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Sample records for angiogenesis imaging agent

  1. Biological evaluation of an ornithine-modified 99mTc-labeled RGD peptide as an angiogenesis imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Radiolabeled RGD peptides that specifically target integrin ανβ3 have great potential in early tumor detection through noninvasive monitoring of tumor angiogenesis. Based on previous findings of our group on radiopeptides containing positively charged aminoacids, we developed a new cyclic cRGDfK derivative, c(RGDfK)-(Orn)3-CGG. This new peptide availing the polar linker (Orn)3 and the 99mTc-chelating moiety CGG (Cys-Gly-Gly) is appropriately designed for 99mTc-labeling, as well as consequent conjugation onto nanoparticles. Methods: A tumor imaging agent, c(RGDfK)-(Orn)3-[CGG-99mTc], is evaluated with regard to its radiochemical, radiobiological and imaging characteristics. Results: The complex c(RGDfK)-(Orn)3-[CGG-99mTc] was obtained in high radiochemical yield (> 98%) and was stable in vitro and ex vivo. It presented identical to the respective, fully analytically characterized 185/187Re complex retention time in RP-HPLC. In contrary to other RGD derivatives, we showed that the new radiopeptide exhibits kidney uptake and urine excretion due to the ornithine linker. High tumor uptake (3.87 ± 0.48% ID/g at 60 min p.i.) was observed and was maintained relatively high even at 24 h p.i. (1.83 ± 0.05 % ID/g), thus providing well-defined scintigraphic imaging. Accumulation in other organs was negligible. Blocking experiments indicated target specificity for integrin receptors in U87MG glioblastoma cells. Conclusion: Due to its relatively high tumor uptake, renal elimination and negligible abdominal localization, the new 99mTc-RGD peptide is considered promising in the field of imaging ανβ3-positive tumors. However, the preparation of multifunctional SPECT/MRI contrast agents (RGD-conjugated nanoparticles) for dual modality imaging of integrin expressing tumors should be further investigated

  2. Visualization of Tumor Angiogenesis Using MR Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibody Conjugate in a Mouse Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To visualize tumor angiogenesis using the MRI contrast agent, Gd- DTPA-anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody conjugate, with a 4.7-Tesla MRI instrument in a mouse model. We designed a tumor angiogenesis-targeting T1 contrast agent that was prepared by the bioconjugation of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) antibody. The specific binding of the agent complex to cells that express VEGFR2 was examined in cultured murine endothelial cells (MS-1 cells) with a 4.7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Angiogenesis-specific T1 enhancement was imaged with the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate using a CT-26 adenocarcinoma tumor model in eight mice. As a control, the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-rat immunoglobulin G (Gd-DTPA-anti-rat IgG) was imaged with a tumor model in eight mice. Statistical significance was assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. Tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate showed predominant binding to cultured endothelial cells that expressed a high level of VEGFR2. Signal enhancement was approximately three-fold for in vivo T1-weighted MR imaging with the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as compared with the Gd-DTPA-rat IgG in the mouse tumor model (p < 0.05). VEGFR2 expression in CT-26 tumor vessels was demonstrated using immunohistochemical staining. MR imaging using the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as a contrast agent is useful in visualizing noninvasively tumor angiogenesis in a murine tumor model

  3. Inorganic nanomaterials for tumor angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. Noninvasive detection of angiogenic activities is thus of great importance in cancer diagnosis as well as evaluation of cancer therapeutic responses. Various angiogenesis-related molecular targets have been identified and used in tumor vasculature targeting and imaging. Recently, inorganic nanomaterials with various unique intrinsic physical properties have attracted growing interest in biomedical imaging applications. This article will review current progresses in the applications of inorganic nanoprobes in molecular angiogenesis imaging. Several types of nanomaterials with various optical properties, including semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, have been used as novel optical probes to image angiogenic events. Besides optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of angiogenesis using magnetic nanoparticles has also been intensively investigated. Moreover, nanomaterials provide unique platforms for the integration of various imaging modalities together with therapeutic functionalities for multi-modality imaging and therapy. Although the application of inorganic nanomaterials in clinical imaging and diagnosis is still facing many challenges, the unique properties and functions of these novel nanoprobes make them very promising agents in angiogenesis imaging and could bring great opportunities to this fast-growing field. (orig.)

  4. In Vivo CEST MR imaging of U87 mice brain tumor angiogenesis using targeted LipoCEST contrast agent at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LipoCEST are liposome-encapsulating paramagnetic contrast agents (CA) based on chemical exchange saturation transfer with applications in bio-molecular MRI. Their attractive features include biocompatibility, sub-nanomolar sensitivity, and amenability to functionalization for targeting bio-markers. We demonstrate MR imaging using a targeted lipoCEST, injected intravenously. A lipoCEST carrying Tm(III)-complexes was conjugated to RGD tripeptide (RGD-lipoCEST), to target integrin αv,β3 receptors involved in tumor angiogenesis and was compared with an unconjugated lipoCEST. Brain tumors were induced in athymic nude mice by intracerebral injection of U87MG cells and were imaged at 7 T after intravenous injection of either of the two contrast agents (n = 12 for each group). Chemical exchange saturation transfer-MSME sequence was applied over 2 h with an average acquisition time interval of 13.5 min. The chemical exchange saturation transfer signal was ∼1% in the tumor and controlateral regions, and decreased to ∼0.3% after 2 h; while RGD-lipoCEST signal was ∼1.4% in the tumor region and persisted for up to 2 h. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a persistent co-localization of RGD-lipoCEST with αv,β3 receptors in the tumor region. These results constitute an encouraging step toward in vivo MRI imaging of tumor angiogenesis using intravenously injected lipoCEST. (authors)

  5. Optical techniques for the molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of angiogenesis, an essential hallmark for tumour development as well as for several inflammatory diseases and physiological phenomena, is of growing interest for diagnosis and therapy in oncology. In the context of biochemical characterisation of key molecules involved in angiogenesis, several targets for imaging and therapy could be identified in the last decade. Optical imaging (OI) relies on the visualisation of near infrared (NIR) light, either its absorption and scattering in tissue (non-enhanced OI) or using fluorescent contrast agents. OI offers excellent signal to noise ratios due to virtually absent background fluorescence in the NIR range and is thus a versatile tool to image specific molecular target structures in vivo. This work intends to provide a survey of the different approaches to imaging of angiogenesis using OI methods in preclinical research as well as first clinical trials. Different imaging modalities as well as various optical contrast agents are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. PET imaging for evaluating tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis, a main characteristic in tumors, plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, which provides a new strategy for tumor treatment. By marking angiogenesis-related receptors, polypeptides, kinases or extracellular matrix proteins as high affinity molecular probes, PET imaging can noninvasively display integrin, VEGF/VEGFR, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and closely monitor tumor angiogenesis and vascular-targeted treatments on the molecular level. In this paper, research progress and future development of PET imaging for evaluating tumor angiogenesis are reviewed. (authors)

  7. Advances of molecular imaging in tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis has a close relationship with tumor growth, progression, metastasis and the prognosis of tumor patients. Therefore, tumor anti-angiogenic treatment arouses great public interest. Molecular imaging can characteristically display and measure the biochemical process of organisms at cellular and molecular level in vivo,which is based on the specific binding of molecular probe with high affinity and target molecules. In recent years, molecular imaging has a certain progress on visual and quantitative research of tumor angiogenesis and it is expected to become an important technique in the efficacy evaluation and prognostic assessment. This article summarizes the new advances of molecular imaging technology in tumor angiogenesis. (authors)

  8. Diversity of radioprobes targeted to tumor angiogenesis on molecular functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular functional imaging could visualize, characterize, and measure the bio- logical processes including tumor angiogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The molecular probes labeled by a variety of radionuclide used in the field of the nuclear medicine play pivotal roles in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the regulatory role of different probes in tumor angiogenesis has not been systematically illustrated. The current status of tumor angiogenesis imaging with radiolabeled probes of peptide, monoclonal antibody as well as its fragment, especially nanoparticle-based probes to gain insights into the robust tumor angiogenesis development were summarized. It was recognized that only the probes such as nanoparticle-based probes, which truly target the tumor vasculature rather than tumor cells because of poor extravasation, are really tumor angiogenesis imaging agent. The research of molecular probe targeted to angiogenesis would meet its flourish just after the outstanding improvements in the in vivo stability and biocompatibility, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of tumor angiogenesis imaging probes are made. Translation to clinical applications will also be critical for the maximize benefits of these novel agents. The future of tumor angiogenesis imaging lies in liable imaging probes and multiple imaging modalities, imaging of protein-protein interactions, and quantitative molecular imaging. (authors)

  9. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

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    Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X [Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun Jianqi; Gu Xiang; Liu Ping [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xiao Tiqiao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: pingliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lisaxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2010-04-21

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  10. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  11. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or αvβ3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging αvβ3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. (orig.)

  12. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life than those used for PET. In addition, SPECT is a less expensive technique than PET. Commonly used gamma emitters are: 99mTc (Emax 141 keV, T1/2 6.02 h), 123I (Emax 529 keV, T1/2 13.0 h) and 111In (Emax 245 keV, T1/2 67.2 h). Compared to clinical SPECT, PET has a higher spatial resolution and the possibility to more accurately estimate the in vivo concentration of a tracer. In preclinical imaging, the situation is quite different. The resolution of microSPECT cameras (1.5 mm). In this report, studies on new radiolabelled tracers for SPECT imaging of angiogenesis in tumours are reviewed. (orig.)

  13. Preliminary study on application of synchrotron radiation imaging to tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, only vessels lager than 200 μm in diameter can be observed using conventional medical image. Synchrotron radiation(SR) phase contrast imaging, with a spatial resolution being as high as 1 μm, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structure, such as blood vessels and tumors. The morphology of tumor angiogenesis at different stages in the 4T1 nude mice tumor window model was firstly studied without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at SSRF X-ray imaging and biomedical application beamline. The results showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor angiogenesis with the smallest vessels of 20-30 μm in diameter. (authors)

  14. Quantum dots for multimodal molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, W.J.M.; Strijkers, G.J.; Nicolay, K.; Griffioen, A W

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots exhibit unique optical properties for bioimaging purposes. We have previously developed quantum dots with a paramagnetic and functionalized coating and have shown their potential for molecular imaging purposes. In the current mini-review we summarize the synthesis procedure, the in vitro testing and, importantly, the in vivo application for multimodal molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis.

  15. Grating-based phase-contrast imaging of tumor angiogenesis in lung metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Lin

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents.We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF and compared with histological sections.Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape.Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases.

  16. Adrenal imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of this proposal are the development of selenium-containing analogs of the aromatic amino acids as imaging agents for the pancreas and of the adrenal cortex enzyme inhibitors as imaging agents for adrenal pathology. The objects for this year include (a) the synthesis of methylseleno derivatives of phenylalanine and tryptophan, and (b) the preparation and evaluation of radiolabeled iodobenzoyl derivatives of the selenazole and thiazole analogs of metyrapone and SU-9055

  17. Angiogenesis imaging with vascular-constrained particles: the why and how

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis is a keystone in the treatment of cancer and potentially many other diseases. In cancer, first-generation antiangiogenic therapeutic approaches have demonstrated survival benefit in subsets of patients, but their high cost and notable adverse side effect risk have fueled alternative development efforts to personalize patient selection and reduce off-target effects. In parallel, rapid advances in cost-effective genomic profiling and sensitive early detection of high-risk biomarkers for cancer, atherosclerosis, and other angiogenesis-related pathologies will challenge the medical imaging community to identify, characterize, and risk stratify patients early in the natural history of these disease processes. Conventional diagnostic imaging techniques were not intended for such sensitive and specific detection, which has led to the emergence of novel noninvasive biomedical imaging approaches. The overall intent of molecular imaging is to achieve greater quantitative characterization of pathologies based on microanatomical, biochemical, or functional assessments; in many approaches, the capacity to deliver effective therapy, e.g., antiangiogenic therapy, can be combined. Agents with both diagnostic and therapy attributes have acquired the moniker ''theranostics.'' This review will explore biomedical imaging options being pursued to better segment and treat patients with angiogenesis-influenced disease using vascular-constrained contrast platform technologies. (orig.)

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  19. Micro-CT molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis using a magnetite nano-cluster probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-06-01

    Due to its high resolution, micro-CT is desirable for molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the sensitivity of micro-CT to contrast agents is relatively low. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop high micro-CT sensitive molecular imaging probes for direct visualization and dynamic monitoring of tumor angiogenesis. To this end, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides conjugated magnetite nano clusters (RGD-MNCs) were developed by assembling individual magnetite nano particles into clusters with amphiphilic (maleimide) methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) ((Mal)mPEG-PLA) copolymer and subsequently encoding RGD peptides onto the clusters for specific targeting alpha(v)beta3 integrin. The hydrodynamic size of RGD-MNCs was about 85 nm. To test its specificity, alpha(v)beta3 positive cells (H1299) were incubated with magnetite nano clusters (MNCs), RGD-MNCs or RGD-MNCs competition with free RGD peptides. Prussian Blue staining and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements indicated that the cell uptake of RGD-MNCs was significantly more than that of MNCs, which could be inhibited by free RGD peptides. For detection of tumor angiogenesis, mice bearing H1299 tumors were injected intravenously with RGD-MNCs at the dose of 400 micro mol Fe/kg. Tumor angiogenic hot spots as well as individual angiogenic vessels could be clearly manifested by micro-CT imaging 12 h post injection, which was dynamically monitored with the extension of probe circulation time. Subsequent histological studies of tumor tissues verified that RGD-MNCs registered tumor angiogenic vessels. Our study demonstrated that RGD-MNC probes fabricated in this study could be used to effectively target alpha(v)beta3 integrin. Using high resolution micro-CT in combination with the probes, tumor angiogenesis could be studied dynamically. PMID:23858968

  20. An open-label, multicenter, phase 2a study to assess the feasibility of imaging metastases in late-stage cancer patients with the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3}-selective angiogenesis imaging agent 99mTc-NC100692

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    Axelsson, Rimma (Division of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: rimma.axelsson@ki.se; Bach-Gansmo, Tore (The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Castell-Conesa, Juan (Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)); McParland, Brian J. (Research and Development, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Ltd., Amersham (United Kingdom))

    2010-01-15

    Background: The alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3} integrin is one of the angiogenesis-related membrane proteins highly expressed on the neovasculature of breast cancer and lung carcinomas. Labeling of the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3} integrin with 99mTc-NC100692 provides a potential tool for imaging angiogenesis and hence the presence of malignant lesions. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of detecting metastatic lesions in liver, lung, bone, and brain with scintigraphy using the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3}-avid imaging agent 99mTc-NC100692 in patients with breast or lung cancer, and to assess its safety profile. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients, 15 with lung cancer and 10 with breast cancer, were recruited at 10 centers. Metastases were newly diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or bone scintigraphy, i.e., the reference standard. Patients underwent whole-body scans of approximately 10-15 min duration beginning at 45 min post-injection and a SPECT acquisition of approximately 30 min beginning at 75 min after injection of up to 1100 MBq 99mTc-NC100692. In case of liver metastases, dynamic acquisitions of 15 min were performed starting immediately post-injection. Safety measurements were performed up to 2.5 hours after injection and included hematology, serum biochemistry, coagulation, urine analysis, vital signs, oximetry, 12-lead ECG assessments, and a physical examination. Results: In patients with breast cancer, 99mTc-NC100692 scintigraphy detected 1 of 7 liver, 4 of 5 lung, 8 of 17 bone, and 1 of 1 brain metastases. The corresponding numbers for lung cancer patients were 0 of 2, 17 of 18, 2 of 2, and 7 of 9. There was overall stability through the follow-up period for all investigated safety parameters. Conclusion: Scintigraphy with 99mTc-NC100692 is feasible for detection of lung and brain metastases from breast and lung cancer, while the detection of liver and bone lesions is poor. The use of 99mTc-NC100692 is safe and well tolerated

  1. An open-label, multicenter, phase 2a study to assess the feasibility of imaging metastases in late-stage cancer patients with the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-selective angiogenesis imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelsson, Rimma [Division of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: rimma.axelsson@ki.se; Bach-Gansmo, Tore [The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Castell-Conesa, Juan [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); McParland, Brian J. [Research and Development, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Ltd., Amersham (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Background: The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is one of the angiogenesis-related membrane proteins highly expressed on the neovasculature of breast cancer and lung carcinomas. Labeling of the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin with {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 provides a potential tool for imaging angiogenesis and hence the presence of malignant lesions. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of detecting metastatic lesions in liver, lung, bone, and brain with scintigraphy using the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-avid imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 in patients with breast or lung cancer, and to assess its safety profile. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients, 15 with lung cancer and 10 with breast cancer, were recruited at 10 centers. Metastases were newly diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or bone scintigraphy, i.e., the reference standard. Patients underwent whole-body scans of approximately 10-15 min duration beginning at 45 min post-injection and a SPECT acquisition of approximately 30 min beginning at 75 min after injection of up to 1100 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692. In case of liver metastases, dynamic acquisitions of 15 min were performed starting immediately post-injection. Safety measurements were performed up to 2.5 hours after injection and included hematology, serum biochemistry, coagulation, urine analysis, vital signs, oximetry, 12-lead ECG assessments, and a physical examination. Results: In patients with breast cancer, {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 scintigraphy detected 1 of 7 liver, 4 of 5 lung, 8 of 17 bone, and 1 of 1 brain metastases. The corresponding numbers for lung cancer patients were 0 of 2, 17 of 18, 2 of 2, and 7 of 9. There was overall stability through the follow-up period for all investigated safety parameters. Conclusion: Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 is feasible for detection of lung and brain metastases from breast and lung cancer, while the detection of liver and bone lesions is poor. The use of {sup

  2. Automated angiogenesis quantification through advanced image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charlampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels in tumors, is an interactive process between tumor, endothelial and stromal cells in order to create a network for oxygen and nutrients supply, necessary for tumor growth. According to this, angiogenic activity is considered a suitable method for both tumor growth or inhibition detection. The angiogenic potential is usually estimated by counting the number of blood vessels in particular sections. One of the most popular assay tissues to study the angiogenesis phenomenon is the developing chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which is a highly vascular structure lining the inner surface of the egg shell. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated image analysis method that would give an unbiased quantification of the micro-vessel density and growth in angiogenic CAM images. The presented method has been validated by comparing automated results to manual counts over a series of digital chick embryo photos. The results indicate the high accuracy of the tool, which has been thus extensively used for tumor growth detection at different stages of embryonic development. PMID:17946107

  3. Agent-based model of angiogenesis simulates capillary sprout initiation in multicellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, J; Chappell, J C; Cluceru, J G; Mac Gabhann, F; Bautch, V L; Peirce, S M

    2015-09-01

    Many biological processes are controlled by both deterministic and stochastic influences. However, efforts to model these systems often rely on either purely stochastic or purely rule-based methods. To better understand the balance between stochasticity and determinism in biological processes a computational approach that incorporates both influences may afford additional insight into underlying biological mechanisms that give rise to emergent system properties. We apply a combined approach to the simulation and study of angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from existing networks. This complex multicellular process begins with selection of an initiating endothelial cell, or tip cell, which sprouts from the parent vessels in response to stimulation by exogenous cues. We have constructed an agent-based model of sprouting angiogenesis to evaluate endothelial cell sprout initiation frequency and location, and we have experimentally validated it using high-resolution time-lapse confocal microscopy. ABM simulations were then compared to a Monte Carlo model, revealing that purely stochastic simulations could not generate sprout locations as accurately as the rule-informed agent-based model. These findings support the use of rule-based approaches for modeling the complex mechanisms underlying sprouting angiogenesis over purely stochastic methods. PMID:26158406

  4. Differential Modulation of Angiogenesis by Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in a Mouse Model of Ischaemic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, Carmel M.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Abrahams, Jodie L.; Kitson, Claire L.; Hamilton, Ross; Medina, Reinhold J.; Durga, Dash; Gardiner, Tom A.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) are widely used to treat anaemia but concerns exist about their potential to promote pathological angiogenesis in some clinical scenarios. In the current study we have assessed the angiogenic potential of three ESAs; epoetin delta, darbepoetin alfa and epoetin beta using in vitro and in vivo models. Methodology/Principal Findings The epoetins induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells at high doses, although darbepoetin alfa was pro-angiogenic at low-doses (1–20 IU/ml). ESA-induced angiogenesis was VEGF-mediated. In a mouse model of ischaemia-induced retinopathy, all ESAs induced generation of reticulocytes but only epoetin beta exacerbated pathological (pre-retinal) neovascularisation in comparison to controls (p<0.05). Only epoetin delta induced a significant revascularisation response which enhanced normality of the vasculature (p<0.05). This was associated with mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells and their localisation to the retinal vasculature. Darbepoetin alfa also increased the number of active microglia in the ischaemic retina relative to other ESAs (p<0.05). Darbepoetin alfa induced retinal TNFα and VEGF mRNA expression which were up to 4 fold higher than with epoetin delta (p<0.001). Conclusions This study has implications for treatment of patients as there are clear differences in the angiogenic potential of the different ESAs. PMID:20686695

  5. Differential modulation of angiogenesis by erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in a mouse model of ischaemic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel M McVicar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs are widely used to treat anaemia but concerns exist about their potential to promote pathological angiogenesis in some clinical scenarios. In the current study we have assessed the angiogenic potential of three ESAs; epoetin delta, darbepoetin alfa and epoetin beta using in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The epoetins induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells at high doses, although darbepoetin alfa was pro-angiogenic at low-doses (1-20 IU/ml. ESA-induced angiogenesis was VEGF-mediated. In a mouse model of ischaemia-induced retinopathy, all ESAs induced generation of reticulocytes but only epoetin beta exacerbated pathological (pre-retinal neovascularisation in comparison to controls (p<0.05. Only epoetin delta induced a significant revascularisation response which enhanced normality of the vasculature (p<0.05. This was associated with mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells and their localisation to the retinal vasculature. Darbepoetin alfa also increased the number of active microglia in the ischaemic retina relative to other ESAs (p<0.05. Darbepoetin alfa induced retinal TNFalpha and VEGF mRNA expression which were up to 4 fold higher than with epoetin delta (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This study has implications for treatment of patients as there are clear differences in the angiogenic potential of the different ESAs.

  6. Tumour angiogenesis pathways: related clinical issues and implications for nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour angiogenesis is essential for growth, invasion and metastasis. Retrospective studies suggest that it is an independent prognostic factor that merits prospective validation. Furthermore, as tumour blood vessels show many differences from normal vessels and are not genetically unstable, they form a key area for therapy development. However, as anti-angiogenic therapy is primarily cytostatic and not cytotoxic, novel tailor-made specific end-points for treatment monitoring are required. In this regard, suitable molecular parameters for imaging tumour angiogenesis by means of nuclear medicine are being explored. Here we review current knowledge on the multiple pathways controlling tumour angiogenesis and try to assess which are the most clinically relevant for nuclear medicine imaging. Parameters that may influence the imaging potential of radiopharmaceuticals for angiogenesis imaging such as molecular weight and structure, their targeted location within the tumour and their usefulness in terms of specificity and constancy of the targeted molecular pathway are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy

  8. Imaging techniques used for the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis has a critical role in primary tumor growth and the development of metastases. Several angiogenesis inhibitors were recently developed, being a very attractive target for digestive tumor therapy. However, individualized therapy should not only be based on the pre-treatment imaging...... evaluation, but also on sensitive monitoring of microvascular changes during treatment. State-of-the-art imaging techniques have the potential to visualize and characterize angiogenesis, although the technology and methodologies employed are recent and need further validation. The aim of this series of...... reviews was to analyze and enhance current knowledge and future perspectives about the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers, used for the longitudinal monitoring of the effects of chemo-radiotherapy (including anti-angiogenic therapies), as well as for the precise targeting of drugs...

