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Sample records for angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

  1. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Atsushi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki; Matsuura, Satoko; Murakami, Mami; Murai, Atsuko; Mori, Takashi; Maruo, Kouji; Kimura, Tohru; Masegi, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA) tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF), flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A), FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using canine-specific primer sets. Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF) was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the other tumors. We established 6 xenograft canine HSA

  2. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruo Kouji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF, flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A, FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the

  3. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA) tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF), flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A), FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF) was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the other tumors. Conclusion We

  4. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  5. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu......Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX......) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating c...

  6. Homeobox Genes in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Klein, David C

    2013-01-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine gland responsible for nocturnal synthesis of melatonin. During early development of the rodent pineal gland from the roof of the diencephalon, homeobox genes of the orthodenticle homeobox (Otx)- and paired box (Pax)-families are expressed and are essential...... for normal pineal development consistent with the well-established role that homeobox genes play in developmental processes. However, the pineal gland appears to be unusual because strong homeobox gene expression persists in the pineal gland of the adult brain. Accordingly, in addition to developmental...... functions, homeobox genes appear to be key regulators in postnatal phenotype maintenance in this tissue. In this paper, we review ontogenetic and phylogenetic aspects of pineal development and recent progress in understanding the involvement of homebox genes in rodent pineal development and adult function...

  7. Small RNA regulation of rice homeobox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukesh; Khurana, Jitendra P

    2008-11-01

    Recently, we reported the genome-wide identification of 107 homeobox genes in rice and classified them into ten distinct subfamilies based upon their domain composition and phylogenetic analysis. Microarray analysis revealed the tissue-specific and overlapping expression profiles of these genes during various stages of floral transition, panicle development and seed set. Several homeobox genes were also found to be differentially expressed under abiotic stress conditions. Based on massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) data analysis, we report here that a large number of small RNA signatures are associated with rice homeobox genes, which may be involved in their tissue-specific/developmental regulation and stress responses. The association of a very large number of small RNA signatures suggested an unusually high degree of regulation of homeobox genes by small RNAs during inflorescence development.

  8. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here the first genome-wide classification and comparative genomic analysis of the 14 homeobox genes present in D. discoideum. Based on the structural alignment of the homeodomains, they ... Himanshu Mishra1 Shweta Saran1. School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India ...

  9. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems.

  10. Human Genetic Variation, Sport and Exercise Medicine, and Achilles Tendinopathy: Role for Angiogenesis-Associated Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Masouda; El Khoury, Louis Y; Raleigh, Stuart M; Ribbans, William J; Posthumus, Michael; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2016-09-01

    Sport and Exercise Medicine is one of the important subspecialties of 21st century healthcare contributing to improving the physical function, health, and vitality of populations while reducing the prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases. Moreover, sport and exercise are associated with injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy, which is a common tendon injury. The angiogenesis-associated signaling pathway plays a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling, with increased levels of angiogenic cytokines reported after cyclic stretching of tendon fibroblasts. We investigated the variants in angiogenesis genes in relation to the risk of Achilles tendinopathy in two population samples drawn independently from South Africa (SA) and the United Kingdom (UK). The study sample comprised 120 SA and 130 UK healthy controls, and 108 SA and 87 UK participants with Achilles tendinopathy. All participants were genotyped for five functional polymorphisms in the vascular endothelial growth factor, A isoform (VEGFA) (rs699947, rs1570360, rs2010963) and kinase insert-domain receptor (KDR) genes (rs1870377, rs2071559). The VEGFA A-G-G inferred haplotype was associated with an increased risk of Achilles tendinopathy in the SA group (15% in controls vs. 20% in cases, p = 0.048) and the combined SA+UK group (14% in controls vs. 20% in cases, p = 0.009). These new findings implicate the VEGFA gene with Achilles tendinopathy risk, while highlighting the potential biological significance of the angiogenesis signaling pathway in the etiology of Achilles tendinopathy. The evidence suggesting a genetic contribution to the susceptibility of sustaining a tendon injury is growing. We anticipate that high-throughput and multi-omics approaches, building on genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, may soon uncover the pathophysiology of many diseases in the field of Sports and Exercise Medicine, as a new frontier of global precision medicine.

  11. Planarian homeobox genes: cloning, sequence analysis, and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernàndez, J; Baguñà, J; Saló, E

    1991-01-01

    Freshwater planarians (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria, and Tricladida) are acoelomate, triploblastic, unsegmented, and bilaterally symmetrical organisms that are mainly known for their ample power to regenerate a complete organism from a small piece of their body. To identify potential pattern-control genes in planarian regeneration, we have isolated two homeobox-containing genes, Dth-1 and Dth-2 [Dugesia (Girardia) tigrina homeobox], by using degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to the most conserved amino acid sequence from helix-3 of the homeodomain. Dth-1 and Dth-2 homeodomains are closely related (68% at the nucleotide level and 78% at the protein level) and show the conserved residues characteristic of the homeodomains identified to data. Similarity with most homeobox sequences is low (30-50%), except with Drosophila NK homeodomains (80-82% with NK-2) and the rodent TTF-1 homeodomain (77-87%). Some unusual amino acid residues specific to NK-2, TTF-1, Dth-1, and Dth-2 can be observed in the recognition helix (helix-3) and may define a family of homeodomains. The deduced amino acid sequences from the cDNAs contain, in addition to the homeodomain, other domains also present in various homeobox-containing genes. The expression of both genes, detected by Northern blot analysis, appear slightly higher in cephalic regions than in the rest of the intact organism, while a slight increase is detected in the central period (5 days) or regeneration. Images PMID:1714599

  12. Cloning of fragments of novel homeobox genes expressed during regeneration in planarians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, K.A.; Tarabykin, V.S.; Potapov, V.K. [and others

    1994-11-01

    The polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers corresponding to the most conservative amino acids 16-21 (ELEKEF) and 49-54 (WPQNRR) of the Antennapedia class homeodomains was used for the amplification of cDNA from regenerating planarians (asexual race of Dugesia tigrina). A total of six new Antennapedia-like homeobox sequences, designated Dutarh-1-Dutarh-6 (Dugesia tigrina asexual race homeobox gene), have been identified. Their comparison with other homeobox genes using a Genebee software (the EMBL Data Library) showed that all sequences except Dutarh-6 belong to the Antennapedia class. Dutarh-6 is closely related to a recently described novel homeobox gene subfamily which includes mouse mesodermal homeobox genes Max-1 and Max-2 and rat homeobox gene Gax. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Homeobox genes: a molecular link between development and cancer Genes homeobox: uma relação molecular entre o desenvolvimento e o câncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Daumas Nunes

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes are regulatory genes encoding nuclear proteins that act as transcription factors, regulating aspects of morphogenesis and cell differentiation during normal embryonic development of several animals. Vertebrate homeobox genes can be divided in two subfamilies: clustered, or HOX genes, and nonclustered, or divergent, homeobox genes. During the last decades, several homeobox genes, clustered and nonclustered ones, were identified in normal tissue, in malignant cells, and in different diseases and metabolic alterations. Homeobox genes are involved in the normal teeth development and in familial teeth agenesis. Normal development and cancer have a great deal in common, as both processes involve shifts between cell proliferation and differentiation. The literature is accumulating evidences that homeobox genes play an important role in oncogenesis. Many cancers exhibit expression of or alteration in homeobox genes. Those include leukemias, colon, skin, prostate, breast and ovarian cancers, among others. This review is aimed at introducing readers to some of the homeobox family functions in normal tissues and especially in cancer.Os genes homeobox são genes reguladores que codificam proteínas nucleares as quais atuam como fatores de transcrição, regulando vários aspectos da morfogênese e da diferenciação celular durante o desenvolvimento embrionário normal de diversos animais. Os genes homeobox de vertebrados podem ser subdivididos em duas famílias: os agrupados, ou HOX, e os não agrupados, ou divergentes. Durante as últimas décadas, vários genes homeobox, agrupados e não agrupados, foram identificados em tecidos normais, em células malignas e em diferentes doenças e condições metabólicas. Os genes homeobox estão envolvidos, por exemplo, no desenvolvimento normal do dente e em agenesias dentárias de ocorrência familiar. O desenvolvimento normal e o câncer têm muito em comum, já que ambos envolvem prolifera

  14. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Mansi; Larroux, Claire; Lu, Daniel R; Mohanty, Kareshma; Chapman, Jarrod; Degnan, Bernard M; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-01-01

    LIM homeobox (Lhx) transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons) indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In Nematostella, Lhx gene expression is correlated with neural

  15. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degnan Bernard M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM homeobox (Lhx transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. Results We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. Conclusions The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In

  16. Evolutionary Change of the Numbers of Homeobox Genes in Bilateral Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jongmin; Nei, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    It has been known that the conservation or diversity of homeobox genes is responsible for the similarity and variability of some of the morphological or physiological characters among different organisms. To gain some insights into the evolutionary pattern of homeobox genes in bilateral animals, we studied the change of the numbers of these genes during the evolution of bilateral animals. We analyzed 2,031 homeodomain sequences compiled from 11 species of bilateral animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. Our phylogenetic analysis using a modified reconciled-tree method suggested that there were at least about 88 homeobox genes in the common ancestor of bilateral animals. About 50–60 genes of them have left at least one descendant gene in each of the 11 species studied, suggesting that about 30–40 genes were lost in a lineage-specific manner. Although similar numbers of ancestral genes have survived in each species, vertebrate lineages gained many more genes by duplication than invertebrate lineages, resulting in more than 200 homeobox genes in vertebrates and about 100 in invertebrates. After these gene duplications, a substantial number of old duplicate genes have also been lost in each lineage. Because many old duplicate genes were lost, it is likely that lost genes had already been differentiated from other groups of genes at the time of gene loss. We conclude that both gain and loss of homeobox genes were important for the evolutionary change of phenotypic characters in bilateral animals. PMID:16079247

  17. Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensman, H.; Goransson, H.; Leuchowius, K.J.; Stromberg, S.; Ponten, F.; Isaksson, A.; Rutteman, G.R.; Heldin, N.; Pejler, G.; Hellmen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas Journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 0167-6806 (Print) 1573-7217 (Online) Issue Volume 118, Number 2 / November, 2009 Category Preclinical Study DOI

  18. The Homeobox Genes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Insights into Their Spatio-Temporal Expression Dynamics during Embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Akram M.; Lüppert, Martin; Dethlefsen, Johan; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Tong, Yong Guang; Tang, Lois; Gangishetti, Umesh; Baillie, David L.; Bürglin, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes play crucial roles for the development of multicellular eukaryotes. We have generated a revised list of all homeobox genes for Caenorhabditis elegans and provide a nomenclature for the previously unnamed ones. We show that, out of 103 homeobox genes, 70 are co-orthologous to human homeobox genes. 14 are highly divergent, lacking an obvious ortholog even in other Caenorhabditis species. One of these homeobox genes encodes 12 homeodomains, while three other highly divergent homeobox genes encode a novel type of double homeodomain, termed HOCHOB. To understand how transcription factors regulate cell fate during development, precise spatio-temporal expression data need to be obtained. Using a new imaging framework that we developed, Endrov, we have generated spatio-temporal expression profiles during embryogenesis of over 60 homeobox genes, as well as a number of other developmental control genes using GFP reporters. We used dynamic feedback during recording to automatically adjust the camera exposure time in order to increase the dynamic range beyond the limitations of the camera. We have applied the new framework to examine homeobox gene expression patterns and provide an analysis of these patterns. The methods we developed to analyze and quantify expression data are not only suitable for C. elegans, but can be applied to other model systems or even to tissue culture systems. PMID:26024448

  19. The Aspergillus flavus Homeobox Gene, hbx1, Is Required for Development and Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Cary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox proteins, a class of well conserved transcription factors, regulate the expression of targeted genes, especially those involved in development. In filamentous fungi, homeobox genes are required for normal conidiogenesis and fruiting body formation. In the present study, we identified eight homeobox (hbx genes in the aflatoxin-producing ascomycete, Aspergillus flavus, and determined their respective role in growth, conidiation and sclerotial production. Disruption of seven of the eight genes had little to no effect on fungal growth and development. However, disruption of the homeobox gene AFLA_069100, designated as hbx1, in two morphologically different A. flavus strains, CA14 and AF70, resulted in complete loss of production of conidia and sclerotia as well as aflatoxins B1 and B2, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem. Microscopic examination showed that the Δhbx1 mutants did not produce conidiophores. The inability of Δhbx1 mutants to produce conidia was related to downregulation of brlA (bristle and abaA (abacus, regulatory genes for conidiophore development. These mutants also had significant downregulation of the aflatoxin pathway biosynthetic genes aflC, aflD, aflM and the cluster-specific regulatory gene, aflR. Our results demonstrate that hbx1 not only plays a significant role in controlling A. flavus development but is also critical for the production of secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxins.

  20. Homeobox genes and tooth development: Understanding the biological pathways and applications in regenerative dental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Anand; Srijaya, Thekkeparambil Chandrabose; Sukumaran, Prema; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2018-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of conserved class of transcription factors that function as key regulators during the embryonic developmental processes. They act as master regulator for developmental genes, which involves coordinated actions of various auto and cross-regulatory mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern of homeobox genes in relation to the tooth development and various signaling pathways or molecules contributing to the specific actions of these genes in the regulation of odontogenesis. An electronic search was undertaken using combination of keywords e.g. Homeobox genes, tooth development, dental diseases, stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, gene control region was used as search terms in PubMed and Web of Science and relevant full text articles and abstract were retrieved that were written in English. A manual hand search in text books were also carried out. Articles related to homeobox genes in dentistry and tissue engineering and regenerative medicine of odontogenesis were selected. The possible perspective of stem cells technology in odontogenesis and subsequent analysis of gene correction pertaining to dental disorders through the possibility of induced pluripotent stem cells technology is also inferred. We demonstrate the promising role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine on odontogenesis, which can generate a new ray of hope in the field of dental science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Aspergillus flavus Homeobox Gene, hbx1, is Required for Development and Aflatoxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Jeffrey W; Harris-Coward, Pamela; Scharfenstein, Leslie; Mack, Brian M; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Wei, Qijian; Lebar, Matthew; Carter-Wientjes, Carol; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Mitra, Chandrani; Banerjee, Sourav; Chanda, Anindya

    2017-10-12

    Homeobox proteins, a class of well conserved transcription factors, regulate the expression of targeted genes, especially those involved in development. In filamentous fungi, homeobox genes are required for normal conidiogenesis and fruiting body formation. In the present study, we identified eight homeobox ( hbx ) genes in the aflatoxin-producing ascomycete, Aspergillus flavus , and determined their respective role in growth, conidiation and sclerotial production. Disruption of seven of the eight genes had little to no effect on fungal growth and development. However, disruption of the homeobox gene AFLA_069100, designated as hbx1 , in two morphologically different A. flavus strains, CA14 and AF70, resulted in complete loss of production of conidia and sclerotia as well as aflatoxins B₁ and B₂, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem. Microscopic examination showed that the Δ hbx1 mutants did not produce conidiophores. The inability of Δ hbx1 mutants to produce conidia was related to downregulation of brlA (bristle) and abaA (abacus), regulatory genes for conidiophore development. These mutants also had significant downregulation of the aflatoxin pathway biosynthetic genes aflC , aflD , aflM and the cluster-specific regulatory gene, aflR . Our results demonstrate that hbx1 not only plays a significant role in controlling A. flavus development but is also critical for the production of secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxins.

  2. Homeobox gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia is linked to typical underlying molecular aberrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Kramarzova (Karolina Skvarova); K. Fiser (Karel); E. Mejstříková (Ester); K. Rejlova (Katerina); M. Zaliova (Marketa); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten); H.A. Drabkin (Harry); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); J. Stary (Jan); J. Trka (Jan); J. Starkova (Julia)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Although distinct patterns of homeobox (HOX) gene expression have been described in defined cytogenetic and molecular subsets of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it is unknown whether these patterns are the direct result of transcriptional alterations or

  3. Cytokinin control of KNOTTED1-like homeobox genes expression during Arabidopsis shoot development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Přemysl; Klíma, Petr; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2005), S24 [2nd International Symposium Auxins and Cytokinins in Plant Development. 07.07.2005-12.07.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A081; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600380507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : homeobox genes * cytokinin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. Molecular phylogeny of four homeobox genes from the purple sea star Pisaster ochraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassi, Giorgio; Imai, Janice Hitomi; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Homeobox genes cloned from the purple sea star Pisaster ochraceus (Phylum Echinodermata/Class Asteroidea) were used along with related sequences available from members of other representative animal phyla to generate molecular phylogenies for Distal-less/Dlx, Hox5, Hox7, and Hox9/10 homeobox genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred based on the predicted 60 amino acid homeodomain, using amino acid (AA) and nucleotide (NT) models as well as the recently developed codon substitution models of sequence evolution. The resulting phylogenetic trees were mostly congruent with the consensus species-tree, grouping these newly identified genes with those isolated from other Asteroidea. This analysis also allowed a preliminary comparison of the performance of codon models with that of NT and AA evolutionary models in the inference of homeobox phylogeny. We found that, overall, the NT models displayed low reliability in recovering major clades at the Superphylum/Phylum level, and that codon models were slightly more dependable than AA models. Remarkably, in the majority of cases, codon substitution models seemed to outperform both AA and NT models at both the Class level and homeobox paralogy-group level of classification.

  5. Altered histone mark deposition and DNA methylation at homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2014-10-01

    We recently reported a role of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC2 trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the regulation of homeobox (HOX) (Marcinkiewicz and Gudas, 2013, Exp Cell Res) gene transcript levels in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT1R) and tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. Here, we assessed both the levels of various histone modifications at a subset of homeobox genes and genome wide DNA methylation patterns in OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells by using ERRBS (enhanced reduced representation bisulfite sequencing). We detected the H3K9me3 mark at HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 at levels higher in OKF6-TERT1R than in SCC-9 cells; at IRX1 and SIX2 the H3K9me3 levels were conversely higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R. The H3K79me3 mark was detectable only at IRX1 in OKF6-TERT1R and at IRX4 in SCC-9 cells. The levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks correlate with the transcript levels of the assessed homeobox genes in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9. We detected generally lower CpG methylation levels on DNA in SCC-9 cells at annotated genomic regions which were differentially methylated between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells; however, some genomic regions, including the HOX gene clusters, showed DNA methylation at higher levels in SCC-9 than OKF6-TERT1R. Thus, both altered histone modification patterns and changes in DNA methylation are associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human oral cavity SCC cells, and this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic phenotype of oral keratinocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ontogenetic expression of the Otx2 and Crx homeobox genes in the retina of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Morin, Fabrice; Shi, Qiong

    2007-01-01

    Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail. This conf......Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail....... This confirmed the presence of Otx2 mRNA in both the embryonic retinal pigment epithelium and the developing neural retina. During development, the expression of Otx2 persists in the pigment epithelium, whereas Otx2 expression of the neural retina becomes progressively restricted to the outer nuclear layer...... in the developing and mature mammalian retina....

  7. Identification and Characterization of TALE Homeobox Genes in the Endangered Fern Vandenboschia speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Bakkali, Mohammed; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A

    2017-10-17

    We report and discuss the results of a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of the expression patterns of seven three amino acid loop extension ( TALE ) homeobox genes (four KNOTTED-like homeobox ( KNOX ) and three BEL1-like homeobox ( BELL ) genes) identified after next generation sequencing (NGS) and assembly of the sporophyte and gametophyte transcriptomes of the endangered fern species Vandenboschia speciosa . Among the four KNOX genes, two belonged to the KNOX1 class and the other two belonged to the KNOX2 class. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences supported the typical domain structure of both types of TALE proteins, and the homology to TALE proteins of mosses, lycophytes, and seed plant species. The expression analyses demonstrate that these homeodomain proteins appear to have a key role in the establishment and development of the gametophyte and sporophyte phases of V. speciosa lifecycle, as well as in the control of the transition between both phases. Vandenboschia speciosa VsKNAT3 (a KNOX2 class protein) as well as VsBELL4 and VsBELL10 proteins have higher expression levels during the sporophyte program. On the contrary, one V. speciosa KNOX1 protein (VsKNAT6) and one KNOX2 protein (VsKNAT4) seem important during the development of the gametophyte phase. TALE homeobox genes might be among the key regulators in the gametophyte-to-sporophyte developmental transition in regular populations that show alternation of generations, since some of the genes analyzed here ( VsKNAT3 , VsKNAT6 , VsBELL4 , and VsBELL6 ) are upregulated in a non-alternating population in which only independent gametophytes are found (they grow by vegetative reproduction outside of the range of sporophyte distribution). Thus, these four genes might trigger the vegetative propagation of the gametophyte and the repression of the sexual development in populations composed of independent gametophytes. This study represents a comprehensive

  8. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  10. The Homeobox BcHOX8 Gene in Botrytis Cinerea Regulates Vegetative Growth and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Zsuzsanna; Rascle, Christine; Cimerman, Agnès; Viaud, Muriel; Billon-Grand, Geneviève; Choquer, Mathias; Bruel, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. PMID:23133556

  11. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells

  12. Expression of the Otx2 homeobox gene in the developing mammalian brain: embryonic and adult expression in the pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Muñoz, Estela; Ganguly, Surajit

    2006-01-01

    Otx2 is a vertebrate homeobox gene, which has been found to be essential for the development of rostral brain regions and appears to play a role in the development of retinal photoreceptor cells and pinealocytes. In this study, the temporal expression pattern of Otx2 was revealed in the rat brain...... with phototransduction and melatonin synthesis....

  13. Exclusion of pituitary homeobox 2 gene polymorphism in vertical mandibular asymmetry patients: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyanti, Ervina; Boel, Trelia; Soegiharto, Benny; Ilyas, Syafruddin; Irani Nainggolan, Lidya; Auerkari, Elza Ibrahim

    2018-03-01

    Pituitary Homeobox 2 (PITX2), is an active gene as a paired-related homeobox gene that encodes multiple isoforms. Its Nodal pathway in determination of left-right patterning during embryogenesis has been reported in satellite cells and expressed in adult human skeletal muscle. PITX2A and PITX2B are produced by alternative splicing and used of different promoters. PITX2C uses an alternative promoter located upstream of exon 4. PITX2D is produced by PITX2C alternative promoter and differential splicing. The 5’-primers and 3’- antisense primer were unique for each isoforms. Variability measurement in vertical dimension showed stronger genetic component than sagittal. This study aims to obtain the genotype marker of vertical mandibular asymmetry related to PITX2A and PITX2D isoform by visualization of the amplified product on stained gel to allele specific oligonucleotide between the case and control with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Determination of vertical mandibular asymmetry based on condylar height asymmetry index of pre-treatment panoramic radiograph using Kjellberg’s technique whilst vertical mandibular growth pattern using lateral cephalogram. The differences of condylar height asymmetry in case-control based on vertical growth pattern was compared using Pearson’s chi-squared test. DNA extraction of 129 out-coming orthodontic patients in Universitas Sumatera Utara Dental Hospital were obtained from Buccal swab. Then DNA samples were amplified by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digested with NciI restriction enzyme prior to electrophoresis visualization. There was no significant statistical difference in vertical mandibular asymmetry compared to vertical mandibular growth pattern. The RFLP analysis did not show any polymorphism for PITX2A and PITX2D isoform. All of the samples showed wild type homozygote. Further analysis method, except RFLP, were required to understand the genetic factor in the variance of vertical mandibular

  14. Two human homeobox genes, c1 and c8: structure analysis and expression in embryonic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, A.; Mavilio, F.; Acampora, D.

    1987-01-01

    Two human cDNA clones (HHO.c1.95 and HHO.c8.5111) containing a homeobox region have been characterized, and the respective genomic regions have been partially analyzed. Expression of the corresponding genes, termed c1 and c8, was evaluated in different organs and body parts during human embryonic/fetal development. HHO.c1.95 apparently encodes a 217-amino acid protein containing a class I homeodomain that shares 60 out of 61 amino acid residues with the Antennapedia homeodomain of Drosophila melanogaster. HHO.c8.5111 encodes a 153-amino acid protein containing a homeodomains identical to that of the frog AC1 gene. Clones HHO.c1 and HHO.c8 detect by blot-hybridization one and two specific polyadenylylated transcripts, respectively. These are differentially expressed in spinal cord, backbone rudiments, limb buds (or limbs), heart, and skin of human embryos and early fetuses in the 5- to 9-week postfertilization period, thus suggesting that the c1 and c8 genes play a key role in a variety of developmental processes. Together, the results of the embryonic/fetal expression of c1 and c8 and those of two previously analyzed genes (c10 and c13) indicate a coherent pattern of expression of these genes in early human ontogeny

  15. Expression of the homeobox genes OTX2 and OTX1 in the early developing human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen B; Lutterodt, Melissa C; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the Otx2 gene is expressed in the diencephalon, mesencephalon, and cerebellum and is crucial for the development of these brain regions. Together with Otx1, Otx2 is known to cooperate with other genes to develop the caudal forebrain and, further, Otx1 is also involved in differentiati...... in the neocortex, and OTX2 in the archicortex, diencephalon, rostral brain stem, and cerebellum.......In rodents, the Otx2 gene is expressed in the diencephalon, mesencephalon, and cerebellum and is crucial for the development of these brain regions. Together with Otx1, Otx2 is known to cooperate with other genes to develop the caudal forebrain and, further, Otx1 is also involved in differentiation...... of young neurons of the deeper cortical layers. We have studied the spatial and temporal expression of the two homeobox genes OTX2 and OTX1 in human fetal brains from 7 to 14 weeks postconception by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. OTX2 was expressed in the diencephalon, mesencephalon...

  16. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX2 regulates cell differentiation during secondary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Mansfield, Shawn D; Groover, Andrew T

    2009-12-01

    The stem cells of the vascular cambium divide to produce daughter cells, which in turn divide before undergoing differentiation during the radial growth of woody stems. The genetic regulation of these developmental events is poorly understood, however. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of a Populus class-I KNOX homeobox gene, ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2), which we show influences terminal cell differentiation and cell wall properties during secondary growth. In the early stages of secondary growth, ARK2 is expressed broadly in the cambial zone and in terminally differentiating cell types, before becoming progressively restricted to the cambium. ARK2 overexpression and synthetic miRNA-suppression transgenics reveal positive correlations between ARK2 expression level and the timing of cambium formation, the width of the cambial zone and inhibition of cambial daughter cell differentiation. These phenotypes in turn correlate with changes in the expression of genes affecting transcription, cell division, auxin and cell wall synthesis. Notably, wood properties associated with secondary cell wall synthesis are negatively associated with ARK2 expression, including lignin and cellulose content. Together, our results suggest that ARK2 functions primarily to regulate a complex suite of genes that together influence cell differentiation during secondary growth. We propose that ARK2 may represent a co-evolved transcriptional module that influences complex, adaptive wood properties.

  17. Mouse Obox and Crxos modulate preimplantation transcriptional profiles revealing similarity between paralogous mouse and human homeobox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy H. Royall

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ETCHbox genes are eutherian-specific homeobox genes expressed during preimplantation development at a time when the first cell lineage decisions are being made. The mouse has an unusual repertoire of ETCHbox genes with several gene families lost in evolution and the remaining two, Crxos and Obox, greatly divergent in sequence and number. Each has undergone duplication to give a double homeodomain Crxos locus and a large cluster of over 60 Obox loci. The gene content differences between species raise important questions about how evolution can tolerate loss of genes implicated in key developmental events. Results We find that Crxos internal duplication occurred in the mouse lineage, while Obox duplication was stepwise, generating subgroups with distinct sequence and expression. Ectopic expression of three Obox genes and a Crxos transcript in primary mouse embryonic cells followed by transcriptome sequencing allowed investigation into their functional roles. We find distinct transcriptomic influences for different Obox subgroups and Crxos, including modulation of genes related to zygotic genome activation and preparation for blastocyst formation. Comparison with similar experiments performed using human homeobox genes reveals striking overlap between genes downstream of mouse Crxos and genes downstream of human ARGFX. Conclusions Mouse Crxos and human ARGFX homeobox genes are paralogous rather than orthologous, yet they have evolved to regulate a common set of genes. This suggests there was compensation of function alongside gene loss through co-option of a different locus. Functional compensation by non-orthologous genes with dissimilar sequences is unusual but may indicate underlying distributed robustness. Compensation may be driven by the strong evolutionary pressure for successful early embryo development.

  18. Altered Histone Mark Deposition and DNA Methylation at Homeobox Genes in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported a role of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC2 trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the regulation of homeobox (HOX) (Marcinkiewicz and Gudas, 2013) gene transcript levels in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT1R) and tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. Here, we assessed both the levels of various histone modifications at a subset of homeobox genes and genome wide DNA methylation patterns in OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells by using ERRBS (enhanced reduced representation bisulfite sequencing). We detected the H3K9me3 mark at HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13 and HOXD8 at levels higher in OKF6-TERT1R than in SCC-9 cells; at IRX1 and SIX2 the H3K9me3 levels were conversely higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R. The H3K79me3 mark was detectable only at IRX1 in OKF6-TERT1R and at IRX4 in SCC-9 cells. The levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks correlate with the transcript levels of the assessed homeobox genes in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9. We detected generally lower CpG methylation levels on DNA in SCC-9 cells at annotated genomic regions which were differentially methylated between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells; however, some genomic regions, including the HOX gene clusters, showed DNA methylation at higher levels in SCC-9 than OKF6-TERT1R. Thus, both altered histone modification patterns and changes in DNA methylation are associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human oral cavity SCC cells, and this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic phenotype of oral keratinocytes. PMID:24519855

  19. Novel visual system homeobox 1 gene mutations in Turkish patients with keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardak, H; Gunay, M; Yildiz, E; Bardak, Y; Gunay, B; Ozbas, H; Bagci, O

    2016-11-03

    The aim of this study was to screen the visual system homeobox 1 (VSX1) gene in Turkish patients with keratoconus (KC). The patient group consisted of 44 patients who had undergone corneal transplant surgery before the age of 30, for advanced and rapidly progressive KC. The control group comprised 250 healthy individuals. We detected two missense mutations, D144N and D295Y, in exon 2 and exon 5 of the VSX1 gene, respectively, using next-generation sequencing analysis. The pathologic effects of the D144N and D295Y missense mutations on protein function were determined with bioinformatic analysis tools, SIFT, PolyPhen, and MutationTaster. Aspartic acid at the 144th position was more preserved among species than aspartic acid at the 295th position of the VSX1 protein. In the control group, five different genetic variations were detected, two of which (rs8123716 and rs12480307) were synonymous with variations in the patient group. Our results suggested that the D144N and D295Y mutations might have a role in the pathogenesis of KC disease.

  20. Characterization of the Six1 homeobox gene in normal mammary gland morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManaman James L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Six1 homeobox gene is highly expressed in the embryonic mammary gland, continues to be expressed in early postnatal mammary development, but is lost when the mammary gland differentiates during pregnancy. However, Six1 is re-expressed in breast cancers, suggesting that its re-instatement in the adult mammary gland may contribute to breast tumorigenesis via initiating a developmental process out of context. Indeed, recent studies demonstrate that Six1 overexpression in the adult mouse mammary gland is sufficient for initiating invasive carcinomas, and that its overexpression in xenograft models of mammary cancer leads to metastasis. These data demonstrate that Six1 is causally involved in both breast tumorigenesis and metastasis, thus raising the possibility that it may be a viable therapeutic target. However, because Six1 is highly expressed in the developing mammary gland, and because it has been implicated in the expansion of mammary stem cells, targeting Six1 as an anti-cancer therapy may have unwanted side effects in the breast. Results We sought to determine the role of Six1 in mammary development using two independent mouse models. To study the effect of Six1 loss in early mammary development when Six1 is normally expressed, Six1-/- embryonic mammary glands were transplanted into Rag1-/- mice. In addition, to determine whether Six1 downregulation is required during later stages of development to allow for proper differentiation, we overexpressed Six1 during adulthood using an inducible, mammary-specific transgenic mouse model. Morphogenesis of the mammary gland occurred normally in animals transplanted with Six1-/- embryonic mammary glands, likely through the redundant functions of other Six family members such as Six2 and Six4, whose expression was increased in response to Six1 loss. Surprisingly, inappropriate expression of Six1 in the adult mammary gland, when levels are normally low to absent, did not inhibit

  1. Short stature homeobox-containing gene duplications in 3.7% of girls with tall stature and normal karyotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Upners, Emmie N; Jensen, Rikke B; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The short stature homeobox containing gene (SHOX) plays an important role in short stature, but has not been explored in detail in a tall stature population before. This study explored the prevalence of SHOX aberrations in girls diagnosed with idiopathic tall stature with a normal karyotype...... in three girls with tall stature and normal karyotypes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  2. NKL homeobox gene MSX1 acts like a tumor suppressor in NK-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Drexler, Hans G

    2017-09-15

    NKL homeobox gene MSX1 is physiologically expressed in lymphoid progenitors and subsequently downregulated in developing T- and B-cells. In contrast, elevated expression levels of MSX1 persist in mature natural killer (NK)-cells, indicating a functional role in this compartment. While T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) subsets exhibit aberrant overexpression of MSX1, we show here that in malignant NK-cells the level of MSX1 transcripts is aberrantly downregulated. Chromosomal deletions at 4p16 hosting the MSX1 locus have been described in NK-cell leukemia patients. However, NK-cell lines analyzed here showed normal MSX1 gene configurations, indicating that this aberration might be uncommon. To identify alternative MSX1 regulatory mechanisms we compared expression profiling data of primary normal NK-cells and malignant NK-cell lines. This procedure revealed several deregulated genes including overexpressed IRF4, MIR155HG and MIR17HG and downregulated AUTS2, EP300, GATA3 and HHEX. As shown recently, chromatin-modulator AUTS2 is overexpressed in T-ALL subsets where it mediates aberrant transcriptional activation of MSX1. Here, our data demonstrate that in malignant NK-cell lines AUTS2 performed MSX1 activation as well, but in accordance with downregulated MSX1 transcription therein we detected reduced AUTS2 expression, a small genomic deletion at 7q11 removing exons 3 and 4, and truncating mutations in exon 1. Moreover, genomic profiling and chromosomal analyses of NK-cell lines demonstrated amplification of IRF4 at 6p25 and deletion of PRDM1 at 6q21, highlighting their potential oncogenic impact. Functional analyses performed via knockdown or forced expression of these genes revealed regulatory network disturbances effecting downregulation of MSX1 which may underlie malignant development in NK-cells.

  3. The homeobox gene Hex regulates hepatocyte differentiation from embryonic stem cell-derived endoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Kim, Yon Hui; Irion, Stefan; Kasuda, Shogo; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Iwano, Masayuki; Dohi, Yoshiko; Saito, Yoshihiko; Snodgrass, Ralph; Keller, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the role of the hematopoietically expressed homeobox (Hex) in the differentiation and development of hepatocytes within embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived embryoid bodies (EBs). Analyses of hepatic endoderm derived from Hex(-/-) EBs revealed a dramatic reduction in the levels of albumin (Alb) and alpha-fetoprotein (Afp) expression. In contrast, stage-specific forced expression of Hex in EBs from wild-type ESCs led to the up-regulation of Alb and Afp expression and secretion of Alb and transferrin. These inductive effects were restricted to c-kit(+) endoderm-enriched EB-derived populations, suggesting that Hex functions at the level of hepatic specification of endoderm in this model. Microarray analysis revealed that Hex regulated the expression of a broad spectrum of hepatocyte-related genes, including fibrinogens, apolipoproteins, and cytochromes. When added to the endoderm-induced EBs, bone morphogenetic protein 4 acted synergistically with Hex in the induction of expression of Alb, Afp, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, transcription factor 1, and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha. These findings indicate that Hex plays a pivotal role during induction of liver development from endoderm in this in vitro model and suggest that this strategy may provide important insight into the generation of functional hepatocytes from ESCs.

  4. Homeobox gene Dlx-2 is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sung-Chul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to tumor-suppressive apoptosis and autophagic cell death, necrosis promotes tumor progression by releasing the pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, and its presence in tumor patients is associated with poor prognosis. Thus, necrosis has important clinical implications in tumor development; however, its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Results In the present study, we show that Distal-less 2 (Dlx-2, a homeobox gene of the Dlx family that is involved in embryonic development, is induced in cancer cell lines dependently of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to glucose deprivation (GD, one of the metabolic stresses occurring in solid tumors. Increased Dlx-2 expression was also detected in the inner regions, which experience metabolic stress, of human tumors and of a multicellular tumor spheroid, an in vitro model of solid tumors. Dlx-2 short hairpin RNA (shRNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced increase in propidium iodide-positive cell population and HMGB1 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, indicating the important role(s of Dlx-2 in metabolic stress-induced necrosis. Dlx-2 shRNA appeared to exert its anti-necrotic effects by preventing metabolic stress-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS, which are responsible for triggering necrosis. Conclusions These results suggest that Dlx-2 may be involved in tumor progression via the regulation of metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

  5. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Felix

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is

  6. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Daniel A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2010-04-22

    Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi) leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi) animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation) to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is required for

  7. A conserved cluster of three PRD-class homeobox genes (homeobrain, rx and orthopedia in the Cnidaria and Protostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Maureen E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are a superclass of transcription factors with diverse developmental regulatory functions, which are found in plants, fungi and animals. In animals, several Antennapedia (ANTP-class homeobox genes reside in extremely ancient gene clusters (for example, the Hox, ParaHox, and NKL clusters and the evolution of these clusters has been implicated in the morphological diversification of animal bodyplans. By contrast, similarly ancient gene clusters have not been reported among the other classes of homeobox genes (that is, the LIM, POU, PRD and SIX classes. Results Using a combination of in silico queries and phylogenetic analyses, we found that a cluster of three PRD-class homeobox genes (Homeobrain (hbn, Rax (rx and Orthopedia (otp is present in cnidarians, insects and mollusks (a partial cluster comprising hbn and rx is present in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. We failed to identify this 'HRO' cluster in deuterostomes; in fact, the Homeobrain gene appears to be missing from the chordate genomes we examined, although it is present in hemichordates and echinoderms. To illuminate the ancestral organization and function of this ancient cluster, we mapped the constituent genes against the assembled genome of a model cnidarian, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, and characterized their spatiotemporal expression using in situ hybridization. In N. vectensis, these genes reside in a span of 33 kb with the same gene order as previously reported in insects. Comparisons of genomic sequences and expressed sequence tags revealed the presence of alternative transcripts of Nv-otp and two highly unusual protein-coding polymorphisms in the terminal helix of the Nv-rx homeodomain. A population genetic survey revealed the Rx polymorphisms to be widespread in natural populations. During larval development, all three genes are expressed in the ectoderm, in non-overlapping territories along the oral-aboral axis, with distinct

  8. Lim homeobox genes in the Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi: the evolution of neural cell type specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons David K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous systems are thought to be important to the evolutionary success and diversification of metazoans, yet little is known about the origin of simple nervous systems at the base of the animal tree. Recent data suggest that ctenophores, a group of macroscopic pelagic marine invertebrates, are the most ancient group of animals that possess a definitive nervous system consisting of a distributed nerve net and an apical statocyst. This study reports on details of the evolution of the neural cell type specifying transcription factor family of LIM homeobox containing genes (Lhx, which have highly conserved functions in neural specification in bilaterian animals. Results Using next generation sequencing, the first draft of the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been generated. The Lhx genes in all animals are represented by seven subfamilies (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, Islet, Lhx2/9, Lhx6/8, and LMO of which four were found to be represented in the ctenophore lineage (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, and Islet. Interestingly, the ctenophore Lhx gene complement is more similar to the sponge complement (sponges do not possess neurons than to either the cnidarian-bilaterian or placozoan Lhx complements. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, the Lhx gene expression patterns were examined and found to be expressed around the blastopore and in cells that give rise to the apical organ and putative neural sensory cells. Conclusion This research gives us a first look at neural cell type specification in the ctenophore M. leidyi. Within M. leidyi, Lhx genes are expressed in overlapping domains within proposed neural cellular and sensory cell territories. These data suggest that Lhx genes likely played a conserved role in the patterning of sensory cells in the ancestor of sponges and ctenophores, and may provide a link to the expression of Lhx orthologs in sponge larval photoreceptive cells. Lhx genes were later co-opted into patterning more

  9. Muscle segment homeobox genes direct embryonic diapause by limiting inflammation in the uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Bartos, Amanda; Li, Yingju; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jegga, Anil; Murata, Shigeo; Hirota, Yasushi; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-06-11

    Embryonic diapause (delayed implantation) is a reproductive strategy widespread in the animal kingdom. Under this condition, embryos at the blastocyst stage become dormant simultaneously with uterine quiescence until environmental or physiological conditions are favorable for the survival of the mother and newborn. Under favorable conditions, activation of the blastocyst and uterus ensues with implantation and progression of pregnancy. Although endocrine factors are known to participate in this process, the underlying molecular mechanism coordinating this phenomenon is not clearly understood. We recently found that uterine muscle segment homeobox (Msx) transcription factors are critical for the initiation and maintenance of delayed implantation in mice. To better understand why Msx genes are critical for delayed implantation, we compared uterine proteomics profiles between littermate floxed (Msx1/Msx2f/f) mice and mice with uterine deletion of Msx genes (Msx1/Msx2d/d) under delayed conditions. In Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri, pathways including protein translation, ubiquitin-proteasome system, inflammation, chaperone-mediated protein folding, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were enriched, and computational modeling showed intersection of these pathways on inflammatory responses. Indeed, increases in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and inflammation conformed to proteotoxic and ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri under delayed conditions. Interestingly, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor bortezomib further exacerbated ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri with aggravated inflammatory response, deteriorating rate of blastocyst recovery and failure to sustain delayed implantation. This study highlights a previously unrecognized role for Msx in preventing proteotoxic stress and inflammatory responses to coordinate embryo dormancy and uterine quiescence during embryonic diapause.

  10. Mesoderm/mesenchyme homeobox gene l promotes vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Yun-He; Zhang, You-En; Zheng, Fei; Yang, Jian-Ye; Guo, Ling-Yun; Li, Xing-Yuan; Wang, Lu; Tang, Jun-Ming; Chen, Shi-You; Wang, Jia-Ning

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the role of mesoderm/mesenchyme homeobox gene l (Meox1) in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) phenotypic modulation during vascular remodeling. By using immunostaining, Western blot, and histological analyses, we found that Meox1 was up-regulated in PDGF-BB-treated SMCs in vitro and balloon injury-induced arterial SMCs in vivo. Meox1 knockdown by shRNA restored the expression of contractile SMCs phenotype markers including smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and calponin. In contrast, overexpression of Moex1 inhibited α-SMA and calponin expressions while inducing the expressions of synthetic SMCs phenotype markers such as matrix gla protein, osteopontin, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Mechanistically, Meox1 mediated the SMCs phenotypic modulation through FAK-ERK1/2 signaling, which appears to induce autophagy in SMCs. In vivo, knockdown of Meox1 attenuated injury-induced neointima formation and promoted SMCs contractile proteins expressions. Meox1 knockdown also reduced the number of proliferating SMCs, suggesting that Meox1 was important for SMCs proliferation in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of Meox1 attenuated ERK1/2 signaling and autophagy markers expressions, suggesting that Meox1 may promote SMCs phenotypic modulation via ERK1/2 signaling-autophagy in vivo. Our data indicated that Meox1 promotes SMCs phenotypic modulation and injury-induced vascular remodeling by regulating the FAK-ERK1/2-autophagy signaling cascade. Thus, targeting Meox1 may be an attractive approach for treating proliferating vascular diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Homeobox transcription factor Pitx2: The rise of an asymmetry gene in cardiogenesis and arrhythmogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, Diego; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Campione, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The homeobox transcription factor Pitx2 displays a highly specific expression pattern during embryogenesis. Gain and loss of function experiments have unraveled its pivotal role in left-right signaling. Conditional deletion in mice has demonstrated a complex and intricate role for Pitx2 in distinct

  12. A variant of the H6 homeobox gene maps to the 10q25.1-q26.2 region of human chromosome 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, H.S.; Solursh, M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Goodfellow, P.J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Homeobox genes represent a class of transcription factors which play a major role in the regulation of embryogenesis. Utilizing primers based on the conserved regions of the H6 homeobox gene, we were able to amplify several H6-like homeobox sequences from human genomic DNA. Analysis of these sequences indicated that at least 3 distinct H6-like homeobox regions may be present in Homo sapiens. From these distinct homeobox regions, primers were selected to screen a CEPH mega-YAC library for genomic clones containing the variant H6-like sequences. These screenings identified a YAC clone (YH6var) which contained the variant H6-like homeobox sequence. Utilizing a human/rodent somatic cell panel (Coriell B), the end clones from YH6var were chromosomally mapped to human chromosomes 10 and 16, indicating that YH6var was chimeric. An additional sequence flanking the H6 variant homeobox region was derived by inverse-PCR using YH6var as a template. From this flanking sequence, Homo sapien-specific primers were selected to assign the H6 variant to human chromosome 10 using the same Coriell B panel. The H6 variant gene was sublocalized to the 10q25.1-q26.2 region using a panel of somatic cell hybrids that retain well-characterized deletions/derivatives of chromosome 10. We are currently screening for STS-based markers for genetic linkage studies to confirm our physical mapping to the 10q25.1-q26.2 region as well as for use in linkage studies with developmental defects mapping to the same chromosomal region.

  13. Expression of class I knotted1-like homeobox genes in the storage roots of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaru; Kato, Nakao; Nakayama, Hiroki; Nakatani, Makoto; Takahata, Yasuhiro

    2008-11-01

    As a first step in clarifying the involvement of class I knotted1-like homeobox (KNOXI) genes in the storage root development of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas), we isolated three KNOXI genes, named Ibkn1, Ibkn2 and Ibkn3, expressed in the storage roots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Ibkn1 was homologous to the SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) gene of Arabidopsis, while Ibkn2 and Ibkn3 were homologous to the BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) gene. Of these, expression of Ibkn1 and Ibkn2 were upregulated in developing and mature storage roots compared with fibrous roots. Ibkn1 and Ibkn2 showed different expression patterns in the storage roots. Ibkn1 was preferentially expressed at the proximal end and around the primary vascular cambium, while Ibkn2 expression was highest in the thickest part and lower in both the proximal and distal ends. In contrast to Ibkn1 and Ibkn2, expression of Ibkn3 in roots was not consistent among sweetpotato cultivars. The distribution of endogenous trans-zeatin riboside (t-ZR) in sweetpotato roots showed a similarity to the expression pattern of KNOXI genes, supporting the idea that KNOXI genes control cytokinin levels in the storage roots. The physiological functions of these KNOXI genes in storage root development are discussed.

  14. Chimeric homeobox gene E2A-PBX1 induces proliferation, apoptosis, and malignant lymphomas in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedera, D A; Waller, E K; LeBrun, D P; Sen-Majumdar, A; Stevens, M E; Barsh, G S; Cleary, M L

    1993-09-10

    Expression of the homeobox fusion gene E2A-PBX1 under control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer efficiently induced malignancies in transgenic mice. All animals died before 5 months of age with lymphomas that demonstrated phenotypes consistent with transitional intermediate thymocytes (CD4+/CD8+/CD3med). E2A-PBX1 also markedly altered lymphoid development in pretumorous animals, reducing the number of thymocytes and bone marrow B lineage progenitors to 20% of normal levels. In spite of the observed reductions in lymphoid cells, premalignant animals contained significantly increased numbers of cycling thymocytes, but a higher proportion was also undergoing apoptosis, suggesting that increased cell death resulted in the marked lymphopenias. These data indicate that the chimeric homeodomain protein E2A-PBX1 paradoxically induces both proliferation and apoptosis in lymphoid cells, suggesting an in vivo association between nuclear oncogene-induced cell cycle progression and programed cell death.

  15. A modulatory role of the Rax homeobox gene in mature pineal gland function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Bering, Tenna; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2017-01-01

    to investigate the role of Rax in pineal function while circumventing forebrain abnormalities of the global Rax knockout, we generated an eye and pineal-specific Rax conditional knockout mouse. Deletion of Rax in the pineal gland did not affect morphology of the gland, suggesting that Rax is not essential......The retinal and anterior neural fold homeobox gene (Rax) controls development of the eye and the forebrain. Postnatal expression of Rax in the brain is restricted to the pineal gland, a forebrain structure devoted to melatonin synthesis. The role of Rax in pineal function is unknown. In order...... for pineal gland development. In contrast, deletion of Rax in the eye generated an anophthalmic phenotype. In addition to the loss of central visual pathways, the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus housing the circadian clock was absent, indicating that the retinohypothalamic tract is required...

