Nkx-ES- and wt-ES-derived EB outgrowths, respectively. The DTZ-positive cellular clusters were found to be immunoreactive to insulin, while the gene expressions of pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1(PDX1), proinsulin 1 and proinsulin 2 were observed in the cultures that contained DTZ-positive cellular clusters.Insulin secretion was also confirmed by ELISA, whereas glucose-dependent secretion was not demonstrated.CONCLUSION: Nkx2.2-transfected ES cells showed an ability to differentiate into insulin-producing cells.

  14. Overexpression of PaFT gene in the wild orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiarti, Endang; Mercuriani, Ixora S.; Rizal, Rinaldi; Slamet, Agus; Utami, Bekti S.; Bestari, Ida A.; Aziz-Purwantoro, Moeljopawiro, S.; Jang, Soenghoe; Machida, Y.; Machida, C.

    2015-09-01

    To shorten vegetative stage and induce transition from vegetative to reproductive stage in orchids, we overexpressed Phalaenopsis amabilis Flowering LocusT (PaFT) gene under the control of Ubiquitin promoter into protocorm of Indonesian Wild Orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume. The dynamic expression of vegetative gene Phalaenopsis Homeobox1 (POH1) and flowering time gene PaFT has been analyzed. Accumulation of mRNA was detected in shoot and leaves of both transgenic and non transgenic plants by using Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) with specific gene primers for POH1 and PaFT in 24 months old plants. To analyze the POH1 and PaFT genes, three pairs of degenerate primers PaFT degF1R1, F2R2 and F3R3 that amplified 531 bp PaFT cDNA were used. We detected 700 bp PaFTcDNA from leaves and shoots of transgenic plants, but not in NT plants. POH1 mRNA was detected in plants. PaFT protein consists of Phospatidyl Ethanolamine-Binding Protein (PEBP) in interval base 73-483 and CETS family protein at base 7-519, which are important motif for transmembrane protein. We inserted Ubipro::PaFT/pGAS101 into P. amabilis protocorm using Agrobacterium. Analysis of transgenic plants showed that PaFTmRNA was accumulated in leaves of 12 months after sowing, although it is not detected in non transgeic plants. Compare to the wild type (NT plants), ectopic expression of PaFT shows alter phenotype as follows: 31% normal, 19% with short-wavy leaves, 5% form rosette leaves and 45% produced multishoots. Analysis of protein profiles of trasgenic plants showed that a putative PaFT protein (MW 19,7 kDa) was produced in 1eaves and shoots.This means that at 12 months, POH1 gene expression gradually decreased/negatively regulated, the expression of PaFT gene was activated, although there is no flower initiation yet. Some environmental factors might play a role to induce inflorescens. This experiment is in progress.

  15. The nuclear transcription factor PKNOX2 is a candidate gene for substance dependence in European-origin women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    Full Text Available Substance dependence or addiction is a complex environmental and genetic disorder that results in serious health and socio-economic consequences. Multiple substance dependence categories together, rather than any one individual addiction outcome, may explain the genetic variability of such disorder. In our study, we defined a composite substance dependence phenotype derived from six individual diagnoses: addiction to nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, opiates or other drugs as a whole. Using data from several genomewide case-control studies, we identified a strong (Odds ratio  = 1.77 and significant (p-value = 7E-8 association signal with a novel gene, PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 2 (PKNOX2, on chromosome 11 with the composite phenotype in European-origin women. The association signal is not as significant when individual outcomes for addiction are considered, or in males or African-origin population. Our findings underscore the importance of considering multiple addiction types and the importance of considering population and gender stratification when analyzing data with heterogeneous population.

  16. Ascl1 is a required downstream effector of Gsx gene function in the embryonic mouse telencephalon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Zegary J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeobox gene Gsx2 (formerly Gsh2 is known to regulate patterning in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE of the embryonic telencephalon. In its absence, the closely related gene Gsx1 (previously known as Gsh1 can partially compensate in the patterning and differentiation of ventral telencephalic structures, such as the striatum. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this compensation remain unclear. Results We show here that in the Gsx2 mutants Gsx1 is expressed in only a subset of the ventral telencephalic progenitors that normally express Gsx2. Based on the similarities in the expression of Gsx1 and Ascl1 (Mash1 within the Gsx2 mutant LGE, we examined whether Ascl1 plays an integral part in the Gsx1-based recovery. Ascl1 mutants show only modest alterations in striatal development; however, in Gsx2;Ascl1 double mutants, striatal development is severely affected, similar to that seen in the Gsx1;Gsx2 double mutants. This is despite the fact that Gsx1 is expressed, and even expands, in the Gsx2;Ascl1 mutant LGE, comparable to that seen in the Gsx2 mutant. Finally, Notch signaling has recently been suggested to be required for normal striatal development. In spite of the fact that Notch signaling is severely disrupted in Ascl1 mutants, it actually appears to be improved in the Gsx2;Ascl1 double mutants. Conclusion These results, therefore, reveal a non-proneural requirement of Ascl1 that together with Gsx1 compensates for the loss of Gsx2 in a subset of LGE progenitors.

  17. Genome-wide copy number profiling using a 100K SNP array reveals novel disease-related genes BORIS and TSHZ1 in juvenile angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Bernhard; Wemmert, Silke; Willnecker, Vivienne; Dlugaiczyk, Julia; Nicolai, Piero; Siwiec, Henryk; Thiel, Christian T; Rauch, Anita; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-11-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma (JA) is a unique fibrovascular tumor, which is almost exclusively found in the posterior nasal cavity of adolescent males. Although histologically classified as benign, the tumor often shows an aggressive growth pattern and has been associated with chromosomal imbalances, amplification of oncogenes and epigenetic dysregulation. We present the first genome-wide profiling of JAs (n=14) with a 100K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Among the 30 novel JA-specific amplifications detected on autosomal chromosomes with this technique, the genes encoding the cancer-testis antigen BORIS (brother of the regulator of imprinted sites) and the developmental regulator protein TSHZ1 (teashirt zinc finger homeobox 1) were selected for further analysis. Gains for both BORIS (20q13.3) and TSHZ1 (18q22.3) were confirmed by quantitative genomic PCR. Furthermore, quantitative RT-PCR revealed a significant up-regulation of BORIS (ptool for identifying novel disease-related genes in JAs and newly implicates BORIS and TSHZ1 overexpression in the pathogenesis of JAs. Detection of BORIS in JAs is described with special regard to tumor proliferation and epigenetic dysregulation, and the finding of TSHZ1 amplifications is discussed with special respect to the hypothesis of JAs as malformations of the first branchial arch artery.

  18. Genes and Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diet Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode Genes and Psoriasis Genes hold the key to understanding ... is responsible for causing psoriatic disease. How do genes work? Genes control everything from height to eye ...

  19. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  20. INHIBITION OF ERN1 SIGNALING ENZYME AFFECTS HYPOXIC REGULATION OF THE EXPRESSION OF E2F8, EPAS1, HOXC6, ATF3, TBX3 AND FOXF1 GENES IN U87 GLIOMA CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchenko, O H; Tsymbal, D O; Minchenko, D O; Kovalevska, O V; Karbovskyi, L L; Bikfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress are important factors of malignant tumor growth and control of the expression of genes, which regulate numerous metabolic processes and cell proliferation. Furthermore, blockade of ERN1 (endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus 1) suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth. We studied the effect of hypoxia on the expression of genes encoding the transcription factors such as E2F8 (E2F transcription factor 8), EPAS1 (endothelial PAS domain protein 1), TBX3 (T-box 3), ATF3 (activating transcription factor 3), FOXF1 (forkhead box F), and HOXC6 (homeobox C6) in U87 glioma cells with and without ERN1 signaling enzyme function. We have established that hypoxia enhances the expression of HOXC6, E2F8, ATF3, and EPAS1 genes but does not change TBX3 and FOXF1 gene expression in glioma cells with ERNI function. At the same time, the expression level of all studied genes is strongly decreased, except for TBX3 gene, in glioma cells without ERN1 function. Moreover, the inhibition of ERN1 signaling enzyme function significantly modifies the effect of hypoxia on the expression of these transcription factor genes. removes or introduces this regulation as well as changes a direction or magnitude of hypoxic regulation. Present study demonstrates that fine-tuning of the expression of proliferation related genes depends upon hypoxia and ERN1-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling and correlates with slower proliferation rate of glioma cells without ERN1 function. PMID:26255341

  1. Defective Regulation of MicroRNA Target Genes in Myoblasts from Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Petr; Stankevicins, Luiza; Ansseau, Eugenie; Petrov, Andrei; Barat, Ana; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Lazar, Vladimir; Labourer, Emmanuel; Belayew, Alexandra; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder linked to the deletion of an integral number of 3.3-kb-long macrosatellite repeats (D4Z4) within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4q. Most genes identified in this region are overexpressed in FSHD myoblasts, including the double homeobox genes DUX4 and DUX4c. We have carried out a simultaneous miRNome/transcriptome analysis of FSHD and control primary myoblasts. Of 365 microRNAs (miRNAs) analyzed in this study, 29 were found to be differentially expressed between FSHD and normal myoblasts. Twenty-one microRNAs (miR-1, miR-7, miR-15a, miR-22, miR-30e, miR-32, miR-107, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-139, miR-152, miR-206, miR-223, miR-302b, miR-331, miR-362, miR-365, miR-382, miR-496, miR-532, miR-654, and miR-660) were up-regulated, and eight were down-regulated (miR-15b, miR-20b, miR-21, miR-25, miR-100, miR-155, miR-345, and miR-594). Twelve of the miRNAs up-regulated in FHSD were also up-regulated in the cells ectopically expressing DUX4c, suggesting that this gene could regulate miRNA gene transcription. The myogenic miRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 were highly expressed in FSHD myoblasts, which nonetheless did not prematurely enter myogenic differentiation. This could be accounted for by the fact that in FSHD myoblasts, functionally important target genes, including cell cycle, DNA damage, and ubiquitination-related genes, escape myogenic microRNA-induced repression. PMID:24145033

  2. Genome-wide association mapping and identification of candidate genes for the rumpless and ear-tufted traits of the Araucana chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorai, Rooksana E; Freese, Nowlan H; Wright, Lindsay M; Chapman, Susan C; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2012-01-01

    Araucana chickens are known for their rounded, tailless rumps and tufted ears. Inheritance studies have shown that the rumpless (Rp) and ear-tufted (Et) loci each act in an autosomal dominant fashion, segregate independently, and are associated with an increased rate of embryonic mortality. To find genomic regions associated with Rp and Et, we generated genome-wide SNP profiles for a diverse population of 60 Araucana chickens using the 60 K chicken SNP BeadChip. Genome-wide association studies using 40 rumpless and 11 tailed birds showed a strong association with rumpless on Gga 2 (P(raw) = 2.45×10(-10), P(genome) = 0.00575), and analysis of genotypes revealed a 2.14 Mb haplotype shared by all rumpless birds. Within this haplotype, a 0.74 Mb critical interval containing two Iroquois homeobox genes, Irx1 and Irx2, was unique to rumpless Araucana chickens. Irx1 and Irx2 are central for developmental prepatterning, but neither gene is known to have a role in mechanisms leading to caudal development. A second genome-wide association analysis using 30 ear-tufted and 28 non-tufted birds revealed an association with tufted on Gga 15 (P(raw) = 6.61×10(-7), P(genome) = 0.0981). We identified a 0.58 Mb haplotype common to tufted birds and harboring 7 genes. Because homozygosity for Et is nearly 100% lethal, we employed a heterozygosity mapping approach to prioritize candidate gene selection. A 60 kb region heterozygous in all Araucana chickens contains the complete coding sequence for TBX1 and partial sequence for GNB1L. TBX1 is an important transcriptional regulator of embryonic development and a key genetic determinant of human DiGeorge syndrome. Herein, we describe localization of Rp and Et and identification of positional candidate genes. PMID:22844420

  3. Genome-wide association mapping and identification of candidate genes for the rumpless and ear-tufted traits of the Araucana chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooksana E Noorai

    Full Text Available Araucana chickens are known for their rounded, tailless rumps and tufted ears. Inheritance studies have shown that the rumpless (Rp and ear-tufted (Et loci each act in an autosomal dominant fashion, segregate independently, and are associated with an increased rate of embryonic mortality. To find genomic regions associated with Rp and Et, we generated genome-wide SNP profiles for a diverse population of 60 Araucana chickens using the 60 K chicken SNP BeadChip. Genome-wide association studies using 40 rumpless and 11 tailed birds showed a strong association with rumpless on Gga 2 (P(raw = 2.45×10(-10, P(genome = 0.00575, and analysis of genotypes revealed a 2.14 Mb haplotype shared by all rumpless birds. Within this haplotype, a 0.74 Mb critical interval containing two Iroquois homeobox genes, Irx1 and Irx2, was unique to rumpless Araucana chickens. Irx1 and Irx2 are central for developmental prepatterning, but neither gene is known to have a role in mechanisms leading to caudal development. A second genome-wide association analysis using 30 ear-tufted and 28 non-tufted birds revealed an association with tufted on Gga 15 (P(raw = 6.61×10(-7, P(genome = 0.0981. We identified a 0.58 Mb haplotype common to tufted birds and harboring 7 genes. Because homozygosity for Et is nearly 100% lethal, we employed a heterozygosity mapping approach to prioritize candidate gene selection. A 60 kb region heterozygous in all Araucana chickens contains the complete coding sequence for TBX1 and partial sequence for GNB1L. TBX1 is an important transcriptional regulator of embryonic development and a key genetic determinant of human DiGeorge syndrome. Herein, we describe localization of Rp and Et and identification of positional candidate genes.

  4. KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

    2014-06-01

    The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs.

  5. Multicistronic lentiviral vectors containing the FMDV 2A cleavage factor demonstrate robust expression of encoded genes at limiting MOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margison Geoffrey P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of gene therapy applications would benefit from vectors capable of expressing multiple genes. In this study we explored the feasibility and efficiency of expressing two or three transgenes in HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. Bicistronic and tricistronic self-inactivating lentiviral vectors were constructed employing the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and/or foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV cleavage factor 2A. We employed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT, and homeobox transcription factor HOXB4 as model genes and their expression was detected by appropriate methods including fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, biochemical assay, and western blotting. Results All the multigene vectors produced high titer virus and were able to simultaneously express two or three transgenes in transduced cells. However, the level of expression of individual transgenes varied depending on: the transgene itself; its position within the construct; the total number of transgenes expressed; the strategy used for multigene expression and the average copy number of pro-viral insertions. Notably, at limiting MOI, the expression of eGFP in a bicistronic vector based on 2A was ~4 times greater than that of an IRES based vector. Conclusion The small and efficient 2A sequence can be used alone or in combination with an IRES for the construction of multicistronic lentiviral vectors which can express encoded transgenes at functionally relevant levels in cells containing an average of one pro-viral insert.

  6. Deficiency of Prdm13, a dorsomedial hypothalamus-enriched gene, mimics age-associated changes in sleep quality and adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Akiko; Brace, Cynthia S; Rensing, Nick; Imai, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) controls a number of essential physiological responses. We have demonstrated that the DMH plays an important role in the regulation of mammalian aging and longevity. To further dissect the molecular basis of the DMH function, we conducted microarray-based gene expression profiling with total RNA from laser-microdissected hypothalamic nuclei and tried to find the genes highly and selectively expressed in the DMH. We found neuropeptide VF precursor (Npvf), PR domain containing 13 (Prdm13), and SK1 family transcriptional corepressor (Skor1) as DMH-enriched genes. Particularly, Prdm13, a member of the Prdm family of transcription regulators, was specifically expressed in the compact region of the DMH (DMC), where Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2-1) is predominantly expressed. The expression of Prdm13 in the hypothalamus increased under diet restriction, whereas it decreased during aging. Prdm13 expression also showed diurnal oscillation and was significantly upregulated in the DMH of long-lived BRASTO mice. The transcriptional activity of the Prdm13 promoter was upregulated by Nkx2-1, and knockdown of Nkx2-1 suppressed Prdm13 expression in primary hypothalamic neurons. Interestingly, DMH-specific Prdm13-knockdown mice showed significantly reduced wake time during the dark period and decreased sleep quality, which was defined by the quantity of electroencephalogram delta activity during NREM sleep. DMH-specific Prdm13-knockdown mice also exhibited progressive increases in body weight and adiposity. Our findings indicate that Prdm13/Nkx2-1-mediated signaling in the DMC declines with advanced age, leading to decreased sleep quality and increased adiposity, which mimic age-associated pathophysiology, and provides a potential link to DMH-mediated aging and longevity control in mammals.