  9. Tc-99m imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide range of pharmaceuticals for labeling with Tc-99m, developed by the Soreq Radiopharmaceuticals Department, is described. Details of the production and quality control of 13 kits are given, as well as the range of results required for consistently high quality imaging agents

  10. In Vivo Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging Using Peptide-Based Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Conti, Peter S; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an emerging imaging technique for studying diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with a near-infrared emitting fluorophore for targeting tumor angiogenesis offers a noninvasive method for early tumor detection and efficient monitoring of tumor response to anti-angiogenesis therapy. CD13 receptor, a zinc-dependent membrane-bound ectopeptidase, plays important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis and the growth of new blood vessels. In this chapter, we use CD13 receptor as an example to demonstrate how to construct CD13-specific NGR-containing peptides via bioorthogonal click chemistry for visualizing and quantifying the CD13 receptor expression in vivo by means of NIRF optical imaging. PMID:27283419

  11. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-07-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in 3D formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3-kb collagen type I promoter-driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We showed that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with host bone

  12. The application of CD13/aminopeptidase N in the angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and metasis of malignant tumor depend on neovascularization. CD 13 is a significant marker of cells commit to myeloid lineage to classify leukemia, meanwhile it expresses on the neovascular endothelial cells specifically but expresses barely in vascular endothelial cells. Coupling CD13 monoclonal antibody or CD13 ligand to CD13 in fluorescence, radionuclide or magnetic nanoparticles to achieve molecular imaging to probe angiogenesis and provide imaging evidence of the development of angiogenesis associated disease. Asn-Gly-Arg peptide motif compound with different anticancer drugs targeted deliver to neovascular endothelial cells and release the anticancer drugs to treat the tumor. The research of CD13 to understand, diagnose and treat the angiogenesis associated diseases has gotten breakthrough and have a promising future. (authors)

  13. In vivo laser speckle imaging reveals microvascular remodeling and hemodynamic changes during wound healing angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rege, Abhishek; Thakor, Nitish V; Rhie, Kevin; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2011-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a high-resolution and high contrast optical imaging technique often used to characterize hemodynamic changes in short-term physiological experiments. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of LSCI for characterizing microvascular remodeling and hemodynamic changes during wound healing angiogenesis in vivo. A 2 mm diameter hole was made in the mouse ear and the periphery of the wound imaged in vivo using LSCI over 12 days. We were able to visualize a...

  14. Imaging techniques used for the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    evaluation, but also on sensitive monitoring of microvascular changes during treatment. State-of-the-art imaging techniques have the potential to visualize and characterize angiogenesis, although the technology and methodologies employed are recent and need further validation. The aim of this series of...... reviews was to analyze and enhance current knowledge and future perspectives about the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers, used for the longitudinal monitoring of the effects of chemo-radiotherapy (including anti-angiogenic therapies), as well as for the precise targeting of drugs...

  15. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy...... adults where it is primaily found in wound healing, pregnancy and during the menstrual cycle. This thesis focus on the negative consequences of angiogenesis in cancer. It consists of a an initial overview followed by four manuscripts. The overview gives a short introduction to the process of angiogenesis...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  16. Tumor angiogenesis imaging: radioiodinated NGR peptide containing t-butyloxycarbonyl as a pharmacokinetic modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor growth and metastasis largely depend on persistent new blood vessel growth, which is even the rate-limiting step in solid tumor growth. Identified as a cell adhesion motif, NGR has been proven an effective tumor-homing agent, binding specifically on CD13/APN that is expressed in tumor vasculature undergoing angiogenesis and not detected in blood vessels of various other normal tissues. Whether NGR also possesses the potential of tumor imaging in vivo is still in suspension. Internalization of small peptides is an important phenomenon. Internalization brings on deiodination of directly radioiodinated small peptides, and the low weight radiolabeled catabolites are quickly removed from tumor, resulting in poor tumor imaging. It is of good value to study whether Boc could be an effective tyrosine-protecting group, increasing peptide's resistance to deiodination, meanwhile preserving peptide's original specialty. The cyclic peptide YGGGGGCNGRC (G5) and the t-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc)-modified analog (Boc-G5) were synthesized and radiolabeled with iodine-131. Biodistribution results in normal mice indicated that in the case of G5, deiodination in vivo was found, whereas for Boc-G5, the phenomenon was scarce (Figs.1 and 2). Although the radiotracer clearance in tumor became faster for Boc-G5, tumor-to-tissue ratios still improved, arid at 1 h post injection, the uptake ratios of tumor to muscle, blood, heart, and lung reached 4.73, 1.70, 4.09 and 1.70, respectively. It is demonstrated that Boc-group is an effective prosthetic one to prevent deiodination in vivo and meliorate tumor imaging for small peptide.

  17. Angiogenesis Imaging Using (68)Ga-RGD PET/CT: Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Jae Seon; Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis imaging is important for diagnostic and therapeutic treatment of various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence has been known to bind with the αvβ3 integrin that is expressed on the surface of angiogenic blood vessels or tumor cells. Thus, various radiolabeled derivatives of RGD peptides have been developed for angiogenesis imaging. Among the various radionuclides, (68)Ga was the most widely studied for RGD peptide imaging because of its excellent nuclear physical properties, easy-to-label chemical properties, and cost-effectiveness owing to the availability of a (68)Ge-(68)Ga generator. Thus, various (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives have been developed and applied for preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials were performed for both malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Breast cancer, glioma, and lung cancer were malignant, and myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and moyamoya disease were nonmalignant among the investigated diseases. Further, these (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives could be applied to assess the effects of antiangiogenic treatment or theragnosis or both, of cancers. In conclusion, the angiogenesis imaging technology using (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives might be useful for the development of new therapeutic assessments, and for diagnostic and theragnostic applications. PMID:27553467

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in a subcutaneous islet transplant site in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-06-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is an established clinical therapy for select patients with type-1 diabetes. Clinically, the hepatic portal vein serves as the site for IT. Despite numerous advances in clinical IT, limitations remain, including early islet cell loss posttransplant, procedural complications, and the inability to effectively monitor islet grafts. Hence, alternative sites for IT are currently being explored, with the subcutaneous space as one potential option. When left unmodified, the subcutaneous space routinely fails to promote successful islet engraftment. However, when employing the previously developed subcutaneous "deviceless" technique, a favorable microenvironment for islet survival and function is established. In this technique, an angiocatheter was temporarily implanted subcutaneously, which facilitated angiogenesis to promote subsequent islet engraftment. This technique has been employed in preclinical animal models, providing a sufficient means to develop techniques to monitor functional aspects of the graft such as angiogenesis. Here, we utilize photoacoustic imaging to track angiogenesis during the priming of the subcutaneous site by the implanted catheter at 1 to 4 weeks postcatheter. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities shows gradual growth of vasculature in the implant position. These results demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis, thus facilitating a means to optimize and assess the pretransplant microenvironment.

  19. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy to assess mucosal angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio; Danese; Gionata; Fiorino; Erika; Angelucci; Stefania; Vetrano; Nico; Pagano; Giacomo; Rando; Antonino; Spinelli; Alberto; Malesci; Alessandro; Repici

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether narrow band imaging (NBI) is a useful tool for the in vivo detection of angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: Conventional and NBI colonoscopy was performed in 14 patients with colonic inflammation (8 ulcerative colitis and 6 Crohn’s disease). Biopsy samples were taken and CD31 expression was assayed immuno- histochemically; microvascular density was assessed by vessel count. RESULTS: In areas that were endoscopically normal but positive on NBI, ther...

  20. 19F molecular MR imaging for detection of brain tumor angiogenesis: in vivo validation using targeted PFOB nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) targeted contrast agents has emerged as a promising diagnostic approach in cancer research to detect associated bio-markers. In this work, the potential of 19F MRI was investigated to detect angiogenesis with αvβ3-targeted perfluoro-octylbromide nanoparticles (PFOB NP) in a U87 glioblastoma mouse model at 7 Tesla. Mice were injected intravenously with targeted or non-targeted NP and 19F images were immediately acquired for 90 min using a PFOB-dedicated MRI sequence. Mice infused with targeted NP exhibited higher concentrations in tumors than mice of the control group, despite the presence of nonspecific signal originating from the blood. Imaging results were corroborated by histology and fluorescence imaging, suggesting specific binding of targeted NP to αvβ3 integrin. Two other groups of mice were injected 24 h before imaging to allow blood clearance but no significant differences were found between both groups, probably due to a loss of specificity of PFOB NP. This is the first demonstration of the ability of 19F MRI to detect αvβ3 -integrin endothelial expression in brain tumors in vivo. (authors)

  1. Natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis: a potential source for investigational new agents to treat cancer-Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, S M; Yance, D; Wong, R K

    2006-02-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiologic pathways that support tumour development and minimize normal-tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The present article focuses on products that have a high degree of anti-angiogenic activity, but it also describes some of the many other actions of these agents that can inhibit tumour progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. Natural health products target molecular pathways other than angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the HER2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the nuclear factor kappa-B transcription factor, the protein kinases, the Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbs that are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and that are anti-angiogenic through multiple interdependent processes (including effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities) include Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (curcumin), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinalis (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens hora (Rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking upon clinical trials. More data are required on dose-response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations. During active cancer therapy, they should generally be evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. In this role, they act as modifiers of biologic response or as

  2. Multi-modal imaging of angiogenesis in a nude rat model of breast cancer bone metastasis using magnetic resonance imaging, volumetric computed tomography and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Berger, Martin R; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential feature of cancer growth and metastasis formation. In bone metastasis, angiogenic factors are pivotal for tumor cell proliferation in the bone marrow cavity as well as for interaction of tumor and bone cells resulting in local bone destruction. Our aim was to develop a model of experimental bone metastasis that allows in vivo assessment of angiogenesis in skeletal lesions using non-invasive imaging techniques. For this purpose, we injected 10(5) MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells into the superficial epigastric artery, which precludes the growth of metastases in body areas other than the respective hind leg. Following 25-30 days after tumor cell inoculation, site-specific bone metastases develop, restricted to the distal femur, proximal tibia and proximal fibula. Morphological and functional aspects of angiogenesis can be investigated longitudinally in bone metastases using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), volumetric computed tomography (VCT) and ultrasound (US). MRI displays morphologic information on the soft tissue part of bone metastases that is initially confined to the bone marrow cavity and subsequently exceeds cortical bone while progressing. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) functional data including regional blood volume, perfusion and vessel permeability can be obtained and quantified. Bone destruction is captured in high resolution using morphological VCT imaging. Complementary to MRI findings, osteolytic lesions can be located adjacent to sites of intramedullary tumor growth. After contrast agent application, VCT angiography reveals the macrovessel architecture in bone metastases in high resolution, and DCE-VCT enables insight in the microcirculation of these lesions. US is applicable to assess morphological and functional features from skeletal lesions due to local osteolysis of cortical bone. Using B-mode and Doppler techniques, structure and perfusion of the soft tissue metastases can be evaluated

  3. Radiolabeled RGD peptides as tumor angiogenesis markers: from molecular imaging to targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrin ανβ3 plays a significant role in tumor angiogenesis which is one of the key requirements for cancer growth. During the past two decades, a number of radiolabeled linear and cyclic RGD peptide derivatives have been evaluated as integrin ανβ3-targeting radiotracers for detection and prognosis of cancer by SPECT and PET imaging. However, there is a continuing need for more efficient integrin ανβ3 -targeted radiotracers that could be readily prepared from a kit formulation without further post-labeling purification. The present article gives a brief overview of the fundamental aspects in the design and development of ideal radiotracers for targeting tumor angiogenesis based on RGD peptides. (author)

  4. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Bao, Jin-ku, E-mail: jinkubao@yahoo.com [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  5. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. → ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. → ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca2+/Mn2+-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-κB-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  6. {sup 18}F-labeled RGD peptide: initial evaluation for imaging brain tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaoyuan; Park, Ryan; Shahinian, Anthony H.; Tohme, Michel; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Bozorgzadeh, Mohammed H.; Bading, James R.; Moats, Rex; Laug, Walter E.; Conti, Peter S. E-mail: pconti@usc.edu

    2004-02-01

    Brain tumors are highly angiogenesis dependent. The cell adhesion receptor integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is overexpressed in glioma and activated endothelial cells and plays an important role in brain tumor growth, spread and angiogenesis. Suitably labeled {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin antagonists may therefore be useful for imaging brain tumor associated angiogenesis. Cyclic RGD peptide c(RGDyK) was labeled with {sup 18}F via N-succinimidyl-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate through the side-chain {epsilon}-amino group of the lysine residue. The radiotracer was evaluated in vivo for its tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics in subcutaneously implanted U87MG and orthotopically implanted U251T glioblastoma nude mouse models by means of microPET, quantitative autoradiography and direct tissue sampling. The N-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl-RGD ([{sup 18}F]FB-RGD) was produced in less than 2 h with 20-25% decay-corrected yields and specific activity of 230 GBq/{mu}mol at end of synthesis. The tracer showed very rapid blood clearance and both hepatobiliary and renal excretion. Tumor-to-muscle uptake ratio at 30 min was approximately 5 in the subcutaneous U87MG tumor model. MicroPET imaging with the orthotopic U251T brain tumor model revealed very high tumor-to-brain ratio, with virtually no uptake in the normal brain. Successful blocking of tumor uptake of [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD in the presence of excess amount of c(RGDyK) revealed receptor specific activity accumulation. Hence, N-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl labeled cyclic RGD peptide [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD is a potential tracer for imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin positive tumors in brain and other anatomic locations.

  7. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... cancer cells for cancer diagnosis in MRI. F127-Folate coated SPION were stable in various types of suspension medium for over six months. They could specifically target folate receptor of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo thus enhancing the contrast in MRI T2/T2* weighted images. These are preliminary...

  8. Liposome imaging agents in personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Hansen, Anders Elias; Gabizon, Alberto;

    2012-01-01

    that selectively localize in tumor tissue can transport both drugs and imaging agents, which allows for a theranostic approach with great potential in personalized medicine. Radiolabeling of liposomes have for many years been used in preclinical studies for evaluating liposome in vivo performance and...... arena where we start to consider how to use imaging for patient selection and treatment monitoring in connection to nanocarrier based medicines. Nanocarrier imaging agents could furthermore have interesting properties for disease diagnostics and staging. Here, we review the major advances in the...... development of radiolabeled liposomes for imaging as a tool in personalized medicine....

  9. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with a 66Ga-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Myklejord, Duane V.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Theuer, Charles P.; Robert J. Nickles; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a 66Ga-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for non-invasive imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer. 66Ga was produced using a cyclotron with natZn or isotopically enriched 66Zn targets. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 2-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1, 4, 7-triazacyclononane-1, 4, 7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and labeled with 66Ga. No difference in CD105 binding affinit...

  10. Agent Based Image Segmentation Method : A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja Mishra; Navita Srivastava; Shukla, K. K.; Achintya Singlal

    2011-01-01

    Image segmentation is an important research area in computer vision and many segmentation methods have been proposed. This paper attempts to provide a brief overview of elemental segmentation techniques based on boundary or regional approaches. It focuses mainly on the agent based image segmentation techniques

  11. Relationship of binding specificity and structural property of the technetium-99m complexes for tumor hypoxia and tumor angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of tumor requires nutrition and oxygen. Tumor cells will become hypoxic when the supply of oxygen is insufficient. Hypoxic tumor cells will not only resist radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but also induce angiogenesis for oxygen supply and for metastasis. Therefore, detection of tumor hypoxia and tumor angiogenesis with high sensitive radio labeled imaging agents is important. Hypoxic tumor cells may display some molecules as tumor markers for the specific binding with radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceuticals, unlike the non-radioactive drugs, are trace compounds in a given dosage. Due to the extreme low concentration, the non-specific accumulation of the radiotracers by blood cells and proteins, tissues, and organs can be even more serious compared to the non-radioactive drugs. The non-specific accumulation of the radiotracers can make the ratios of tumor/tissue (in terms of i.d.%/g) falling to the range of 2∼7 [1-2]. Non-specific binding of radiopharmaceuticals is common, but detailed studies on it are poor documented. This presentation reports the study of the relationship of non-specific accumulation and the structural property of two type of 99mTC labeled compounds: (a) 99mTc-(amineoxime) containing either 2-nitroimidazole (2-NI, as hypoxia tumor cells specific agents), or 4-nitro- imidazole (4-NI, as control), or aniline (as reference) groups; (b) 99mTc-(arginine-glycine- aspartic acid, RGD, as tumor angiogenesis specific agents) and 99mTc-(arginine-glycine- glutarmic acid, RGE, as control). The 99mTc-(amine-oxime) complexes, in addition to the 2-NI, 4-NI, and aniline groups, contain methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, iso-butyl-, t-butyl-, phenyl-, and Benzyl- groups as well to make the radiotracers differing in structure and in lipophilicity , while the lipophilicity of a radiotracer plays an important role in non-specific cellular accumulation and protein binding, The results demonstrated that (1) the complex containing 2-NI showed specific

  12. MR imaging of tumor angiogenesis using sterically stabilized Gd-DTPA liposomes targeted to CD105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To depict tumor angiogenesis via the expression of CD105 in tumor-bearing rats using Gd-DTPA liposomes targeted to CD105 (CD105-Gd-SLs) on MR imaging. Materials and methods: Three Gd-DTPA liposomal nanoparticles were prepared in our trial: liposomes entrapping Gd-DTPA (Gd-SLs), Gd-SLs conjugated to immunoglobulins (IgG-Gd-SLs) and CD105-Gd-SLs. Forty glioma-bearing rats were randomized into four groups: (a) Gd-DTPA; (b) Gd-SLs; (c) IgG-Gd-SLs; (d) CD105-Gd-SLs. Axial T1WI MRI images were collected at baseline and repeated at 5, 30, 60 and 120 min post-intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA or liposome. Enhancement features and contrast-to-noise ratio of each group were analyzed. After imaging, tumors were resected for immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining to assess vascularity and angiogenesis. Results: The four groups showed different enhancement features. The enhancement area was restricted for group CD105-Gd-SLs, while diffused for the other three. The degree of enhancement over time varied: group Gd-DTPA showed an early contrast enhancement at instant after injection with a peak at 30 min and a decline to baseline values at 60 min. In group CD105-Gd-SLs, the signal intensity (SI) continuously increased over 120 min. In groups IgG-Gd-SLs and Gd-SLs the SI peaked at 60 min, followed by a minor decrease for IgG-Gd-SLs and a rapid decrease for Gd-SLs almost to baseline. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence showed that the enhancement in the CD105-Gd-SLs group resulted mainly from new microvessels. While in the other three groups, mature microvessels and new microvasculature resulted in the enhancement of the tumor. Conclusion: CD105-Gd-SLs can be used to detect early tumor angiogenesis on MR images. This might provide a means to non-invasively reveal a malignant phenotype of extracerebral F98 tumor and evaluate its progression.

  13. Technetium-99m myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major focus of cardiovascular radiopharmaceutical research over the past decade has been the search for a Tc-99m agent that could replace Tl-201, the current agent of choice for myocardial perfusion imaging. Recent advances in the inorganic chemistry of technetium, and in the translation of this chemistry to radiopharmaceutical development, make it very likely that this search will soon be successfully completed

  14. Multi-scale agent-based brain cancer modeling and prediction of TKI treatment response: Incorporating EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiaoqiang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis in brain cancer act as an engine for tumor initiation, expansion and response to therapy. Since the existing literature does not have any models that investigate the impact of both angiogenesis and molecular signaling pathways on treatment, we propose a novel multi-scale, agent-based computational model that includes both angiogenesis and EGFR modules to study the response of brain cancer under tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs treatment. Results The novel angiogenesis module integrated into the agent-based tumor model is based on a set of reaction–diffusion equations that describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the distributions of micro-environmental factors such as glucose, oxygen, TGFα, VEGF and fibronectin. These molecular species regulate tumor growth during angiogenesis. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR signaling pathway linked to a cell-cycle pathway to determine its phenotype. EGFR TKIs are delivered through the blood vessels of tumor microvasculature and the response to treatment is studied. Conclusions Our simulations demonstrated that entire tumor growth profile is a collective behaviour of cells regulated by the EGFR signaling pathway and the cell cycle. We also found that angiogenesis has a dual effect under TKI treatment: on one hand, through neo-vasculature TKIs are delivered to decrease tumor invasion; on the other hand, the neo-vasculature can transport glucose and oxygen to tumor cells to maintain their metabolism, which results in an increase of cell survival rate in the late simulation stages.

  15. Characterization and biodistribution of a novel MRI molecular imaging agent by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis is integral to the development and progression of atherosclerotic disease and solid tumor growth. New microvessels form in atherosclerotic plaque and the presence of new vessels has been associated with carotid plaque instability. Likewise, solid tumor growth depends upon angiogenesis to provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrients. Recently, Lanza et al. have demonstrated molecular imaging of angiogenesis both in human melanoma xenografts in nude mice and atherosclerotic rabbits by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with clinical magnet strengths using αvβ3-targeted nanoparticles developed in their lab. αvβ3-integrin is a selective molecular epitope expressed by angiogenic endothelium and the MRI contrast agent consists of a lipid-encapsulated, liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticle directly coupled to a selective αvβ3 ligand. The nanoparticle also contains the paramagnetic contrast agent gadolinium linked to the nanoparticle as Gd-DTPA-bis-oleate. Use of neutron activation analysis to confirm the Gd content of the nanoparticle formulations and determine the biodistribution of Gd post injection is reported. (author)

  16. Multi-modal Imaging of Angiogenesis in a Nude Rat Model of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Volumetric Computed Tomography and Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Bäuerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Martin R. Berger; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential feature of cancer growth and metastasis formation. In bone metastasis, angiogenic factors are pivotal for tumor cell proliferation in the bone marrow cavity as well as for interaction of tumor and bone cells resulting in local bone destruction. Our aim was to develop a model of experimental bone metastasis that allows in vivo assessment of angiogenesis in skeletal lesions using non-invasive imaging techniques.