  16. Transcriptional activation of prostate specific homeobox gene NKX3-1 in subsets of T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nagel

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes encode transcription factors impacting key developmental processes including embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cell differentiation. Reflecting their tight transcriptional control, homeobox genes are often embedded in large non-coding, cis-regulatory regions, containing tissue specific elements. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL homeobox genes are frequently deregulated by chromosomal aberrations, notably translocations adding T-cell specific activatory elements. NKX3-1 is a prostate specific homeobox gene activated in T-ALL patients expressing oncogenic TAL1 or displaying immature T-cell characteristics. After investigating regulation of NKX3-1 in primary cells and cell lines, we report its ectopic expression in T-ALL cells independent of chromosomal rearrangements. Using siRNAs and expression profiling, we exploited NKX3-1 positive T-ALL cell lines as tools to investigate aberrant activatory mechanisms. Our data confirmed NKX3-1 activation by TAL1/GATA3/LMO and identified LYL1 as an alternative activator in immature T-ALL cells devoid of GATA3. Moreover, we showed that NKX3-1 is directly activated by early T-cell homeodomain factor MSX2. These activators were regulated by MLL and/or by IL7-, BMP4- and IGF2-signalling. Finally, we demonstrated homeobox gene SIX6 as a direct leukemic target of NKX3-1 in T-ALL. In conclusion, we identified three major mechanisms of NKX3-1 regulation in T-ALL cell lines which are represented by activators TAL1, LYL1 and MSX2, corresponding to particular T-ALL subtypes described in patients. These results may contribute to the understanding of leukemic transcriptional networks underlying disturbed T-cell differentiation in T-ALL.

  17. Human homeobox gene HOXC13 is the partner of NUP98 in adult acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;12)(p15;q13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Starza, Roberta; Trubia, Maurizio; Crescenzi, Barbara; Matteucci, Caterina; Negrini, Massimo; Martelli, Massimo F; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Mecucci, Cristina

    2003-04-01

    The chimeric gene NUP98/HOXC13 was detected in a patient with a de novo acute myeloid leukemia and a t(11;12)(p15;q13). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with PAC1173K1 identified the breakpoint on 11p15, indicating that the NUP98 gene was involved in the translocation. At 12q13, the breakpoint fell within BAC 578A18, selected for the homeobox C (HOXC) cluster genes. RACE-PCR showed that HOXC13 was the partner gene of NUP98. To date, HOXC13 is the eighth homeobox gene that, as the result of a reciprocal translocation, fuses with NUP98 in myeloid malignancies. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The homeobox gene Mohawk represses transcription by recruiting the sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Douglas M; Beres, Brian J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Rawls, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Mohawk is an atypical homeobox gene expressed in embryonic progenitor cells of skeletal muscle, tendon, and cartilage. We demonstrate that Mohawk functions as a transcriptional repressor capable of blocking the myogenic conversion of 10T1/2 fibroblasts. The repressor activity is located in three small, evolutionarily conserved domains (MRD1-3) in the carboxy-terminal half of the protein. Point mutation analysis revealed six residues in MRD1 are sufficient for repressor function. The carboxy-terminal half of Mohawk is able to recruit components of the Sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex (Sin3A, Hdac1, and Sap18) and a subset of Polymerase II general transcription factors (Tbp, TFIIA1 and TFIIB). Furthermore, Sap18, a protein that bridges the Sin3A/HDAC complex to DNA-bound transcription factors, is co-immunoprecipitated by MRD1. These data predict that Mohawk can repress transcription through recruitment of the Sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex, and as a result, repress target genes required for the differentiation of cells to the myogenic lineage. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Fusion of the NUP98 gene and the homeobox gene HOXC13 in acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;12)(p15;q13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Isaksson, Margareth; Billström, Rolf; Strömbeck, Bodil; Mitelman, Felix; Johansson, Bertil

    2003-01-01

    The NUP98 gene at 11p15 is known to be fused to DDX10, HOXA9, HOXA11, HOXA13, HOXD11, HOXD13, LEDGF, NSD1, NSD3, PMX1, RAP1GDS1, and TOP1 in various hematologic malignancies. The common theme in all NUP98 chimeras is a transcript consisting of the 5' part of NUP98 and the 3' portion of the partner gene; however, apart from the frequent fusion to different homeobox genes, there is no apparent similarity among the other partners. We here report a de novo acute myeloid leukemia with a t(11;12)(p15;q13), resulting in a novel NUP98/HOXC13 fusion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses, by the use of probes covering NUP98 and the HOXC gene cluster at 12q13, revealed a fusion signal at the der(11)t(11;12), indicating a NUP98/HOXC chimera, whereas no fusion was found on the der(12)t(11;12), suggesting that the translocation was accompanied by a deletion of the reciprocal fusion gene. Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analyses showed that exon 16 (nucleotide 2290) of NUP98 was fused in-frame with exon 2 (nucleotide 852) of HOXC13. Neither the HOXC13/NUP98 transcript nor the normal HOXC13 was expressed. The present results, together with previous studies of NUP98/homeobox gene fusions, strongly indicate that NUP98/HOXC13 is of pathogenetic importance in t(11;12)-positive acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Hematopoietically-expressed homeobox gene three widely-evaluated polymorphisms and risk for diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hematopoietically-expressed homeobox (HHEX gene is identified as a promising candidate for type 2 diabetes by genome-wide association studies, triggering plenty of subsequent replications; however, the results are conflicting. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis of three widely-evaluated polymorphisms in HHEX gene and diabetes risk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A random-effects model was adopted irrespective of heterogeneity. Data and study quality were assessed in duplicate. There were 49 studies (cases/controls: 57931/74658 for rs1111875, 18 studies (18227/30366 for rs5015480 and 26 studies (25725/30579 for rs7923837, respectively. Overall analyses indicated that rs1111875-C allele (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-1.2; P<0.0005, rs5015480-C allele (OR = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06-1.26; P = 0.001 and rs7923837-G allele (OR = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.12-1.24; P<0.0005 conferred significantly increased risk for type 2 diabetes, yet accompanying moderate to strong evidence of heterogeneity. Despite vast divergence in allele distributions, subgroup analyses by ethnicity showed comparable risk estimates between Asians and Caucasians for three examined polymorphisms. Moreover, results of studies with hospital-based controls deviated greatly from that of all qualified studies, especially for rs7923837-G allele carrying a doubled risk (OR = 1.37 versus 1.18. Furthermore, when only large studies (≥ 500 case-patients were considered, risk effects were identical to the overall estimates for three examined polymorphisms. The Begg's funnel plot and Egger's test indicated low probability of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide clarification to the significant association of rs1111875, rs5015480 and rs7923837 in HHEX gene with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Clinicopathological features and pituitary homeobox 1 gene expression in the progression and prognosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma

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    Figen Barut

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence that PITX1 (pituitary homeobox 1 is a significant tumor suppressor in human cancer remains largely circumstantial, but it clearly warrants further study as little is known about the tumor-inhibitory roles of PITX1 in cutaneous malignant melanoma. The aims of this study were to investigate PITX1 gene expression in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma and to evaluate its potential relevance to clinicopathological characteristics and tumor cell proliferation. Clinicopathological findings of patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma were analyzed retrospectively. PITX1 and Ki-67 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry in malignant melanoma and healthy tissue samples from each patient. Labeling indices were calculated based on PITX1 gene and Ki-67 expression. The correlation between PITX1and Ki-67 expressions was analyzed in cutaneous malignant melanoma cases. The relationship between PITX1 expression intensity and clinicopathological characteristics was also analyzed. PITX1 expression was observed in all (100% normal healthy skin tissue samples. In addition, PITX1 expression was found in 56 (80% and was absent in 14 (20% of the 70 cutaneous malignant melanoma cases. Ki-67 positive expression was only detected in the 14 (20% PITX1-negative cases. PITX1-positive tumor cells were observed on the surface, but Ki-67 positive tumor cells were observed in deeper zones of the tumor nests. PITX1 expression was downregulated in human cutaneous malignant melanoma lesions compared with healthy skin tissue, but Ki-67 expression was upregulated in concordance with the progression of cutaneous malignant melanoma. PITX1 expression may be involved in tumor progression and is a potential tumor suppressor gene and prognostic marker for cutaneous malignant melanoma.

  2. Characterization of wheat Bell1-type homeobox genes in floral organs of alloplasmic lines with Aegilops crassa cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murai Koji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alloplasmic wheat lines with Aegilops crassa cytoplasm often show homeotic conversion of stamens into pistils under long-day conditions. In the pistillody-exhibiting florets, an ectopic ovule is formed within the transformed stamens, and female sterility is also observed because of abnormal integument development. Results In this study, four wheat Bell1-like homeobox (BLH genes were isolated and named WBLH1 to WBLH4. WBLH1/WBLH3/WBLH4 expression was observed in the basal boundary region of the ovary in both normal pistils and transformed stamens. WBLH2 was also strongly expressed in integuments not only of normal ovules in pistils but also of the ectopic ovules in transformed stamens, and the WBLH2 expression pattern in the sterile pistils seemed to be identical to that in normal ovules of fertile pistils. In addition, WBLH1 and WBLH3 showed interactions with the three wheat KNOX proteins through the BEL domain. WBLH2, however, formed a complex with wheat KNOTTED1 and ROUGH SHEATH1 orthologs through SKY and BEL domains, but not with a wheat LIGULELESS4 ortholog. Conclusions Expression of the four WBLH genes is evident in reproductive organs including pistils and transformed stamens and is independent from female sterility in alloplasmic wheat lines with Ae. crassa cytoplasm. KNOX-BLH interaction was conserved among various plant species, indicating the significance of KNOX-BLH complex formation in wheat developmental processes. The functional features of WBLH2 are likely to be distinct from other BLH gene functions in wheat development.

  3. Identification of a different-type homeobox gene, BarH1, possibly causing Bar (B) and Om(1D) mutations in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, T; Ishimaru, S; Higashijima, S; Takayama, E; Akimaru, H; Sone, M; Emori, Y; Saigo, K

    1991-01-01

    The Bar mutation B of Drosophila melanogaster and optic morphology mutation Om(1D) of Drosophila ananassae result in suppression of ommatidium differentiation at the anterior portion of the eye. Examinations was made to determine the genes responsible for these mutations. Both loci were found to share in common a different type of homeobox gene, which we call "BarH1." Polyptides encoded by D. melanogaster and D. ananassae BarH1 genes consist of 543 and 604 amino acids, respectively, with home...

  4. Complex epigenetic regulation of engrailed-2 (EN-2) homeobox gene in the autism cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S J; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Melnyk, Stepan; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Pogribny, I P

    2013-02-19

    The elucidation of epigenetic alterations in the autism brain has potential to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal gene expression in this disorder. Given strong evidence that engrailed-2 (EN-2) is a developmentally expressed gene relevant to cerebellar abnormalities and autism, the epigenetic evaluation of this candidate gene was undertaken in 26 case and control post-mortem cerebellar samples. Assessments included global DNA methylation, EN-2 promoter methylation, EN-2 gene expression and EN-2 protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to evaluate trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) associated with gene downregulation and histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) associated with gene activation. The results revealed an unusual pattern of global and EN-2 promoter region DNA hypermethylation accompanied by significant increases in EN-2 gene expression and protein levels. Consistent with EN-2 overexpression, histone H3K27 trimethylation mark in the EN-2 promoter was significantly decreased in the autism samples relative to matched controls. Supporting a link between reduced histone H3K27 trimethylation and increased EN-2 gene expression, the mean level of histone H3K4 trimethylation was elevated in the autism cerebellar samples. Together, these results suggest that the normal EN-2 downregulation that signals Purkinje cell maturation during late prenatal and early-postnatal development may not have occurred in some individuals with autism and that the postnatal persistence of EN-2 overexpression may contribute to autism cerebellar abnormalities.

  5. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. Results We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. Conclusions RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid

  6. Inhibition of Breast Cancer-Induced Angiogenesis by a Diverged Homeobox Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    A through HOX D— that arose from gene duplication (Krum- lauf 1994). Because of this, each HOX gene may have as many as three para - logues. The...expression patterns during embryogene- sis, it has been hypothesized that they may have overlapping or complemen- tary functions. Thus, targeting one para ...diverse human diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic retinopathy, psoriasis , and others, has become more apparent (42). Because blocking aberrant

  7. Screening the visual system homeobox 1 gene in keratoconus and posterior polymorphous dystrophy cohorts identifies a novel variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Andrea L; Jordan, Charlotte; Sheck, Leo; Niederer, Rachel; Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the visual system homeobox 1 (VSX1) gene have been described at a low frequency in keratoconus and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD). The putative role is controversial for several reasons, including a lack of mutations detected in other population cohorts. This study aims to determine whether VSX1 contributes to the genetic pathogenesis of keratoconus and PPCD in a New Zealand population, and includes analysis of a Polynesian population. Recruitment of patients with keratoconus and PPCD, comprehensive clinical examination including corneal topography and pachymetry, and collection of biologic samples for DNA extraction were undertaken. Mutational analysis of VSX1 (exons 1-7) with PCR and sequencing with bioinformatic assessment of variants was performed. Probable pathogenic variants were screened for in a control population using high-resolution melting analysis. Forty-seven patients with keratoconus, including 15 familial cases, and ten unrelated patients with PPCD were recruited. Two pathogenic changes were detected; a novel change c.173C>T (p.Pro58Leu) was found in a patient with PPCD, predicted to be pathogenic, and not seen in 200 ethnically matched control alleles. The previously reported c.731A>G (p.His244Arg) was detected in a patient with sporadic keratoconus, and not present in the controls. No family members were available for segregation analysis. This study reports the presence of pathogenic mutations in VSX1 in PPCD and keratoconus, including a novel disease-causing variant. The affected numbers are small, but given the growing body of evidence of pathogenic segregating changes in VSX1 in disease cohorts, the expression in keratocytes as part of wound healing, and the documented association of PPCD and keratoconus, it seems likely that the role of VSX1 as a genetic factor contributing to disease is real.

  8. vox homeobox gene: a novel regulator of midbrain-hindbrain boundary development in medaka fish?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabian, Peter; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula; Kozmiková, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 226, č. 2 (2016), s. 99-107 ISSN 0949-944X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Midbrain-hindbrain boundary * vox * medaka * Heat shock element * fgf8 * Gene regulatory network Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.422, year: 2016

  9. Mouse transgenesis identifies conserved functional enhancers and cis-regulatory motif in the vertebrate LIM homeobox gene Lhx2 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison P Lee

    Full Text Available The vertebrate Lhx2 is a member of the LIM homeobox family of transcription factors. It is essential for the normal development of the forebrain, eye, olfactory system and liver as well for the differentiation of lymphoid cells. However, despite the highly restricted spatio-temporal expression pattern of Lhx2, nothing is known about its transcriptional regulation. In mammals and chicken, Crb2, Dennd1a and Lhx2 constitute a conserved linkage block, while the intervening Dennd1a is lost in the fugu Lhx2 locus. To identify functional enhancers of Lhx2, we predicted conserved noncoding elements (CNEs in the human, mouse and fugu Crb2-Lhx2 loci and assayed their function in transgenic mouse at E11.5. Four of the eight CNE constructs tested functioned as tissue-specific enhancers in specific regions of the central nervous system and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, recapitulating partial and overlapping expression patterns of Lhx2 and Crb2 genes. There was considerable overlap in the expression domains of the CNEs, which suggests that the CNEs are either redundant enhancers or regulating different genes in the locus. Using a large set of CNEs (810 CNEs associated with transcription factor-encoding genes that express predominantly in the central nervous system, we predicted four over-represented 8-mer motifs that are likely to be associated with expression in the central nervous system. Mutation of one of them in a CNE that drove reporter expression in the neural tube and DRG abolished expression in both domains indicating that this motif is essential for expression in these domains. The failure of the four functional enhancers to recapitulate the complete expression pattern of Lhx2 at E11.5 indicates that there must be other Lhx2 enhancers that are either located outside the region investigated or divergent in mammals and fishes. Other approaches such as sequence comparison between multiple mammals are required to identify and characterize such enhancers.

  10. Spatiotemporal expression of the homeobox gene S8 during mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, H; Burger, E H; Lyaruu, D M; Bronckers, A L; Wöltgens, J H

    1997-09-01

    The murine S8 gene encodes a nuclear homeodomain containing transcription factor that is expressed at sites of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, including those in cranofacial tissues. The spatiotemporal expression of S8 mRNA was examined in tooth primordia by in situ hybridization. S8 transcripts were found in all stages of tooth development in 13- to 16.5-day-old mouse embryos (E13-E16.5), covering the early bud stage up to the late bell stage. S8 mRNA was found exclusively in the ectomesenchyme and its derivatives that originate from the neural crest: future pulp cells, odontoblast precursors and dental follicle cells. Expression was highest at the late cap and early bud stages and declined at the mid-bell stage, in both first molar and incisor primordia. In E13 jaw explants grown in organ culture for 48 h, S8 mRNA was still present in first and second molar primordia after culture. At E15.5, S8 mRNA was also transiently present in the surrounding osteogenic tissue. It is concluded that the distribution pattern of S8 mRNA during tooth development indicates a role for the gene in defining the identity of dental papilla and follicle cells. It is speculated that the time-restricted expression of S8 in tooth primordia involves establishing the definitive form of the tooth organ.

  11. Regulation and functions of the lms homeobox gene during development of embryonic lateral transverse muscles and direct flight muscles in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patterning and differentiation of developing musculatures require elaborate networks of transcriptional regulation. In Drosophila, significant progress has been made into identifying the regulators of muscle development and defining their interactive networks. One major family of transcription factors involved in these processes consists of homeodomain proteins. In flies, several members of this family serve as muscle identity genes to specify the fates of individual muscles, or groups thereof, during embryonic and/or adult muscle development. Herein, we report on the expression and function of a new Drosophila homeobox gene during both embryonic and adult muscle development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The newly described homeobox gene, termed lateral muscles scarcer (lms, which has yet uncharacterized orthologs in other invertebrates and primitive chordates but not in vertebrates, is expressed exclusively in subsets of developing muscle tissues. In embryos, lms is expressed specifically in the four lateral transverse (LT muscles and their founder cells in each hemisegment, whereas in larval wing imaginal discs, it is expressed in myoblasts that develop into direct flight muscles (DFMs, which are important for proper wing positioning. We have analyzed the regulatory inputs of various other muscle identity genes with overlapping or complementary expression patterns towards the cell type specific regulation of lms expression. Further we demonstrate that lms null mutants exhibit reduced numbers of embryonic LT muscles, and null mutant adults feature held-out-wing phenotypes. We provide a detailed description of the pattern and morphology of the direct flight muscles in the wild type and lms mutant flies by using the recently-developed ultramicroscopy and show that, in the mutants, all DFMs are present and present normal morphologies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified the homeobox gene lms as a new muscle identity gene

  12. Analysis of the WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX gene family in the conifer picea abies reveals extensive conservation as well as dynamic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Members of the WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) gene family have important functions during all stages of plant development and have been implicated in the development of morphological novelties during evolution. Most studies have examined the function of these genes in angiosperms and very little is known from other plant species. Results In this study we examine the presence and expression of WOX genes in the conifer Picea abies. We have cloned 11 WOX genes from both mRNA and genomic DNA and examined their phylogenetic relationship to WOX genes from other species as well as their expression during somatic embryogenesis and in adult tissues. Conclusions Our study shows that all major radiations within the WOX gene family took place before the angiosperm-gymnosperm split and that there has been a recent expansion within the intermediate clade in the Pinaceae family. Furthermore, we show that the genes from the intermediate clade are preferentially expressed during embryo development in Picea abies. Our data also indicates that there are clear orthologs of both WUS and WOX5 present in the P. abies genome. PMID:23758772

  13. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y

    1990-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from...... the same patients exhibited little immunoreactivity. Both the peptide antiserum and the polyclonal antiserum against the native protein immunoblotted a molecular weight 63,000 protein in nuclear extracts of tumor tissue, but not significantly in extracts of normal tissue. At the molecular level......, the presence of the homeobox transcript in human carcinoma was documented by in situ hybridization and RNase protection mapping. These results demonstrate that human cancer is associated with the expression of homeobox proteins. Such homeobox proteins, as well as other regulatory proteins, could be involved...

  14. Identification of a different-type homeobox gene, BarH1, possibly causing Bar (B) and Om(1D) mutations in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, T; Ishimaru, S; Higashijima, S; Takayama, E; Akimaru, H; Sone, M; Emori, Y; Saigo, K

    1991-05-15

    The Bar mutation B of Drosophila melanogaster and optic morphology mutation Om(1D) of Drosophila ananassae result in suppression of ommatidium differentiation at the anterior portion of the eye. Examinations was made to determine the genes responsible for these mutations. Both loci were found to share in common a different type of homeobox gene, which we call "BarH1." Polyptides encoded by D. melanogaster and D. ananassae BarH1 genes consist of 543 and 604 amino acids, respectively, with homeodomains identical in sequence except for one amino acid substitution. A unique feature of these homeodomains is that the phenylalanine residue in helix 3, conserved in all metazoan homeodomains so far examined, is replaced by a tyrosine residue. By Northern blotting, considerably more BarH1 RNA was detected in the Bar mutant than in wild type. P element-mediated transformation showed Bar-like eye malformation to be induced by transient overexpression of the BarH1 gene in the late third-instar larvae. Somatic recombination analysis indicated normal gene functions of the Bar region, including the BarH1 gene, to be required for normal eye morphogenesis.

  15. A novel mutation in homeobox DNA binding domain of HOXC13 gene underlies pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (ECTD9) in a Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar Kamal; Muhammad, Noor; Aziz, Abdul; Khan, Sher Alam; Shah, Khadim; Nasir, Abdul; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Khan, Saadullah

    2017-04-12

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a congenital disorder of hair abnormalities and nail dysplasia. Both autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance fashion of PHNED occurs. In literature, to date, five different forms of PHNED have been reported at molecular level, having three genes known and two loci with no gene yet. In this study, a four generations consanguineous family of Pakistani origin with autosomal recessive PHNED was investigated. Affected members exhibited PHNED phenotypes with involvement of complete hair loss and nail dysplasia. To screen for mutation in the genes (HOXC13, KRT74, KRT85), its coding exons and exons-intron boundaries were sequenced. The 3D models of normal and mutated HOXC13 were predicted by using homology modeling. Through investigating the family to known loci, the family was mapped to ectodermal dysplasia 9 (ECTD9) loci with genetic address of 12q13.13. Mutation screening revealed a novel missense mutation (c.929A > C; p.Asn310Thr) in homeobox DNA binding domain of HOXC13 gene in affected members of the family. Due to mutation, loss of hydrogen bonding and difference in potential energy occurs, which may resulting in alteration of protein function. This is the first mutation reported in homeodomain, while 5 th mutation reported in HOXC13 gene causing PHNED.

  16. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifan; Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Nelson, Jessica C; Abe, Namiko; Gordon, Patricia; Lloret-Fernandez, Carla; Maicas, Miren; Flames, Nuria; Mann, Richard S; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Hobert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation program of the cholinergic AIY interneuron class. Using a panel of different terminal differentiation markers, including neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides, we show that ttx-3 also controls the terminal differentiation program of two additional, distinct neuron types, namely the cholinergic AIA interneurons and the serotonergic NSM neurons. We show that the type of differentiation program that is controlled by ttx-3 in different neuron types is specified by a distinct set of collaborating transcription factors. One of the collaborating transcription factors is the POU homeobox gene unc-86, which collaborates with ttx-3 to determine the identity of the serotonergic NSM neurons. unc-86 in turn operates independently of ttx-3 in the anterior ganglion where it collaborates with the ARID-type transcription factor cfi-1 to determine the cholinergic identity of the IL2 sensory and URA motor neurons. In conclusion, transcription factors operate as terminal selectors in distinct combinations in different neuron types, defining neuron type-specific identity features.

  17. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  18. Ancient Expansion of the Hox Cluster in Lepidoptera Generated Four Homeobox Genes Implicated in Extra-Embryonic Tissue Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William R.; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J.; Holland, Peter W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes) has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina) plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus) to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths). Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria), with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks. PMID:25340822

  19. Preliminary molecular detection of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (VpSERK) and knotted-like homeobox (VpKNOX1) genes during in vitro morphogenesis ofVanilla planifoliaJacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Mosqueda, Marco A; Iglesias-Andreu, Lourdes G; Sáenz, Luis; Córdova, Iván

    2018-02-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the embryogenic competence of different tissues from different stages (friable callus, bud-regenerating callus, and whole buds) of Vanilla planifolia , through the molecular detection of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase ( VpSERK ) and knotted-like homeobox ( VpKNOX1 ) genes. RNA was extracted with Trizol ® , cDNA was obtained, and the studied transcripts were amplified. Using non-specific primers, VpSERK and VpSTM gene expression was detected in the three stages evaluated. This study might contribute to providing an explanation for the recalcitrance of this Vanilla species to somatic embryogenesis.

  20. A novel role of BELL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH, in floral patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Patibanda, Varun; Smith, Harley M S

    2009-02-01

    Flowers are determinate shoots comprised of perianth and reproductive organs displayed in a whorled phyllotactic pattern. Floral organ identity genes display region-specific expression patterns in the developing flower. In Arabidopsis, floral organ identity genes are activated by LEAFY (LFY), which functions with region-specific co-regulators, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) and WUSCHEL (WUS), to up-regulate homeotic genes in specific whorls of the flower. PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) are redundant functioning BELL1-like homeodomain proteins that are expressed in shoot and floral meristems. During flower development, PNY functions with a co-repressor complex to down-regulate the homeotic gene, AGAMOUS (AG), in the outer whorls of the flower. However, the function of PNY as well as PNF in regulating floral organ identity in the central whorls of the flower is not known. In this report, we show that combining mutations in PNY and PNF enhance the floral patterning phenotypes of weak and strong alleles of lfy, indicating that these BELL1-like homeodomain proteins play a role in the specification of petals, stamens and carpels during flower development. Expression studies show that PNY and PNF positively regulate the homeotic genes, APETALA3 and AG, in the inner whorls of the flower. Moreover, PNY and PNF function in parallel with LFY, UFO and WUS to regulate homeotic gene expression. Since PNY and PNF interact with the KNOTTED1-like homeodomain proteins, SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and KNOTTED-LIKE from ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA2 (KNAT2) that regulate floral development, we propose that PNY/PNF-STM and PNY/PNF-KNAT2 complexes function in the inner whorls to regulate flower patterning events.

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals potentially novel roles of Homeobox genes in adipose deposition in fat-tailed sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Danju; Zhou, Guangxian; Zhou, Shiwei; Zeng, Jie; Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Yuxin; Chen, Yulin

    2017-11-03

    Adipose tissues are phenotypically, metabolically and functionally heterogeneous based on the sites of their deposition. Undesirable fat deposits in the body are often detrimental to animal and human health. To unravel the potential underlying mechanisms governing accumulation of adipose tissues in various regions of the body, i.e., subcutaneous (SAT), visceral (VAT) and tail (TAT), we profiled transcriptomes from Tan sheep, a Chinese indigenous breed with notable fat tail using RNA-seq. Upon comparison, we identified a total of 1,058 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the three adipose types (218, 324, and 795 in SAT/VAT, SAT/TAT, and VAT/TAT, respectively), from which several known key players were identified that are involved in lipid metabolic process, Wnt signals, Vitamin A metabolism, and transcriptional regulation of adipocyte differentiation. We also found that many elevated genes in VAT were notably enriched for key biological processes such as cytokine secretion, signaling molecule interaction and immune systems. Several developmental genes including HOXC11, HOXC12 and HOXC13, and adipose-expressed genes in the tail region, such as HOTAIR_2, HOTAIR_3 and SP9 were specially highlighted, indicating their strong associations with tail fat development in fat-tailed sheep. Our results provide new insight into exploring the specific fat deposition in tail, also contribute to the understanding of differences between adipose depots.

  2. Suppression of the homeobox gene HDTF1 enhances resistance to Verticillium dahliae and Botrytis cinerea in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Xu, Li; Lindsey, Keith; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Longfu

    2016-05-01

    Development of pathogen-resistant crops, such as fungus-resistant cotton, has significantly reduced chemical application and improved crop yield and quality. However, the mechanism of resistance to cotton pathogens such as Verticillium dahliae is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterized a cotton gene (HDTF1) that was isolated following transcriptome profiling during the resistance response of cotton to V. dahliae. HDTF1 putatively encodes a homeodomain transcription factor, and its expression was found to be down-regulated in cotton upon inoculation with V. dahliae and Botrytis cinerea. To characterise the involvement of HDTF1 in the response to these pathogens, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to generate HDTF1-silenced cotton. VIGS reduction in HDTF1 expression significantly enhanced cotton plant resistance to both pathogens. HDTF1 silencing resulted in activation of jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling and JA accumulation. However, the silenced plants were not altered in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) or the expression of marker genes associated with SA signaling. These results suggest that HDTF1 is a negative regulator of the JA pathway, and resistance to V. dahliae and B. cinerea can be engineered by activation of JA signaling. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. miR-224 promotion of cell migration and invasion by targeting Homeobox D 10 gene in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Ding, Chenchen; Chen, Chuan; Zhang, Zhimin; Xiao, He; Xie, Fei; Lei, Lin; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mao, Bijing; Jiang, Mei; Li, Jian; Wang, Dong; Wang, Ge

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that control target gene expression and are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular pathways. In our previous research, we have demonstrated that miR-224 was overexpressed in liver cancer cells and tissues, which was an important factor in the regulation of cell migration and invasion. This study aimed to further explore the regulatory mechanism of miR-224 in the migration and invasion in liver cancer cells. A luciferase reporter assay was used to confirm that the HOXD10 gene was a direct target of miR-224. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, Transwell migration, and Matrigel invasion assays were performed to clarify the molecular mechanism of miR-224 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). (i) The expression of miR-224 was strongly upregulated in MHHC97H and MHCC97L cells, and its expression level was significantly associated with cell invasive potential. (ii) The HOXD10 gene was confirmed to be a direct target of miR-224. Compared with normal liver tissues and cells, HOXD10 had lower expression in HCC tissues and cells and inversely regulated HCC cell invasion. (iii) miR-224 promoted expression of the tumor invasion-associated proteins p-PAK4 and MMP-9 by directly targeting HOXD10. Our findings suggest a previously undescribed regulatory pathway in which the miR-224/HOXD10/p-PAK4/MMP-9 signaling pathway contributes to the regulation of cell migration and invasion and provides a new biotarget for HCC treatment. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. MEIS homeobox genes in neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Dirk; Revet, Ingrid; Jorritsma, Gerda; Schilderink, Nathalie; Versteeg, Rogier

    2005-01-01

    The common pediatric tumor neuroblastoma originates from primitive neural crest-derived precursor cells of the peripheral nervous system. Neuroblastoma especially affects very young children, and can already be present at birth. Its early onset and cellular origin predict the involvement of

  5. Timing the generation of distinct retinal cells by homeobox proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Decembrini

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The reason why different types of vertebrate nerve cells are generated in a particular sequence is still poorly understood. In the vertebrate retina, homeobox genes play a crucial role in establishing different cell identities. Here we provide evidence of a cellular clock that sequentially activates distinct homeobox genes in embryonic retinal cells, linking the identity of a retinal cell to its time of generation. By in situ expression analysis, we found that the three Xenopus homeobox genes Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are initially transcribed but not translated in early retinal progenitors. Their translation requires cell cycle progression and is sequentially activated in photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. Furthermore, by in vivo lipofection of "sensors" in which green fluorescent protein translation is under control of the 3' untranslated region (UTR, we found that the 3' UTRs of Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are sufficient to drive a spatiotemporal pattern of translation matching that of the corresponding proteins and consistent with the time of generation of photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. The block of cell cycle progression of single early retinal progenitors impairs their differentiation as photoreceptors and bipolar cells, but is rescued by the lipofection of Xotx5b and Xvsx1 coding sequences, respectively. This is the first evidence to our knowledge that vertebrate homeobox proteins can work as effectors of a cellular clock to establish distinct cell identities.

  6. The Short-Stature Homeobox-Containing Gene (shox/SHOX Is Required for the Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Bone Differentiation in Zebrafish Embryo and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Yokokura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The short-stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX was originally discovered as one of genes responsible for idiopathic short-stature syndromes in humans. Previous studies in animal models have shown the evolutionarily conserved link between this gene and skeletal formation in early embryogenesis. Here, we characterized developmental roles of shox/SHOX in zebrafish embryos and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs using loss-of-function approaches. Morpholino oligo-mediated knockdown of zebrafish shox markedly hindered cell proliferation in the anterior region of the pharyngula embryos, which was accompanied by reduction in the dlx2 expression at mesenchymal core sites for future pharyngeal bones. In addition, the impaired shox expression transiently increased expression levels of skeletal differentiation genes in early larval stage. In cell culture studies, we found that hMSCs expressed SHOX; the siRNA-mediated blockade of SHOX expression significantly blunted cell proliferation in undifferentiated hMSCs but the loss of SHOX expression did augment the expressions of subsets of early osteogenic genes during early osteoblast differentiation. These data suggest that shox/SHOX maintains the population of embryonic bone progenitor cells by keeping its proliferative status and by repressing the onset of early osteogenic gene expression. The current study for the first time shows cellular and developmental responses caused by shox/SHOX deficiency in zebrafish embryos and hMSCs, and it expands our understanding of the role of this gene in early stages of skeletal growth.

  7. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4 Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram Brenig

    Full Text Available Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4 gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA and 289 White Galloway (WGA cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed.

  8. The homeobox gene Gsx2 regulates the self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells and the cell fate of postnatal progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor R Méndez-Gómez

    Full Text Available The Genetic screened homeobox 2 (Gsx2 transcription factor is required for the development of olfactory bulb (OB and striatal neurons, and for the regional specification of the embryonic telencephalon. Although Gsx2 is expressed abundantly by progenitor cells in the ventral telencephalon, its precise function in the generation of neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs is not clear. Similarly, the role of Gsx2 in regulating the self-renewal and multipotentiality of NSCs has been little explored. Using retroviral vectors to express Gsx2, we have studied the effect of Gsx2 on the growth of NSCs isolated from the OB and ganglionic eminences (GE, as well as its influence on the proliferation and cell fate of progenitors in the postnatal mouse OB. Expression of Gsx2 reduces proliferation and the self-renewal capacity of NSCs, without significantly affecting cell death. Furthermore, Gsx2 overexpression decreases the differentiation of NSCs into neurons and glia, and it maintains the cells that do not differentiate as cycling progenitors. These effects were stronger in GESCs than in OBSCs, indicating that the actions of Gsx2 are cell-dependent. In vivo, Gsx2 produces a decrease in the number of Pax6+ cells and doublecortin+ neuroblasts, and an increase in Olig2+ cells. In summary, our findings show that Gsx2 inhibits the ability of NSCs to proliferate and self-renew, as well as the capacity of NSC-derived progenitors to differentiate, suggesting that this transcription factor regulates the quiescent and undifferentiated state of NSCs and progenitors. Furthermore, our data indicate that Gsx2 negatively regulates neurogenesis from postnatal progenitor cells.

  9. GA3 stimulates the formation and germination of somatic embryos and the expression of a KNOTTED-like homeobox gene of Cocos nucifera (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Córtes, M; Sáenz, Luis; Córdova, I; Quiroz, A; Verdeil, J-L; Oropeza, C

    2010-09-01

    The micropropagation of coconut palm has progressed rapidly; yet, there are constraints with regard to the number of somatic embryos formed and their germination. To overcome these, we tested the effect of gibberellic acid and characterized genes of the KNOX family. Gibberellic acid at 0.5 muM increased 1.5-fold the number of calli forming somatic embryos and twofold the number of somatic embryos per callus, calli with germinating embryos and the number of germinating somatic embryos per callus. With regard to the study of KNOX family genes, the complete sequences of two KNOX-like genes were obtained for CnKNOX1 and CnKNOX2. The deduced amino acid sequence of both showed highly conserved domains characteristic of KNOX genes. CnKNOX1 showed high homology with KNOX class I proteins. CnKNOX1 expression was detected throughout the embryogenesis process except in somatic embryos at the pro-globular stage, and was highest in somatic embryos at the coleoptilar stage. No detection of CnKNOX1 expression occurred in calli with aberrant embryos. The addition of gibberellic acid stimulated the expression of CnKNOX1 earlier and the relative expression at all stages was higher. CnKNOX2 expression occurred at all stages peaking at the globular stage, but gibberellic acid treatment decreased the expression. Gene expression was also analyzed in tissues of different organs of adult palms. With CnKNOX1, high level of expression was found in tissues of organs with, but not in those without, meristem, whereas CnKNOX2 expression was detected in tissues with and also in those without meristem.

  10. XLMR in MRX families 29, 32, 33 and 38 results from the dup24 mutation in the ARX (Aristaless related homeobox gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Andrée

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked mental retardation (XLMR is the leading cause of mental retardation in males. Mutations in the ARX gene in Xp22.1 have been found in numerous families with both nonsyndromic and syndromic XLMR. The most frequent mutation in this gene is a 24 bp duplication in exon 2. Based on this fact, a panel of XLMR families linked to Xp22 was tested for this particular ARX mutation. Methods Genomic DNA from XLMR families linked to Xp22.1 was amplified for exon 2 in ARX using a Cy5 labeled primer pair. The resulting amplicons were sized using the ALFexpress automated sequencer. Results A panel of 11 families with X-linked mental retardation was screened for the ARX 24dup mutation. Four nonsyndromic XLMR families – MRX29, MRX32, MRX33 and MRX38 – were found to have this particular gene mutation. Conclusion We have identified 4 additional XLMR families with the ARX dup24 mutation from a panel of 11 XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. This finding makes the ARX dup24 mutation the most common mutation in nonsyndromic XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. As this mutation can be readily tested for using an automated sequencer, screening should be considered for any male with nonsyndromic MR of unknown etiology.

  11. XLMR in MRX families 29, 32, 33 and 38 results from the dup24 mutation in the ARX (Aristaless related homeobox) gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Monica L; Cason, A Lauren; Finnis, Merran; Mangelsdorf, Marie; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Macgregor, David; MacMillan, Andrée; Holden, Jeanette JA; Gecz, Jozef; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    Background X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is the leading cause of mental retardation in males. Mutations in the ARX gene in Xp22.1 have been found in numerous families with both nonsyndromic and syndromic XLMR. The most frequent mutation in this gene is a 24 bp duplication in exon 2. Based on this fact, a panel of XLMR families linked to Xp22 was tested for this particular ARX mutation. Methods Genomic DNA from XLMR families linked to Xp22.1 was amplified for exon 2 in ARX using a Cy5 labeled primer pair. The resulting amplicons were sized using the ALFexpress automated sequencer. Results A panel of 11 families with X-linked mental retardation was screened for the ARX 24dup mutation. Four nonsyndromic XLMR families – MRX29, MRX32, MRX33 and MRX38 – were found to have this particular gene mutation. Conclusion We have identified 4 additional XLMR families with the ARX dup24 mutation from a panel of 11 XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. This finding makes the ARX dup24 mutation the most common mutation in nonsyndromic XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. As this mutation can be readily tested for using an automated sequencer, screening should be considered for any male with nonsyndromic MR of unknown etiology. PMID:15850492

  12. DNA methylation of the homeobox genes PITX2 and SHOX2 predicts outcome in non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Dimo; Hasinger, Oliver; Liebenberg, Volker; Field, John K; Kristiansen, Glen; Soltermann, Alex

    2012-06-01

    Biomarkers that facilitate prediction of disease progression in lung cancer patients might be clinically valuable in optimizing individualized therapy. In this study, the ability of the DNA methylation biomarkers PITX2 and SHOX2 to predict disease outcome in lung cancer patients has been evaluated. Quantitative, methylation-specific (HeavyMethyl), real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure DNA methylation of PITX2 and SHOX2 in bisulfite-converted DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 474 non-small-cell lung cancer patients. In univariate Cox Proportional Hazard analysis, high methylation of SHOX2 and PITX2 was a significant predictor of progression-free survival [SHOX2: n=465, hazard ratio (HR)=1.395 (1.130 to 1.721), P=0.002; PITX2: n=445, HR=1.312 (1.059 to 1.625), P=0.013]. Patients with low methylation of either PITX2 and/or SHOX2 (n=319) showed a significantly higher risk of disease progression as compared with patients with higher methylation of both genes [n=126; HR=1.555 (1.210 to 1.999), P=0.001]. This was particularly true for the subgroup of patients receiving no adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy [n=258, HR=1.838 (1.252 to 2.698), P=0.002]. In multivariate analysis, both biomarkers added significant independent prognostic information to pT, pN, pM, and grade. Another interesting finding of this study was that SHOX2 and PITX2 DNA methylation was shown to be inversely correlated with TTF1 (also known as NKX2-1) expression (PITX2: P=0.018, SHOX2: PPITX2 and SHOX2 is an independent prognostic biomarker for disease progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

  13. Mutations in the nuclear localization sequence of the Aristaless related homeobox; sequestration of mutant ARX with IPO13 disrupts normal subcellular distribution of the transcription factor and retards cell division.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoubridge, C.; Tan, M.H.; Fullston, T.; Cloosterman, D.; Coman, D.; McGillivray, G.; Mancini, G.M.S.; Kleefstra, T.; Gecz, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aristaless related homeobox (ARX) is a paired-type homeobox gene. ARX function is frequently affected by naturally occurring mutations. Nonsense mutations, polyalanine tract expansions and missense mutations in ARX cause a range of intellectual disability and epilepsy phenotypes with or

  14. The Homeobox Transcription Factor RHOX10 Drives Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Won Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The developmental origins of most adult stem cells are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of a transcription factor—RHOX10—critical for the initial establishment of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs. Conditional loss of the entire 33-gene X-linked homeobox gene cluster that includes Rhox10 causes progressive spermatogenic decline, a phenotype indistinguishable from that caused by loss of only Rhox10. We demonstrate that this phenotype results from dramatically reduced SSC generation. By using a battery of approaches, including single-cell-RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq analysis, we show that Rhox10 drives SSC generation by promoting pro-spermatogonia differentiation. Rhox10 also regulates batteries of migration genes and promotes the migration of pro-spermatogonia into the SSC niche. The identification of an X-linked homeobox gene that drives the initial generation of SSCs has implications for the evolution of X-linked gene clusters and sheds light on regulatory mechanisms influencing adult stem cell generation in general.

  15. Mouse H6 Homeobox 1 (Hmx1 mutations cause cranial abnormalities and reduced body mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munroe Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The H6 homeobox genes Hmx1, Hmx2, and Hmx3 (also known as Nkx5-3; Nkx5-2 and Nkx5-1, respectively, compose a family within the NKL subclass of the ANTP class of homeobox genes. Hmx gene family expression is mostly limited to sensory organs, branchial (pharyngeal arches, and the rostral part of the central nervous system. Targeted mutation of either Hmx2 or Hmx3 in mice disrupts the vestibular system. These tandemly duplicated genes have functional overlap as indicated by the loss of the entire vestibular system in double mutants. Mutants have not been described for Hmx1, the most divergent of the family. Results Dumbo (dmbo is a semi-lethal mouse mutation that was recovered in a forward genetic mutagenesis screen. Mutants exhibit enlarged ear pinnae with a distinctive ventrolateral shift. Here, we report on the basis of this phenotype and other abnormalities in the mutant, and identify the causative mutation as being an allele of Hmx1. Examination of dumbo skulls revealed only subtle changes in cranial bone morphology, namely hyperplasia of the gonial bone and irregularities along the caudal border of the squamous temporal bone. Other nearby otic structures were unaffected. The semilethality of dmbo/dmbo mice was found to be ~40%, occured perinatally, and was associated with exencephaly. Surviving mutants of both sexes exhibited reduced body mass from ~3 days postpartum onwards. Most dumbo adults were microphthalmic. Recombinant animals and specific deletion-bearing mice were used to map the dumbo mutation to a 1.8 Mb region on Chromosome 5. DNA sequencing of genes in this region revealed a nonsense mutation in the first exon of H6 Homeobox 1 (Hmx1; also Nkx5-3. An independent spontaneous allele called misplaced ears (mpe was also identified, confirming Hmx1 as the responsible mutant gene. Conclusion The divergence of Hmx1 from its paralogs is reflected by different and diverse developmental roles exclusive of vestibular

  16. Mouse H6 Homeobox 1 (Hmx1) mutations cause cranial abnormalities and reduced body mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Robert J; Prabhu, Vinay; Acland, Greg M; Johnson, Kenneth R; Harris, Belinda S; O'Brien, Tim P; Welsh, Ian C; Noden, Drew M; Schimenti, John C

    2009-01-01

    Background The H6 homeobox genes Hmx1, Hmx2, and Hmx3 (also known as Nkx5-3; Nkx5-2 and Nkx5-1, respectively), compose a family within the NKL subclass of the ANTP class of homeobox genes. Hmx gene family expression is mostly limited to sensory organs, branchial (pharyngeal) arches, and the rostral part of the central nervous system. Targeted mutation of either Hmx2 or Hmx3 in mice disrupts the vestibular system. These tandemly duplicated genes have functional overlap as indicated by the loss of the entire vestibular system in double mutants. Mutants have not been described for Hmx1, the most divergent of the family. Results Dumbo (dmbo) is a semi-lethal mouse mutation that was recovered in a forward genetic mutagenesis screen. Mutants exhibit enlarged ear pinnae with a distinctive ventrolateral shift. Here, we report on the basis of this phenotype and other abnormalities in the mutant, and identify the causative mutation as being an allele of Hmx1. Examination of dumbo skulls revealed only subtle changes in cranial bone morphology, namely hyperplasia of the gonial bone and irregularities along the caudal border of the squamous temporal bone. Other nearby otic structures were unaffected. The semilethality of dmbo/dmbo mice was found to be ~40%, occured perinatally, and was associated with exencephaly. Surviving mutants of both sexes exhibited reduced body mass from ~3 days postpartum onwards. Most dumbo adults were microphthalmic. Recombinant animals and specific deletion-bearing mice were used to map the dumbo mutation to a 1.8 Mb region on Chromosome 5. DNA sequencing of genes in this region revealed a nonsense mutation in the first exon of H6 Homeobox 1 (Hmx1; also Nkx5-3). An independent spontaneous allele called misplaced ears (mpe) was also identified, confirming Hmx1 as the responsible mutant gene. Conclusion The divergence of Hmx1 from its paralogs is reflected by different and diverse developmental roles exclusive of vestibular involvement. Additionally

  17. Mouse H6 Homeobox 1 (Hmx1) mutations cause cranial abnormalities and reduced body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Robert J; Prabhu, Vinay; Acland, Greg M; Johnson, Kenneth R; Harris, Belinda S; O'Brien, Tim P; Welsh, Ian C; Noden, Drew M; Schimenti, John C

    2009-04-20

    The H6 homeobox genes Hmx1, Hmx2, and Hmx3 (also known as Nkx5-3; Nkx5-2 and Nkx5-1, respectively), compose a family within the NKL subclass of the ANTP class of homeobox genes. Hmx gene family expression is mostly limited to sensory organs, branchial (pharyngeal) arches, and the rostral part of the central nervous system. Targeted mutation of either Hmx2 or Hmx3 in mice disrupts the vestibular system. These tandemly duplicated genes have functional overlap as indicated by the loss of the entire vestibular system in double mutants. Mutants have not been described for Hmx1, the most divergent of the family. Dumbo (dmbo) is a semi-lethal mouse mutation that was recovered in a forward genetic mutagenesis screen. Mutants exhibit enlarged ear pinnae with a distinctive ventrolateral shift. Here, we report on the basis of this phenotype and other abnormalities in the mutant, and identify the causative mutation as being an allele of Hmx1. Examination of dumbo skulls revealed only subtle changes in cranial bone morphology, namely hyperplasia of the gonial bone and irregularities along the caudal border of the squamous temporal bone. Other nearby otic structures were unaffected. The semilethality of dmbo/dmbo mice was found to be ~40%, occured perinatally, and was associated with exencephaly. Surviving mutants of both sexes exhibited reduced body mass from ~3 days postpartum onwards. Most dumbo adults were microphthalmic. Recombinant animals and specific deletion-bearing mice were used to map the dumbo mutation to a 1.8 Mb region on Chromosome 5. DNA sequencing of genes in this region revealed a nonsense mutation in the first exon of H6 Homeobox 1 (Hmx1; also Nkx5-3). An independent spontaneous allele called misplaced ears (mpe) was also identified, confirming Hmx1 as the responsible mutant gene. The divergence of Hmx1 from its paralogs is reflected by different and diverse developmental roles exclusive of vestibular involvement. Additionally, these mutant Hmx1 alleles

  18. Homeobox transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) correlates with good prognosis in breast cancer patients and induces apoptosis in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lanigan, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    The homeobox-containing transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) plays an important role in mammary gland development. However, the clinical implications of Msx2 expression in breast cancer are unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the potential clinical value of Msx2 as a breast cancer biomarker and to clarify its functional role in vitro.