  7. Transcriptomic events involved in melon mature-fruit abscission comprise the sequential induction of cell-wall degrading genes coupled to a stimulation of endo and exocytosis.

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    Jorge Corbacho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mature-fruit abscission (MFA in fleshy-fruit is a genetically controlled process with mechanisms that, contrary to immature-fruit abscission, has not been fully characterized. Here, we use pyrosequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of melon abscission zone (AZ at three stages during AZ-cell separation in order to understand MFA control at an early stage of AZ-activation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results show that by early induction of MFA, the melon AZ exhibits major gene induction, while by late induction of MFA, melon AZ shows major gene repression. Although some genes displayed similar regulation in both early and late induction of abscission, such as EXT1-EXT4, EGase1, IAA2, ERF1, AP2D15, FLC, MADS2, ERAF17, SAP5 and SCL13 genes, the majority had different expression patterns. This implies that time-specific events occur during MFA, and emphasizes the value of characterizing multiple time-specific abscission transcriptomes. Analysis of gene-expression from these AZs reveal that a sequential induction of cell-wall-degrading genes is associated with the upregulation of genes involved in endo and exocytosis, and a shift in plant-hormone metabolism and signaling genes during MFA. This is accompanied by transcriptional activity of small-GTPases and synthaxins together with tubulins, dynamins, V-type ATPases and kinesin-like proteins potentially involved in MFA signaling. Early events are potentially controlled by down-regulation of MADS-box, AP2/ERF and Aux/IAA transcription-factors, and up-regulation of homeobox, zinc finger, bZIP, and WRKY transcription-factors, while late events may be controlled by up-regulation of MYB transcription-factors. SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, the data provide a comprehensive view on MFA in fleshy-fruit, identifying candidate genes and pathways associated with early induction of MFA. Our comprehensive gene-expression profile will be very useful for elucidating gene regulatory networks of the MFA in

  8. Gene gymnastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  9. Expression of wild-type PtrIAA14.1, a poplar Aux/IAA gene causes morphological changes in Arabidopsis

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    Shanda eLiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aux/IAA proteins are transcriptional repressors that control auxin signaling by interacting with Auxin Response Factors (ARFs. So far all of the identified Aux/IAA mutants with auxin-related phenotypes in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa are dominant gain-of-function mutants, with mutantions in Domain II that affected stability of the corresponding Aux/IAA proteins. On the other hand, morphological changes were observed in knock-down mutants of Aux/IAA genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, suggesting that functions of Aux/IAA proteins may be specific for certain plant species. We report here the characterization of PtrIAA14.1, a poplar (Populus trichocarpa homologue of IAA7. Bioinformatics analysis showed that PtrIAA14.1 is a classic Aux/IAA protein. It contains four conserved domains with the repressor motif in Domain I, the degron in Domain II, and the conserved amino acid signatures for protein-protein interactions in Domain III and Domain IV. Protoplast transfection assays showed that PtrIAA14.1 is localized in nucleus. It is unable in the presence of auxin, and it represses auxin response reporter gene expression. Expression of wild type PtrIAA14.1 in Arabidopsis resulted in auxin-related phenotypes including down-curling leaves, semi-draft with increased number of branches, and greatly reduced fertility, but expression of the Arabidopsis Aux/IAA genes tested remain largely unchanged in the transgenic plants. Protein-protein interaction assays in yeast and protoplasts showed that PtrIAA14.1 interacted with ARF5, but not other ARFs. Consistent with this observation, vascular patterning was altered in the transgenic plants, and the expression of AtHB8 (Arabidopsis thaliana Homeobox Gene 8 was reduced in transgenic plants.

  10. Topography of somatostatin gene expression relative to molecular progenitor domains during ontogeny of the mouse hypothalamus

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    Nicanor eMorales-Delgado

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus comprises alar, basal and floor plate developmental compartments. Recent molecular data support a rostro-caudal subdivision into rostral (terminal and caudal (peduncular halves. In this context, the distribution of neuronal populations expressing somatostatin (Sst mRNA was analyzed in the developing mouse hypothalamus, comparing with the expression pattern of the genes Orthopedia (Otp, Distal-less 5 (Dlx5, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2.1. At embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5, Sst mRNA was first detectable in the anterobasal nucleus, a Nkx2.1-, Shh- and Otp- positive basal domain. By E13.5, nascent Sst expression was also related to two additional Otp-positive domains within the alar plate and one in the basal plate. In the alar plate, Sst-positive cells were observed in rostral and caudal ventral subdomains of the Otp-positive paraventricular complex. An additional basal Sst-expressing cell group was found within a longitudinal Otp-positive periretromamillary band that separates the retromamillary area from tuberal areas. Apart of subsequent growth of these initial populations, at E13.5 and E15.5 some Sst-positive derivatives migrate tangentially into neighboring regions. A subset of cells produced at the anterobasal nucleus disperses ventralwards into the shell of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and the arcuate nucleus. Cells from the rostroventral paraventricular subdomain reach the suboptic nucleus, whereas a caudal contingent migrates radially into lateral paraventricular, perifornical and entopeduncular nuclei. Our data provide a topologic map of molecularly-defined progenitor areas originating a specific neuron type during early hypothalamic development. Identification of four main separate sources helps to understand causally its complex adult organization.

  11. Principles of gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  12. Organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, S; Brack, C; Hozumi, N; Pirrotta, V

    1978-01-01

    The nucleotide-sequence determination of a cloned, embryonic Vlambda gene directly demonstrated that V genes are separate from a corresponding C gene in embryonic cells. Analysis by restriction enzymes of total cellular DNA from various sources strongly suggested that the two separate immunoglobulin genes become continuous during differentiation of B lymphocytes. There seems to be a strict correlation between the joining event and activation of the joined genes. Cloning of more immunoglobulin genes from embryo and plasma cells will not only provide direct demonstration of such a gene-joining event but also help in the elucidation of a possible relationship of the event to gene activation mechanisms.

  13. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Hervé

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most

  14. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k+) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k+ gene expression where the H S V-1 t k+ gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([18 F]F H P G; [18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([123/131 I]I V R F U; [124/131I]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [123/131I]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k+ reporter gene will be presented

  15. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  16. Evolutionary variations in the expression of dorso-ventral patterning genes and the conservation of pioneer neurons in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffar, Lucia; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2015-04-01

    Insects are ideally suited for gaining insight into the evolutionary developmental mechanisms that have led to adaptive changes of the nervous system since the specific structure of the nervous system can be directly linked to the neural stem cell (neuroblast) lineages, which in turn can be traced back to the last common ancestor of insects. The recent comparative analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum neuroblast maps revealed substantial differences in the expression profiles of neuroblasts. Here we show that despite the overall conservation of the dorso-ventral expression domains of muscle segment homeobox, intermediate neuroblasts defective and ventral nervous system defective, the expression of these genes relative to the neuroblasts in the respective domains has changed considerably during insect evolution. Furthermore, functional studies show evolutionary changes in the requirement of ventral nervous system defective in the formation of neuroblast 1-1 and the correct differentiation of its presumptive progeny, the pioneer neurons aCC and pCC. The inclusion of the expression data of the dorso-ventral genes into the recently established T. castaneum neuroblast map further increases the differences in the neuroblast expression profiles between D. melanogaster and T. castaneum. Despite these molecular variations, the Even-skipped positive pioneer neurons show an invariant arrangement, except for an additional Even-skipped positive cluster that we discovered in T. castaneum. Given the importance of these pioneer neurons in establishing the intersegmental nerves and the longitudinal tracts, which are part of the conserved axonal scaffold of arthropods, we discuss internal buffering mechanisms that might ensure that neuroblast lineages invariantly generate pioneer neurons over a wide range of molecular variations.

  17. Identifying Gene Interaction Enrichment for Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jigang Zhang; Jian Li; Hong-Wen Deng

    2009-01-01

    Gene set analysis allows the inclusion of knowledge from established gene sets, such as gene pathways, and potentially improves the power of detecting differentially expressed genes. However, conventional methods of gene set analysis focus on gene marginal effects in a gene set, and ignore gene interactions which may contribute to complex human diseases. In this study, we propose a method of gene interaction enrichment analysis, which incorporates knowledge of predefined gene sets (e.g. gene ...

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK109961 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ilar to reprolysin zinc metalloproteases, complete sequence.|VRT VRT 9e-26 +1 ... ...1), four novel genes, the msxc gene for muscle segment homeobox protein C and a novel gene for a protein sim

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK060702 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ilar to reprolysin zinc metalloproteases, complete sequence.|VRT VRT 4e-22 +3 ... ...1), four novel genes, the msxc gene for muscle segment homeobox protein C and a novel gene for a protein sim

  20. LIM Homeobox Domain 2 Is Required for Corneal Epithelial Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartaj, Rachel; Chee, Ru-ik; Yang, Jing; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Aihong; Guaiquil, Victor; Fuchs, Elaine; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2016-02-01

    The cornea requires constant epithelial renewal to maintain clarity for appropriate vision. A subset of stem cells residing at the limbus is primarily responsible for maintaining corneal epithelium homeostasis. Trauma and disease may lead to stem cell deficiency and therapeutic targeting to replenish the stemness capacity has been stalled by the lack of reliable corneal epithelial stem cell markers. Here we identified the location of Lhx2 in mice (mLhx2) cornea and conjunctival tissue using an Lhx2eGFP reporter model and in human tissues (hLHX2). Lhx2 localized to the basal cells of central cornea, the conjunctiva and the entire limbal epithelium in humans and mice. To ascribe a functional role we generated Lhx2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice and the phenotypic effects in corneas were analyzed by slit lamp microscopy, in cell-based assays and in a model of corneal epithelium debridement. Immunodetection on corneal sections were used to visualize conjunctivalization, a sign of limbal barrier failure. Lhx2cKO mice produced reduced body hair and spontaneous epithelial defects in the cornea that included neovascularization, perforation with formation of scar tissue and opacification. Cell based assays showed that Lhx2cKO derived corneal epithelial cells have a significantly lower capacity to form colonies over time and delayed wound-healing recovery when compared to wildtype cells. Repeated corneal epithelial wounding resulted in decreased re-epithelialization and multiple cornea lesions in Lhx2cKO mice compared to normal recovery seen in wildtype mice. We conclude that Lhx2 is required for maintenance of the corneal epithelial cell compartment and the limbal barrier. PMID:26661907

  1. Autism and Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  2. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.;

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes we...

  3. Principles of gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Biju

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics and future percepts and the technical and ethical issues of using gene therapy.

  4. GnRH-a控制性超促排卵(COH)对小鼠着床期Hoxa-10基因表达的影响%Effect of GnRH-a Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation (COH) on Homeobox a10 (Hoxa-10) Gene Expression in Mouse Peri-implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付正英; 卢建荣; 苏晓华

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To research the impact of long GnRH-a protocol controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) on mouse pregnancy rate, embryo nidation rate, mRNA and protein expression of Hoxa-10 in peri-implantation, and to discuss the possible mechanisms of COH influencing on embryo nidation. Methods: Mice were randomly divided into treatment group (GnRH-a +hMG+hCG) and control group (9 g/L, NaCl), female and male mice were copulated, the situation of vaginal plug, pregnancy and embryo nidation were observed. RT-PCR, Real-time PCR were used to detect the concentration of Hoxa-l0mRNA and immunohistochemical method was used to detect the concentration of HOXA-10 protein expression in the uterine tissue in peri-implantation. Results: The vaginal plug rate and pregnancy rate in treatment group were significantiy lower than those in the control (p<0.01), the number of the embryo nidation was larger in treatment group than that in the control (P<0.01), but the implantation rate of embyro was significantly lower in in treatment group than that in the control (p<0.05). Both PCR and immunohistochemical method showed that the expressions of HOXA10 mRNA and protein in treatment group were significantly lower than those in the control. Conclusion: The GnRH-a COH can decrease the expression of Hoxa-10, it disturbs the endometrial receptivity and window phase of normal uterus, thus lower the rate of pregnancy and embryo nidation.%目的:研究GnRH-a长方案控制性超促排卵(COH)对小鼠妊娠率、胚胎着床率及着床期HOXA-10基因表达的影响,探讨COH影响胚胎着床的机制.方法:实验动物随机分为实验组(GnRH-a +hMG+hCG)和对照组(生理盐水),雌、雄合笼后观察小鼠阴栓率,于着床期取小鼠子宫,观察妊娠率及胚胎着床数,计算着床率;应用RT-PCR、Real-time PCR方法及免疫组织化学法分别检测小鼠着床期子宫内膜Hoxa-10 mRNA及蛋白的表达.结果:实验组小鼠阴栓率及妊娠率均明显低于对照组(P<0.01),实验组胚胎着床数高于对照组(P<0.01),但胚胎着床率较对照组显著降低(P<0.05),着床期小鼠子宫内膜Hoxa-10mRNA及蛋白表达下降,与对照组比较均有明显差异(P<0.05).结论:GnRH-a长方案COH可引起小鼠着床期子宫内膜Hoxa- 10表达下降,导致子宫内膜容受性降低,从而影响小鼠妊娠及胚胎着床.

  5. The research based on next generation sequencing of the association between muscle segment homeobox 1 gene and non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate%同源异型盒基因1的基因多态性与非综合征性唇腭裂的关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    居来提·吐尔逊; 古丽; 艾尼瓦尔·米吉提; 阿地力·莫明

    2015-01-01

    目的:   探讨同源异型盒基因1(MSX1)与非综合征性唇腭裂在新疆地区维吾尔人群中的相关性。方法   选择世居新疆的维吾尔族非综合征性唇腭裂患者100例为病例组,60例健康人群为对照组,用二代测序技术对MSX1基因前500 bp、5’非翻译区(UTR)和编码区进行测序分析。结果   基因测序共发现5个单核苷酸多态性(SNP)位点:rs36059701、rs80120240、rs1042484、rs34165410、rs8670。病例对照分析结果显示,以上位点等位基因与基因型分布在病例组与对照组间的差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05)。以上5个SNP的连锁不平衡分析结果显示,未能证实其存在连锁不平衡(r20.05) and significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium were not found in the 5 loci(r2<0.8). Conclusion   The association between MSX1 gene polymorphisms and NSCL/P in Xinjiang Uygur people was not observed.

  6. A Comprehensive In Silico Analysis on the Structural and Functional Impact of SNPs in the Congenital Heart Defects Associated with NKX2-5 Gene-A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz Abdul Samad

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects (CHD presented as structural defects in the heart and blood vessels during birth contribute an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many Single nucletotide polymorphisms (SNPs in different genes have been associated with various types of congenital heart defects. NKX 2-5 gene is one among them, which encodes a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays a crucial role during the initial phases of heart formation and development. Mutations in this gene could cause different types of congenital heart defects, including Atrial septal defect (ASD, Atrial ventricular block (AVB, Tetralogy of fallot and ventricular septal defect. This highlights the importance of studying the impact of different SNPs found within this gene that might cause structural and functional modification of its encoded protein. In this study, we retrieved SNPs from the database (dbSNP, followed by identification of potentially deleterious Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs and prediction of their effect on proteins by computational screening using SIFT and Polyphen. Furthermore, we have carried out molecular dynamic simulation (MDS in order to uncover the SNPs that would cause the most structural damage to the protein altering its biological function. The most important SNP that was found using our approach was rs137852685 R161P, which was predicted to cause the most damage to the structural features of the protein. Mapping nsSNPs in genes such as NKX 2-5 would provide valuable information about individuals carrying these polymorphisms, where such variations could be used as diagnostic markers.