  17. Imaging tumor angiogenesis in breast cancer experimental lung metastasis with positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence, and bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Nayak, Tapas R; Valdovinos, Hector F; Myklejord, Duane V; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a molecular imaging agent that can allow for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of CD105 expression in metastatic breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., IRDye 800CW) and (64)Cu to yield (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was carried out to non-invasively monitor the lung tumor burden in BALB/c mice, after intravenous injection of firefly luciferase-transfected 4T1 (i.e., fLuc-4T1) murine breast cancer cells to establish the experimental lung metastasis model. Serial PET imaging revealed that fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 11.9 ± 1.2, 13.9 ± 3.9, and 13.4 ± 2.1 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively (n = 3). Biodistribution studies, blocking fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake with excess TRC105, control experiments with (64)Cu-NOTA-cetuximab-800CW (which served as an isotype-matched control), ex vivo BLI/PET/NIRF imaging, autoradiography, and histology all confirmed CD105 specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of tumor angiogenesis (i.e., CD105 expression) in the breast cancer experimental lung metastasis model warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based agents, which can potentially enable early detection of small metastases and image-guided surgery for tumor removal. PMID:23471463

  18. Natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis: a potential source for investigational new agents to treat cancer-Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, S M; Yance, D; Wong, R K

    2006-06-01

    The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are expanding the clinical knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The herbs that are traditionally used for anti-cancer treatment and that are anti-angiogenic through multiple interdependent processes (including effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities) include Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (curcumin), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinalis (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens hora (Rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Natural health products target molecular pathways other than angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the HER2/neu gene, the cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme, the nuclear factor kappa-B transcription factor, the protein kinases, the Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking upon clinical trials. More data are required on dose-response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations. During active cancer therapy they should generally be evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. In this role, they act as modifiers of biologic response or as adaptogens, potentially enhancing the efficacy of the conventional therapies or reducing toxicity. Their effectiveness may be increased when multiple agents are used in optimal combinations. New designs for trials to demonstrate activity in human subjects are required. Although controlled trials may be preferable, smaller studies with appropriate endpoints and

  19. Tumor angiogenesis in rabbit VX2 brain tumor: model establishment, pathologic study and preliminary imaging observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a stable implanted model of VX2 rabbit brain tumor, and to evaluate the pathological and imaging features and tumor angiogenesis. Methods: Thirty New Zealand white rabbits were implanted with 100 μl viable VX2 tumor cells (107/ml) through a hole 5 mm to the right of the sagittal suture and 5 mm posterior to the coronal suture bored by a dental drill. MRI was performed every 2 days after 7 days of implantation to evaluate the growth of the tumor, and perfusion CT studies were performed in different days of tumor growth. After that the animals were sacrificed on days 14, 18, 22, 26, and 30 of tumor implantation. 2% Evans blue (2 ml/kg) was given intravenously in 16 of these animals 1 hour prior to sacrifice to detect the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The specimens of the rabbit brains were examined pathologically and histologically. VEGF and MVD were evaluated in immunohistochemical examination. Results: Of the 22 animals included into the study, the tumor grew in 20 animals, which could be seen clearly on MR imaging. Pathologic examination showed characteristics of squamous carcinoma. VEGF was expressed in all tumors with the mean rate of positive cells of (52.51 ± 19.15)% (19.5%-92.9%). Mean MVD was (51.30 ± 14.42) pice piece/microscope (25-81 pice piece/microscope). Using Pearson's linear correlation analysis, positive correlation was found between tumor growth time and volume (r=0.791, P=0.000), between MVD and tumor growth time (r=0.875, P=0.000), and between MVD and tumor volume (r=0.901, P=0.000), respectively. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed positive correlation between VEGF grade and blue stain of the tumor (rs=0.594, P=0.015). Conclusion: A stable model of VX2 rabbit brain tumor has been established with the method of skull drilling. The method was simple and easy to use, with a high tumor growth rate and remarkable angiogenesis. The model is helpful for the pathological and radiological study of tumor

  20. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes

  1. Synthesis of Fluorine-18 Labeled Glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe as a Potential Tumor Imaging Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The αvβ3 integrin is an important receptor affecting tumor growth, metastatic potential on proliferating endothelial cells as well as on tumor cells of various origin, tumor-induced angiogenesis could be blocked by antagonizing the αvβ3 integrin with RGD. Therefore, αvβ3 integrin is a target for angiogenesis imaging that might be useful in assessing tumor-induced angiogenesis and identifying tumor metastasis. To design potent radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis containing a cRGD moiety should include low hepatic uptake in vivo. Tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), naturally existed in extracellular matrix proteins, is known to be the primary binding site of the αvβ3 integrin. The imaging of αvβ3 receptor expression will give the information of the metastatic ability of the tumor which is not available by [18F]FDG. Our interest in developing new radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo visualization of angiogenesis has led us to synthesize derivatives of cRGD (cyclic arginineglycine-aspartic acid) that contains glucose moiety. Because sugar-protein interaction is a key step in metastasis and angiogenesis, it has also been proposed to play an intriguing role in imaging of tumor. We designed and synthesized two fluorine-18 labeled RGD glycopeptides . N-fluorobenzyl-diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([18F]fluorobenzyl-glucose-KRGDf, and Nfluorobenzoyl- diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([18F]fluorobenzoyl-glucose-KRGDf, from same precursor as a diagnostic tumor imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 labeled cRGD glycopeptides were prepared using two different simple labeling methods: one is reductive alkylation of an amine with [18F]fluorobenzaldehyde and the other is amide condensation with [18F]fluorobenzoic acid

  2. Modelling approaches for angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraboletti, G; Giavazzi, R

    2004-04-01

    The development of a functional vasculature within a tumour is a requisite for its growth and progression. This fact has led to the design of therapies directed toward the tumour vasculature, aiming either to prevent the formation of new vessels (anti-angiogenic) or to damage existing vessels (vascular targeting). The development of agents with different mechanisms of action requires powerful preclinical models for the analysis and optimization of these therapies. This review concerns 'classical' assays of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, recent approaches to target identification (analysis of gene and protein expression), and the study of morphological and functional changes in the vasculature in vivo (imaging techniques). It mainly describes assays designed for anti-angiogenic compounds, indicating, where possible, their application to the study of vascular-targeting agents. PMID:15120043

  3. A novel microtubule-modulating agent EM011 inhibits angiogenesis by repressing the HIF-1α axis and disrupting cell polarity and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Karna, Prasanthi; Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Gao, Jinmin; Gupta, Meenakshi; Fritz, Andreas; Werner, Erica; Yates, Clayton; Zhou, Jun; Aneja, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial tubular morphogenesis relies on an exquisite interplay of microtubule dynamics and actin remodeling to propel directed cell migration. Recently, the dynamicity and integrity of microtubules have been implicated in the trafficking and efficient translation of the mRNA for HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor), the master regulator of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, microtubule-disrupting agents that perturb the HIF-1α axis and neovascularization cascade are attractive anticancer drug candida...

  4. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hao [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yunan [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Third Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound, Xinqiao Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Leigh, Bryan R. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Overexpression of CD105 (endoglin) correlates with poor prognosis in many solid tumor types. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) assessed by CD105 staining is the current gold standard for evaluating tumor angiogenesis in the clinic. The goal of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging CD105 expression. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with {sup 64}Cu. FACS analysis and microscopy studies were performed to compare the CD105 binding affinity of TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105. PET imaging, biodistribution, blocking, and ex vivo histology studies were performed on 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the ability of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105 to target tumor angiogenesis. Another chimeric antibody, cetuximab, was used as an isotype-matched control. FACS analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity between TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105, which was further validated by fluorescence microscopy. {sup 64}Cu labeling was achieved with high yield and specific activity. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 tumor uptake of the tracer was 8.0 {+-} 0.5, 10.4 {+-} 2.8, and 9.7 {+-} 1.8%ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection, respectively (n = 3), higher than most organs at late time points which provided excellent tumor contrast. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105. This is the first successful PET imaging study of CD105 expression. Fast, prominent, persistent, and CD105-specific uptake of the tracer in the 4T1 tumor was observed. Further studies are warranted and currently underway. (orig.)

  5. Clinical application of several tumor imaging agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Neoplasms is one of the main diseases for harming health.It is difficult to prevent the neoplasms because the factors of bringing out them are complex.To raise survival rate the early diagnosis of tumors is very important.Radionuclide imaging is useful to detect recurrent or residual diseaseand to identificate benign or malignant tumor.Several tumorimaging agents as following have clinical significance indiagnosing tumors.

  6. A clinical study of contrast-enhanced digital mammography to correlate image descriptors with angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) is a technique based on the subtraction of images applying a contrast medium (CM), with the goal of eliminating the breast anatomical structure in the images. The CM generally contains iodine, due to the relatively high attenuation of X rays in iodine with respect to breast tissues. It is assumed that CEDM images enhance the visualization of the CM next to rapidly growing lesions as a consequence of angiogenesis, the formation of new microvessels. This study is designed to investigate the possible correlation between iodine uptake in CEDM images and microvessel density in breast lesions. 19 patients, whose mammographies were classified as BIRADS 4-5, were included. A series of 6 images was acquired under one single breast compression, combining dual-energy and temporal acquisition. Low- and high-energy masks were acquired, CM was injected before the CM temporal sequence, a biopsy was obtained after the images, specific biomarkers for blood and lymphatic neo-microvessels were applied, and microvessel density was evaluated. In the processing, masks were subtracted from weighted CM images and the weight factor was a matrix obtained from the masks and contained pixel-by-pixel anatomical and radiological information. Iodine uptake after the subtraction was quantified by contrast between the lesion and normal glandular tissue. Contrast was transformed into iodine mass thickness using calibrated samples. 11 lesions were malignant and 8, benign. The subtraction formalism severely reduced the anatomic noise in resulting images, compared with alternative techniques based on mean pixel values within regions-of-interest. Five types of time-intensity curves were identified, qualitatively similar to what is known for magnetic resonance images (MRI). Blood and lymphatic microvessel densities were correlated (r=0.94 p<0.05) and mean blood values in cancer were twice those in benign cases. No correlation was found between image contrast

  7. Development of NMR imaging using CEST agents: application to brain tumor in a rodent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study aimed at developing saturation transfer imaging of lipoCEST contrast agents for the detection of angiogenesis in a U87 mouse brain tumor model. A lipoCEST with a sensitivity threshold of 100 pM in vitro was optimized in order to make it compatible with CEST imaging in vivo. Thanks to the development of an experimental setup dedicated to CEST imaging, we evaluated lipoCEST to detect specifically tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrated for the first time that lipoCEST visualization was feasible in vivo in a mouse brain after intravenous injection. Moreover, the integrin αvβ3 over expressed during tumor angiogenesis can be specifically targeted using a functionalized lipoCEST with RGD peptide. The specific association between the RGD-lipoCEST and its target αvβ3 was confirmed by immunohistochemical data and fluorescence microscopy. Finally, in order to tend to a molecular imaging protocol by CEST-MRI, we developed a quantification tool of lipoCEST contrast agents. This tool is based on modeling of proton exchange processes in vivo. By taking into account both B0 and B1 fields inhomogeneities which can dramatically alter CEST contrast, we showed that the accuracy of our quantification tool was 300 pM in vitro. The tool was applied on in vivo data acquired on the U87 mouse model and the maximum concentration of RGD-lipoCEST linked to their molecular targets was evaluated to 1.8 nM. (author)

  8. Natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis: a potential source for investigational new agents to treat cancer—Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Sagar, S.M.; Yance, D.; Wong, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiologic pathways that support tumour development and minimize normal-tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The present article focuses on products that have a high degree of anti-angiogenic activity, but it also describes some of the many other actions of ...

  9. Hemodynamic response imaging: a potential tool for the assessment of angiogenesis in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Ben Bashat

    Full Text Available Blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD imaging under either hypercapnia or hyperoxia has been used to study neuronal activation and for assessment of various brain pathologies. We evaluated the benefit of a combined protocol of BOLD imaging during both hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenges (termed hemodynamic response imaging (HRI. Nineteen healthy controls and seven patients with primary brain tumors were included: six with glioblastoma (two newly diagnosed and four with recurrent tumors and one with atypical-meningioma. Maps of percent signal intensity changes (ΔS during hyperoxia (carbogen; 95%O2+5%CO2 and hypercapnia (95%air+5%CO2 challenges and vascular reactivity mismatch maps (VRM; voxels that responded to carbogen with reduced/absent response to CO2 were calculated. VRM values were measured in white matter (WM and gray matter (GM areas of healthy subjects and used as threshold values in patients. Significantly higher response to carbogen was detected in healthy subjects, compared to hypercapnia, with a GM/WM ratio of 3.8 during both challenges. In patients with newly diagnosed/treatment-naive tumors (n = 3, increased response to carbogen was detected with substantially increased VRM response (compared to threshold values within and around the tumors. In patients with recurrent tumors, reduced/absent response during both challenges was demonstrated. An additional finding in 2 of 4 patients with recurrent glioblastoma was a negative response during carbogen, distant from tumor location, which may indicate steal effect. In conclusion, the HRI method enables the assessment of blood vessel functionality and reactivity. Reference values from healthy subjects are presented and preliminary results demonstrate the potential of this method to complement perfusion imaging for the detection and follow up of angiogenesis in patients with brain tumors.

  10. Development of 68Ga-Glycopeptide as an Imaging Probe for Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Tsao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was aimed to study tissue distribution and tumor imaging potential of 68Ga-glycopeptide (GP in tumor-bearing rodents by PET. Methods. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan. GP was labeled with 68Ga chloride for in vitro and in vivo studies. Computer outlined region of interest (counts per pixel of the tumor and muscle (at the symmetric site was used to determine tumor-to-muscle count density ratios. To ascertain the feasibility of 68Ga-GP in tumor imaging in large animals, PET/CT imaging of 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG were conducted in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors. Standard uptake value of tumors were determined by PET up to 45 min. To determine blood clearance and half-life of 68Ga-GP, blood samples were collected from 10 seconds to 20 min. Results. Radiochemical purity of 68Ga-GP determined by instant thin-layer chromatography was >95%. Tumor uptake values (SUV for 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors were 3.25 versus 7.04. PET images in tumor-bearing rats and rabbits confirmed that 68Ga-GP could assess tumor uptake. From blood clearance curve, the half-life of 68Ga-GP was 1.84 hr. Conclusion Our data indicate that it is feasible to use 68Ga-GP to assess tumor angiogenesis.

  11. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-21

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30-40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [(64)Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for

  12. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30–40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [64Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for

  13. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  14. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor angiogenesis with a 66Ga-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jonathan W; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F; Myklejord, Duane V; Barnhart, Todd E; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a (66)Ga-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for noninvasive imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer. (66)Ga was produced using a cyclotron with (nat)Zn or isotopically enriched (66)Zn targets. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 2-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and labeled with (66)Ga. No difference in CD105 binding affinity or specificity was observed between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105 based on flow cytometry analysis. Reactivity of (66)Ga for NOTA, corrected to the end of bombardment, was between 74 and 222 GBq/μmol for both target enrichments with 80% radiochemical yield. Serial PET imaging revealed that the murine breast cancer 4T1 tumor uptake of (66)Ga-NOTA-TRC105 was 5.9 ± 1.6, 8.5 ± 0.6, and 9.0 ± 0.6% ID/g at 4, 20, and 36 h postinjection, respectively (n = 4). At the last time point, tumor uptake was higher than that of all organs, which gave excellent tumor contrast with a tumor/muscle ratio of 10.1 ± 1.1. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiment, control studies with (66)Ga-NOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of (66)Ga-NOTA-TRC105. Successful PET imaging with high specific activity (66)Ga (>700 GBq/μmol has been achieved) as the radiolabel opens many new possibilities for future PET research with antibodies or other targeting ligands. PMID:22519890

  15. Angiogenesis and tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Mansouri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation from existing ones, plays an important role in the physiologic circumstances such as embryonic development, placenta formation, and wound healing. It is also crucial to progress of pathogenic processes of a variety of disorders, including tumor growth and metastasis. In general, angiogenesis process is a multi-factorial and highly structured sequence of cellular events comprising migration, proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and finally vascular formation, maturation and remodeling.Thereby, angiogenesis inhibition as a helping agent to conventional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation has attracted the scientists’ attentions studying in this field.

  16. Angiogenesis and Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis occurs in pathological conditions, such as tumors, where a specific critical point in tumor progression is the transition from the avascular to the vascular phase. Tumor angiogenesis depends mainly on the release by neoplastic cells of growth factors specific for endothelial cells, which are able to stimulate the growth of the host’s blood vessels. This article summarizes the literature concerning the relationship between angiogenesis and human melanoma progression. The recent applications of antiangiogenic agents which interfere with melanoma progression are also described

  17. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  18. Research progress of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical diagnostic modality, which has become popular in hospitals around the world. Approximately 30% of MRI exams include the use of contrast agents. The research progress of the paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents was described briefly. Three important approaches in the soluble paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents design including nonionic, tissue-specific and macromolecular contrast agents were investigated. In addition, the problems in the research and development in future were discussed.

  19. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of angiogenesis using theranostic ανβ3-targeted copper nanoparticles incorporating a sn-2 lipase-labile fumagillin prodrug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Cai, Xin; Yang, Xiaoxia; Senpan, Angana; Allen, John S.; Pan, Dipanjan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) tomography imaging is an emerging, versatile, and noninvasive imaging modality, which combines the advantages of both optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. It opens up opportunities for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis, a feature of skin pathologies including cancers and psoriasis. In this study, high-density copper oleate encapsulated within a phospholipid surfactant (CuNPs) generated a soft nanoparticle with PA contrast comparable to gold. Within the near-infrared window, the copper nanoparticles can provide a signal more than 7 times higher that of blood. ανβ3-targeted of CuNPs in a Matrigel mouse model demonstrated prominent PA contrast enhancement of the neovasculature compared to mice given nontargeted or competitively inhibited CuNPs. Incorporation of a sn-2 lipase-labile fumagillin prodrug into the CuNPs produced marked antiangiogenesis in the same model, demonstrating the theranostic potential of a PA agent for the first time in vivo. With a PA signal comparable to gold-based nanoparticles yet a lower cost and demonstrated drug delivery potential, ανβ3-targeted CuNPs hold great promise for the management of skin pathologies with neovascular features.

  20. Molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis with VEGFR2 targeting microbubbles in colon cancer bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of tumor neovascularization imaging in a nude mouse model of colon cancer by contrast ultrasound molecular imaging (UMI) of VEGF receptor 2 (kinase insert domain receptor, KDR). Methods: Targeted microbubbles (MBt) were built by conjugating K237, a small peptide with high affinity for KDR, to liposome microbubbles through a biotin-avidin bridge. Control microbubbles (MBc) with control peptide were prepared by the same method. Nude mice models of LS174T human colon cancer were established. MBt and MBc were injected intravenously in twelve mice in random order with an interval of 30 min. MBt were injected in another six mice after K237-peptide blocking. UMI was performed in all mice at 5 min postinjection to observe the imaging difference and measure the video intensity (Ⅵ) of tumor tissues in different groups. One-way analysis of variance and the least significant difference t test were performed to analyze the difference of tumor Ⅵ in the groups with MBt, MBc and K237 blocking. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression and distribution of KDR in tumor tissue and adjacent tumor tissues. Results: K237 peptide was successfully conjugated to the surface of microbubbles through biotin-avidin mediation. Ultrasound imaging signal of the tumor was high in the MBt group, while there were no significant enhancement in the groups of K237 blocking and MBc. The Ⅵ in MBt, MBc and K237 blocking groups was significantly different (F=39.130, P<0.01). There was a significant difference of Ⅵ in the MBt group compared to the MBc group (30.18 ± 9.56 vs 8.28 ± 4.74, t=6.91, P<0.01). In the K237 blocking group Ⅵ was significantly lower than that in the MBt group (9.23 ± 3.44 vs 30.18 ± 9.56, t=4.91, P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry results showed that KDR was highly expressed in tumor tissue. Conclusions: KDR-targeting liposome contrast microbubbles may specifically and efficiently link to tumor vascular endothelial cells in

  1. Breast imaging technology: Application of magnetic resonance imaging to angiogenesis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques enable vascular function to be mapped with high spatial resolution. Current methods for imaging in breast cancer are described, and a review of recent studies that compared dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with histopathological indicators of tumour vascular status is provided. These studies show correlation between in vivo dynamic contrast measurements and in vitro histopathology. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI is also being applied to assessment of the response of breast tumours to treatment

  2. Platelets actively sequester angiogenesis regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Lakka Klement, Giannoula; Yip, Tai-Tung; Cassiola, Flavia; Kikuchi, Lena; Cervi, David; Podust, Vladimir; Italiano, Joseph E.; Wheatley, Erin; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Bender, Elise; Almog, Nava; Kieran, Mark W.; Folkman, Judah

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials with antiangiogenic agents have not been able to validate plasma or serum levels of angiogenesis regulators as reliable markers of cancer presence or therapeutic response. We recently reported that platelets contain numerous proteins that regulate angiogenesis. We now show that accumulation of angiogenesis regulators in platelets of animals bearing malignant tumors exceeds significantly their concentration in plasma or serum, as well as their levels in platelets from non–tumor...

  3. Learning by Observation of Agent Software Images

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Botelho, Luís Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Learning by observation can be of key importance whenever agents sharing similar features want to learn from each other. This paper presents an agent architecture that enables software agents to learn by direct observation of the actions executed by expert agents while they are performing a task. This is possible because the proposed architecture displays information that is essential for observation, making it possible for software agents to observe each other. The agent architecture support...

  4. Study and application of imaging agents for infection and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Situation of current study and clinic application of main imaging agents for infection and inflammation is summarized. These agents include radiolabelled small molecular compounds, leucocytes, large molecular proteins, liposomes, antibiotics, biotins and etc

  5. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy.

  6. Content Based Image Retrieval with Mobile Agents and Steganography

    OpenAIRE

    Thampi, Sabu M.; Sekaran, K. Chandra

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present an image retrieval system based on Gabor texture features, steganography, and mobile agents.. By employing the information hiding technique, the image attributes can be hidden in an image without degrading the image quality. Thus the image retrieval process becomes simple. Java based mobile agents manage the query phase of the system. Based on the simulation results, the proposed system not only shows the efficiency in hiding the attributes but also provides other adv...

  7. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis by MRI Study Using Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ashoor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones and it is a perquisite for the growth, invasion and metastasis of solid tumors. This complex process involves multiple steps and pathways dependent on the local balance between positive and negative regulatory factors, as well as interactions among the tumor, its vasculature and the surrounding extracellular tissue matrix. Tumors lay dormant yet viable, unable to grow beyond 2-3 mm3 in size without angiogenesis."nWith the development of novel therapies for treat-ment of several diseases, directed noninvasive imaging strategies will be critical for defining the pathophysiology of angiogenesis. Imaging modalities used to detect angiogenesis include PET, SPECT, MRI, CT, US and near-infrared optical imaging. For these modalities, methods have been developed to measure blood volume, blood flow and several other semi quantitative and quantitative kinetic hemodynamic parameters such as vascular permeability. Characteristic molecular makers of angiogenesis may be visualized with the aid of molecular imaging agents such as VEGFs or the α vß3 integrin. "nMRI is a practical modality for assessing angiogenesis over time because it is already widely used clinically to assess tumor growth and for response evaluation. Anatomical information can be co registered with functional and molecular information within a single imaging method. Moreover, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation and the commonly used contrast agent has low toxicity. "nSuper paramagnetic iron oxides (SPIO are FDA-approved contrast agents for use in magnetic reson-ance (MR imaging. Most of the administered SPIO end up in the reticuloendotelial system via endocytosis and the iron core released from the SPIO is utilized in normal iron metabolism pathways. We utilize the paramagnetic characteristics of SPIO to improve the contrast of the image in MRI."nFor the first time we will introduce a method for evaluating angiogenesis

  8. Breast Lesions: Correlation of Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Patterns on MR images with Tumor Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeifangLiu; RunxianBao; YunNiu; YongYu

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI features of the early -phase enhancement rate, enhancement amplitude, and signal-intensity (SI) time course are associated with the microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of malignant and benign breast lesions. METHODS Sixty patients with breast lesions, detected with physical examination or conventional mammography, were examined pre-operatively with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI from December 1998 to June 2000. Of these 60 patients, histopathological correlation was available in 38. These 38 patients(aged 29-73 years) formed the basis of this study. SI changes during dynamic scanning were assessed quantitatively. Early-phase enhancement rate and enhancement amplitude were calculated. Time-Sl curves of the lesions were obtained and classified according to their shapes as type I (which was steady enhancement to the end of the dynamic data acquisition at 7.5rain.), type Ⅱ (plateau of SI after avid initial contrast enhancement), or type Ⅲ (washout of SI after avid initial contrast enhancement). The mean MVD and VEGF expression of the lesions were measured with immunohistochemical staining methods in all the pathologic specimens by a pathologist without knowledge of the results of the MR examination. Care was taken to ensure identical location in the plane of the MR image and pathologic specimens. The relationships among dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI features, MVD, and VEGF expression of benign and malignant breast lesions were analyzed. RESULTS Histology revealed 21 malignancies and 17 benign lesions. The mean MVD and VEGF expression for the 21 malignant lesions were significantly higher than the mean MVD and VEGF expression for the 17 benign lesions (P60%) MR early-phase enhancement rate and time-SI curve type Ⅱ or Ⅲ showed a significant association with MVD and VEGF expression. All the differences mentioned above showed statistical significance (P 0

  9. Positron emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis in a murine hindlimb ischemia model with 64Cu-labeled TRC105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Hakan; Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Hacker, Timothy A; Valdovinos, Hector F; Zagzebski, James A; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to assess ischemia-induced angiogenesis with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 positron emission tomography (PET) in a murine hindlimb ischemia model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). CD105 binding affinity/specificity of NOTA-conjugated TRC105 (an anti-CD105 antibody) was evaluated by flow cytometry, which exhibited no difference from unconjugated TRC105. BALB/c mice were anesthetized, and the right femoral artery was ligated to induce hindlimb ischemia, with the left hindlimb serving as an internal control. Laser Doppler imaging showed that perfusion in the ischemic hindlimb plummeted to ∼ 20% of the normal level after surgery and gradually recovered to near normal level on day 24. Ischemia-induced angiogenesis was noninvasively monitored and quantified with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET on postoperative days 1, 3, 10, 17, and 24. (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 uptake in the ischemic hindlimb increased significantly from the control level of 1.6 ± 0.2 %ID/g to 14.1 ± 1.9 %ID/g at day 3 (n = 3) and gradually decreased with time (3.4 ± 1.9 %ID/g at day 24), which correlated well with biodistribution studies performed on days 3 and 24. Blocking studies confirmed the CD105 specificity of tracer uptake in the ischemic hindlimb. Increased CD105 expression on days 3 and 10 following ischemia was confirmed by histology and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This is the first report of PET imaging of CD105 expression during ischemia-induced angiogenesis. (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET may play multiple roles in future PAD-related research and improve PAD patient management by identifying the optimal timing of treatment and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. PMID:23738915

  10. In Vivo Photoacoustic Tomography of Total Blood Flow and Potential Imaging of Cancer Angiogenesis and Hypermetabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow is a key parameter in studying cancer angiogenesis and hypermetabolism. Current photoacoustic blood flow estimation methods focus on either the axial or transverse component of the flow vector. However, the Doppler angle (beam-to-flow angle) is needed to calculate the total flow speed, and it cannot always be estimated accurately in practice, especially when the system's axial and lateral resolutions are different. To overcome this problem, we propose a method to compute the total ...