  19. Zinc-fingers and homeoboxes 1 (ZHX1) binds DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3B to enhance DNMT3B-mediated transcriptional repression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Hak; Park, Jinah; Choi, Moon-Chang; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Yeonjoo; Lee, Ju-Hee; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You

    2007-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 3B is a de novo DNMT that represses transcription independent of DNMT activity. In order to gain a better insight into DNMT3B-mediated transcriptional repression, we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis using DNMT3B as a bait. Of the various binding candidates, ZHX1, a member of zinc-finger and homeobox protein, was found to interact with DNMT3B in vivo and in vitro. N-terminal PWWP domain of DNMT3B was required for its interaction with homeobox motifs of ZHX1. ZHX1 contains nuclear localization signal at C-terminal homeobox motif, and both ZHX1 and DNMT3B were co-localized in nucleus. Furthermore, we found that ZHX1 enhanced the transcriptional repression mediated by DNMT3B when DNMT3B is directly targeted to DNA. These results showed for First the direct linkage between DNMT and zinc-fingers homeoboxes protein, leading to enhanced gene silencing by DNMT3B

  20. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 2. Domain architecture analyses of the 14 homeodomain containing proteins from D. discoideum. These were derived using the online software SMART with Pfam database. The domains present in each protein are shown with their respective genomic positions. The figure is not drawn up to the scale.

  1. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-27

    Apr 27, 2015 ... neoformans; Ec: Encephalitozoon cuniculi; Nv: Nematostella vectensis; Cs: Cupiennius salei; Sp: Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Mda: Myotis davidii; Aa: Aedes aegypti; Ta: Trichoplax adhaerens; Sk: Saccoglossus kowalevskii; Cgi: Crassostrea gigas; Dr: Danio rerio; Rn: Rattus norvegicus; Cg: Cricetulus ...

  2. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-27

    Apr 27, 2015 ... not consider them as members of OTHER. NOVEL class proteins bear no similarity to any known class of homeodomain proteins and are unique to D. discoideum while the OTHER group members show weak similarity to many known homeodomain proteins but still do not belong to any one class as such.

  3. Genomic Identification and Analysis of Shared Cis-regulator Elements in a Developmentally Critical homeobox Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Amemiya

    2003-04-01

    The goals of this project were to isolate, characterize, and sequence the Dlx3/Dlx7 bigene cluster from twelve different species of mammals. The Dlx3 and Dlx7 genes are known to encode homeobox transcription factors involved in patterning of structures in the vertebrate jaw as well as vertebrate limbs. Genomic sequences from the respective taxa will subsequently be compared in order to identify conserved non-coding sequences that are potential cis-regulatory elements. Based on the comparisons they will fashion transgenic mouse experiments to functionally test the strength of the potential cis-regulatory elements. A goal of the project is to attempt to identify those elements that may function in coordinately regulating both Dlx3 and Dlx7 functions.

  4. Smad4-dependent suppressor pituitary homeobox 2 promotes PPP2R2A-mediated inhibition of Akt pathway in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Wu, Wei; Shen, Ruizhe; Jiang, He; Qian, Yuting; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wu, Sheng; Wei, Lumin; Zang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of Pituitary homeobox 2 (Pitx2) in malignancy remains enigmatic, and Pitx2 has not been previously implicated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this study, we performed gene expression profiling of human PDAC tissues and identified Pitx2 as a promising candidate. Pitx2 expression was decreased from 2.6- to 19-fold in human PDAC tissues from microarray units. Immunochemistry staining showed that Pitx2 expression was moderate to intense in normal pancreatic and pancr...

  5. Homeobox transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) correlates with good prognosis in breast cancer patients and induces apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Fiona; Gremel, Gabriela; Hughes, Rowena; Brennan, Donal J; Martin, Finian; Jirström, Karin; Gallagher, William M

    2010-01-01

    The homeobox-containing transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) plays an important role in mammary gland development. However, the clinical implications of Msx2 expression in breast cancer are unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the potential clinical value of Msx2 as a breast cancer biomarker and to clarify its functional role in vitro. Msx2 gene expression was first examined in a well-validated breast cancer transcriptomic dataset of 295 patients. Msx2 protein expression was then evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 281 invasive breast tumours. Finally, to assess the functional role of Msx2 in vitro, Msx2 was ectopically expressed in a highly invasive breast tumour cell line (MDA-MB-231) and an immortalised breast cell line (MCF10a), and these cell lines were examined for changes in growth rate, cell death and cell signalling. Examination of Msx2 mRNA expression in a breast cancer transcriptomic dataset demonstrated that increased levels of Msx2 were associated with good prognosis (P = 0.011). Evaluation of Msx2 protein expression on a TMA revealed that Msx2 was detectable in both tumour cell nuclei and cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic Msx2 expression was associated with low grade tumours (P = 0.012) and Ki67 negativity (P = 0.018). Nuclear Msx2 correlated with low-grade tumours (P = 0.015), estrogen receptor positivity (P = 0.038), low Ki67 (P = 0.005) and high cyclin D1 expression (P = 0.037). Increased cytoplasmic Msx2 expression was associated with a prolonged breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.049), recurrence-free survival (P = 0.029) and overall survival (P = 0.019). Ectopic expression of Msx2 in breast cell lines resulted in radically decreased cell viability mediated by induction of cell death via apoptosis. Further analysis of Msx2-expressing cells revealed increased levels of p21 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and decreased levels of Survivin and the 'split

  6. Origins and Evolution of WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Protein Family in Plant Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaibin Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX is a large group of transcription factors specifically found in plants. WOX members contain the conserved homeodomain essential for plant development by regulating cell division and differentiation. However, the evolutionary relationship of WOX members in plant kingdom remains to be elucidated. In this study, we searched 350 WOX members from 50 species in plant kingdom. Linkage analysis of WOX protein sequences demonstrated that amino acid residues 141–145 and 153–160 located in the homeodomain are possibly associated with the function of WOXs during the evolution. These 350 members were grouped into 3 clades: the first clade represents the conservative WOXs from the lower plant algae to higher plants; the second clade has the members from vascular plant species; the third clade has the members only from spermatophyte species. Furthermore, among the members of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, we observed ubiquitous expression of genes in the first clade and the diversified expression pattern of WOX genes in distinct organs in the second clade and the third clade. This work provides insight into the origin and evolutionary process of WOXs, facilitating their functional investigations in the future.

  7. Homeobox protein CDX2 as a prognostic biomarker in solid malignancies: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingsheng; Yin, Zhijie; Tao, Kaixiong; Wang, Guobing; Gao, Jinbo

    2017-10-24

    CDX2 is a caudal-homeobox gene and its expression is abnormal in numerous tumour cell types. Nevertheless, its prognostic value for solid tumours requires further investigation. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine the significance of CDX2 as a prognostic biomarker in solid malignancies systematically. We performed a systematic literature search in PUBMED and EMBASE up to May 2017. Retrospective studies comparing the prognostic value of different CDX2 levels in human malignancies were included. Data extractions and methodological assessments were performed separately by two investigators using a standard procedure. The statistical procedures were performed using Review Manager 5.3 and STATA/MP 14.0. A total of 26 retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and comprised 5008 participants. Patients with CDX2 overexpression had significantly better 3-year, 5-year, 10-year and disease-free survival outcomes in solid malignancies, regardless of the cancer type, mean age, and source region. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference in the patients from Europe. The expression level of CDX2 was not statistically associated with cancer relapse. Moreover, our analysis showed that CDX2 overexpression is correlated to better responses to chemotherapy in patients with TNM IV stage cancers. The stability of the pooled outcomes was verified by sensitivity analysis. The funnel plots, Egger's test and Begg's test jointly confirmed that there was no publication bias. Overexpression of CDX2 is a reliable biomarker of a better prognosis in solid malignancies.

  8. The MSX1 homeobox transcription factor is a downstream target of PHOX2B and activates the Delta-Notch pathway in neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revet, Ingrid; Huizenga, Gerda; Chan, Alvin; Koster, Jan; Volckmann, Richard; Sluis, Peter van; Ora, Ingrid; Versteeg, Rogier; Geerts, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (SNS). One of the master regulator genes for peripheral SNS differentiation, the homeobox transcription factor PHOX2B, is mutated in familiar and sporadic neuroblastomas. Here we report that inducible expression of PHOX2B in the neuroblastoma cell line SJNB-8 down-regulates MSX1, a homeobox gene important for embryonic neural crest development. Inducible expression of MSX1 in SJNB-8 caused inhibition of both cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar. Affymetrix micro-array and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that MSX1 strongly up-regulated the Delta-Notch pathway genes DLK1, NOTCH3, and HEY1. In addition, the proneural gene NEUROD1 was down-regulated. Western blot analysis showed that MSX1 induction caused cleavage of the NOTCH3 protein to its activated form, further confirming activation of the Delta-Notch pathway. These experiments describe for the first time regulation of the Delta-Notch pathway by MSX1, and connect these genes to the PHOX2B oncogene, indicative of a role in neuroblastoma biology. Affymetrix micro-array analysis of a neuroblastic tumour series consisting of neuroblastomas and the more benign ganglioneuromas showed that MSX1, NOTCH3 and HEY1 are more highly expressed in ganglioneuromas. This suggests a block in differentiation of these tumours at distinct developmental stages or lineages

  9. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyan Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren and Flos Carthami (Honghua are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4. Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1 blank, (2 model, (3 control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg, (4 THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg, and (5 Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD (8.50 g/kg. Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR, Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways.

  10. Circadian Dynamics of the Cone-Rod Homeobox (CRX) Transcription Factor in the Rat Pineal Gland and Its Role in Regulation of Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferase (AANAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Rovsing, Louise; Ho, Anthony K

    2014-01-01

    The cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene encodes a transcription factor in the retina and pineal gland. Crx deficiency influences the pineal transcriptome, including a reduced expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat), a key enzyme in nocturnal pineal melatonin production. However, previous...... that the rhythmic nature of pineal CRX protein may directly modulate the daily profile of Aanat expression by inducing nighttime expression of this enzyme, thus facilitating nocturnal melatonin synthesis in addition to its role in ensuring a correct tissue distribution of Aanat expression....

  11. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cheng, Jung-Chien [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Huang, He-Feng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Leung, Peter C.K., E-mail: peter.leung@ubc.ca [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  12. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells

  13. The homeobox transcription factor HOXA9 is a regulator of SHOX in U2OS cells and chicken micromass cultures.

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    Claudia Durand

    Full Text Available The homeobox gene SHOX encodes for a transcription factor that plays an important role during limb development. Mutations or deletions of SHOX in humans cause short stature in Turner, Langer and Leri-Weill syndrome as well as idiopathic short stature. During embryonic development, SHOX is expressed in a complex spatio-temporal pattern that requires the presence of specific regulatory mechanisms. Up to now, it was known that SHOX is regulated by two upstream promoters and several enhancers on either side of the gene, but no regulators have been identified that can activate or repress the transcription of SHOX by binding to these regulatory elements. We have now identified the homeodomain protein HOXA9 as a positive regulator of SHOX expression in U2OS cells. Using luciferase assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we could narrow down the HOXA9 binding site to two AT-rich sequences of 31 bp within the SHOX promoter 2. Virus-induced Hoxa9 overexpression in a chicken micromass model validated the regulation of Shox by Hoxa9 (negative regulation. As Hoxa9 and Shox are both expressed in overlapping regions of the developing limb buds, a regulatory relationship of Hoxa9 and Shox during the process of limb development can be assumed.

  14. Identification of Novel HLA-A*24:02-Restricted Epitope Derived from a Homeobox Protein Expressed in Hematological Malignancies.

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    Maiko Matsushita

    Full Text Available The homeobox protein, PEPP2 (RHOXF2, has been suggested as a cancer/testis (CT antigen based on its expression pattern. However, the peptide epitope of PEPP2 that is recognized by cytotoxic T cells (CTLs is unknown. In this study, we revealed that PEPP2 gene was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia cells and some other hematological malignancies. This gene was also expressed in leukemic stem-like cells. We next identified the first reported epitope peptide (PEPP2(271-279. The CTLs induced by PEPP2(271-279 recognized PEPP2-positive target cells in an HLA-A*24:02-restricted manner. We also found that a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, could enhance PEPP2 expression in leukemia cells but not in blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. The cytotoxic activity of anti-PEPP2 CTL against leukemic cells treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was higher than that directed against untreated cells. These results suggest a clinical rationale that combined treatment with this novel antigen-specific immunotherapy together with demethylating agents might be effective in therapy-resistant myeloid leukemia patients.

  15. Estrogen-dependent expression of sine oculis homeobox 1 in the mouse uterus during the estrous cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sijeong [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hwang [Fertility Center of CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13496 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyemin [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Miseon [Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, Seoul 06135 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye-Ryun; Song, Haengseok [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kwonho, E-mail: kwonho.hong@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Nanobiomedical Science & BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 31116 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Youngsok, E-mail: youngsokchoi@cha.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science, CHA University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13488 (Korea, Republic of); Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, Seoul 06135 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-08

    The sine oculis homeobox 1 (SIX1) is a member of the Six gene family. SIX1 is involved in tissue development by regulating proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. However, function of SIX1 in the uterus remains unknown. Here, we found that Six1 expression is regulated along the estrous cycle in mouse uterus. Six1 expression was significantly increased at estrus stage and decreased at the rest of stages. SIX1 is detected in the luminal and glandular epithelium of uterine endometrium at the estrus stage. Estrogen injection increased Six1 expression in the ovariectomized mouse uterus, whereas progesterone had no effect on its expression. Estrogen receptor antagonist inhibited estrogen-induced Six1 expression. Our findings imply that SIX1 may play a role as an important regulator to orchestrate the dynamic of uterine endometrium in response to estrogen level during the estrous cycle. These results will give us a better understanding of uterine biology. - Highlights: • Six1 expression is regulated during the estrous cycle in mouse uterus. • Six1 is highly expressed at the estrus stage of estrous cycle. • SIX1 is detected in luminal/glandular epithelium of the uterus at the estrus stage. • Estrogen stimulates Six1 expression in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner.

  16. A role for the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 in schizophrenia: Convergent evidence from animal and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Albertsen Malt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with diverse mental and somatic symptoms. The molecular mechanisms leading from genes to disease pathology in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies have shown that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with specific diseases are enriched in the recognition sequences of transcription factors that regulate physiological processes relevant to the disease. We have used a bottom-up approach and tracked a developmental trajectory from embryology to physiological processes and behavior and recognized that the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1 possesses properties of particular interest for schizophrenia. NKX2-1 is selectively expressed from prenatal development to adulthood in the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, lungs, skin, and enteric ganglia, and has key functions at the interface of the brain, the endocrine-, and the immune system. In the developing brain, NKX2-1-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into distinct subclasses of forebrain GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. The transcription factor is highly expressed in mature limbic circuits related to context-dependent goal-directed patterns of behavior, social interaction and reproduction, fear responses, responses to light, and other homeostatic processes. It is essential for development and mature function of the thyroid gland and the respiratory system, and is involved in calcium metabolism and immune responses. NKX2-1 interacts with a number of genes identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. We suggest that NKX2-1 may lie at the core of several dose dependent pathways that are dysregulated in schizophrenia. We correlate the symptoms seen in schizophrenia with the temporal and spatial activities of NKX2-1 in order to highlight promising future research areas.

  17. Homeobox A7 increases cell proliferation by up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanase Toshihiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox (HOX genes encode transcription factors, which regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. The deregulation of HOX genes is frequently associated with human reproductive system disorders. However, knowledge regarding the role of HOX genes in human granulosa cells is limited. Methods To determine the role of HOXA7 in the regulation and associated mechanisms of cell proliferation in human granulosa cells, HOXA7 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR expressions were examined in primary granulosa cells (hGCs, an immortalized human granulosa cell line, SVOG, and a granulosa tumor cell line, KGN, by real-time PCR and Western blotting. To manipulate the expression of HOXA7, the HOXA7 specific siRNA was used to knockdown HOXA7 in KGN. Conversely, HOXA7 was overexpressed in SVOG by transfection with the pcDNA3.1-HOAX7 vector. Cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay. Results Our results show that HOXA7 and EGFR were overexpressed in KGN cells compared to hGCs and SVOG cells. Knockdown of HOXA7 in KGN cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and EGFR expression. Overexpression of HOXA7 in SVOG cells significantly promoted cell growth and EGFR expression. Moreover, the EGF-induced KGN proliferation was abrogated, and the activation of downstream signaling was diminished when HOXA7 was knocked down. Overexpression of HOXA7 in SVOG cells had an opposite effect. Conclusions Our present study reveals a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating granulosa cell proliferation via the regulation of EGFR. This finding contributes to the knowledge of the pro-proliferation effect of HOXA7 in granulosa cell growth and differentiation.

  18. The pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein PDX-1 regulates the ductal specific keratin 19 through the degradation of MEIS1 and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes von Burstin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreas organogenesis is the result of well-orchestrated and balanced activities of transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role in the development and function of the pancreas, both in the maintenance of progenitor cells and in determination and maintenance of differentiated endocrine cells. However, the activity of homeobox transcription factors requires coordination with co-factors, such as PBX and MEIS proteins. PBX and MEIS proteins belong to the family of three amino acid loop extension (TALE homeodomain proteins. In a previous study we found that PDX-1 negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of the ductal specific keratin 19 (Krt19. In this study, we investigate the role of different domains of PDX-1 and elucidate the functional interplay of PDX-1 and MEIS1 necessary for Krt19 regulation.Here, we demonstrate that PDX-1 exerts a dual manner of regulation of Krt19 transcriptional activity. Deletion studies highlight that the NH(2-terminus of PDX-1 is functionally relevant for the down-regulation of Krt19, as it is required for DNA binding of PDX-1 to the Krt19 promoter. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of PBX. Second, we provide insight on how PDX-1 regulates the Hox co-factor MEIS1 post-transcriptionally. We find specific binding of MEIS1 and MEIS2 to the Krt19 promoter using IP-EMSA, and siRNA mediated silencing of Meis1, but not Meis2, reduces transcriptional activation of Krt19 in primary pancreatic ductal cells. Over-expression of PDX-1 leads to a decreased level of MEIS1 protein, and this decrease is prevented by inhibition of the proteasome.Taken together, our data provide evidence for a dual mechanism of how PDX-1 negatively regulates Krt19 ductal specific gene expression. These findings imply that transcription factors may efficiently regulate target gene expression through diverse, non-redundant mechanisms.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of AQP-8, a Caenorhabditis elegans aquaporin exclusively expressed in the excretory system, by the POU homeobox transcription factor CEH-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Allan K; Armstrong, Kristin R; Chew, Derek S; Chu, Jeffrey S; Tu, Domena K; Johnsen, Robert C; Chen, Nansheng; Chamberlin, Helen M; Baillie, David L

    2007-09-21

    Due to the ever changing environmental conditions in soil, regulation of osmotic homeostasis in the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is critical. AQP-8 is a C. elegans aquaporin that is expressed in the excretory cell, a renal equivalent tissue, where the protein participates in maintaining water balance. To better understand the regulation of AQP-8, we undertook a promoter analysis to identify the aqp-8 cis-regulatory elements. Using progressive 5' deletions of upstream sequence, we have mapped an essential regulatory region to roughly 300 bp upstream of the translational start site of aqp-8. Analysis of this region revealed a sequence corresponding to a known DNA functional element (octamer motif), which interacts with POU homeobox transcription factors. Phylogenetic footprinting showed that this site is perfectly conserved in four nematode species. The octamer site's function was further confirmed by deletion analyses, mutagenesis, functional studies, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Of the three POU homeobox proteins encoded in the C. elegans genome, CEH-6 is the only member that is expressed in the excretory cell. We show that expression of AQP-8 is regulated by CEH-6 by performing RNA interference experiments. CEH-6's mammalian ortholog, Brn1, is expressed both in the kidney and the central nervous system and binds to the same octamer consensus binding site to drive gene expression. These parallels in transcriptional control between Brn1 and CEH-6 suggest that C. elegans may well be an appropriate model for determining gene-regulatory networks in the developing vertebrate kidney.

  20. Caudal homeobox protein Cdx-2 cooperates with Wnt pathway to regulate claudin-1 expression in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaz A Bhat

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of tight junctions (TJs is often associated with human diseases including carcinogenesis and recent studies support role of TJ integral proteins in the regulation of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. In this regard, expression of claudin-1, a key constituent of TJs, is highly increased in colon cancer and is causally associated with the tumor growth and progression. However, mechanism/s underlying regulation of claudin-1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells remains poorly understood. In our studies, we have identified putative binding sites for intestinal transcription factors Cdx1, -2 and GATA4 in the 5'-flanking region of the claudin-1 gene. Our further studies using full length and/or deletion mutant constructs in two different human colon cancer cell lines, SW480 and HCT116, showed key role of Cdx1, Cdx2 and GATA4 in the regulation of claudin-1 mRNA expression. However, overexpression of Cdx2 had the most potent effect upon claudin-1 mRNA expression and promoter activity. Also, in colon cancer patient samples, we observed a significant and parallel correlation between claudin-1 and Cdx2 expressions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay confirmed the Cdx2 binding with claudin-1 promoter in vivo. Using Cdx2 deletion mutant constructs, we further mapped the Cdx2 C-terminus domain to be important in the regulation of claudin-1 promoter activity. Interestingly, co-expression of activated β-catenin further induced the Cdx2-dependent upregulation of claudin-1 promoter activity while expression of the dominant negative (dn-TCF-4 abrogated this activation. Taken together, we conclude that homeodomain transcription factors Cdx1, Cdx2 and GATA4 regulate claudin-1 gene expression in human colon cancer cells. Moreover, a functional crosstalk between Wnt-signaling and transcriptional activation related to caudal-related homeobox (Cdx proteins and GATA-proteins is demonstrated in the regulation of claudin-1 promoter-activation.

  1. Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT (Pias1 and Piasy) Differentially Regulate Pituitary Homeobox 2 (PITX2) Transcriptional Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbo; Sun, Zhao; Zhang, Zichao; Saadi, Irfan; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Engle, Jamison J.; Kuburas, Adisa; Fu, Xueyao; Yu, Wenjie; Klein, William H.; Russo, Andrew F.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein inhibitors of activated STAT (Pias) proteins can act independent of sumoylation to modulate the activity of transcription factors and Pias proteins interacting with transcription factors can either activate or repress their activity. Pias proteins are expressed in many tissues and cells during development and we asked if Pias proteins regulated the pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) homeodomain protein, which modulates developmental gene expression. Piasy and Pias1 proteins are expressed during craniofacial/tooth development and directly interact and differentially regulate PITX2 transcriptional activity. Piasy and Pias1 are co-expressed in craniofacial tissues with PITX2. Yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments demonstrate Piasy and Pias1 interactions with the PITX2 protein. Piasy interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to attenuate its transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to increase PITX2 transcriptional activity. The E3 ligase activity associated with the RING domain in Piasy is not required for the attenuation of PITX2 activity, however, the RING domain of Pias1 is required for enhanced PITX2 transcriptional activity. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal PITX2 interactions with Piasy and Pias1 in the nucleus. Piasy represses the synergistic activation of PITX2 with interacting co-factors and Piasy represses Pias1 activation of PITX2 transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 did not affect the synergistic interaction of PITX2 with transcriptional co-factors. Last, we demonstrate that Pias proteins form a complex with PITX2 and Lef-1, and PITX2 and β-catenin. Lef-1, β-catenin, and Pias interactions with PITX2 provide new molecular mechanisms for the regulation of PITX2 transcriptional activity and the activity of Pias proteins. PMID:23515314

  2. Protein inhibitors of activated STAT (Pias1 and Piasy) differentially regulate pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbo; Sun, Zhao; Zhang, Zichao; Saadi, Irfan; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Engle, Jamison J; Kuburas, Adisa; Fu, Xueyao; Yu, Wenjie; Klein, William H; Russo, Andrew F; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-05-03

    Protein inhibitors of activated STAT (Pias) proteins can act independent of sumoylation to modulate the activity of transcription factors and Pias proteins interacting with transcription factors can either activate or repress their activity. Pias proteins are expressed in many tissues and cells during development and we asked if Pias proteins regulated the pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) homeodomain protein, which modulates developmental gene expression. Piasy and Pias1 proteins are expressed during craniofacial/tooth development and directly interact and differentially regulate PITX2 transcriptional activity. Piasy and Pias1 are co-expressed in craniofacial tissues with PITX2. Yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments demonstrate Piasy and Pias1 interactions with the PITX2 protein. Piasy interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to attenuate its transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to increase PITX2 transcriptional activity. The E3 ligase activity associated with the RING domain in Piasy is not required for the attenuation of PITX2 activity, however, the RING domain of Pias1 is required for enhanced PITX2 transcriptional activity. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal PITX2 interactions with Piasy and Pias1 in the nucleus. Piasy represses the synergistic activation of PITX2 with interacting co-factors and Piasy represses Pias1 activation of PITX2 transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 did not affect the synergistic interaction of PITX2 with transcriptional co-factors. Last, we demonstrate that Pias proteins form a complex with PITX2 and Lef-1, and PITX2 and β-catenin. Lef-1, β-catenin, and Pias interactions with PITX2 provide new molecular mechanisms for the regulation of PITX2 transcriptional activity and the activity of Pias proteins.

  3. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and represses expression of Cyclins A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liang, Xiaohong; Gao, Lifen; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Di; Liu, Xiao; Ma, Hongxin; Guo, Min; Spear, Brett T; Gong, Yaoqin; Ma, Chunhong

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) represses transcription of several genes associated with liver cancer. However, little is known about the role of ZHX2 in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated the mechanisms by which ZHX2 might affect proliferation of HCC cells. We overexpressed and knocked down ZHX2 in HCC cells and analyzed the effects on proliferation, colony formation, and the cell cycle. We also analyzed the effects of ZHX2 overexpression in growth of HepG2.2.15 tumor xenografts in nude mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays were used to measure binding of ZHX2 target promoters. Levels of ZHX2 in HCC samples were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. ZHX2 overexpression significantly reduced proliferation of HCC cells and growth of tumor xenografts in mice; it led to G1 arrest and reduced levels of Cyclins A and E in HCC cell lines. ZHX2 bound to promoter regions of CCNA2 (which encodes Cyclin A) and CCNE1 (which encodes Cyclin E) and inhibited their transcription. Knockdown of Cyclin A or Cyclin E reduced the increased proliferation mediated by ZHX2 knockdown. Nuclear localization of ZHX2 was required for it to inhibit proliferation of HCC cells in culture and in mice. Nuclear localization of ZHX2 was reduced in human HCC samples, even in small tumors (diameter, <5 cm), compared with adjacent nontumor tissues. Moreover, reduced nuclear levels of ZHX2 correlated with reduced survival times of patients, high levels of tumor microvascularization, and hepatocyte proliferation. ZHX2 inhibits HCC cell proliferation by preventing expression of Cyclins A and E, and reduces growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Loss of nuclear ZHX2 might be an early step in the development of HCC. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle Segment Homeobox Genes Direct Embryonic Diapause by Limiting Inflammation in the Uterus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Bartos, Amanda; Li, Yingju; Baker, Erin S.; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jegga, Anil G.; Murata, Shigeo; Hirota, Yasushi; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic diapause is a reproductive strategy widespread in the animal kingdom. This phenomenon is defined by a temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within a quiescent uterus without implantation until the environmental and maternal milieu become favorable for pregnancy to progress. We found that uterine Msx expression persists during diapause across species; their inactivation in the mouse uterus results in termination of diapause with the development of implantation-like responses (“pseudoimplantation”) that ultimately succumbed to resorption. To understand the cause of this failure, we compared proteome profiles between floxed and Msx-deleted uteri. In deleted uteri, several functional networks, including transcription/translation, ubiquitin-proteasome, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress, were dysregulated. Computational modeling predicted intersection of these pathways on an enhanced inflammatory signature. Further studies showed that this signature was reflected in increased phosphorylated IκB levels and nuclear NFκB in deleted uteri. This was associated with enhanced proteasome activity and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Interestingly, treatment with anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid (dexamethasone) reduced the inflammatory signature with improvement of the diapause phenotype. These findings highlight an unexpected role of uterine Msx in limiting aberrant inflammatory responses to maintain embryonic diapause. PMID:25931120

  5. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX2 regulates cell differentiation during secondary growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Du; Shawn D. Mansfield; Andrew T. Groover

    2009-01-01

    The stem cells of the vascular cambium divide to produce daughter cells, which in turn divide before undergoing differentiation during the radial growth of woody stems. The genetic regulation of these developmental events is poorly understood, however. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of a Populus class-I KNOX...

  6. Phyllotactic pattern and stem cell fate are determined by the Arabidopsis homeobox gene BELLRINGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Byrne; Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Lateral organs in plants arise from the meristem in a stereotypical pattern known as phyllotaxy. Spiral patterns result from initiation of successive organs at a fixed angle of divergence but variable patterns of physical contact. Such patterns ultimately give rise to individual leaves and flowers at positions related to each other by consecutive terms in the...

  7. Gastrointestinal differentiation marker Cytokeratin 20 is regulated by homeobox gene CDX1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Carol W M; Wong, Newton A; Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    colorectal cancer cell lines. Deletion and mutation analysis of the KRT20 promoter showed that the minimum regulatory region for the control of KRT20 expression by CDX1 is within 246 bp upstream of the KRT20 transcription start site. ChIP analysis confirmed that CDX1 binds to the predicted CDX elements...... a role for CDX1 in maintaining differentiation in intestinal epithelial cells. Because a key feature of the development of a cancer is an unbalanced program of proliferation and differentiation, dysregulation of CDX1 may be an advantage for the development of a colorectal carcinoma. This could, therefore...... in this region of the KRT20 promoter in vivo. In addition, immunohistochemistry showed expression of CDX1 parallels that of KRT20 in the normal crypt, which further supports their close relationship. In summary, our observations strongly imply that KRT20 is directly regulated by CDX1, and therefore suggest...

  8. The Lhx9 homeobox gene controls pineal gland development and prevents postnatal hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Møller, Morten; Fu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    stalk are also reduced in size. Although the brains of neonatal Lhx9 (-/-) mutant mice appear normal, severe hydrocephalus develops in about 70 % of the Lhx9 (-/-) mice at 5-8 weeks of age; these observations are the first to document that deletion of Lhx9 results in hydrocephalus and as such indicate...... that Lhx9 contributes to the maintenance of normal brain structure. Whereas hydrocephalus is absent in neonatal Lhx9 (-/-)mutant mice, the neonatal pineal gland in these animals is hypoplastic. Accordingly, it appears that Lhx9 is essential for early development of the mammalian pineal gland...... and that this effect is not secondary to hydrocephalus....

  9. Msh homeobox 1 (Msx1)- and Msx2-overexpressing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells resemble blastema cells and enhance regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghiyar, Leila; Hesaraki, Mahdi; Sayahpour, Forough Azam; Satarian, Leila; Hosseini, Samaneh; Aghdami, Naser; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza

    2017-06-23

    Amputation of the proximal region in mammals is not followed by regeneration because blastema cells (BCs) and expression of regenerative genes, such as Msh homeobox ( Msx ) genes, are absent in this animal group. The lack of BCs and positional information in other cells is therefore the main obstacle to therapeutic approaches for limb regeneration. Hence, this study aimed to create blastema-like cells (BlCs) by overexpressing Msx1 and Msx2 genes in mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs) to regenerate a proximally amputated digit tip. We transduced mBMSCs with Msx1 and Msx2 genes and compared osteogenic activity and expression levels of several Msx -regulated genes ( Bmp4 , Fgf8 , and keratin 14 ( K14 )) in BlC groups, including MSX1, MSX2, and MSX1/2 (in a 1:1 ratio) with those in mBMSCs and BCs in vitro and in vivo following injection into the amputation site. We found that Msx gene overexpression increased expression of specific blastemal markers and enhanced the proliferation rate and osteogenesis of BlCs compared with mBMSCs and BCs via activation of Fgf8 and Bmp4 Histological analyses indicated full regrowth of digit tips in the Msx -overexpressing groups, particularly in MSX1/2, through endochondral ossification 6 weeks post-injection. In contrast, mBMSCs and BCs formed abnormal bone and nail. Full digit tip was regenerated only in the MSX1/2 group and was related to boosted Bmp4, Fgf8 , and K14 gene expression and to limb-patterning properties resulting from Msx1 and Msx2 overexpression. We propose that Msx -transduced cells that can regenerate epithelial and mesenchymal tissues may potentially be utilized in limb regeneration. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Analysis of common SHOX gene sequence variants and ∼4.9-kb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Solc R., Hirschfeldova K., Kebrdlova V. and Baxova A. 2014 Analysis of common SHOX gene sequence variants and ∼4.9-kb PAR1 deletion in ISS patients. J. Genet. 93, 505–508]. Introduction. Defects of the SHOX gene (short stature homeobox- containing gene), localized in the pseudoautosomal region 1. (PAR1) have ...

  11. A symphony of inner ear developmental control genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus Petra

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The inner ear is one of the most complex and detailed organs in the vertebrate body and provides us with the priceless ability to hear and perceive linear and angular acceleration (hence maintain balance. The development and morphogenesis of the inner ear from an ectodermal thickening into distinct auditory and vestibular components depends upon precise temporally and spatially coordinated gene expression patterns and well orchestrated signaling cascades within the otic vesicle and upon cellular movements and interactions with surrounding tissues. Gene loss of function analysis in mice has identified homeobox genes along with other transcription and secreted factors as crucial regulators of inner ear morphogenesis and development. While otic induction seems dependent upon fibroblast growth factors, morphogenesis of the otic vesicle into the distinct vestibular and auditory components appears to be clearly dependent upon the activities of a number of homeobox transcription factors. The Pax2 paired-homeobox gene is crucial for the specification of the ventral otic vesicle derived auditory structures and the Dlx5 and Dlx6 homeobox genes play a major role in specification of the dorsally derived vestibular structures. Some Micro RNAs have also been recently identified which play a crucial role in the inner ear formation.

  12. Down-regulation of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2 releases GLI1 from the nuclear repressor complex to restore its transcriptional activity during mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riku, Miho; Inaguma, Shingo; Ito, Hideaki; Tsunoda, Takumi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies, the molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are not fully understood. To identify key molecules involved, we screened publicly available microarray datasets for genes differentially expressed between breast cancers and normal mammary glands. We found that three of the genes predicted in this analysis were differentially expressed among human mammary tissues and cell lines. Of these genes, we focused on the role of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2, which is down-regulated in breast cancer cells. We found that TSHZ2 is a nuclear protein harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal, and we confirmed its function as a C-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Through comprehensive screening, we identified TSHZ2-suppressing genes such as AEBP1 and CXCR4, which are conversely up-regulated by GLI1, the downstream transcription factor of Hedgehog signaling. We found that GLI1 forms a ternary complex with CtBP2 in the presence of TSHZ2 and that the transcriptional activity of GLI1 is suppressed by TSHZ2 in a CtBP-dependent manner. Indeed, knockdown of TSHZ2 increases the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 in TSHZ2-expressing immortalized mammary duct epithelium. Concordantly, immunohistochemical staining of mammary glands revealed that normal duct cells expresses GLI1 in the nucleus along with TSHZ2 and CtBP2, whereas invasive ductal carcinoma cells, which does not express TSHZ2, show the increase in the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 and in the cytoplasmic localization of GLI1. Thus, we propose that down-regulation of TSHZ2 is crucial for mammary tumorigenesis via the activation of GLI1. PMID:26744317

  13. Smad4-dependent suppressor pituitary homeobox 2 promotes PPP2R2A-mediated inhibition of Akt pathway in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Wu, Wei; Shen, Ruizhe; Jiang, He; Qian, Yuting; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wu, Sheng; Wei, Lumin; Zang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of Pituitary homeobox 2 (Pitx2) in malignancy remains enigmatic, and Pitx2 has not been previously implicated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this study, we performed gene expression profiling of human PDAC tissues and identified Pitx2 as a promising candidate. Pitx2 expression was decreased from 2.6- to 19-fold in human PDAC tissues from microarray units. Immunochemistry staining showed that Pitx2 expression was moderate to intense in normal pancreatic and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions, whereas low in human PDAC tissues. The Pitx2 levels correlated with overall patient survival post-operatively in PDAC. Induction of Pitx2 expression partly inhibited the malignant phenotype of PDAC cells. Interestingly, low Pitx2 expression was correlated with Smad4 mutant inactivation, but not with Pitx2 DNA-methylation. Furthermore, Smad4 protein bound to Pitx2 promoter and stimulated Pitx2 expression in PDAC. In addition, Pitx2 protein bound to the promoter of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B55α (PPP2R2A) and upregulated PPP2R2A expression, which may activate dephosphorylation of Akt in PDAC. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into Pitx2 as a tumor suppressor in the downstream of Smad4. And Pitx2 protein promotes PPP2R2A expression which may inhibit Akt pathway. Therefore, we propose that the Smad4-Pitx2-PPP2R2A axis, a new signaling pathway, suppresses the pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:26848620

  14. Unique nucleotide polymorphism of ankyrin gene cluster in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomics 19, 478–493. Krumlauf R. 1992 Evolution of the vertebrate Hox homeobox genes. BioEssays 14, 245–252. Kuittinen H. and Aguadé M. 2000 Nucleotide variation at the. CHALCONE ISOMERASE locus in Arabidopsis thaliana. Ge- netics 155, 863–872. Lercher M. J., Urrutia A. O. and Hurst L. D. 2002 Clustering of.

  15. Pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) protects renal cancer cell lines against doxorubicin toxicity by transcriptional activation of the multidrug transporter ABCB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Kee; Chakraborty, Prabir K; Thévenod, Frank

    2013-08-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR) P-glycoprotein ABCB1 plays a major role in MDR of malignant cells and is regulated by various transcription factors, including Wnt/β-catenin/TCF4. The transcription factor PITX2 (Pituitary homeobox-2) is essential for embryonic development. PITX2 operates by recruiting and interacting with β-catenin to increase the expression of growth-regulating genes, such as cyclin D1/2 and c-Myc. The importance of PITX2 in malignancy is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that in the renal cancer cell lines ACHN and A498, the level of ABCB1 expression and function correlate with nuclear PITX2 localization and PITX2-luciferase reporter gene activity (A498 > ACHN). In A498 cells, doxorubicin toxicity is augmented by the ABCB1 inhibitor, PSC833. PITX2 overexpression increases ABCB1 expression and cell survival in ACHN cells. Silencing of PITX2 by siRNA downregulates ABCB1 and induces a greater chemotherapeutic response to doxorubicin in A498 cells, as determined by MTT cell viability and clonogenic survival assays. Two PITX2 binding sequences were identified in the ABCB1 promoter sequence. PITX2 binding was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. β-Catenin is not required for PITX2 upregulation of ABCB1 because ABCB1 mRNA increased and doxorubicin toxicity decreased upon PITX2 overexpression in β-catenin(-/-) cells. The data show for the first time that ABCB1 is a target gene of PITX2 transcriptional activity, promoting MDR and cell survival of cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  16. ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX25 uncovers a role for Gibberellins in seed longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueso, Eduardo; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Campos, Francisco; Brunaud, Veronique; Martínez, Liliam; Sayas, Enric; Ballester, Patricia; Yenush, Lynne; Serrano, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Seed longevity is crucial for agriculture and plant genetic diversity, but it is limited by cellular damage during storage. Seeds are protected against aging by cellular defenses and by structures such as the seed coat. We have screened an activation-tagging mutant collection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and selected four dominant mutants with improved seed longevity (isl1-1D to isl4-1D) under both natural and accelerated aging conditions. In the isl1-1D mutant, characterized in this work, overexpression of the transcription factor ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX25 (ATHB25; At5g65410) increases the expression of GIBBERELLIC ACID3-OXIDASE2, encoding a gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic enzyme, and the levels of GA1 and GA4 are higher (3.2- and 1.4-fold, respectively) in the mutant than in the wild type. The morphological and seed longevity phenotypes of the athb25-1D mutant were recapitulated in transgenic plants with moderate (4- to 6-fold) overexpression of ATHB25. Simultaneous knockdown of ATHB25, ATHB22, and ATHB31 expression decreases seed longevity, as does loss of ATHB25 and ATHB22 function in a double mutant line. Seeds from wild-type plants treated with GA and from a quintuple DELLA mutant (with constitutive GA signaling) are more tolerant to aging, providing additional evidence for a role of GA in seed longevity. A correlation was observed in several genotypes between seed longevity and mucilage formation at the seed surface, suggesting that GA may act by reinforcing the seed coat. This mechanism was supported by the observation of a maternal effect in reciprocal crosses between the wild type and the athb25-1D mutant.

  17. ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX25 Uncovers a Role for Gibberellins in Seed Longevity1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueso, Eduardo; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Campos, Francisco; Brunaud, Veronique; Martínez, Liliam; Sayas, Enric; Ballester, Patricia; Yenush, Lynne; Serrano, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Seed longevity is crucial for agriculture and plant genetic diversity, but it is limited by cellular damage during storage. Seeds are protected against aging by cellular defenses and by structures such as the seed coat. We have screened an activation-tagging mutant collection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and selected four dominant mutants with improved seed longevity (isl1-1D to isl4-1D) under both natural and accelerated aging conditions. In the isl1-1D mutant, characterized in this work, overexpression of the transcription factor ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX25 (ATHB25; At5g65410) increases the expression of GIBBERELLIC ACID3-OXIDASE2, encoding a gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic enzyme, and the levels of GA1 and GA4 are higher (3.2- and 1.4-fold, respectively) in the mutant than in the wild type. The morphological and seed longevity phenotypes of the athb25-1D mutant were recapitulated in transgenic plants with moderate (4- to 6-fold) overexpression of ATHB25. Simultaneous knockdown of ATHB25, ATHB22, and ATHB31 expression decreases seed longevity, as does loss of ATHB25 and ATHB22 function in a double mutant line. Seeds from wild-type plants treated with GA and from a quintuple DELLA mutant (with constitutive GA signaling) are more tolerant to aging, providing additional evidence for a role of GA in seed longevity. A correlation was observed in several genotypes between seed longevity and mucilage formation at the seed surface, suggesting that GA may act by reinforcing the seed coat. This mechanism was supported by the observation of a maternal effect in reciprocal crosses between the wild type and the athb25-1D mutant. PMID:24335333

  18. Identification of a putative nuclear export signal motif in human NANOG homeobox domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Huh, Sun-Hyung; Sung, Boreum; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found the putative nuclear export signal motif within human NANOG homeodomain. ► Leucine-rich residues are important for human NANOG homeodomain nuclear export. ► CRM1-specific inhibitor LMB blocked the potent human NANOG NES-mediated nuclear export. -- Abstract: NANOG is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in pluripotent stem cells and tumorigenic cells. To understand how nuclear localization of human NANOG is regulated, the NANOG sequence was examined and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif ( 125 MQELSNILNL 134 ) was found in the homeodomain (HD). To functionally validate the putative NES motif, deletion and site-directed mutants were fused to an EGFP expression vector and transfected into COS-7 cells, and the localization of the proteins was examined. While hNANOG HD exclusively localized to the nucleus, a mutant with both NLSs deleted and only the putative NES motif contained (hNANOG HD-ΔNLSs) was predominantly cytoplasmic, as observed by nucleo/cytoplasmic fractionation and Western blot analysis as well as confocal microscopy. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of the putative NES motif in a partial hNANOG HD only containing either one of the two NLS motifs led to localization in the nucleus, suggesting that the NES motif may play a functional role in nuclear export. Furthermore, CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor LMB blocked the hNANOG potent NES-mediated export, suggesting that the leucine-rich motif may function in CRM1-mediated nuclear export of hNANOG. Collectively, a NES motif is present in the hNANOG HD and may be functionally involved in CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  19. The telomere-associated homeobox-containing protein TAH1/HMBOX1 participates in telomere maintenance in ALT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuyang; Luo, Zhenhua; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Feng; Han, Xin; Hu, Yang; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Wenbin; Liu, Dan; Huang, Junjiu; Songyang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    The majority of cancer cells rely on elevated telomerase expression and activity for rapid growth and proliferation. Telomerase-negative cancer cells, by contrast, often employ the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to maintain telomeres. ALT cells are characterized by long and dynamic telomeres and the presence of ALT-associated promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies (APBs). Previous work has shown the importance of APBs to the ALT pathway, but their formation and precise role remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a homeobox-containing protein known as HMBOX1 can directly bind telomeric double-stranded DNA and associate with PML nuclear bodies. Hence, we renamed this protein TAH1 for telomere-associated homeobox-containing protein 1. TAH1 knockdown significantly reduced the number of APBs and led to an increase in DNA damage response signals at telomeres. Importantly, TAH1 inhibition also notably reduced the presence of telomere C-circles, indicating altered ALT activity. Our findings point to TAH1 as a novel link between pathways that regulate DNA damage responses, PML nuclear bodies, and telomere homeostasis in ALT cells, and provide insight into how ALT cells may achieve sustained growth and proliferation independent of the telomerase.

  20. The LIM homeodomain transcription factor LHX6: a transcriptional repressor that interacts with pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) to regulate odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichao; Gutierrez, Diana; Li, Xiao; Bidlack, Felicitas; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Andrade, Kelsey; Margolis, Henry C; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-01-25

    LHX6 is a LIM-homeobox transcription factor expressed during embryogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating LHX6 transcriptional activities are unknown. LHX6 and the PITX2 homeodomain transcription factor have overlapping expression patterns during tooth and craniofacial development, and in this report, we demonstrate new transcriptional mechanisms for these factors. PITX2 and LHX6 are co-expressed in the oral and dental epithelium and epithelial cell lines. Lhx6 expression is increased in Pitx2c transgenic mice and decreased in Pitx2 null mice. PITX2 activates endogenous Lhx6 expression and the Lhx6 promoter, whereas LHX6 represses its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal endogenous PITX2 binding to the Lhx6 promoter. LHX6 directly interacts with PITX2 to inhibit PITX2 transcriptional activities and activation of multiple promoters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal an LHX6·PITX2 nuclear interaction in living cells. LHX6 has a dominant repressive effect on the PITX2 synergistic activation with LEF-1 and β-catenin co-factors. Thus, LHX6 acts as a transcriptional repressor and represses the expression of several genes involved in odontogenesis. We have identified specific defects in incisor, molar, mandible, bone, and root development and late stage enamel formation in Lhx6 null mice. Amelogenin and ameloblastin expression is reduced and/or delayed in the Lhx6 null mice, potentially resulting from defects in dentin deposition and ameloblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that LHX6 regulates cell proliferation in the cervical loop and promotes cell differentiation in the anterior region of the incisor. We demonstrate new molecular mechanisms for LHX6 and an interaction with PITX2 for normal craniofacial and tooth development.

  1. Molecular functions of the LIM-homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 in hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kenji; Kawaguchi, Manami; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Hara, Takahiko

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cells are robustly expanded from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by enforced expression of Lhx2, a LIM-homeobox domain (LIM-HD) transcription factor. In this study, we analyzed the functions of Lhx2 in that process using an ESC line harboring an inducible Lhx2 gene cassette. When ESCs are cultured on OP9 stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are differentiated and these HPCs are prone to undergo rapid differentiation into mature hematopoietic cells. Lhx2 inhibited differentiation of HPCs into mature hematopoietic cells and this effect would lead to accumulation of HSC-like cells. LIM-HD factors interact with LIM domain binding (Ldb) protein and this interaction abrogates binding of LIM-only (Lmo) protein to Ldb. We found that one of Lmo protein, Lmo2, was unstable due to dissociation of Lmo2 from Ldb1 in the presence of Lhx2. This effect of Lhx2 on the amount of Lmo2 contributed into accumulation of HSC-like cells, since enforced expression of Lmo2 into HSC-like cells inhibited their self-renewal. Expression of Gata3 and Tal1/Scl was increased in HSC-like cells and enforced expression of Lmo2 reduced expression of Gata3 but not Tal1/Scl. Enforced expression of Gata3 into HPCs inhibited mature hematopoietic cell differentiation, whereas Gata3-knockdown abrogated the Lhx2-mediated expansion of HPCs. We propose that multiple transcription factors/cofactors are involved in the Lhx2-mediated expansion of HSC-like cells from ESCs. Lhx2 appears to fine-tune the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of HSC-like cells. © AlphaMed Press.