  7. A Comprehensive In Silico Analysis on the Structural and Functional Impact of SNPs in the Congenital Heart Defects Associated with NKX2-5 Gene-A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Samad, Firoz; Suliman, Bandar A; Basha, Syed Hussain; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) presented as structural defects in the heart and blood vessels during birth contribute an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many Single nucletotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different genes have been associated with various types of congenital heart defects. NKX 2-5 gene is one among them, which encodes a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays a crucial role during the initial phases of heart formation and development. Mutations in this gene could cause different types of congenital heart defects, including Atrial septal defect (ASD), Atrial ventricular block (AVB), Tetralogy of fallot and ventricular septal defect. This highlights the importance of studying the impact of different SNPs found within this gene that might cause structural and functional modification of its encoded protein. In this study, we retrieved SNPs from the database (dbSNP), followed by identification of potentially deleterious Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) and prediction of their effect on proteins by computational screening using SIFT and Polyphen. Furthermore, we have carried out molecular dynamic simulation (MDS) in order to uncover the SNPs that would cause the most structural damage to the protein altering its biological function. The most important SNP that was found using our approach was rs137852685 R161P, which was predicted to cause the most damage to the structural features of the protein. Mapping nsSNPs in genes such as NKX 2-5 would provide valuable information about individuals carrying these polymorphisms, where such variations could be used as diagnostic markers. PMID:27152669

  8. The spatial and temporal expression of Ch-en, the engrailed gene in the polychaete Chaetopterus, does not support a role in body axis segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, E. C.; Paulson, D. A.; Irvine, S. Q.; Martindale, M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    We are interested in understanding whether the annelids and arthropods shared a common segmented ancestor and have approached this question by characterizing the expression pattern of the segment polarity gene engrailed (en) in a basal annelid, the polychaete Chaetopterus. We have isolated an en gene, Ch-en, from a Chaetopterus cDNA library. Genomic Southern blotting suggests that this is the only en class gene in this animal. The predicted protein sequence of the 1.2-kb cDNA clone contains all five domains characteristic of en proteins in other taxa, including the en class homeobox. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that Ch-en is expressed throughout larval life in a complex spatial and temporal pattern. The Ch-en transcript is initially detected in a small number of neurons associated with the apical organ and in the posterior portion of the prototrochophore. At later stages, Ch-en is expressed in distinct patterns in the three segmented body regions (A, B, and C) of Chaetopterus. In all segments, Ch-en is expressed in a small set of segmentally iterated cells in the CNS. In the A region, Ch-en is also expressed in a small group of mesodermal cells at the base of the chaetal sacs. In the B region, Ch-en is initially expressed broadly in the mesoderm that then resolves into one band/segment coincident with morphological segmentation. The mesodermal expression in the B region is located in the anterior region of each segment, as defined by the position of ganglia in the ventral nerve cord, and is involved in the morphogenesis of segment-specific feeding structures late in larval life. We observe banded mesodermal and ectodermal staining in an anterior-posterior sequence in the C region. We do not observe a segment polarity pattern of expression of Ch-en in the ectoderm, as is observed in arthropods. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Gene doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mehmet; Ozer Unal, Durisehvar

    2004-01-01

    Gene or cell doping is defined by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance". New research in genetics and genomics will be used not only to diagnose and treat disease, but also to attempt to enhance human performance. In recent years, gene therapy has shown progress and positive results that have highlighted the potential misuse of this technology and the debate of 'gene doping'. Gene therapies developed for the treatment of diseases such as anaemia (the gene for erythropoietin), muscular dystrophy (the gene for insulin-like growth factor-1) and peripheral vascular diseases (the gene for vascular endothelial growth factor) are potential doping methods. With progress in gene technology, many other genes with this potential will be discovered. For this reason, it is important to develop timely legal regulations and to research the field of gene doping in order to develop methods of detection. To protect the health of athletes and to ensure equal competitive conditions, the International Olympic Committee, WADA and International Sports Federations have accepted performance-enhancing substances and methods as being doping, and have forbidden them. Nevertheless, the desire to win causes athletes to misuse these drugs and methods. This paper reviews the current status of gene doping and candidate performance enhancement genes, and also the use of gene therapy in sports medicine and ethics of genetic enhancement.

  10. Analysis of the transcriptome of Panax notoginseng root uncovers putative triterpene saponin-biosynthetic genes and genetic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Hongmei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panax notoginseng (Burk F.H. Chen is important medicinal plant of the Araliacease family. Triterpene saponins are the bioactive constituents in P. notoginseng. However, available genomic information regarding this plant is limited. Moreover, details of triterpene saponin biosynthesis in the Panax species are largely unknown. Results Using the 454 pyrosequencing technology, a one-quarter GS FLX titanium run resulted in 188,185 reads with an average length of 410 bases for P. notoginseng root. These reads were processed and assembled by 454 GS De Novo Assembler software into 30,852 unique sequences. A total of 70.2% of unique sequences were annotated by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST similarity searches against public sequence databases. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG assignment discovered 41 unique sequences representing 11 genes involved in triterpene saponin backbone biosynthesis in the 454-EST dataset. In particular, the transcript encoding dammarenediol synthase (DS, which is the first committed enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of major triterpene saponins, is highly expressed in the root of four-year-old P. notoginseng. It is worth emphasizing that the candidate cytochrome P450 (Pn02132 and Pn00158 and UDP-glycosyltransferase (Pn00082 gene most likely to be involved in hydroxylation or glycosylation of aglycones for triterpene saponin biosynthesis were discovered from 174 cytochrome P450s and 242 glycosyltransferases by phylogenetic analysis, respectively. Putative transcription factors were detected in 906 unique sequences, including Myb, homeobox, WRKY, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, and other family proteins. Additionally, a total of 2,772 simple sequence repeat (SSR were identified from 2,361 unique sequences, of which, di-nucleotide motifs were the most abundant motif. Conclusion This study is the first to present a large-scale EST dataset for P. notoginseng root acquired by next

  11. Functional Characterization of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in the 3' Untranslated Region of Sheep DLX3 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enguang Rong

    Full Text Available The Distal-less 3 (homeobox protein DLX-3, a transcription factor, is critical for the development of hair follicle and hair formation and regeneration. We previously identified and found that four SNPs (c. *118T>C, c. *228T>C, c. *688A>G and c. *1,038_1,039 insC in 3' untranslated region (UTR of sheep DLX3 were in high linkage disequilibrium with each other and significantly associated with wool crimp (P<0.05, however, the underlying mechanisms by which these SNPs affect the wool crimp remains unknown. In the present study, we performed association analysis between these four identified SNPs and DLX3 gene expression in sheep skin using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that these SNPs were significantly associated with sheep skin DLX3 mRNA expression levels. Then, we constructed DLX3 3'UTR luciferase reporters and validated the association. The reporter assays showed that the three major haplotypes, derived from the four SNPs, had significantly different effects on luciferase reporter activity and the four SNPs also had significantly different allelic effects on the luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the SNP (c. *1,038_1,039 insC was located within a potential miR-188 binding site of the 3'UTR of sheep DLX3 mRNA. This SNP may affect miR-188-mediated DLX3 gene expression and result in phenotypic variation. To test the hypothesis, we investigated the effects of miR-188 mimic and inhibitor on the activity of the DLX3 3'UTR luciferase reporter with different SNP alleles. The results showed that in both sheep fetal fibroblasts (SFFs and human HaCaT cells, miR-188 mimic could significantly decrease the allele D (deletion luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05, but miR-188 inhibitor could increased the reporter activitiy. However, neither miR-188 mimc nor inhibitor could influence the allele I (insertion reporter activity. In addition, transfection of miR-188 mimic dramatically decreased the

  12. Gene therapy in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Anirban Chatterjee; Nidhi Singh; Mini Saluja

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person′s genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ′the use of genes as medicine′. It...

  13. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  14. CHROMATIN LOOPS, GENE POSITIONING AND GENE EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd eHolwerda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Technological developments and intense research over the last years have led to a better understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the genome and its influence on genome function inside the cell nucleus. We will summarize topological studies performed on four model gene loci: the α- and β-globin gene loci, the antigen receptor loci, the imprinted H19-Igf2 locus and the Hox gene clusters. Collectively, these studies show that regulatory DNA sequences physically contact genes to control their transcription. Proteins set up the three-dimensional configuration of the genome and we will discuss the roles of the key structural organizers CTCF and cohesin, the nuclear lamina and the transcription machinery. Finally, genes adopt non-random positions in the nuclear interior. We will review studies on gene positioning and propose that cell-specific genome conformations can juxtapose a regulatory sequence on one chromosome to a responsive gene on another chromosome to cause altered gene expression in subpopulations of cells.

  15. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Akil, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  16. Low Six4 and Six5 gene dosage improves dystrophic phenotype and prolongs life span of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Muscle regeneration is an important process for skeletal muscle growth and recovery. Repair of muscle damage is exquisitely programmed by cellular mechanisms inherent in myogenic stem cells, also known as muscle satellite cells. We demonstrated previously the involvement of homeobox transcription factors, SIX1, SIX4 and SIX5, in the coordinated proliferation and differentiation of isolated satellite cells in vitro. However, their roles in adult muscle regeneration in vivo remain elusive. To investigate SIX4 and SIX5 functions during muscle regeneration, we introduced knockout alleles of Six4 and Six5 into an animal model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), mdx (Dmd(mdx) /Y) mice, characterized by frequent degeneration-regeneration cycles in muscles. A lower number of small myofibers, higher number of thick ones and lower serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were noted in 50-week-old Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice than Dmd(mdx) /Y mice, indicating improvement of dystrophic phenotypes of Dmd(mdx) /Y mice. Higher proportions of cells positive for MYOD1 and MYOG (markers of regenerating myonuclei) and SIX1 (a marker of regenerating myoblasts and newly regenerated myofibers) in 12-week-old Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice suggested enhanced regeneration, compared with Dmd(mdx) /Y mice. Although grip strength was comparable in Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y and Dmd(mdx) /Y mice, treadmill exercise did not induce muscle weakness in Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice, suggesting higher regeneration capacity. In addition, Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice showed 33.8% extension of life span. The results indicated that low Six4 and Six5 gene dosage improved dystrophic phenotypes of Dmd(mdx) /Y mice by enhancing muscle regeneration, and suggested that SIX4 and SIX5 are potentially useful de novo targets in therapeutic applications against muscle disorders, including DMD. PMID:27224259

  17. Elevated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in the Engrailed-2 (EN-2) promoter is associated with increased gene expression and decreased MeCP2 binding in autism cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S J; Shpyleva, S; Melnyk, S; Pavliv, O; Pogribny, I P

    2014-10-07

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate programmed gene expression during prenatal neurogenesis and serve as a mediator between genetics and environment in postnatal life. The recent discovery of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), with highest concentration in the brain, has added a new dimension to epigenetic regulation of neurogenesis and the development of complex behavior disorders. Here, we take a candidate gene approach to define the role 5-hmC in Engrailed-2 (EN-2) gene expression in the autism cerebellum. The EN-2 homeobox transcription factor, previously implicated in autism, is essential for normal cerebellar patterning and development. We previously reported EN-2 overexpression associated with promoter DNA hypermethylation in the autism cerebellum but because traditional DNA methylation methodology cannot distinguish 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) from 5-hmC, we now extend our investigation by quantifying global and gene-specific 5-mC and 5-hmC. Globally, 5-hmC was significantly increased in the autism cerebellum and accompanied by increases in the expression of de novo methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B, ten-eleven translocase genes TET1 and TET3, and in 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) content, a marker of oxidative DNA damage. Within the EN-2 promoter, there was a significant positive correlation between 5-hmC content and EN-2 gene expression. Based on reports of reduced MeCP2 affinity for 5-hmC, MeCP2 binding studies in the EN-2 promoter revealed a significant decrease in repressive MeCP2 binding that may contribute to the aberrant overexpression of EN-2. Because normal cerebellar development depends on perinatal EN-2 downregulation, the sustained postnatal overexpression suggests that a critical window of cerebellar development may have been missed in some individuals with autism with downstream developmental consequences. Epigenetic regulation of the programmed on-off switches in gene expression that occur at birth and during early brain development warrants

  18. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  19. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  20. Reading and Generalist Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  1. A Pilot Study of Gene/Gene and Gene/Environment Interactions in Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ghebranious, Nader; Mukesh, Bickol; Giampietro, Philip F.; Glurich, Ingrid; Mickel, Susan F.; Waring, Stephen C.; Catherine A McCarty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although some genes associated with increased risk of Alzheimer Disease (AD) have been identified, few data exist related to gene/gene and gene/environment risk of AD. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore gene/gene and gene/environment associations in AD and to obtain data for sample size estimates for larger, more definitive studies of AD.

  2. Regulation of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE genes/microRNA 156 Module by the Homeodomain Proteins PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shruti Lal; Leo Bryan Pacis; Harley M.S. Smith

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of inflorescences is regulated in part by the temporal and spatial events that regulate flower specification.In Arabidopsis,an endogenous flowering time pathway mediated by a subset of SQUAMOSA PROMOTERBINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factors,including SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5,function to specify flowers by activating floral meristem identity genes.During shoot development,SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 are post-transcriptionally regulated by microRNA156 (miR156).The photoperiod regulated florigenic signal,FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT),promotes floral induction,in part by activating SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5.In turn,these SPLs function in parallel with FT to specify flower meristems.Two related BELL1-like homeobox genes PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) expressed in the shoot apical meristem are absolutely required for the specification of floral meristems.Genetic studies show that the floral specification function of FT depends upon PNY and PNF; however,the interplay between these homeodomain proteins and SPLs is not known.In this manuscript,we show that the photoperiodic floral induction of SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 is dependent upon PNY and PNF.Further,PNY and PNF also control SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 expression by negatively regulating miR156.Lastly,ectopic expression of SPL4 partially rescues the pny pnf non-flower-producing phenotype,while overexpression of SPL3 or SPL5 in pny pnf plants was unable to restore flower specification.These results suggest that:(1) SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 function is dependent upon PNY and PNF,or (2) expression of multiple SPLs is required for floral specification in pny pnf plants.

  3. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  4. Modelling prokaryote gene content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Susko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of genes across the prokaryotes may be caused by multiple gene losses or lateral transfer. Probabilistic models of gene gain and loss are needed to distinguish between these possibilities. Existing models allow only single genes to be gained and lost, despite the empirical evidence for multi-gene events. We compare birth-death models (currently the only widely-used models, in which only one gene can be gained or lost at a time to blocks models (allowing gain and loss of multiple genes within a family. We analyze two pairs of genomes: two E. coli strains, and the distantly-related Archaeoglobus fulgidus (archaea and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive bacteria. Blocks models describe the data much better than birth-death models. Our models suggest that lateral transfers of multiple genes from the same family are rare (although transfers of single genes are probably common. For both pairs, the estimated median time that a gene will remain in the genome is not much greater than the time separating the common ancestors of the archaea and bacteria. Deep phylogenetic reconstruction from sequence data will therefore depend on choosing genes likely to remain in the genome for a long time. Phylogenies based on the blocks model are more biologically plausible than phylogenies based on the birth-death model.