  11. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ozawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs, biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  12. Agentes antitumorais inibidores da angiogênese: modelos farmacofóricos para inibidores da integrina anb3 Angiogenesis inhibitors antitumor agents: pharmacophore models to anb3 antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Horta Álvares da Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O câncer é, atualmente, uma das principais causas de morte no mundo. A angiogênese, formação de novos vasos capilares a partir de células endoteliais, é essencial para vários processos fisiopatológicos, tais como o desenvolvimento e a disseminação dos tumores. As integrinas são uma família de receptores de superfície que estão envolvidos na angiogênese, na qual a integrina anb3 exerce papel importante. Os antagonistas da integrina anb3 têm efeitos diretos na prevenção do crescimento, angiogênese e metástase tumorais. A avaliação in vitro frente à integrina anb3 de coleções de ciclopeptídeos levou a compostos muito ativos e seletivos. Antagonistas não-peptídicos da integrina anb3 também foram planejados e sintetizados. A partir da determinação da estrutura tridimensional da integrina anb3 complexada com um inibidor, tornou-se possível o planejamento racional de ligantes com alta afinidade. Além disto, estes estudos permitiram a validação e o refinamento de modelo farmacofórico para os inibidores da integrina anb3.Cancer is one of the leading causes of death. Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, is essential for tumor development and spreading. Integrins are a family of surface receptors that are involved in angiogenesis. The anb3 integrin plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis. anb3 inhibitors have direct effects to prevent tumor metastases, growth and angiogenesis. In vitro screening of cyclic peptide libraries led to highly active and anb3-selective compounds. Non-peptidic anb3 antagonists were also designed and synthesized. The crystal structure of the anb3 integrin in complex with RGD ligant allowed structure-based rational design of ligands and validation of pharmacophore model to anb3 antagonists.

  13. Ultrasound Imaging Beyond the Vasculature with New Generation Contrast Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, Reshani H.; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 μm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signa...

  14. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Dual-Modality Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Rats Using GEBP11 Peptide Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tao; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Jiinda; Han, Dong; Ma, Sai; Cao, Jianbo; Li, Xiujuan; Zhang, Ran; Qiao, Hongyu; Liang, Jimin; Liu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Liang, Shuhui; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Li, Jiayi; Cao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor progression. Tumor vasculature-targeting peptides have shown great potential for use in cancer imaging and therapy. Our previous studies have shown that GEBP11, a novel vasculature-specific binding peptide that exhibits high affinity and specificity to tumor angiogenesis, is a promising candidate for the diagnosis and targeted radiotherapy of gastric cancer. In the present study, we developed a novel magnetic resonance and fluorescence (MR/Fluo) dual-modality imaging probe by covalently coupling 2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid-coated paramagnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-MNPs) and Cy5.5 to the GEBP11 peptide. The probe Cy5.5-GEBP11-DMSA-MNPs (CGD-MNPs), with a hydrodynamic diameter of 82.8 ± 6.5 nm, exhibited good imaging properties, high stability and little cytotoxicity. In vivo MR/Fluo imaging revealed that CGD-MNPs were successfully applied to visualize tumor angiogenesis in SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models. Prussian blue and CD31 immunohistochemical staining confirmed that CGD-MNPs co-localized with tumor blood vessels. In conclusion, CGD-MNPs are promising candidates for use as MR and fluorescence imaging probes for visualizing gastric cancer angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:27305822

  15. Thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized Fe2O3/Au nanoparticles targeted to CD105: Synthesis, characterization and application in MR imaging of tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect tumor angiogenesis in tumor-bearing mice using thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized Fe2O3/Au nanoparticles targeted to CD105 on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Fe2O3/Au nanoparticles (hybrids) were prepared by reducing Au3+ on the surface of Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Hybrids were stabilized with thiol-PEG-carboxyl via the Au–S covalent bond, and further conjugated with anti-CD105 antibodies through amide linkages. Characteristics of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles were evaluated. Using these nanoparticles, the labeling specificity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated in vitro. MRI T2*-weighted images were obtained at different time points after intravenous administration of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles in the tumor-bearing mice. After MR imaging, the breast cancer xenografts were immediately resected for immunohistochemistry staining and Prussian blue staining to measure the tumor microvessel density (MVD) and evaluate the labeling of blood microvessels by the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles in vivo. Results: The mean diameter of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was 56.6 ± 8.0 nm, as measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Immune activity of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was 53% of that of the anti-CD105 antibody, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The specific binding of HUVECs with the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was proved by immunostaining and Prussian blue staining in vitro. For breast cancer xenografts, the combination of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles with blood microvessels was detectable by MRI after 60 min administration of the contrast agent. The T2* relative signal intensity (SIR) was positively correlated with the tumor MVD (R2 = 0.8972). Conclusion: Anti-CD105 antibody-coupled, thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized core–shell Fe2O3/Au nanoparticles can efficiently target CD105 expressed by HUVECs. Furthermore, the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles can be

  16. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy a...... in a transgenic mouse model. The last manuscript presents a new method for in vivo cell labeling. This method could find use in studying the metastatic spread of cancer cells throughout the body....... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...

  17. Chitosan-based formulations of drugs, imaging agents and biotherapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, M.; Hennink, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    This preface is part of the Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews theme issue on “Chitosan-Based Formulations of Drugs, Imaging Agents and Biotherapeutics”. This special Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews issue summarizes recent progress and different applications of chitosanbased formulations.

  18. Several new imaging agents for central dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    123I-β-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-[4-iodophenyl]-tropane), a promising agent for imaging central dopamine transporter, has been successfully used in clinical and differential diagnosis and assessment of the magnitude of degeneration of nigra-striatum in Parkinson's disease. However, due to its poor selectivity for dopamine transporter and prolonged imaging interval (usually 20h after injection), and therefore limits its clinical use. Several new imaging agents have been developed for dopamine transporter in recent years, and significantly improved the characterization for imaging dopamine transporter

  19. Development of a New Positron Emission Tomography Tracer for Targeting Tumor Angiogenesis: Synthesis, Small Animal Imaging, and Radiation Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Lalush

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer progression and correlates with disease aggressiveness and poor clinical outcomes. Affinity ligands discovered by screening phage display random peptide libraries can be engineered to molecularly target tumor blood vessels for noninvasive imaging and early detection of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we tested the ability of a phage-display-selected peptide sequence recognizing specifically bone marrow- derived pro-angiogenic tumor-homing cells, the QFP-peptide, radiolabeled with 64Cu radioisotope to selectively image tumor vasculature in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET. To prepare the targeted PET tracer we modified QFP-phage with the DOTA chelator and radiolabeled the purified QFP-phage-DOTA intermediate with 64Cu to obtain QFP-targeted radioconjugate with high radiopharmaceutical yield and specific activity. We evaluated the new PET tracer in vivo in a subcutaneous (s.c. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC mouse model and conducted tissue distribution, small animal PET/CT imaging study, autoradiography, histology, fluorescence imaging, and dosimetry assessments. The results from this study show that, in the context of the s.c. LLC immunocompetent mouse model, the QFP-tracer can target tumor blood vessels selectively. However, further optimization of the biodistribution and dosimetry profile of the tracer is necessary to ensure efficient radiopharmaceutical applications enabled by the biological specificity of the QFP-peptide.

  20. Neo-angiogenesis metabolic biomarker of tumor-genesis tracking by infrared joystick contact imaging in personalized homecare system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hoekstra, Philip; Landa, Joseph; Vydelingum, Nadarajen A.

    2014-05-01

    We describe an affordable, harmless, and administrative (AHA) metabolic biomarker (MBM) for homecare cancer screening. It may save hundreds of thousands of women's and thousands of men's lives every year from breast cancer and melanoma. The goal is to increase the specificity of infrared (IR) imagery to reduce the false alarm rate (FAR). The patient's hands are immersed in icy cold water, about 11oC, for 30 seconds. We then compare two IR images, taken before and after the cold stimulus, and the difference reveals an enhanced signal and noise ratio (SNR) at tumorigenesis sites since the contraction of capillaries under cold challenge is natural to healthy capillaries, except those newly built capillaries during angiogenesis (Folkman, Nature 1995). Concomitant with the genome and the phenome (molecular signaling by phosphor-mediate protein causing inflammation by platelet activating factor (PAF) that transform cells from benign to malignant is the amplification of nitric oxide (NO) syntheses, a short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) that dilates regional blood vessels; superseding normal autonomic nervous system regulation. A rapidly growing tumor site might implicate accumulation of ROS, for which NO can rapidly stretch the capillary bed system usually having thinning muscular lining known as Neo-Angiogenesis (NA) that could behave like Leaky In-situ Faucet Effect (LIFE) in response to cold challenge. To emphasize the state of art knowledge of NA, we mentioned in passing the first generation of an anticapillary growth drug, Avastin by Genetech; it is an antibody protein that is injected for metastasis, while the second generation drug; Sorafenib by Bayers (2001) and Sutent by Pfizer (2000) both target molecular signaling loci to block receptor associated tyrosine kinase induced protein phosphorylation in order to reverse the angiogenesis. Differentiating benign from malignant in a straightforward manner is required to achieve the wellness protocol, yet would

  1. 肿瘤血管生成的影像学评价及新进展%Imaging assessment and trends of tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽

    2012-01-01

    肿瘤的生长和转移依赖于血管生成.抑制肿瘤血管形成是继外科手术、放化疗之后肿瘤治疗的新的有效手段.许多临床前抗血管生成治疗动物试验显示出很好的前景,但是在临床应用中的疗效却不够满意,其原因有待深入探讨.如何在活体上无创评价肿瘤血管生成和抗肿瘤血管生成治疗的效果是目前肿瘤学研究的热点之一.文中介绍利用显微光学成像、超声成像、CT、MRI、核医学、分子影像、多模式成像等成像方法对肿瘤血管生成的研究及进展.%The development and metastasis of solid tumor require angiogenesis to get oxygen and nutrients. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is another effective means following surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenic therapy in many preclinical animal tests show good prospects, but their deviation of the clinical efficacy call for in-depth studies. Of them in vivo noninvasive evaluation of tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic effect is currently one of the hot-points. This article describes the use of optical microscopy imaging, ultrasound imaging, MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, molecular imaging, multi-mode imaging and other imaging methods in tumor angiogenesis and their progress.

  2. Molecular imaging of hypoxia with radiolabelled agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue hypoxia results from an inadequate supply of oxygen (O2) that compromises biological functions. Structural and functional abnormalities of the tumour vasculature together with altered diffusion conditions inside the tumour seem to be the main causes of tumour hypoxia. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies points to a role for tumour hypoxia in tumour propagation, resistance to therapy and malignant progression. This has led to the development of assays for the detection of hypoxia in patients in order to predict outcome and identify patients with a worse prognosis and/or patients that would benefit from appropriate treatments. A variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches have been developed to measure tumour oxygenation including oxygen-sensitive electrodes and hypoxia marker techniques using various labels that can be detected by different methods such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. This review aims to give a detailed overview of non-invasive molecular imaging modalities with radiolabelled PET and SPECT tracers that are available to measure tumour hypoxia. (orig.)

  3. User-agent cooperation in multiagent IVUS image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenkamp, E G P; Dijkstra, J; Bosch, J G; Reiber, J H C

    2009-01-01

    Automated interpretation of complex images requires elaborate knowledge and model-based image analysis, but often needs interaction with an expert as well. This research describes expert interaction with a multiagent image interpretation system using only a restricted vocabulary of high-level user interactions. The aim is to minimize inter- and intra-observer variability by keeping the total number of interactions as low and simple as possible. The multiagent image interpretation system has elaborate high-level knowledge-based control over low-level image segmentation algorithms. Agents use contextual knowledge to keep the number of interactions low but, when in doubt, present the user with the most likely interpretation of the situation. The user, in turn, can correct, supplement, and/or confirm the results of image-processing agents. This is done at a very high level of abstraction such that no knowledge of the underlying segmentation methods, parameters or agent functioning is needed. High-level interaction thereby replaces more traditional contour correction methods like inserting points and/or (re)drawing contours. This makes it easier for the user to obtain good results, while inter- and intra-observer variability are kept minimal, since the image segmentation itself remains under control of image-processing agents. The system has been applied to intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Experiments show that with an average of 2-3 high-level user interactions per correction, segmentation results substantially improve while the variation is greatly reduced. The achieved level of accuracy and repeatability is equivalent to that of manual drawing by an expert. PMID:19116192

  4. Angiogenesis and Its Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays critical roles in human physiology that range from reproduction and fetal growth to wound healing and tissue repair. The sophisticated multistep process is tightly regulated in a spatial and temporal manner by “on-off switch signals” between angiogenic factors, extracellular matrix components, and endothelial cells. Uncontrolled angiogenesis may lead to several angiogenic disorders, including vascular insufficiency (myocardial or critical limb ischemia and vascular overgrowth (hemangiomas, vascularized tumors, and retinopathies. Thus, numerous therapeutic opportunities can be envisaged through the successful understanding and subsequent manipulation of angiogenesis. Here, we review the clinical implications of angiogenesis and discuss pro- and antiangiogenic agents that offer potential therapy for cancer and other angiogenic diseases.

  5. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis after myocardial infarction by 111In-DTPA-cNGR and 99mTc-sestamibi dual-isotope myocardial SPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrikx, Geert; Saint-Hubert, Marijke De; Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Bauwens, Matthias; Douma, Kim; Wierts, Roel; Pooters, Ivo; Van den Akker, Nynke MS; Hackeng, Tilman M.; Post, Mark J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2015-01-01

    Background CD13 is selectively upregulated in angiogenic active endothelium and can serve as a target for molecular imaging tracers to non-invasively visualise angiogenesis in vivo. Non-invasive determination of CD13 expression can potentially be used to monitor treatment response to pro-angiogenic drugs in ischemic heart disease. CD13 binds peptides and proteins through binding to tripeptide asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) amino acid residues. Previous studies using in vivo fluorescence mi...

  6. PET/SPECT Imaging of Hindlimb Ischemia: Focusing on Angiogenesis and Blood Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Orbay, Hakan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a result of the atherosclerotic narrowing of blood vessels to the extremities, and the subsequent tissue ischemia can lead to the up-regulation of angiogenic growth factors and formation of new vessels as a recovery mechanism. Such formation of new vessels can be evaluated with various non-invasive molecular imaging techniques, where serial images from the same subjects can be obtained to allow the documentation of disease progression and therapeutic respons...

  7. Multi-agent Remote Sensing Image Segmentation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to fractal network evolution algorithm (FNEA in the treatment of the high spatial resolution remote sensing image (HSRI using a parallel global control strategies which limited when the objects in each cycle by traversal of and not good use the continuity of homogenous area on the space and lead to problems such as bad image segmentation, therefore puts forward the remote sensing image segmentation algorithm based on multi-agent. The algorithm in the merger guidelines, combining the image spectral and shape information, and by using region merging process of multi-agent parallel control integral, its global merger control strategy can ensure algorithm has the advantages of parallel computing and fully considering the regional homogeneity, and continuity. Finally simulation experiment was performed with FNEA algorithms, experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is better than FNEA algorithm in dividing the overall effect, has a good stability

  8. Software Agent with Reinforcement Learning Approach for Medical Image Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahsa Chitsaz; Chaw Seng Woo

    2011-01-01

    Many image segmentation solutions are problem-based. Medical images have very similar grey level and texture among the interested objects. Therefore, medical image segmentation requires improvements although there have been researches done since the last few decades. We design a self-learning framework to extract several objects of interest simultaneously from Computed Tomography (CT) images. Our segmentation method has a learning phase that is based on reinforcement learning (RL) system. Each RL agent works on a particular sub-image of an input image to find a suitable value for each object in it. The RL system is define by state, action and reward. We defined some actions for each state in the sub-image. A reward function computes reward for each action of the RL agent. Finally, the valuable information, from discovering all states of the interest objects, will be stored in a Q-matrix and the final result can be applied in segmentation of similar images. The experimental results for cranial CT images demonstrated segmentation accuracy above 95%.

  9. Contrast Agent Mass Spectrometry Imaging Reveals Tumor Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Alessandra; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard J; Jaffray, David A; Ifa, Demian R; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-08-01

    Mapping intratumoral heterogeneity such as vasculature and margins is important during intraoperative applications. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has demonstrated potential for intraoperative tumor imaging using validated MS profiles. The clinical translation of DESI-MS into a universal label-free imaging technique thus requires access to MS profiles characteristic to tumors and healthy tissues. Here, we developed contrast agent mass spectrometry imaging (CA-MSI) that utilizes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent targeted to disease sites, as a label, to reveal tumor heterogeneity in the absence of known MS profiles. Human breast cancer tumors grown in mice were subjected to CA-MSI using Gadoteridol revealing tumor margins and vasculature from the localization of [Gadoteridol+K](+) and [Gadoteridol+Na](+) adducts, respectively. The localization of the [Gadoteridol+K](+) adduct as revealed through DESI-MS complements the in vivo MRI results. DESI-MS imaging is therefore possible for tumors for which no characteristic MS profiles are established. Further DESI-MS imaging of the flux of the contrast agent through mouse kidneys was performed indicating secretion of the intact label. PMID:26138213

  10. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  11. Peripheral pulmonary nodules: Relationship between multi-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging and tumor angiogenesis and VEGF expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between16-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging and tumor angiogenesis and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression in patients with benign and malignant pulmonary nodules, and differential diagnosis between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. Sixty-four patients with benign and malignant pulmonary nodules underwent 16-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging. The CT perfusion imaging was analyzed for TDC (time density curve), perfusion parametric maps, and the respective perfusion parameters. Immunohistochemical findings of MVD (microvessel density) measurement and VEGF expression was evaluated. The shape of the TDC of peripheral lung cancer was similar to those of inflammatory nodule. PH (peak height), PHpm/PHa (peak height ratio of pulmonary nodule to aorta), BF (blood flow), BV (blood volume) value of peripheral lung cancer and inflammatory nodule were not statistically significant (all P > 0.05). Both showed significantly higher PH, PHpm/PHa, BF, BV value than those of benign nodule (all P < 0.05). Peripheral lung cancer showed significantly higher PS (permeability surface) value than that of inflammatory nodule and benign nodule (all P < 0.05). BV, BF, PS, MTT, PH, PHpm/PHa, and MVD among three groups of peripheral lung cancers were not significantly (all P > 0.05). In the case of adenocarcinoma, BV, BF, PS, PHpm/PHa, and MVD between poorly and well differentiation and between poorly and moderately differentiation were statistically significant (all P < 0.05). The peripheral lung cancers with VEGF positive expression showed significantly higher PH, PHpm/PHa, BF, BV, PS, and MVD value than those of the peripheral lung cancer with VEGF negative expression, and than those of benign nodule with VEGF positive expression (all P < 0.05). When investigating VEGF negative expression, it is found that PH, PHpm/PHa, and MVD of inflammatory nodule were significantly higher than those of peripheral lung cancer

  12. Imaging tumor angiogenesis in breast cancer experimental lung metastasis with positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence, and bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Nayak, Tapas R.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Myklejord, Duane V.; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a molecular imaging agent that can allow for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of CD105 expression in metastatic breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., IRDye 800CW) and 64Cu to yield 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial bio...

  13. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Targeted Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael M; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents our adaptation of Fryback and Thornbury's hierarchical scheme for modeling the efficacy of diagnostic imaging systems. The original scheme was designed to evaluate new medical imaging systems but is less successful when applied to evaluate new radiopharmaceuticals. The proposed adaptation, which is specifically directed toward evaluating targeted imaging agents, has 6 levels: in vitro characterization, in vivo animal studies, initial human studies, impact on clinical care (change in management), impact on patient outcome, and societal efficacy. These levels, particularly the first four, implicitly define the sequence of studies needed to move an agent from the radiochemistry synthesis laboratory to the clinic. Completion of level 4 (impact on clinical care) should be sufficient for initial approval and reimbursement. We hope that the adapted scheme will help streamline the process and assist in bringing new targeted radiopharmaceuticals to approval over the next few years. PMID:26769867

  14. MULTIVARIATE MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY FOR DCE-MRI IMAGE ANALYSIS IN ANGIOGENESIS STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Noyel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new computer aided detection framework for tumours acquired on DCE-MRI (Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging series on small animals. To perform this approach, we consider DCE-MRI series as multivariate images. A full multivariate segmentation method based on dimensionality reduction, noise filtering, supervised classification and stochastic watershed is explained and tested on several data sets. The two main key-points introduced in this paper are noise reduction preserving contours and spatio temporal segmentation by stochastic watershed. Noise reduction is performed in a special way to select factorial axes of Factor Correspondence Analysis in order to preserves contours. Then a spatio-temporal approach based on stochastic watershed is used to segment tumours. The results obtained are in accordance with the diagnosis of the medical doctors.