  2. A muscle-specific promoter directs Pitx3 gene expression in skeletal muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulon, Vincent; L'Honoré, Aurore; Ouimette, Jean-François; Dumontier, Emilie; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Drouin, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The Pitx homeobox transcription factor genes have been implicated in different developmental processes, including determination of hind limb identity for Pitx1, left-right asymmetry for Pitx2, and eye development and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons for Pitx3. Pitx1 and Pitx2 have partly

  3. Downregulation of HOPX controls metastatic behavior in sarcoma cells and identifies genes associated with metastasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Denisa; Plachý, Jiří; Kosla, Jan; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Čermák, Vladimír; Hejnar, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2013), s. 1235-1247 ISSN 1541-7786 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : homeobox gene * metastasis * HOPX Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.502, year: 2013

  4. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  5. HOX Gene Promoter Prediction and Inter-genomic Comparison: an Evo-Devo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Endriga, Maria A; de la Paz, Victoria Karenina R; Sazon, Jezreel Marie G; Co, Elisa L; Deocaris, Custer C

    2010-01-01

    Homeobox genes direct the anterior-posterior axis of the body plan in eukaryotic organisms. Promoter regions upstream of the Hox genes jumpstart the transcription process. CpG islands found within the promoter regions can cause silencing of these promoters. The locations of the promoter regions and the CpG islands of Homeo sapiens sapiens (human), Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Mus musculus (mouse), and Rattus norvegicus (brown rat) are compared and related to the possib...

  6. Regulation of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 protein by DNA-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Patricia; Montminy, Marc R; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2005-11-18

    The transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role during pancreatic development and in the function of insulin-producing beta cells. Disruption of the pdx-1 gene in these cells induces overt diabetes in mice, and this gene is modified in several type 2 diabetic families. It is thus crucial to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PDX-1 expression and/or activation. We identified new proteins associated with PDX-1 by mass spectrometry. These proteins, Ku70 and Ku80, are regulatory subunits of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). We determined that the interaction between PDX-1 and Ku70 or Ku80 is dependent on the homeodomain of PDX-1. Most interestingly, we demonstrated in vitro that the DNA-PK phosphorylates PDX-1 on threonine 11. Although this residue is located in the transactivation domain, this phosphorylation does not seem to be implicated in the transcriptional activation of PDX-1. However, in response to radiation, which activates DNA-PK, a second form of the PDX-1 protein appears rapidly. This form is phosphorylated on threonine and seems to drive PDX-1 degradation by the proteosome. In correlation with this degradation, we observed a subsequent reduction in the activation of the insulin promoter and a decrease in PDX-1-mediated gene expression, i.e. glut2 and glucokinase. Our study demonstrates that radiation, through the activation of DNA-PK, may regulate PDX-1 protein expression.

  7. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios eStergiopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs, promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibits astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs, differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis.

  8. Homeobox B9 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas and promotes tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyi [Department of General Surgery, Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, No. 8 Sanba Square, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dlleidong@126.com [Department of Laparoscopic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, No. 193 Lianhe Street, Shahekou District, Dalian 116001 (China); Xing, Rong [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Dalian Medical University, No. 9 Lvshunnan Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Wang, Li; Luan, Fengming; Yao, Chenhui [Department of General Surgery, Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, No. 8 Sanba Square, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Ji, Xuening [Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, No. 6 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Bai, Lizhi, E-mail: dllizhibai@126.com [Department of Emergency, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, No. 6 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation in HCC cells. - Abstract: HomeoboxB9 (HOXB9), a nontransforming transcription factor that is overexpressed in multiple tumor types, alters tumor cell fate and promotes tumor progression. However, the role of HOXB9 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development has not been well studied. In this paper, we found that HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. We investigated HOXB9 expression and its prognostic value for HCC. HCC surgical tissue samples were taken from 89 HCC patients. HOXB9 overexpression was observed in 65.2% of the cases, and the survival analysis showed that the HOXB9 overexpression group had significantly shorter overall survival time than the HOXB9 downexpression group. The ectopic expression of HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells; whereas the knockdown of HOXB9 produced an opposite effect. HOXB9 also modulated the tumorigenicity of HCC cells in vivo. Moreover, we found that the activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation activities. The results provide the first evidence that HOXB9 is a critical regulator of tumor growth factor in HCC.

  9. The homeobox protein CEH-23 mediates prolonged longevity in response to impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludivine Walter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that perturbations of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC can cause extended longevity in evolutionarily diverse organisms. To uncover the molecular basis of how altered METC increases lifespan in C. elegans, we performed an RNAi screen and revealed that three predicted transcription factors are specifically required for the extended longevity of mitochondrial mutants. In particular, we demonstrated that the nuclear homeobox protein CEH-23 uniquely mediates the longevity but not the slow development, reduced brood size, or resistance to oxidative stress associated with mitochondrial mutations. Furthermore, we showed that ceh-23 expression levels are responsive to altered METC, and enforced overexpression of ceh-23 is sufficient to extend lifespan in wild-type background. Our data point to mitochondria-to-nucleus communications to be key for longevity determination and highlight CEH-23 as a novel longevity factor capable of responding to mitochondrial perturbations. These findings provide a new paradigm for how mitochondria impact aging and age-dependent diseases.

  10. Homeobox B9 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas and promotes tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fangyi; Dong, Lei; Xing, Rong; Wang, Li; Luan, Fengming; Yao, Chenhui; Ji, Xuening; Bai, Lizhi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation in HCC cells. - Abstract: HomeoboxB9 (HOXB9), a nontransforming transcription factor that is overexpressed in multiple tumor types, alters tumor cell fate and promotes tumor progression. However, the role of HOXB9 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development has not been well studied. In this paper, we found that HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. We investigated HOXB9 expression and its prognostic value for HCC. HCC surgical tissue samples were taken from 89 HCC patients. HOXB9 overexpression was observed in 65.2% of the cases, and the survival analysis showed that the HOXB9 overexpression group had significantly shorter overall survival time than the HOXB9 downexpression group. The ectopic expression of HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells; whereas the knockdown of HOXB9 produced an opposite effect. HOXB9 also modulated the tumorigenicity of HCC cells in vivo. Moreover, we found that the activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation activities. The results provide the first evidence that HOXB9 is a critical regulator of tumor growth factor in HCC

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9)-pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) pathway mediates transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling to regulate cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme during mouse palatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Tung, Lily; Urata, Mark; Hacia, Joseph G; Pelikan, Richard; Suzuki, Akiko; Ramenzoni, Liza; Chaudhry, Obaid; Parada, Carolina; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-20

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling plays crucial functions in regulating craniofacial development, and loss of TGFβ receptor type II in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial malformations, including cleft palate in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice). Here we have identified candidate target genes of TGFβ signaling during palatal formation. These target genes were selected based on combining results from gene expression profiles of embryonic day 14.5 palates from Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice and previously identified cleft palate phenotypes in genetically engineered mouse models. We found that fibroblast growth factor 9 (Fgf9) and transcription factor pituitary homeobox 2 (Pitx2) expressions are significantly down-regulated in the palate of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice, and Fgf9 and Pitx2 loss of function mutations result in cleft palate in mice. Pitx2 expression is down-regulated by siRNA knockdown of Fgf9, suggesting that Fgf9 is upstream of Pitx2. We detected decreased expression of both cyclins D1 and D3 in the palates of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice, consistent with the defect in cell proliferation. Significantly, exogenous FGF9 restores expression of cyclins D1 and D3 in a Pitx2-dependent manner and rescues the cell proliferation defect in the palatal mesenchyme of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Our study indicates that a TGFβ-FGF9-PITX2 signaling cascade regulates cranial neural crest cell proliferation during palate formation.

  12. LIM homeobox protein 5 (Lhx5 is essential for mamillary body development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya eMiquelajauregui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The mamillary body (MM is a group of hypothalamic nuclei related to memory and spatial navigation that interconnects hippocampal, thalamic, and tegmental regions. Here we demonstrate that Lhx5, a LIM-HD domain transcription factor expressed early in the developing posterior hypothalamus, is required for the generation of the MM and its derived tracts. The MM markers Foxb1, Sim2 and Lhx1 are absent in Lhx5 knock-out mice from early embryonic stages, suggesting abnormal specification of this region. This was supported by the absence of Nkx2.1 and expansion of Shh in the prospective mamillary area. Interestingly, we also found an ectopic domain expressing Lhx2 and Lhx9 along the anterio-posterior hypothalamic axis. Our results suggest that Lhx5 controls early aspects of hypothalamic development by regulating gene expression and cellular specification in the prospective MM.

  13. A family history of DUX4: phylogenetic analysis of DUXA, B, C and Duxbl reveals the ancestral DUX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewitt Jane E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DUX4 is causally involved in the molecular pathogenesis of the neuromuscular disorder facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. It has previously been proposed to have arisen by retrotransposition of DUXC, one of four known intron-containing DUX genes. Here, we investigate the evolutionary history of this multi-member double-homeobox gene family in eutherian mammals. Results Our analysis of the DUX family shows the distribution of different homologues across the mammalian class, including events of secondary loss. Phylogenetic comparison, analysis of gene structures and information from syntenic regions confirm the paralogous relationship of Duxbl and DUXB and characterize their relationship with DUXA and DUXC. We further identify Duxbl pseudogene orthologues in primates. A survey of non-mammalian genomes identified a single-homeobox gene (sDUX as a likely representative homologue of the mammalian DUX ancestor before the homeobox duplication. Based on the gene structure maps, we suggest a possible mechanism for the generation of the DUX gene structure. Conclusions Our study underlines how secondary loss of orthologues can obscure the true ancestry of individual gene family members. Their relationships should be considered when interpreting the relevance of functional data from DUX4 homologues such as Dux and Duxbl to FSHD.

  14. Angiogenesis gene expression in murine endothelial cells during post-pneumonectomy lung growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konerding Moritz A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although blood vessel growth occurs readily in the systemic bronchial circulation, angiogenesis in the pulmonary circulation is rare. Compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy is an experimental model with presumed alveolar capillary angiogenesis. To investigate the genes participating in murine neoalveolarization, we studied the expression of angiogenesis genes in lung endothelial cells. After left pneumonectomy, the remaining right lung was examined on days 3, 6, 14 and 21days after surgery and compared to both no surgery and sham thoracotomy controls. The lungs were enzymatically digested and CD31+ endothelial cells were isolated using flow cytometry cell sorting. The transcriptional profile of the CD31+ endothelial cells was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Focusing on 84 angiogenesis-associated genes, we identified 22 genes with greater than 4-fold regulation and significantly enhanced transcription (p

  15. MSX1 gene in the etiology orofacial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Paradowska-Stolarz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The muscle segment homeobox (MSX1 gene plays a crucial role in epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions in craniofacial development. It plays a regulative role in cellular proliferation, differentiation and cell death. The human MSX1 domain was also found in cow (Bt 302906, mouse (Mm 123311, rat (Rn13592001, chicken (Gg 170873 and clawed toad (XI 547690. Cleft lip and palate is the most common anomaly of the facial part of the skull. The etiology is not fully understood, but it is believed that the key role is played by the genetic factor activated by environmental factors. Among the candidate genes whose mutations could lead to formation of the cleft, the MSX1 homeobox gene is mentioned. Mutations in the gene MSX1 can lead to isolated cleft deformities, but also cause other dismorphic changes. Among the most frequently mentioned is loss of permanent tooth buds (mostly of less than 4 teeth – hypodontia, including second premolars. Mutations of MSX1 are observed in the Pierre- Robin sequence, which may be one of the features of congenital defects or is observed as an isolated defect. Mutation of the gene can lead to the occurrence of a rare congenital defect Wiktop (dental-nail syndrome. Deletion of a fragment MSX1 (4p16.3 located in the WHS critical region, may be a cause of some symptoms of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

  16. Evidence for intron length conservation in a set of mammalian genes associated with embryonic development

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-10-05

    Abstract Background We carried out an analysis of intron length conservation across a diverse group of nineteen mammalian species. Motivated by recent research suggesting a role for time delays associated with intron transcription in gene expression oscillations required for early embryonic patterning, we searched for examples of genes that showed the most extreme conservation of total intron content in mammals. Results Gene sets annotated as being involved in pattern specification in the early embryo or containing the homeobox DNA-binding domain, were significantly enriched among genes with highly conserved intron content. We used ancestral sequences reconstructed with probabilistic models that account for insertion and deletion mutations to distinguish insertion and deletion events on lineages leading to human and mouse from their last common ancestor. Using a randomization procedure, we show that genes containing the homeobox domain show less change in intron content than expected, given the number of insertion and deletion events within their introns. Conclusions Our results suggest selection for gene expression precision or the existence of additional development-associated genes for which transcriptional delay is functionally significant.

  17. A mutation in the RIEG1 gene associated with Peters' anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Doward, W; Perveen, R; Lloyd, I; Ridgway, A; Wilson, L; Black, G

    1999-01-01

    Mutations within the RIEG1 homeobox gene on chromosome 4q25 have previously been reported in association with Rieger syndrome. We report a 3' splice site mutation within the 3rd intron of the RIEG1 gene which is associated with unilateral Peters' anomaly. The mutation is a single base substition of A to T at the invariant -2 site of the 3' splice site. Peters' anomaly, which is characterised by ocular anterior segment dysgenesis and central corneal opacification, is distinct from Rieger anoma...

  18. Further elucidation of the genomic structure of PAX3, and identification of two different point mutations within the PAX3 homeobox that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.B.; Wilcox, E.R. [National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigmentary disturbances. Previous work has linked the disease to PAX3 on chromosome 2, and several mutations within the highly conserved paired-box and octapeptide motifs, but not the homeobox, have been reported. In this report, we have used the published cDNA sequence to further define the genomic structure of PAX3, using inverse PCR. We have identified exon/intron boundaries between exons 5 and 6 and between exons 6 and 7. Further, we have identified the first two mutations within the homeobox in two different families with type 1 Waardenburg syndrome. The first is a point mutation (G{yields}T) at the first base of exon 6, which substitutes phenylalanine for valine. In another family, we have identified a point mutation (C{yields}G) within the homeobox, in exon 6, which substitutes a glycine for arginine at a highly conserved site. The homeodomain is important in binding of DNA and in effecting transcriptional control. These mutations likely result in structural change within the homeodomain that either change the DNA-binding specificity of the homeodomain or reduce the affinity of the PAX3 protein for DNA. These homeodomain mutations should aid in elucidating the role of the homeodomain in the function of the PAX3 protein. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Developmental and daily expression of the Pax4 and Pax6 homeobox genes in the rat retina: localization of Pax4 in photoreceptor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Bailey, Michael J; Kim, Jong-So

    2009-01-01

    in the foetal eye. Histological analysis revealed that Pax4 mRNA is exclusively expressed in the retinal photoreceptors, whereas Pax6 mRNA and protein are present in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer of the mature retina. In the adult retina, Pax4 transcripts exhibit a diurnal rhythm...

  20. A neuroanatomical and physiological study of the non-image forming visual system of the cone-rod homeobox gene (Crx) knock out mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Rath, Martin F; Lund-Andersen, Casper

    2010-01-01

    that the retinohypothalamic projection to the SCN and the central optic pathways were similar in both animals. Telemetric monitoring of the running activity and temperature revealed that both the Crx(-/-)and wild type mouse exhibited diurnal rhythms with a 24-h period, which could be phase changed by light. However, power...... spectral analysis revealed that both rhythms in the Crx(-/-) mouse were less robust than those in the wild type. The normal development of the SCN and the central visual pathways in the Crx(-/-) mouse suggests that a modulatory input from the photoreceptors in the peripheral retina to the retinal...

  1. GenBank blastx search result: AK287639 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287639 J065078H11 AF287967.1 AF287967 Homo sapiens homeobox B7 (HOXB7) gene, partial cds; and home...obox B6 (HOXB6), homeobox B5 (HOXB5), homeobox B4 (HOXB4), and homeobox B3 (HOXB3) genes, complete cds. PRI 0.0 0 ...

  2. The human insulin receptor substrate-1 gene (IRS1) is localized on 2q36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Masaki; Matsufuji, Senya; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Furusaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Teruji (Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Inazawa, J.; Nakamura, Yusuke (Cancer Institute, Tokyo (Japan)); Ariyama, Takeshi (Kyoto Prefactural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)); Wands, J.R. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The chromosomal localization of some of the genes participating in the insulin signaling pathway is known. The insulin and insulin receptor genes have been mapped to chromosomes 11 and 19, respectively. To identify the chromosomal localization of the human IRS1 gene, the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was employed with Genomic Clone B-10. A total of 50 metaphase cells exhibiting either single or double spots of hybridization signals were examined. Among them, 32 showed the specific signals on 2q36. Therefore, the authors assigned the human IRS1 gene to 2q36. The genes for homeobox sequence (HOX4), fibronectin 1, alkaline phosphatase (intestinal), transition protein 1, villin 1, collagen (type IV), Waardenburg syndrome (type 1), alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and glucagon have been localized in the vicinity of the IRS1 gene.

  3. Fine-tuning the onset of myogenesis by homeobox proteins that interact with the Myf5 limb enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Daubas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal myogenesis in vertebrates is initiated at different sites of skeletal muscle formation during development, by activation of specific control elements of the myogenic regulatory genes. In the mouse embryo, Myf5 is the first myogenic determination gene to be expressed and its spatiotemporal regulation requires multiple enhancer sequences, extending over 120 kb upstream of the Mrf4-Myf5 locus. An enhancer, located at −57/−58 kb from Myf5, is responsible for its activation in myogenic cells derived from the hypaxial domain of the somite, that will form limb muscles. Pax3 and Six1/4 transcription factors are essential activators of this enhancer, acting on a 145-bp core element. Myogenic progenitor cells that will form the future muscle masses of the limbs express the factors necessary for Myf5 activation when they delaminate from the hypaxial dermomyotome and migrate into the forelimb bud, however they do not activate Myf5 and the myogenic programme until they have populated the prospective muscle masses. We show that Msx1 and Meox2 homeodomain-containing transcription factors bind in vitro and in vivo to specific sites in the 145-bp element, and are implicated in fine-tuning activation of Myf5 in the forelimb. Msx1, when bound between Pax and Six sites, prevents the binding of these key activators, thus inhibiting transcription of Myf5 and consequent premature myogenic differentiation. Meox2 is required for Myf5 activation at the onset of myogenesis via direct binding to other homeodomain sites in this sequence. Thus, these homeodomain factors, acting in addition to Pax3 and Six1/4, fine-tune the entry of progenitor cells into myogenesis at early stages of forelimb development.

  4. Evaluation of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 and transforming growth factor-beta2 expression in bladder cancer tissue in comparison with healthy adjacent tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mahdavinezhad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The fifth most common cancer is allocated to bladder cancer (BC worldwide. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of BC invasion and metastasis to identify target therapeutic strategies will improve disease survival. So the aim of this study was to measure expression rate of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1 and transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2 mRNA in tissue samples of patients with BC and its healthy adjacent tissue samples and their association with muscle invasion, size and grade of the tumor. Materials and Methods: Tissue samples were collected from 35 newly diagnosed untreated patients with BC from 2013 to 2014. Total RNA was extracted from about 50-mg tissue samples using TRIzol reagent. TAKARA SYBR Premix EX Tag II was applied to determine the rate of mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. To obtain final validation, PCR product of ZEB1 and TGF-β2 were sequenced. STATA 11 software was used to analyze the data. Results: The expression level of ZEB1 in tumor samples was significantly more than of in healthy adjacent tissue samples. Up-regulation of TGF-β2 showed a strong association with muscle invasion (p=0.017. There was also demonstrated a relationship between over expression of ZEB1 with the tumor size (p=0.050. Conclusions: It looks ZEB1 and TGF-β2 had a role in BC patients. In this study ZEB1 expression was higher in BC tissues than that of in healthy control tissues. There was demonstrated a markedly association between overexpression of TGF-β2 and muscle invasion. Therefore, they are supposed to be candidate as potential biomarkers for early detection and progression of BC.

  5. Diurnal expression of proteins in the retina of the blind cone-rod homeobox (Crx-/- ) mouse and the 129/Sv mouse: a proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Ludvigsen, Maja; Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik

    2017-11-01

    The vertebrate retina contains a circadian clock participating in adaptations to day and night vision. This peripheral clock is independent of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The retinal clock is located in several cell types, including the photoreceptors. To investigate the role of the circadian clock of the photoreceptor cells in regulation of retinal protein rhythms, we analysed diurnal protein expression in the photoreceptor-deficient cone-rod homeobox knockout mouse (Crx -/- ) and the 129/Sv mouse. 2D gels were made from retinal homogenates of 129/Sv and Crx -/- mice killed at midday and midnight. Stained gels were analysed by use of PDQuest 2D gel analysis software. After trypsin digestion of differential expressed spots, the proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS using a nano-liquid chromatograph connected to a Q-TOF Premier mass spectrometer. These data were used to search the SWISS-PROT database. Both the retinae of the control and the Crx -/- mice exhibited diurnal proteins rhythms. As expected, proteins involved in phototransduction were not detected in the Crx -/- mouse; in this phenotype, however, proteins from spots showing diurnal rhythms were specifically identified as enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, Krebs cycle, and mitochondrial enzymes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005556. We show diurnal protein rhythms in the retina of a mouse lacking the rods and cones. The diurnal protein rhythms in this genotype, lacking the circadian clock of the photoreceptors, might be caused by a circadian clock in other retinal cell types or a direct light input to the retina. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xihai; Liang, Wenna; Ye, Hongzhi; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Lin, Pingdong; Liu, Xianxiang

    2015-09-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild‑type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression‑associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice.

  7. The Lotus japonicus ndx gene family is involved in nodule function and maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Gustafsen, Camilla; Jensen, Dorthe Bødker

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the function of the ndx homeobox genes during the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, two Lotus japonicus ndr genes were expressed in the antisense orientation under the control of the nodule-expressed promoter Psenod12 in transgenic Lotus japonicus plants. Many of the transformants obtained...... segregated into plants that failed to sustain proper development and maintenance of root nodules concomitant with down-regulation of the two ndx genes. The root nodules were actively fixing nitrogen 3 weeks after inoculation, but the plants exhibited a stunted growth phenotype. The nodules on such antisense...... supplied to the plants in which the two ndx genes are down-regulated. The results presented here, indicate that the ndx genes play a role in the development of structural nodule features, required for proper gas diffusion into the nodule and/or transport of the assimilated nitrogen to the plant....

  8. Study of duplication 24bp of ARX gene among patients presenting a Mental Retardation with a syndromic and non syndromic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essouissi, Imen

    2006-01-01

    Mental Retardation (MR) is the most frequent handicap. It touches 3% of the general population. The genetic causes of this handicap account for 40% of these cases. ARX gene (Aristaless related homeobox gene) belongs to the family of the genes homeobox located in Xp22.1. It is considered as the most frequently muted gene after the FMR1 gene. It is implicated in various forms of syndromic and nonsyndromic MR. Several types of mutation were identified on the level of this gene, including deletions/insertions, duplications, missense and nonsense mutations, responsible for a wide spectrum of phenotypes. The goal of this work is to seek the most frequent change of gene ARX: duplication 24pb (at the origin of an expansion of the field poly has protein ARX in the position 144-155AA) among Tunisian boys presenting in particular family forms of non specific MR, sporadic forms of non specific MR like certain patients presenting a West syndrome.To prove the duplication of 24 Pb, we used in this work the Pcr technique. The change of duplication 24pb was not found in our series, this could be explained by the low number of cases family studied (38 families) and by the absence of connection studies accusing a mode of transmission related to X chromosome in particular for the sporadic cases. (Author)

  9. Constitutive knox1 gene expression in dandelion (Taraxacum officinale, Web.) changes leaf morphology from simple to compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kai J; He, Xinqiang; Fischer, Rainer; Prüfer, Dirk

    2006-10-01

    Seed plants with compound leaves constitute a polyphyletic group, but studies of diverse taxa show that genes of the class 1 KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX1) family are often involved in compound leaf development. This suggests that knox1 genes have been recruited on multiple occasions during angiosperm evolution (Bharathan et al. in Science 296:1858-1860, 2002). In agreement with this, we demonstrate that the simple leaf of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Web.) can be converted into a compound leaf by the constitutive expression of heterologous knox1 genes. Dandelion is a rosette plant of the family Asteraceae, characterised by simple leaves with deeply lobed margins and endogenous knox1 gene expression. Transgenic dandelion plants constitutively expressing the barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) hooded gene (bkn3, barley knox3) or the related bkn1 gene, developed compound leaves featuring epiphyllous rosettes. We discuss these results in the context of two current models of compound leaf formation.

  10. Pitx2, an atrial fibrillation predisposition gene, directly regulates ion transport and intercalated disc genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Zhang, Min; Li, Lele; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Moon, Anne M; Kaminski, Henry J; Martin, James F

    2014-02-01

    Pitx2 is the homeobox gene located in proximity to the human 4q25 familial atrial fibrillation (AF) locus. When deleted in the mouse germline, Pitx2 haploinsufficiency predisposes to pacing-induced AF, indicating that reduced Pitx2 promotes an arrhythmogenic substrate. Previous work focused on Pitx2 developmental functions that predispose to AF. Although Pitx2 is expressed in postnatal left atrium, it is unknown whether Pitx2 has distinct postnatal and developmental functions. To investigate Pitx2 postnatal function, we conditionally inactivated Pitx2 in the postnatal atrium while leaving its developmental function intact. Unstressed adult Pitx2 homozygous mutant mice display variable R-R interval with diminished P-wave amplitude characteristic of sinus node dysfunction, an AF risk factor in human patients. An integrated genomics approach in the adult heart revealed Pitx2 target genes encoding cell junction proteins, ion channels, and critical transcriptional regulators. Importantly, many Pitx2 target genes have been implicated in human AF by genome-wide association studies. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy studies in adult Pitx2 mutant mice revealed structural remodeling of the intercalated disc characteristic of human patients with AF. Our findings, revealing that Pitx2 has genetically separable postnatal and developmental functions, unveil direct Pitx2 target genes that include channel and calcium handling genes, as well as genes that stabilize the intercalated disc in postnatal atrium.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of WOX genes in upland cotton and their expression pattern under different stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoen; Gong, Qian; Qin, Wenqiang; Yang, Zuoren; Cheng, Yuan; Lu, Lili; Ge, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Chaojun; Wu, Zhixia; Li, Fuguang

    2017-07-06

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) family members play significant roles in plant growth and development, such as in embryo patterning, stem-cell maintenance, and lateral organ formation. The recently published cotton genome sequences allow us to perform comprehensive genome-wide analysis and characterization of WOX genes in cotton. In this study, we identified 21, 20, and 38 WOX genes in Gossypium arboreum (2n = 26, A 2 ), G. raimondii (2n = 26, D 5 ), and G. hirsutum (2n = 4x = 52, (AD) t ), respectively. Sequence logos showed that homeobox domains were significantly conserved among the WOX genes in cotton, Arabidopsis, and rice. A total of 168 genes from three typical monocots and six dicots were naturally divided into three clades, which were further classified into nine sub-clades. A good collinearity was observed in the synteny analysis of the orthologs from At and Dt (t represents tetraploid) sub-genomes. Whole genome duplication (WGD) and segmental duplication within At and Dt sub-genomes played significant roles in the expansion of WOX genes, and segmental duplication mainly generated the WUS clade. Copia and Gypsy were the two major types of transposable elements distributed upstream or downstream of WOX genes. Furthermore, through comparison, we found that the exon/intron pattern was highly conserved between Arabidopsis and cotton, and the homeobox domain loci were also conserved between them. In addition, the expression pattern in different tissues indicated that the duplicated genes in cotton might have acquired new functions as a result of sub-functionalization or neo-functionalization. The expression pattern of WOX genes under different stress treatments showed that the different genes were induced by different stresses. In present work, WOX genes, classified into three clades, were identified in the upland cotton genome. Whole genome and segmental duplication were determined to be the two major impetuses for the expansion of gene numbers during the

  12. Hydrocephalus caused by conditional ablation of the Pten or beta-catenin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtoshi Akihira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the roles of Pten and β-Catenin in the midbrain, either the Pten gene or the β-catenin gene was conditionally ablated, using Dmbx1 (diencephalon/mesencephalon-expressed brain homeobox gene 1-Cre mice. Homozygous disruption of the Pten or β-catenin gene in Dmbx1-expressing cells caused severe hydrocephalus and mortality during the postnatal period. Conditional deletion of Pten resulted in enlargement of midbrain structures. β-catenin conditional mutant mice showed malformation of the superior and inferior colliculi and stenosis of the midbrain aqueduct. These results demonstrate that both Pten and β-Catenin are essential for proper midbrain development, and provide the direct evidence that mutations of both Pten and β-catenin lead to hydrocephalus.

  13. The Gene Regulatory Network of Lens Induction Is Wired through Meis-Dependent Shadow Enhancers of Pax6

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antošová, Barbora; Smolíková, Jana; Klímová, Lucie; Láchová, Jitka; Bendova, Michaela; Kozmiková, Iryna; Machoň, Ondřej; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 12 (2016), č. článku e1006441. ISSN 1553-7404 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-23675S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11214; GA MŠk LO1419; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : homeobox-containing gene * eye development * nasal development * surface ectoderm * neural crest * expression * mouse * morphogenesis * aniridia * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.100, year: 2016

  14. Using the Developmental Gene Bicoid to Identify Species of Forensically Important Blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Hwan Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying species of insects used to estimate postmortem interval (PMI is a major subject in forensic entomology. Because forensic insect specimens are morphologically uniform and are obtained at various developmental stages, DNA markers are greatly needed. To develop new autosomal DNA markers to identify species, partial genomic sequences of the bicoid (bcd genes, containing the homeobox and its flanking sequences, from 12 blowfly species (Aldrichina grahami, Calliphora vicina, Calliphora lata, Triceratopyga calliphoroides, Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya pinguis, Phormia regina, Lucilia ampullacea, Lucilia caesar, Lucilia illustris, Hemipyrellia ligurriens and Lucilia sericata; Calliphoridae: Diptera were determined and analyzed. This study first sequenced the ten blowfly species other than C. vicina and L. sericata. Based on the bcd sequences of these 12 blowfly species, a phylogenetic tree was constructed that discriminates the subfamilies of Calliphoridae (Luciliinae, Chrysomyinae, and Calliphorinae and most blowfly species. Even partial genomic sequences of about 500 bp can distinguish most blowfly species. The short intron 2 and coding sequences downstream of the bcd homeobox in exon 3 could be utilized to develop DNA markers for forensic applications. These gene sequences are important in the evolution of insect developmental biology and are potentially useful for identifying insect species in forensic science.

  15. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  16. Adaptive evolution of Hoxc13 genes in the origin and diversification of the vertebrate integument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianghong; Husile; Sun, Hailian; Wang, Feng; Li, Yurong; Zhao, Cunfa; Zhang, Wenguang

    2013-11-01

    The problem of origination and diversification of integument derivatives in vertebrates is still a challenge. The homeobox (Hox) genes Hoxc13 control integument formation in vertebrate. Hoxc13 show strong expression in the integument development, are highly conserved across vertebrates, and show mutations that are associated with skin and appendages. To test whether the evolution of the integument is associated with positive selection or relaxation of Hoxc13, we obtained these genes in a wide range of vertebrates. In Hoxc13, we found evidence of diversifying selection after speciation during the origin of vertebrates. In addition, we found the glycine-rich regions in Hoxc13 protein in mammals, but not among non-mammalian taxa. Our results strongly implicate that Hoxc13 genes could have played an important role in the evolution of integument structure. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Identification of epigenetically altered genes and potential gene targets in melanoma using bioinformatic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan HH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Honghao Duan, Ke Jiang, Dengke Wei, Lijun Zhang, Deliang Cheng, Min Lv, Yuben Xu, Aimin He Department of Hand Surgery, Honghui Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: This study aimed to analyze epigenetically and genetically altered genes in melanoma to get a better understanding of the molecular circuitry of melanoma and identify potential gene targets for the treatment of melanoma. The microarray data of GSE31879, including mRNA expression profiles (seven melanoma and four melanocyte samples and DNA methylation profiles (seven melanoma and five melanocyte samples, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs and differentially methylated positions (DMPs were screened using the linear models for microarray data (limma package in melanoma compared with melanocyte samples. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs were carried out using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. Moreover, differentially methylated genes (DMGs were identified, and a transcriptional regulatory network was constructed using the University of California Santa Cruz genome browser database. A total of 1,215 DEGs (199 upregulated and 1,016 downregulated and 14,094 DMPs (10,450 upregulated and 3,644 downregulated were identified in melanoma compared with melanocyte samples. Additionally, the upregulated and downregulated DEGs were significantly associated with different GO terms and pathways, such as pigment cell differentiation, biosynthesis, and metabolism. Furthermore, the transcriptional regulatory network showed that DMGs such as Aristaless-related homeobox (ARX, damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 (DDB2, and myelin basic protein (MBP had higher node degrees. Our results showed that several methylated genes (ARX, DDB2, and MBP may be involved in melanoma progression. Keywords: melanoma, DNA

  18. The ken and barbie gene encoding a putative transcription factor with a BTB domain and three zinc finger motifs functions in terminalia development of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacsovich, Tamas; Yuge, Kazuya; Awano, Wakae; Asztalos, Zoltan; Kondo, Shunzo; Juni, Naoto; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2003-10-01

    Mutations in the ken and barbie locus are accompanied by the malformation of terminalia in adult Drosophila. Male and female genitalia often remain inside the body, and the same portions of genitalia and analia are missing in a fraction of homozygous flies. Rotated and/or duplicated terminalia are also observed. Terminalia phenotypes are enhanced by mutations in the gap gene tailless, the homeobox gene caudal, and the decapentaplegic gene that encodes a TGFbeta-like morphogen. The ken and barbie gene encodes a protein with three CCHH-type zinc finger motifs that are conserved in several transcription factors such as Krüppel and BCL-6. All defects in ken and barbie mutants are fully rescued by the expression of a wild-type genomic construct, which establishes the causality between phenotypes and the gene. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Of mice and genes: evolution of vertebrate brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.

    1998-01-01

    In this review the current understanding of genetic and molecular evolution of development, in particular the formation of the major axis of bilateral animals, is critically evaluated, and the early pattern formation in the hindbrain is related as much as possible to these processes. On the genetic level it is proposed that the exuberant multiplication of regulatory genes compared to that of structural genes relates to the increased flexibility of early vertebrate development. In comparisons to fruit flies, many conserved genes are found to be expressed very differently, while many others seem to reflect a comparable pattern and thus suggest a conservation of function. Even genes with a largely conserved pattern of expression may change the level at which they are expressed and the mechanisms by which they are regulated in their expression. Evolution and development of hindbrain motoneurons is reviewed, and it is concluded that both comparative data as well as more recent experimental data suggest a limited importance for the rhombomeres. Clearly, many cell fate-specifying processes work below the level of rhombomeres or in the absence of rhombomeres. It is suggested that more comparative developmental data are needed to establish firmly the relationship between homeobox genes and rhombomere specification in vertebrates other than a few model species.

  20. VSX1 gene and keratoconus: genetic analysis in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeoung, Jin Wook; Kim, Mee Kum; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Sung Yeun; Ko, Hyun Soo; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak

    2012-07-01

    The visual system homeobox 1 (VSX1) gene variants have recently been shown to be associated with keratoconus. To replicate this finding, we performed a genetic analysis of the VSX1 gene in a Korean case-control sample. Patients with keratoconus and healthy control subjects were recruited from Seoul National University Hospital. A diagnosis of keratoconus was made based on clinical examinations and the presence of characteristic topographic features. For all patients and controls, the whole coding region and the exon-intron junctions of the VSX1 gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. Fifty-three patients with keratoconus and 100 healthy volunteers were included. We observed 2 novel missense substitutions (Leu17Val and Val199Leu) and 1 previously reported substitution (Gly160Val) in 6 of the 53 affected probands. Because these substitutions have been identified in unaffected individuals, they were not considered to be pathogenic. No intragenic polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of keratoconus. We cannot confirm the previously reported association of the VSX1 gene variants with keratoconus. Our results suggest that the VSX1 gene and its mutations with amino acid changes do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus.

  1. Knock-in strategy at 3'-end of Crx gene by CRISPR/Cas9 system shows the gene expression profiles during human photoreceptor differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Kohei; Usui, Sumiko; Kaneda, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescent reporter gene knock-in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines have been used to evaluate the efficiency of differentiation into specific cell lineages. Here, we report a knock-in strategy for the generation of human iPSC reporter lines in which a 2A peptide sequence and a red fluorescent protein (E2-Crimson) gene were inserted at the termination codon of the cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene, a photoreceptor-specific transcriptional factor gene. The knock-in iPSC lines were differentiated into fluorescence-expressing cells in 3D retinal differentiation culture, and the fluorescent cells also expressed Crx specifically in the nucleus. We found that the fluorescence intensity was positively correlated with the expression levels of Crx mRNA and that fluorescent cells expressed rod photoreceptor-specific genes in the later stage of differentiation. Finally, we treated the fluorescent cells with DAPT, a Notch inhibitor, and found that DAPT-enhanced retinal differentiation was associated with up-regulation of Crx, Otx2 and NeuroD1, and down-regulation of Hes5 and Ngn2. These suggest that this knock-in strategy at the 3'-end of the target gene, combined with the 2A peptide linked to fluorescent proteins, offers a useful tool for labeling specific cell lineages or monitoring expression of any marker genes without affecting the function of the target gene. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Identification of early response genes to roughness and fluoride modification of titanium implants in human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Joana Maria; Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien Francis; Lyngstadaas, Staale Petter; Reseland, Janne Elin; Ellingsen, Jan Eirik; Monjo, Marta

    2012-04-01

    Tissue response after implantation determines the success of the healing process. This response is not only dependent on the chemical properties of the implant surface but also by the surface topography or its roughness. Although in vitro and in vivo studies show improved results with rough- and fluoride-modified implants, the mechanisms behind these findings are still unknown. Here, we have used a two-step procedure to identify novel genes related to the early response of primary human osteoblasts to roughness and fluoride-modified titanium implants. Two hundred seventeen genes responding to roughness were identified by microarray analysis and 198 genes responding to fluoride, 33 genes were common. Those identified genes related to bone and mineralization were further investigated by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. After 1 day of culture, toll-like receptor 3, ankylosis-progressive homolog, decorin, osteocalcin, and runt-related transcription factor-2 were classified as responsive genes to roughness; Distal-less homeobox-2 and Tuftelin-1 as responsive genes to fluoride treatment. Responsive genes to both treatments were collagen type I, parathyroid hormone-like hormone, hairy and enhancer of split-1, follistatin, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1, and thyroid hormone receptor-alpha. Our strategy was useful for identifying novel genes that might be involved in the early response of osteoblasts to rough and fluoride-modified titanium implants.

  3. Chelicerate Hox genes and the homology of arthropod segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzhanov, A; Popadic, A; Kaufman, T C

    1999-01-01

    Genes of the homeotic complex (HOM-C) in insects and vertebrates are required for the specification of segments along the antero-posterior axis. Multiple paralogues of the Hox genes in the horseshoe crab Limulus poliphemus have been used as evidence for HOM-C duplications in the Chelicerata. We addressed this possibility through a limited PCR survey to sample the homeoboxes of two spider species, Steatoda triangulosa and Achaearanea tepidariorum. The survey did not provide evidence for multiple Hox clusters although we have found apparent duplicate copies of proboscipedia (pb) and Deformed (Dfd). In addition, we have cloned larger cDNA fragments of pb, zerknullt (zen/Hox3) and Dfd. These fragments allowed the determination of mRNA distribution by in situ hybridization. Our results are similar to the previously published expression patterns of Hox genes from another spider and an oribatid mite. Previous studies compared spider/mite Hox gene expression patterns with those of insects and argued for a pattern of segmental homology based on the assumption that the co-linear anterior boundaries of the Hox domains can be used as markers. To test this assumption we performed a comparative analysis of the expression patterns for UBX/ABD-A in chelicerates, myriapods, crustaceans, and insects. We conclude that the anterior boundary can be and is changed considerably during arthropod evolution and, therefore, Hox expression patterns should not be used as the sole criterion for identifying homology in different classes of arthropods.

  4. [The methylation of ZHX2 gene promoter enhances AFP gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zili; DU, Yangjun; Wen, Jianming

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between Zinc-fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) promoter methylation and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) gene expression, and analyze the mechanism of AFP gene expression. HepG2 cell line was cultured with 0.5, 1.0 or 5.0 μmol/L of 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-Dc). RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expressions of ZHX2 and AFP in HepG2 cell line. Methylation-specific PCR was used to detect ZHX2 promoter methylation in 38 hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. The HepG2 cell line showed a low level of ZHX2 mRNA, negative expression of ZHX2 protein, but high expression of AFP at both mRNA and protein levels. After the HepG2 cells were treated with 1.0 or 5.0 μmol/L 5-Aza-Dc for 6 d, the expression of ZHX2 mRNA and protein increased and the expression of AFP mRNA and protein decreased. Among 38 hepatocellular carcinoma tissues, ZHX2 promoter methylation was found in 16 hepatocellular carcinoma tissues with AFP>25 ng/mL in serum. No methylation of ZHX2 promoter was found in 8 hepatocellular carcinoma tissues with AFPexpression.

  5. Generation of a multipurpose Prdm16 mouse allele by targeted gene trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Strassman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene trap mutagenesis is a powerful tool to create loss-of-function mutations in mice and other model organisms. Modifications of traditional gene trap cassettes, including addition of conditional features in the form of Flip-excision (FlEx arrays to enable directional gene trap cassette inversions by Cre and Flpe site-specific recombinases, greatly enhanced their experimental potential. By taking advantage of these conditional gene trap cassettes, we developed a generic strategy for generating conditional mutations and validated this strategy in mice carrying a multipurpose allele of the Prdm16 transcription factor gene. We demonstrate that the gene trap insertion creates a null mutation replicating the Pierre Robin sequence-type cleft palate phenotype of other Prdm16 mutant mice. Consecutive breeding to Flpe and Emx1IREScre deleter mice spatially restricted Prdm16 loss to regions of the forebrain expressing the homeobox gene Emx1, demonstrating the utility of the technology for the analysis of tissue-specific gene functions.

  6. The FSHD-associated repeat, D4Z4, is a member of a dispersed family of homeobox-containing repeats, subsets of which are clustered on the short arms of the acrocentric chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, R.; Wright, T.J.; Clark, L.N.; Hewitt, J.E. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-10

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is in autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder that maps to human chromosome 4q35. FSHD is tightly linked to a polymorphic 3.3-kb tandem repeat locus, D4Z4. D4Z4 is a complex repeat: it contains a novel homeobox sequence and two other repetitive sequence motifs. In most sporadic FSHD cases, a specific DNA rearrangement, deletion of copies of the repeat at D4Z4, is associated with development of the disease. However, no expressed sequences from D4Z4 have been identified. We have previously shown that there are other loci similar to D4Z4 within the genome. In this paper we describe the isolation of two YAC clones that map to chromosome 14 and that contain multiple copies of a D4Z4-like repeat. Isolation of cDNA clones that map to the acrocentric chromosomes and Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids show that there are similar loci on all of the acrocentric chromosomes. D4Z4 is a member of a complex repeat family, and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids shows an organization into distinct subfamilies. The implications of this work in relation to the molecular mechanism of FSHD pathogenesis is discussed. We propose the name 3.3-kb repeat for this family of repetitive sequence elements. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Repression of Lateral Organ Boundary Genes by PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH Is Essential for Meristem Maintenance and Flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha; Ragni, Laura; Tabb, Paul; Salasini, Brenda C; Chatfield, Steven; Datla, Raju; Lock, John; Kuai, Xiahezi; Després, Charles; Proveniers, Marcel; Yongguo, Cao; Xiang, Daoquan; Morin, Halima; Rullière, Jean-Pierre; Citerne, Sylvie; Hepworth, Shelley R; Pautot, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), endogenous and environmental signals acting on the shoot apical meristem cause acquisition of inflorescence meristem fate. This results in changed patterns of aerial development seen as the transition from making leaves to the production of flowers separated by elongated internodes. Two related BEL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF), fulfill this transition. Loss of function of these genes impairs stem cell maintenance and blocks internode elongation and flowering. We show here that pny pnf apices misexpress lateral organ boundary genes BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1/2 (BOP1/2) and KNOTTED-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA6 (KNAT6) together with ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX GENE1 (ATH1). Inactivation of genes in this module fully rescues pny pnf defects. We further show that BOP1 directly activates ATH1, whereas activation of KNAT6 is indirect. The pny pnf restoration correlates with renewed accumulation of transcripts conferring floral meristem identity, including FD, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN LIKE genes, LEAFY, and APETALA1. To gain insight into how this module blocks flowering, we analyzed the transcriptome of BOP1-overexpressing plants. Our data suggest a central role for the microRNA156-SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE-microRNA172 module in integrating stress signals conferred in part by promotion of jasmonic acid biosynthesis. These data reveal a potential mechanism by which repression of lateral organ boundary genes by PNY-PNF is essential for flowering. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woon Kyu; Kim, Yong-Man; Malik, Nasir; Ma Chang; Westphal, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    The paired-like homeobox-containing gene Ehox plays a role in embryonic stem cell differentiation and is highly expressed in the developing placenta and thymus. To understand the mechanisms of regulation of Ehox gene expression, the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene was isolated from a mouse BAC library. 5'-RACE analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site 130 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Transient transfection with a luciferase reporter gene under the control of serially deleted 5'-flanking sequences revealed that the nt -84 to -68 region contained a positive cis-acting element for efficient expression of the Ehox gene. Mutational analysis of this region and oligonucleotide competition in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the presence of a CCAAT box, which is a target for transcription nuclear factor Y (NFY). NFY is essential for positive gene regulation. No tissue-specific enhancer was identified in the 1.9-kb 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene. Ehox is expressed during the early stages of embryo development, specifically in Brain at 9.5 dpc, as well as during the late stages of embryo development. These results suggest that NFY is an essential regulatory factor for Ehox transcriptional activity, which is important for the post-implantation stage of the developing embryo

  9. miR-203 and miR-320 Regulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2-Induced Osteoblast Differentiation by Targeting Distal-Less Homeobox 5 (Dlx5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navya Laxman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a family of small, non-coding RNAs (17–24 nucleotides, which regulate gene expression either by the degradation of the target mRNAs or inhibiting the translation of genes. Recent studies have indicated that miRNA plays an important role in regulating osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we identified miR-203 and miR-320b as important miRNAs modulating osteoblast differentiation. We identified Dlx5 as potential common target by prediction algorithms and confirmed this by knock-down and over expression of the miRNAs and assessing Dlx5 at mRNA and protein levels and specificity was verified by luciferase reporter assays. We examined the effect of miR-203 and miR-320b on osteoblast differentiation by transfecting with pre- and anti-miRs. Over-expression of miR-203 and miR-320b inhibited osteoblast differentiation, whereas inhibition of miR-203 and miR-320b stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization. We show that miR-203 and miR-320b negatively regulate BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation by suppressing Dlx5, which in turn suppresses the downstream osteogenic master transcription factor Runx2 and Osx and together they suppress osteoblast differentiation. Taken together, we propose a role for miR-203 and miR-320b in modulating bone metabolism.

  10. Glaucoma and Cytochrome P4501B1 Gene Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Tanwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental anomalies of the ocular anterior chamber angle may lead to an incomplete development of the structures that form the conventional aqueous outflow pathway. Thus, disorders that present with such dysfunction tend to be associated with glaucoma. Among them, Axenfeld-Rieger (ARS malformation is a rare clinical entity with an estimated prevalence of one in every 200,000 individuals. The changes in eye morphogenesis in ARS are highly penetrant and are associated with 50% risk of development of glaucoma. Mutations in the cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1 gene have been reported to be associated with primary congenital glaucoma and other forms of glaucoma and mutations in pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2 gene have been identified in ARS in various studies. This case was negative for PITX2 mutations and compound heterozygote for CYP1B1 mutations. Clinical manifestations of this patient include bilateral elevated intraocular pressure (>40 mmHg with increased corneal diameter (>14 mm and corneal opacity. Patient also had iridocorneal adhesions, anteriorly displaced Schwalbe line, anterior insertion of iris, broad nasal bridge and protruding umbilicus. This is the first study from north India reporting CYP1B1 mutations in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome with bilateral buphthalmos and early onset glaucoma. Result of this study supports the role of CYP1B1 as a causative gene in ASD disorders and its role in oculogenesis.