  5. Gene conversion in human rearranged immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, John M; Stott, David I

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, many DNA sequences have been published suggesting that all or part of the V(H) segment of a rearranged immunoglobulin gene may be replaced in vivo. Two different mechanisms appear to be operating. One of these is very similar to primary V(D)J recombination, involving the RAG proteins acting upon recombination signal sequences, and this has recently been proven to occur. Other sequences, many of which show partial V(H) replacements with no addition of untemplated nucleotides at the V(H)-V(H) joint, have been proposed to occur by an unusual RAG-mediated recombination with the formation of hybrid (coding-to-signal) joints. These appear to occur in cells already undergoing somatic hypermutation in which, some authors are convinced, RAG genes are silenced. We recently proposed that the latter type of V(H) replacement might occur by homologous recombination initiated by the activity of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), which is essential for somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. The latter has been observed in other species, but not in human Ig genes, so far. In this paper, we present a new analysis of sequences published as examples of the second type of rearrangement. This not only shows that AID recognition motifs occur in recombination regions but also that some sequences show replacement of central sections by a sequence from another gene, similar to gene conversion in the immunoglobulin genes of other species. These observations support the proposal that this type of rearrangement is likely to be AID-mediated rather than RAG-mediated and is consistent with gene conversion.

  6. Evaluating gene × gene and gene × smoking interaction in rheumatoid arthritis using candidate genes in GAW15

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Ling; Li Xiaohui; Yang Kai; Cui Jinrui; Fang Belle; Guo Xiuqing; Rotter Jerome I

    2007-01-01

    Abstract We examined the potential gene × gene interactions and gene × smoking interactions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the candidate gene data sets provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 Problem 2. The multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method was used to test gene × gene interactions among candidate genes. The case-only sample was used to test gene × smoking interactions. The best predictive model was the single-locus model with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs247660...

  7. 视紫红质和Peripherin/RDS基因在视网膜色素变性家系中的突变检测%Mutation of rhodopsin and peripherin/rhodopsin genes in a family with retinitis pigmentosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章雪敏; 刘铁城; 金鑫; 张宝全; 徐华

    2012-01-01

    目的 对一常染色体显性视网膜色素变性(autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa,adRP) 家系进行视紫红质基因(rhodopsin,RHO)、盘膜边缘蛋白/ 视网膜变性慢基因(Peripherin/retinal degeneration slow,Peripherin/RDS)、视杆外节盘膜蛋白1 基因(retinal outer segment membrane protein 1,ROM1)、神经视网膜亮氨酸拉链基因(neural retinal leucine zipper,NRL) 和视锥杆细胞同源盒基(cone-rod homeobox-containing gene,CRX) 基因的突变检测.方法 采集一连续3 代发病的adRP 家系28 名成员外周血,提取基因组DNA,采用聚合酶链反应(polymerase chain reaction,PCR) 和直接测序技术,对RHO、Peripherin/RDS、ROM1、NRL 和CRX 基因进行检测,结果与标准核酸序列进行比对和分析.结果 该家系成员在RHO、Peripherin/RDS、ROM1、NRL 和CRX 基因中未发现致病突变,但是在Peripherin/RDS 基因第1 外显子和第3 外显子编码区发现4 处单核苷酸改变.结论 该家系在RHO、Peripherin/RDS、ROM1、NRL 和CRX 基因中未检测到致病突变,Peripherin/RDS 基因外显子中4 处单核苷酸改变属于单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNPs).%Objective To detect the mutations of rhodopsin(RDS), peripherin/RDS, retinal outer segment membrane protein 1(ROM1), neural retinal leucine(NRL) zipper and cone-rod homeobox-containing(CRX) genes in a family with retinitis pigmentosa(RP). Methods Peripheral blood samples were taken from 28 members of a family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa(adRP) to isolate genomic DNA. RHO, peripherin/RDS, ROM1, NRL and CRX genes were detected by PCR and direct sequencing respectively and compared with the standard nucleic acid sequences. Results No pathogenic mutation of RHO, peripherin/RDS, ROM1, NRL and CRX genes was detected in the family members. However, single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNP) were detected in exons 1 and 3 coding areas of the peripherin/RDS gene. Conclusion No pathogenic mutation of

  8. Delivery Systems in Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hu; Anas El-Aneed; Cui Guohui

    2005-01-01

    1 Gene therapy Gene therapy includes the treatment of both genetically based and infectious diseases by introducing genetic materials which have therapeutic effects[1~3]. In its simplest terms, a wild type gene (which is non-functional in the cell leading to disease development) is introduced into the somatic cell lacking this gene to restore the normal gene function in this cell. Many gene therapy strategies, however, utilize genes to destroy specific cells.

  9. Gene Conversion and Evolution of Gene Families: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoko Ohta

    2010-01-01

    The importance of gene conversion for the evolution of gene families is reviewed. Four problems concerning gene conversion, i.e., concerted evolution, generation of useful variation, deleterious effects, and relation to neofunctionalization, are discussed by surveying reported examples of evolving gene families. Emphasis is given toward understanding interactive effects of gene conversion and natural selection.

  10. Expression of the Lhx genes apterous and lim1 in an errant polychaete: implications for bilaterian appendage evolution, neural development, and muscle diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winchell Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod and vertebrate appendages appear to have evolved via parallel co-option of a plesiomorphic gene regulatory network. Our previous work implies that annelids evolved unrelated appendage-forming mechanisms; we therefore found no support for homology of parapodia and arthropodia at the level of the whole appendage. We expand on that study here by asking whether expression of the LIM homeobox (Lhx genes apterous and lim1 in the annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata supports homology of the dorsal branches as well as the proximodistal axes of parapodia and arthropodia. In addition, we explore whether the neural expression of apterous and lim1 in Neanthes supports the putative ancestral function of the Lhx gene family in regulating the differentiation and maintenance of neuronal subtypes. Results Both genes exhibit continuous expression in specific portions of the developing central nervous system, from hatching to at least the 13-chaetiger stage. For example, nerve cord expression occurs in segmentally iterated patterns consisting of diffuse sets of many lim1-positive cells and comparatively fewer, clustered pairs of apterous-positive cells. Additionally, continuous apterous expression is observed in presumed neurosecretory ganglia of the posterior brain, while lim1 is continuously expressed in stomatogastric ganglia of the anterior brain. apterous is also expressed in the jaw sacs, dorsal parapodial muscles, and a presumed pair of cephalic sensory organs, whereas lim1 is expressed in multiple pharyngeal ganglia, the segmental peripheral nervous system, neuropodial chaetal sac muscles, and parapodial ligules. Conclusions The early and persistent nervous system expression of apterous and lim1 in Neanthes juveniles supports conservation of Lhx function in bilaterian neural differentiation and maintenance. Our results also suggest that diversification of parapodial muscle precursors involves a complementary LIM code similar to

  11. Gene promoters dictate histone occupancy within genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Roberto; Erickson, Benjamin; Zhang, Lian; Kim, Hyunmin; Valiquett, Elan; Bentley, David

    2013-10-01

    Spt6 is a transcriptional elongation factor and histone chaperone that reassembles transcribed chromatin. Genome-wide H3 mapping showed that Spt6 preferentially maintains nucleosomes within the first 500 bases of genes and helps define nucleosome-depleted regions in 5' and 3' flanking sequences. In Spt6-depleted cells, H3 loss at 5' ends correlates with reduced pol II density suggesting enhanced transcription elongation. Consistent with its 'Suppressor of Ty' (Spt) phenotype, Spt6 inactivation caused localized H3 eviction over 1-2 nucleosomes at 5' ends of Ty elements. H3 displacement differed between genes driven by promoters with 'open'/DPN and 'closed'/OPN chromatin conformations with similar pol II densities. More eviction occurred on genes with 'closed' promoters, associated with 'noisy' transcription. Moreover, swapping of 'open' and 'closed' promoters showed that they can specify distinct downstream patterns of histone eviction/deposition. These observations suggest a novel function for promoters in dictating histone dynamics within genes possibly through effects on transcriptional bursting or elongation rate.

  12. Lamins and their genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is an important nuclear structure. The studies on its peptides lamins and genes have made substantial progress in recent years. In this paper, the new achievements in studies of new lamin members and their functions, lamin genes and their origin and differentiation, are reviewed and discussed. Some research areas that deserve to be investigated further are put forward.

  13. Your Genes, Your Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table of Contents Your Genes, Your Choices describes the Human Genome Project, the science behind it, and the ethical, legal, and social issues that are ... Nothing could be further from the truth. Your Genes, Your Choices points out how the progress of ...

  14. The GeneMANIA prediction server: biological network integration for gene prioritization and predicting gene function

    OpenAIRE

    Warde-Farley, David; Sylva L. Donaldson; Comes, Ovi; Zuberi, Khalid; Badrawi, Rashad; Chao, Pauline; Franz, Max; Grouios, Chris; Kazi, Farzana; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Maitland, Anson; Mostafavi, Sara; Montojo, Jason; Shao, Quentin; Wright, George

    2010-01-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible, user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. Six organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis t...

  15. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  16. [Is gene technology immoral?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, H

    1994-10-01

    Since it came into being in the USA in the early 1970s, gene technology has always been fundamentally controversial, especially in the German-speaking countries. The optimistic--or critical--supporters of gene technology are convinced that, in view of gene technology's not otherwise attainable advantages for human and animal health, for food production and other important aims, it would be ethically unacceptable to restrict to the minimum or even ban it. On the other hand, the radical critics are convinced that gene technology, in view of its anthropologically false starting-point, the questionable interests behind it, and above all its unforeseeable, serious negative implications for mankind and environment, is unacceptable on ethical grounds. Critical reflexion on these polarized arguments must start from the question why precisely gene technology is so controversial, and what are the criteria for ethical assessment. These reflexions presuppose that the prior judgement of gene technology as a technology in the ideological field is rooted in life attitudes, history and nature in general, and this is true not only of gene technology's opponents but also its supporters. It is thus a question of one ideology vs. another. Chief importance here attaches to the mankind-nature relationship and the need to take seriously the fundamental ambivalence of all (!) human action with unforeseeable consequences. The conclusion is that neither to demonize nor to glorify gene technology, as a matter of principle, does justice to its wide and varied positive or negative potential. The ethical assessment of gene technology must be differentiated according to the aims and possible implications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7939540

  17. Lodgepole pine: the first evidence of seed-based somatic embryogenesis and the expression of embryogenesis marker genes in shoot bud cultures of adult trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Young; Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-11-01

    Of the various alternatives for cloning elite conifers, somatic embryogenesis (SE) appears to be the best option. In recent years, significant areas of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forest have been devastated by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) in Western Canada. In an attempt to establish an SE propagation system for MPB-resistant lodgepole pine, several families displaying varying levels of resistance were selected for experimentation involving shoot bud and immature seed explants. In bud cultures, eight embryogenic lines were induced from 2 of 15 genotypes following various treatments. Genotype had an important influence on embryogenic culture initiation, and this effect was consistent over time. These lines were identified by microscopic observation and genetic markers. Despite the abundance of early somatic embryos, the cultures have yet to develop into mature embryos. In contrast, immature zygotic embryos (ZEs) cultured from megagametophytes initiated SE at an early dominance stage via nodule-type callus in 1 of 10 genotypes. As part of the study, putative embryogenesis-specific genes, WOX2 (WUSCHELL homeobox 2) and HAP3A, were analyzed in cultures of both shoot bud explants and ZEs. On the basis of these analyses, we postulate that PcHAP3A was expressed mainly in callus and may be involved in cell division, whereas WOX2 was expressed mainly in embryonal mass (EM)-like tissues. The findings from this study, based on molecular assessment, suggest that the cell lines derived from bud cultures were truly EM. Moreover, these experimental observations suggest that PcWOX2 could be used as an early genetic marker to discriminate embryogenic cultures from callus. PMID:20935320

  18. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  19. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  20. What Is a Gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What Is a Gene? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is ...

  1. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  2. The SHOX gene and the short stature. Roundtable on diagnosis and treatment of short stature due to SHOX haploinsufficiency: how genetics, radiology and anthropometry can help the pediatrician in the diagnostic process Padova (April 20th, 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Tosetto, Ilaria; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Antoniazzi, Franco; Clementi, Maurizio; Toffolutti, Tiziana; Facchin, Paola; Monti, Elena; Pisanello, Lorena; Tonini, Giorgio; Greggio, Nella A

    2012-08-01

    The growth of the human body depends from a complex interaction between nutritional, environmental and hormonal factors and by a large number of different genes. One of these genes, short stature homeobox (SHOX), is believed to play a major role in growth. SHOX haploinsufficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of conditions, all characterized growth failure such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, Turner syndrome, short stature with subtle auxological and radiological findings and the so called "idiopathic short stature" (short stature with no specific findings other than growth failure). The document was prepared by a multidisciplinary team (paediatric endocrinologists, paediatrician, radiologist, geneticist and epidemiologist) to focus on the investigation of children with suspected SHOX- deficiency (SHOX-D) for an early identification and a correct diagnostic work - up of this genetic disorder. On the basis of a number of screening studies, SHOX-D appears to be a relatively frequent cause of short stature. The following recommendations were suggested by our multidisciplinary team: (i) a careful family history, measurements of body proportions and detection of any dysmorphic features are important for the suspect of a genetic disorder ,(ii)the presence of any combination of the following physical findings, such as reduced arm span/height ratio, increased sitting height/height ratio, above average BMI, Madelung deformity, cubitus valgus, short or bowed forearm, dislocation of the ulna at the elbow, or the appearance of muscular hypertrophy, should prompt the clinician to obtain a molecular analysis of the SHOX region, (iii) it is of practical importance to recognise early or mild signs of Madelung deformity on hand and wrist radiographs, (iv) growth hormone ,after stimulation test, is usually normal. However, treatment with rhGH may improve final adult height; the efficacy of treatment is similar to that observed in those treated for Turner syndrome. PMID

  3. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  4. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactionsand single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatorycytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiologyof type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in thepro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step inglucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrialinjury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis inT2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin(IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissueplasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins.Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strongenvironmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic modeof inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and antiinflammatorycytokines have been reported as a riskfor T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed byunifying results in different studies and wide variationshave been reported in various ethnic groups. Theinter-ethnic variations can be explained by the factthat gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene,gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. Thisreview highlights the impact of these interactions ondetermining the role of single nucleotide polymorphismof IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesisof T2DM.

  5. The Mycoplasma hominis vaa gene displays a mosaic gene structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Emmersen, Jeppe M. G.; Jensen, Lise T.;

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis contains a variable adherence-associated (vaa) gene. To classify variants of the vaa genes, we examined 42 M. hominis isolated by PCR, DNA sequencing and immunoblotting. This uncovered the existence of five gene categories. Comparison of the gene types revealed a modular...

  6. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  7. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  8. Gene therapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, K; Engelhard, H H

    2000-09-01

    "Gene therapy" can be defined as the transfer of genetic material into a patient's cells for therapeutic purposes. To date, a diverse and creative assortment of treatment strategies utilizing gene therapy have been devised, including gene transfer for modulating the immune system, enzyme prodrug ("suicide gene") therapy, oncolytic therapy, replacement/therapeutic gene transfer, and antisense therapy. For malignant glioma, gene-directed prodrug therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was the first gene therapy attempted clinically. A variety of different strategies have now been pursued experimentally and in clinical trials. Although, to date, gene therapy for brain tumors has been found to be reasonably safe, concerns still exist regarding issues related to viral delivery, transduction efficiency, potential pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Improved viral vectors are being sought, and potential use of gene therapy in combination with other treatments is being investigated.

  9. Introns in higher plant genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intron is an important component of eukaryotic gene. Extensive studies have been conducted to get a better understanding of its structure and function. This paper presents a brief review of the structure and function of introns in higher plant genes. It is shown that higher plant introns possess structural properties shared by all eukaryotic introns, however, they also exhibit a striking degree of diversity. The process of intron splicing in higher plant genes involves interaction between multiple cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, such as 5′ splicing site, 3′ splicing site and many protein factors. The process of intron splicing is an important level at which gene expression is regulated. Especially alternative splicing of intron can regulate time and space of gene expression. In addition, some introns in higher plant genes also regulate gene expression by affecting the pattern of gene expression, enhancing the level of gene expression and driving the gene expression.