  15. Functional imaging of the lungs with gas agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Stanley J; Nagle, Scott K; Couch, Marcus J; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas--and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multidetector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multispectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultrashort echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis in both adults and children. PMID:26218920

  16. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  17. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  18. Development of a new structure for in vivo tracers synthesis: application to tumor neo-angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging is an essential non-invasive tool usable for diagnosis and characterisation of many diseases. Technetium-based tracers are the most popular ones due to availability, cost and radiochemical properties of 99mTc. Nevertheless, effective tracers development requires a long, expensive, and mainly empirical optimisation process. This context prompted us to carry on the development of a new technetium structure which exhibits lots of potential functionalization spots compatible with a combinatorial approach. We synthesised 12 N3X (X = N, O, S) different ligands. Each of them includes a triazole moiety, (formed via a click-chemistry reaction), which is involved in the metal complexation that implies one of its nitrogen atoms. Then we evaluated their ability to readily form oxo-technetium complexes in conditions that are compatible with medical use in hospital. One complex was formed in quantitative yields and its stability in mice plasma was investigated. A complex called TriaS-99mTc, stable to more than 90% after 6 h incubation, was selected. In vivo study of TriaS-99mTc revealed an efficient blood clearance via the urinary excretion pathway with very low degradation. As an application, we used this structure for the development of tracers that target integrin αvβ3, a known bio-marker of tumor neo-angiogenesis. First, we synthesised functionalized TriaS-based integrated complexes. Functional modification of TriaS by addition of side chains and substituents did not affect its ability to chelate oxo-technetium quantitatively. In addition, its stability in mice plasma was satisfactory. We also developed a bifunctional approach using c(RGDfK) peptide as the targeting biomolecule. In this way, a variable moiety (herein a PEG moiety) can be inserted in the structure through click-chemistry in order to modulate tracers solubility, biodistribution and excretion. (author)

  19. Superparamagnetic particles as an oral MR imaging contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new superparamagnetic oral magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent has been developed that reduces the signal from the bowel due to T2 shortening. The contrast agent consists of monodisperse resin carrier particles with a diameter of approximately 3.5 μm and containing 20% magnetic iron oxide. The contrast agent produced a satisfactory lowering of the signal intensity with different spin-echo sequences at a dose of 0.1-1.0g of particles in 1,000 mL of water; and lower doses were needed with gradient-echo and phase-contrast sequences. In an examination of 25 volunteers and patients with malignant lymphoma, the depiction of normal and pathologic structures was enhanced after administration of the contrast medium

  20. Development of (F-18)-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the 'amyloid cascade hypothesis' which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  1. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  2. In vivo imaging agents: an international market report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a global perspective of the in vivo imaging agents business to market planning executives who are working for companies that develop, produce and distribute various types of in vivo imaging agents. Others that could find this study useful include investment bankers, regulatory and governmental authorities and purchasers of these products. The study attempts to diligently provide market data by type for important geographic markets - Western Europe, the U.S.A., and Japan. A competitive intelligence section which discusses companies involved in these markets constitutes the last part of this study. These profiles are not intended to extensively evaluate each company's marketing strengths or strategies but to provide a general idea of the market presence and prospects. A combination of primary and secondary research is used for all findings. (author).

  3. In vivo imaging agents: an international market report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to provide a global perspective of the in vivo imaging agents business to market planning executives who are working for companies that develop, produce and distribute various types of in vivo imaging agents. Others that could find this study useful include investment bankers, regulatory and governmental authorities and purchasers of these products. The study attempts to diligently provide market data by type for important geographic markets - Western Europe, the U.S.A., and Japan. A competitive intelligence section which discusses companies involved in these markets constitutes the last part of this study. These profiles are not intended to extensively evaluate each company's marketing strengths or strategies but to provide a general idea of the market presence and prospects. A combination of primary and secondary research is used for all findings. (author)

  4. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously. Based on the 4(prime)-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  5. Live imaging of cysteine-cathepsin activity reveals dynamics of focal inflammation, angiogenesis, and polyp growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gounaris

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that up to 30% of detectable polyps in patients regress spontaneously. One major challenge in the evaluation of effective therapy of cancer is the readout for tumor regression and favorable biological response to therapy. Inducible near infra-red (NIR fluorescent probes were utilized to visualize intestinal polyps of mice hemizygous for a novel truncation of the Adenomatous Polyposis coli (APC gene. Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy in live mice allowed visualization of cathepsin activity in richly vascularized benign dysplastic lesions. Using biotinylated suicide inhibitors we quantified increased activities of the Cathepsin B & Z in the polyps. More than (3/4 of the probe signal was localized in CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC and CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages infiltrating the lesions. Polyposis was attenuated through genetic ablation of cathepsin B, and suppressed by neutralization of TNFalpha in mice. In both cases, diminished probe signal was accounted for by loss of MDSC. Thus, in vivo NIR imaging of focal cathepsin activity reveals inflammatory reactions etiologically linked with cancer progression and is a suitable approach for monitoring response to therapy.

  6. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  7. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Taejun Wang; Won Hyuk Jang; Seunghun Lee; Yoon, Calvin J.; Jun Ho Lee; Bumju Kim; Sekyu Hwang; Chun-Pyo Hong; Yeoreum Yoon; Gilgu Lee; Viet-Hoan Le; Seoyeon Bok; G-One Ahn; Jaewook Lee; Yong Song Gho

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetra...

  8. Valine-based biphenylsulphonamide matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as tumor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the subfamily of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) is of particular interest due to their ability to degrade type IV collagen and other non-fibrillar collagen domains and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. Whilst malignant cells often over-express various MMPs, the gelatinases have been most consistently detected in malignant tissues and associated with tumor growth, metastatic potential and angiogenesis. Radiosynthesis of carboxylic (1') and hydroxamic (2') MMPIs resulted in radiochemical yields of 70+/-5% (n=6) and 60+/-5% (n=4), respectively. Evaluation in A549-inoculated athymic mice showed a tumor uptake of 2.0+/-0.7%ID/g (3h p.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 0.5 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 4.6 at 48hp.i. for 1'. For compound 2' a tumor uptake of 0.7+/-0.2%ID/g (3hp.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 1.2 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 1.8 at 24hp.i. were observed. HPLC analysis of the blood (plasma) showed no dehalogenation or other metabolites of 1' 2hp.i. For compound 2', 65.4% of intact compound was found in the blood (plasma) and one polar metabolite (31%) was detected whereas in the tumor 91.8% of the accumulated activity was caused by intact compound and only 8.1% by the metabolite. Planar imaging, using a Toshiba GCA-9300A/hg SPECT camera, showed that tumor tissue could be visualized and that image quality improved by decreasing specific activity resulting in lower liver uptake, indicating some degree of saturable binding in the liver. In vivo evaluation of these radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers revealed that MMP inhibitors could have potential as tumor imaging agents, but that further research is necessary

  9. Graphene-based nanomaterials as molecular imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhaskar; Sung, Chu-Hsun; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) is a noninvasive, real-time visualization of biochemical events at the cellular and molecular level within tissues, living cells, and/or intact objects that can be advantageously applied in the areas of diagnostics, therapeutics, drug discovery, and development in understanding the nanoscale reactions including enzymatic conversions and protein-protein interactions. Consequently, over the years, great advancement has been made in the development of a variety of MI agents such as peptides, aptamers, antibodies, and various nanomaterials (NMs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes. Recently, graphene, a material popularized by Geim & Novoselov, has ignited considerable research efforts to rationally design and execute a wide range of graphene-based NMs making them an attractive platform for developing highly sensitive MI agents. Owing to their exceptional physicochemical and biological properties combined with desirable surface engineering, graphene-based NMs offer stable and tunable visible emission, small hydrodynamic size, low toxicity, and high biocompatibility and thus have been explored for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications as a promising alternative of traditional imaging agents. This review begins by describing the intrinsic properties of graphene and the key MI modalities. After which, we provide an overview on the recent advances in the design and development as well as physicochemical properties of the different classes of graphene-based NMs (graphene-dye conjugates, graphene-antibody conjugates, graphene-nanoparticle composites, and graphene quantum dots) being used as MI agents for potential applications including theranostics. Finally, the major challenges and future directions in the field will be discussed. PMID:25857851

  10. Toward carbon nanotube-based imaging agents for the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Zaibaq, Nicholas G; Wilson, Lon J

    2016-09-01

    Among the many applications for carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their use in medicine has drawn special attention due to their potential for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. As progress toward clinical applications continues, monitoring CNTs in vivo will be essential to evaluate their biodistribution, potential toxicity, therapeutic activity, and any physiological changes that the material may induce in specific tissues. There are many different imaging modalities to visualize and track CNTs in vivo, yet only a few are full-body penetrating, a central characteristic that widens their clinical utility. In order to visualize CNTs, chemical modification is often required for the material to be used as a platform to carry imaging agents compatible with one or more of the clinical imaging techniques. Here, we focus on the most recent work involving the use of CNTs as imaging agents for the non-invasive, full-body penetrating clinical modalities of MRI, PET, SPECT, and X-ray CT. The synthesis and modification of the CNT materials are discussed, as well as relevant preclinical studies. PMID:27294540

  11. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with a 61/64Cu-Labeled F(ab')2 Antibody Fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Orbay, Hakan; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Nayak, Tapas R.; Bean, Jero; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro and in vivo properties of the F(ab')2 fragment of TRC105, a human/murine chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds with high avidity to human and murine CD105 (i.e. endoglin), and investigate its potential for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor angiogenesis after 61/64Cu-labeling. TRC105-F(ab')2 of high purity was produced by pepsin digestion of TRC105, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, HPLC analysis, and mass spe...

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles as both imaging probes and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ho, Don; Sun, Shouheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been explored extensively as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or as heating agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) [1]. To achieve optimum operation conditions in MRI and MFH, these NPs should have well-controlled magnetic properties and biological functionalities. Although numerous efforts have been dedicated to the investigations on MNPs for biomedical applications [2-5], the NP optimizations for early diagnostics and efficient therapeutics are still far from reached. Recent efforts in NP syntheses have led to some promising MNP systems for sensitive MRI and efficient MFH applications. This review summarizes these advances in the synthesis of monodisperse MNPs as both contrast probes in MRI and as therapeutic agents via MFH. It will first introduce the nanomagnetism and elucidate the critical parameters to optimize the superparamagnetic NPs for MRI and ferromagnetic NPs for MFH. It will further outline the new chemistry developed for making monodisperse MNPs with controlled magnetic properties. The review will finally highlight the NP functionalization with biocompatible molecules and biological targeting agents for tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20388109

  14. One-step radiosynthesis of 18F-AlF-NOTA-RGD2 for tumor angiogenesis PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major obstacles of the clinical translation of 18F-labeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides has been the laborious multistep radiosynthesis. In order to facilitate the application of RGD-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes in the clinical setting we investigated in this study the feasibility of using the chelation reaction between Al18F and a macrocyclic chelator-conjugated dimeric RGD peptide as a simple one-step 18F labeling strategy for development of a PET probe for tumor angiogenesis imaging. Dimeric cyclic peptide E[c(RGDyK)]2 (RGD2) was first conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA), and the resulting bioconjugate NOTA-RGD2 was then radiofluorinated via Al18F intermediate to synthesize 18F-AlF-NOTA-RGD2. Integrin binding affinities of the peptides were assessed by a U87MG cell-based receptor binding assay using 125I-echistatin as the radioligand. The tumor targeting efficacy and in vivo profile of 18F-AlF-NOTA-RGD2 were further evaluated in a subcutaneous U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model by microPET and biodistribution. NOTA-RGD2 was successfully 18F-fluorinated with good yield within 40 min using the Al18F intermediate. The IC50 of 19F-AlF-NOTA-RGD2 was determined to be 46 ± 4.4 nM. Quantitative microPET studies demonstrated that 18F-AlF-NOTA-RGD2 showed high tumor uptake, fast clearance from the body, and good tumor to normal organ ratios. NOTA-RGD2 bioconjugate has been successfully prepared and labeled with Al18F in one single step of radiosynthesis. The favorable in vivo performance and the short radiosynthetic route of 18F-AlF-NOTA-RGD2 warrant further optimization of the probe and the radiofluorination strategy to accelerate the clinical translation of 18F-labeled RGD peptides. (orig.)

  15. Potential lung perfusion imaging agent of synthetic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-labelled macroaggregated albumin (MAA) is the radiopharmaceutical routinely used for perfusion lung scans. However MAA formulations contain excipients of biological origin, that may potentially cause allergic hypersensitivity in patients. The aim of this study was to prepare a non-biological lung imaging agent, with physiological uptake based on a mechanism of colloid localisation in the pulmonary vasculature. To a frozen stannous fluoride cold kit (RAH Radiopharmacy) was added 99mTc-pcrtcchnetate (99mTc-products were analysed for % radiolabelling efficiciency (RE), radioactive particle size distribution (RPSD). qualitative and quantitative rat biodistribution studies. Results indicated that all radioactive particles were formed with >99% RE. and 1-47% were >8 um. The optimum radiotracer formulation containing the highest proportion of the largest particles, was prepared by mixing SnF2 and 99mTc-pertechnetate with a low [Na+] at room temperature for 50 minutes. Results from the quantitative organ assays gave 88+/-1% tracer in the lungs. 7+/-l% in the liver and l+/-0% in the spleen. The images showed excellent lung uptake with minimal interference from liver and spleen to the lower regions of right and left lobes. In conclusion, the synthetic radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-stan-nous fluoride colloid can be prepared with a large particle size, from a commercially available cold kit in a simple and practical manner, and it has high potential for use as a perfusion imaging agent in lung scans

  16. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J; Sopko, V; Jakubek, J [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F, E-mail: jiri.dammer@utef.cvut.cz [Biological center of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Entomology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1{mu}m, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  17. PET imaging of angiogenesis after myocardial infarction/reperfusion using a one-step labeled integrin-targeted tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haokao [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Lang, Lixin; Guo, Ning; Quan, Qimeng; Hu, Shuo; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Cao, Feng [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China)

    2012-04-15

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin represents a potential target for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel one-step labeled integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeting positron emission tomography (PET) probe, {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2, for angiogenesis imaging in a myocardial infarction/reperfusion (MI/R) animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 45-min transient left coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. The myocardial infarction was confirmed by ECG, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging, and cardiac ultrasound. In vivo PET imaging was used to determine myocardial uptake of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 at different time points following reperfusion. The control peptide RAD was labeled with a similar procedure and used to confirm the specificity. Ex vivo autoradiographic analysis and CD31/CD61 double immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the PET results. Myocardial origin of the {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 accumulation was confirmed by {sup 18}F-FDG and autoradiography. PET imaging demonstrated increased focal accumulation of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 in the infarcted area which started at day 3 (0.28 {+-} 0.03%ID/g, p < 0.05) and peaked between 1 and 3 weeks (0.59 {+-} 0.16 and 0.55 {+-} 0.13%ID/g, respectively). The focal accumulation decreased but still kept at a higher level than the sham group after 4 months of reperfusion (0.31 {+-} 0.01%ID/g, p < 0.05). Pretreatment with unlabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide significantly decreased tracer uptake, indicating integrin specificity of this tracer. At 1 week after MI/R, uptake of the control tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-RAD that does not bind to integrin, in the infarcted area, was only 0.21 {+-} 0.01%ID/g. Autoradiographic imaging showed the same trend of uptake in the myocardial infarction area. The time course of focal tracer uptake was consistent with the pattern of vascular density and integrin {beta

  18. Characteristics of meningioma scintigraphy with multiple brain imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To clarify the characteristics of meningioma scintigraphy with multiple brain imaging agents and to evaluate their roles in diagnosis of meningiomas. Methods: Blood flow, 99mTc-ECD, 99mTc-DTPA, and/or 99mTc-MIBI brain imagings were performed in 21 patients with meningiomas (3 malignant, 18 benign) proved by surgery and pathology. CT/MRI examinations were also made within one month. Characteristics of meningioma images were analyzed and uptake ratios were calculated. Results: In 16 of 20 patients, increased radioactivity during the arterial phase in the blood flow image was seen. Concave round or oval defects with smooth contour in the cerebral cortex were observed in 17 of 19 patients with 99mTc-ECD, depression of frontoparietal cortex was found in one case and no abnormality in the other. A homogeneous accumulation of radioactivity in area corresponding to the defect in 99mTc-ECD image was found in 17/17 patients with 99mTc-DTPA and in 14/14 patients with 99mTc-MIBI study. No correlation was found between uptake ratios of the three tracers, but 99mTc-ECD uptake ratio was significantly lower in malignant meningioma than in benign one. Conclusions: The combined use of 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-DTPA and/or 99mTc-MIBI brain imaging is useful in making the diagnosis of meningiomas. Whether the 99mTc-ECD uptake ratio will be valuable to differentiate malignant from benign meningioma needs further studies

  19. Gold nanoparticles as high-resolution X-ray imaging contrast agents for the analysis of tumor-related micro-vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien Chia-Chi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis is widely investigated in conjunction with cancer development, in particular because of the possibility of early stage detection and of new therapeutic strategies. However, such studies are negatively affected by the limitations of imaging techniques in the detection of microscopic blood vessels (diameter 3-5 μm grown under angiogenic stress. We report that synchrotron-based X-ray imaging techniques with very high spatial resolution can overcome this obstacle, provided that suitable contrast agents are used. Results We tested different contrast agents based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs for the detection of cancer-related angiogenesis by synchrotron microradiology, microtomography and high resolution X-ray microscopy. Among them only bare-AuNPs in conjunction with heparin injection provided sufficient contrast to allow in vivo detection of small capillary species (the smallest measured lumen diameters were 3-5 μm. The detected vessel density was 3-7 times higher than with other nanoparticles. We also found that bare-AuNPs with heparin allows detecting symptoms of local extravascular nanoparticle diffusion in tumor areas where capillary leakage appeared. Conclusions Although high-Z AuNPs are natural candidates as radiology contrast agents, their success is not guaranteed, in particular when targeting very small blood vessels in tumor-related angiography. We found that AuNPs injected with heparin produced the contrast level needed to reveal--for the first time by X-ray imaging--tumor microvessels with 3-5 μm diameter as well as extravascular diffusion due to basal membrane defenestration. These results open the interesting possibility of functional imaging of the tumor microvasculature, of its development and organization, as well as of the effects of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  20. Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Westmeyer, Gil G.; Romero, Philip A.; Szablowski, Jerzy O.; Küster, Benedict; Shah, Ameer; Christopher R Otey; Langer, Robert; Frances H Arnold; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents sensitive to the neurotransmitter dopamine. The sensors were derived from the heme domain of the bacterial cytochrome P450-BM3 (BM3h). Ligand binding to a site near BM3h's paramagnetic heme iron led to a drop in MRI signal enhancement a...

  1. Nicotinic α4β2 receptor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. Optimal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents are therefore highly desired for this receptor. We report here the development and initial evaluation of 2-fluoro-3-[2-((S)-3-pyrrolinyl)methoxy]pyridine (nifene). In vitro binding affinity of nifene in rat brain homogenate using 3H-cytisine exhibited a K i=0.50 nM for the α4β2 sites. The radiosynthesis of 2-18F-fluoro-3-[2-((S)-3-pyrrolinyl)methoxy]pyridine (18F-nifene) was accomplished in 2.5 h with an overall radiochemical yield of 40-50%, decay corrected. The specific activity was estimated to be approx. 37-185 GBq/μmol. In vitro autoradiography in rat brain slices indicated selective binding of 18F-nifene to anteroventral thalamic (AVT) nucleus, thalamus, subiculum, striata, cortex and other regions consistent with α4β2 receptor distribution. Rat cerebellum showed some binding, whereas regions in the hippocampus had the lowest binding. The highest ratio of >13 between AVT and cerebellum was measured for 18F-nifene in rat brain slices. The specific binding was reduced (>95%) by 300 μM nicotine in these brain regions. Positron emission tomography imaging study of 18F-nifene (130 MBq) in anesthetized rhesus monkey was carried out using an ECAT EXACT HR+ scanner. PET study showed selective maximal uptake in the regions of the anterior medial thalamus, ventro-lateral thalamus, lateral geniculate, cingulate gyrus, temporal cortex including the subiculum. The cerebellum in the monkeys showed lower binding than the other regions. Thalamus-to-cerebellum ratio peaked at 30-35 min postinjection to a value of 2.2 and subsequently reduced. The faster binding profile of 18F-nifene indicates promise as a PET imaging agent and thus needs further evaluation

  2. Biomarkers of Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Luay Mousa; Salem, Mohamed E.; Sameh Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and accounts for 10% of all new cancer diagnoses. Angiogenesis is a tightly regulated process that is mediated by a group of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors. Given the widespread use of antiangiogenic agents in CRC, there has been considerable interest in the development of methods to identify novel markers that can predict outcome in the treatment of this disease with angiogenesi...

  3. Angiogenesis and vascular targeting: Relevance for hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    The creation of a functional blood supply from the normal tissue vasculature via the process of angiogenesis is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumours. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the tumour vasculature as a therapeutic strategy, and two major...... types of vascular targeting agents (VTAs) have developed; those that inhibit the angiogenic process-angiogenesis inhibiting agents (AIAs)-and those that specifically damage the already established neovasculature-vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The tumour vasculature also plays a critical role in...

  4. Radiolabeled Zn-DPA as a potential infection imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A zinc-dipicolylamine analog (Zn-DPA) conjugated with a fluorophore (PSVue®794) has been shown to image bacterial infections in mice. However, radiolabeled Zn-DPA has not previously been considered for nuclear imaging of infection. Methods: Both 111In-labeled DOTA-biotin and Zn-DPA-biotin were combined using streptavidin (SA) as a noncovalent linker. Mice injected intramuscularly with Streptococcus pyogenes (infection model) or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (inflammation model) were coinjected intravenously with 6 μg of DPA as PSVue794 and as 111In-DOTA-biotin/SA/biotin-Zn-DPA. Periodic fluorescent and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography)/CT (computed tomography) images were acquired, and biodistributions were obtained at 22 h. Results: Histological examination confirmed the validity of both the infection and inflammation animal models. Both the whole-body optical and nuclear images showed obvious accumulations in the target thigh in both models at all time points. At 22 h, the average target thigh accumulation of 111In was 1.66%ID/g (S.D. 0.15) in the infection mice compared to 0.58%ID/g (S.D. 0.07) in the inflammation mice (P111In target/normal thigh ratio was 2.8 fold higher in the infection animals compared to the inflammation animals. Conclusions: These preliminary results show that Zn-DPA within streptavidin targets S. pyogenes-infected mice similarly to its free fluorescent analogue. The significantly higher accumulation in the live bacterial infection thigh compared to that of the LPS-induced inflammation thigh suggests that Zn-DPA may be a promising imaging agent to distinguish between bacterial infections and sterile inflammations.

  5. Positrons as imaging agents and probes in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Suzanne V.

    2009-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracks a positron emitting radiopharmaceutical injected into the body and generates a 3-dimensional image of its location. Introduced in the early 70s, it has now developed into a powerful medical diagnostic tool for routine clinical use as well as in drug development. Unrivalled as a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive imaging tool, PET unfortunately lacks the resolution of Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As the resolution of PET depends significantly on the energy of the positron incorporated in the radiopharmaceutical and its interaction with its surrounding tissue, there is growing interest in expanding our understanding of how positrons interact at the atomic and molecular level. A better understanding of these interactions will contribute to improving the resolution of PET and assist in the design of better imaging agents. Positrons are also used in Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to determine electron density and or presence and incidence of micro- and mesopores (0.1 to 10 nm) in materials. The control of porosity in engineered materials is crucial for applications such as controlled release or air and water resistant films. Equally important to the design of nano and microtechnologies, is our understanding of the microenvironments within these pores and on surfaces. Hence as radiopharmaceuticals are designed to track disease, nuclear probes (radioactive molecules) are synthesized to investigate the chemical properties within these pores. This article will give a brief overview of the present role of positrons in imaging as well as explore its potential to contribute in the engineering of new materials to the marketplace.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Angiogenesis in a Murine Hindlimb Ischemia Model with 64Cu-Labeled TRC105

    OpenAIRE

    Orbay, Hakan; Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Hacker, Timothy A.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Zagzebski, James A; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess ischemia-induced angiogenesis with 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 positron emission tomography (PET) in a murine hindlimb ischemia model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). CD105 binding affinity/specificity of NOTA-conjugated TRC105 (an anti-CD105 antibody) was evaluated by flow cytometry, which exhibited no difference from unconjugated TRC105. BALB/c mice were anesthetized and the right femoral artery was ligated to induce hindlimb ischemia, with the left hindlimb ser...