  11. Molecular analysis of the VSX1 gene in familial keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskova, Petra; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Gwilliam, Rhian; El-Ashry, Mohamed F.; Moodaley, Lalitha C.; Hau, Scott; Twa, Michael; Tuft, Stephen J.; Bhatacharya, Shomi S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the role of the visual system homeobox gene 1 (VSX1) in the pathogenesis of familial keratoconus. Methods Families with two or more individuals with keratoconus were recruited and their members examined. The coding region and intron-exon junctions of the VSX1 gene were sequenced in affected individuals. In cases where there were possible pathogenic changes, segregation within the pedigree was analyzed. Meta analysis of reports on an association of p.D144E change with keratoconus phenotype was performed. Results Probands from a panel of 85 apparently unrelated keratoconus families were included. Eleven sequence variants were observed, including the previously reported c.432C>G (p.D144E) change and two novel intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms. However, these three changes did not cosegregate with the disease phenotype. Conclusions We excluded the c.432C>G sequence alteration as the direct cause of the disease. Lack of possibly pathogenic VSX1 sequence variants in the familial panel suggests that involvement of this gene in the pathogenesis of keratoconus is likely to be confined to a small number of pedigrees, at least in the population studied. PMID:17960127

  12. Comparative analysis of weighted gene co-expression networks in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Stubbs, Lisa; Almaas, Eivind

    2017-01-01

    The application of complex network modeling to analyze large co-expression data sets has gained traction during the last decade. In particular, the use of the weighted gene co-expression network analysis framework has allowed an unbiased and systems-level investigation of genotype-phenotype relationships in a wide range of systems. Since mouse is an important model organism for biomedical research on human disease, it is of great interest to identify similarities and differences in the functional roles of human and mouse orthologous genes. Here, we develop a novel network comparison approach which we demonstrate by comparing two gene-expression data sets from a large number of human and mouse tissues. The method uses weighted topological overlap alongside the recently developed network-decomposition method of s-core analysis, which is suitable for making gene-centrality rankings for weighted networks. The aim is to identify globally central genes separately in the human and mouse networks. By comparing the ranked gene lists, we identify genes that display conserved or diverged centrality-characteristics across the networks. This framework only assumes a single threshold value that is chosen from a statistical analysis, and it may be applied to arbitrary network structures and edge-weight distributions, also outside the context of biology. When conducting the comparative network analysis, both within and across the two species, we find a clear pattern of enrichment of transcription factors, for the homeobox domain in particular, among the globally central genes. We also perform gene-ontology term enrichment analysis and look at disease-related genes for the separate networks as well as the network comparisons. We find that gene ontology terms related to regulation and development are generally enriched across the networks. In particular, the genes FOXE3, RHO, RUNX2, ALX3 and RARA, which are disease genes in either human or mouse, are on the top-10 list of globally

  13. A Pituitary Homeobox 2 (Pitx2):microRNA-200a-3p:β-catenin Pathway Converts Mesenchymal Cells to Amelogenin-expressing Dental Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thad; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Xiao; Cao, Huojun; Gao, Shan; Moreno, Myriam; Amendt, Brad A.

    2014-01-01

    Pitx2, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and microRNAs (miRs) play a critical role in the regulation of dental stem cells during embryonic development. In this report, we have identified a Pitx2:β-catenin regulatory pathway involved in epithelial cell differentiation and conversion of mesenchymal cells to amelogenin expressing epithelial cells via miR-200a. Pitx2 and β-catenin are expressed in the labial incisor cervical loop or epithelial stem cell niche, with decreased expression in the differentiating ameloblast cells of the mouse lower incisor. Bioinformatics analyses reveal that miR-200a-3p expression is activated in the pre-ameloblast cells to enhance epithelial cell differentiation. We demonstrate that Pitx2 activates miR-200a-3p expression and miR-200a-3p reciprocally represses Pitx2 and β-catenin expression. Pitx2 and β-catenin interact to synergistically activate gene expression during odontogenesis and miR-200a-3p attenuates their expression and directs differentiation. To understand how this mechanism controls cell differentiation and cell fate, oral epithelial and odontoblast mesenchymal cells were reprogrammed by a two-step induction method using Pitx2 and miR-200a-3p. Conversion to amelogenin expressing dental epithelial cells involved an up-regulation of the stem cell marker Sox2 and proliferation genes and decreased expression of mesenchymal markers. E-cadherin expression was increased as well as ameloblast specific factors. The combination of Pitx2, a regulator of dental stem cells and miR-200a converts mesenchymal cells to a fully differentiated dental epithelial cell type. This pathway and reprogramming can be used to reprogram mesenchymal or oral epithelial cells to dental epithelial (ameloblast) cells, which can be used in tissue repair and regeneration studies. PMID:25122764

  14. A pituitary homeobox 2 (Pitx2):microRNA-200a-3p:β-catenin pathway converts mesenchymal cells to amelogenin-expressing dental epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thad; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Xiao; Cao, Huojun; Gao, Shan; Moreno, Myriam; Amendt, Brad A

    2014-09-26

    Pitx2, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and microRNAs (miRs) play a critical role in the regulation of dental stem cells during embryonic development. In this report, we have identified a Pitx2:β-catenin regulatory pathway involved in epithelial cell differentiation and conversion of mesenchymal cells to amelogenin expressing epithelial cells via miR-200a. Pitx2 and β-catenin are expressed in the labial incisor cervical loop or epithelial stem cell niche, with decreased expression in the differentiating ameloblast cells of the mouse lower incisor. Bioinformatics analyses reveal that miR-200a-3p expression is activated in the pre-ameloblast cells to enhance epithelial cell differentiation. We demonstrate that Pitx2 activates miR-200a-3p expression and miR-200a-3p reciprocally represses Pitx2 and β-catenin expression. Pitx2 and β-catenin interact to synergistically activate gene expression during odontogenesis and miR-200a-3p attenuates their expression and directs differentiation. To understand how this mechanism controls cell differentiation and cell fate, oral epithelial and odontoblast mesenchymal cells were reprogrammed by a two-step induction method using Pitx2 and miR-200a-3p. Conversion to amelogenin expressing dental epithelial cells involved an up-regulation of the stem cell marker Sox2 and proliferation genes and decreased expression of mesenchymal markers. E-cadherin expression was increased as well as ameloblast specific factors. The combination of Pitx2, a regulator of dental stem cells and miR-200a converts mesenchymal cells to a fully differentiated dental epithelial cell type. This pathway and reprogramming can be used to reprogram mesenchymal or oral epithelial cells to dental epithelial (ameloblast) cells, which can be used in tissue repair and regeneration studies. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Effects of amelogenins on angiogenesis-associated processes of endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almqvist, S; Kleinman, H K; Werthén, M

    2011-01-01

    To study the effects of an amelogenin mixture on integrin-dependent adhesion, DNA synthesis and apoptosis of cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and angiogenesis in an organotypic assay.......To study the effects of an amelogenin mixture on integrin-dependent adhesion, DNA synthesis and apoptosis of cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and angiogenesis in an organotypic assay....

  16. Excessive angiogenesis associated with psoriasis as a cause for cardiovascular ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecic, Nina; Young, Helen S

    2017-04-01

    Psoriasis, a common disease affecting 2%-3% of the UK population, produces significant impairment of quality of life and is an immense burden on sufferers and their families. Psoriasis is associated with significant cardiovascular comorbidity and the metabolic syndrome. Angiogenesis, a relatively under-researched component of psoriasis, is a key factor in pathogenesis of psoriasis and also contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a well-established mediator of pathological angiogenesis which is upregulated in psoriasis. It is possible that, in patients with psoriasis, cutaneous angiogenesis may be both a marker for systemic vascular pathology and a novel therapeutic target. In this viewpoint study, the role of VEGF-mediated angiogenesis as a cause for cardiovascular events in patients with psoriasis is explored. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The fusion partner specifies the oncogenic potential of NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Jesslyn; Curtis, David J; Hussey, Damian J; Dobrovic, Alexander; Aplan, Peter D; Slape, Christopher I

    2013-12-01

    NUP98 is among the most promiscuously translocated genes in hematological diseases. Among the 28 known fusion partners, there are two categories: homeobox genes and non-homeobox genes. The homeobox fusion partners are well-studied in animal models, resulting in HoxA cluster overexpression and hematological disease. The non-homeobox fusion partners are less well studied. We created transgenic animal models for three NUP98 fusion genes (one homeobox, two non-homeobox), and show that in this system, the NUP98-homeobox fusion promotes self-renewal and aberrant gene expression to a significantly greater extent. We conclude that homeobox partners create more potent NUP98 fusion oncogenes than do non-homeobox partners. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Studying Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Studying Genes Studying Genes Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area PDF Version (382 KB) Other Fact Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions ...

  19. GeneChip microarrays facilitate identification of Protease Nexin-1 as a target gene of the Prx2 (S8) homeoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen K; Norris, Russell A; Potter, S Steven; Norrington, David W; Baybo, Mary Ann; Hicklin, David M; Kern, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    The paired-related homeobox genes, Prx1 and Prx2, are important for normal skeletal and cardiovascular development as well as adult vascular remodeling. The identification and characterization of Prx downstream targets is crucial to understanding their function in normal developmental processes and congenital malformations. To identify Prx2 regulated genes, stably transfected NIH3T3 clones expressing Prx2 sense or antisense transcripts were generated. Expression profiles initially were established for two of the clones using Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. Over 6,400 genes were screened by the microarray approach, and approximately 500 genes differed in expression by a factor of two or more. Fifteen genes were chosen for further analysis. RT-PCR of the two transfectants used in the GeneChip analysis demonstrated that five out of the 15 genes were differentially expressed. However, after screening additional stable transfectant clones only one of the 15 genes, Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1), was differentially expressed. Subsequent Northern blot, RT-PCR, and further GeneChip analysis of additional stable transfectants confirmed that PN-1 expression is increased at least fivefold when Prx2 is overexpressed. It was demonstrated that Prx2 directly regulates PN-1 because (1) Prx2 binds to a cis element in the PN-1 promoter in vitro, and (2) Prx2 regulates the PN-1 promoter in transient transfection assays. The GeneChip analysis generated a prioritized list of other potential targets. The utility and limitations of cell culture models combined with microarray analysis for elucidating complex regulatory cascades are discussed.

  20. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  1. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Labadorf

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480 of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05 and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes, that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD.

  2. Regulation of Silk Genes by Hox and Homeodomain Proteins in the Terminal Differentiated Silk Gland of the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeharu Takiya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The silk gland of the silkworm Bombyx mori is a long tubular organ that is divided into several subparts along its anteroposterior (AP axis. As a trait of terminal differentiation of the silk gland, several silk protein genes are expressed with unique regional specificities. Most of the Hox and some of the homeobox genes are also expressed in the differentiated silk gland with regional specificities. The expression patterns of Hox genes in the silk gland roughly correspond to those in embryogenesis showing “colinearity”. The central Hox class protein Antennapedia (Antp directly regulates the expression of several middle silk gland–specific silk genes, whereas the Lin-1/Isl-1/Mec3 (LIM-homeodomain transcriptional factor Arrowhead (Awh regulates the expression of posterior silk gland–specific genes for silk fiber proteins. We summarize our results and discuss the usefulness of the silk gland of Bombyx mori for analyzing the function of Hox genes. Further analyses of the regulatory mechanisms underlying the region-specific expression of silk genes will provide novel insights into the molecular bases for target-gene selection and regulation by Hox and homeodomain proteins.

  3. Capsicum annuum homeobox 1 (CaHB1) is a nuclear factor that has roles in plant development, salt tolerance, and pathogen defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Yoon, Joonseon; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Hyun A; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Choi, Doil

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The CaHB1 is a nuclear factor, belonging to HD-Zip proteins. •SA and ET, as signal molecules, modulate CaHB1-mediated responses. •Overexpression of CaHB1 in tomato resulted in a thicker cell wall. •CaHB1-transgenic tomato confers resistance to Phytophthora infestans. •CaHB1 enhanced tolerance to saline stress in tomato. -- Abstract: Homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family proteins are unique to plants, but little is known about their role in defense responses. CaHB1 is a nuclear factor in peppers, belonging to subfamily II of HD-Zip proteins. Here, we determined the role of CaHB1 in the defense response. CaHB1 expression was induced when pepper plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici, a plant pathogen to which peppers are susceptible, or environmental stresses such as drought and salt stimuli. CaHB1 was also highly expressed in pepper leaves following application of SA, whereas ethephon and MeJA had a moderate effect. To further investigate the function of CaHB1 in plants, we performed gain-of-function study by overexpression of CaHB1 in tomato. CaHB1-transgenic tomatoes showed significant growth enhancement including increased leaf thickness and enlarged cell size (1.8-fold larger than control plants). Microscopic analysis revealed that leaves from CaHB1-transgenic plants had thicker cell walls and cuticle layers than those from controls. Moreover, CaHB1-transgenic plants displayed enhanced resistance against Phytophthora infestans and increased tolerance to salt stress. Additionally, RT-PCR analysis of CaHB1-transgenic tomatoes revealed constitutive up-regulation of multiple genes involved in plant defense and osmotic stress. Therefore, our findings suggest roles for CaHB1 in development, salt stress, and pathogen defense

  4. Capsicum annuum homeobox 1 (CaHB1) is a nuclear factor that has roles in plant development, salt tolerance, and pathogen defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Yoon, Joonseon [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seou1 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyung Ja [Screening Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hyun A; Kwon, Suk-Yoon [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yusung, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doil, E-mail: doil@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seou1 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •The CaHB1 is a nuclear factor, belonging to HD-Zip proteins. •SA and ET, as signal molecules, modulate CaHB1-mediated responses. •Overexpression of CaHB1 in tomato resulted in a thicker cell wall. •CaHB1-transgenic tomato confers resistance to Phytophthora infestans. •CaHB1 enhanced tolerance to saline stress in tomato. -- Abstract: Homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family proteins are unique to plants, but little is known about their role in defense responses. CaHB1 is a nuclear factor in peppers, belonging to subfamily II of HD-Zip proteins. Here, we determined the role of CaHB1 in the defense response. CaHB1 expression was induced when pepper plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici, a plant pathogen to which peppers are susceptible, or environmental stresses such as drought and salt stimuli. CaHB1 was also highly expressed in pepper leaves following application of SA, whereas ethephon and MeJA had a moderate effect. To further investigate the function of CaHB1 in plants, we performed gain-of-function study by overexpression of CaHB1 in tomato. CaHB1-transgenic tomatoes showed significant growth enhancement including increased leaf thickness and enlarged cell size (1.8-fold larger than control plants). Microscopic analysis revealed that leaves from CaHB1-transgenic plants had thicker cell walls and cuticle layers than those from controls. Moreover, CaHB1-transgenic plants displayed enhanced resistance against Phytophthora infestans and increased tolerance to salt stress. Additionally, RT-PCR analysis of CaHB1-transgenic tomatoes revealed constitutive up-regulation of multiple genes involved in plant defense and osmotic stress. Therefore, our findings suggest roles for CaHB1 in development, salt stress, and pathogen defense.

  5. Digital gene expression tag profiling of bat digits provides robust candidates contributing to wing formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rebecca L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the only truly flying mammals, bats use their unique wing - consisting of four elongated digits (digits II-V connected by membranes - to power their flight. In addition to the elongated digits II-V, the forelimb contains one shorter digit (digit I that is morphologically similar to the hindlimb digits. Here, we capitalized on the morphological variation among the bat forelimb digits to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying digit elongation and wing formation. Using next generation sequencing technology, we performed digital gene expression tag profiling (DGE-tag profiling of developing digits in a pooled sample of two Myotis ricketti and validated our sequencing results using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR of gene expression in the developing digits of two Hipposideros armiger. Results Among hundreds of genes exhibiting significant differences in expression between the short and long digits, we highlight 14 genes most related to digit elongation. These genes include two Tbx genes (Tbx3 and Tbx15, five BMP pathway genes (Bmp3, RGMB, Smad1, Smad4 and Nog, four Homeobox genes (Hoxd8, Hoxd9, Hoxa1 and Satb1, and three other genes (Twist1, Tmeff2 and Enpp2 related to digit malformations or cell proliferation. In addition, our results suggest that Tbx4 and Pitx2 contribute to the morphological similarity and five genes (Acta1, Tnnc2, Atp2a1, Hrc and Myoz1 contribute to the functional similarity between the thumb and hindlimb digits. Conclusions Results of this study not only implicate many developmental genes as robust candidates underlying digit elongation and wing formation in bats, but also provide a better understanding of the genes involved in autopodial development in general.

  6. Characterization of Transcriptional Repressor Gene MSX1 Variations for Possible Associations with Congenital Heart Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Feng Li

    Full Text Available The human heart consists of several cell types with distinct lineage origins. Interactions between these cardiac progenitors are very important for heart formation. The muscle segment homeobox gene family plays a key role in the cell morphogenesis and growth, controlled cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, but the relationships between the genetic abnormalities and CHD phenotypes still remain largely unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate variations in MSX1 and MSX2 for their possible associations with CHD.We sequenced the MSX1 and MSX2 genes for 300 Chinese Han CHD patients and 400 normal controls and identified the variations. The statistical analyses were conducted using Chi-Square Tests as implemented in SPSS (version 19.0. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test of the population was carried out using the online software OEGE.Six variations rs4647952, rs2048152, rs4242182, rs61739543, rs111542301 and rs3087539 were identified in the MSX2 gene, but the genetic heterozygosity of those SNPs was very low. In contrast, the genetic heterozygosity of two variations rs3821949 near the 5'UTR and rs12532 within 3'UTR of the MSX1 gene was considerably high. Statistical analyses showed that rs3821949 and rs12532 were associated with the risk of CHD (specifically VSD.The SNPs rs3821949 and rs12532 in the MSX1 gene were associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations.

  7. NUP98 gene fusions and hematopoietic malignancies: common themes and new biologic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Sheryl M; Slape, Christopher I; Aplan, Peter D

    2011-12-08

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements of the Nucleoporin 98 gene (NUP98), primarily balanced translocations and inversions, are associated with a wide array of hematopoietic malignancies. NUP98 is known to be fused to at least 28 different partner genes in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and bilineage/biphenotypic leukemia. NUP98 gene fusions typically encode a fusion protein that retains the amino terminus of NUP98; in this context, it is important to note that several recent studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal portion of NUP98 exhibits transcription activation potential. Approximately half of the NUP98 fusion partners encode homeodomain proteins, and at least 5 NUP98 fusions involve known histone-modifying genes. Several of the NUP98 fusions, including NUP98-homeobox (HOX)A9, NUP98-HOXD13, and NUP98-JARID1A, have been used to generate animal models of both lymphoid and myeloid malignancy; these models typically up-regulate HOXA cluster genes, including HOXA5, HOXA7, HOXA9, and HOXA10. In addition, several of the NUP98 fusion proteins have been shown to inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic precursors and to increase self-renewal of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, providing a potential mechanism for malignant transformation.

  8. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  9. Differential gene expression patterns during embryonic development of sea urchin exposed to triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinik; Suh, Sung-Suk; Park, Mirye; Park, So Yun; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2017-02-01

    Triclosan (TCS; 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether) is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent used in common industrial, personal care and household products which are eventually rinsed down the drain and discharged with wastewater effluent. It is therefore commonly found in the aquatic environment, leading to the continual exposure of aquatic organisms to TCS and the accumulation of the antimicrobial and its harmful degradation products in their bodies. Toxic effects of TCS on reproductive and developmental progression of some aquatic organisms have been suggested but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been defined. We investigated the expression patterns of genes involved in the early development of TCS-treated sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus using cDNA microarrays. We observed that the predominant consequence of TCS treatment in this model system was the widespread repression of TCS-modulated genes. In particular, empty spiracles homeobox 1 (EMX-1), bone morphogenic protein, and chromosomal binding protein genes showed a significant decrease in expression in response to TCS. These results suggest that TCS can induce abnormal development of sea urchin embryos through the concomitant suppression of a number of genes that are necessary for embryonic differentiation in the blastula stage. Our data provide new insight into the crucial role of genes associated with embryonic development in response to TCS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 426-433, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  11. Gene-expression analysis of cementoblasts and osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, B G; Roguljic, H; Franceschetti, T; Roeder, E; Matic, I; Vidovic, I; Joshi, P; Kum, K-Y; Kalajzic, I

    2016-06-01

    Cementum and bone are similar mineralized tissues, but cementum accumulates much more slowly than bone, does not have vasculature or innervation and does not undergo remodeling. Despite these differences, there are no well-established markers to distinguish cementoblasts from other mature mineralizing cells such as osteoblasts and odontoblasts. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in gene expression between cementoblasts and osteoblasts using gene profiling of cell populations isolated directly from osteocalcin-green fluorescent protein (OC-GFP) transgenic mice. OC-GFP reporter mice were used as they show labeling of cementoblasts, osteoblasts and odontoblasts, but not of periodontal ligament fibroblasts, within the periodontium. We sorted cells digested from the molar root surface to isolate OC-GFP(+) cementoblasts. Osteoblasts were isolated from calvarial digests. Microarray analysis was performed, and selected results were confirmed by real-time PCR and immunostaining or in situ hybridization. Microarray analysis identified 95 genes that were expressed at least two-fold higher in cementoblasts than in osteoblasts. Our analysis indicated that the Wnt signaling pathway was differentially regulated, as were genes related to skeletal development. Real-time PCR confirmed that expression of the Wnt inhibitors Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) and secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (Sfrp1) was elevated in cementoblasts compared with osteoblasts, and Wif1 expression was localized to the apical root region. In addition, the transcription factor BARX homeobox 1 (Barx1) was expressed at higher levels in cementoblasts, and immunohistochemistry indicated that BARX1 was expressed in apical cementoblasts and cementocytes, but not in osteoblasts or odontoblasts. The OC-GFP mouse provides a good model for selectively isolating cementoblasts, and allowed for identification of differentially expressed genes between cementoblasts and osteoblasts. © 2015 John Wiley

  12. Pathways of aging: comparative analysis of gene signatures in replicative senescence and stress induced premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kural, Kamil C; Tandon, Neetu; Skoblov, Mikhail; Kel-Margoulis, Olga V; Baranova, Ancha V

    2016-12-28

    In culturing normal diploid cells, senescence may either happen naturally, in the form of replicative senescence, or it may be a consequence of external challenges such as oxidative stress. Here we present a comparative analysis aimed at reconstruction of molecular cascades specific for replicative (RS) and stressinduced senescence (SIPS) in human fibroblasts. An involvement of caspase-3/keratin-18 pathway and serine/threonine kinase Aurora A/ MDM2 pathway was shared between RS and SIPS. Moreover, stromelysin/MMP3 and N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase enzyme MGAT1, which initiates the synthesis of hybrid and complex Nglycans, were identified as key orchestrating components in RS and SIPS, respectively. In RS only, Aurora-B driven cell cycle signaling was deregulated in concert with the suppression of anabolic branches of the fatty acids and estrogen metabolism. In SIPS, Aurora-B signaling is deprioritized, and the synthetic branches of cholesterol metabolism are upregulated, rather than downregulated. Moreover, in SIPS, proteasome/ubiquitin ligase pathways of protein degradation dominate the regulatory landscape. This picture indicates that SIPS proceeds in cells that are actively fighting stress which facilitates premature senescence while failing to completely activate the orderly program of RS. The promoters of genes differentially expressed in either RS or SIPS are unusually enriched by the binding sites for homeobox family proteins, with particular emphasis on HMX1, IRX2, HDX and HOXC13. Additionally, we identified Iroquois Homeobox 2 (IRX2) as a master regulator for the secretion of SPP1-encoded osteopontin, a stromal driver for tumor growth that is overexpressed by both RS and SIPS fibroblasts. The latter supports the hypothesis that senescence-specific de-repression of SPP1 aids in SIPS-dependent stromal activation. Reanalysis of previously published experimental data is cost-effective approach for extraction of additional insignts into the functioning of

  13. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and seedling leaves were sampled at 6 h after the treatment. For cold stress, the seedlings were transferred to 4◦C growth chamber for 30 min. Control seedlings were exposed to none of these treatments. To examine the expression patterns of these predicted genes in Poplar and to further confirm their stress responsive-.

  14. Genetic Transformation of Transcription Factor (35S-oshox4 Gene into Rice Genome and Transformant Analysis of hpt Gene by PCR and Hygromycin Resistance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INEZ HORTENZE SLAMET-LOEDIN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Global warming, climate change and crop extensification in marginal dryland areas are related to long dry season and water deficit. The water availability is an important factor in improving plant production. Application of drought tolerant rice cultivars is one of several options that might be used. Genetic engineering at the level of transcription factors is particularly promising strategy to develop drought tolerant rice varieties. Transcription factors regulate a wide range of target genes in which of them contribute to stress tolerance. HD Zip genes are transcription factor that potential in the adaptation of plants to some environment stresses including water deficit. HD-ZIP oshox4 (oryza sativa homeobox gene controlled by 35S promotor is inserted into pCAMBIA 1300 vector with hpt (hygromycin gene as a selectable marker. The aim of this research is to obtain transgenic rice plant from transformation with 35S-oshox4 plasmid, segregation analysis of marker gene (hpt by PCR method at T0 and T1 generation, and hygromycin resistance analysis of seeds. Recombinant plasmid was transformed into rice genome of IRAT 112 and rojolele cultivars using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The results showed that transformation efficiency of IRAT 112 is 5.7-13.6% and 26-66,7% for rojolele. While regeneration efficiency for IRAT 112 is 4.7-43.7% and 23-44.1% for rojolele. The result of hygromycin resistance test at T1 seeds were obtained 14 lines cv. rojolele segregation Mendelian for hpt gene. The PCR analysis using specific primers for hpt gene at the parent (T0 from 14 lines showed that 7 lines contain the gene. At the second generation (T1, PCR analysis using hpt primers showed that 3 from 4 lines were followed Mendelian segregation pattern by the presence of specific band.

  15. Expression analyses of the genes harbored by the type 2 diabetes and pediatric BMI associated locus on 10q23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that one of the key type 2 diabetes (T2D loci identified by GWAS exerts its influence early on in life through its impact on pediatric BMI. This locus on 10q23 harbors three genes, encoding hematopoietically expressed homeobox (HHEX, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE and kinesin family member 11 (KIF11, respectively. Methods We analyzed the impact of adipogeneis on the mRNA and protein expression levels of these genes in the human adipocyte Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS cell line in order to investigate which could be the culprit gene(s in this region of linkage disequilibrium. Results Following activation of differentiation with a PPARγ ligand, we observed ~20% decrease in IDE, ~40% decrease in HHEX and in excess of 80% decrease in KIF11 mRNA levels when comparing the adipocyte and pre-adipocyte states. We also observed decreases in KIF11 and IDE protein levels, but conversely we observed a dramatic increase in HHEX protein levels. Subsequent time course experiments revealed some marked changes in expression as early as three hours after activation of differentiation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the expression of all three genes at this locus are impacted during SGBS adipogenesis and provides insights in to the possible mechanisms of how the genes at this 10q23 locus could influence both adipocyte differentiation and susceptibility to T2D through insulin resistance.

  16. KNOX1 genes regulate lignin deposition and composition in monocots and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Brad T; Sinha, Neelima R; Kang, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Plant secondary cell walls are deposited mostly in vascular tissues such as xylem vessels, tracheids, and fibers. These cell walls are composed of a complex matrix of compounds including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin functions primarily to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of both the transport vessel and the entire plant itself. Since lignin has been identified as a major source of biomass for biofuels, regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis has been a topic of much recent investigation. Biosynthesis and patterning of lignin involves many developmental and environmental cues including evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory modules and hormonal signals. Here, we investigate the role of the class I Knotted1-like-homeobox (KNOX) genes and gibberellic acid in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in a representative monocot and a representative eudicot. Knotted1 overexpressing mutant plants showed a reduction in lignin content in both maize and tobacco. Expression of four key lignin biosynthesis genes was analyzed and revealed that KNOX1 genes regulate at least two steps in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. The negative regulation of lignin both in a monocot and a eudicot by the maize Kn1 gene suggests that lignin biosynthesis may be preserved across large phylogenetic distances. The evolutionary implications of regulation of lignification across divergent species are discussed.

  17. Identification of regeneration-associated genes after central and peripheral nerve injury in the adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Gary A

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that neurons of the peripheral nervous system have the capacity to regenerate a severed axon leading to functional recovery, whereas neurons of the central nervous system do not regenerate successfully after injury. The underlying molecular programs initiated by axotomized peripheral and central nervous system neurons are not yet fully understood. Results To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration in the nervous system, differential display polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify differentially expressed genes following axotomy of peripheral and central nerve fibers. For this purpose, axotomy induced changes of regenerating facial nucleus neurons, and non-regenerating red nucleus and Clarke's nucleus neurons have been analyzed in an intra-animal side-to-side comparison. One hundred and thirty five gene fragments have been isolated, of which 69 correspond to known genes encoding for a number of different functional classes of proteins such as transcription factors, signaling molecules, homeobox-genes, receptors and proteins involved in metabolism. Sixty gene fragments correspond to genomic mouse sequences without known function. In situ-hybridization has been used to confirm differential expression and to analyze the cellular localization of these gene fragments. Twenty one genes (~15% have been demonstrated to be differentially expressed. Conclusions The detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes in different lesion paradigms provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and may lead to the identification of genes which play key roles in functional repair of central nervous tissues.

  18. Mutations in the SRY, DAX1, SF1 and WNT4 genes in Brazilian sex-reversed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Domenice

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In most mammals, male development is triggered by the transient expression of the SRY gene, which initiates a cascade of gene interactions ultimately leading to the formation of a testis from the indifferent fetal gonad. Mutation studies have identified several genes essential for early gonadal development. We report here a molecular study of the SRY, DAX1, SF1 and WNT4 genes, mainly involved in sexual determination, in Brazilian 46,XX and 46,XY sex-reversed patients. The group of 46,XX sex-reversed patients consisted of thirteen 46,XX true hermaphrodites and four 46,XX males, and was examined for the presence of the SRY gene and for the loss of function (inactivating mutations and deletions of DAX1 and WNT4 genes. In the second group consisting of thirty-three 46,XY sex-reversed patients we investigated the presence of inactivating mutations in the SRY and SF1 genes as well as the overexpression (duplication of the DAX1 and WNT4 genes. The SRY gene was present in two 46,XX male patients and in none of the true hermaphrodites. Only one mutation, located outside homeobox domain of the 5' region of the HMG box of SRY (S18N, was identified in a patient with 46,XY sex reversal. A novel 8-bp microdeletion of the SF1 gene was identified in a 46,XY sex-reversed patient without adrenal insufficiency. The dosage of DAX1 and WNT4 was normal in the sex-reversed patients studied. We conclude that these genes are rarely involved in the etiology of male gonadal development in sex-reversed patients, a fact suggesting the presence of other genes in the sex determination cascade.

  19. Characterization of an in vitro differentiation assay for pancreatic-like cell development from murine embryonic stem cells: detailed gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chialin; Chai, Jing; Singh, Lipi; Kuo, Ching-Ying; Jin, Liang; Feng, Tao; Marzano, Scott; Galeni, Sheetal; Zhang, Nan; Iacovino, Michelina; Qin, Lihui; Hara, Manami; Stein, Roland; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Kyba, Michael; Ku, Hsun Teresa

    2011-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell technology may serve as a platform for the discovery of drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes. However, because of difficulties in establishing reliable ES cell differentiation methods and in creating cost-effective plating conditions for the high-throughput format, screening for molecules that regulate pancreatic beta cells and their immediate progenitors has been limited. A relatively simple and inexpensive differentiation protocol that allows efficient generation of insulin-expressing cells from murine ES cells was previously established in our laboratories. In this report, this system is characterized in greater detail to map developmental cell stages for future screening experiments. Our results show that sequential activation of multiple gene markers for undifferentiated ES cells, epiblast, definitive endoderm, foregut, and pancreatic lineages was found to follow the sequence of events that mimics pancreatic ontogeny. Cells that expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein, driven by pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 or insulin 1 promoter, correctly expressed known beta cell lineage markers. Overexpression of Sox17, an endoderm fate-determining transcription factor, at a very early stage of differentiation (days 2-3) enhanced pancreatic gene expression. Overexpression of neurogenin3, an endocrine progenitor cell marker, induced glucagon expression at stages when pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 message was present (days 10-16). Forced expression (between days 16 and 25) of MafA, a pancreatic maturation factor, resulted in enhanced expression of insulin genes, glucose transporter 2 and glucokinase, and glucose-responsive insulin secretion. Day 20 cells implanted in vivo resulted in pancreatic-like cells. Together, our differentiation assay recapitulates the proceedings and behaviors of pancreatic development and will be valuable for future screening of beta cell effectors.

  20. Transcription factors AS1 and AS2 interact with LHP1 to repress KNOX genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongfei; Li, Bin; Liu, Jian; Guo, Zhihao; Liu, Yuhao; Li, Yan; Shen, Wen-Hui; Huang, Ying; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Yijing; Dong, Aiwu

    2016-12-01

    Polycomb group proteins are important repressors of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which Polycomb group proteins are recruited to specific genes is poorly understood. In Arabidopsis, LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (LHP1), also known as TERMINAL FLOWER 2, was originally proposed as a subunit of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) that could bind the tri-methylated lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) established by the PRC2. In this work, we show that LHP1 mainly functions with PRC2 to establish H3K27me3, but not with PRC1 to catalyze monoubiquitination at lysine 119 of histone H2A. Our results show that complexes of the transcription factors ASYMMETRIC LEAVES 1 (AS1) and AS2 could help to establish the H3K27me3 modification at the chromatin regions of Class-I KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes BREVIPEDICELLUS and KNAT2 via direct interactions with LHP1. Additionally, our transcriptome analysis indicated that there are probably more common target genes of AS1 and LHP1 besides Class-I KNOX genes during leaf development in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Expression analysis of KAP9.2 and Hoxc13 genes during different cashmere growth stages by qRT-PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Xu, H R; Li, T; Qu, L; Zhao, Z D; Zhang, Z Y

    2014-09-01

    Keratin-associated protein 9.2 (KAP9.2) and Homeobox C13 (Hoxc13) genes were chosen to study because of their biological functions involving hair formation. KAP9.2 gene belongs to the ultra high sulfur KAPs, which is important for hair formation and may have association with cashmere. Hoxc13 takes part in the formation of cashmere keratin and maintaining the normal structure of follicle. It has been reported that Hoxc13 gene exists binding site of KP and KAP genes at its promoter regions in mouse. So the expression of KAP9.2 and Hoxc13 genes was detected at anagen stage vs telogen stage by qRT-PCR. The data showed that KAP9.2 and Hoxc13 gene had similar expression trend at different stages, which indicated that there was interaction between them. KAP9.2 and Hoxc13 gene had lower expression level in anagen than that of in telogen of cashmere growth. In anagen, KAP9.2 and Hoxc13 expressed lower in high cashmere yield individuals than that of in low cashmere yield ones. In telogen, the result was reverse. The study would provide the evidence of involvement of KAP9.2 and Hoxc13 in hair periodic growth.

  2. HOXA9 and MEIS1 gene overexpression in the diagnosis of childhood acute leukemias: Significant correlation with relapse and overall survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamaki, Maria; Lambrou, George I; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Moschovi, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Homeobox genes HOXA9 and MEIS1 are evolutionarily conserved transcription factors with essential roles in both hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. They act as dominant cooperating oncoproteins that cause acute leukemias bearing MLL translocations and to a lesser extent T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) characterized by other gene fusions. Overexpression is associated with an adverse prognosis in adults. In childhood, the genes have only been investigated in leukemias bearing MLL translocations. The aim of this study was to determine whether overexpression extends to leukemic subtypes other than the MLL-positive subtype in childhood. We use quantitative real-time PCR methodology to investigate gene expression in 100 children with acute leukemias and compare them to those of healthy controls. We show that abnormally high HOXA9 and MEIS1 gene expression is associated with a variety of leukemic subtypes, including various maturation stages of B-cell ALL and cytogenetic types other than the MLL-positive population, thus suggesting that the genes are implicated in the development of a broad range of leukemic subtypes in childhood. In addition, we show that HOXA9 and MEIS1 overexpression are inversely correlated with relapse and overall survival, so the genes could become useful predictive markers of the clinical course of pediatric acute leukemias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression analysis under abiotic stresses in the desert biomass willow, Salix psammophila

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    Jianbo Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Salix psammophila is a desert shrub willow that has extraordinary adaptation to abiotic stresses and plays an important role in maintaining local ecosystems. Moreover, S. psammophila is regarded as a promising biomass feedstock because of its high biomass yields and short rotation coppice cycle. However, few suitable reference genes (RGs for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR constrain the study on normalization of gene expression in S. psammophila until now. Here, we investigated the expression stabilities of 14 candidate RGs across tissue types and under four abiotic stress treatments, including heat, cold, salt and drought treatments. After calculation of PCR efficiencies, three different software, NormFinder, geNorm, and BestKeeper were employed to analyze systematically the qRT-PCR data, and the outputs were merged by RankAggreg software. The optimal reference genes selected for gene expression analysis were EF1□□ (Elongation factor-1 alpha and OTU (OTU-like cysteine protease family protein for different tissue types, UBC (Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 and LTA4H (Leukotriene A-4 hydrolase homologue for heat treatment, HIS (Histone superfamily protein H3 and ARF2 (ADP-ribosylation factor 2 for cold treatment, OTU and ACT7 (Actin 7 for salt treatment, UBC and LTA4H for drought treatment. The expression of UBC, ARF2 and VHAC (V-type proton ATPase subunit C varied the least across tissue types and under abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the relative genes expression profiles of one tissue-specific gene WOX1a (WUSCHEL-related homeobox 1a, and four stress-inducible genes, including Hsf-A2 (Heat shock transcription factors A2, CBF3 (C-repeat binding factor 3, HKT1 (High-Affinity K+ Transporter 1 and GST (Glutathione S-transferase, were conducted to confirm the validity of the reference genes in this study. These results provided an important RGs application guideline for gene expression characterization in S. psammophila.

  4. HOXC13 is involved in the regulation of human hair keratin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; Winter, Hermelita; Langbein, Lutz; Rogers, Michael A; Schweizer, Jürgen

    2002-02-01

    At present, HOXC13 is the only member of the HOX multigene family that produces a fragile hair phenotype when mutated or overexpressed in mice. To determine whether hair keratin genes are targets for this transcription factor, we analyzed the HOXC13 responsiveness of human hair keratin genes, whose expression matched that of nuclear HOXC13, immunologically revealed in cells of the lower hair-forming compartment of the human anagen hair follicle. We show that HOXC13, but not a homeobox-deleted HOXC13, strongly activated the promoters of the genes, with the respective proximal promoter regions being sufficient for optimal activation. The hair keratin promoters contained numerous putative Hox binding core motifs TAAT, TTAT, and TTAC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that HOXC13 bound exclusively to distinct TAAT and TTAT core motifs that were clearly concentrated in the proximal promoter regions. A comparison of the sequences flanking HOXC13 binding and nonbinding core motifs, respectively, allowed the deduction of an extended 8-bp HOXC13 consensus binding sequence TT(A/T)ATNPuPu. Thus, the DNA binding conditions for HOXC13 were distinct from those of other members of the paralogous group 13, i.e. murine Hoxb13 and HOXd13, for which previous investigations yielded the consensus binding sequence TTTA(T/C)NPuPu. Collectively, our data speak for a direct involvement of HOXC13 in the control of hair keratin expression during early trichocyte differentiation.

  5. MSX1 gene and nonsyndromic oral clefts in a Southern Brazilian population

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    L.T. Souza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic oral clefts (NSOC are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans. The etiology of NSOC is complex, involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several genes that play a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis have been associated with clefting. For example, variations in the homeobox gene family member MSX1, including a CA repeat located within its single intron, may play a role in clefting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MSX1 CA repeat polymorphism and NSOC in a Southern Brazilian population using a case-parent triad design. We studied 182 nuclear families with NSOC recruited from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in Southern Brazil. The polymorphic region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by using an automated sequencer. Among the 182 families studied, four different alleles were observed, at frequencies of 0.057 (175 bp, 0.169 (173 bp, 0.096 (171 bp and 0.67 (169 bp. A transmission disequilibrium test with a family-based association test (FBAT software program was used for analysis. FBAT analysis showed overtransmission of the 169 bp allele in NSOC (P=0.0005. These results suggest that the CA repeat polymorphism of the MSX1 gene may play a role in risk of NSOC in populations from Southern Brazil.

  6. Identification of SNPs in growth-related genes in Colombian creole cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R; Rocha, J F; Bejarano, D; Gomez, Y; Abuabara, Y; Gallego, J

    2016-09-19

    Colombian creole cattle have important adaptation traits related to heat tolerance and reproductive and productive efficiency. Romosinuano (ROMO) and Blanco Orejinegro (BON) are the most common breeds used by Colombian cattle breeders. Growth traits are of prime importance in these animals, which are mainly raised for beef production. Genes encoding growth hormone, growth hormone receptor, homeobox protein, insulin growth factor binding protein 3, leptin, and myostatin have been associated with physiological growth pathways in cattle and other species. We therefore aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes in ROMO, BON, and Zebu cattle. DNA regions of these genes were sequenced in 386 animals; 47 new SNPs were found, of which 14 were located in the exonic regions, thereby changing the protein sequence. An association of SNPs with weaning weight (WW), daily weight gain at weaning (DWG), and weight at 16 months (W16M) traits was deduced. The genetic analysis revealed several SNPs related to these traits. The SNP GhRE06.2 had a significant association with WW and the SNP Lep03.4 was highly associated with DWG and W16M. Other polymorphisms were significantly associated with WW and DWG, although they did not surpass the Bonferroni significance threshold. The new mutations identified may indicate important points of genetic control in the DNA that could be responsible for changes in the expression of the analyzed traits. These SNPs might be used in future breeding programs to improve the productive performance of cattle in beef farms.

  7. MSX1 gene and nonsyndromic oral clefts in a Southern Brazilian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.T. [Laboratório de Medicina Genômica, Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduaçãoo em Saúde da Criança e do Adolescente, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kowalski, T.W. [Laboratório de Medicina Genômica, Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Collares, M.V.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Cirurgia, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, Departamento de Cirurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Félix, T.M. [Laboratório de Medicina Genômica, Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduaçãoo em Saúde da Criança e do Adolescente, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Serviço de Genética Médica, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, Serviço de Genética Médica, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-10

    Nonsyndromic oral clefts (NSOC) are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans. The etiology of NSOC is complex, involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several genes that play a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis have been associated with clefting. For example, variations in the homeobox gene family member MSX1, including a CA repeat located within its single intron, may play a role in clefting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MSX1 CA repeat polymorphism and NSOC in a Southern Brazilian population using a case-parent triad design. We studied 182 nuclear families with NSOC recruited from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in Southern Brazil. The polymorphic region was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by using an automated sequencer. Among the 182 families studied, four different alleles were observed, at frequencies of 0.057 (175 bp), 0.169 (173 bp), 0.096 (171 bp) and 0.67 (169 bp). A transmission disequilibrium test with a family-based association test (FBAT) software program was used for analysis. FBAT analysis showed overtransmission of the 169 bp allele in NSOC (P=0.0005). These results suggest that the CA repeat polymorphism of the MSX1 gene may play a role in risk of NSOC in populations from Southern Brazil.

  8. Quality improvement of transgenic cloned bovine embryos using an aggregation method: Effects on cell number, cell ratio, embryo perimeter, mitochondrial distribution, and gene expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, J I; Jin, J I; Ghanem, N; Choi, B H; Fakruzzaman, M; Ha, A N; Lee, K L; Uhm, S J; Ko, D H; Koo, B C; Lee, J G; Kong, I K

    2015-09-01

    The production of cloned embryos using conventional methods has extremely low success rates owing to low embryo quality. To improve the quality of cloned bovine embryos expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we applied an aggregation culture method. The EGFP gene was transfected into bovine fetal fibroblasts using a retroviral vector system. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was performed using these cells, and the resulting embryos were cultured in aggregates or individually. Gene expression was analyzed by a microarray, and differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The total number of cells per blastocyst and the ratio of inner cell mass cells to trophectoderm cells were higher in aggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (agBL; 368.7 ± 109.6 and 1:4.8, respectively) than in in vitro-fertilized blastocysts (ivfBL; 189.8 ± 65.8 and 1:2.6, respectively) and nonaggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (sBL; 113.1 ± 36.3 and 1:1.5, respectively; P fluorescence intensity was higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (P genes identified in the microarray belonged to 18 categories. Expression of the Krüppel-like factor 4 gene, which is associated with cell proliferation, development, and transcription, was 7.2-fold higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL group (P  0.05). Expression of the heat shock 70-kDa protein 1A gene, which is associated with apoptosis, was 12-fold higher in the sBL group than in the ivfBL and agBL groups (P Expression of a stemness-related gene (octamer-binding transcription factor 4) and trophectoderm-specific genes (homeobox protein CDX2 and keratin 18) was higher in the agBL group than in the sBL group (P expression of the stemness gene homeobox protein NANOG did not differ among the groups (P > 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the aggregation method improves the quality of cloned embryos expressing EGFP and might be helpful

  9. Identification of a developmental gene expression signature, including HOX genes, for the normal human colonic crypt stem cell niche: overexpression of the signature parallels stem cell overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatlekar, Seema; Addya, Sankar; Salunek, Moreh; Orr, Christopher R; Surrey, Saul; McKenzie, Steven; Fields, Jeremy Z; Boman, Bruce M

    2014-01-15

    Our goal was to identify a unique gene expression signature for human colonic stem cells (SCs). Accordingly, we determined the gene expression pattern for a known SC-enriched region--the crypt bottom. Colonic crypts and isolated crypt subsections (top, middle, and bottom) were purified from fresh, normal, human, surgical specimens. We then used an innovative strategy that used two-color microarrays (∼18,500 genes) to compare gene expression in the crypt bottom with expression in the other crypt subsections (middle or top). Array results were validated by PCR and immunostaining. About 25% of genes analyzed were expressed in crypts: 88 preferentially in the bottom, 68 in the middle, and 131 in the top. Among genes upregulated in the bottom, ∼30% were classified as growth and/or developmental genes including several in the PI3 kinase pathway, a six-transmembrane protein STAMP1, and two homeobox (HOXA4, HOXD10) genes. qPCR and immunostaining validated that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are selectively expressed in the normal crypt bottom and are overexpressed in colon carcinomas (CRCs). Immunostaining showed that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are co-expressed with the SC markers CD166 and ALDH1 in cells at the normal crypt bottom, and the number of these co-expressing cells is increased in CRCs. Thus, our findings show that these two HOX genes are selectively expressed in colonic SCs and that HOX overexpression in CRCs parallels the SC overpopulation that occurs during CRC development. Our study suggests that developmental genes play key roles in the maintenance of normal SCs and crypt renewal, and contribute to the SC overpopulation that drives colon tumorigenesis.

  10. Ancestral and derived attributes of the dlx gene repertoire, cluster structure and expression patterns in an African cichlid fish

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    Renz Adina J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have undergone rapid, expansive evolutionary radiations that are manifested in the diversification of their trophic morphologies, tooth patterning and coloration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the cichlids' unique patterns of evolution requires a thorough examination of genes that pattern the neural crest, from which these diverse phenotypes are derived. Among those genes, the homeobox-containing Dlx gene family is of particular interest since it is involved in the patterning of the brain, jaws and teeth. Results In this study, we characterized the dlx genes of an African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, to provide a baseline to later allow cross-species comparison within Cichlidae. We identified seven dlx paralogs (dlx1a, -2a, -4a, -3b, -4b, -5a and -6a, whose orthologies were validated with molecular phylogenetic trees. The intergenic regions of three dlx gene clusters (dlx1a-2a, dlx3b-4b, and dlx5a-6a were amplified with long PCR. Intensive cross-species comparison revealed a number of conserved non-coding elements (CNEs that are shared with other percomorph fishes. This analysis highlighted additional lineage-specific gains/losses of CNEs in different teleost fish lineages and a novel CNE that had previously not been identified. Our gene expression analyses revealed overlapping but distinct expression of dlx orthologs in the developing brain and pharyngeal arches. Notably, four of the seven A. burtoni dlx genes, dlx2a, dlx3b, dlx4a and dlx5a, were expressed in the developing pharyngeal teeth. Conclusion This comparative study of the dlx genes of A. burtoni has deepened our knowledge of the diversity of the Dlx gene family, in terms of gene repertoire, expression patterns and non-coding elements. We have identified possible cichlid lineage-specific changes, including losses of a subset of dlx expression domains in the pharyngeal teeth, which will be the targets of future functional

  11. Pitx2 is a critical early regulatory gene in normal cecal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Peter F; Saijoh, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    The murine cecum is a critical digestive structure. Morphogenesis of the cecum involves several key genes, including Homeobox (Hox) d12. Ectopic expression of Hoxd12 has been shown to result in cecal agenesis and a down-regulation of both Fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) and the Pituitary homeobox 2 gene (Pitx2). Homozygous null mutation of Fgf10 or its cognate receptor Fgfr2IIIb results in severe cecal defects where there is the initiation of mesodermal budding, but a failure of the endoderm to grow and extend into this structure. We examined the expression of Pitx2 in the cecum and hypothesized that homozygous null mutation of Pitx2 would result in cecal agenesis. IACUC approval was obtained for these studies. Whole mount in situ hybridizations for Pitx2 were performed on wild-type embryos between embryonic d (E)11.0 and E12.5. Pitx2 -/- and Fgfr2IIIb -/- embryos were generated from n/+ heterozygote breedings and harvested at E10.5, E11.5, and E13.5. Genotypes were confirmed by PCR. Morphology of Pitx2 -/- cecae were compared with those of wild-type littermates and Fgfr2IIIb -/- embryos at identical stages. Embryos were fixed overnight and photographed the following day. Pitx2 is expressed in the cecal mesoderm and endoderm as early as E11.0. Expression becomes increasingly more robust by E12.5. Homozygous null mutation of Pitx2 results in agenesis of the cecum. In contrast to Fgfr2IIIb -/- embryos, which demonstrate a persistent mesodermal bud as late as E18.5, no mesodermal bud is present in Pitx2 -/- embryos. Our findings demonstrate that Pitx2 is a critical regulatory gene in cecal morphogenesis and suggest that Pitx2 is required for initiation of mesodermal budding and likely resides upstream of Fgf10-Fgfr2IIIb signaling in the normal development of this structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  13. Selector genes display tumor cooperation and inhibition in Drosophila epithelium in a developmental context-dependent manner

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    Ram Prakash Gupta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During animal development, selector genes determine identities of body segments and those of individual organs. Selector genes are also misexpressed in cancers, although their contributions to tumor progression per se remain poorly understood. Using a model of cooperative tumorigenesis, we show that gain of selector genes results in tumor cooperation, but in only select developmental domains of the wing, haltere and eye-antennal imaginal discs of Drosophila larva. Thus, the field selector, Eyeless (Ey, and the segment selector, Ultrabithorax (Ubx, readily cooperate to bring about neoplastic transformation of cells displaying somatic loss of the tumor suppressor, Lgl, but in only those developmental domains that express the homeo-box protein, Homothorax (Hth, and/or the Zinc-finger protein, Teashirt (Tsh. In non-Hth/Tsh-expressing domains of these imaginal discs, however, gain of Ey in lgl− somatic clones induces neoplastic transformation in the distal wing disc and haltere, but not in the eye imaginal disc. Likewise, gain of Ubx in lgl− somatic clones induces transformation in the eye imaginal disc but not in its endogenous domain, namely, the haltere imaginal disc. Our results reveal that selector genes could behave as tumor drivers or inhibitors depending on the tissue contexts of their gains.