  10. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  11. A review on microcephaly genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to summarize the recent findings regarding microcephaly genes. We have discussed the molecular genetics studies of microcephaly genes including a comprehensive appraisal of the seven mapped loci (MCPH1–MCPH7, their corresponding genes and protein products of the genes, their likely role in normal brain development and the details of the mutations reported in these genes.

  12. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of ...

  13. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  14. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  15. The gene tree delusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are

  16. The gene tree delusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are

  17. Vertebrate gene predictions and the problem of large genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Li, ShengTing; Zhang, Yong;

    2003-01-01

    To find unknown protein-coding genes, annotation pipelines use a combination of ab initio gene prediction and similarity to experimentally confirmed genes or proteins. Here, we show that although the ab initio predictions have an intrinsically high false-positive rate, they also have a consistently...... low false-negative rate. The incorporation of similarity information is meant to reduce the false-positive rate, but in doing so it increases the false-negative rate. The crucial variable is gene size (including introns)--genes of the most extreme sizes, especially very large genes, are most likely to...

  18. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  19. GENES BEHIND SMOKE ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmos Soós

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Smoke can break dormancy and promote seed germination of many plant species. We investigated changes in the gene expression changes after imbibition of light-sensitive Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids achenes with dilute smoke water compared to water control samples kept in dark or continuous light. Although no difference was detected in the smoke water vs. water control samples germinated in light, smoke water treatment resulted in the differential display of several expressed sequence tags (ESTs when compared to water control samples kept in dark. The most pronounced fragments isolated correspond to known genes with functions related to cell wall expansion, abscisic acid regulation, regulation of translation, the cell division cycle, carbohydrate metabolism and desiccation tolerance. These data clearly indicate that the smoke water, which stimulates germination of light-sensitive Grand Rapids lettuce seeds in the dark, rapidly affects genes that are essential for cell division, cell wall expansion and mobilization and utilization of nutrients for the resumption of embryo growth. Although the master genes remained unknown, our hope is that the using of maize microarray will reveal the whole molecular background of smoke action.

  20. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  1. Old genes experience stronger translational selection than young genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongyan; Ma, Lina; Wang, Guangyu; Li, Mengwei; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-09-15

    Selection on synonymous codon usage for translation efficiency and/or accuracy has been identified as a widespread mechanism in many living organisms. However, it remains unknown whether translational selection associates closely with gene age and acts differentially on genes with different evolutionary ages. To address this issue, here we investigate the strength of translational selection acting on different aged genes in human. Our results show that old genes present stronger translational selection than young genes, demonstrating that translational selection correlates positively with gene age. We further explore the difference of translational selection in duplicates vs. singletons and in housekeeping vs. tissue-specific genes. We find that translational selection acts comparably in old singletons and old duplicates and stronger translational selection in old genes is contributed primarily by housekeeping genes. For young genes, contrastingly, singletons experience stronger translational selection than duplicates, presumably due to redundant function of duplicated genes during their early evolutionary stage. Taken together, our results indicate that translational selection acting on a gene would not be constant during all stages of evolution, associating closely with gene age. PMID:27259662

  2. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannenfelser Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs, researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our

  3. Industrial scale gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notka, Frank; Liss, Michael; Wagner, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The most recent developments in the area of deep DNA sequencing and downstream quantitative and functional analysis are rapidly adding a new dimension to understanding biochemical pathways and metabolic interdependencies. These increasing insights pave the way to designing new strategies that address public needs, including environmental applications and therapeutic inventions, or novel cell factories for sustainable and reconcilable energy or chemicals sources. Adding yet another level is building upon nonnaturally occurring networks and pathways. Recent developments in synthetic biology have created economic and reliable options for designing and synthesizing genes, operons, and eventually complete genomes. Meanwhile, high-throughput design and synthesis of extremely comprehensive DNA sequences have evolved into an enabling technology already indispensable in various life science sectors today. Here, we describe the industrial perspective of modern gene synthesis and its relationship with synthetic biology. Gene synthesis contributed significantly to the emergence of synthetic biology by not only providing the genetic material in high quality and quantity but also enabling its assembly, according to engineering design principles, in a standardized format. Synthetic biology on the other hand, added the need for assembling complex circuits and large complexes, thus fostering the development of appropriate methods and expanding the scope of applications. Synthetic biology has also stimulated interdisciplinary collaboration as well as integration of the broader public by addressing socioeconomic, philosophical, ethical, political, and legal opportunities and concerns. The demand-driven technological achievements of gene synthesis and the implemented processes are exemplified by an industrial setting of large-scale gene synthesis, describing production from order to delivery.

  4. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V;

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  5. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    Entrez Gene (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=gene) is NCBI's database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene includes records from genomes that have been completely sequenced, that have an active research community to contribute gene-specific information or that are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content of Entrez Gene represents the result of both curation and automated integration of data from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), from collaborating model organism databases and from other databases within NCBI. Records in Entrez Gene are assigned unique, stable and tracked integers as identifiers. The content (nomenclature, map location, gene products and their attributes, markers, phenotypes and links to citations, sequences, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is provided via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programing utilities (E-Utilities), and for bulk transfer by ftp. PMID:17148475

  6. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaogang; LI Yingxin; LI Jiangeng; GONG Daoxiong; WANG Jinlian

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  7. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  8. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  9. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelta dos Santos

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  10. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:26613610

  11. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  12. Gene doping in modern sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAREK SAWCZUK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The subject of this paper is gene doping, which should be understood as "he non-therapeutic use of cells, genes, genetic elements, or of the modulation of gene expression, having the capacity to improve athletic performance". The authors of this work, based on the review of literature and previous research, make an attempt at wider characterization of gene doping and the discussion of related potential threats.Methods: This is a comprehensive survey of literature on the latest applications of molecular biology in medicine. The analysis involves a dozen scientific databases examined in order to find genes used in gene therapy and potentially useful in gene doping. Results: The obtained results enable better recognition of gene doping and indicate genes used in medicine that could be used in gene doping. This paper describes potential effects of their use and associated risk, and predicts the possible developments of gene doping in the future. Conclusion: Gene doping is undoubtedly a part of modern sport. Although WADA included gene doping on the list of banned methods as early as 2004, as previously stated above, it has not managed to develop efficient methods of detection.

  13. On atavisms and atavistic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú, J M; Ruiz, C

    1985-01-01

    The authors propose the term atavistic to designate a gene producing an ancestral phenotype (atavism). Several examples are presented, and the possible origin of atavistic genes, as well as their pathological implications discussed. PMID:3879145

  14. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the ... 16 previously unknown variations. Six were found in genes already suspected of regulating blood pressure. The remaining ...

  15. Genes and human brain evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    Several genes were duplicated during human evolution. It seems that one such duplication gave rise to a gene that may have helped to make human brains bigger and more adaptable than those of our ancestors.

  16. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQ NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia This fact sheet provides an overview of gene testing for ataxia. It also addresses commonly asked ...

  17. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  18. Human housekeeping genes are compact

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Eli; Erez Y. Levanon

    2003-01-01

    We identify a set of 575 human genes that are expressed in all conditions tested in a publicly available database of microarray results. Based on this common occurrence, the set is expected to be rich in "housekeeping" genes, showing constitutive expression in all tissues. We compare selected aspects of their genomic structure with a set of background genes. We find that the introns, untranslated regions and coding sequences of the housekeeping genes are shorter, indicating a selection for co...

  19. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); B. Sangro; Prieto, J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/pro-drug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition, gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy. These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reac...

  20. Genes y especies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Sáez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La posibilidad de secuenciar y manipular los genes sigue abriendo fronteras en el estudio de las especies y la especiación. En tiempos recientes particularmente en dos direcciones. Por un lado, la secuenciación del gen COI (y otros en miles de muestras de forma sistemática y masiva, el llamado "DNA barcoding", está revelando una gran cantidad de biodiversidad, en buena medida previamente no sospechada y correspondiente a especies crípticas (morfológicamente irreconocibles. En segundo lugar, el estudio de los genes responsables de los cambios morfológicos nos está haciendo volver a dar una creciente importancia a la selección como motor de la especiación y de la evolución, incluso en presencia de dosis importantes de flujo génico.

  1. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  2. Gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ponder, Katherine P.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are due to deficiencies in activities of lysosomal enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans. Some attempts at gene therapy for MPS in animal models have involved intravenous injection of vectors derived from an adeno-associated virus (AAV), adenovirus, retrovirus or a plasmid, which primarily results in expression in liver and secretion of the relevant enzyme into blood. Most vectors can correct disease in liver and spleen, although correction in other organs includ...

  3. Engineering prokaryotic gene circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Isalan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Engineering of synthetic gene circuits is a rapidly growing discipline, currently dominated by prokaryotic transcription networks, which can be easily rearranged or rewired to give different output behaviours. In this review, we examine both a rational and a combinatorial design of such networks and discuss progress on using in vitro evolution techniques to obtain functional systems. Moving beyond pure transcription networks, more and more networks are being implemented at the level of RNA, t...

  4. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  5. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  6. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  7. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    William R Jeffery

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  8. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin;

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  9. Decationized polyplexes for gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novo, L.; Mastrobattista, E.; Nostrum, van C.F.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.; Hennink, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy has received much attention in the field of drug delivery. Synthetic, nonviral gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention as vectors for gene therapy mainly due to a favorable immunogenicity profile and ease of manufacturing as compared to viral vectors. The great majority o

  10. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  11. Gene therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy for thyroid cancer include immunotherapy, suicide gene therapy, tumor suppressor replacement, 131I therapy by sodium/iodide symporter and antisense therapy and so on. Gene therapy has wide perspectives, but there are many problems need to be solved for clinical application

  12. nanosheets for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  13. Extracting gene-gene interactions through curve fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ranajit; Mitra, Sushmita; Murthy, C A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a simple and novel curve fitting approach for generating simple gene regulatory subnetworks from time series gene expression data. Microarray experiments simultaneously generate massive data sets and help immensely in the large-scale study of gene expression patterns. Initial biclustering reduces the search space in the high-dimensional microarray data. The least-squares error between fitting of gene pairs is minimized to extract a set of gene-gene interactions, involving transcriptional regulation of genes. The higher error values are eliminated to retain only the strong interacting gene pairs in the resultant gene regulatory subnetwork. Next the algorithm is extended to a generalized framework to enhance its capability. The methodology takes care of the higher-order dependencies involving multiple genes co-regulating a single gene, while eliminating the need for user-defined parameters. It has been applied to the time-series Yeast data, and the experimental results biologically validated using standard databases and literature. PMID:22997274

  14. Identification of Significant Association and Gene-Gene Interaction of GABA Receptor Subunit Genes in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, D Q; Whitehead, P. L.; Menold, M M; Martin, E. R.; Ashley-Koch, A. E.; Mei, H; Ritchie, M. D.; Delong, G R; Abramson, R.K.; Wright, H. H.; Cuccaro, M. L.; Hussman, J. P.; Gilbert, J.R.; Pericak-Vance, M A

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a significant genetic component. Existing research suggests that multiple genes contribute to autism and that epigenetic effects or gene-gene interactions are likely contributors to autism risk. However, these effects have not yet been identified. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, has been implicated in autism etiology. Fourteen known autosomal GABA receptor subunit genes were studied...

  15. Gene Network Biological Validity Based on Gene-Gene Interaction Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Gómez-Vela; Norberto Díaz-Díaz

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, gene networks have become one of the most useful tools for modeling biological processes. Many inference gene network algorithms have been developed as techniques for extracting knowledge from gene expression data. Ensuring the reliability of the inferred gene relationships is a crucial task in any study in order to prove that the algorithms used are precise. Usually, this validation process can be carried out using prior biological knowledge. The metabolic pathways stored in...

  16. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  17. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  18. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Hugh M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space.

  19. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... Willi syndrome. PDF version of this page (220K) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  20. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  1. Genes and species

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez, Alberto G.

    2009-01-01

    La posibilidad de secuenciar y manipular los genes sigue abriendo fronteras en el estudio de las especies y la especiación. En tiempos recientes particularmente en dos direcciones. Por un lado, la secuenciación del gen COI (y otros) en miles de muestras de forma sistemática y masiva, el llamado "DNA barcoding", está revelando una gran cantidad de biodiversidad, en buena medida previamente no sospechada y correspondiente a especies crípticas (morfológicamente irreconocibles). En segundo lug...

  2. Computation in gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Asa; Siegelmann, Hava T.

    2004-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have the complex task of controlling all aspects of life. Using a model of gene expression by piecewise linear differential equations we show that this process can be considered as a process of computation. This is demonstrated by showing that this model can simulate memory bounded Turing machines. The simulation is robust with respect to perturbations of the system, an important property for both analog computers and biological systems. Robustness is achieved using a condition that ensures that the model equations, that are generally chaotic, follow a predictable dynamics.

  3. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  4. The GeneMANIA prediction server: biological network integration for gene prioritization and predicting gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warde-Farley, David; Donaldson, Sylva L; Comes, Ovi; Zuberi, Khalid; Badrawi, Rashad; Chao, Pauline; Franz, Max; Grouios, Chris; Kazi, Farzana; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Maitland, Anson; Mostafavi, Sara; Montojo, Jason; Shao, Quentin; Wright, George; Bader, Gary D; Morris, Quaid

    2010-07-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible, user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. Six organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and hundreds of data sets have been collected from GEO, BioGRID, Pathway Commons and I2D, as well as organism-specific functional genomics data sets. Users can select arbitrary subsets of the data sets associated with an organism to perform their analyses and can upload their own data sets to analyze. The GeneMANIA algorithm performs as well or better than other gene function prediction methods on yeast and mouse benchmarks. The high accuracy of the GeneMANIA prediction algorithm, an intuitive user interface and large database make GeneMANIA a useful tool for any biologist. PMID:20576703

  5. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gene...... expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  6. PROAPOPTOTIC FUNCTION OF FHIT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhe-fu; HAN De-min; ZHANG Luo; ZHANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene found recently was studied in a deep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof ep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof anti-tumor in human various type of tissue. Due to the high efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed gh efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed as a candidate of tumor suppressor gene though there are several opposite opinions.several opposite opinions. We stress the summary of some properties of FHIT gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed the stronger proapoptotic function of FHIT gene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of ene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of FHIT; and FHIT gene can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process e can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process induced by FHIT has no relation to p53 gene. In a ward, in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical et for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.le histidine triad (FHIT) gene; Apoptosis; Tumorigenesis; Tumor suppressor gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.

  7. Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer by Triangulating Gene Expression, Gene Location, and Survival Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates – or integrates – three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  8. Genes of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2003-10-01

    According to developmental genetics theories, aging is a genetically programmed and controlled continuum of development and maturation. Being dynamic and malleable processes, development and aging are controlled not only by genes but also by environmental and epigenetic influences that predominate in the second half of life. Genetic mutations affect many phenotypes in flies, worms, rodents, and humans which share several diseases or their equivalents, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and infectious disorders as well as their susceptibility to them. Life span and stress resistance are closely linked. Oxidative stress actually constitutes a defined hypothesis of aging in that macromolecule oxidative damage accumulates with age and tends to be associated with life expectancy. DNA methylation, a force in the regulation of gene expression, is also one of the biomarkers of genetic damage. The mitotic clock of aging is marked, if not guided, by telomeres, essential genetic elements stabilizing natural chromosomic ends. The dream of humans to live longer, healthy lives is being tested by attempts to modify longevity in animal models, frequently by dietary manipulation. The quest continues to understand the mechanisms of healthy aging, one of the most compelling areas of research in the 21st century. PMID:14577056

  9. Tetraspanin genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2012-07-01

    Tetraspanins represent a four-transmembrane protein superfamily with a conserved structure and amino acid residues that are present in mammals, insects, fungi and plants. Tetraspanins interact with each other or with other membrane proteins to form tetraspanin-enriched microdomains that play important roles in development, pathogenesis and immune responses via facilitating cell-cell adhesion and fusion, ligand binding and intracellular trafficking. Here, we emphasize evolutionary aspects within the plant kingdom based on genomic sequence information. A phylogenetic tree based on 155 tetraspanin genes of 11 plant species revealed ancient and fast evolving clades. Tetraspanins were only present in multicellular plants, were often duplicated in the plant genomes and predicted by the electronic Fluorescent Pictograph for gene expression analysis to be either functionally redundant or divergent. Tetraspanins contain a large extracellular loop with conserved cysteines that provide the binding sites for the interactions. The Arabidopsis thaliana TETRASPANIN1/TORNADO2/EKEKO has a function in leaf and root patterning and TETRASPANIN3 was identified in the plasmodesmatal proteome, suggesting a role in cell-cell communication during plant development.