  7. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart

  8. Tracers and contrast agents in cardiovascular imaging: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief article addresses the current status and future potential of nuclear medicine, X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. The currently perceived advantages and disadvantages, as well as the possible future roles, of each of the modalities with regard to the evaluation of coronary artery disease are delineated. The certain advent of Mr and US myocardial contrast agents, combined with the inexorable pressures of health care reform, will alter the future usage patterns of all four modalities. Future debates about which modality should be used in which clinical situation will be based not on 'anatomy vs function', nor on the issues of cost effectiveness and patient outcomes

  9. Thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles targeted to CD105: Synthesis, characterization and application in MR imaging of tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Song; Gong, Mingfu; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Hua [Department of Radiology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Gao, Fabao [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zou, Liguang, E-mail: zlgxqyy@163.com [Department of Radiology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To detect tumor angiogenesis in tumor-bearing mice using thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles targeted to CD105 on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles (hybrids) were prepared by reducing Au{sup 3+} on the surface of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Hybrids were stabilized with thiol-PEG-carboxyl via the Au–S covalent bond, and further conjugated with anti-CD105 antibodies through amide linkages. Characteristics of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles were evaluated. Using these nanoparticles, the labeling specificity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated in vitro. MRI T2*-weighted images were obtained at different time points after intravenous administration of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles in the tumor-bearing mice. After MR imaging, the breast cancer xenografts were immediately resected for immunohistochemistry staining and Prussian blue staining to measure the tumor microvessel density (MVD) and evaluate the labeling of blood microvessels by the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles in vivo. Results: The mean diameter of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was 56.6 ± 8.0 nm, as measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Immune activity of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was 53% of that of the anti-CD105 antibody, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The specific binding of HUVECs with the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was proved by immunostaining and Prussian blue staining in vitro. For breast cancer xenografts, the combination of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles with blood microvessels was detectable by MRI after 60 min administration of the contrast agent. The T2* relative signal intensity (SI{sub R}) was positively correlated with the tumor MVD (R{sup 2} = 0.8972). Conclusion: Anti-CD105 antibody-coupled, thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized core–shell Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles can efficiently target CD105 expressed

  10. Radiopharmaceuclicks: from multimodal imaging probes to therapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. The 'click-to-chelate' concept developed recently by Schibli and Coll. allowed the synthesis and biological evaluation of numerous metallic complexes based on a triazole ring for nuclear medicine [Ref.1]. Most of these radio-complexes, prepared by a Copper-catalyzed Alkyne-Azide Cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC reaction), have been used for single photon emission computer tomography applications (SPECT), particularly 99mTc complexes. The CuAAC reaction representing, in our opinion, a very powerful tool, we anticipated that its use could be interesting for the development of dual imaging probes and for the preparation of new therapeutic agents. These compounds, so-called radiopharmaceuclicks, have been developed using (i) a 99mTc(I)/185/187Re metal pairs for the preparation of a novel bimodal SPECT/fluorescence probe and (ii) a 188Re(I) core for the conception of a new Re-radio-complex. Therefore, we developed recently a novel bimodal optical/radiolabelled probe based on a pyridyl-triazole scaffold, so-called pyta [Ref.2]. The final dual imaging agent combines a carboxylate functionalization for bio-molecule conjugation and two distinct metal chelating sites: a pyta-based tricarbonyl-rhenium moiety as fluorescent probe and a 99mTc(CO3)+ core through the tridentate chelating iminodiacetic acid (IDA) clamp as SPECT reporter. The preparation and biological evaluation (in vitro stability, non-toxicity, cell tracking... ) of this complex will be presented here and its potential as a pre- and intra-operative diagnostic probe will be discussed. On the other hand, first investigations about the preparation of a new bifunctional chelating agent based on a triazolyl moiety and specific for the 188Re-tricarbonyl core complexation will be described. To the best of our knowledge, this 188Re(CO)3 complex represents the second example of a chelate in which the 188Re-tricarbonyl core is coordinated by a click ligand, the first one being

  11. A preliminary study of new imaging agents on inflammatory lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility of imaging inflammatory lesions with five small molecular weight complexes of 99mTc was investigated. The labeling yields of D-glucaric acid (D-Gca), citric acid (Cit), DL-malic acid (DL-Mal), L-malic acid (L-Mal) and tartaric acid (Tar) were all more than 90%. The percentage uptake/g tissue of them and 99mTc-pertechnetate (P) in mice with turpentine-induced abscesses and abscess/muscle (A/M), blood (A/B), liver (A/L), kidney (A/K) concentration ratios were calculated. The maximum A/M ratios were 4.02±0.21 (Cit, 3h), 4.30±0.77 (D-Gca, 3h), 4.04±0.21 (DL-Mal, 6h), 3.50±0.23 (L-Mal, 1h), 3.20±0.17 (Tar, 1h) and 3.23±0.41 (P, 1h) respectively. The scintigram was obtained in a rabbit with turpentine-induced abscess after 99mTc-D-Gca i.v. injection. Results demonstrated they all can accumulate in inflammatory lesions. Of them, 99mTc-D-Gca is probably a potential imaging agent on inflammatory lesions. (author)

  12. Comparison of radiation dosimetry for several potential myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although myocardial imaging is currently dominated by Tl-201, several alternative agents with improved physiologic or radionuclidic properties have been proposed. Based on human and animal studies in the literature, the metabolism of several of these compounds was studied for the purpose of generating radiation dose estimates. Dose estimates are listed for several I-123-labeled free fatty acids, an I-123-labeled phosphonium compound, Rb-82, Cu-64, F-18 FDG (all compounds which are taken up by the normal myocardium), and for Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP) (which localizes in myocardial infarcts). Dose estimates could not be generated for C-11 palmitate, but his compound was included in a comparison of myocardial retention times. For the I-123-labeled compounds, I-124 was included as a contaminant in generating the dose estimates. Radiation doses were lowest for Rb-82 (gonads 0.3-0.4 Gy/MBq, kidneys 8.6 Gy/MBq). Doses for the I-123-labeled fatty acids were similar to one another, with IPPA being the lowest (gonads 15 Gy/MBq, heart wall 18 Gy/MBq). Doses for Tc-99m PYP were also low (gonads 4-7 Gy/MBq, heart wall 4 Gy/MBq, skeleton 15 Gy/MBq). The desirability of these compounds is discussed briefly, considering half-life, imaging mode and energy, and dosimetry, including a comparison of the effective whole body dose equivalents. 37 references, 11 tables

  13. Nicotinic {alpha}4{beta}2 receptor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichika, Rama [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Collins, Daphne [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Christian, Bradley T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH 45429 (United States); Shi, Bingzhi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH 45429 (United States); Narayanan, Tanjore K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH 45429 (United States); Potkin, Steven G. [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Mukherjee, Jogeshwar [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States)]. E-mail: j.mukherjee@uci.edu

    2006-04-15

    The {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. Optimal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents are therefore highly desired for this receptor. We report here the development and initial evaluation of 2-fluoro-3-[2-((S)-3-pyrrolinyl)methoxy]pyridine (nifene). In vitro binding affinity of nifene in rat brain homogenate using {sup 3}H-cytisine exhibited a K {sub i}=0.50 nM for the {alpha}4{beta}2 sites. The radiosynthesis of 2-{sup 18}F-fluoro-3-[2-((S)-3-pyrrolinyl)methoxy]pyridine ({sup 18}F-nifene) was accomplished in 2.5 h with an overall radiochemical yield of 40-50%, decay corrected. The specific activity was estimated to be approx. 37-185 GBq/{mu}mol. In vitro autoradiography in rat brain slices indicated selective binding of {sup 18}F-nifene to anteroventral thalamic (AVT) nucleus, thalamus, subiculum, striata, cortex and other regions consistent with {alpha}4{beta}2 receptor distribution. Rat cerebellum showed some binding, whereas regions in the hippocampus had the lowest binding. The highest ratio of >13 between AVT and cerebellum was measured for {sup 18}F-nifene in rat brain slices. The specific binding was reduced (>95%) by 300 {mu}M nicotine in these brain regions. Positron emission tomography imaging study of {sup 18}F-nifene (130 MBq) in anesthetized rhesus monkey was carried out using an ECAT EXACT HR+ scanner. PET study showed selective maximal uptake in the regions of the anterior medial thalamus, ventro-lateral thalamus, lateral geniculate, cingulate gyrus, temporal cortex including the subiculum. The cerebellum in the monkeys showed lower binding than the other regions. Thalamus-to-cerebellum ratio peaked at 30-35 min postinjection to a value of 2.2 and subsequently reduced. The faster binding profile of {sup 18}F-nifene indicates promise as a PET imaging agent and thus needs further evaluation.

  14. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  15. Anti-angiogenesis therapies: their potential in cancer management

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Eichholz; Shairoz Merchant; Gaya, Andrew M

    2010-01-01

    Andrew Eichholz, Shairoz Merchant, Andrew M GayaDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Angiogenesis plays an important role in normal animal growth and development. This process is also vital for the growth of tumors. Angiogenesis inhibitors have a different mechanism of action to traditional chemotherapy agents and radiation therapy. The angiogenesis inhibitors can act synergistically with conventional ...

  16. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F; Rasmussen, J B Grønvall; Schroeder, T V

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  17. In vitro and in vivo imaging of prostate cancer angiogenesis using anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody-conjugated quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors aimed to determine the targeting ability of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) in vitro, and apply it for a xenograft prostate cancer mouse model. Conjugation reaction of QDs was performed by using the N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and sulfo-(N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide) (Sulfo-NHS). The human umbilical vein cord endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with QDs, conjugated with antiVGFR2, to see a specific binding in vitro. Fluorescent cell images were taken by a confocal microscope. The human prostate cancer cells (PC3) were injected to five nude mice on hind limbs to make the xenograft tumor model. QD-antiVEGFR2 antibody complex was injected into the tumor model and fluorescence measurements were performed at 1, 4, 9, 12, 15, and 24 hours after the injection. The specific interaction between HUVECs and QD-antiVEGFR2 antibody was clearly shown in vitro. The in vivo fluorescence image disclosed that there was an increased signal of tumor, 12 hours after the injection of QDs. By showing endothelial cells binding with QDs-antiVEGFR2 antibodyand an experimental application of the antibody for VEGFR2 imaging in the prostate cancer xenograft mouse model, we suggests that the antibody-conjugated QDs can be a potential imaging tool for angiogenesis of the cancer.

  18. In vitro and in vivo imaging of prostate cancer angiogenesis using anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody-conjugated quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Haejin; Lee, Jiyeon; Song, Rita; Lee, Jung Han [Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory, Institute Pasteur Korea (IP-K), Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Il; Lee, Hak Jong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Clinical Research Institute, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwa [Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Authors aimed to determine the targeting ability of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) in vitro, and apply it for a xenograft prostate cancer mouse model. Conjugation reaction of QDs was performed by using the N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and sulfo-(N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide) (Sulfo-NHS). The human umbilical vein cord endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with QDs, conjugated with antiVGFR2, to see a specific binding in vitro. Fluorescent cell images were taken by a confocal microscope. The human prostate cancer cells (PC3) were injected to five nude mice on hind limbs to make the xenograft tumor model. QD-antiVEGFR2 antibody complex was injected into the tumor model and fluorescence measurements were performed at 1, 4, 9, 12, 15, and 24 hours after the injection. The specific interaction between HUVECs and QD-antiVEGFR2 antibody was clearly shown in vitro. The in vivo fluorescence image disclosed that there was an increased signal of tumor, 12 hours after the injection of QDs. By showing endothelial cells binding with QDs-antiVEGFR2 antibodyand an experimental application of the antibody for VEGFR2 imaging in the prostate cancer xenograft mouse model, we suggests that the antibody-conjugated QDs can be a potential imaging tool for angiogenesis of the cancer.

  19. Pravastatin stimulates angiogenesis in a murine hindlimb ischemia model: a positron emission tomography imaging study with 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Hakan; Hong, Hao; Koch, Jill M; Valdovinos, Hector F; Hacker, Timothy A; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 (TRC105 is an anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody that binds to both human and murine CD105) positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess the response to pravastatin treatment in a murine model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). Hindlimb ischemia was induced by ligation of the right femoral arteries in BALB/c mice under anesthesia, and the left hindlimb served as an internal control. Mice in the treatment group were given intraperitoneal pravastatin daily until the end of the study, whereas the animals in the control group were injected with 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Laser Doppler imaging showed that blood flow in the ischemic hindlimb plummeted to ~20% of the normal level after surgery, and gradually recovered to near normal level on day 10 in the treatment group and on day 20 in the control group. Angiogenesis was non-invasively monitored and quantified with 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET on postoperative days 3, 10, 17, and 24. Tracer uptake at 48 h post-injection in the ischemic hindlimb in the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group on day 10 (20.5 ± 1.9 %ID/g vs 11.4 ± 1.5 %ID/g), suggesting increased CD105 expression and higher level of angiogenesis upon pravastatin treatment, and gradually decreased to background levels in both groups (4.9 ± 0.8 %ID/g vs 3.4 ± 1.9 %ID/g on day 24). The in vivo PET data correlated well with ex vivo biodistribution studies performed on day 24. Increased CD105 expression on days 3 and 10 following ischemia was further confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. Taken together, our results indicated that 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET is a suitable and non-invasive method to monitor the angiogenesis and therapeutic response in PAD, which can also be utilized for non-invasive evaluation of other pro-angiogenic/anti-angiogenic drugs in other cardiovascular diseases and cancer. PMID:24349621

  20. Pravastatin stimulates angiogenesis in a murine hindlimb ischemia model: a positron emission tomography imaging study with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Hakan; Hong, Hao; Koch, Jill M; Valdovinos, Hector F; Hacker, Timothy A; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 (TRC105 is an anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody that binds to both human and murine CD105) positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess the response to pravastatin treatment in a murine model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). Hindlimb ischemia was induced by ligation of the right femoral arteries in BALB/c mice under anesthesia, and the left hindlimb served as an internal control. Mice in the treatment group were given intraperitoneal pravastatin daily until the end of the study, whereas the animals in the control group were injected with 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Laser Doppler imaging showed that blood flow in the ischemic hindlimb plummeted to ~20% of the normal level after surgery, and gradually recovered to near normal level on day 10 in the treatment group and on day 20 in the control group. Angiogenesis was non-invasively monitored and quantified with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET on postoperative days 3, 10, 17, and 24. Tracer uptake at 48 h post-injection in the ischemic hindlimb in the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group on day 10 (20.5 ± 1.9 %ID/g vs 11.4 ± 1.5 %ID/g), suggesting increased CD105 expression and higher level of angiogenesis upon pravastatin treatment, and gradually decreased to background levels in both groups (4.9 ± 0.8 %ID/g vs 3.4 ± 1.9 %ID/g on day 24). The in vivo PET data correlated well with ex vivo biodistribution studies performed on day 24. Increased CD105 expression on days 3 and 10 following ischemia was further confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. Taken together, our results indicated that (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET is a suitable and non-invasive method to monitor the angiogenesis and therapeutic response in PAD, which can also be utilized for non-invasive evaluation of other pro-angiogenic/anti-angiogenic drugs in other cardiovascular diseases and cancer. PMID:24349621

  1. Radiochemical evaluation of a new brain receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report about the radiochemical evaluation of a new serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor imaging agent. The new derivative of WAY 100635, viz. C1-(2 methoxyphenyl)-(4- mercaptoethyl)-piperazine, was labelled with technetium-99m using thiocresol through 99mTc(V)-glucoheptonate precursor. The labelling was carried out at room temperature within 10 minutes using 370-740 MBq of 99mTc-pertechnetate. The specific activity of the '2+1+1' mixed ligand complex was about 40 GBq/ml. The labelling efficiency and the stability of the labelled compound were monitored by ITLC-SG, solvent extraction and reverse-phase HPLC. The labelling efficiency exceeded 95% and remained high about 4 hours if stored at room temperature or in a refrigerator at 4 deg C. The results give evidence of a high labelling efficiency and stability of the ligand used. The labelled ligand seems to hold promise within the family of existing radiopharmaceuticals

  2. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium

  3. DTPA: Bis benzimidazole as multi model imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The DTPA bis benzimidazole analogue has been tested for radiopharmaceutical efficacy. The radiolabelling was found more then 98% after 8 hrs and blood kinetics was fast. The compound was also tested for optical imaging agent. The Eu3+ ion has an absorption band in the visible spectrum (578-582 nm) whose wavelength is very sensitive to even small changes in the coordination environment. Although the intensity of this 7F0 → 5D0 transition is low, the bands are relatively narrow, which allows distinguishing different coordination states of the metal. For Eu3+ complexes which have two differently hydrated forms in aqueous solution, one observes two absorption bands belonging to the two species. High-resolution UV-visible spectra were recorded in aqueous solutions which show a temperature invariant absorption with two distinct, temperature-dependent absorption bands. The intensity ratio of these two bands changes with temperature: the band at shorter wavelengths is decreasing very slightly, while that at longer wavelengths is increasing with the temperature. The ratio of the integrals of the two bands is related to the equilibrium constant, and its temperature dependence yields the reaction enthalpy and entropy

  4. Superparamagnetic particles as possible contrast agents for NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of 'magneto-pharmaceuticals' plays an important role in the extension of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for diagnostic medicine. Fundamental investigations leading to the new area of NMR contrast agents are considered. Superparamagnetic particles represent a new class of NMR contrast agents that usually referred to as T2 or T*2 contrast agents as opposed to T1 agents, such as paramagnetic chelates. Another novelty presented by superparamagnetic agents is their specific distribution. The synthesis and the transverse R2 and longitudinal R1 relaxivity measurements of some ferro-, ferri- and superparamagnetic particles suspensions are presented. (authors)

  5. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F;

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA).......to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  6. Multifunctional Silica Particles as Contrast Agents for Optical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Feldmann, Verena

    2011-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) towards one of the most powerful techniques in clinical diagnosis is accompanied by progress in the design of paramagnetic contrast agents (CAs) to enhance imaging sensitivity. Most of the currently applied CAs for enhanced T1-contrast are based on gadolinium(III)-chelate-complexes and are mainly extracellular agents which only distribute non-specifically throughout the circulatory system and interstitial space. Since those agents are excret...

  7. Mediators of ocular angiogenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yureeda Qazi; Surekha Maddula; Balamurali K. Ambati

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature. Pathologic angiogenesis in the eye can lead to severe visual impairment. In our review, we discuss the roles of both pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic molecular players in corneal angiogenesis, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, exudative macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity, highlighting novel targets that have emerged over the past decade.

  8. Technetium-99m Labelled Infection Imaging Agents. Chapter 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection specific radiopharmaceuticals can be used for diagnosis as well as for decision making in therapy and treatment follow-up. Most of the currently used tracers are not able to discriminate between infection and inflammation. Research has been going on to develop infection specific markers, and radiolabelled anti-infective agents look promising towards developing infection specific agents. Technetium-99m labelled antibiotics might also have the potential to differentiate sterile inflammation from infection. There are numerous ongoing studies reporting the use of other radiolabelled antibacterial and antifungal agents for detecting infection. Other promising agents are antimicrobial peptides as they preferentially bind to membranes of bacteria over mammalian cells and, therefore, will discriminate between infection and sterile inflammation. Clinical studies are now being undertaken with these agents and further evaluation with different types of pathogens such as viruses, fungi, parasites and intracellular pathogens in humans will provide new infection specific diagnostic agents. (author)

  9. Photoacoustic microscopy for quantitative evaluation of angiogenesis inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Burnett, Joseph; Sun, Duxin; Xie, Zhixing; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    We present the photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for evaluation of angiogenesis inhibitors on a chick embryo model. Microvasculature in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick embryos was imaged by PAM, and the optical microscopy (OM) images of the same set of CAMs were also acquired for comparisons, serving for validation of the results from PAM. The angiogenesis inhibitors, Sunitinib, with different concentrations applied to the CAM result in the change in microvascular density, which was quantified by both PAM and OM imaging. Similar change in microvascular density from PAM and OM imaging in response to angiogenesis inhibitor at different doses was observed, demonstrating that PAM has potential to provide objective evaluation of anti-angiogenesis medication. Besides, PAM is advantageous in three-dimensional and functional imaging compared with OM so that the emerging PAM technique may offer unique information on the efficacy of angiogenesis inhibitors and could benefit applications related to antiangiogenesis treatments.

  10. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  11. Functional imaging of the lung using a gaseous contrast agent: 3Helium-magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current imaging methods of the lung concentrate on morphology as well as on the depiction of the pulmonary parenchyma. The need of an advanced and more subtle imaging technology compared to conventional radiography is met by computed topograhy as the method of choice. Nevertheless, computed tomography yields very limited functional information. This is to be derived from arterial blood gas analysis, spirometry and body plethysmography. These methods, however, lack the scope for regional allocation of any pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lung has been advanced by the use of hyperpolarised 3Helium as an inhaled gaseous contrast agent. The inhalation of the gas provides functional data by distribution, diffusion and relaxation of its hyperpolarised state. Because anatomical landmarks of the lung can be visualised as well, functional information can be linked with regional information. Furthermore, the method provides high spatial and temporal resolution and lacks the potential side-effects of ionising radiation. Four different modalities have been established: 1. Spin density imaging studies the distribution of gas, normally after a single inhalation of contrast gas in inspiratory breath hold. 2. Dynamic cine imaging studies the distribution of gas with respect to regional time constants of pulmonary gas inflow. 3. Diffusion weighted imaging can exhibit the presence and severity of pulmonary airspace enlargement, as in pulmonary emphysema. 4. Oxygen sensitive imaging displays intrapulmonary oxygen partial pressure and its distribution. Currently, the method is limited by comparably high costs and limited availability. As there have been recent developments which might bring this modality closer to clinical use, this review article will comprise the methodology as well as the current state of the art and standard of knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging of the lung using hyperpolarised 3Helium. (orig.)

  12. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation

  13. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  14. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  15. Review and current status of hepatobiliary imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review will outline aspects of the normal hepatobiliary anatomy and physiology relevant to an understanding of cholescintigraphy and discuss factors of hepatobiliary diseases which impact on the design of new hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals. The synthesis, pharmacokinetics, and structure-distribution relationship of the existing /sup 99m/Tc hepatobiliary agents will be compared, and the clinical status of present cholescintigraphic agents will be summarized. Future trends in the design and use of hepatobiliary tracers will be presented

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with a 61/64Cu-Labeled F(ab')2 Antibody Fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Orbay, Hakan; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Nayak, Tapas R.; Bean, Jero; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro and in vivo properties of the F(ab')2 fragment of TRC105, a human/murine chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds with high avidity to human and murine CD105 (i.e. endoglin), and investigate its potential for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor angiogenesis after 61/64Cu-labeling. TRC105-F(ab')2 of high purity was produced by pepsin digestion of TRC105, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, HPLC analysis, and mass spectrometry. 61/64Cu-labeling of NOTA-TRC105-F(ab')2 (NOTA denotes 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) was achieved with yields of > 75% (specific activity: ~115 GBq/μmol). PET imaging revealed rapid tumor uptake of 64Cu-NOTA TRC105-F(ab')2 in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model (5.8 ± 0.8, 7.6 ± 0.6, 5.6 ± 0.4, 5.0 ± 0.6, and 3.8 ± 0.7 %ID/g at 0.5, 3, 16, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively; n = 4). Since tumor uptake peaked at 3 h post-injection, 61Cu-NOTA-TRC105-F(ab')2 also gave good tumor contrast at 3 and 8 h post-injection. CD105 specificity of the tracers was confirmed by blocking studies and histopathology. In conclusion, the use of a F(ab')2 fragment led to more rapid tumor uptake (which peaked at 3 h post-injection) than radiolabeled intact antibody (which often peaked after 24 h post-injection), which may allow for same day immunoPET imaging in future clinical studies. PMID:23316869

  17. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor angiogenesis with a (61/64)Cu-labeled F(ab')(2) antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Orbay, Hakan; Valdovinos, Hector F; Nayak, Tapas R; Bean, Jero; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro and in vivo properties of the F(ab')(2) fragment of TRC105, a human/murine chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds with high avidity to human and murine CD105 (i.e., endoglin), and investigate its potential for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor angiogenesis after (61/64)Cu-labeling. TRC105-F(ab')(2) of high purity was produced by pepsin digestion of TRC105, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, HPLC analysis, and mass spectrometry. (61/64)Cu-labeling of NOTA-TRC105-F(ab')(2) (NOTA denotes 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) was achieved with yields of >75% (specific activity: ∼115 GBq/μmol). PET imaging revealed rapid tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-F(ab')(2) in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model (5.8 ± 0.8, 7.6 ± 0.6, 5.6 ± 0.4, 5.0 ± 0.6, and 3.8 ± 0.7% ID/g at 0.5, 3, 16, 24, and 48 h postinjection respectively; n = 4). Since tumor uptake peaked at 3 h postinjection, (61)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-F(ab')(2) also gave good tumor contrast at 3 and 8 h postinjection. CD105 specificity of the tracers was confirmed by blocking studies and histopathology. In conclusion, the use of a F(ab')(2) fragment led to more rapid tumor uptake (which peaked at 3 h postinjection) than radiolabeled intact antibody (which often peaked after 24 h postinjection), which may allow for same day immunoPET imaging in future clinical studies. PMID:23316869

  18. Experimental characterization, comparison and image quality assessment of two ultrasound contrast agents: Optison and Definity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy C.; Day, Steven W.; Linte, Cristian A.; Schwarz, Karl Q.