  14. Construction and evaluation of normalized cDNA libraries enriched with full-length sequences for rapid discovery of new genes from Sisal (Agave sisalana Perr.) different developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Zhao; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Lu, Jun-Ying; Li, Jun-Feng

    2012-10-12

    To provide a resource of sisal-specific expressed sequence data and facilitate this powerful approach in new gene research, the preparation of normalized cDNA libraries enriched with full-length sequences is necessary. Four libraries were produced with RNA pooled from Agave sisalana multiple tissues to increase efficiency of normalization and maximize the number of independent genes by SMART™ method and the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN). This procedure kept the proportion of full-length cDNAs in the subtracted/normalized libraries and dramatically enhanced the discovery of new genes. Sequencing of 3875 cDNA clones of libraries revealed 3320 unigenes with an average insert length about 1.2 kb, indicating that the non-redundancy of libraries was about 85.7%. These unigene functions were predicted by comparing their sequences to functional domain databases and extensively annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Comparative analysis of sisal unigenes and other plant genomes revealed that four putative MADS-box genes and knotted-like homeobox (knox) gene were obtained from a total of 1162 full-length transcripts. Furthermore, real-time PCR showed that the characteristics of their transcripts mainly depended on the tight expression regulation of a number of genes during the leaf and flower development. Analysis of individual library sequence data indicated that the pooled-tissue approach was highly effective in discovering new genes and preparing libraries for efficient deep sequencing.

  15. Construction and Evaluation of Normalized cDNA Libraries Enriched with Full-Length Sequences for Rapid Discovery of New Genes from Sisal (Agave sisalana Perr. Different Developmental Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To provide a resource of sisal-specific expressed sequence data and facilitate this powerful approach in new gene research, the preparation of normalized cDNA libraries enriched with full-length sequences is necessary. Four libraries were produced with RNA pooled from Agave sisalana multiple tissues to increase efficiency of normalization and maximize the number of independent genes by SMART™ method and the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN. This procedure kept the proportion of full-length cDNAs in the subtracted/normalized libraries and dramatically enhanced the discovery of new genes. Sequencing of 3875 cDNA clones of libraries revealed 3320 unigenes with an average insert length about 1.2 kb, indicating that the non-redundancy of libraries was about 85.7%. These unigene functions were predicted by comparing their sequences to functional domain databases and extensively annotated with Gene Ontology (GO terms. Comparative analysis of sisal unigenes and other plant genomes revealed that four putative MADS-box genes and knotted-like homeobox (knox gene were obtained from a total of 1162 full-length transcripts. Furthermore, real-time PCR showed that the characteristics of their transcripts mainly depended on the tight expression regulation of a number of genes during the leaf and flower development. Analysis of individual library sequence data indicated that the pooled-tissue approach was highly effective in discovering new genes and preparing libraries for efficient deep sequencing.

  16. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2016-06-21

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4 This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants.

  17. PITX2-dependent gene regulation in atrial fibrillation and rhythm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Fahima; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa

    2017-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia. Better prevention and treatment of AF are needed to reduce AF-associated morbidity and mortality. There are several major mechanisms that cause AF in patients, including a genetic predisposition to develop AF. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with AF populations, with the strongest hits clustering on chromosome 4q25, close to the gene for the homeobox transcription factor PITX2. The effect of these common gene variants on cardiac PITX2 mRNA is currently under study. PITX2 protein regulates right-left differentiation of the embryonic heart, thorax and aorta. PITX2 is expressed in the adult left atrium, but much less so in other heart chambers. Pitx2 deficiency results in electrical and structural remodelling, and impaired repair of the heart in murine models, all of which may influence AF through divergent mechanisms. PITX2 levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4q25 may also be a predictor of the effectiveness of anti-arrhythmic drug therapy. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  18. PITX2‐dependent gene regulation in atrial fibrillation and rhythm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Fahima; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia. Better prevention and treatment of AF are needed to reduce AF‐associated morbidity and mortality. There are several major mechanisms that cause AF in patients, including a genetic predisposition to develop AF. Genome‐wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with AF populations, with the strongest hits clustering on chromosome 4q25, close to the gene for the homeobox transcription factor PITX2. The effect of these common gene variants on cardiac PITX2 mRNA is currently under study. PITX2 protein regulates right–left differentiation of the embryonic heart, thorax and aorta. PITX2 is expressed in the adult left atrium, but much less so in other heart chambers. Pitx2 deficiency results in electrical and structural remodelling, and impaired repair of the heart in murine models, all of which may influence AF through divergent mechanisms. PITX2 levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4q25 may also be a predictor of the effectiveness of anti‐arrhythmic drug therapy. PMID:28217939

  19. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  20. Comprehensive Identification of Sexual Dimorphism-Associated Differentially Expressed Genes in Two-Way Factorial Designed RNA-Seq Data on Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Seo, Minseok; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra; Oh, Jae-Don; Han, Jae Yong; Lee, Kichoon; Park, Tae Sub; Shin, Sangsu; Jiao Jiao, Zhang; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Jeong, Dong Kee; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) reach sexual maturity earlier, breed rapidly and successfully, and cost less and require less space than other birds raised commercially. Given the value of this species for food production and experimental use, more studies are necessary to determine chromosomal regions and genes associated with gender and breed-differentiation. This study employed Trinity and edgeR for transcriptome analysis of next-generation RNA-seq data, which included 4 tissues obtained from 3 different breeding lines of Japanese quail (random bred control, heavy weight, low weight). Differentially expressed genes shared between female and male tissue contrast groups were analyzed to identify genes related to sexual dimorphism as well as potential novel candidate genes for molecular sexing. Several of the genes identified in the present study as significant sex-related genes have been previously found in avian gene expression analyses (NIPBL, UBAP2), and other genes found differentially expressed in this study and not previously associated with sex-related differences may be considered potential candidates for molecular sexing (TERA, MYP0, PPR17, CASQ2). Additionally, other genes likely associated with neuronal and brain development (CHKA, NYAP), as well as body development and size differentiation (ANKRD26, GRP87) in quail were identified. Expression of homeobox protein regulating genes (HXC4, ISL1) shared between our two sex-related contrast groups (Female Brain vs. Male Brain and Ovary vs. Testis) indicates that these genes may regulate sex-specific anatomical development. Results reveal genetic features of the quail breed and could allow for more effective molecular sexing as well as selective breeding for traits important in commercial production.

  1. [Adenovirus-mediated killing of hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells by heterogeneous fusion gene NT4p53(N15)Ant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-ping; Qiu, Shu-dong; Song, Li-ping; Wang, Quan-ying; Yang, Guang-xiao

    2007-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To construct a recombinant adenovirus Ad.NT4p53(N15)Ant and explore its cytotoxic effect against hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells in vitro. The recombinant adenovirus containing the fusion gene of neurotrophin 4 (NT4)signal peptide, N-terminal residues (12-26) of p53 and 17 amino acid Drosophila homeobox protein Antennapedia (Ant) was constructed by gene cloning protocol. The effect of this fusion gene on HepG2 cells was evaluated by MTT assay, PI staining and flow cytometry. The fusion gene Ad.NT4p53(N15)Ant was successfully constructed, as verified by restriction endonuclease digestion and PCR. Ad.NT4p53(N15)Ant could strongly suppress the growth of HepG2 cells (with a growth inhibition rate of 63.3% 48 h after infection) without affecting NIH-3T3 cells. Flow cytometry showed that Ad.NT4p53(N15)Ant could induce obvious apoptosis of HepG2 cells. The recombinant adenovirus containing NT4p53(N15)Ant fusion gene can inhibit the growth the of HepG2 cells in vitro partially by inducing cell apoptosis.

  2. Copy Number Analysis of the DLX4 and ERBB2 Genes in South African Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langa, Bridget C; Oliveira, Márcia M C; Pereira, Silma R F; Lupicki, Kamil; Marian, Catalin; Govender, Dhirendra; Panieri, Eugenio; Hiss, Donavon; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Abdul-Rasool, Sahar; Cavalli, Luciane R

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of cancer death among South African women. Although several risk factors can be attributed to the observed high mortality rate, the biology of the tumors is not extensively investigated. Copy number gain of the DLX4 homeobox gene has been observed in breast cancer in association with poor prognosis and specific racial groups. Therefore, we aimed to assess the copy number and prognostic role of DLX4 in breast cancer from South African patients. Due to the co-location of ERBB2 and DLX4 in the 17q21 region, its copy number was also evaluated. Our results in the analysis of 66 cases demonstrated copy number gains of DLX4 and ERBB2 in 24.1 and 29.7% of the cases, respectively. Linear regression analysis showed no dependency between the copy number alterations in these genes. Although not significant, patients with DLX4 and ERBB2 gains presented a higher frequency of advanced-grade tumors. In addition, copy number alterations of these genes were not significantly differently observed in the 3 main racial groups of the Western Cape population: Colored, White, and Black. These findings indicate that gains of DLX4 and ERBB2 occur in South African breast cancer patients irrespectively of their race and factors known to influence prognosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Identification of WOX family genes in Selaginella kraussiana for studies on stem cells and regeneration in lycophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachao eGe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant stem cells give rise to all tissues and organs and also serve as the source for plant regeneration. The organization of plant stem cells has undergone a progressive change from simple to complex during the evolution of vascular plants. Most studies on plant stem cells have focused on model angiosperms, the most recently diverged branch of vascular plants. However, our knowledge of stem cell function in other vascular plants is limited. Lycophytes and euphyllophytes (ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms are two existing branches of vascular plants that separated more than 400 million years ago. Lycophytes retain many of the features of early vascular plants. Based on genome and transcriptome data, we identified WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX genes in Selaginella kraussiana, a model lycophyte that is convenient for in vitro culture and observations of organ formation and regeneration. WOX genes are key players controlling stem cells in plants. Our results showed that the S. kraussiana genome encodes at least eight members of the WOX family, which represent an early stage of WOX family evolution. Identification of WOX genes in S. kraussiana could be a useful tool for molecular studies on the function of stem cells in lycophytes.

  4. The nude mutant gene Foxn1 is a HOXC13 regulatory target during hair follicle and nail differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S; Pruett, Nathanael D; Kern, Michael J; Baybo, Mary Ann; Godwin, Alan R; Potter, Kathleen A; Peterson, Ron L; Sundberg, John P; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Among the Hox genes, homeobox C13 (Hoxc13) has been shown to be essential for proper hair shaft differentiation, as Hoxc13 gene-targeted (Hoxc13(tm1Mrc)) mice completely lack external hair. Because of the remarkable overt phenotypic parallels to the Foxn1(nu) (nude) mutant mice, we sought to determine whether Hoxc13 and forkhead box N1 (Foxn1) might act in a common pathway of hair follicle (HF) differentiation. We show that the alopecia exhibited by both the Hoxc13(tm1Mrc) and Foxn1(nu) mice is because of strikingly similar defects in hair shaft differentiation and that both mutants suffer from a severe nail dystrophy. These phenotypic similarities are consistent with the extensive overlap between Hoxc13 and Foxn1 expression patterns in the HF and the nail matrix. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis of skin from Hoxc13(tm1Mrc) mice identified Foxn1 as significantly downregulated along with numerous hair keratin genes. This Foxn1 downregulation apparently reflects the loss of direct transcriptional control by HOXC13 as indicated by our results obtained through co-transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. As presented in the discussion, these data support a regulatory model of keratinocyte differentiation in which HOXC13-dependent activation of Foxn1 is part of a regulatory cascade controlling the expression of terminal differentiation markers.

  5. Inhibition of in vivo angiogenesis by Anacardium occidentale L. involves repression of the cytokine VEGF gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaraju, S M; Keshavaiah, K; Salimath, B P

    2008-08-01

    Lethal tumor growth and progression cannot occur without angiogenesis, which facilitates cancer cell proliferation, survival, and dissemination. Among the many growth factors and cytokines engaged in angiogenesis, the cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is regarded as the most potent and specific. Angiogenesis inhibitors are recognized as potentially useful agents for treating angiogenesis-associated diseases and VEGF represents a promising and well-studied target for antiangiogenic agents. In this study, we have tested the crude ethanolic extract of the leaves of Anacardium occidentale Linn, on Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT) in vivo and in vitro. Anacardium occidentale extract (AOE) was able to suppress VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane, rat cornea, and tumorinduced angiogenesis in the peritoneum of EAT bearing mice. The extract inhibited cell proliferation of different tumor cells such as EAT, BeWo, and MCF-7 in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and it reduced the VEGF level in the ascites of treated mice. A decrease in the microvessel density count and CD31 antigen staining of treated mice peritoneum provide further evidence of its antiangiogenic activity. Our results from Northern blot analysis and ELISA demonstrate that AOE can downregulate endogenous VEGF gene expression at the mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, results of our gene analysis of VEGF-promoter luciferase reporter indicated that this effect is mediated by transcriptional repression of VEGF promoter activity in EAT cells treated with AOE. Taken together, the data suggest that the VEGF system of angiogenesis is the molecular target for the antiangiogenic action of AOE.

  6. Immunoglobulin genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honjo, T; Alt, F. W; Rabbitts, T. H

    1989-01-01

    ... Cataloguing in Publication Data Immunoglobulin genes 1. Vertebrates. Immunoglobulins 1. Honjo, T. II. Alt, F.W. III. Rabbitts, T.H. 612'. 118223 ISBN 0-12-354865-9 This book is printed on acid-free paper ( T...

  7. Ageing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2018-01-01

    The idea of gerontogenes is in line with the evolutionary explanation of ageing as being an emergent phenomenon as a result of the imperfect maintenance and repair systems. Although evolutionary processes did not select for any specific ageing genes that restrict and determine the lifespan...... of an individual, the term ‘gerontogenes’ primarily refers to any genes that may seem to influence ageing and longevity, without being specifically selected for that role. Such genes can also be called ‘virtual gerontogenes’ by virtue of their indirect influence on the rate and process of ageing. More than 1000...... virtual gerontogenes have been associated with ageing and longevity in model organisms and humans. The ‘real’ genes, which do influence the essential lifespan of a species, and have been selected for in accordance with the evolutionary life history of the species, are known as the longevity assurance...

  8. Comparative gene expression analysis of two mouse models of autism:transcriptome profiling of the BTBR and En2-/- hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Provenzano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Genomic studies identified common pathological processes underlying the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of ASD, and transcriptome analyses revealed that gene networks involved in synapse development, neuronal activity and immune function are deregulated in ASD. Mouse models provide unique tools to investigate the neurobiological basis of ASD; however, a comprehensive approach to identify transcriptional abnormalities in different ASD models has never been performed. Here we used two well-recognized ASD mouse models, BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR and Engrailed-2 knockout (En2-/-, to identify conserved ASD-related molecular signatures. En2-/- mice bear a mutation within the EN2 transcription factor homeobox, while BTBR is an inbred strain with unknown genetic defects. Hippocampal RNA samples from BTBR, En2-/- and respective control (C57Bl/6J and En2+/+ adult mice were assessed for differential gene expression using microarrays. A total of 153 genes were similarly deregulated in the BTBR and En2-/- hippocampus. Mouse phenotype and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed on BTBR and En2-/- hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Pathways represented in both BTBR and En2-/- hippocampal DEGs included abnormal behavioral response and chemokine/MAP kinase signaling. Genes involved in abnormal function of the immune system and abnormal synaptic transmission/seizures were significantly represented among BTBR and En2-/- DEGs, respectively. Interestingly, both BTBR and En2-/- hippocampal DEGs showed a significant enrichment of ASD and schizophrenia (SCZ-associated genes. Specific gene sets were enriched in the two models: microglial genes were significantly enriched among BTBR DEGs, whereas GABAergic/glutamatergic postsynaptic genes, FMRP-interacting genes and epilepsy-related genes were significantly enriched among En2-/- DEGs. Weighted

  9. Homeotic function of Drosophila Bithorax-Complex miRNAs mediates fertility by restricting multiple Hox genes and TALE cofactors in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaulet, Daniel L.; Castellanos, Monica; Bejarano, Fernando; Sanfilippo, Piero; Tyler, David M.; Allan, Douglas W.; Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto; Lai, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila Bithorax-Complex (BX-C) Hox cluster contains a bidirectionally-transcribed miRNA locus, and a deletion mutant (∆mir) lays no eggs and is completely sterile. We show these miRNAs are expressed and active in distinct spatial registers along the anterior-posterior axis in the central nervous system. ∆mir larvae derepress a network of direct homeobox gene targets in the posterior ventral nerve cord (VNC), including BX-C genes and their TALE cofactors. These are phenotypically critical targets, since sterility of ∆mir mutants was substantially rescued by heterozygosity of these genes. The posterior VNC contains Ilp7+ oviduct motoneurons, whose innervation and morphology are defective in ∆mir females, and substantially rescued by heterozygosity of ∆mir targets, especially within the BX-C. Collectively, we reveal (1) critical roles for Hox miRNAs that determine segment-specific expression of homeotic genes, which are not masked by transcriptional regulation, and (2) that BX-C miRNAs are essential for neural patterning and reproductive behavior. PMID:24909902

  10. The HOX-like gene Cnox2-Pc is expressed at the anterior region in all life cycle stages of the jellyfish Podocoryne carnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda-Nakagawa, L M; Gröer, H; Aerne, B L; Schmid, V

    2000-03-01

    The marine jellyfish Podocoryne carnea (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) has a metagenic life cycle consisting of a larva, a colonial polyp and a free-swimming jellyfish (medusa). To study the function of HOX genes in primitive diploblastic animals we screened a library of P. carnea cDNA using PCR primers derived from the most conserved regions in helix 1 and helix 3 of the homeobox. A novel gene, Cnox2-Pc, has been isolated and characterized. Cnox2-Pc is a HOX cluster-like gene, and its homeodomain shows similarity to the Deformed subfamily of HOM-C/HOX genes. In situ hybridization revealed that Cnox2-Pc is expressed in the anterior region of the larva, the polyp head, and the most apical ectoderm of the differentiating bud during medusa development. In adult medusa expression is restricted to the gastrovascular entoderm. The results suggest that Cnox2-Pc is involved in establishment of an anterior-posterior axis during development in primitive metazoans.

  11. Role of cadmium in the regulation of AR gene expression and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary Beth; Voeller, H James; Gelmann, Edward P; Lu, Jianming; Stoica, Elly-Gerald; Hebert, Elijah J; Reiter, Ronald; Singh, Baljit; Danielsen, Mark; Pentecost, Elizabeth; Stoica, Adriana

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of human prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, with cadmium stimulated cell growth. There was a 2.4-fold increase in the population of cells in the S + G(2)M phase by d 4 and a 2.7-fold increase in cell number by d 8. The metal decreased the concentration of AR protein and mRNA (80 and 60%, respectively) and increased the expression of prostate-specific antigen and the homeobox gene, NKX 3.1 (6-fold) that was blocked by an antiandrogen. In addition, cadmium activated the AR in mouse L cells containing an MMTV-luciferase reporter gene (4-fold increase) and in COS-1 cells transfected with wild-type AR and an MMTV-CAT reporter gene (7-fold increase). Cadmium also activated a chimeric receptor (GAL-AR) containing the hormone-binding domain of AR. The metal bound to AR with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 1.19 x 10(-10) M. Cadmium blocked the binding of androgen to the receptor but did not alter its affinity (dissociation constant = 2.8 x 10(-10) M), suggesting that the metal is an inhibitor of hormone binding. In castrated animals, a single, low, environmentally relevant dose of cadmium (20 microg/kg body weight) increased the wet weight of the prostate (1.97- to 3-fold) and the seminal vesicle complex (approximately 1.5-fold) and increased the expression of the androgen-regulated gene, probasin (27-fold). The in vivo effects were also blocked by an antiandrogen.

  12. Genetic interactions between Shox2 and Hox genes during the regional growth and development of the mouse limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Stanley J; Wang, Fan; Cobb, John

    2014-11-01

    The growth and development of the vertebrate limb relies on homeobox genes of the Hox and Shox families, with their independent mutation often giving dose-dependent effects. Here we investigate whether Shox2 and Hox genes function together during mouse limb development by modulating their relative dosage and examining the limb for nonadditive effects on growth. Using double mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in single embryos, we first show that Shox2 and Hox genes have associated spatial expression dynamics, with Shox2 expression restricted to the proximal limb along with Hoxd9 and Hoxa11 expression, juxtaposing the distal expression of Hoxa13 and Hoxd13. By generating mice with all possible dosage combinations of mutant Shox2 alleles and HoxA/D cluster deletions, we then show that their coordinated proximal limb expression is critical to generate normally proportioned limb segments. These epistatic interactions tune limb length, where Shox2 underexpression enhances, and Shox2 overexpression suppresses, Hox-mutant phenotypes. Disruption of either Shox2 or Hox genes leads to a similar reduction in Runx2 expression in the developing humerus, suggesting their concerted action drives cartilage maturation during normal development. While we furthermore provide evidence that Hox gene function influences Shox2 expression, this regulation is limited in extent and is unlikely on its own to be a major explanation for their genetic interaction. Given the similar effect of human SHOX mutations on regional limb growth, Shox and Hox genes may generally function as genetic interaction partners during the growth and development of the proximal vertebrate limb. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...... of flexibility in calculating genetic linkage and displaying linkage group. Among other features, this software enables user to identify linkage groups with output visualized graphically. The program calculates interference and coefficient of coincidence with elevated accuracy in sample datasets. AVAILABILITY......: The database is available for free at http://www.moperandib.com....

  14. Differential Gene Expression during Larval Metamorphic Development in the Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata, Based on Transcriptome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available P. fucata experiences a series of transformations in appearance, from swimming larvae to sessile juveniles, during which significant changes in gene expression likely occur. Thus, P. fucata could be an ideal model in which to study the molecular mechanisms of larval metamorphosis during development in invertebrates. To study the molecular driving force behind metamorphic development in larvae of P. fucata, transcriptomes of five larval stages (trochophore, D-shape, umbonal, eyespots, and spats were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 system and assembled and characterized with the transcripts of six tissues. As a result, a total of 174,126 unique transcripts were assembled and 60,999 were annotated. The number of unigenes varied among the five larval stages. Expression profiles were distinctly different between trochophore, D-shape, umbonal, eyespots, and spats larvae. As a result, 29 expression trends were sorted, of which eight were significant. Among others, 80 development-related, differentially expressed unigenes (DEGs were identified, of which the majority were homeobox-containing genes. Most DEGs occurred among trochophore, D-shaped, and UES (umbonal, eyespots, and spats larvae as verified by qPCR. Principal component analysis (PCA also revealed significant differences in expression among trochophore, D-shaped, and UES larvae with ten transcripts identified but no matching annotations.

  15. Identification of the MUC2 Promoter as a Strong Promoter for Intestinal Gene Expression through Generation of Transgenic Quail Expressing GFP in Gut Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfint, Rachel M; Chen, Paula R; Ahn, Jinsoo; Suh, Yeunsu; Hwang, Seongsoo; Lee, Sang Suk; Lee, Kichoon

    2017-01-19

    Identification of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is valuable for delineating the functional roles of specific genes in genetically engineered animals. Here, through the comparison of gene expression in different tissues by analysis of a microarray database, the intestinal specificity of mucin 2 ( MUC2 ) expression was identified in mice and humans, and further confirmed in chickens by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis. An analysis of cis -acting elements in avian MUC2 gene promoters revealed conservation of binding sites, within a 2.9 kb proximal promoter region, for transcription factors such as caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4A), and transcription factor 4 (TCF4) that are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis and functional integrity. By generating transgenic quail, we demonstrated that the 2.9 kb chicken MUC2 promoter could drive green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression exclusively in the small intestine, large intestine, and ceca. Fluorescence image analysis further revealed GFP expression in intestine epithelial cells. The GFP expression was barely detectable in the embryonic intestine, but increased during post-hatch development. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the reporter gene confirmed that the 2.9 kb MUC2 promoter could retain the regulatory element to drive expression of target genes in intestinal tissues after hatching. This new transgene expression system, using the MUC2 promoter, will provide a new method of overexpressing target genes to study gene function in the avian intestine.

  16. Identification of the MUC2 Promoter as a Strong Promoter for Intestinal Gene Expression through Generation of Transgenic Quail Expressing GFP in Gut Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Woodfint

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is valuable for delineating the functional roles of specific genes in genetically engineered animals. Here, through the comparison of gene expression in different tissues by analysis of a microarray database, the intestinal specificity of mucin 2 (MUC2 expression was identified in mice and humans, and further confirmed in chickens by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR analysis. An analysis of cis-acting elements in avian MUC2 gene promoters revealed conservation of binding sites, within a 2.9 kb proximal promoter region, for transcription factors such as caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2, GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4A, and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 that are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis and functional integrity. By generating transgenic quail, we demonstrated that the 2.9 kb chicken MUC2 promoter could drive green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter expression exclusively in the small intestine, large intestine, and ceca. Fluorescence image analysis further revealed GFP expression in intestine epithelial cells. The GFP expression was barely detectable in the embryonic intestine, but increased during post-hatch development. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the reporter gene confirmed that the 2.9 kb MUC2 promoter could retain the regulatory element to drive expression of target genes in intestinal tissues after hatching. This new transgene expression system, using the MUC2 promoter, will provide a new method of overexpressing target genes to study gene function in the avian intestine.

  17. Transcriptomic analysis suggests a key role for SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE, NAC and YUCCA genes in the heteroblastic development of the temperate rainforest tree Gevuina avellana (Proteaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostria-Gallardo, Enrique; Ranjan, Aashish; Chitwood, Daniel H; Kumar, Ravi; Townsley, Brad T; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Corcuera, Luis J; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-04-01

    Heteroblasty, the temporal development of the meristem, can produce diverse leaf shapes within a plant. Gevuina avellana, a tree from the South American temperate rainforest shows strong heteroblasty affecting leaf shape, transitioning from juvenile simple leaves to highly pinnate adult leaves. Light availability within the forest canopy also modulates its leaf size and complexity. Here we studied how the interaction between the light environment and the heteroblastic progression of leaves is coordinated in this species. We used RNA-seq on the Illumina platform to compare the range of transcriptional responses in leaf primordia of G. avellana at different heteroblastic stages and growing under different light environments. We found a steady up-regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL), NAC, YUCCA and AGAMOUS-LIKE genes associated with increases in age, leaf complexity, and light availability. In contrast, expression of TCP, TPR and KNOTTED1 homeobox genes showed a sustained down-regulation. Additionally, genes involved in auxin synthesis/transport and jasmonate activity were differentially expressed, indicating an active regulation of processes controlled by these hormones. Our large-scale transcriptional analysis of the leaf primordia of G. avellana sheds light on the integration of internal and external cues during heteroblastic development in this species. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Chromatin-prebound Crm1 recruits Nup98-HoxA9 fusion to induce aberrant expression of Hox cluster genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Masahiro; Mura, Sonoko; Yamada, Kohji; Sangel, Percival; Hirata, Saki; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Kawakami, Koichi; Tachibana, Taro; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-07

    The nucleoporin Nup98 is frequently rearranged to form leukemogenic Nup98-fusion proteins with various partners. However, their function remains largely elusive. Here, we show that Nup98-HoxA9, a fusion between Nup98 and the homeobox transcription factor HoxA9, forms nuclear aggregates that frequently associate with facultative heterochromatin. We demonstrate that stable expression of Nup98-HoxA9 in mouse embryonic stem cells selectively induces the expression of Hox cluster genes. Genome-wide binding site analysis revealed that Nup98-HoxA9 is preferentially targeted and accumulated at Hox cluster regions where the export factor Crm1 is originally prebound. In addition, leptomycin B, an inhibitor of Crm1, disassembled nuclear Nup98-HoxA9 dots, resulting in the loss of chromatin binding of Nup98-HoxA9 and Nup98-HoxA9-mediated activation of Hox genes. Collectively, our results indicate that highly selective targeting of Nup98-fusion proteins to Hox cluster regions via prebound Crm1 induces the formation of higher order chromatin structures that causes aberrant Hox gene regulation.

  19. The Necessity of OCT-4 and CDX2 for Early Development and Gene Expression Involved in Differentiation of Inner Cell Mass and Trophectoderm Lineages in Bovine Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; Emura, Natsuko; Fujii, Takashi; Hirayama, Hiroki; Kageyama, Soichi; Hashizume, Tsutomu; Sawai, Ken

    2016-10-01

    The functions of POU class 5 transcription factor 1 (Oct-4) and caudal-type homeobox 2 (Cdx2) in the differentiation of the murine inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) have been described in detail. However, little is known about the roles of OCT-4 and CDX2 in preimplantation bovine embryos. To elucidate their functions during early development in bovine embryos, we performed OCT-4 and CDX2 downregulation using RNA interference. We injected OCT-4- or CDX2-specific short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into bovine zygotes. The rate of blastocyst development of OCT-4-downregulated embryos was lower compared with uninjected or control siRNA-injected embryos. Gene expression analysis revealed decreased CDX2 and fibroblast growth factor 4 expression in OCT-4-downregulated embryos. CDX2-downregulated embryos developed to the blastocyst stage; however, in most cases, blastocoel formation was delayed. Gene expression analysis revealed decreased GATA3 expression and elevated NANOG expression in CDX2-downregulated embryos. In conclusion, OCT-4 and CDX2 are essential for early development and gene expression involved in differentiation of ICM and TE lineages in bovine embryos.

  20. Gene expression study and pathway analysis of histological subtypes of intestinal metaplasia that progress to gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmel Companioni

    Full Text Available Intestinal metaplasia (IM is a precursor lesion that precedes gastric cancer (GC. There are two IM histological subtypes, complete (CIM and incomplete (IIM, the latter having higher progression rates to GC. This study was aimed at analysing gene expression and molecular processes involved in the progression from normal mucosa to IM, and also from IM subtypes to GC.We used expression data to compare the transcriptome of healthy gastric mucosa to that of IM not progressing to GC, and the transcriptome of IM subtypes that had progressed to GC to those that did not progress. Some deregulated genes were validated and pathway analyses were performed.Comparison of IM subtypes that had progressed to GC with those that did not progress showed smaller differences in the expression profiles than the comparison of IM that did not progress with healthy mucosa. New transcripts identified in IM not progressing to GC included TRIM, TMEM, homeobox and transporter genes and SNORD116. Comparison to normal mucosa identified non tumoral Warburg effect and melatonin degradation as previously unreported processes involved in IM. Overexpressed antigen processing is common to both IM-subtypes progressing to GC, but IIM showed more over-expressed oncogenic genes and molecular processes than CIM.There are greater differences in gene expression and molecular processes involved in the progression from normal healthy mucosa to IM than from IM to gastric cancer. While antigen processing is common in both IM-subtypes progressing to GC, more oncogenic processes are observed in the progression of IIM.

  1. PAX9 and MSX1 transcription factor genes in non-syndromic dental agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Braga, Tatiana; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Mundstock, Karina; Mundstock, Carlos Alberto; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2011-04-01

    The molecular variation of paired domain box gene 9 (PAX9) was previously investigated by our research group and a high degree of evolutionary conservation in coding and non-coding regions was observed except in exon 3. PAX9 is a transcription factor important in tooth development, and we wanted to verify its role in dental agenesis in detail. Since dental development is a complex trait we also decided to examine the influence of another transcription factor, muscle segment homeodomain-homeobox 1 (MSX1) on it. A total of 360 consecutively ascertained patients seeking orthodontic treatment were screened for tooth agenesis and 33% of them were found to have it. Thirty-five of those with agenesis and 15 controls had their DNA studied for PAX9 exons 2, 3, 4 and adjacent regions (total of 1476 base pairs, bp) as well as MSX1 exon 2 (698bp). A trio (a proband and her parents) was also studied. Six polymorphic sites were found, three in PAX9 exon 3 and three in MSX1 exon2. MSX1 rs1095 derived allele occurred in individuals with agenesis only, and two other mutations in this gene had been earlier associated with tooth agenesis. Homozygosity for the PAX9 Ala240Pro mutation was studied in a family (proband and her parents), suggesting recessive inheritance with variable expressivity for the dental agenesis found. Common variants located out of the DNA binding domain of the two PAX9 and MSX1 genes can also be related to tooth agenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genes con efecto mayor sobre la fertilidad de ovejas. Revisión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Luna Palomera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El estudio genético en razas de ovejas que na turalmente presentan altas tasas de ovulación (TO y de prolificidad, ha permitido detectar la participación de varios genes. Entre ellos están los relacion ados a la superfamilia del factor de crecimiento transformante β(BMPRIB, GDF9 y BMP-15, así como de otros genes con efecto mayor, tales como el “distal-less homeobox 3” (FecL, el receptor de estrógenos (ESR, el rec eptor de prolactina (PRLR y el de las inhibinas (INHA y INHB. Sin embargo, las ovejas homocigotas para la mayoría de las variantes alélicas en BMP-15 o GDF9 son estériles, por lo que es importante el entendimiento de las bases genéticas y moleculares de estos polimorfismos, para su uso en programas racionales de mejoramiento genético con énfasis en la prolificidad. El polimorfismo en el gen de la melatonina (MTNR1 se ha asociado con la no estacionalidad reproductiva en ovejas. La selección en varias razas de ovejas para estas característ icas ha reducido significativamente el anestro estacional, mostrando actividad reproductiva durante la prima vera y el verano. Sin embargo, parece ser que estos genes en algunas razas pueden estar interactuando aditivamente, y una variante alélica en una raza puede no aparecer en otra, o bien dos al mismo tiempo, por lo que son variados los mecanismos genéticos que afectan la tasa ovulatoria y prolificidad.

  3. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  4. A novel 12 bp deletion within goat LHX4 gene significantly affected litter size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The LIM homeobox transcription factor 4 (LHX4 gene plays a critical role in regulating the development of the pituitary and the secretion of growth hormone (GH and prolactin (PRL associated with reproduction. Thus this gene may affect litter size. Herein, the aim of this study is to detect the novel insertion/deletion (indel within the LHX4 gene as well as to test its association with litter size in 1149 Shaanbei white cashmere goats. Herein, a novel 12 bp indel (NC_030823.1:g.60001011_60001022delGGGGAGGAGGGG was firstly found, which was located in the first intron. Meanwhile, three genotypes were detected in Shaanbei white cashmere goats, and the allelic frequencies of I and D were 0.593 and 0.407, respectively. Interestingly, the genotype distributions between mothers of single-lamb (n = 895 and multi-lamb (n = 254 groups within Shaanbei white cashmere goats were significantly different, implying that the 12 bp indel might affect the litter size. Furthermore, the association analysis was carried out to find out that the 12 bp indel was significantly associated with litter size in the analyzed goat population (P  <  0.05. The litter sizes of genotype DD and ID individuals were superior to those of genotype II (P  <  0.05. These findings suggest that this locus could be considered as a genetic marker for goat breeding, enriching the research category of functional genome of goats.

  5. Relationship between CDX2 gene methylation and dietary factors in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Yasuhito; Nagasaki, Hiromi; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Sakai, Hidekazu; Nakajima, Tomoko; Ohkura, Yasuo; Takizawa, Touichirou; Koike, Morio; Tani, Masao; Iwai, Takehisa; Sugihara, Kenichi; Imai, Kazue; Nakachi, Kei

    2005-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing through DNA methylation is one of the important steps in the mechanism underlying tumorigenesis, including in the stomach. Past lifestyle factors of cancer patients, such as intake of vegetables, are very important in affecting gastric carcinogenesis. However, the relationship between DNA methylation and past dietary habits in cancer patients remains largely unknown. The CDX2 homeobox transcription factor plays a key role in intestinal development, but CDX2 is also expressed in most of the intestinal metaplasia and part of the carcinomas of the stomach. We analyzed the methylation status of the CDX2 5' CpG island in gastric cancer cell lines by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and then CDX2 mRNA was found to be activated after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of the methylation-positive cells. We further examined the methylation status of CDX2 in primary gastric carcinomas by MSP and compared it with the past lifestyle of the patients, including dietary habits. Methylation of CDX2 was found in 20 (34.5%) of the 58 male patients and one (6.7%) of the 15 female patients. Since the methylation frequency was low in the female patients, the analysis was performed only on the male cases. CDX2 methylation was correlated with the decreased intake of green tea and cruciferous vegetables, and also with full or overeating habits. These findings are consistent with epidemiological observations on gastric cancer. We also analyzed the methylation status of p16/INK4a and hMLH1, but their frequencies were not associated with dietary factors or other lifestyle factors. Thus, diet could be an important factor determining the methylation status of genes such as CDX2 and the resultant aberrant expression of genes involved in carcinogenesis.

  6. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  7. Overexpression of PaFT gene in the wild orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiarti, Endang; Mercuriani, Ixora S.; Rizal, Rinaldi; Slamet, Agus; Utami, Bekti S.; Bestari, Ida A.; Aziz-Purwantoro, Moeljopawiro, S.; Jang, Soenghoe; Machida, Y.; Machida, C.

    2015-09-01

    To shorten vegetative stage and induce transition from vegetative to reproductive stage in orchids, we overexpressed Phalaenopsis amabilis Flowering LocusT (PaFT) gene under the control of Ubiquitin promoter into protocorm of Indonesian Wild Orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume. The dynamic expression of vegetative gene Phalaenopsis Homeobox1 (POH1) and flowering time gene PaFT has been analyzed. Accumulation of mRNA was detected in shoot and leaves of both transgenic and non transgenic plants by using Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) with specific gene primers for POH1 and PaFT in 24 months old plants. To analyze the POH1 and PaFT genes, three pairs of degenerate primers PaFT degF1R1, F2R2 and F3R3 that amplified 531 bp PaFT cDNA were used. We detected 700 bp PaFTcDNA from leaves and shoots of transgenic plants, but not in NT plants. POH1 mRNA was detected in plants. PaFT protein consists of Phospatidyl Ethanolamine-Binding Protein (PEBP) in interval base 73-483 and CETS family protein at base 7-519, which are important motif for transmembrane protein. We inserted Ubipro::PaFT/pGAS101 into P. amabilis protocorm using Agrobacterium. Analysis of transgenic plants showed that PaFTmRNA was accumulated in leaves of 12 months after sowing, although it is not detected in non transgeic plants. Compare to the wild type (NT plants), ectopic expression of PaFT shows alter phenotype as follows: 31% normal, 19% with short-wavy leaves, 5% form rosette leaves and 45% produced multishoots. Analysis of protein profiles of trasgenic plants showed that a putative PaFT protein (MW 19,7 kDa) was produced in 1eaves and shoots.This means that at 12 months, POH1 gene expression gradually decreased/negatively regulated, the expression of PaFT gene was activated, although there is no flower initiation yet. Some environmental factors might play a role to induce inflorescens. This experiment is in progress.

  8. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  9. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  10. Molecular Mechanism of MicroRNA-200c Regulating Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β)/SMAD Family Member 3 (SMAD3) Pathway by Targeting Zinc Finger E-Box Binding Homeobox 1 (ZEB1) in Hypospadias in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chong; Dang, Xiangyang; Wang, Xianglin; Xu, Wei; Pang, Guijian; Chen, Yifeng; Liu, Chengbei

    2016-10-29

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore effects of microRNA-200c regulating TGF-β/Smad3 pathway by targeting Zeb1 on the occurrence and development of hypospadias and to evaluate the relationship between microRNA-200c and occurrence of hypospadias. MATERIAL AND METHODS Pregnant rats with a gestational age of 12 days were allocated into 2 groups; one received gavage of DEHP-contained soybean oil (1 ml/day, 8 days; Group A) and the other had gavage of normal soybean oil (1 ml/day, 8 days; Group B). Baby rats with hypospadias from Group A were assigned to the model group (n=20) and healthy baby rats from Group B were assigned to the control group (n=20). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were performed to detect microRNA-200c, Zeb1, TGF-β, and Smad3 mRNA and protein expressions in the model group (n=20) and the control group (n=20). The relationship between microRNA-200c and Zeb1 was detected using a dual-luciferase reporter gene experiment. After the in vitro intervention experiment in fetal rat penises, Western blot was used to detect the expression of Zeb1, TGF-β, and Smad3. RESULTS In the model group, microRNA-200c was expressed at a low level, and microRNA-200c expression in control group was 2.1 times higher than in the model group (Phypospadias occurrence by suppressing the expression of Zeb1, TGF-β, and Smad3. CONCLUSIONS MicroRNA-200c was expressed in hypospadias penis tissues at low levels and was negatively correlated with Zeb1 expression. MicroRNA-200c up-regulated Zeb1 expression to regulate the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway, which led to the occurrence of hypospadias.

  11. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. Methods: We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cre-mediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. Results: Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3, implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. Conclusions: Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. Keywords: Npr3, Pancreatic Ducts, Primary Cilia

  12. Altered regulation of Prox1-gene-expression in liver tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Füzesi Laszlo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 transcription factor was described as a tumor-suppressor gene in liver tumors. In contrast, Prox1 knock out in murine embryos drastically reduces proliferation of hepatoblasts. Methods We have studied the expression of Prox1 in normal liver, liver cirrhosis and peritumoral liver samples in comparison to hepatocellular (HCC and cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC at mRNA, protein and functional levels. Results Prox1 was found in hepatocytes of normal liver, while normal bile duct epithelial cells were negative. However, Prox1+ cells, which co-expressed biliary epithelial makers and showed ductular morphology, could be detected within fibrotic septa of cirrhotic livers, and in both HCC and CCC. Two Prox1 mRNA isoforms (2.9 kb and 7.9 kb were identified with a prevalence of the longer isoform in several HCC samples and the shorter in most CCC samples. Evidence was provided that Myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ might significantly contribute to the gene expression of Prox1 in HCC, while neo-expression of Prox1 in CCC remains to be resolved. A point mutation in the prospero domain of Prox1 was found in one HCC sample. Conclusion Our study shows dysregulation of Prox1 in liver cirrhosis, HCC and CCC, such as neo-expression in cells with biliary epithelial phenotype in liver cirrhosis, and in CCC. Altered Prox1 mRNA expression is partly regulated by MAZ, and mutation of the prospero domain in HCC indicates an involvement for Prox1 during tumor progression.

  13. The nuclear transcription factor PKNOX2 is a candidate gene for substance dependence in European-origin women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    Full Text Available Substance dependence or addiction is a complex environmental and genetic disorder that results in serious health and socio-economic consequences. Multiple substance dependence categories together, rather than any one individual addiction outcome, may explain the genetic variability of such disorder. In our study, we defined a composite substance dependence phenotype derived from six individual diagnoses: addiction to nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, opiates or other drugs as a whole. Using data from several genomewide case-control studies, we identified a strong (Odds ratio  = 1.77 and significant (p-value = 7E-8 association signal with a novel gene, PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 2 (PKNOX2, on chromosome 11 with the composite phenotype in European-origin women. The association signal is not as significant when individual outcomes for addiction are considered, or in males or African-origin population. Our findings underscore the importance of considering multiple addiction types and the importance of considering population and gender stratification when analyzing data with heterogeneous population.

  14. The HMX/NKX homeodomain protein MLS-2 specifies the identity of the AWC sensory neuron type via regulation of the ceh-36 Otx gene in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyuhyung; Kim, Rinho; Sengupta, Piali

    2010-01-01

    The differentiated features of postmitotic neurons are dictated by the expression of specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which the precise spatiotemporal expression patterns of these factors are regulated are poorly understood. In C. elegans, the ceh-36 Otx homeobox gene is expressed in the AWC sensory neurons throughout postembryonic development, and regulates terminal differentiation of this neuronal subtype. Here, we show that the HMX/NKX homeodomain protein MLS-2 regulates ceh-36 expression specifically in the AWC neurons. Consequently, the AWC neurons fail to express neuron type-specific characteristics in mls-2 mutants. mls-2 is expressed transiently in postmitotic AWC neurons, and directly initiates ceh-36 expression. CEH-36 subsequently interacts with a distinct site in its cis-regulatory sequences to maintain its own expression, and also directly regulates the expression of AWC-specific terminal differentiation genes. We also show that MLS-2 acts in additional neuron types to regulate their development and differentiation. Our analysis describes a transcription factor cascade that defines the unique postmitotic characteristics of a sensory neuron subtype, and provides insights into the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms that generate functional diversity in the sensory nervous system. PMID:20150279

  15. Genome-wide identification of binding sites for NAC and YABBY transcription factors and co-regulated genes during soybean seedling development by ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Two plant-specific transcription factors, NAC and YABBY, are involved in important plant developmental processes. However their molecular mechanisms, especially DNA binding sites and co-regulated genes, are largely unknown during soybean seedling development. Results In order to identify genome-wide binding sites of specific members of the NAC and YABBY transcription factors and co-regulated genes, we performed Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) using cotyledons from soybean seedling developmental stages. Our RNA-Seq data revealed that these particular NAC and YABBY transcription factors showed a clear pattern in their expression during soybean seedling development. The highest level of their expression was found in seedling developmental stage 4 when cotyledons undergo a physiological transition from non-photosynthetic storage tissue to a metabolically active photosynthetic tissue. Our ChIP-Seq data identified 72 genes potentially regulated by the NAC and 96 genes by the YABBY transcription factors examined. Our RNA-Seq data revealed highly differentially expressed candidate genes regulated by the NAC transcription factor include lipoxygense, pectin methyl esterase inhibitor, DEAD/DEAH box helicase and homeobox associated proteins. YABBY-regulated genes include AP2 transcription factor, fatty acid desaturase and WRKY transcription factor. Additionally, we have identified DNA binding motifs for the NAC and YABBY transcription factors. Conclusions Genome-wide determination of binding sites for NAC and YABBY transcription factors and identification of candidate genes regulated by these transcription factors will advance the understanding of complex gene regulatory networks during soybean seedling development. Our data imply that there is transcriptional reprogramming during the functional transition of cotyledons from non-photosynthetic storage tissue to metabolically active photosynthetic tissue. PMID:23865409

  16. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which they are found e.g. the evolution of the gene coding for the protein cytochrome-C which is part ofthe respiratory apparatus. On the contrary, paralogous genes are descendants of a duplicated gene. Paralogous genes therefore evolve within the same species as well as in different species e.g. genes coding for alpha ...