  10. Immunity-related genes and gene families in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophides, George K; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Birney, Ewan; Blandin, Stephanie; Blass, Claudia; Brey, Paul T; Collins, Frank H; Danielli, Alberto; Dimopoulos, George; Hetru, Charles; Hoa, Ngo T; Hoffmann, Jules A; Kanzok, Stefan M; Letunic, Ivica; Levashina, Elena A; Loukeris, Thanasis G; Lycett, Gareth; Meister, Stephan; Michel, Kristin; Moita, Luis F; Müller, Hans-Michael; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan M; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Troxler, Laurent; Vernick, Kenneth D; Vlachou, Dina; Volz, Jennifer; von Mering, Christian; Xu, Jiannong; Zheng, Liangbiao; Bork, Peer; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-10-01

    We have identified 242 Anopheles gambiae genes from 18 gene families implicated in innate immunity and have detected marked diversification relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Immune-related gene families involved in recognition, signal modulation, and effector systems show a marked deficit of orthologs and excessive gene expansions, possibly reflecting selection pressures from different pathogens encountered in these insects' very different life-styles. In contrast, the multifunctional Toll signal transduction pathway is substantially conserved, presumably because of counterselection for developmental stability. Representative expression profiles confirm that sequence diversification is accompanied by specific responses to different immune challenges. Alternative RNA splicing may also contribute to expansion of the immune repertoire. PMID:12364793

  11. Gene-targeting pharmaceuticals for single-gene disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Arthur L; Meng, Linyan

    2016-04-15

    The concept of orphan drugs for treatment of orphan genetic diseases is perceived enthusiastically at present, and this is leading to research investment on the part of governments, disease-specific foundations and industry. This review attempts to survey the potential to use traditional pharmaceuticals as opposed to biopharmaceuticals to treat single-gene disorders. The available strategies include the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to alter splicing or knock-down expression of a transcript, siRNAs to knock-down gene expression and drugs for nonsense mutation read-through. There is an approved drug for biallelic knock-down of the APOB gene as treatment for familial hypercholesterolemia. Both ASOs and siRNAs are being explored to knock-down the transthyretin gene to prevent the related form of amyloidosis. The use of ASOs to alter gene-splicing to treat spinal muscular atrophy is in phase 3 clinical trials. Work is progressing on the use of ASOs to activate the normally silent paternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene in neurons as a treatment for Angelman syndrome. A gene-activation or gene-specific ramp-up strategy would be generally helpful if such could be developed. There is exciting theoretical potential for converting biopharmaceutical strategies such gene correction and CRISPR-Cas9 editing to a synthetic pharmaceutical approach. PMID:26628634

  12. Gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Marja L; Loos, Bruno G.; Crielaard, W.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP) susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polymorphism. Candidate gene polymorphism studies with a case-control design and reported genotype frequencies in CP patients were searched and reviewed. There is growing evidence that polymorphisms in ...

  13. Hormones, genes, and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Pfaff, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    With assays of hormone-sensitive behaviors, it is possible to demonstrate both direct and indirect actions of genes on mammalian social behaviors. Direct effects of estrogen receptor gene expression and progesterone receptor gene expression figure prominently in well analyzed neuroendocrine mechanisms for sex behavior, operating through a neural circuit that has been delineated. Indirect effects, notably the consequences of sexual differentiation, display complex d...

  14. Gene set analysis for GWAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We discuss the use of modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistics in the context of gene set analysis and review corresponding null and alternative hypotheses. Especially, we show that, when enhancing the impact of highly significant genes in the calculation of the test statistic...... parameter and the genesis and distribution of the gene-level statistics, and illustrate the effects of differential weighting in a real-life example....

  15. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC...

  16. Testing for gene-gene interaction with AMMI models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhdadi, Amina; Dubé, Marie-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that many common diseases are influenced by multiple genes and their interactions. There is currently a strong interest in testing for association between combinations of these genes and disease, in particular because genes that affect the risk of disease only in the presence of another genetic variant may not be detected in marginal analysis. In this paper we propose the use of additive main effect and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) models to detect and to quantify gene-gene interaction effects for a quantitative trait. The objective of the present research is to demonstrate the practical advantages of these models to describe complex interaction between two unlinked loci. Although gene-gene interactions have often been defined as a deviance from additive genetic effects, the residual term has generally not been appropriately treated. The AMMI models allow for the analysis of a two way factorial data structure and combine the analysis of variance of the two main genotype effects with a principal component analysis of the residual multiplicative interaction. The AMMI models for gene-gene interaction presented here allow for the testing of non additivity between the two loci, and also describe how their interaction structure fits the existing non-additivity. Moreover, these models can be used to identify the specific two genotypes combinations that contribute to the significant gene-gene interaction. We describe the use of the biplot to display the structure of the interaction and evaluate the performance of the AMMI and the special cases of the AMMI previously described by Tukey and Mandel with simulated data sets. Our simulated study showed that the AMMI model is as powerful as general linear models when the interaction is not modeled in the presence of marginal effects. However, in the presence of pure epitasis, i.e. in the absence of marginal effects, the AMMI method was not found to be superior to other tested regression methods.

  17. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  18. ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2004-01-01

    ERGDB is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed database and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant databases, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475

  19. Gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, Stephen B; McCaffery, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of increasingly accessible technologies for typing genetic variation, studies of gene-environment (G×E) interactions have proliferated in psychological research. Among the aims of such studies are testing developmental hypotheses and models of the etiology of behavioral disorders, defining boundaries of genetic and environmental influences, and identifying individuals most susceptible to risk exposures or most amenable to preventive and therapeutic interventions. This research also coincides with the emergence of unanticipated difficulties in detecting genetic variants of direct association with behavioral traits and disorders, which may be obscured if genetic effects are expressed only in predisposing environments. In this essay we consider these and other rationales for positing G×E interactions, review conceptual models meant to inform G×E interpretations from a psychological perspective, discuss points of common critique to which G×E research is vulnerable, and address the role of the environment in G×E interactions.

  20. Angiogenin gene polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongli Wang; Dongsheng Fan; Yingshuang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenin is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Here, we se-quenced the coding region of the angiogenin gene in genomic DNA from 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mel itus (129 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and 78 diabetic non-neuropathy pa-tients) and 268 healthy controls. Al subjects were from the Han population of northern China. No mutations were found. We then compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the angiogenin synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs11701 between the diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and controls, and between the diabetic neuropathy and non-neuropathy patients, using a case-control design. We detected no statistical y significant genetic associations. Angiogenin may not be associated with genetic susceptibility to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the Han population of northern China.

  1. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  2. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART I. GENE DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy fina...

  3. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  4. Erg gene: a human gene related to the ets oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, E.S.P.; Rao, V.N.; Papas, T.S.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone representing the complete coding sequence of a human gene named erg, related to the ets oncogene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this cDNA (4.6 kilobases long) revealed that this gene encodes a 363-residue protein whose predicted amino acid sequence showed a homology of approx. = 40% and 70% to two domains corresponding to the 5' and 3' regions of v-ets oncogene, respectively. A 3.2- to 3.6-kilobase and approx. = 5-kilobase transcript of the erg gene, which differ in size from those of the previously described Hu-ets 1 and Hu-ets 2 genes, were observed in different cells. These results suggest that the erg gene is a member of the ets oncogen family.

  5. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ming-Hsi; FIOCCHI, CLAUDIO; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ripke, Stephan; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Rebert, Nancy; Duerr, Richard H.; Achkar, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified at least 133 ulcerative colitis (UC) associated loci. The role of genetic factors in clinical practice is not clearly defined. The relevance of genetic variants to disease pathogenesis is still uncertain because of not characterized gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. We examined the predictive value of combining the 133 UC risk loci with genetic interactions in an ongoing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) GWAS. The Wellcome Trust...

  6. Evidence Based Selection of Housekeeping Genes

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, Hendrik J.M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Eveline S. J. M. de Bont; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e.g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental conditions and therefore their use for normalization is limited. We performed a meta-analysis of 13,629 human gene array samples in order to identify the most stable expressed genes. Here we show n...

  7. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA inter...

  8. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/. PMID:27131783

  9. Candidate genes for behavioural ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitzpatrick, M.J.; Ben-Sahar, Y.; Smid, H.M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Sokolowski, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of millions of years of evolutionary divergence, the conservation of gene function is common across distant lineages. As such, genes that are known to influence behaviour in one organism are likely to influence similar behaviours in other organisms. Recent studies of the evolution of behavi

  10. Gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Laine; B.G. Loos; W. Crielaard

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP) susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polym

  11. FunGeneClusterS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites of fungi are receiving an increasing amount of interest due to their prolific bioactivities and the fact that fungal biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often occurs from co-regulated and co-located gene clusters. This makes the gene clusters attractive for synthetic biology...

  12. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  13. Multifunctional nanorods for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Aliasger K.; Searson, Peter C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into somatic cells to supplement defective genes or provide additional biological functions, and can be achieved using either viral or synthetic non-viral delivery systems. Compared with viral vectors, synthetic gene-delivery systems, such as liposomes and polymers, offer several advantages including ease of production and reduced risk of cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, but their use has been limited by the relatively low transfection efficiency. This problem mainly stems from the difficulty in controlling their properties at the nanoscale. Synthetic inorganic gene carriers have received limited attention in the gene-therapy community, the only notable example being gold nanoparticles with surface-immobilized DNA applied to intradermal genetic immunization by particle bombardment. Here we present a non-viral gene-delivery system based on multisegment bimetallic nanorods that can simultaneously bind compacted DNA plasmids and targeting ligands in a spatially defined manner. This approach allows precise control of composition, size and multifunctionality of the gene-delivery system. Transfection experiments performed in vitro and in vivo provide promising results that suggest potential in genetic vaccination applications.

  14. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...

  15. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  16. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  17. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder;

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...... known genes and 157 ESTs were found to be highly relevant for CRC. The alteration of known genes was confirmed in >70% of the cases by array analysis of 25 single samples. Two-way hierarchical average linkage cluster analysis clustered normal tissue together with Dukes' A, clustered Dukes' B with Dukes...

  18. Delivery systems for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  19. Function analysis of unknown genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.

    2002-01-01

      This thesis entitled "Function analysis of unknown genes" presents the use of proteome analysis for the characterisation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes and their products (proteins especially those of unknown function). This study illustrates that proteome analysis can be used...... to describe different aspects of molecular biology of the cell, to study changes that occur in the cell due to overexpression or deletion of a gene and to identify various protein modifications. The biological questions and the results of the described studies show the diversity of the information that can...... genes and proteins. It reports the first global proteome database collecting 36 yeast single gene deletion mutants and selecting over 650 differences between analysed mutants and the wild type strain. The obtained results show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome...

  20. GeneMANIA Prediction Server 2013 Update

    OpenAIRE

    Zuberi, Khalid; Franz, Max; Rodriguez, Harold; Montojo, Jason; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Bader, Gary D.; Morris, Quaid

    2013-01-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query gene list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. GeneMANIA can also be used in a function predict...

  1. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  3. Progress of gene targeting in mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful approach of study- ing the genefunction in vivo. Specific genetic modifications, including simple gene disruption, point mutations, large chromosomal deletions and rearrangements, targeted incor- poration of foreign genes, could be introduced into the mouse genome by gene targeting. Recent studies make it possible to do the gene targeting with temporal and spatial control.

  4. Genes, Economics, and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H; Frey, Bruno S

    2012-11-01

    We explore the influence of genetic variation on subjective well-being by employing a twin design and genetic association study. In a nationally-representative twin sample, we first show that about 33% of the variation in life satisfaction is explained by genetic variation. Although previous studies have shown that baseline happiness is significantly heritable, little research has considered molecular genetic associations with subjective well-being. We study the relationship between a functional polymorphism on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and life satisfaction. We initially find that individuals with the longer, transcriptionally more efficient variant of this genotype report greater life satisfaction (n=2,545, p=0.012). However, our replication attempts on independent samples produce mixed results indicating that more work needs to be done to better understand the relationship between this genotype and subjective well-being. This work has implications for how economists think about the determinants of utility, and the extent to which exogenous shocks might affect individual well-being.

  5. Genes and equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, C

    2004-12-01

    The way people think about equality as a value will influence how they think genetic interventions should be regulated. In this paper the author uses the taxonomy of equality put forth by Derek Parfit and applies this to the issue of genetic interventions. It is argued that telic egalitarianism is untenable and that deontic egalitarianism collapses into prioritarianism. The priority view maintains that it is morally more important to benefit the people who are worse off. Once this precision has been given to the concerns egalitarians have, a number of diverse issues must be considered before determining what the just regulation of genetic interventions would be. Consideration must be given to the current situation of the least advantaged, the fiscal realities behind genetic interventions, the budget constraints on other social programmes egalitarians believe should receive scarce public funds, and the interconnected nature of genetic information. These considerations might lead egalitarians to abandon what they take to be the obvious policy recommendations for them to endorse regarding the regulation of gene therapies and enhancements. PMID:15574450

  6. Genes, Economics, and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H; Frey, Bruno S

    2012-11-01

    We explore the influence of genetic variation on subjective well-being by employing a twin design and genetic association study. In a nationally-representative twin sample, we first show that about 33% of the variation in life satisfaction is explained by genetic variation. Although previous studies have shown that baseline happiness is significantly heritable, little research has considered molecular genetic associations with subjective well-being. We study the relationship between a functional polymorphism on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and life satisfaction. We initially find that individuals with the longer, transcriptionally more efficient variant of this genotype report greater life satisfaction (n=2,545, p=0.012). However, our replication attempts on independent samples produce mixed results indicating that more work needs to be done to better understand the relationship between this genotype and subjective well-being. This work has implications for how economists think about the determinants of utility, and the extent to which exogenous shocks might affect individual well-being. PMID:24349601

  7. c.194 A>C (Q65P) mutation in the LMX1B gene in patients with nail-patella syndrome associated with glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Pablo; Sanhueza, Felipe; Lopez, Pamela; Reyes, Loreto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical, ophthalmic, extraophthalmic, and genetic characteristics of nail-patella syndrome (NPS) in a Chilean family and to investigate the expressivity of open angle glaucoma (OAG) and ocular hypertension (OHT) in the family members. Methods Five family members affected with NPS and two unaffected members underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including computerized visual field, optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the optic disc and ultrasound pachymetry. Renal function was assessed by urinalysis and blood tests. Orthopedic evaluations were also performed, including radiological studies of the wrist, elbow and hip joints. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes of the five affected and two unaffected family members. Exons 2–6 of the LIM homeobox transcription factor 1-beta (LMX1B) gene were screened for mutations by DNA sequencing of the proband. We also screened for mutations in exon 2 by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the other participants and 91 blood donors. Results Five living family members from three generations were positively diagnosed with NPS, three of them with varying degrees of OAG and one with OHT. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured by spectral domain OCT was below normal values in three individuals. All subjects evaluated had normal nephrologic function. Orthopedic, clinical, and radiological alterations were compatible with NPS. Screening for mutations in exons 2- 6 of LMX1B showed a heterozygous missense mutation c.194 A>C changing glutamine to proline within exon 2 in codon 65 (Q65P) of the coding sequence. This mutation was present in all NPS subjects and absent in the unaffected family members and in 91 Chilean blood donors. Conclusions This is the first report of c.194 A>C mutation in LMX1B in a Chilean family with NPS and the second worldwide. The phenotype associated with this mutation is variable within the family

  8. Gene Electrotransfer: A Mechanistic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosazza, Christelle; Meglic, Sasa Haberl; Zumbusch, Andreas; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is a powerful method of DNA delivery offering several medical applications, among the most promising of which are DNA vaccination and gene therapy for cancer treatment. Electroporation entails the application of electric fields to cells which then experience a local and transient change of membrane permeability. Although gene electrotransfer has been extensively studied in in vitro and in vivo environments, the mechanisms by which DNA enters and navigates through cells are not fully understood. Here we present a comprehensive review of the body of knowledge concerning gene electrotransfer that has been accumulated over the last three decades. For that purpose, after briefly reviewing the medical applications that gene electrotransfer can provide, we outline membrane electropermeabilization, a key process for the delivery of DNA and smaller molecules. Since gene electrotransfer is a multipart process, we proceed our review in describing step by step our current understanding, with particular emphasis on DNA internalization and intracellular trafficking. Finally, we turn our attention to in vivo testing and methodology for gene electrotransfer. PMID:27029943

  9. Genes: an Open Access Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Peter W. Young

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Genes have been in the scientific vocabulary for a hundred years. The term "gene" was proposed by the Danish plant scientist Wilhelm Johannsen in the first decade of the 20th century. For Johannsen, the gene remained an abstract concept, "free of any hypothesis" [1], but others were already pointing to chromosomes as the likely location of genes. The science of genetics was born at that time, and genes were rapidly connected with mutations, with patterns of inheritance, with development, with quantitative traits, with evolution and with biochemical pathways. All this was achieved without knowledge of the physical nature of genes, but this changed in mid-century with the discoveries of molecular biology. DNA was revealed as the genetic material, and the mechanisms were elucidated by which the information was encoded, and propagated, and linked to the phenotype. However, the concept of a "gene" did not become clearer. Quite the reverse, as the units of mutation, of recombination, of inheritance, of expression, of regulation, etc. did not necessarily coincide. [...