    2016-04-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents are commonly used in ultrasound imaging to help differentiate the blood pool from the endocardial wall. It is essential to use an agent which produces high image intensity relative to the surrounding tissue, commonly referred to contrast effect. When exposed to ultrasound waves, microbubbles produce an intense backscatter signal in addition to the contrast produced by the fluctuating size of the microbubbles. However, over time, the microbubble concentration depletes, leading to reduced visual enhancement. The retention time associated with contrast effect varies according to the frequency and power level of the ultrasound wave, as well as the contrast agent used. The primary objective of this study was to investigate and identify the most appropriate image acquisition parameters that render optimal contrast effect for two intravenous contrast agents, Optison™ and Definity™. Several controlled in vitro experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus that featured a perfused tissue-emulating phantom. A continuous flow of contrast agent was imaged using ultrasound at different frequencies and power levels, while a pulse wave Doppler device was used to monitor the concentration of the contrast agent solution. The contrast effect was determined based on the image intensity inside the flow pipe mimicking the blood-pool relative to the intensity of the surrounding phantom material mimicking cardiac tissue. To identify the combination of parameters that yielded optimal visualization for each contrast agent tested, the contrast effect was assessed at different microbubble concentrations and different ultrasound imaging frequencies and transmission power levels.

  19. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J. [MSD lab, Department of Information Engineering, Univ of Florence, Via S.Marta, 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); Erasmus MC, ’s-Gravendijkwal 230, Faculty Building, Ee 2302, 3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tortoli, P. [MSD lab, Department of Information Engineering, Univ of Florence, Via S.Marta, 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); Verweij, M. D. [Acoustical Wavefield Imaging, ImPhys, Delft Univ Technology, van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH Delft (Netherlands); Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J., E-mail: h.vos@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus MC, ’s-Gravendijkwal 230, Faculty Building, Ee 2302, 3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Acoustical Wavefield Imaging, ImPhys, Delft Univ Technology, van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  20. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode

  1. Study of suspending agents for gadolinium(III)-exchanged hectorite. An oral magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clays modified with paramagnetic ions have been shown to be effective magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. The efficacy in part relies on the suspension of the small clay particles in aqueous solution. In this study a series of macromolecules were eveluated as suspending agents for Gd(III) ion exchanged hectorite clay in water. The room temperature relaxivities for the Gd-hectorite clays were enhanced by the addition of poly(ethylene oxide), poly(ethylene glycol), cyclodextrins, and cholic acid to aqueous suspensions. Additionally, there was no evidence of free Gd(III) in solution in the presence of these suspending agents. In contrast the combination of alginic acid or poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) with the clays resulted in release of the Gd(III) into solution. Xanthan gum, which is often used as an emulsifier and stabilizer in food products, forms a viscous suspension but also reacts with free Gd(III) ions. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  2. New Dual Mode Gadolinium Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Ravoori, Murali; Sabapathy, Divya; Bankson, James; Kundra, Vikas; ANNAPRAGADA, ANANTH

    2009-01-01

    Background Liposomal-based gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles have elicited significant interest for use as blood pool and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Previous generations of liposomal MR agents contained gadolinium-chelates either within the interior of liposomes (core-encapsulated gadolinium liposomes) or presented on the surface of liposomes (surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes). We hypothesized that a liposomal agent that contained both core-encapsulated gad...

  3. Angiogenesis and liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gülsüm ?zlem Elpek

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that hepatic angiogenesis,regardless of the etiology, takes place in chronic liverdiseases (CLDs) that are characterized by inflammationand progressive fibrosis. Because antiangiogenictherapy has been found to be efficient inthe prevention of fibrosis in experimental models ofCLDs, it is suggested that blocking angiogenesis couldbe a promising therapeutic option in patients withadvanced fibrosis. Consequently, efforts are beingdirected to revealing the mechanisms involved inangiogenesis during the progression of liver fibrosis.Literature evidences indicate that hepatic angiogenesisand fibrosis are closely related in both clinical andexperimental conditions. Hypoxia is a major inducer ofangiogenesis together with inflammation and hepaticstellate cells. These profibrogenic cells stand at theintersection between inflammation, angiogenesis andfibrosis and play also a pivotal role in angiogenesis.This review mainly focuses to give a clear view on therelevant features that communicate angiogenesis withprogression of fibrosis in CLDs towards the-end point ofcirrhosis that may be translated into future therapies.The pathogenesis of hepatic angiogenesis associatedwith portal hypertension, viral hepatitis, non-alcoholicfatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease are alsodiscussed to emphasize the various mechanisms involvedin angiogenesis during liver fibrogenesis.

  4. Targeting angiogenesis: a review of angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Srikala S; Shepherd, Frances A

    2003-12-01

    It has now been almost 30 years since Dr J. Folkman first proposed that inhibition of angiogenesis could play a key role in treating cancer; however, it is only recently that anti-angiogenesis agents have entered the clinical setting. The search for novel therapies is particularly important in lung cancer, where the majority of patients succumb to their disease despite aggressive treatments. Several classes of agents now exist that target the different steps involved in angiogenesis. These include drugs inhibiting matrix breakdown, the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs), such as marimastat, prinomastat, BMS275291, BAY12-9566, and neovastat drugs that block endothelial cell signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) including rhuMAb VEGF, SU5416, SU6668, ZD6474, CP-547,632 and ZD4190. Drugs that are similar to endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis including endostatin, angiostatin and interferons. There has also been renewed interest in thalidomide. Drugs such as squalamine, celecoxib, ZD6126, TNP-470 and those targeting the integrins are also being evaluated in lung cancer. Despite early enthusiasm for many of these agents, Phase III trials have not yet demonstrated significant increases in overall survival and toxicity remains an issue. It is hoped that as our understanding of the complex process of angiogenesis increases, so will our ability to design more effective targeted therapies. PMID:14611919

  5. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    amyloid fibrils and the disease pathology. Alzheimer’s disease is very difficult to diagnose, and much research is being performed to develop noninvasive diagnostic methods, such as imaging with small-molecule agents. The interactions between amyloid fibrils and imaging agents are challenging to examine...... experimentally due to the insoluble nature of amyloid fibrils. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions between 13 aromatic amyloid imaging agents, entailing 4 different organic scaffolds, and a model of an amyloid fibril. Clustering analysis combined with free energy...... binding modes for imaging agents is proposed to originate from subtle differences in amino acid composition of the surface grooves on an amyloid fibril, resulting in fine tuning of the binding affinities for a specific amyloid fibril....

  6. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  7. Kit for preparing Tc (III)-99m myocardial imaging agents that are effective in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a myocardial imaging agent for humans that is a technetium (III) complex ligated in the planar positions by a tetradenate ligand such as (acac)2en and in the axial positions by an ether containing phosphine ligand such as tris(3-methoxy-1-propyl)-phosphine. The agent exhibits extremely rapid blood clearance after injection into a human and has a sufficiently high heart/liver and heart/lung ratios to provide effective myocardial images

  8. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It ...

  9. Medical imaging environment : a multi-agent system for a computer clustering based multi-display

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Victor; Marreiros, Filipe; Nelas, Luís; Heymer, Mourvlise; Neves, José

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to minimize a problem that normally arises from the huge amount of images that a radiologist usually has to interpret. A multi-agent system that implements a multi-display for medical imaging based on computer clustering of normal personal computers is therefore described, as well as the multi-agent architecture that caters for the system evolution. An evaluation study was performed and its results are presented.

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Systems for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianjun Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents play a vital role in diagnosing diseases, demand for new MRI contrast agents, with an enhanced sensitivity and advanced functionalities, is very high. During the past decade, various inorganic nanoparticles have been used as MRI contrast agents due to their unique properties, such as large surface area, easy surface functionalization, excellent contrasting effect, and other size-dependent properties. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of nanoparticle-based T1-weighted MRI contrast agents. The chemical synthesis of the nanoparticle-based contrast agents and their potential applications were discussed and summarized. In addition, the recent development in nanoparticle-based multimodal contrast agents including T1-weighted MRI/computed X-ray tomography (CT and T1-weighted MRI/optical were also described, since nanoparticles may curtail the shortcomings of single mode contrast agents in diagnostic and clinical settings by synergistically incorporating functionality.

  11. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Stress-Induced Angiogenesis in MCF7 Human Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman-Haran, Edna; Margalit, Raanan; Grobgeld, Dov; Degani, Hadassa

    1996-06-01

    The mechanism of contrast enhancement of tumors using magnetic resonance imaging was investigated in MCF7 human breast cancer implanted in nude mice. Dynamic contrast-enhanced images recorded at high spatial resolution were analyzed by an image analysis method based on a physiological model, which included the blood circulation, the tumor, the remaining tissues, and clearance via the kidneys. This analysis enabled us to map in rapidly enhancing regions within the tumor, the capillary permeability factor (capillary permeability times surface area per voxel volume) and the fraction of leakage space. Correlation of these maps with T2-weighted spin echo images, with histopathology, and with immunohistochemical staining of endothelial cells demonstrated the presence of dense permeable microcapillaries in the tumor periphery and in intratumoral regions that surrounded necrotic loci. The high leakage from the intratumoral permeable capillaries indicated an induction of a specific angiogenic process associated with stress conditions that cause necrosis. This induction was augmented in tumors responding to tamoxifen treatment. Determination of the distribution and extent of this stress-induced angiogenic activity by contrast-enhanced MRI might be of diagnostic and of prognostic value.

  12. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Hyperpolarized 13C Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jeremy W.

    Hyperpolarized 13C substrates offer the potential to non-invasively image metabolism and enzymatic activity. However, hyperpolarization introduces a number of difficulties, and imaging is hampered by non-equilibrium magnetization and the need for spectral encoding. There is therefore a need for fast and RF efficient spectral imaging techniques. This work presents a number of new methods that can be used to improve polarization, increase RF efficiency and improve modeling accuracy in hyperpolarized 13C experiments. In particular, a novel encoding and reconstruction algorithm is presented that can generate spatially and spectrally resolved images with a single RF excitation and echo time. This reconstruction framework increases data acquisition efficiency, enabling accelerated acquisition speed, preserved polarization, and/or improved temporal or spatial resolution. Overall, the methods enumerated in this dissertation have the potential to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate the conventional tradeoffs between SNR, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution that govern image quality in hyperpolarized 13C experiments.

  14. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study...

  15. Tumor imaging with novel radiogallium (67/68Ga) labeled agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P. V.; Antich, P. P.; Constantinescu, A.; Ranney, D. F.; Fernando, J. L.; Xiong, R.; Oz, O.; Parkey, R. W.

    1997-02-01

    Gallium-67 (t1/2: 78 h) has played an important role in tumor imaging. It is produced in a cyclotron and is commercially available for routine clinical use. 68Ga (t1/2: 68 min), a positron emitter, suitable for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging, is obtained from a generator with long lived parent 68Ge (t1/2: 288 d). Radiogallium has been used mostly, as gallium citrate in imaging studies. Recently, receptor specific agents labeled with gallium have been developed. These include, agents to image somatostatin and folate receptors. We have shown that a new class of agents based on glycosaminoglycoans (GLYCOS) target a variety of tumors. Gallium labeled deferroxamine (DF) bound to sulfated glycosaminoglycans has the ability to rapidly target and permeate a wide variety of solid animal tumors and also undergo rapid blood clearance almost exclusively by the renal route. We have been able to image (within 5 min to 1 hr), prostate adenocarcinoma (AT-1 tumor) grown in surgically prepared pedicles of Copenhagen male rats and breast tumor in pedicles of Fisher female rats. 67Ga labeled agent was used in single photon imaging mode and 68Ga labeled agent was used in PET mode with a small animal PET imaging device built in our laboratory with plastic scintillating optical fibers.

  16. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  17. Multi-agent systems and neural networks for automatic target recognition on air images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozien, Roger F.; Rosenberger, Christophe; Eyherabide, Partrick; Rossettini, Joaquim; Ceyrolle, Arnaud

    2000-08-01

    Our purpose is, in medium term, to detect in air images, characteristic shapes and objects such as airports, industrial plants, planes, tanks, trucks, ... with great accuracy and low rate of mistakes. However, we also want to value whether the link between neural networks and multi-agents systems is relevant and effective. If it appears to be really effective, we hope to use this kind of technology in other fields. That would be an easy and convenient way to depict and to use the agents' knowledge which is distributed and fragmented. After a first phase of preliminary tests to know if agents are able to give relevant information to a neural network, we verify that only a few agents running on an image are enough to inform the network and let it generalize the agents' distributed and fragmented knowledge. In a second phase, we developed a distributed architecture allowing several multi- agents systems running at the same time on different computers with different images. All those agents send information to a 'multi neural networks system' whose job is to identify the shapes detected by the agents. The name we gave to our project is Jarod.

  18. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  19. Prodrug Strategies for Metalloenzyme Inhibitors and Molecular Imaging Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Kevin Brett

    2015-01-01

    Prodrugs are effective tools in overcoming drawbacks typically associated with drug properties in vivo. This dissertation will first discuss prodrug approaches and how they have been successfully applied to a variety of pharmacological agents. Metalloenzymes will then be introduced with an emphasis on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as therapeutic targets. A survey of reported prodrugs of metalloenzymes will be presented, highlighting the limited number of strategies previously explored. A d...

  20. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It was found that the obtained polypyrrole hollow microspheres (PPyHMs) can act as an efficient theranostic agent not only to enhance US imaging greatly, but also exhibit excellent photohyperthermic effects. The contrast consistently sustained the echo signals for no less than 5 min and the NIR laser light ablated the tumor completely within two weeks in the presence of PPyHMs. More importantly, no use of additional NIR absorber substantially minimizes an onetime dose of the theranostic agent.

  1. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.; Ehnholm, G.; Wistrand, L.-G.; Petersson, J. S.; Golman, K.

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been e...... than 1 μT in water at room temperature. The longitudinal electron spin relaxation rate is calculated from the DNP enhancement curves. The oxygen broadening in water is about 50 μT/mM O2at 37°C. These agents have good properties for oximetry with OMRI.......Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... dipolar limit. The agents have a single, narrow EPR line, which is analyzed as a Voigt function. The linewidth is measured as a function of the agent concentration and the oxygen concentration. The concentration broadenings are about 1–3 μT/mM and the Lorentzian linewidths at infinite dilution are less...

  2. Positron radioactive molecular imaging agents for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron radioactive molecular imaging can be used to do early diagnose of Parkinson's disease, a senile neurodegenerative disease, and the method has been accepted by more and more doctors and patients. In this paper, we give a review on positron radioactive molecular imaging agents in clinical application and research of Parkinson's disease. (authors)

  3. MicroPET imaging of brain tumor angiogenesis with {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated RGD peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Park, Ryan; Hou, Yingping; Tohme, Michel; Bading, James R.; Conti, Peter S. [PET Imaging Science Center, Department of Radiology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1510 San Pablo St., Suite 350, CA 90033, Los Angeles (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Gonzales-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E. [Department of Pediatrics, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, CA 90027, Los Angeles (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We have previously labeled cyclic RGD peptide c(RGDyK) with fluorine-18 through conjugation labeling via a prosthetic 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl moiety and applied this [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD radiotracer for {alpha}{sub v}-integrin expression imaging in different preclinical tumor models with good tumor-to-background contrast. However, the unfavorable hepatobiliary excretion and rapid tumor washout rate of this tracer limit its potential clinical applications. The aims of this study were to modify the [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD tracer by inserting a heterobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, M.W. =3,400) between the {sup 18}F radiolabel and the RGD moiety and to test this [{sup 18}F]FB-PEG-RGD tracer for brain tumor targeting and in vivo kinetics. [{sup 18}F]FB-PEG-RGD was prepared by coupling the RGD-PEG conjugate with N-succinimidyl 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate ([{sup 18}F]SFB) under slightly basic conditions (pH=8.5). The radiochemical yield was about 20-30% based on the active ester [{sup 18}F]SFB, and specific activity was over 100 GBq/{mu}mol. This tracer had fast blood clearance, rapid and high tumor uptake in the subcutaneous U87MG glioblastoma model (5.2{+-}0.5%ID/g at 30 min p.i.). Moderately rapid tumor washout was observed, with the activity accumulation decreased to 2.2{+-}0.4%ID/g at 4 h p.i. MicroPET and autoradiography imaging showed a very high tumor-to-background ratio and limited activity accumulation in the liver, kidneys and intestinal tracts. U87MG tumor implanted into the mouse forebrain was well visualized with [{sup 18}F]FB-PEG-RGD. Although uptake in the orthotopic tumor was significantly lower (P<0.01) than in the subcutaneous tumor, the maximum tumor-to-brain ratio still reached 5.0{+-}0.6 due to low normal brain background. The results of H and E staining post mortem agreed with the anatomical information obtained from non-invasive microPET imaging. In conclusion, PEGylation suitably modifies the physiological behavior of the RGD peptide. [{sup 18

  4. In vivo tumor angiogenesis imaging with site-specific labeled {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-VEGF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenberg, Francis G. [Stanford University, Division of Nuclear Medicine/Department of Radiology and MIPS (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford), Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, CA (United States); Backer, Marina V.; Patel, Vimalkumar; Backer, Joseph M. [SibTech, Inc., Newington, CT (United States); Levashova, Zoia [Stanford University, Division of Nuclear Medicine/Department of Radiology and MIPS (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford), Stanford, CA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    We recently developed a cysteine-containing peptide tag (C-tag) that allows for site-specific modification of C-tag-containing fusion proteins with a bifunctional chelator, HYNIC (hydrazine nicotinamide)-maleimide. We then constructed and expressed C-tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and labeled it with HYNIC. We wished to test {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-C-tagged VEGF ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-VEGF) for the imaging of tumor vasculature before and after antiangiogenic (low continuous dosing, metronomic) and tumoricidal (high-dose) cyclophosphamide treatment. HYNIC-maleimide was reacted with the two thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF without any effect on biologic activity in vitro. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-VEGF was prepared using tin/tricine as an exchange reagent, and injected via the tail vein (200-300 {mu}Ci, 1-2 {mu}g protein) followed by microSPECT imaging 1 h later. Sequencing analysis of HYNIC-containing peptides obtained after digestion confirmed the site-specific labeling of the two accessible thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF. Tumor vascularity was easily visualized with {sup 99m}Tc/VEGF in Balb/c mice with 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma 10 days after implantation into the left axillary fat pad in controls (12.3{+-}5.0 tumor/bkg, n=27) along with its decrease following treatment with high (150 mg/kg q.o.d. x 4; 1.14{+-}0.48 tumor/bkg, n=9) or low (25 mg/kg q.d. x 7; 1.03{+-}0.18 tumor/bkg, n=9) dose cyclophosphamide. Binding specificity was confirmed by observing a 75% decrease in tumor uptake of {sup 99m}Tc/biotin-inactivated VEGF, as compared with {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-VEGF. {sup 99m}Tc can be loaded onto C-tagged VEGF in a site-specific fashion without reducing its bioactivity. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-VEGF can be rapidly prepared for the imaging of tumor vasculature and its response to different types of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Recent progress of imaging agents for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoai; Cai, Huawei; Ge, Ran; Li, Lin; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive, neurodegenerative brain disease that is promoted by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, protein aggregation and proteasome dysfunction in the brain. Compared with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), non-invasive nuclear radiopharmaceuticals have great significance for the early diagnosis of PD due to their high sensitivity and specificity in atypical and preclinical cases. Based on the development of coordination chemistry and chelator design, radionuclides may be delivered to lesions by attaching to PD-related transporters and receptors, such as dopamine, serotonin, and others. In this review, we comprehensively detailed the current achievements in radionuclide imaging in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25977680

  6. Human brain tumor imaging with a protein-binding MR contrast agent: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Marco; Giesel, Frederik; Weber, Marc-Andre; Gerigk, Lars [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Rohrer, Martin [University of Applied Science Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Tuettenberg, Jochen [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany); Michaely, Hendrik; Voth, Matthias [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Gadofosveset is a Gd-based protein-binding blood pool agent with increased relaxivities and blood half-life compared with conventional Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). No experience exists about the use of gadofosveset as an extracellular agent. In this report we present the first clinical experience with gadofosveset in enhancing intracranial tumors. Ten patients with different intracranial tumors were examined with a standard dose (0.03 mmol/kg) of gadofosveset compared with a standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of conventional GBCA. As a result of its significantly higher relaxivity, gadofosveset could, despite its low dose, achieve a sufficient contrast enhancement. The visual rating of the intensity of enhancement and the contrast to noise ratios were comparable to conventional agents. The detection and delineation of more complex lesions was rated equal. In one nonenhancing low grade astrocytoma an enhancing nodule became visible only 5 h after gadofosvesest injection. As shown in this initial report, contrast-enhanced intracranial tumor imaging is possible with the protein-binding blood pool agent gadofosveset. The agent gives a significant tumor contrast in early postcontrast imaging comparable with conventional agents. As a result of its unique longer lasting contrast, the use of gadofosveset might enable a new approach to imaging mild or nonenhancing tumors. (orig.)

  7. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  8. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  9. Context Aware Multisensor Image Fusion for Military Sensor Networks using Multi Agent System

    CERN Document Server

    Sutagundar, Ashok V; 10.5121/ijasuc.2011.2113

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a Context Aware Agent based Military Sensor Network (CAMSN) to form an improved infrastructure for multi-sensor image fusion. It considers contexts driven by a node and sink. The contexts such as general and critical object detection are node driven where as sensing time (such as day or night) is sink driven. The agencies used in the scheme are categorized as node and sink agency. Each agency employs a set of static and mobile agents to perform dedicated tasks. Node agency performs context sensing and context interpretation based on the sensed image and sensing time. Node agency comprises of node manager agent, context agent and node blackboard (NBB). Context agent gathers the context from the target and updates the NBB, Node manager agent interprets the context and passes the context information to sink node by using flooding mechanism. Sink agency mainly comprises of sink manager agent, fusing agent, and sink black board. A context at the sensor node triggers the fusion process at the si...

  10. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  11. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqib H Zehri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM, two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery.