  17. Multicistronic lentiviral vectors containing the FMDV 2A cleavage factor demonstrate robust expression of encoded genes at limiting MOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margison Geoffrey P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of gene therapy applications would benefit from vectors capable of expressing multiple genes. In this study we explored the feasibility and efficiency of expressing two or three transgenes in HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. Bicistronic and tricistronic self-inactivating lentiviral vectors were constructed employing the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and/or foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV cleavage factor 2A. We employed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT, and homeobox transcription factor HOXB4 as model genes and their expression was detected by appropriate methods including fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, biochemical assay, and western blotting. Results All the multigene vectors produced high titer virus and were able to simultaneously express two or three transgenes in transduced cells. However, the level of expression of individual transgenes varied depending on: the transgene itself; its position within the construct; the total number of transgenes expressed; the strategy used for multigene expression and the average copy number of pro-viral insertions. Notably, at limiting MOI, the expression of eGFP in a bicistronic vector based on 2A was ~4 times greater than that of an IRES based vector. Conclusion The small and efficient 2A sequence can be used alone or in combination with an IRES for the construction of multicistronic lentiviral vectors which can express encoded transgenes at functionally relevant levels in cells containing an average of one pro-viral insert.

  18. Analysis of RNA splicing defects in PITX2 mutants supports a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semina Elena V

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene that encodes a homeobox transcription factor. Several intronic PITX2 mutations have been reported in Axenfeld-Rieger patients but their effects on gene expression have not been tested. Methods We present two new families with recurrent PITX2 intronic mutations and use PITX2c minigenes and transfected cells to address the hypothesis that intronic mutations effect RNA splicing. Three PITX2 mutations have been analyzed: a G>T mutation within the AG 3' splice site (ss junction associated with exon 4 (IVS4-1G>T, a G>C mutation at position +5 of the 5' (ss of exon 4 (IVS4+5G>C, and a previously reported A>G substitution at position -11 of 3'ss of exon 5 (IVS5-11A>G. Results Mutation IVS4+5G>C showed 71% retention of the intron between exons 4 and 5, and poorly expressed protein. Wild-type protein levels were proportionally expressed from correctly spliced mRNA. The G>T mutation within the exon 4 AG 3'ss junction shifted splicing exclusively to a new AG and resulted in a severely truncated, poorly expressed protein. Finally, the A>G substitution at position -11 of the 3'ss of exon 5 shifted splicing exclusively to a newly created upstream AG and resulted in generation of a protein with a truncated homeodomain. Conclusion This is the first direct evidence to support aberrant RNA splicing as the mechanism underlying the disorder in some patients and suggests that the magnitude of the splicing defect may contribute to the variability of ARS phenotypes, in support of a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  19. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  20. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: incomplete suppression of a retrotransposed gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Snider

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Each unit of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat contains a retrotransposed gene encoding the DUX4 double-homeobox transcription factor. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD is caused by deletion of a subset of the D4Z4 units in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4. Although it has been reported that the deletion of D4Z4 units induces the pathological expression of DUX4 mRNA, the association of DUX4 mRNA expression with FSHD has not been rigorously investigated, nor has any human tissue been identified that normally expresses DUX4 mRNA or protein. We show that FSHD muscle expresses a different splice form of DUX4 mRNA compared to control muscle. Control muscle produces low amounts of a splice form of DUX4 encoding only the amino-terminal portion of DUX4. FSHD muscle produces low amounts of a DUX4 mRNA that encodes the full-length DUX4 protein. The low abundance of full-length DUX4 mRNA in FSHD muscle cells represents a small subset of nuclei producing a relatively high abundance of DUX4 mRNA and protein. In contrast to control skeletal muscle and most other somatic tissues, full-length DUX4 transcript and protein is expressed at relatively abundant levels in human testis, most likely in the germ-line cells. Induced pluripotent (iPS cells also express full-length DUX4 and differentiation of control iPS cells to embryoid bodies suppresses expression of full-length DUX4, whereas expression of full-length DUX4 persists in differentiated FSHD iPS cells. Together, these findings indicate that full-length DUX4 is normally expressed at specific developmental stages and is suppressed in most somatic tissues. The contraction of the D4Z4 repeat in FSHD results in a less efficient suppression of the full-length DUX4 mRNA in skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, FSHD represents the first human disease to be associated with the incomplete developmental silencing of a retrogene array normally expressed early in development.

  1. The impact of dietary magnesium restriction on magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Angelen, Annelies A; San-Cristobal, Pedro; Pulskens, Wilco P; Hoenderop, Joost G; Bindels, René J

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg(2+)) is an essential electrolyte with important physiological functions. Consequently, hypomagnesaemia, an electrolyte disorder frequently diagnosed in critically ill patients, can have life-threatening consequences. The kidney plays a central role in the regulation of the Mg(2+) balance. The present study investigated the molecular consequences of dietary Mg(2+) restriction on renal Mg(2+) transporters. Two groups of 10 mice were fed a Mg(2+)-deficient diet or a Mg(2+)-enriched diet for 2 weeks. Serum and urine electrolyte concentrations were assayed. Next, renal mRNA expression levels of Mg(2+)-related genes were measured to determine their sensitivity to the dietary Mg(2+) content. Subsequently, parvalbumin (PV) and the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), both co-expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) with TRPM6, were further analysed at the protein level using immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Serum and urine electrolyte measurements revealed that dietary Mg(2+) restriction resulted in significant reduction of serum Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) levels, and that the urinary excretion of these ions was also markedly reduced, while phosphate (Pi) excretion was significantly increased. In addition, the serum FGF23 level was markedly increased, whereas Pi was not significantly changed in the Mg(2+)-restricted mouse group. The renal abundance of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) and the epithelial Mg(2+) channel TRPM6 were increased in response to dietary Mg(2+) restriction, whereas other magnesiotropic transporters were not affected. PV abundance was upregulated, while NCC was significantly downregulated. Furthermore, the expression levels of the epithelial Ca(2+) channel TRPV5 and calbindin-D28K were markedly reduced in the low Mg(2+) group. Our data indicate an essential adaptive role for DCT during hypomagnesaemia since TRPM6, HNF1B, PV and NCC expression levels were adjusted. Moreover, hypomagnesaemia resulted in

  2. Gene cluster statistics with gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Narayanan; Durand, Dannie

    2009-05-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such "gene clusters" is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  3. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.; Amati, G.; Andersen, K.K.; Arnaud, M.; Asai, K.; Ashikaga, S.; Aymerich, S.; Bessieres, P.; Boland, F.; Brignell, S.C.; Bron, S; Bunai, K.; Chapuis, J; Christiansen, L.C.; Danchin, A.; Debarbouille, M.; Dervyn, E.; Deuerling, E.; Devine, K.; Devine, S.K.; Dreesen, O.; Errington, J.; Fillinger, S.; Foster, S.J.; Fujita, Y.; Galizzi, A.; Gardan, R.; Eschevins, C.; Fukushima, T.; Haga, K.; Harwood, C.R; Hecker, M.; Hosoya, D.; Hullo, M.F.; Kakeshita, H.; Karamata, D.; Kasahara, Y.; Kawamura, F.; Koga, K.; Koski, P.; Kuwana, R.; Imamura, D.; Ishimaru, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Ishio, I.; Le Coq, D.; Masson, A.; Mauel, C.; Meima, Roelf; Mellado, R.P.; Moir, A.; Moriya, S.; Nagakawa, E.; Nanamiya, H.; Nakai, S.; Nygaard, P.; Ogura, M.; Ohanan, T.; O'Reilly, M.; O'Rourke, M.; Pragai, Z.; Pooley, H.M.; Rapoport, G.; Rawlins, J.P.; Rivas, L.A.; Rivolta, C.; Sadaie, A.; Sadaie, Y.; Sarvas, M; Sato, T.; Saxild, H.H.; Scanlan, E.; Schumann, W; Seegers, J.F. M. L.; Sekiguchi, J.; Sekowska, A.; Seror, S.J.; Simon, M.; Stragier, P.; Studer, R.; Takamatsu, H.; Tanaka, T.; Takeuchi, M.; Thomaides, H.B.; Vagner, V.; van Dijl, J.M.; Watabe, K.; Wipat, A; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamane, K.; Yata, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Zuber, U.; Ogasawara, N.; Ishio, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were

  4. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    The human genome codes for ~35,000 genes and all these genes are not expressed in every cell. The time and site of gene expression is very precisely regulated. In any cell, only. Silence of the Genes. 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath and Saumitra Das. Keywords. RNA interference, siRNA,.

  5. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Hervé

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most

  6. Characteristic Changes in Decidual Gene Expression Signature in Spontaneous Term Parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidy El-Azzamy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The decidua has been implicated in the “terminal pathway” of human term parturition, which is characterized by the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways in gestational tissues. However, the transcriptomic changes in the decidua leading to terminal pathway activation have not been systematically explored. This study aimed to compare the decidual expression of developmental signaling and inflammation-related genes before and after spontaneous term labor in order to reveal their involvement in this process. Methods Chorioamniotic membranes were obtained from normal pregnant women who delivered at term with spontaneous labor (TIL, n = 14 or without labor (TNL, n = 15. Decidual cells were isolated from snap-frozen chorioamniotic membranes with laser microdissection. The expression of 46 genes involved in decidual development, sex steroid and prostaglandin signaling, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, was analyzed using high-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Chorioamniotic membrane sections were immunostained and then semi-quantified for five proteins, and immunoassays for three chemokines were performed on maternal plasma samples. Results The genes with the highest expression in the decidua at term gestation included insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1, galectin-1 (LGALS1, and progestogen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP; the expression of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1, homeobox A11 (HOXA11, interleukin 1β (IL1B, IL8, progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2, and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES was higher in TIL than in TNL cases; the expression of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, CCL5, LGALS1, LGALS3, and PAEP was lower in TIL than in TNL cases; immunostaining confirmed qRT-PCR data for IL-8, CCL2, galectin-1, galectin-3, and PAEP; and no correlations between the decidual gene expression and the maternal plasma protein concentrations of CCL2, CCL5, and

  7. Ras-dva is a novel Pit-1- and glucocorticoid-regulated gene in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellestad, Laura E; Porter, Tom E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a role in functional differentiation of pituitary somatotrophs and lactotrophs during embryogenesis. Ras-dva was identified as a gene regulated by anterior neural fold protein-1/homeobox expressed in embryonic stem cells-1, a transcription factor known to be critical in pituitary development, and has an expression profile in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland that is consistent with in vivo regulation by glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was to characterize expression and regulation of ras-dva mRNA in the developing chicken anterior pituitary. Pituitary ras-dva mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on embryonic day (e) 18 and then decreased and remained low or undetectable after hatch. Ras-dva expression was highly enriched in the pituitary gland on e18 relative to other tissues examined. Glucocorticoid treatment of pituitary cells from mid- and late-stage embryos rapidly increased ras-dva mRNA, suggesting it may be a direct transcriptional target of glucocorticoids. A reporter construct driven by 4 kb of the chicken ras-dva 5'-flanking region, containing six putative pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) binding sites and two potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites, was highly activated in embryonic pituitary cells and up-regulated by corticosterone. Mutagenesis of the most proximal Pit-1 site decreased promoter activity in chicken e11 pituitary cells, indicating regulation of ras-dva by Pit-1. However, mutating putative GR binding sites did not substantially reduce induction of ras-dva promoter activity by corticosterone, suggesting additional DNA elements within the 5'-flanking region are responsible for glucocorticoid regulation. We have identified ras-dva as a glucocorticoid-regulated gene that is likely expressed in cells of the Pit-1 lineage within the developing anterior pituitary gland.

  8. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  9. Hoxa9 collaborates with E2A-PBX1 in mouse B cell leukemia in association with Flt3 activation and decrease of B cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassawi, Mona; Shestakova, Elena A; Fournier, Marilaine; Lebert-Ghali, Charles-Étienne; Vaisson, Gratianne; Frison, Héloïse; Sinnett, Daniel; Vidal, Ramon; Thompson, Alexander; Bijl, Janet J

    2014-01-01

    The fusion protein E2A-PBX1 induces pediatric B cell leukemia in human. Previously, we reported oncogenic interactions between homeobox (Hox) genes and E2A-PBX1 in murine T cell leukemia. A proviral insertional mutagenesis screen with our E2A-PBX1 B cell leukemia mouse model identified Hoxa genes as potential collaborators to E2A-PBX1. Here we studied whether Hoxa9 could enhance E2A-PBX1 leukemogenesis. We show that Hoxa9 confers a proliferative advantage to E2A-PBX1 B cells. Transplantation experiments with E2A-PBX1 transgenic B cells overexpressing Hoxa9 isolated from bone marrow chimeras showed that Hoxa9 accelerates the generation of E2A-PBX1 B cell leukemia, but Hoxa9 is unable to transform B cells alone. Quantitative-reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a strong repression of B cell specific genes in these E2A-PBX1/Hoxa9 leukemias in addition to Flt3 activation, indicating inhibition of B cell differentiation in combination with enhanced proliferation. Overexpression of Hoxa9 in established E2A-PBX1 mouse leukemic B cells resulted in a growth advantage in vitro, which was also characterized by an enhanced expression of Flt3. we show for the first time that Hoxa9 collaborates with E2A-PBX1 in the oncogenic transformation of B cells in a mouse model that involves Flt3 signaling, which is potentially relevant to human disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Genetic mapping of the LOBED LEAF 1 (ClLL1) gene to a 127.6-kb region in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunhua; Chen, Xiner; Wang, Zhongyuan; Liu, Qiyan; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Jianxiang; Yang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Xian

    2017-01-01

    The lobed leaf character is a unique morphologic trait in crops, featuring many potential advantages for agricultural productivity. Although the majority of watermelon varieties feature lobed leaves, the genetic factors responsible for lobed leaf formation remain elusive. The F2:3 leaf shape segregating population offers the opportunity to study the underlying mechanism of lobed leaf formation in watermelon. Genetic analysis revealed that a single dominant allele (designated ClLL1) controlled the lobed leaf trait. A large-sized F3:4 population derived from F2:3 individuals was used to map ClLL1. A total of 5,966 reliable SNPs and indels were identified genome-wide via a combination of BSA and RNA-seq. Using the validated SNP and indel markers, the location of ClLL1 was narrowed down to a 127.6-kb region between markers W08314 and W07061, containing 23 putative ORFs. Expression analysis via qRT-PCR revealed differential expression patterns (fold-changes above 2-fold or below 0.5-fold) of three ORFs (ORF3, ORF11, and ORF18) between lobed and non-lobed leaf plants. Based on gene annotation and expression analysis, ORF18 (encoding an uncharacterized protein) and ORF22 (encoding a homeobox-leucine zipper-like protein) were considered as most likely candidate genes. Furthermore, sequence analysis revealed no polymorphisms in cDNA sequences of ORF18; however, two notable deletions were identified in ORF22. This study is the first report to map a leaf shape gene in watermelon and will facilitate cloning and functional characterization of ClLL1 in future studies.

  11. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  12. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...... predicted to be essential. The vast majority of essential genes were categorized in relatively few domains of cell metabolism, with about half involved in information processing, one-fifth involved in the synthesis of cell envelope and the determination of cell shape and division, and one-tenth related...... to cell energetics. Only 4% of essential genes encode unknown functions. Most essential genes are present throughout a wide range of Bacteria, and almost 70% can also be found in Archaea and Eucarya. However, essential genes related to cell envelope, shape, division, and respiration tend to be lost from...

  13. Epigenetics: beyond genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fossey, A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory processes lead to differential gene expression and are referred to as epigenetic phenomena; these are ubiquitous processes in the biological world. These reversible heritable changes concern DNA and RNA, their interactions...

  14. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. MR REPORTER GENES

    OpenAIRE

    Gilad, Assaf A.; Ziv, Keren; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Neeman, Michal; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging of dynamic processes has benefited tremendously from the use of reporter genes. These genes encode for proteins that emit light, bind radiolabeled probes or, as covered in this review, modulate magnetic resonance (MR) contrast. Reporter genes play a pivotal role in monitoring cell trafficking, gene replacement therapy, protein-protein interactions, neuronal plasticity and embryonic development. Several strategies exist for generating MR contrast: enzyme-catalyze...

  16. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  17. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    tary to the endogenous sense mRNA produced by the normal gene. The antisense strand binds to the sense strand and blocks protein synthesis. This method of gene inhibition was termed antisense technology. The antisense technology soon became a. RNA interference. (RNAi) is a novel mechanism for controlling gene.

  18. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  19. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanavichit, Apichart

    2002-01-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  20. Analysis of the transcriptome of Panax notoginseng root uncovers putative triterpene saponin-biosynthetic genes and genetic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Hongmei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panax notoginseng (Burk F.H. Chen is important medicinal plant of the Araliacease family. Triterpene saponins are the bioactive constituents in P. notoginseng. However, available genomic information regarding this plant is limited. Moreover, details of triterpene saponin biosynthesis in the Panax species are largely unknown. Results Using the 454 pyrosequencing technology, a one-quarter GS FLX titanium run resulted in 188,185 reads with an average length of 410 bases for P. notoginseng root. These reads were processed and assembled by 454 GS De Novo Assembler software into 30,852 unique sequences. A total of 70.2% of unique sequences were annotated by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST similarity searches against public sequence databases. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG assignment discovered 41 unique sequences representing 11 genes involved in triterpene saponin backbone biosynthesis in the 454-EST dataset. In particular, the transcript encoding dammarenediol synthase (DS, which is the first committed enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of major triterpene saponins, is highly expressed in the root of four-year-old P. notoginseng. It is worth emphasizing that the candidate cytochrome P450 (Pn02132 and Pn00158 and UDP-glycosyltransferase (Pn00082 gene most likely to be involved in hydroxylation or glycosylation of aglycones for triterpene saponin biosynthesis were discovered from 174 cytochrome P450s and 242 glycosyltransferases by phylogenetic analysis, respectively. Putative transcription factors were detected in 906 unique sequences, including Myb, homeobox, WRKY, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, and other family proteins. Additionally, a total of 2,772 simple sequence repeat (SSR were identified from 2,361 unique sequences, of which, di-nucleotide motifs were the most abundant motif. Conclusion This study is the first to present a large-scale EST dataset for P. notoginseng root acquired by next

  1. Carboxylesterase 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Madsen, Majbritt Busk

    2018-01-01

    The carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) encodes a hydrolase that metabolizes commonly used drugs. The CES1-related pseudogene, carboxylesterase 1 pseudogene 1 (CES1P1), has been implicated in gene exchange with CES1 and in the formation of hybrid genes including the carboxylesterase 1A2 gene (CES1A2...... region was revealed. In conclusion, many procedures for CES1, CES1A2 and CES1P1 genotyping appear to lack specificity. Knowledge about the segmental duplications may improve the typing of these genes....

  2. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  3. Human gene essentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; di Iulio, Julia; Venter, J Craig; Telenti, Amalio

    2018-01-01

    A gene can be defined as essential when loss of its function compromises viability of the individual (for example, embryonic lethality) or results in profound loss of fitness. At the population level, identification of essential genes is accomplished by observing intolerance to loss-of-function variants. Several computational methods are available to score gene essentiality, and recent progress has been made in defining essentiality in the non-coding genome. Haploinsufficiency is emerging as a critical aspect of gene essentiality: approximately 3,000 human genes cannot tolerate loss of one of the two alleles. Genes identified as essential in human cell lines or knockout mice may be distinct from those in living humans. Reconciling these discrepancies in how we evaluate gene essentiality has applications in clinical genetics and may offer insights for drug development.

  4. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  5. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene ( BDNF ), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  6. Genes and Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2008-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence beh...

  7. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lentiviral Transfer of γ-Globin with Fusion Gene NUP98-HOXA10HD Expands Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Ameliorates Murine β-Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui Fen; Abraham, Allistair; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wang, Yong-Dong; Pestina, Tamara; Zhan, Jun; Humphries, Keith; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Persons, Derek A

    2017-03-01

    Recently, an engineered Homeobox-nucleoporin fusion gene, NUP98-HOXA10HD or NA10HD, was reported to expand and maintain murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We postulated that NA10HD would increase the number of human γ-globin-expressing cells to therapeutic levels. We developed a double gene lentiviral vector encoding both human γ-globin and NA10HD, which was used to transduce human peripheral blood CD34 + cells and increased engraftment 2- to 2.5-fold at 15 weeks post-transplantation in immunodeficient mice. In β-thalassemic mice transplanted with β-thalassemic HSCs transduced with the γ-globin/NA10HD vector, the number of fetal hemoglobin (HbF)-expressing cells was significantly increased after 3 months, leading to resolution of the anemia. Furthermore, the increases in HbF were maintained at 6 months and persisted after secondary transplantation. In addition, NA10HD enrichment of transduced HSCs led to HbF increases without affecting homeostasis of the white blood cell lineages. Our results suggest that NA10HD increases the number of γ-globin-transduced HSCs that engraft, leading to an elevated number of fetal hemoglobin-containing red cells. These effects of NA10HD provide an improved platform for testing of the therapeutic efficacy of novel globin vectors and provide further impetus to develop safe and effective methods for selective expansion of genetically modified cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Characterization of the chromosome 1q41q42.12 region, and the candidate gene DISP1, in patients with CDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Sibel; Ackerman, Kate G; Russell, Meaghan K; Longoni, Mauro; Sougnez, Carrie; Noonan, Kristin M; Hatchwell, Eli; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Pieretti Vanmarcke, Rafael; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Dickman, Paul; Wilson, Jay; Donahoe, Patricia K; Pober, Barbara R

    2010-10-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic studies demonstrate association between congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and chromosome 1q41q42 deletions. In this study, we screened a large CDH cohort (N=179) for microdeletions in this interval by the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique, and also sequenced two candidate genes located therein, dispatched 1 (DISP1) and homo sapiens H2.0-like homeobox (HLX). MLPA analysis verified deletions of this region in two cases, an unreported patient with a 46,XY,del(1)(q41q42.13) karyotype and a previously reported patient with a Fryns syndrome phenotype [Kantarci et al., 2006]. HLX sequencing showed a novel but maternally inherited single nucleotide variant (c.27C>G) in a patient with isolated CDH, while DISP1 sequencing revealed a mosaic de novo heterozygous substitution (c.4412C>G; p.Ala1471Gly) in a male with a left-sided Bochdalek hernia plus multiple other anomalies. Pyrosequencing demonstrated the mutant allele was present in 43%, 12%, and 4.5% of the patient's lymphoblastoid, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and saliva cells, respectively. We examined Disp1 expression at day E11.5 of mouse diaphragm formation and confirmed its presence in the pleuroperitoneal fold, as well as the nearby lung which also expresses Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Our report describes the first de novo DISP1 point mutation in a patient with complex CDH. Combining this finding with Disp1 embryonic mouse diaphragm and lung tissue expression, as well as previously reported human chromosome 1q41q42 aberrations in patients with CDH, suggests that DISP1 may warrant further consideration as a CDH candidate gene. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. FGF-2b and h-PL Transform Duct and Non-Endocrine Human Pancreatic Cells into Endocrine Insulin Secreting Cells by Modulating Differentiating Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Donadel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a multifactorial disease orphan of a cure. Regenerative medicine has been proposed as novel strategy for DM therapy. Human fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2b controls β-cell clusters via autocrine action, and human placental lactogen (hPL-A increases functional β-cells. We hypothesized whether FGF-2b/hPL-A treatment induces β-cell differentiation from ductal/non-endocrine precursor(s by modulating specific genes expression. Methods: Human pancreatic ductal-cells (PANC-1 and non-endocrine pancreatic cells were treated with FGF-2b plus hPL-A at 500 ng/mL. Cytofluorimetry and Immunofluorescence have been performed to detect expression of endocrine, ductal and acinar markers. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and annexin-V quantified cells proliferation and apoptosis. Insulin secretion was assessed by RIA kit, and electron microscopy analyzed islet-like clusters. Results: Increase in PANC-1 duct cells de-differentiation into islet-like aggregates was observed after FGF-2b/hPL-A treatment showing ultrastructure typical of islets-aggregates. These clusters, after stimulation with FGF-2b/hPL-A, had significant (p < 0.05 increase in insulin, C-peptide, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, somatostatin, glucagon, and glucose transporter 2 (Glut-2, compared with control cells. Markers of PANC-1 (Cytokeratin-19, MUC-1, CA19-9 were decreased (p < 0.05. These aggregates after treatment with FGF-2b/hPL-A significantly reduced levels of apoptosis. Conclusions: FGF-2b and hPL-A are promising candidates for regenerative therapy in DM by inducing de-differentiation of stem cells modulating pivotal endocrine genes.

  11. Remodeling of the chromatin structure of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD locus and upregulation of FSHD-related gene 1 (FRG1 expression during human myogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marozzi Anna

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder associated with the partial deletion of integral numbers of 3.3 kb D4Z4 DNA repeats within the subtelomere of chromosome 4q. A number of candidate FSHD genes, adenine nucleotide translocator 1 gene (ANT1, FSHD-related gene 1 (FRG1, FRG2 and DUX4c, upstream of the D4Z4 array (FSHD locus, and double homeobox chromosome 4 (DUX4 within the repeat itself, are upregulated in some patients, thus suggesting an underlying perturbation of the chromatin structure. Furthermore, a mouse model overexpressing FRG1 has been generated, displaying skeletal muscle defects. Results In the context of myogenic differentiation, we compared the chromatin structure and tridimensional interaction of the D4Z4 array and FRG1 gene promoter, and FRG1 expression, in control and FSHD cells. The FRG1 gene was prematurely expressed during FSHD myoblast differentiation, thus suggesting that the number of D4Z4 repeats in the array may affect the correct timing of FRG1 expression. Using chromosome conformation capture (3C technology, we revealed that the FRG1 promoter and D4Z4 array physically interacted. Furthermore, this chromatin structure underwent dynamic changes during myogenic differentiation that led to the loosening of the FRG1/4q-D4Z4 array loop in myotubes. The FRG1 promoter in both normal and FSHD myoblasts was characterized by H3K27 trimethylation and Polycomb repressor complex binding, but these repression signs were replaced by H3K4 trimethylation during differentiation. The D4Z4 sequences behaved similarly, with H3K27 trimethylation and Polycomb binding being lost upon myogenic differentiation. Conclusion We propose a model in which the D4Z4 array may play a critical chromatin function as an orchestrator of in cis chromatin loops, thus suggesting that this repeat may play a role in coordinating gene expression.

  12. Human housekeeping genes, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2013-10-01

    Housekeeping genes are involved in basic cell maintenance and, therefore, are expected to maintain constant expression levels in all cells and conditions. Identification of these genes facilitates exposure of the underlying cellular infrastructure and increases understanding of various structural genomic features. In addition, housekeeping genes are instrumental for calibration in many biotechnological applications and genomic studies. Advances in our ability to measure RNA expression have resulted in a gradual increase in the number of identified housekeeping genes. Here, we describe housekeeping gene detection in the era of massive parallel sequencing and RNA-seq. We emphasize the importance of expression at a constant level and provide a list of 3804 human genes that are expressed uniformly across a panel of tissues. Several exceptionally uniform genes are singled out for future experimental use, such as RT-PCR control genes. Finally, we discuss both ways in which current technology can meet some of past obstacles encountered, and several as yet unmet challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Recombinant gene expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuan, Rocky S

    1997-01-01

    .... A fundamental requirement for successful recombinant gene expression is the design of the cloning vector and the choice of the host organism for expression. Recombinant Gene Expression Protocols grows out of the need for a laboratory manual that provides the reader the background and rationale, as well as the practical protocols for the preparation of...

  14. One gene's shattering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kenneth M

    2012-05-29

    A new study shows that three independent mutations in the Sh1 gene, which encodes a YABBY transcription factor, gave rise to the non-shattering seed phenotype in domesticated sorghum. This same gene may have also had a role in the domestication of other cereals, including maize and rice.

  15. Your Genes, Your Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table of Contents Your Genes, Your Choices describes the Human Genome Project, the science behind it, and the ethical, legal, and social issues that are ... Nothing could be further from the truth. Your Genes, Your Choices points out how the progress of ...

  16. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases

  17. Genome-wide analysis of PDX1 target genes in human pancreatic progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene coding for the homeobox transcription factor (TF PDX1 leads to pancreatic agenesis, whereas heterozygous mutations can cause Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young 4 (MODY4. Although the function of Pdx1 is well studied in pre-clinical models during insulin-producing β-cell development and homeostasis, it remains elusive how this TF controls human pancreas development by regulating a downstream transcriptional program. Also, comparative studies of PDX1 binding patterns in pancreatic progenitors and adult β-cells have not been conducted so far. Furthermore, many studies reported the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and T2DM, and it has been shown that islet enhancers are enriched in T2DM-associated SNPs. Whether regions, harboring T2DM-associated SNPs are PDX1 bound and active at the pancreatic progenitor stage has not been reported so far. Methods: In this study, we have generated a novel induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line that efficiently differentiates into human pancreatic progenitors (PPs. Furthermore, PDX1 and H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq was used to identify PDX1 transcriptional targets and active enhancer and promoter regions. To address potential differences in the function of PDX1 during development and adulthood, we compared PDX1 binding profiles from PPs and adult islets. Moreover, combining ChIP-seq and GWAS meta-analysis data we identified T2DM-associated SNPs in PDX1 binding sites and active chromatin regions. Results: ChIP-seq for PDX1 revealed a total of 8088 PDX1-bound regions that map to 5664 genes in iPSC-derived PPs. The PDX1 target regions include important pancreatic TFs, such as PDX1 itself, RFX6, HNF1B, and MEIS1, which were activated during the differentiation process as revealed by the active chromatin mark H3K27ac and mRNA expression profiling, suggesting that auto-regulatory feedback regulation

  18. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Premzl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomenclature of eutherian lysozyme genes.

  19. Gene amplification in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimari Bizari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification increases the number of genes in a genome and can give rise to karyotype abnormalities called double minutes (DM and homogeneously staining regions (HSR, both of which have been widely observed in human tumors but are also known to play a major role during embryonic development due to the fact that they are responsible for the programmed increase of gene expression. The etiology of gene amplification during carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood but can be considered a result of genetic instability. Gene amplification leads to an increase in protein expression and provides a selective advantage during cell growth. Oncogenes such as CCND1, c-MET, c-MYC, ERBB2, EGFR and MDM2 are amplified in human tumors and can be associated with increased expression of their respective proteins or not. In general, gene amplification is associated with more aggressive tumors, metastases, resistance to chemotherapy and a decrease in the period during which the patient stays free of the disease. This review discusses the major role of gene amplification in the progression of carcinomas, formation of genetic markers and as possible therapeutic targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of some types of tumors.

  20. Genes and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E A; Newhouse, S; Caulfield, M J; Munroe, P B

    2003-01-01

    The combination of investigation of rare Mendelian forms of hypertension, candidate gene studies, comparative mapping and genome-wide screening in both animal models and man has led to significant progress in determining new mechanisms of blood pressure control. In this review, the newly discovered blood pressure/cardiovascular genes, WNK kinases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and the development of a new anti-hypertensive agent PST2238 are discussed. Major genes causing essential hypertension have yet to be discovered, however, there are now over 20 published genome-wide screens for blood pressure controlling genes. Several regions demonstrate suggestive linkage to the trait and there is some overlap of regions between the different studies. It is hoped that new blood pressure genes will ultimately be discovered using this method. Pharmacogenetic studies in hypertension have only been initiated recently, some are described in this paper. Small studies upon single candidate genes, suggest that the contribution of genetics to the inter-individual variation in blood pressure response to anti-hypertensive therapy, is small, approximately 3-5%. Recently micro-arrays with multiple polymorphisms in multiple genes have been used. After accounting for the additive affects of multiple blood pressure loci, an individual's genetic profile appeared to explain up to 50% of the variation in blood pressure response to therapy. Knowledge of the genetic variants that cause hypertension and influence response to anti-hypertensive therapy will ultimately provide a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying blood pressure control.

  1. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  2. Rice Genomics: Gene discovery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a need for discovering candidate genes( a lot of them all over the genome indeed ) and the unlimited allelic variation that can productively take over rice metabolism when cellular water content falls below threshold levels.

  3. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  4. Radiosensitivity and genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qiyue; Lun Mingyue

    1995-07-01

    Reported effects of some oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and DNA repair genes on sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation are reviewed. The role of oncogenes in cellular response to irradiation is discussed, especially the extensively studied oncogenes such as the ras gene family. For tumour suppressor genes, mainly the p53, which is increasingly implicated as a gene affecting radiosensitivity, is reviewed. It is considered that there is a cell cycle checkpoint determinant which is postulated to be able to arrest the irradiated cells in G 1 phase to allow them to repair damage before they undergo DNA synthesis. So far there are six DNA repair genes which have been cloned in mammalian cells, but only one, XRCC1, appears to be involved in repair of human X-ray damage. XRCC1 can correct high sisterchromatid exchange levels when transferred into EM 9 cells, but its expression seems to have no correlation with radiosensitivity of human neck and head tumour cells. Radiosensitivity is an intricate issue which may involve many factors. A scheme of cellular reactions after exposure to irradiation is proposed to indicate a possible sequence of events initiated by ionizing radiation

  5. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  6. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  7. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  8. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

    OpenAIRE

    Premzl, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomencla...

  9. Lodgepole pine: the first evidence of seed-based somatic embryogenesis and the expression of embryogenesis marker genes in shoot bud cultures of adult trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Young; Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-11-01

    Of the various alternatives for cloning elite conifers, somatic embryogenesis (SE) appears to be the best option. In recent years, significant areas of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forest have been devastated by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) in Western Canada. In an attempt to establish an SE propagation system for MPB-resistant lodgepole pine, several families displaying varying levels of resistance were selected for experimentation involving shoot bud and immature seed explants. In bud cultures, eight embryogenic lines were induced from 2 of 15 genotypes following various treatments. Genotype had an important influence on embryogenic culture initiation, and this effect was consistent over time. These lines were identified by microscopic observation and genetic markers. Despite the abundance of early somatic embryos, the cultures have yet to develop into mature embryos. In contrast, immature zygotic embryos (ZEs) cultured from megagametophytes initiated SE at an early dominance stage via nodule-type callus in 1 of 10 genotypes. As part of the study, putative embryogenesis-specific genes, WOX2 (WUSCHELL homeobox 2) and HAP3A, were analyzed in cultures of both shoot bud explants and ZEs. On the basis of these analyses, we postulate that PcHAP3A was expressed mainly in callus and may be involved in cell division, whereas WOX2 was expressed mainly in embryonal mass (EM)-like tissues. The findings from this study, based on molecular assessment, suggest that the cell lines derived from bud cultures were truly EM. Moreover, these experimental observations suggest that PcWOX2 could be used as an early genetic marker to discriminate embryogenic cultures from callus.

  10. Construction of a recombinant eukaryotic human ZHX1 gene expression plasmid and the role of ZHX1 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Liu, Dejie; Liang, Xiaohong; Gao, Lifen; Yue, Xuetian; Yang, Yang; Ma, Chunhong; Liu, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The zinc-fingers and homeoboxes protein 1 (ZHX1) consists of 873 amino acid residues, is localized in the cell nucleus and appears to act as a transcriptional repressor. Previous studies have shown that ZHX1 interacts with nuclear factor Y subunit α (NF-YA), DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 3B and ZHX2, all of which are involved in tumorigenesis. However, the exact role of ZHX1 in tumorigenesis remains unknown. The aim of the current study was to construct a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid containing the human ZHX1 (hZHX1) gene and to investigate the biological activities of ZHX1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR) was used to amplify the N- and C-terminal fragments (ZHX1‑N and ZHX1‑C, respectively) of the hZHX1 gene. The two PCR fragments were cloned into the pEASY-T1 vector and subcloned into the pcDNA3 plasmid to generate a recombinant pcDNA3‑ZHX1 plasmid. Following identification by enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing, the recombinant pcDNA3‑ZHX1 plasmid was transfected into SMMC-7721 cells. The level of ZHX1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Cell growth curve assays were used to evaluate the effect of ZHX1 on cell proliferation. Moreover, the differential expression of ZHX1 between cancer and adjacent cirrhotic liver tissue was investigated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing confirmed the successful construction of the recombinant plasmid, pcDNA3‑ZHX1. qPCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that ZHX1 was efficiently expressed in SMMC-7721 cells and overexpression of ZHX1 may inhibit the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells. In addition, reduced ZHX1 expression is widespread among cancer tissues from HCC patients. In conclusion, a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid, pcDNA3‑ZHX1, was successfully constructed. In addition, the current results indicate that a low expression of ZHX1 may be responsible for hepatocarcinogenesis.

  11. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  12. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2007-01-01

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  13. [Gene therapy in cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, David

    2002-01-01

    The modification of genetic material of living cells for therapeutic purposes have been regarded by many as an unrealized promise. However, recent successful achievements in the field have contributed to vanish this perception and have reopened the possibility to use gene therapy as a medical intervention in humans. In the case of cardiovascular diseases, and despite its high prevalence, the number of approved human gene therapy protocols has remained low. This may be due, at least in part, to the availability of effective alternative therapies for some of the most common vasculopathies. However, recent advances in the understanding of the genetic and molecular bases of the cardiovascular system have opened the possibility to introduce gene therapy in the management of a great variety of cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this communication is to briefly summarize the progress in this area.

  14. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  15. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  16. Inferring horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Ravenhall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric" methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic" approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events.

  17. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwatkin, R.B.L. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  18. Are there anxious genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Anxiety comprises many clinical descriptions and phenotypes. A genetic predisposition to anxiety is undoubted; however, the nature and extent of that contribution is still unclear. Methods for the genetic analysis of such complex disorders is briefly reviewed, followed by a discussion of the comorbidity of anxiety with other psychiatric disorders and their possible common genetic etiology. Extensive genetic studies of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) gene have revealed how variation in gene expression can be correlated with anxiety phenotypes. Complete genome-wide linkage scans for panic disorder (PD) susceptibility genes have suggested a locus on chromosome arm 7p, and association studies have highlighted many candidate genes. A highly significant association between phobias, panic disorder, and a duplication at chromosomal region 15q24-26 is one of the most exciting findings to date. Emerging molecular genetic technologies and the use of increasingly sophisticated animal models of anxiety provide great promise for the future of the field. PMID:22033820

  19. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 4. Silence of the Genes - 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath Saumitra Das. General Article Volume 12 Issue 4 April 2007 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectr...... evidence for genes that may be associated with colour morphotype in the genus Hypoplectrus....

  1. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haemoglobin is a well known respiratory pigment which transports oxygen to various tissues of the body. Tetrameric haemoglo bin (Hb) molecules consist of two .... production of a tetramer that was more effective in oxygen transport and release as compared to the ancestral monomeric form of haemoglobin. Further, gene ...

  2. pyrophosphatase gene in rye

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    photoperiod. Leaves, stems and roots were collected sepa- rately at 6-h intervals from the start (0 h) to the end (72 h) of each experiment. Each treatment was conducted in triplicate. All samples were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and were stored at −80. ◦. C until being used for analysis. Isolation of the ScHP1 gene.

  3. Hidden genes in birds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hron, Tomáš; Pajer, Petr; Pačes, Jan; Bartůněk, Petr; Elleder, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, August 18 (2015) ISSN 1465-6906 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11215; GA MŠk LO1419 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : REPETITIVE SEQUENCES * G/C stretches * avian genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.313, year: 2015

  4. What is a Gene?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 4. What is a Gene? A Question With Variable Answers. S C Lakhotia. General Article Volume 2 Issue 4 April 1997 pp 38-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/04/0038-0047 ...

  5. What is a Gene?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    certain supra-genic aspects of biological information that we inherit through the generations and has a profound role in gene activity. Our understanding of the structure and organization of the genetic material has greatly increased in recent years: we have deciphered the total DNA base sequence of genomes of some.

  6. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  7. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs), researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our finding that disease genes in

  8. Industrial scale gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notka, Frank; Liss, Michael; Wagner, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The most recent developments in the area of deep DNA sequencing and downstream quantitative and functional analysis are rapidly adding a new dimension to understanding biochemical pathways and metabolic interdependencies. These increasing insights pave the way to designing new strategies that address public needs, including environmental applications and therapeutic inventions, or novel cell factories for sustainable and reconcilable energy or chemicals sources. Adding yet another level is building upon nonnaturally occurring networks and pathways. Recent developments in synthetic biology have created economic and reliable options for designing and synthesizing genes, operons, and eventually complete genomes. Meanwhile, high-throughput design and synthesis of extremely comprehensive DNA sequences have evolved into an enabling technology already indispensable in various life science sectors today. Here, we describe the industrial perspective of modern gene synthesis and its relationship with synthetic biology. Gene synthesis contributed significantly to the emergence of synthetic biology by not only providing the genetic material in high quality and quantity but also enabling its assembly, according to engineering design principles, in a standardized format. Synthetic biology on the other hand, added the need for assembling complex circuits and large complexes, thus fostering the development of appropriate methods and expanding the scope of applications. Synthetic biology has also stimulated interdisciplinary collaboration as well as integration of the broader public by addressing socioeconomic, philosophical, ethical, political, and legal opportunities and concerns. The demand-driven technological achievements of gene synthesis and the implemented processes are exemplified by an industrial setting of large-scale gene synthesis, describing production from order to delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  10. Patenting human genes: Chinese academic articles' portrayal of gene patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li

    2018-04-24

    The patenting of human genes has been the subject of debate for decades. While China has gradually come to play an important role in the global genomics-based testing and treatment market, little is known about Chinese scholars' perspectives on patent protection for human genes. A content analysis of academic literature was conducted to identify Chinese scholars' concerns regarding gene patents, including benefits and risks of patenting human genes, attitudes that researchers hold towards gene patenting, and any legal and policy recommendations offered for the gene patent regime in China. 57.2% of articles were written by law professors, but scholars from health sciences, liberal arts, and ethics also participated in discussions on gene patent issues. While discussions of benefits and risks were relatively balanced in the articles, 63.5% of the articles favored gene patenting in general and, of the articles (n = 41) that explored gene patents in the Chinese context, 90.2% supported patent protections for human genes in China. The patentability of human genes was discussed in 33 articles, and 75.8% of these articles reached the conclusion that human genes are patentable. Chinese scholars view the patent regime as an important legal tool to protect the interests of inventors and inventions as well as the genetic resources of China. As such, many scholars support a gene patent system in China. These attitudes towards gene patents remain unchanged following the court ruling in the Myriad case in 2013, but arguments have been raised about the scope of gene patents, in particular that the increasing numbers of gene patents may negatively impact public health in China.

  11. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  12. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  13. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelta dos Santos

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  14. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Farjadnia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable.

  15. Graphene based gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  16. Gene Expression in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrogio, A.

    Skeletal system has two main functions, to provide mechanical integrity for both locomotion and protection and to play an important role in mineral homeostasis. There is extensive evidence showing loss of bone mass during long-term Space-Flights. The loss is due to a break in the equilibrium between the activity of osteoblasts (the cells that forms bone) and the activity of osteoclasts (the cells that resorbs bone). Surprisingly, there is scanty information about the possible altered gene expression occurring in cells that form bone in microgravity.(Just 69 articles result from a "gene expression in microgravity" MedLine query.) Gene-chip or microarray technology allows to screen thousands of genes at the same time: the use of this technology on samples coming from cells exposed to microgravity could provide us with many important informations. For example, the identification of the molecules or structures which are the first sensors of the mechanical stress derived from lack of gravity, could help in understanding which is the first event leading to bone loss due to long-term exposure to microgravity. Consequently, this structure could become a target for a custom-designed drug. It is evident that bone mass loss, observed during long-time stay in Space, represents an accelerated model of what happens in aging osteoporosis. Therefore, the discovery and design of drugs able to interfere with the bone-loss process, could help also in preventing negative physiological processes normally observed on Earth. Considering the aims stated above, my research is designed to:

  17. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  18. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  19. Regulation of eucaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, R.; Ptashne, M.S

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a method of regulating the expression of a gene in a eucaryotic cell. The method consists of: providing in the eucaryotic cell, a peptide, derived from or substantially similar to a peptide of a procaryotic cell able to bind to DNA upstream from or within the gene, the amount of the peptide being sufficient to bind to the gene and thereby control expression of the gene.

  20. Genealogy and gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    Heredity can be followed in persons or in genes. Persons can be identified only a few generations back, but simplified models indicate that universal ancestors to all now living persons have occurred in the past. Genetic variability can be characterized as variants of DNA sequences. Data are available only from living persons, but from the pattern of variation gene trees can be inferred by means of coalescence models. The merging of lines backwards in time leads to a MRCA (most recent common ancestor). The time and place of living for this inferred person can give insights in human evolutionary history. Demographic processes are incorporated in the model, but since culture and customs are known to influence demography the models used ought to be tested against available genealogy. The Icelandic data base offers a possibility to do so and points to some discrepancies. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome patterns give a rather consistent view of human evolutionary history during the latest 100 000 years but the earlier epochs of human evolution demand gene trees with longer branches. The results of such studies reveal as yet unsolved problems about the sources of our genome.

  1. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  2. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  3. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  4. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  5. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  6. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  7. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...... describes how gene therapy may be performed using electric pulses to enhance uptake and expression.......Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapter...

  8. The ethics of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  9. Exploring new gene integration sites for gene knock-in by gene-trapping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchi, Isamu; Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Masago, Yusaku; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Okuda, Tomohiko

    2015-06-01

    The knock-in mouse is a powerful tool for biological research, but the stability of expression of an integrated gene strongly depends on where it is integrated in the mouse genome. At present, there are an insufficient number of loci suitable for gene knock-in, such as the Rosa26 locus. Therefore, in this study, we developed an efficient strategy for identifying genome loci suitable for gene knock-in and characterized the properties of such loci for gene integration. For efficient discovery and characterization, we constructed a new gene-trapping vector that enables monitoring of the expression of both trapped and integrated genes using fluorescence. We successfully obtained fluorescent-positive mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) clones with the vector. Thorough analysis of the expression of fluorescent proteins in chimera embryos generated with the obtained mESC clones, some of the gene-trapped chimera embryos showed stable and ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene. Furthermore, adult mice derived from one of the gene-trapped mESC clones showed ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene in various tissues without any unusual phenotype. This indicated that the identified locus possesses high potential for foreign gene integration. Our strategy allows for efficient discovery and characterization of mouse genome loci for gene integration.

  10. TLX1 and NOTCH coregulate transcription in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S; Luu, Truong V; Lee, Norman H; Hawley, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The homeobox gene TLX1 (for T-cell leukemia homeobox 1, previously known as HOX11) is inappropriately expressed in a major subgroup of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it is strongly associated with activating NOTCH1 mutations. Despite the recognition that these genetic lesions cooperate in leukemogenesis, there have been no mechanistic studies addressing how TLX1 and NOTCH1 functionally interact to promote the leukemic phenotype. Results Global gene expre...

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.; Morin, K. W.; Knaus, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology have opened the door to disease treatment by transferring genes to cells that are responsible for the pathological condition being addressed. These genes can serve to supplement or introduce the function of indigenous genes that are either inadequately expressed or that are congenitally absent in the patient. They can introduce new functions such as drug sensitization to provide a unique therapeutic target. Gene transfer is readily monitored in vitro using a range of histochemical and biochemical tests that are ''built in'' to the therapeutic gene cassette. In vivo, in situ monitoring of the gene transfer and gene expression processes can be achieved with these tests only if biopsy is possible. Scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the extent and location of gene expression, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. This overview includes a brief orientation to gene transfer therapy and is followed by a review of current approaches to gene therapy imaging. The concluding section deals with imaging based on radiolabelled nucleoside substrates for herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase, with emphasis on IVFRU, a stable potent and selective HSV-1 TK substrate developed in their laboratories

  12. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  13. Gene circuit analysis of the terminal gap gene huckebein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksat Ashyraliyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network.

  14. Maximum Gene-Support Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Shan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomes and genes diversify during evolution; however, it is unclear to what extent genes still retain the relationship among species. Model species for molecular phylogenetic studies include yeasts and viruses whose genomes were sequenced as well as plants that have the fossil-supported true phylogenetic trees available. In this study, we generated single gene trees of seven yeast species as well as single gene trees of nine baculovirus species using all the orthologous genes among the species compared. Homologous genes among seven known plants were used for validation of the finding. Four algorithms—maximum parsimony (MP, minimum evolution (ME, maximum likelihood (ML, and neighbor-joining (NJ—were used. Trees were reconstructed before and after weighting the DNA and protein sequence lengths among genes. Rarely a gene can always generate the “true tree” by all the four algorithms. However, the most frequent gene tree, termed “maximum gene-support tree” (MGS tree, or WMGS tree for the weighted one, in yeasts, baculoviruses, or plants was consistently found to be the “true tree” among the species. The results provide insights into the overall degree of divergence of orthologous genes of the genomes analyzed and suggest the following: 1 The true tree relationship among the species studied is still maintained by the largest group of orthologous genes; 2 There are usually more orthologous genes with higher similarities between genetically closer species than between genetically more distant ones; and 3 The maximum gene-support tree reflects the phylogenetic relationship among species in comparison.