  10. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area.

  11. GeneNet: a database on structure and functional organisation of gene networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ananko, E A; Podkolodny, N. L.; Stepanenko, I. L.; Ignatieva, E. V.; Podkolodnaya, O. A.; Kolchanov, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    The GeneNet database is designed for accumulation of information on gene networks. Original technology applied in GeneNet enables description of not only a gene network structure and functional relationships between components, but also metabolic and signal transduction pathways. Specialised software, GeneNet Viewer, automatically displays the graphical diagram of gene networks described in the database. Current release 3.0 of GeneNet database contains descriptions of 25 gene networks, 945 pr...

  12. Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160528.html Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity Differences in 'genetic ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Hispanic American Health Recent Health ...

  13. Personalized Medicine: Matching Treatments to Your Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Personalized Medicine Matching Treatments to Your Genes You’re one of a kind. It’s not ... personalized medicine begins with the unique set of genes you inherited from your parents. Genes are stretches ...

  14. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? The Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders KidsHealth > For Teens > The Basics ... such as treating health problems. What Is a Gene? To understand how genes work, let's review some ...

  15. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mentor Submit Your Press Release Donate Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency ( ...

  16. The Ensembl gene annotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aken, Bronwen L; Ayling, Sarah; Barrell, Daniel; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valery; Fairley, Susan; Fernandez Banet, Julio; Billis, Konstantinos; García Girón, Carlos; Hourlier, Thibaut; Howe, Kevin; Kähäri, Andreas; Kokocinski, Felix; Martin, Fergal J; Murphy, Daniel N; Nag, Rishi; Ruffier, Magali; Schuster, Michael; Tang, Y Amy; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Zadissa, Amonida; Flicek, Paul; Searle, Stephen M J

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl gene annotation system has been used to annotate over 70 different vertebrate species across a wide range of genome projects. Furthermore, it generates the automatic alignment-based annotation for the human and mouse GENCODE gene sets. The system is based on the alignment of biological sequences, including cDNAs, proteins and RNA-seq reads, to the target genome in order to construct candidate transcript models. Careful assessment and filtering of these candidate transcripts ultimately leads to the final gene set, which is made available on the Ensembl website. Here, we describe the annotation process in detail.Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org/index.html. PMID:27337980

  17. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin;

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  18. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  19. [Pathogenicity and pneumococcal capsular genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E; García, P; López, R

    1994-01-01

    Pneumococci remain to be one of the most prominent human pathogens. Increasing efforts are being dedicated to the development of improved vaccines with wider specificity. Since a clear understanding of the genetics of capsular types in Streptococcus pneumoniae is missing, our efforts are oriented to characterize, at the molecular level, the genes involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. We have cloned and sequenced a chromosomal DNA fragment of a clinical isolate of type 3 pneumococcus and showed that it contains a type 3 specific gene as well as genes common to other serotypes.

  20. Parsimonious selection of useful genes in microarray gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    González Navarro, Félix Fernando; Belanche Muñoz, Luis Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Machine Learning methods have of late made significant efforts to solving multidisciplinary problems in the field of cancer classification in microarray gene expression data. These tasks are characterized by a large number of features and a few observations, making the modeling a non-trivial undertaking. In this work we apply entropic filter methods for gene selection, in combination with several off-the-shelf classifiers. The introduction of bootstrap resampling techniques permits the achiev...

  1. Integrating Gene Ontology and Blast to predict gene functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-gang; MO Zhi-hong

    2007-01-01

    A GoBlast system was built to predict gene function by integrating Blast search and Gene Ontology (GO) annotations together. The operation system was based on Debian Linux 3.1, with Apache as the web server and Mysql database as the data storage system. FASTA files with GO annotations were taken as the sequence source for blast alignment, which were formatted by wu-formatdb program. The GoBlast system includes three Bioperl modules in Perl: a data input module, a data process module and a data output module. A GoBlast query starts with an amino acid or nucleotide sequence. It ends with an output in an html page, presenting high scoring gene products which are of a high homology to the queried sequence and listing associated GO terms beside respective gene poducts. A simple click on a GO term leads to the detailed explanation of the specific gene function. This avails gene function prediction by Blast. GoBlast can be a very useful tool for functional genome research and is available for free at http://bioq.org/goblast.

  2. Viral vectors for vascular gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Lukas; Preis, Meir; Weisz, Anat; Koren, Belly; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2002-01-01

    Vascular gene therapy is the focus of multiple experimental and clinical research efforts. While several genes with therapeutic potential have been identified, the best method of gene delivery is unknown. Viral vectors have the capacity to transfer genes at high efficiency rates. Several viral-based vectors have been used in experimental vascular gene therapy for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer. Adenoviral-based vectors are being used for the induction of angiogenesis in phase 1 and 2 clini...

  3. Evolution of the nuclear receptor gene superfamily.

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, V; Hänni, C; Coll, J.; F. Catzeflis; Stéhelin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear receptor genes represent a large family of genes encoding receptors for various hydrophobic ligands such as steroids, vitamin D, retinoic acid and thyroid hormones. This family also contains genes encoding putative receptors for unknown ligands. Nuclear receptor gene products are composed of several domains important for transcriptional activation, DNA binding (C domain), hormone binding and dimerization (E domain). It is not known whether these genes have evolved through gene duplica...

  4. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of ...

  5. Methylation profile of the promoter CpG islands of 31 genes that may contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Li Xu; Jing-De Zhu; Jian Yu; Hong-Yu Zhang; Meng-Hong Sun; Jun Gu; Xiang Du; Da-Ren Shi; Peng Wang; Zhen-Hua Yang

    2004-01-01

    /65). The following genes exhibited moderate changes in methylation: O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) (20%, 13/65),mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2 (E. coli)(hMLH1) (18%, 12/65), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (melanoma, p16, inhibits CDK4) (p16INK4a) (10%, 10/65),methylated in tumor 1 (MINT1) (15%, 10/65), methylated in tumor 31 (MINT31) (11%, 7/65). The rest changed greatly in the methylation pattern in colorectal cancer (CRC): cyclin A1 (cyclin a1) (100%, 65/65), caudal type homeobox transcription factor 1 (CDX1) (100%, 65/65),RAR-(85%, 55/65), myogenic factor 3 (MYOD1) (69%, 45/65),cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (p15, inhibits CDK4)(p15INK4b) (68%, 44/65), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (prostaglandin G/H synthase and cydooxygenase)(COX2) (72%, 47/65), cadherin 13, H-cadherin (heart)(CDH13) (65%, 42/65), CAAX box 1 (CXX1) (58%, 38/65),tumor protein p73 (p73) (63%, 41/65) and Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) (58%, 38/65). However, no significant correlation of changes in methylation with any given clinical-pathological features was detected. Furthermore, the frequent changes in methylation appeared to be an early phase event of colon carcinogenesis. The in situ expression of 10 genes was assessed by the immunohistochemical approach at the protein level: CDH1, CDH13, COX2, cyclin A1, hMLH1,MGMT, p14ARF, p73, RAR-, and TIMP3 genes in the context of the methylation status in colorectal cancer. No clear correlation between the hypermethylation of the promoter CpG islands and the negative expression of the genes was established.CONCLUSION: The methylation profile of 31 genes was established in patients with colon cancer and colorectal adenomas, which provides new insights into the DNA methylation mediated mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer and may be of prognostic values for colorectal cancer.

  6. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin;

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  7. The evolution of resistance gene in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Haiyan; LIU Xuemin; LI Lijun; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    Resistance genes enable plants to fight against plant pathogens. Plant resistance genes (R gene) are organized complexly in genome. Some resistance gene sequence data enable an insight into R gene structure and gene evolution. Some sites like Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) are of specific interest since homologous recombination can happen. Crossing over, transposon insertion and excision and mutation can produce new specificity. Three models explaining R gene evolution were discussed. More information needed for dissection of R gene evolution though some step can be inferred from genetic and sequence analysis.

  8. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  9. Gene discovery in Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Burgos Nelia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triatoma infestans is the most relevant vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone of South America. Since its genome has not yet been studied, sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs is one of the most powerful tools for efficiently identifying large numbers of expressed genes in this insect vector. Results In this work, we generated 826 ESTs, resulting in an increase of 47% in the number of ESTs available for T. infestans. These ESTs were assembled in 471 unique sequences, 151 of which represent 136 new genes for the Reduviidae family. Conclusions Among the putative new genes for the Reduviidae family, we identified and described an interesting subset of genes involved in development and reproduction, which constitute potential targets for insecticide development.

  10. Gene therapy in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masaaki; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2006-08-01

    Lung transplantation is effective life-saving therapy for the treatment of a variety of end-stage lung diseases. However, the application of lung transplantation is hindered by multiple factors such as the shortage of organ donors, early graft failure and chronic graft dysfunction. These problems are related to various lung injuries before and after transplantation including donor brain-death-related lung injury, ischemia, reperfusion and immune-mediated injuries. Gene transfection presents a potential molecular therapeutic solution to modify the transplanted organ such that it is better able to deal with these obstacles. In fact, in many ways lung transplantation is an ideal situation for gene therapy in that: 1) the targeted injuries are predictable (e.g. IR injury), 2) only transient gene expression is needed in many instances, 3) the immunosuppressive regimen necessary to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ attenuates vector-induced inflammation and the immune response to the vectors or the transgene products, and thus effectively augments and prolongs gene expression; 4) the anatomical structure of the lung enables trans-airway access and local gene delivery - as well as re-transfection. A number of issues need to be considered to develop a strategy of gene delivery in lung transplantation: administration route (intra-airway, trans-vascular, intravenous, intramuscular), timing (donor in-vivo, ex-vivo organ transfection or recipient), vector selection and gene selection. Based on our work and the work of others, over the last decade, we present the state of art of in gene therapy in lung transplantation and exciting future directions in the field. PMID:16918334

  11. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Bilke, Sven

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent ...

  12. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  14. Gemini surfactants as gene carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Piskorska

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gemini surfactants are a new class of amphiphilic compounds built from two classic surfactant moieties bound together by a special spacer group. These compounds appear to be excellent for creating complexes with DNA and are effective in mediating transfection. Thanks to their construction, DNA carrier molecules built from gemini surfactants are able to deliver genes to cells of almost any DNA molecule size, unattainable when using viral gene delivery systems. Moreover, they are much safer for living organisms.

  15. Gene therapy in clinical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Selkirk, S

    2004-01-01

    Although the field of gene therapy has experienced significant setbacks and limited success, it is one of the most promising and active research fields in medicine. Interest in this therapeutic modality is based on the potential for treatment and cure of some of the most malignant and devastating diseases affecting humans. Over the next decade, the relevance of gene therapy to medical practices will increase and it will become important for physicians to understand the basic principles and st...

  16. Vascular gene expression: a hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Navarro, Angélica C.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular ti...

  17. Rice's Salt Tolerance Gene Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with US colleagues, CAS researchers have made significant progress in their studies into functional genes for key agronomic traits by cloning SKC1, a salt-tolerant functional gene of rice and making clear its biological functions and mechanisms. This pioneering work,which was reported in the Oct. issue of Nature Genetics (37:1141-1146), is believed to hold promise to increase the output of the crop plant in this country.

  18. Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja L. Laine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polymorphism. Candidate gene polymorphism studies with a case-control design and reported genotype frequencies in CP patients were searched and reviewed. There is growing evidence that polymorphisms in the IL1, IL6, IL10, vitamin D receptor, and CD14 genes may be associated with CP in certain populations. However, carriage rates of the rare (-allele of any polymorphism varied considerably among studies and most of the studies appeared under-powered and did not correct for other risk factors. Larger cohorts, well-defined phenotypes, control for other risk factors, and analysis of multiple genes and polymorphisms within the same pathway are needed to get a more comprehensive insight into the contribution of gene polymorphisms in CP.

  19. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  20. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  1. Origin and evolution of new genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; YANG Shuang; PENG Lixin; CHEN Hong; WANG Wen

    2004-01-01

    Organisms have variable genome sizes andcontain different numbers of genes. This difference demonstrates that new gene origination is a fundamental process in evolutionary biology. Though the study of the origination of new genes dated back more than half a century ago, it is not until the 1990s when the first young genejingwei was found that empirical investigation of the molecular mechanisms of origination of new genes became possible. In the recent years,several young genes were identified and the studies on these genes have greatly enriched the knowledge of this field. Yet more details in a general picture of new genes origination are to be clarified. We have developed a systematic approach to searching for young genes at the genomic level, in the hope to summarize a general pattern of the origination and evolution of new genes, such as the rate of new gene appearance, impact of new genes on their host genomes, etc.

  2. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  3. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  4. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  5. Characterizing gene-gene interactions in a statistical epistasis network of twelve candidate genes for obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Rishika; Hu, Ting; Moore, Jason H.; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent findings have reemphasized the importance of epistasis, or gene-gene interactions, as a contributing factor to the unexplained heritability of obesity. Network-based methods such as statistical epistasis networks (SEN), present an intuitive framework to address the computational challenge of studying pairwise interactions between thousands of genetic variants. In this study, we aimed to analyze pairwise interactions that are associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) between SNPs...

  6. A gene sets approach for identifying prognostic gene signatures for outcome prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Yong Sung; Kim Seon-Young

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene expression profiling is a promising approach to better estimate patient prognosis; however, there are still unresolved problems, including little overlap among similarly developed gene sets and poor performance of a developed gene set in other datasets. Results We applied a gene sets approach to develop a prognostic gene set from multiple gene expression datasets. By analyzing 12 independent breast cancer gene expression datasets comprising 1,756 tissues with 2,411 pr...

  7. How Gene Patents May Inhibit Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo-Engelstein, Lisa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we point out three possible ways gene patents could impede scientific research. First, gene patent laws might exacerbate the culture of secrecy ubiquitous in science. Second, gene patents may limit researchers’ ability to study poly or multigenic diseases without access to all genetic etiologies. Third, gene patents could result in a “patent thicket”.

  8. Analysis of Duplicate Genes in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.M. Cai; K.J. Van; M.Y. Kim; S.H. Lee

    2007-01-01

    @@ Gene duplication is a major determinant of the size and gene complement of eukaryotic genomes (Lockton and Gaut, 2005). There are a number of different ways in which duplicate genes can arise (Sankoff, 2001), but the most spectacular method of gene duplication may be whole genome duplication via polyploidization.

  9. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  10. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S;

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a...

  11. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...... investigated by microarray analysis, and descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate the effects of 1) electroporation, 2) DNA injection, and 3) time after treatment. The biological significance of the results was assessed by gene annotation and supervised cluster analysis.Generally, electroporation...

  12. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  13. FINDING GENERIFS VIA GENE ONTOLOGY ANNOTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhiyong; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    A Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF) is a concise phrase describing a function of a gene in the Entrez Gene database. Applying techniques from the area of natural language processing known as automatic summarization, it is possible to link the Entrez Gene database, the Gene Ontology, and the biomedical literature. A system was implemented that automatically suggests a sentence from a PubMed/MEDLINE abstract as a candidate GeneRIF by exploiting a gene’s GO annotations along with location f...

  14. Molecular Studies on Preproinsulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin plays an important role in maintaining the blood glucose level of the body. The β-cells of pancreas produce insulin in the form of precursor that is preproinsulin. The gene of preproinsulin provides an interesting system for addressing question related to molecular evolution. Recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to isolate and sequence the chromosomal genes coding for unique protein products. Although preproinsulin of various organism has been isolated and cloned, but there is no report from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis that is our major livestock. The genomic DNA of buffalo was isolated using Laura-Lee-Boodram method. The part of preproinsulin gene (596bp and 520bp using BPPI-UPS and bpiful_F as forward and BC1-C as reverse primer was amplified. Cloning of amplified fragments of gene were performed in pCR 2.1 vector. Positive clones were screened on the basis of blue white selection. The band obtained on 596bp and 520bp after colony PCR confirmed the successful cloning of preproinsulin gene in pCR 2.1 vector.

  15. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  16. Clock Genes in Glia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are periodic patterns in biological processes that allow the organisms to anticipate changes in the environment. These rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in vertebrates. At a molecular level, circadian rhythms are regulated by the so-called clock genes, which oscillate in a periodic manner. The protein products of clock genes are transcription factors that control their own and other genes’ transcription, collectively known as “clock-controlled genes.” Several brain regions other than the SCN express circadian rhythms of clock genes, including the amygdala, the olfactory bulb, the retina, and the cerebellum. Glia cells in these structures are expected to participate in rhythmicity. However, only certain types of glia cells may be called “glial clocks,” since they express PER-based circadian oscillators, which depend of the SCN for their synchronization. This contribution summarizes the current information about clock genes in glia cells, their plausible role as oscillators and their medical implications. PMID:27666286

  17. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  18. The UNC-4 homeobox protein represses mab-9 expression in DA motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari, Gholamali; Appleford, Peter J; Seago, Julian;

    2011-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor mab-9 has been shown to be required for the correct fate of the male-specific blast cells B and F, normal posterior hypodermal morphogenesis, and for the correct axon migration of motor neurons that project circumferential commissures to dorsal muscles. In this stud...

  19. The Transcription Factor Orthodenticle Homeobox 2 Influences Axonal Projections and Vulnerability of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chee Yeun; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Simeone, Antonio; Lin, Zhicheng; Martin, Eden; Vance, Jeffery; Isacson, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Two adjacent groups of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, A9 (substantia nigra pars compacta) and A10 (ventral tegmental area), have distinct projections and exhibit differential vulnerability in Parkinson's disease. Little is known about transcription factors that influence midbrain dopaminergic subgroup phenotypes or their potential role in disease.…

  20. Genes Contributing to the Development of Alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Edenberg, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors (i.e., variations in specific genes) account for a substantial portion of the risk for alcoholism. However, identifying those genes and the specific variations involved is challenging. Researchers have used both case–control and family studies to identify genes related to alcoholism risk. In addition, different strategies such as candidate gene analyses and genome-wide association studies have been used. The strongest effects have been found for specific variants of genes that...

  1. Switching on the Lights for Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Winkeler; Miguel Sena-Esteves; Paulis, Leonie E.M.; Hongfeng Li; Yannic Waerzeggers; Benedikt Rückriem; Uwe Himmelreich; Markus Klein; Parisa Monfared; Rueger, Maria A.; Michael Heneka; Stefan Vollmar; Mathias Hoehn; Cornel Fraefel; Rudolf Graf

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for non-invasive and quantitative imaging of gene expression in vivo have been developed over the past decade. Non-invasive assessment of the dynamics of gene regulation is of interest for the detection of endogenous disease-specific biological alterations (e.g., signal transduction) and for monitoring the induction and regulation of therapeutic genes (e.g., gene therapy). To demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of regulated expression of any type of gene after in vivo transductio...

  2. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  3. Repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, C. Daniel; Regelson, Moira; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stan,; Horvath, Steve; Marahrens, York

    2006-01-01

    Housekeeping genes are expressed across a wide variety of tissues. Since repetitive sequences have been reported to influence the expression of individual genes, we employed a novel approach to determine whether housekeeping genes can be distinguished from tissue-specific genes their repetitive sequence context. We show that Alu elements are more highly concentrated around housekeeping genes while various longer (>400-bp) repetitive sequences ("repeats"), including Long Interspersed Nuclear E...

  4. Concerted evolution of human amylase genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Gumucio, D L; Wiebauer, K; Caldwell, R M; Samuelson, L C; Meisler, M H

    1988-01-01

    Cosmid clones containing 250 kilobases of genomic DNA from the human amylase gene cluster have been isolated. These clones contain seven distinct amylase genes which appear to comprise the complete multigene family. By sequence comparison with the cDNAs, we have identified two pancreatic amylase genes and three salivary amylase genes. Two truncated pseudogenes were also recovered. Intergenic distances of 17 to 22 kilobases separate the amylase gene copies. Within the past 10 million years, du...

  5. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    KamranAliAhmed; BrianJamesDavis; TorrenceMWilson; GregoryAWiseman; MarkJFederspiel; JohnCMorris

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our...

  6. Gene Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abaan, Ogan D.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy, being a novel treatment for many diseases, is readily applicable for the treatment of cancer patients. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. There are many clinical protocols for the treatment of breast cancer, and gene therapy is now being considered within current protocols. This review will focus on the basic concepts of cancer gene therapy strategies (suicide gene, tumor suppressor gene, anti-angiogenesis, immunotherapy, oncolytic viruses and ribozyme/antisens...

  7. Gene functional similarity search tool (GFSST)

    OpenAIRE

    Russo James J; Sheng Huitao; Zhang Jinghui; Zhang Peisen; Osborne Brian; Buetow Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background With the completion of the genome sequences of human, mouse, and other species and the advent of high throughput functional genomic research technologies such as biomicroarray chips, more and more genes and their products have been discovered and their functions have begun to be understood. Increasing amounts of data about genes, gene products and their functions have been stored in databases. To facilitate selection of candidate genes for gene-disease research, genetic as...

  8. Novel algorithms for in vitro gene synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Thachuk, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Methods for reliable synthesis of long genes offer great promise for novel protein synthesis via expression of synthetic genes. Current technologies use computational methods for design of short oligos, which can then be reliably synthesized and assembled into the desired target gene. A precursor to this process is optimization of the gene sequence for improved protein expression. In this thesis, we provide the first results on the computational complexity of oligo design for gene synthesis. ...

  9. Gene networks and haloperidol-induced catalepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Iancu, O. D.; Darakjian, P.; Malmanger, B.; Walter, N. A. R.; McWeeney, S.; Hitzemann, R

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the changes in striatal gene network structure induced by short-term selective breeding from a heterogeneous stock for haloperidol response. Brain (striatum) gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina WG 8.2 array, and the datasets from responding and non-responding selected lines were independently interrogated using a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We detected several gene modules (groups of coexpressed genes) in each dataset; the ...

  10. Modelling Nonstationary Gene Regulatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grzegorcyzk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in systems biology is to infer gene regulatory networks from postgenomic data, and dynamic Bayesian networks have been widely applied as a popular tool to this end. The standard approach for nondiscretised data is restricted to a linear model and a homogeneous Markov chain. Recently, various generalisations based on changepoint processes and free allocation mixture models have been proposed. The former aim to relax the homogeneity assumption, whereas the latter are more flexible and, in principle, more adequate for modelling nonlinear processes. In our paper, we compare both paradigms and discuss theoretical shortcomings of the latter approach. We show that a model based on the changepoint process yields systematically better results than the free allocation model when inferring nonstationary gene regulatory processes from simulated gene expression time series. We further cross-compare the performance of both models on three biological systems: macrophages challenged with viral infection, circadian regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana, and morphogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. The plant ADH gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strommer, Judith

    2011-04-01

    The structures, evolution and functions of alcohol dehydrogenase gene families and their products have been scrutinized for half a century. Our understanding of the enzyme structure and catalytic activity of plant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-P) is based on the vast amount of information available for its animal counterpart. The probable origins of the enzyme from a simple β-coil and eventual emergence from a glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase have been well described. There is compelling evidence that the small ADH gene families found in plants today are the survivors of multiple rounds of gene expansion and contraction. To the probable original function of their products in the terminal reaction of anaerobic fermentation have been added roles in yeast-like aerobic fermentation and the production of characteristic scents that act to attract animals that serve as pollinators or agents of seed dispersal and to protect against herbivores.

  12. Gene Technology in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dan Sun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold, cells and signaling factors are regarded as the three essential components in tissue engineering. With the development of molecular and cell biology, gene technology is beginning to show a promising position in tissue engineering as it can influence these essential components at DNA-level. By introducing plasmid DNA or genes encoding certain signaling factors (growth factors/cytokines into the cells, required growth factors/cytokines can be expressed and secreted spatially and temporally by the transfected cells, which will promote the differentiation, proliferation and organization of the cells on the scaffold. Protein-based scaffolds which have specific structures can also be prepared genetically to induce attachment and spreading of the cells. This paper reviews research work of gene technology developed in tissue engineering.

  13. Detecting Sequence Homology at the Gene Cluster Level with MultiGeneBlast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Nowick, Katja

    2013-01-01

    The genes encoding many biomolecular systems and pathways are genomically organized in operons or gene clusters. With MultiGeneBlast, we provide a user-friendly and effective tool to perform homology searches with operons or gene clusters as basic units, instead of single genes. The contextualizatio

  14. EasyGene – a prokaryotic gene finder that ranks ORFs by statistical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Schou; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2003-01-01

    annotated as genes.Results: In this paper, we present a new automated gene-finding method, EasyGene, which estimates the statistical significance of a predicted gene. The gene finder is based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) that is automatically estimated for a new genome. Using extensions of similarities...

  15. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  16. Electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer L; Dean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been used extensively to transfer DNA to bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells in culture for the past 30 years. Over this time, numerous advances have been made, from using fields to facilitate cell fusion, delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to cells and tissues, and most importantly, gene and drug delivery in living tissues from rodents to man. Electroporation uses electrical fields to transiently destabilize the membrane allowing the entry of normally impermeable macromolecules into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, at the appropriate field strengths, the application of these fields to tissues results in little, if any, damage or trauma. Indeed, electroporation has even been used successfully in human trials for gene delivery for the treatment of tumors and for vaccine development. Electroporation can lead to between 100 and 1000-fold increases in gene delivery and expression and can also increase both the distribution of cells taking up and expressing the DNA as well as the absolute amount of gene product per cell (likely due to increased delivery of plasmids into each cell). Effective electroporation depends on electric field parameters, electrode design, the tissues and cells being targeted, and the plasmids that are being transferred themselves. Most importantly, there is no single combination of these variables that leads to greatest efficacy in every situation; optimization is required in every new setting. Electroporation-mediated in vivo gene delivery has proven highly effective in vaccine production, transgene expression, enzyme replacement, and control of a variety of cancers. Almost any tissue can be targeted with electroporation, including muscle, skin, heart, liver, lung, and vasculature. This chapter will provide an overview of the theory of electroporation for the delivery of DNA both in individual cells and in tissues and its application for in vivo gene delivery in a number of animal models.

  17. Genomics of local adaptation with gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigano, Anna; Friesen, Vicki L

    2016-05-01

    Gene flow is a fundamental evolutionary force in adaptation that is especially important to understand as humans are rapidly changing both the natural environment and natural levels of gene flow. Theory proposes a multifaceted role for gene flow in adaptation, but it focuses mainly on the disruptive effect that gene flow has on adaptation when selection is not strong enough to prevent the loss of locally adapted alleles. The role of gene flow in adaptation is now better understood due to the recent development of both genomic models of adaptive evolution and genomic techniques, which both point to the importance of genetic architecture in the origin and maintenance of adaptation with gene flow. In this review, we discuss three main topics on the genomics of adaptation with gene flow. First, we investigate selection on migration and gene flow. Second, we discuss the three potential sources of adaptive variation in relation to the role of gene flow in the origin of adaptation. Third, we explain how local adaptation is maintained despite gene flow: we provide a synthesis of recent genomic models of adaptation, discuss the genomic mechanisms and review empirical studies on the genomics of adaptation with gene flow. Despite predictions on the disruptive effect of gene flow in adaptation, an increasing number of studies show that gene flow can promote adaptation, that local adaptations can be maintained despite high gene flow, and that genetic architecture plays a fundamental role in the origin and maintenance of local adaptation with gene flow.

  18. GeneMANIA prediction server 2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberi, Khalid; Franz, Max; Rodriguez, Harold; Montojo, Jason; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Bader, Gary D; Morris, Quaid

    2013-07-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query gene list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. GeneMANIA can also be used in a function prediction setting: given a query gene, GeneMANIA finds a small set of genes that are most likely to share function with that gene based on their interactions with it. Enriched Gene Ontology categories among this set can sometimes point to the function of the gene. Seven organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, Rattus norvegicus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and hundreds of data sets have been collected from GEO, BioGRID, IRefIndex and I2D, as well as organism-specific functional genomics data sets. Users can customize their search by selecting specific data sets to query and by uploading their own data sets to analyze. PMID:23794635

  19. A gene-based information gain method for detecting gene-gene interactions in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Huang, Dongli; Guo, Maozu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Lv, Hongchao; Wang, Limei

    2015-11-01

    Currently, most methods for detecting gene-gene interactions (GGIs) in genome-wide association studies are divided into SNP-based methods and gene-based methods. Generally, the gene-based methods can be more powerful than SNP-based methods. Some gene-based entropy methods can only capture the linear relationship between genes. We therefore proposed a nonparametric gene-based information gain method (GBIGM) that can capture both linear relationship and nonlinear correlation between genes. Through simulation with different odds ratio, sample size and prevalence rate, GBIGM was shown to be valid and more powerful than classic KCCU method and SNP-based entropy method. In the analysis of data from 17 genes on rheumatoid arthritis, GBIGM was more effective than the other two methods as it obtains fewer significant results, which was important for biological verification. Therefore, GBIGM is a suitable and powerful tool for detecting GGIs in case-control studies.

  20. From gene to disease; hypophosphataemic rickets and the PHEX gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M; van Dael, C.M.L.; Verrijn Stuart, A.A.; van der Hout, A.H.; Rump, P.

    2006-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets is associated with mutations in the PHEX gene on the short arm of the X chromosome, encoding a membrane-bound endoprotease which is predominantly expressed in osteoblasts. Defective PHEX function leaves phosphaturic peptides such as FGF23 uncleaved, enabling these