  15. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  16. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  17. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  18. One gene, many phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available "Phenotype" is the visible or quantifiable effect of the expression of a gene, whereas the specific genetic constitution responsible for a phenotype is called "genotype". It was hoped that phenotype could be accurately predicted if the genotype could be characterized. But, the relationship between the genotype and phenotype is not straightforward. Similar genetic lesions can have entirely different phenotypes. In recent years, there has been tremendous progress in the understanding of the genetic basis of diseases. The extent to which it will be possible to relate findings at the DNA level to the clinical phenotype is difficult to delineate on many occasions. The elucidation of mechanisms underlying genotype-phenotype discrepancies is important as it will influence the use of DNA-based tests in the diagnosis, therapy and counseling of individuals affected with genetic disorders. This issue is pertinent to almost every aspect of medical practice and research in this post-genome era. In this article, we have tried to summarize those factors which are responsible for varied manifestations of lesion(s in a single gene.

  19. Reverse engineering transcriptional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is a step-by-step guide on how to infer gene networks from gene expression profiles. The definition of a gene network is given in Subheading 1, where the different types of networks are discussed. The chapter then guides the readers through a data-gathering process in order to build a compendium of gene expression profiles from a public repository. Gene expression profiles are then discretized and a statistical relationship between genes, called mutual information (MI), is computed. Gene pairs with insignificant MI scores are then discarded by applying one of the described pruning steps. The retained relationships are then used to build up a Boolean adjacency matrix used as input for a clustering algorithm to divide the network into modules (or communities). The gene network can then be used as a hypothesis generator for discovering gene function and analyzing gene signatures. Some case studies are presented, and an online web-tool called Netview is described.

  20. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P

    2012-09-15

    Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Source code under GPL license is available from the author. peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at.

  1. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. Results: This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Availability: Source code under GPL license is available from the author. Contact: peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at PMID:22962488

  2. Cellular homeoproteins, SATB1 and CDP, bind to the unique region between the human cytomegalovirus UL127 and major immediate-early genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Jialing; Klase, Zachary; Gao Xiaoqi; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Stinski, Mark F.; Kashanchi, Fatah; Chao, S.-H.

    2007-01-01

    An AT-rich region of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome between the UL127 open reading frame and the major immediate-early (MIE) enhancer is referred to as the unique region (UR). It has been shown that the UR represses activation of transcription from the UL127 promoter and functions as a boundary between the divergent UL127 and MIE genes during human CMV infection [Angulo, A., Kerry, D., Huang, H., Borst, E.M., Razinsky, A., Wu, J., Hobom, U., Messerle, M., Ghazal, P., 2000. Identification of a boundary domain adjacent to the potent human cytomegalovirus enhancer that represses transcription of the divergent UL127 promoter. J. Virol. 74 (6), 2826-2839; Lundquist, C.A., Meier, J.L., Stinski, M.F., 1999. A strong negative transcriptional regulatory region between the human cytomegalovirus UL127 gene and the major immediate-early enhancer. J. Virol. 73 (11), 9039-9052]. A putative forkhead box-like (FOX-like) site, AAATCAATATT, was identified in the UR and found to play a key role in repression of the UL127 promoter in recombinant virus-infected cells [Lashmit, P.E., Lundquist, C.A., Meier, J.L., Stinski, M.F., 2004. Cellular repressor inhibits human cytomegalovirus transcription from the UL127 promoter. J. Virol. 78 (10), 5113-5123]. However, the cellular factors which associate with the UR and FOX-like region remain to be determined. We reported previously that pancreatic-duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX1) bound to a 45-bp element located within the UR [Chao, S.H., Harada, J.N., Hyndman, F., Gao, X., Nelson, C.G., Chanda, S.K., Caldwell, J.S., 2004. PDX1, a Cellular Homeoprotein, Binds to and Regulates the Activity of Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate Early Promoter. J. Biol. Chem. 279 (16), 16111-16120]. Here we demonstrate that two additional cellular homeoproteins, special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB1) and CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), bind to the human CMV UR in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, CDP is identified as a FOX-like binding protein

  3. Generalist genes and learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2005-07-01

    The authors reviewed recent quantitative genetic research on learning disabilities that led to the conclusion that genetic diagnoses differ from traditional diagnoses in that the effects of relevant genes are largely general rather than specific. This research suggests that most genes associated with common learning disabilities--language impairment, reading disability, and mathematics disability--are generalists in 3 ways. First, genes that affect common learning disabilities are largely the same genes responsible for normal variation in learning abilities. Second, genes that affect any aspect of a learning disability affect other aspects of the disability. Third, genes that affect one learning disability are also likely to affect other learning disabilities. These quantitative genetic findings have far-reaching implications for molecular genetics and neuroscience as well as psychology. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Differential Gene Expression and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Seroude

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that an intricate program of gene expression controls progression through the different stages in development. The equally complex biological phenomenon known as aging is genetically determined and environmentally modulated. This review focuses on the genetic component of aging, with a special emphasis on differential gene expression. At least two genetic pathways regulating organism longevity act by modifying gene expression. Many genes are also subjected to age-dependent transcriptional regulation. Some age-related gene expression changes are prevented by caloric restriction, the most robust intervention that slows down the aging process. Manipulating the expression of some age-regulated genes can extend an organism's life span. Remarkably, the activity of many transcription regulatory elements is linked to physiological age as opposed to chronological age, indicating that orderly and tightly controlled regulatory pathways are active during aging.

  5. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  6. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    the periosteal tissues of healing fractures in small animals , and allow more accurate evaluation of the effects of the fracture therapy (Rundle et...X-ray fluoroscopy (Figure 7). Individual animals receiving the MLV-BMP-2/4 gene therapy by either the percutaneous injection or the intramedullary... animal subjects to understand gene expression in the healing response to bone injury and identify novel genes that might accelerate or delay the

  7. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  8. Genes, evolution and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    I argue that the g factor meets the fundamental criteria of a scientific construct more fully than any other conception of intelligence. I briefly discuss the evidence regarding the relationship of brain size to intelligence. A review of a large body of evidence demonstrates that there is a g factor in a wide range of species and that, in the species studied, it relates to brain size and is heritable. These findings suggest that many species have evolved a general-purpose mechanism (a general biological intelligence) for dealing with the environments in which they evolved. In spite of numerous studies with considerable statistical power, we know of very few genes that influence g and the effects are very small. Nevertheless, g appears to be highly polygenic. Given the complexity of the human brain, it is not surprising that that one of its primary faculties-intelligence-is best explained by the near infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics.

  9. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  10. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  11. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......' C, and clustered Dukes' D separately. Real-time PCR of 10 known genes and 5 ESTs demonstrated excellent reproducibility of the array-based findings. The most frequently altered genes belonged to functional categories of metabolism (22%), transcription and translation (11%), and cellular processes (9...

  12. Synthetic sustained gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy today is hampered by the need of a safe and efficient gene delivery system that can provide a sustained therapeutic effect without cytotoxicity or unwanted immune responses. Bolus gene delivery in solution results in the loss of delivered factors via lymphatic system and may cause undesired effects by the escape of bioactive molecules to distant sites. Controlled gene delivery systems, acting as localized depot of genes, provide an extended sustained release of genes, giving prolonged maintenance of the therapeutic level of encoded proteins. They also limit the DNA degradation in the nuclease rich extra-cellular environment. While attempts have been made to adapt existing controlled drug delivery technologies, more novel approaches are being investigated for controlled gene delivery. DNA encapsulated in nano/micro spheres of polymers have been administered systemically/orally to be taken up by the targeted tissues and provide sustained release once internalized. Alternatively, DNA entrapped in hydrogels or scaffolds have been injected/implanted in tissues/cavities as platforms for gene delivery. The present review examines these different modalities for sustained delivery of viral and non-viral gene-delivery vectors. Design parameters and release mechanisms of different systems made with synthetic or natural polymers are presented along with their prospective applications and opportunities for continuous development.

  13. Gene therapy and reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribley, John M; Rehman, Khurram S; Niu, Hairong; Christman, Gregory M

    2002-04-01

    To review the literature on the principles of gene therapy and its potential application in reproductive medicine. Literature review. Gene therapy involves transfer of genetic material to target cells using a delivery system, or vector. Attention has primarily focused on viral vectors. Significant problems remain to be overcome including low efficacy of gene transfer, the transient expression of some vectors, safety issues with modified adenoviruses and retroviruses, and ethical concerns. If these issues can be resolved, gene therapy will be applicable to an increasing spectrum of single and multiple gene disorders, as the Human Genome Project data are analyzed, and the genetic component of human disease becomes better understood. Gynecologic gene therapy has advanced to human clinical trials for ovarian carcinoma, and shows potential for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Obstetric applications of gene therapy, including fetal gene therapy, remain more distant goals. Concerns about the safety of human gene therapy research are being actively addressed, and remarkable progress in improving DNA transfer has been made. The first treatment success for a genetic disease (severe combined immunodeficiency disease) has been achieved, and ongoing research efforts will eventually yield clinical applications in many spheres of reproductive medicine.

  14. Gene- and evidence-based candidate gene selection for schizophrenia and gene feature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingchun; Han, Leng; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric disorder that affects about 1% of the population globally. A tremendous amount of effort has been expended in the past decade, including more than 2400 association studies, to identify genes influencing susceptibility to the disorder. However, few genes or markers have been reliably replicated. The wealth of this information calls for an integration of gene association data, evidence-based gene ranking, and follow-up replication in large sample. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate evidence-based gene ranking methods and to examine the features of top-ranking candidate genes for schizophrenia. We proposed a gene-based approach for selecting and prioritizing candidate genes by combining odds ratios (ORs) of multiple markers in each association study and then combining ORs in multiple studies of a gene. We named it combination-combination OR method (CCOR). CCOR is similar to our recently published method, which first selects the largest OR of the markers in each study and then combines these ORs in multiple studies (i.e., selection-combination OR method, SCOR), but differs in selecting representative OR in each study. Features of top-ranking genes were examined by Gene Ontology terms and gene expression in tissues. Our evaluation suggested that the SCOR method overall outperforms the CCOR method. Using the SCOR, a list of 75 top-ranking genes was selected for schizophrenia candidate genes (SZGenes). We found that SZGenes had strong correlation with neuro-related functional terms and were highly expressed in brain-related tissues. The scientific landscape for schizophrenia genetics and other complex disease studies is expected to change dramatically in the next a few years, thus, the gene-based combined OR method is useful in candidate gene selection for follow-up association studies and in further artificial intelligence in medicine. This method for prioritization of candidate genes can be applied to other

  15. Gene therapy for meningioma: improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Leonhart, Angelique M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Curiel, David T.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECT: Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  16. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  17. Evaluation of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... MADS family of TFs control floral organ identity within each whorl of the flower by activating downstream genes. Measuring gene expression in different tissue types and developmental stages is of fundamental importance in TFs functional research. In last few years, quantitative real-time. PCR (qRT-PCR) ...

  18. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  19. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  20. Gene Synthesis with HG Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana. Marvin H Caruthers. General Article Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp ... Keywords. Chemical synthesis of genes for yeast alanine tRNA and E. coli supressor tRNA; Khorana's philosophy on science.

  1. Clock genes, ADHD and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogavero, Floriana; Jager, Amanda; Glennon, Jeffrey C

    2016-11-09

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently associated with comorbid aggression and sleep disturbances. The sleep/wake cycle is under the control of the circadian system which is moderated by clock genes. Clock genes can regulate the transcription of monoamine oxidase A, which is involved in the degradation of monoamines. Disturbances in monoamine interaction with clock genes in those with monoamine gene polymorphisms may regulate susceptibility of ADHD and comorbid aggression/sleep disturbances. While monoamines influence circadian rhythm and clock gene expression, circadian rhythm components modulate aggressive behavior, and altered clock genes expression have been associated with ADHD. We propose a mechanism by which circadian rhythm and clock gene expression may influence ADHD and comorbid aggression through the modulation of neurotransmitters. The role of clock genes in ADHD patients with comorbid aggression awaits further research; therefore we also indicate directions for future studies to help increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms in ADHD with comorbid aggression and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. (vitamin B1) biosynthesis genes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the gene transcripts of first two enzymes in thiamine biosynthesis pathway, THIC and THI1/THI4 were identified and amplified from oil palm tissues. Primers were designed based on sequence comparison of the genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Oryza sativa and Alnus glutinosa. Oil palm's responses ...

  3. superoxide dismutase gene in sugarcane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-10

    Jan 10, 2012 ... Superoxide dismutases (SODs) play an important role in stress-tolerance in plants. In this study, for the first time, a full-length cDNA sequence of MnSOD gene, termed as Sc-MnSOD (GenBank accession number: GQ246460), was obtained in sugarcane. Sequence analysis revealed that Sc-MnSOD gene ...

  4. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  5. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  6. Gene recognition by combination of several gene-finding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K; Takagi, T

    1998-01-01

    A number of programs have been developed to predict the eukaryotic gene structures in DNA sequences. However, gene finding is still a challenging problem. We have explored the effectiveness when the results of several gene-finding programs were re-analyzed and combined. We studied several methods with four programs (FEXH, GeneParser3, GEN-SCAN and GRAIL2). By HIGHEST-policy combination method or BOUNDARY method, approximate correlation (AC) improved by 3-5% in comparison with the best single gene-finding program. From another viewpoint, OR-based combination of the four programs is the most reliable to know whether a candidate exon overlaps with the real exon or not, although it is less sensitive than GENSCAN for exon-intron boundaries. Our methods can easily be extended to combine other programs. We have developed a server program (Shirokane System) and a client program (GeneScope) to use the methods. GeneScope is available through a WWW site (http://gf.genome.ad.jp/). (katsu,takagi)@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

  7. Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Ali Y; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Brown, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Chemical detoxification and physical destruction of aflatoxins in foods and feed commodities are mostly unattainable in a way that preserves the edibility of the food. Therefore, preventing mycotoxins in general and aflatoxins in particular from entering the food chain is a better approach. This requires early detection of the aflatoxin-causing organisms. Detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing fungi has always been a challenge, especially within species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. Culture-based methods require a high level of expertise and a list of sophisticated equipment. Furthermore, even for a trained taxonomist, species that are identical in morphology, physiology, and nutritional aspects can be challenging to classify. Fungal taxonomy has changed over the past few decades; more species are being reclassified, and new species are being described due to advances in sequencing and genome assembly. These developments make the use of PCR-based approaches practical, rapid, and more reliable for the identification of fungi to the species level. This chapter presents a variety of protocols to detect and quantify aflatoxin-producing fungi using mycotoxin biosynthesis pathway genes.

  8. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  9. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e. g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental

  10. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth / For Parents / Gene Therapy and ... caused by a "bad" gene. Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  11. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  12. Remote control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiaochun; Miano, Joseph M

    2007-06-01

    The elucidation of a growing number of species' genomes heralds an unprecedented opportunity to ascertain functional attributes of non-coding sequences. In particular, cis regulatory modules (CRMs) controlling gene expression constitute a rich treasure trove of data to be defined and experimentally validated. Such information will provide insight into cell lineage determination and differentiation and the genetic basis of heritable diseases as well as the development of novel tools for restricting the inactivation of genes to specific cell types or conditions. Historically, the study of CRMs and their individual transcription factor binding sites has been limited to proximal regions around gene loci. Two important by-products of the genomics revolution, artificial chromosome vectors and comparative genomics, have fueled efforts to define an increasing number of CRMs acting remotely to control gene expression. Such regulation from a distance has challenged our perspectives of gene expression control and perhaps the very definition of a gene. This review summarizes current approaches to characterize remote control of gene expression in transgenic mice and inherent limitations for accurately interpreting the essential nature of CRM activity.

  13. Delimiting Coalescence Genes (C-Genes) in Phylogenomic Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2018-02-26

    coalescence methods have emerged as a popular alternative for inferring species trees with large genomic datasets, because these methods explicitly account for incomplete lineage sorting. However, statistical consistency of summary coalescence methods is not guaranteed unless several model assumptions are true, including the critical assumption that recombination occurs freely among but not within coalescence genes (c-genes), which are the fundamental units of analysis for these methods. Each c-gene has a single branching history, and large sets of these independent gene histories should be the input for genome-scale coalescence estimates of phylogeny. By contrast, numerous studies have reported the results of coalescence analyses in which complete protein-coding sequences are treated as c-genes even though exons for these loci can span more than a megabase of DNA. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints suggest that c-genes may be much shorter, especially when large clades with many species are the focus of analysis. Although this idea has been challenged recently in the literature, the inverse relationship between c-gene size and increased taxon sampling in a dataset-the 'recombination ratchet'-is a fundamental property of c-genes. For taxonomic groups characterized by genes with long intron sequences, complete protein-coding sequences are likely not valid c-genes and are inappropriate units of analysis for summary coalescence methods unless they occur in recombination deserts that are devoid of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). Finally, it has been argued that coalescence methods are robust when the no-recombination within loci assumption is violated, but recombination must matter at some scale because ILS, a by-product of recombination, is the raison d'etre for coalescence methods. That is, extensive recombination is required to yield the large number of independently segregating c-genes used to infer a species tree. If coalescent methods are powerful

  14. Identification of key player genes in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarieh, Maryam; Wiese, Andreas; Will, Thorsten; Hamed, Mohamed; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-09-06

    Identifying the gene regulatory networks governing the workings and identity of cells is one of the main challenges in understanding processes such as cellular differentiation, reprogramming or cancerogenesis. One particular challenge is to identify the main drivers and master regulatory genes that control such cell fate transitions. In this work, we reformulate this problem as the optimization problems of computing a Minimum Dominating Set and a Minimum Connected Dominating Set for directed graphs. Both MDS and MCDS are applied to the well-studied gene regulatory networks of the model organisms E. coli and S. cerevisiae and to a pluripotency network for mouse embryonic stem cells. The results show that MCDS can capture most of the known key player genes identified so far in the model organisms. Moreover, this method suggests an additional small set of transcription factors as novel key players for governing the cell-specific gene regulatory network which can also be investigated with regard to diseases. To this aim, we investigated the ability of MCDS to define key drivers in breast cancer. The method identified many known drug targets as members of the MDS and MCDS. This paper proposes a new method to identify key player genes in gene regulatory networks. The Java implementation of the heuristic algorithm explained in this paper is available as a Cytoscape plugin at http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/mcds . The SageMath programs for solving integer linear programming formulations used in the paper are available at https://github.com/maryamNazarieh/KeyRegulatoryGenes and as supplementary material.

  15. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73 ISSN 0015-5500 Grant - others:EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  16. Cloning and selection of reference genes for gene expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full length mRNA sequences of Ac-β-actin and Ac-gapdh, and partial mRNA sequences of Ac-18SrRNA and Ac-ubiquitin were cloned from pineapple in this study. The four genes were tested as housekeeping genes in three experimental sets. GeNorm and NormFinder analysis revealed that β-actin was the most ...

  17. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  18. Gene Therapy Approaches to Hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giuliana; Cavazzana, Marina; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies is currently based on transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells genetically modified with a lentiviral vector expressing a globin gene under the control of globin transcriptional regulatory elements. Preclinical and early clinical studies showed the safety and potential efficacy of this therapeutic approach as well as the hurdles still limiting its general application. In addition, for both beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease, an altered bone marrow microenvironment reduces the efficiency of stem cell harvesting as well as engraftment. These hurdles need be addressed for gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies to become a clinical reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The hunt for gene dopers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mai M H; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2009-07-01

    Gene doping, the abuse of gene therapy for illicit athletic enhancement, is perceived as a coming threat and is a prime concern to the anti-doping community. This doping technique represents a significant ethical challenge and there are concerns regarding its safety for athletes. This article presents the basics of gene doping, potential strategies for its detection and the role of promising new technologies in aiding detection efforts. These include the use of lab-on-a-chip techniques as well as nanoparticles to enhance the performance of current analytical methods and to develop new doping detection strategies.

  20. Comparing the evolutionary conservation between human essential genes, human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Zheng, Jiajia; Luan, Meiwei; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-01

    Human housekeeping genes are often confused with essential human genes, and several studies regard both types of genes as having the same level of evolutionary conservation. However, this is not necessarily the case. To clarify this, we compared the differences between human housekeeping genes and essential human genes with respect to four aspects: the evolutionary rate (dN/dS), protein sequence identity, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density and level of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The results showed that housekeeping genes had lower evolutionary rates, higher sequence identities, lower SNP densities and higher levels of LD compared with essential genes. Together, these findings indicate that housekeeping and essential genes are two distinct types of genes, and that housekeeping genes have a higher level of evolutionary conservation. Therefore, we suggest that researchers should pay careful attention to the distinctions between housekeeping genes and essential genes. Moreover, it is still controversial whether we should substitute human orthologs of mouse essential genes for human essential genes. Therefore, we compared the evolutionary features between human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes and we got inconsistent results in long-term and short-term evolutionary characteristics implying the irrationality of simply replacing human essential genes with human orthologs of mouse essential genes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chicago Learn More Close The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy ASGCT is the primary membership organization for scientists, ... Therapeutics Official Journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy is the leading journal for gene ...

  2. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español The Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders KidsHealth / For Teens / The Basics ... such as treating health problems. What Is a Gene? To understand how genes work, let's review some ...

  3. Information-processing genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir Shah, K.

    1995-01-01

    There are an estimated 100,000 genes in the human genome of which 97% is non-coding. On the other hand, bacteria have little or no non-coding DNA. Non-coding region includes introns, ALU sequences, satellite DNA, and other segments not expressed as proteins. Why it exists? Why nature has kept non-coding during the long evolutionary period if it has no role in the development of complex life forms? Does complexity of a species somehow correlated to the existence of apparently useless sequences? What kind of capability is encoded within such nucleotide sequences that is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for the evolution of complex life forms, keeping in mind the C-value paradox and the omnipresence of non-coding segments in higher eurkaryotes and also in many archea and prokaryotes. The physico-chemical description of biological processes is hardware oriented and does not highlight algorithmic or information processing aspect. However, an algorithm without its hardware implementation is useless as much as hardware without its capability to run an algorithm. The nature and type of computation an information-processing hardware can perform depends only on its algorithm and the architecture that reflects the algorithm. Given that enormously difficult tasks such as high fidelity replication, transcription, editing and regulation are all achieved within a long linear sequence, it is natural to think that some parts of a genome are involved is these tasks. If some complex algorithms are encoded with these parts, then it is natural to think that non-coding regions contain processing-information algorithms. A comparison between well-known automatic sequences and sequences constructed out of motifs is found in all species proves the point: noncoding regions are a sort of ''hardwired'' programs, i.e., they are linear representations of information-processing machines. Thus in our model, a noncoding region, e.g., an intron contains a program (or equivalently, it is

  4. Gene discovery in Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Burgos Nelia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triatoma infestans is the most relevant vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone of South America. Since its genome has not yet been studied, sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs is one of the most powerful tools for efficiently identifying large numbers of expressed genes in this insect vector. Results In this work, we generated 826 ESTs, resulting in an increase of 47% in the number of ESTs available for T. infestans. These ESTs were assembled in 471 unique sequences, 151 of which represent 136 new genes for the Reduviidae family. Conclusions Among the putative new genes for the Reduviidae family, we identified and described an interesting subset of genes involved in development and reproduction, which constitute potential targets for insecticide development.

  5. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  6. MHC Genes and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Shiv

    2000-01-01

    Tumors are believed to emerge only when immune surveillance fails. We wished to ascertain whether the failure to inherit putative protective alleles of HLA class II genes is linked to the development of breast cancer...

  7. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the largest genomic studies ever, ... consortium identified 29 genetic variations that influence blood pressure. More than half of these variants were previously ...

  8. Gene therapy of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Tan Jian

    2007-01-01

    Normally, differentiated thyroid carcinoma(DTC) is a disease of good prognosis, but about 30% of the tumors are dedifferentiate, which are inaccessible to standard therapeutic procedures such as 'operation, 131 I therapy and thyroid hormone'. Both internal and abroad experts are researching a new therapy of dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma--gene therapy. Many of them utilize methods of it, but follow different strategies: (1) transduction of the thyroid sodium/iodide transporter gene to make tissues that do not accumulate iodide treatable by 131 I therapy; (2) strengthening of the anti-tumor immune response; (3) suicide gene therapy; (4) depression the generation of tumor cells; (5) gene therapy of anti- vascularization. (authors)

  9. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most...... of these findings still require independent replications and/or functional studies to confirm the exact role in LDL metabolism and the clinical implications for human health. SUMMARY: GWAS, exome sequencing studies, and recently 'exome chip' studies have suggested several novel genes with effects on LDL cholesterol...

  10. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  11. Endocrine aspects of cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-02-01

    The field of cancer gene therapy is in continuous expansion, and technology is quickly moving ahead as far as gene targeting and regulation of gene expression are concerned. This review focuses on the endocrine aspects of gene therapy, including the possibility to exploit hormone and hormone receptor functions for regulating therapeutic gene expression, the use of endocrine-specific genes as new therapeutic tools, the effects of viral vector delivery and transgene expression on the endocrine system, and the endocrine response to viral vector delivery. Present ethical concerns of gene therapy and the risk of germ cell transduction are also discussed, along with potential lines of innovation to improve cell and gene targeting.

  12. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  13. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  14. Rice Multi-Gene Analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gdyang

    Maps of all the intronic MIR genes analyzed using MPSS database in rice. Click here for a legend that explains the icons and colors in the image below. Click here to jump in the page below to the specific gene. osa-MIR159f osa-MIR399i osa-MIR418 osa-MIR437 osa-MIR439b osa-MIR439j osa-MIR440 osa-MIR442.

  15. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  16. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen, S.V; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV...

  17. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  18. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  19. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  20. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  1. Advances in study of reporter gene imaging for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Chuanjie; Zhou Jiwen

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of gene therapy, it is requisite to monitor localization and expression of the therapeutic gene in vivo. Monitoring expression of reporter gene using radionuclide reporter gene technique is the best method. Adenoviral vectors expressing reporter gene are constructed using gene fusion, bicistronic, double promoter or bidirectional transcriptional recombination techniques, and transferred into target cells and tissues, then injected radiolabeled reporter probes which couple to the reporter genes. The reporter genes can be imaged invasively, repeatedly, quantitatively with γ-camera, PET and SPECT. Recently, several reporter gene and reporter probe systems have been used in studies of gene therapy. The part of them has been used for clinic trials

  2. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  3. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Nour; Kweider, Mahmoud; Abbady, Abdul-Qader; Soukkarieh, Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK) antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica. The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique. The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed. Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  4. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by

  5. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...... with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...

  6. Polymorphism of xenobiotic metabolizm genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidin, M. B.; Ten, I. A.; Sevostiyanova, N. v.; Kokorina, Y. I.; Slominskaya, F. M.; Tereshchenko, I. V.; Kolomiets, S. A.; Takhanov, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    The genes of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes genes, also called biotransformation genes or environmental genes seems to be an important factor of individual susceptibility of common diseases of different genesis including cancer. At the present time, a systematic accumulation of information on the role of these genes polymorphism in predisposition to different disorders is carried out worldwide. To investigate a significance of biotransformation genes for cancer disorders in West Siberia region, we studies a polymorphism of genes CYP2C19 (Small-RFLP, 1 and 2 alleles in exone 5), GSTTI, GSTMI (null and normal alleles in both genes) in 47 lung cancer (LC) patients, 269 women with breast cancer (BC), and 130 controls from Tomsk, Russia. All participants were Russians. The frequency of GSTM1 null genotype in LC patients was significantly higher than that in controls (0.608?0.071 vs. 0.162?0-032; p<1x10-7 by Fisher exact test), whereas the frequency of null genotype in BC women was significantly lower in comparison with control women (0.545?0.039 vs. 0.747?0.053: p=0.005 by Fisher exact test). The latter circumstance seems to be unexpected because a priori one suggest that just null genotype of GSTM1 is of a pathological nature. Frequencies of null genotypes of GSTN1 in LC patients and GSTT1 in BC women corresponded to those in controls. In LC patients frequencies of CYP2C19 alleles did not differ significantly from values control sample, whereas in BC women the frequency of CYP2C19 2 allele was higher than that in control (0.340?0.20 vs. 0.182?0.034, p=4,9x10-4 by Fisher exact test). This allele encodes a truncated non-functional protein being a major cause of poor metabolism of some drugs. Thus, the data obtained allow us to conclude that polymorphisms of GSTTi, GSTM1, and CYP2C19 genes are associated with cancer disorders in Russians from West Siberia Even so, their pathogenetic meaning is specific with respect the type of malignant pathology. (Author)

  7. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene expression in which RNA synthesis occurs from the DNA (gene) template in a series of.

  8. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  9. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Why synthesize genes? Because of the naiveté of biologists and molecular biologists in 1965 when Gobind Khorana initiated synthesis of the yeast alanine tRNA gene, this was a valid question. At that time, we could deduce the sequence of only one gene – the yeast alanine tRNA gene as the corresponding tRNA.

  10. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we discuss the dynamic organization of eukaryotic genes into chromatin. Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene ...

  11. Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2008-12-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that lead to defective ion transport in the conducting pulmonary airways and exocrine glands. Through a process that is not fully understood, CFTR defects predispose affected patients to chronic endobronchial infections with organisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Following the discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, CF became one of the primary targets for gene therapy research. Early enthusiasm surrounded the new field of gene therapy during most of the 1990s and it led academics and clinicians on a big effort to apply gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Clinical studies have been pursued using recombinant adenovirus, recombinant adeno-associated virus, cationic liposomes, and cationic polymer vectors. Although to this date no dramatic therapeutic benefits have been observed, a lot of information has been gained from the pre-clinical and clinical studies that were performed. This learning curve has led to the optimization of vector technology and an appreciation of immune and mechanical barriers that have to be overcome for successful delivery.

  12. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  13. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzot, Fabien; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana, Marina

    2014-06-01

    During the last decade, gene therapy has emerged as a convincing therapy for primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Ex vivo gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) via viral vectors permits sustained correction of T cell immunodeficiency in two forms of severe combined immunodeficiency: X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) (γ chain [γc] deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. However, this success has been balanced by the occurrence of genotoxicity generated by the integration of first-generation retroviral vectors. Recently, the development of safer self-inactivating vectors has led to the initiation of new studies with the hope of equivalent efficacy and a better safety profile. This review article focuses on the updated results of gene therapy trials for PIDs - from early studies to ongoing clinical trials. We detail the major advances made in gene transfer and repair technologies, and discuss the many ways to extend our present experience. With optimization in terms of safety and efficacy, gene therapy by lentiviral transduction could become a compelling alternative to allogeneic HSC transplantation, and thus may take center stage in the management of PIDs in coming years.

  15. Molecular Studies on Preproinsulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin plays an important role in maintaining the blood glucose level of the body. The β-cells of pancreas produce insulin in the form of precursor that is preproinsulin. The gene of preproinsulin provides an interesting system for addressing question related to molecular evolution. Recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to isolate and sequence the chromosomal genes coding for unique protein products. Although preproinsulin of various organism has been isolated and cloned, but there is no report from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis that is our major livestock. The genomic DNA of buffalo was isolated using Laura-Lee-Boodram method. The part of preproinsulin gene (596bp and 520bp using BPPI-UPS and bpiful_F as forward and BC1-C as reverse primer was amplified. Cloning of amplified fragments of gene were performed in pCR 2.1 vector. Positive clones were screened on the basis of blue white selection. The band obtained on 596bp and 520bp after colony PCR confirmed the successful cloning of preproinsulin gene in pCR 2.1 vector.

  16. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A hybrid approach of gene sets and single genes for the prediction of survival risks with gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated biological knowledge is often encoded as gene sets, collections of genes associated with similar biological functions or pathways. The use of gene sets in the analyses of high-throughput gene expression data has been intensively studied and applied in clinical research. However, the main interest remains in finding modules of biological knowledge, or corresponding gene sets, significantly associated with disease conditions. Risk prediction from censored survival times using gene sets hasn't been well studied. In this work, we propose a hybrid method that uses both single gene and gene set information together to predict patient survival risks from gene expression profiles. In the proposed method, gene sets provide context-level information that is poorly reflected by single genes. Complementarily, single genes help to supplement incomplete information of gene sets due to our imperfect biomedical knowledge. Through the tests over multiple data sets of cancer and trauma injury, the proposed method showed robust and improved performance compared with the conventional approaches with only single genes or gene sets solely. Additionally, we examined the prediction result in the trauma injury data, and showed that the modules of biological knowledge used in the prediction by the proposed method were highly interpretable in biology. A wide range of survival prediction problems in clinical genomics is expected to benefit from the use of biological knowledge.

  18. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  19. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies......This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  20. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S.V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger.Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed.

  1. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction of gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Using microarray measurements techniques, it is possible to measure the activity of genes simultaneously across the whole genome. Since genes influence each others activity levels through complex regulatory networks, such gene expression measurements are state samples of a dynamical system. Gene expression data has proven useful for diagnosis and definition of disease subgroups, for inference of the functional role of a given gene or for the deciphering of complex disease mechanisms. However,...

  2. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  3. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  4. Candidate Gene Identification of Flowering Time Genes in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrinne E. Grover

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time control is critically important to all sexually reproducing angiosperms in both natural ecological and agronomic settings. Accordingly, there is much interest in defining the genes involved in the complex flowering-time network and how these respond to natural and artificial selection, the latter often entailing transitions in day-length responses. Here we describe a candidate gene analysis in the cotton genus , which uses homologs from the well-described flowering network to bioinformatically and phylogenetically identify orthologs in the published genome sequence from Ulbr., one of the two model diploid progenitors of the commercially important allopolyploid cottons, L. and L. Presence and patterns of expression were evaluated from 13 aboveground tissues related to flowering for each of the candidate genes using allopolyploid as a model. Furthermore, we use a comparative context to determine copy number variability of each key gene family across 10 published angiosperm genomes. Data suggest a pattern of repeated loss of duplicates following ancient whole-genome doubling events in diverse lineages. The data presented here provide a foundation for understanding both the parallel evolution of day-length neutrality in domesticated cottons and the flowering-time network, in general, in this important crop plant.

  5. Effect Alpha Globlin Gene Deletion And Gamma Globin Gene -158 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have been unable to find a molecular basis for the benign clinical course in all our patients. Other genetic or acquired factors must be hypothesized which ameliorate the clinical condition. Keywords: β- thalassemia, Xmn1 polymorphism, α-globin gene deletion. Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol.

  6. FunGeneClusterS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    and industrial biotechnology applications. We have previously published a method for accurate prediction of clusters from genome and transcriptome data, which could also suggest cross-chemistry, however, this method was limited both in the number of parameters which could be adjusted as well as in user......Secondary metabolites of fungi are receiving an increasing amount of interest due to their prolific bioactivities and the fact that fungal biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often occurs from co-regulated and co-located gene clusters. This makes the gene clusters attractive for synthetic biology...

  7. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  8. Gene regulation by growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, R.; Gorham, J.; Siegfried, Z.; Leonard, D.; Gizang-Ginsberg, E.; Thompson, M.A.; Lawe, D.; Kouzarides, T.; Vosatka, R.; MacGregor, D.; Jamal, S.; Greenberg, M.E.; Ziff, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    To coordinate the proliferation and differentiation of diverse cell types, cells of higher eukaryotes communicate through the release of growth factors. These peptides interact with specific transmembrane receptors of other cells and thereby generate intracellular messengers. The many changes in cellular physiology and activity that can be induced by growth factors imply that growth factor-induced signals can reach the nucleus and control gene activity. Moreover, current evidence also suggests that unregulated signaling along such pathways can induce aberrant proliferation and the formation of tumors. This paper reviews investigations of growth factor regulation of gene expression conducted by the authors' laboratory

  9. Gene therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, T R; Laube, B L

    2001-09-01

    Theoretically, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene replacement during the neonatal period can decrease morbidity and mortality from cystic fibrosis (CF). In vivo gene transfers have been accomplished in CF patients. Choice of vector, mode of delivery to airways, translocation of genetic information, and sufficient expression level of the normalized CFTR gene are issues that currently are being addressed in the field. The advantages and limitations of viral vectors are a function of the parent virus. Viral vectors used in this setting include adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Initial studies with Ad vectors resulted in a vector that was efficient for gene transfer with dose-limiting inflammatory effects due to the large amount of viral protein delivered. The next generation of Ad vectors, with more viral coding sequence deletions, has a longer duration of activity and elicits a lesser degree of cell-mediated immunity in mice. A more recent generation of Ad vectors has no viral genes remaining. Despite these changes, the problem of humoral immunity remains with Ad vectors. A variety of strategies such as vector systems requiring single, or widely spaced, administrations, pharmacologic immunosuppression at administration, creation of a stealth vector, modification of immunogenic epitopes, or tolerance induction are being considered to circumvent humoral immunity. AAV vectors have been studied in animal and human models. They do not appear to induce inflammatory changes over a wide range of doses. The level of CFTR messenger RNA expression is difficult to ascertain with AAV vectors since the small size of the vector relative to the CFTR gene leaves no space for vector-specific sequences on which to base assays to distinguish endogenous from vector-expressed messenger RNA. In general, AAV vectors appear to be safe and have superior duration profiles. Cationic liposomes are lipid-DNA complexes. These vectors generally have been

  10. Multifactor dimensionality reduction for detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in pharmacogenomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Marylyn D; Motsinger, Alison A

    2005-12-01

    In the quest for discovering disease susceptibility genes, the reality of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions creates difficult challenges for many current statistical approaches. In an attempt to overcome limitations with current disease gene detection methods, the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach was previously developed. In brief, MDR is a method that reduces the dimensionality of multilocus information to identify polymorphisms associated with an increased risk of disease. This approach takes multilocus genotypes and develops a model for defining disease risk by pooling high-risk genotype combinations into one group and low-risk combinations into another. Cross-validation and permutation testing are used to identify optimal models. While this approach was initially developed for studies of complex disease, it is also directly applicable to pharmacogenomic studies where the outcome variable is drug treatment response/nonresponse or toxicity/no toxicity. MDR is a nonparametric and model-free approach that has been shown to have reasonable power to detect epistasis in both theoretical and empirical studies. This computational technology is described in detail in this review, and its application in pharmacogenomic studies is demonstrated.

  11. Gene and enhancer trap tagging of vascular-expressed genes in poplar trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Gayle Dupper; Caiping Ma; Robert Martienssen; Steven Strauss; Richard Meilan

    2004-01-01

    We report a gene discovery system for poplar trees based on gene and enhancer traps. Gene and enhancer trap vectors carrying the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were inserted into the poplar genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation, where they reveal the expression pattern of genes at or near the insertion sites. Because GUS...

  12. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  13. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this.

  14. Interactive visualization of gene regulatory networks with associated gene expression time series data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, Michel A.; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Lulko, Andrzej T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Linsen, L; Hagen, H; Hamann, B

    2008-01-01

    We present GENeVis, an application to visualize gene expression time series data in a gene regulatory network context. This is a network of regulator proteins that regulate the expression of their respective target genes. The networks are represented as graphs, in which the nodes represent genes,

  15. The UNC-4 homeobox protein represses mab-9 expression in DA motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari, Gholamali; Appleford, Peter J; Seago, Julian

    2011-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor mab-9 has been shown to be required for the correct fate of the male-specific blast cells B and F, normal posterior hypodermal morphogenesis, and for the correct axon migration of motor neurons that project circumferential commissures to dorsal muscles. In this study......, an RNAi screen designed to identify upstream transcriptional regulators of mab-9 showed that silencing of unc-4 (encoding a paired-class homeodomain protein) increases mab-9::gfp expression in the nervous system, specifically in posterior DA motor neurons. Over-expression of unc-4 from a heat......-shock promoter has the opposite effect, causing repression of mab-9 in various cells. We find that mab-9 expression in unc-37 mutants is also elevated in DA motor neurons, consistent with known roles for UNC-37 as a co-repressor with UNC-4. These results identify mab-9 as a novel target of the UNC-4/UNC-37...

  16. Iroquois homeobox 2 suppresses cellular motility and chemokine expression in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Stefan; Stamm, Hauke; Pandjaitan, Mutiha; Kemming, Dirk; Brors, Benedikt; Pantel, Klaus; Wikman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected using ultrasensitive immunocytochemical assays and their presence in the bone marrow can predict the subsequent occurrence of overt metastasis formation and metastatic relapse. Using expression profiling on early stage primary breast tumors, low IRX2 expression was previously shown to be associated with the presence of DTCs in the bone marrow, suggesting a possible role of IRX2 in the early steps of metastasis formation. The purpose of this study is to gain insights into the significance of IRX2 protein function in the progression of breast cancer. To assess the physiological relevance of IRX2 in breast cancer, we evaluated IRX2 expression in a large breast cancer cohort (n = 1992). Additionally, constitutive IRX2 over expression was established in BT-549 and Hs578T breast cancer cell lines. Subsequently we analyzed whether IRX2 overexpression effects chemokine secretion and cellular motility of these cells. Low IRX2 mRNA expression was found to correlate with high tumor grade, positive lymph node status, negative hormone receptor status, and basal type of primary breast tumors. Also in cell lines low IRX2 expression was associated with mainly basal breast cancer cell lines. The functional studies show that overexpression of the IRX2 transcription factor in basal cell lines suppressed secretion of the pro-metastatic chemokines and inhibited cellular motility but did not influence cell proliferation. Our results imply that the IRX2 transcription factor might represent a novel metastasis associated protein that acts as a negative regulator of cellular motility and as a repressor of chemokine expression. Loss of IRX2 expression could therefore contribute to early hematogenous dissemination of breast cancer by sustaining chemokine secretion and enabling mobilization of tumor cells. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1907-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  17. Disruption of Teashirt Zinc Finger Homeobox 1 Is Associated with Congenital Aural Atresia in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Ilse; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Pennings, Ronald J. E.; Nillessen, Willy; Pfundt, Rolph; Kunst, Henricus P.; Admiraal, Ronald J.; Veltman, Joris A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Brunner, Han G.; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital aural atresia (CAA) can occur as an isolated congenital malformation or in the context of a number of monogenic and chromosomal syndromes. CAA is frequently seen in individuals with an 18q deletion, which is characterized by intellectual disability, reduced white-matter myelination, foot

  18. Embryos, genes, and birth defects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferretti, Patrizia

    2006-01-01

    ... Structural anomalies The genesis of chromosome abnormalities Embryo survival The cause of high levels of chromosome abnormality in human embryos Relative parental risks - age, translocations, inversions, gonadal and germinal mosaics 33 33 34 35 36 44 44 45 4 Identification and Analysis of Genes Involved in Congenital Malformation Syndromes Peter J. Scambler Ge...

  19. Meta-morpho-gene deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Forming of meta-morpho-gene deposits make integral processes part of metamorphism and forming of proper rocks. The metamorphism of rocks and ores is essential modification of their mineral composition, structure and texture under the influence of rising of thermodynamical parameters

  20. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  1. Genome position and gene amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsová, Pavla; Snijders, A.M.; Kwek, S.; Roydasgupta, R.; Fridlyand, J.; Tokuyasu, T.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2007), r120 ISSN 1474-760X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * array comparative genomic hybridization * oncogene Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.589, year: 2007

  2. Total Synthesis of a Gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Total Synthesis of a Gene. H G Khorana. Classics Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp 1174-1197 ... Author Affiliations. H G Khorana1. Professor of Biology and Chemestry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139.

  3. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  4. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects.

  6. Gene therapy of inherited immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Giorgia; Thornhill, Susannah I; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a group of inherited diseases that affect the development or activity of the immune system. In severe cases allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has proved to be a successful curative modality but it is limited by toxicity and reduced efficacy in mismatched donor settings. Gene therapy for PID has been developed as an alternative strategy and has entered the clinical arena. In this review we discuss the outcomes of recent gene therapy trials and some of the problems that remain to be tackled. Results from clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), adenosine deaminase deficient SCID (ADA-SCID), and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) are discussed. In addition, other conditions are highlighted such as the Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) for which gene therapy has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies, and are currently being translated into novel clinical approaches. Whilst these encouraging results demonstrate that gene therapy can be used successfully to treat monogenic PID, the occurrence of vector-related side effects has highlighted the need for accurate assessment of the associated risks and a requirement for improvements in vector design.

  7. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  8. (TNNC1) gene in goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-23

    Feb 23, 2012 ... the protein conformation, which was viewed in the Swiss Pdb. Viewer (Schwede et al., 2003). Tissue expression analysis. Tissue expression pattern of TNNC1 was performed by fluorescence quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) using goat β-actin gene as an internal expression control. The primers of β-actin (Table ...

  9. Ancient genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Crespo, P; Poza, M; Prieto-Alcedo, M; Villa, T G

    2004-07-01

    Amber is a plant resin mainly produced by coniferous trees that, after entrapping a variety of living beings, was subjected to a process of fossilization until it turned into yellowish, translucent stones. It is also one of the best sources of ancient DNA on which to perform studies on evolution. Here a method for the sterilization of amber that allows reliable ancient DNA extraction with no actual DNA contamination is described. Working with insects taken from amber, it was possible to amplify the ATP9, PGU1 and rRNA18S ancient genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae corresponding to samples from the Miocene and Oligocene. After comparison of the current genes with their ancient (up to 35-40 million years) counterparts it was concluded that essential genes such as rRNA18S are highly conserved and that even normal 'house-keeping' genes, such as PGU1, are strikingly conserved along the millions of years that S. cerevisiae has evolved.

  10. (TNNC1) gene in goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-23

    Feb 23, 2012 ... nucleotide sequence was high and was similar in various animals ranging from 97.94 (cow) to 83.33%. (African clawed frog), and ... Key words: TroponinC1 gene, molecular cloning, structural analysis, expression, goat. INTRODUCTION ... influence on meat tenderness, in which the types of myofiber can be ...

  11. Candidate genes in panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howe, A. S.; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Bani-Fatemi, A.

    2016-01-01

    association studies and ancestry-specific effects. In the present study, we performed a succinct review of case-control association studies published prior to April 2015. Meta-analyses were performed for candidate gene variants examined in at least three studies using the Cochrane Mantel-Haenszel fixed...

  12. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  13. Using Genes to Guide Prescriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain medicines. In general, each gene is the body's instructions for building a specific protein. These instructions are in a ... or different medications—to prevent the drug from building up to toxic levels before it's processed by the body. Rheumatoid Arthritis New insight into drugs that treat ...

  14. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects of MTHFR ...

  16. Gene editing. Time to reflection.

    OpenAIRE

    Santaló Pedro, Josep

    2017-01-01

    The development of new gene editing technologies and their special characteristics have led to a passionate debate on the suitability and reliability of their use both in plant and animal species and in the human species itself. A brief analysis of the arguments used in this debate as well as a summary of some of the most relevant statements in this regard is made.

  17. Gene therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Eric M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-09-01

    Lung cancer patients suffer a 15% overall survival despite advances in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This unacceptably low survival rate is due to the usual finding of advanced disease at diagnosis. However, multimodality strategies using conventional therapies only minimally improve survival rates even in early stages of lung cancer. Attempts to improve survival in advanced disease using various combinations of platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated that no regimen is superior, suggesting a therapeutic plateau and the need for novel, more specific, and less toxic therapeutic strategies. Over the past three decades, the genetic etiology of cancer has been gradually delineated, albeit not yet completely. Understanding the molecular events that occur during the multistep process of bronchogenic carcinogenesis may make these tasks more surmountable. During these same three decades, techniques have been developed which allow transfer of functional genes into mammalian cells. For example, blockade of activated tumor-promoting oncogenes or replacement of inactivated tumor-suppressing or apoptosis-promoting genes can be achieved by gene therapy. This article will discuss the therapeutic implications of these molecular changes associated with bronchogenic carcinomas and will then review the status of gene therapies for treatment of lung cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  19. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes...... increases opportunities for gene conversion. RESULTS: To characterize gene conversion in rice, we have defined 626 multigene families in which 377 gene conversions were detected using the GENECONV program. Over 60% of the conversions we detected were between chromosomes. We found that the inter......-chromosomal conversions distributed between chromosome 1 and 5, 2 and 6, and 3 and 5 are more frequent than genome average (Z-test, P conversion on the same chromosome decreased with the physical distance between gene conversion partners. Ka/Ks analysis indicates that gene conversion...

  20. QTLminer: identifying genes regulating quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schughart Klaus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping identifies genomic regions that likely contain genes regulating a quantitative trait. However, QTL regions may encompass tens to hundreds of genes. To find the most promising candidate genes that regulate the trait, the biologist typically collects information from multiple resources about the genes in the QTL interval. This process is very laborious and time consuming. Results QTLminer is a bioinformatics tool that automatically performs QTL region analysis. It is available in GeneNetwork and it integrates information such as gene annotation, gene expression and sequence polymorphisms for all the genes within a given genomic interval. Conclusions QTLminer substantially speeds up discovery of the most promising candidate genes within a QTL region.