  12. Imaging of thyroid tumor angiogenesis with microbubbles targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether Contrast Enhanced Ultrasund (CEUS) with microbubbles (MBs) targeted to VEGFR-2 is able to characterize in vivo the VEGFR-2 expression in the tumor vasculature of a mouse model of thyroid cancer (Tg-TRK-T1). Animal protocol was approved by Institutional committee on Laboratory Animal Care. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging with MBs targeted with an anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody (UCAVEGFR-2) and isotype control antibody (UCAIgG) was performed in 7 mice with thyroid carcinoma, 5 mice with hyperplasia or benign thyroid nodules and 4 mice with normal thyroid. After ultrasonography, the tumor samples were harvested for histological examination and VEGFR-2 expression was tested by immunohistochemistry. Data were reported as median and range. Paired non parametric Wilcoxon’s test and ANOVA of Kruskal-Wallis were used. The correlation between the contrast signal and the VEGFR-2 expression was assessed by the Spearman coefficient. The Video intensity difference (VID) caused by backscatter of the retained UCAVEGFR-2 was significantly higher in mice harboring thyroid tumors compared to mice with normal thyroids (P < 0.01) and to mice harboring benign nodules (P < 0.01). No statistically significant differences of VID were observed in the group of mice carrying benign nodules compared to mice with normal thyroids. Moreover in thyroid tumors VID of retained VEGFR-2-targeted UCA was significantly higher than that of control UCAIgG (P <0.05). Results of immunohistochemical analysis confirmed VEGFR-2 overexpression. The magnitude of the molecular ultrasonographic signal from a VEGFR-2-targeted UCA retained by tissue correlates with VEGFR-2 expression determined by immunohistochemistry (rho 0.793, P=0.0003). We demonstrated that CEUS with UCAVEGFR-2 might be used for in vivo non invasive detection and quantification of VEGFR-2 expression in thyroid cancer in mice, and to differentiate benign from malignant thyroid nodules

  13. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging. PMID:24188576

  14. Elemental imaging of MRI contrast agents: benchmarking of LA-ICP-MS to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, J.A.T. [University of Sheffield, Centre for Analytical Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cox, A.G.; McLeod, C.W. [University of Sheffield, Centre for Analytical Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bunch, J. [University of Birmingham, School of Chemistry, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Writer, M.J.; Hart, S.L. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Wolfson Centre for Gene Therapy of Childhood Disease, London (United Kingdom); Bienemann, A.; White, E. [University of Bristol, School of Clinical Sciences, Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bell, J. [Hammersmith Hospital, Metabolic and Molecular Imaging Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been used to map the spatial distribution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (Gd-based) in histological sections in order to explore synergies with in vivo MRI. Images from respective techniques are presented for two separate studies namely (1) convection enhanced delivery of a Gd nanocomplex (developmental therapeutic) into rat brain and (2) convection enhanced delivery, with co-infusion of Magnevist (commercial Gd contrast agent) and Carboplatin (chemotherapy drug), into pig brain. The LA technique was shown to be a powerful compliment to MRI not only in offering improved sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal quantitation but also in giving added value regarding the fate of administered agents (Gd and Pt agents). Furthermore simultaneous measurement of Fe enabled assignment of an anomalous contrast enhancement region in rat brain to haemorrhage at the infusion site. (orig.)

  15. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment. PMID:19763751

  16. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Qing Wang; Ze-Hong Miao

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis ...

  17. How Nelo´s image is perceived in Germany : An empirical investigation amongst their agents

    OpenAIRE

    Bektesevic, Alisa; Oloya, Grace; Schöblom, Tom

    2009-01-01

      The purpose of this research was to investigate how the German market is segmented and what the German consumers perceive of Nelo’s positioning by assessment of what the Agents corroborate. The insights derived from it points out if Nelo’s image is rightly perceived in the German market.   In this paper a qualitative approach is used. Data collection method used was both interviews and documentation. Telephone interviews were conducted with three different agents operating in southern Germa...

  18. A study of the imaging of contrast agents for use in computerised tomography

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hare, Neil John

    1991-01-01

    A computed tomography (CT) scanner is a device which is capable of mapping the variation in linear attenuation coefficient in a slice through an object. This is achieved by the multiple measurement of the attenuation of an X-ray beam at various positions and angles through the body. In medical diagnostic imaging using CT, contrast agents are administered to patients resulting in increased attenuation of the beam in the areas where the contrast agent resides. The increa...

  19. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.;

    1998-01-01

    examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close to the......Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... than 1 μT in water at room temperature. The longitudinal electron spin relaxation rate is calculated from the DNP enhancement curves. The oxygen broadening in water is about 50 μT/mM O2at 37°C. These agents have good properties for oximetry with OMRI....

  20. Dynamic manipulation of magnetic contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Congxian; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Seo, Chi Hyung; Hu, Xiaoge; Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used extensively ex vivo for cellular and molecular separations. We recently showed that a coupled nanoparticle combining a superparamagnetic core with a thin, isolated gold shell providing strong absorption in the near infrared can be used for magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging (mmPA), a new technique in which magnetic manipulation of the particle during PA imaging greatly enhances molecular contrast specificity. This particle can also be biologically targeted for in vivo applications, where mmPA imaging provides a spatially localized readout of magnetic manipulations. As an initial test of potential in vivo molecular assays and integrated molecular therapeutics using magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles, we present experiments demonstrating PA readout of trapped magnetic particles in a flow field. An aqueous solution containing a concentration of 0.05-mg/ml 10-μM superparamagnetic iron oxide particles flowed in a 1.65-mm diameter Zeus PTFE (Teflon) sublite wall tubing at three velocities of 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0-mm/s. Opposed permanent magnets separated by 40-mm were positioned on both sides of the tube. As expected, the targeted objects can be magnetically captured and accumulated locally. By translating the magnets, a dynamic magnetic field (0.1-0.3-T) was alternately generated on the side of the tube closest to one of the magnets and created a synchronous PA motion from accumulated targeted objects. This synchronized motion can be used to differentiate the stationary background or other PA sources moving asynchronously with magnetic manipulations (e.g., moving blood) from targeted cells moving synchronously with the magnetic field. This technology can potentially provide sensitive molecular assays of cellular targets travelling in the vasculature (e.g., metastatic tumor cells).

  1. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bak, M; Vach, W; Rose, C

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... had clinical impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  2. A comparison of radiolabelled agents for thrombus imaging using a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative uptakes of five potential thrombus-localizing radiopharmaceuticals in experimental thrombi of the rabbit jugular vein have been compared to assist with the selection of a thrombus imaging agent for clinical use. Three hours after injection, 111In-platelets were clearly the agent of choice but at 18 h sup(99m)Tc-fibrinogen had more favourable characteristics. Both agents were superior to sup(99m)Tc-plasmin or its acyl derivatives, including sup(99m)Tc-streptokinase-activated anisoylplasminogen. The ease of preparation coupled with favourable biological properties suggest that sup(99m)Tc-fibrinogen should be of value in the clinical situation. (author)

  3. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.B.D. AbbottReproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  4. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  5. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  6. Inhibitors of Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büning, H; Hacker, U T

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in malignant, ischemic, inflammatory, infectious and immune disorders. The increasing molecular understanding of angiogenic processes fostered the development of strategies to induce or inhibit angiogenesis for therapeutic purposes. Here, we focus on anti-angiogenic therapies, which represent a standard of care in the treatment of different cancer types and in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Specifically, strategies related to the blockade of angiogenic proteins and receptors will be outlined covering both preclinical and clinical aspects. Finally, examples of gene therapy based anti-angiogenic approaches are presented. PMID:27236560

  7. From angiogenesis to neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2005-12-01

    Angiogenesis - the growth of new blood vessels - is a crucial force for shaping the nervous system and protecting it from disease. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the brain and other tissues grow new blood vessels under normal and pathological conditions. Angiogenesis factors, especially vascular endothelial growth factor, are now known to have roles in the birth of new neurons (neurogenesis), the prevention or mitigation of neuronal injury (neuroprotection), and the pathogenesis of stroke, Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. As our understanding of pathophysiology grows, these developments may point the way towards new molecular and cell-based therapies.

  8. Cancer Immunotherapy of Targeting Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianmeiHou; LingTian; YuquanWei

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy may be a useful approach to cancer therapy. This review discussed tumor angiogenesis and immunotherapy of targeting tumor angiogenesis from two main aspects: (1) active vaccination to induce effective anti-angiogenesis immunity; (2) passive immunotherapy with anti-pro-angiogenic molecules relevant antibody. Evidence from the recent years suggested that anti-angiogenic therapy should be one of the most promising approaches to cancer therapy.

  9. The use contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, František; Sopko, V.; Jakůbek, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, C01096 (2011), s. 1-7. ISSN 1748-0221. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /12./. Cambridge, 11.07.2010-15.7.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06005 Grant ostatní: Research Program(CZ) 6840770029; Research Program(CZ) 6840770040; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600550614; GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06007; GA MŠk(CZ) 1PO4LA211; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : x-ray radiography and digital radiography (DR) * x-ray detectors * inspections with x-rays Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.869, year: 2011

  10. Bridged cyclams as imaging agents for chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over-expression of chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is present in a majority of cancers, has been linked to an aggressive phenotype, and may indicate the metastatic potential of primary tumor. Several CXCR4 targeted therapeutics are in clinical trials and the development of the corresponding imaging agents is an area of active interest. Previously, 64Cu-labeled imaging agents for CXCR4 have provided clear images of CXCR4-bearing tissues in relevant experimental models but demonstrated fast washout from tissues harboring receptor. Addition of stabilizing bridges is known to provide more robust chelator-Cu(II) complexes. In addition, bridged cyclam-based CXCR4 binding agents demonstrated increased receptor residence times relative to existing agents. Based on that knowledge we synthesized several bridged cyclam analogs of AMD3465, a monocyclam-based CXCR4 imaging agent, to increase the retention time of the tracer bound to the receptor to allow for protracted imaging and improved target-to-non-target ratios. Specific accumulation of two radiolabeled, cross-bridged analogs ([64Cu] RAD1-24 and [64Cu]RAD1-52) was observed in U87-stb-CXCR4 tumors in both PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies. At 90 min post-injection of radiotracer, tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios reached 106.05 ± 17.19 and 28.08 ± 4.78, respectively, for cross-bridged pyrimidine analog [64Cu]RAD1-52. Receptor blockade performed in vivo denoted target binding specificity. The biodistribution and PET/CT imaging studies with the radiolabeled bridged cyclams demonstrated longer tumor retention and comparable uptake to [64Cu]AMD3465, though [64Cu]AMD3465 demonstrated superior overall pharmacokinetics

  11. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138 xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138 were studied in 30 (five groups of six nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA on proton relaxation times was measured in tumors and other organs. T1 values, signal enhancement and the Gd concentration for different contrast agent solutions were also investigated. RESULTS: The porphyrin agents showed higher relaxivity compared to the clincal agent, Gd-DTPA. A significant 16% and 21% modification in T1 relaxation time of the water in human melanoma tumors grafted in the nude mice was revealed 24 hours after injection of Gd-TCP and Gd-H, respectively. The percentage of injected Gd localized to the tumor measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was approximately 21% for Gd-TCP and 28% for Gd-H which were higher than that of Gd-DTPA (10%. CONCLUSIONS: The high concentration of Gd in the tumor is indicative of a selective retention of the compounds and indicates that Gd-TCP and Gd-H are promising MR imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection. Gd-porphyrins have considerable promise for further diagnostic applications in magnetic resonance imaging. KEY WORDS: MRI, porphyrin-based contrast agent, hematoporphyrin, melanoma.

  12. Quantitative whole body biodistribution of fluorescent-labeled agents by non-invasive tomographic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine O Vasquez

    Full Text Available When small molecules or proteins are injected into live animals, their physical and chemical properties will significantly affect pharmacokinetics, tissue penetration, and the ultimate routes of metabolism and clearance. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT offers the ability to non-invasively image and quantify temporal changes in fluorescence throughout the major organ systems of living animals, in a manner analogous to traditional approaches with radiolabeled agents. This approach is best used with biotherapeutics (therapeutic antibodies, or other large proteins or large-scaffold drug-delivery vectors, that are minimally affected by low-level fluorophore conjugation. Application to small molecule drugs should take into account the significant impact of fluorophore labeling on size and physicochemical properties, however, the presents studies show that this technique is readily applied to small molecule agents developed for far-red (FR or near infrared (NIR imaging. Quantification by non-invasive FMT correlated well with both fluorescence from tissue homogenates as well as with planar (2D fluorescence reflectance imaging of excised intact organs (r²  =  0.996 and 0.969, respectively. Dynamic FMT imaging (multiple times from 0 to 24 h performed in live mice after the injection of four different FR/NIR-labeled agents, including immunoglobulin, 20-50 nm nanoparticles, a large vascular imaging agent, and a small molecule integrin antagonist, showed clear differences in the percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g in liver, kidney, and bladder signal. Nanoparticles and IgG1 favored liver over kidney signal, the small molecule integrin-binding agent favored rapid kidney and bladder clearance, and the vascular agent, showed both liver and kidney clearance. Further assessment of the volume of distribution of these agents by fluorescent volume added information regarding their biodistribution and highlighted the relatively poor

  13. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  14. The labelling and animal study of tumor positive imaging agent 5-18F-fluorouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To synthesize and label a tumor positive imaging agent 18F-fluorouracil (FU) and the animal study on the product was also undertaken. Methods: 18F-FU was synthesized and labelled. Its biodistribution analysis was done on normal and tumor bearing nude mice. PET imaging was performed on normal and tumor bearing rabbits. Results: HPLC analysis and other quality control test results guaranteed the possibility of animal study and clinical usage of 18F-FU. Biodistribution analysis and PET imaging also demonstrated a high accumulation of the tracer in tumor tissue. Conclusion: 18F-FU is a kind of potential tumor positive imaging agents which can be used to assess the effects of chemotherapy

  15. How phototherapy affects angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Mary

    2007-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for normal growth, tissue repair and regeneration. Its stimulation accelerates repair and regeneration including wound healing where these processes are delayed. Its inhibition can reduce the rate of growth of solid tumors. Phototherapy can accelerate the resolution of acute inflammation with the result that the proliferative phase of tissue repair, when angiogenesis occurs, begins earlier than in sham-irradiated controls. Evidence that angiogenesis is enhanced in dermal repair, tendon repair and bone regeneration in rodents is presented. The cellular mechanisms that control angiogenesis involve the interaction of endothelial cells, macrophages, pericytes and other cells in response, for example, to changes in the availability of oxygen in the local environment. Pericytes and macrophages modulate endothelial cell proliferation; pericytes guide endothelial cell migration. The stimulation of endothelial cell proliferation in vitro following exposure to red (660 nm) and infrared (820 nm) radiation, 15 mW, at 2-8 J/cm2 is presented. 1J/cm2 was ineffective. 820 nm irradiation, 15 mW, at 8 J/cm2 was observed to inhibit pericyte proliferation in vitro. Indirect effects on endothelial cell and pericyte proliferation followed stimulation of soluble mediator production by macrophages following exposure to red and infrared radiation. The potential clinical significance of the results obtained is discussed and the necessity of clinical trials emphasized.

  16. Preclinical study of dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent 131I-epidepride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the radioactivity distribution and the characteristic of imaging with dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent-epidepride. Methods: 131I-epidepride was prepared using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The authors chose SD rats to study the characteristics of 131I-epidepride distribution in vivo and in brain. Two rabbits were used in SPECT imaging. Dynamic acquisition was performed in one rabbit after rapid injection of 370 MBq 131I-epidepride, and time-activity curve was obtained with Region of Interesting (ROI) technique. The other rabbit had brain tomography imaging and whole body imaging according to the result of time-activity curve. Results: The radiolabeling yield (RLY) of 131I-epidepride with hydrogen peroxide was over 95%. In vivo, the uptake of heart and lung was the fastest, so was the clearance of the two organs. The clearance of 131I-epidepride from the body was mainly through liver, stomach and intestines. The striatum uptake was concentrated and stable, while the cerebellum clearance was rapid. Conclusion: The hydrogen peroxide method is simple and fast with high RLY. The striatum uptake is concentrated and stable. 131I-epidepride is an effective agent suitable for dopamine D2 receptor imaging and may be a promising agent for clinical application

  17. Angiogenesis: Future of pharmacological modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisht Manisha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a fundamental biological process that is regulated by a fine balance between pro- and antiangiogenic molecules, and is deranged in various diseases. Historically, angiogenesis was only implicated in few diseases, such as, cancer, arthritis, and psoriasis. However, in recent years, it has been increasingly evident that excessive, insufficient or abnormal angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of many more disorders. Research in angiogenesis offers a potential to cure a variety of diseases such as Alzheimer′s and AIDS. Modulation of angiogenesis may have an impact on diseases in the twenty-first century similar to that which the discovery of antibiotics had in the twentieth century.

  18. Gentisic acid: a new stabilizer for low tin skeletal imaging agents: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro stabilization of low-tin bone-imaging agents has previously been achieved with ascorbic acid. In this study gentisic acid is shown to be an equally effective antioxidant for the (1-hydroxyethylidene) diphosphonate (HEDP) and hydroxymethylenediphosphonate (HMDP) skeletal agents. In vitro studies show less than 2% free sodium [/sup 99m/Tc] pertechnetate at 24 h with the gentisic acid stabilizer. Studies in guinea pigs at 3 and 24 h - whether with C-14- or H-3-labeled gentisic acid as stabilizer - show no alteration in the biodistribution of either skeletal imaging agent by the addition of the gentisic acid. Gentisic acid is a safe and effective stabilizer, and clinical studies have shown bioequivalency with ascorbic acid

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of three iodinated haloperidol derivatives as potential dopamine receptor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haloperidol, a neuroleptic which shows D-2 receptor affinity and selectivity, has been labelled primarily with positron emitting isotopes. The authors have synthesized three iodinated analogues of Haloperidol to investigate the possibility of an iodine-123 labelled agent for SPECT imaging. These compounds were obtained from the substitution of halogenated butyrophenones by halogenated arylpiperidols. In vitro and in vivo experiments will be discussed

  20. Assessment methods for angiogenesis and current approaches for its quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMalki, Waleed Hassan; Shahid, Imran; Mehdi, Abeer Yousaf; Hafeez, Muhammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a physiological process which describes the development of new blood vessels from the existing vessels. It is a common and the most important process in the formation and development of blood vessels, so it is supportive in the healing of wounds and granulation of tissues. The different assays for the evaluation of angiogenesis have been described with distinct advantages and some limitations. In order to develop angiogenic and antiangiogenic techniques, continuous efforts have been resulted to give animal models for more quantitative analysis of angiogenesis. Most of the studies on angiogenic inducers and inhibitors rely on various models, both in vitro, in vivo and in ova, as indicators of efficacy. The angiogenesis assays are very much helpful to test efficacy of both pro- and anti- angiogenic agents. The development of non-invasive procedures for quantification of angiogenesis will facilitate this process significantly. The main objective of this review article is to focus on the novel and existing methods of angiogenesis and their quantification techniques. These findings will be helpful to establish the most convenient methods for the detection, quantification of angiogenesis and to develop a novel, well tolerated and cost effective anti-angiogenic treatment in the near future. PMID:24987169

  1. Design and fabrication of a micromachined multispectral magnetic resonance imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the fabrication details of magnetic nano- and microstructures that enable a new class of multispectral magnetic resonance imaging agents. Magnetic field and associated geometrical fabrication constraints particular to these new multispectral contrast agents are described, and fabrication schemes based on both electrochemical deposition and thermal evaporation are presented. Relative advantages and disadvantages of top-down microfabrication approaches versus traditional bottom-up chemical synthesis routes are discussed with a focus on trade-offs between resulting microparticle functionality and fabrication process economy. It is shown that large numbers of contrast agent nano- or microstructures can be simultaneously fabricated, suggesting that top-down microfabricated contrast agents may represent an economical, attractive alternative to those based on chemically synthesized molecules or nanoparticles

  2. Metal ion cage complexes as imaging agents for cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cage ligands are very attractive for use in radiolabelling antibodies. Their synthesis is based around Co(III) octahedral co-ordination chemistry and they may be easily derivatised for attachment to antibodies. They are known to form kinetically inert metal complexes. Copper-64 (t1/2 = 12.7 h) has been identified as having potential value in diagnostic and therapeutic application. Its positron annihilation radiation is useful for PET imaging, while its beta (Emax 578 keV, 37.2 %) emissions may also be suitable for therapy. In the current study, the new hexa-aza-cryptand, 1 -N-(4-amino-benzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaaza-bicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane- 1,8-diamine, or SarAr, has been synthesised specifically for radiolabelling antibodies with 64Cu and a kit formulation has been produced. The resulting radiolabelled immunoconjugate (64Cu-SarArB-72.3) was injected into nude mice bearing LS174t colorectal carcinoma. Clearance of 64CuSarAr-B72.3 from the liver and kidneys was typical of a whole IgG antibody. Tumour localisation was comparable to similar radiolabelled immunoconjugates (38± 5 % ID/g at 48 hours). Biodistribution studies of 123I- and 111In- radiolabelled B72.3 were conducted in the same animal model. MIRDOSE 3 was used to compare target to non-target dose of their analogous therapeutic counterparts (90Y and 131I respectively) with 64Cu-SarAr-B72.3. Total body dose for 64Cu-SarAr-B72.3 was significantly lower (0.09 rad/mCi) than analogous products (131I-B72.3, 2.64 rad/mCi; 90Y- B72.3, 2.387 rad/mCi) while still providing enough dose to small tumours to be potentially therapeutic. In order to assess therapeutic effect of 64Cu, a biological study was conducted over a 12 month period. Nude mice bearing tumours between 3.5 - 5.5 mm in length were injected with various doses (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 MBq) of 64Cu-SarAr-B72.3. Animals were regularly monitored for tumour size, animal mass, behavioural and physical abnormalities (e.g. movement / gait, food intake and

  3. 123I-epidepride: an imaging agent for dopamine D2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    123I-epidepride, 123I-(s)-N-[(l-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide, is a potent imaging agent for SPECT of dopamine D2 receptor. With high affinity (Kd = 24 pmol/L) and relatively low lipophilicity (lg Kw = 2.05), it is suitable for imaging in striated and extra-striated. In addition, it has high value in imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in pituitary adenoma, and it can serve as a predictor for response to dopamine agonist treatment

  4. Photoacoustic imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using dual modal contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjo; Lee, Seunghyun; Cha, Myeonggeun; Jeong, Cheolhwan; Kang, Homan; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Yoon-sik; Jeong, Daehong; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a remarkable non-invasive imaging modality that provides a strong optical absorption contrast, high ultrasonic resolution, and great penetration depth. Thus, PAT has been widely used as an in vivo preclinical imaging tool. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another attractive sensing technology in biological research because it offers highly sensitive chemical analyses and multiplexed detection. By performing dual-modal imaging of SERS and PAT, high-resolution structural PAT imaging and high-sensitivity SERS sensing can be achieved. At the same time, it is equally important to develop a dual modal contrast agent for this purpose. To perform both PAT and SERS, we synthesized PEGylated silver bumpy nanoshells (AgBSs). The AgBSs generate strong PA signals owing to their strong optical absorption properties as well as sensitive SERS signals because of the surface plasmon resonance effect. Then, multiplexed Raman chemicals were synthesized to enhance the sensitivity of Raman. We have photoacoustically imaged the sentinel lymph nodes of small animals after intradermal injection of multiplexed agents. Furthermore, the chemical composition of each agent has been distinguished through SERS.

  5. RNA aptamer probes as optical imaging agents for the detection of amyloid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available Optical imaging using multiphoton microscopy and whole body near infrared imaging has become a routine part of biomedical research. However, optical imaging methods rely on the availability of either small molecule reporters or genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, which are challenging and time consuming to develop. While directly labeled antibodies can also be used as imaging agents, antibodies are species specific, can typically not be tagged with multiple fluorescent reporters without interfering with target binding, and are bioactive, almost always eliciting a biological response and thereby influencing the process that is being studied. We examined the possibility of developing highly specific and sensitive optical imaging agents using aptamer technology. We developed a fluorescently tagged anti-Aβ RNA aptamer, β55, which binds amyloid plaques in both ex vivo human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue and in vivo APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Diffuse β55 positive halos, attributed to oligomeric Aβ, were observed surrounding the methoxy-XO4 positive plaque cores. Dot blots of synthetic Aβ aggregates provide further evidence that β55 binds both fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ. The high binding affinity, the ease of probe development, and the ability to incorporate multiple and multimodal imaging reporters suggest that RNA aptamers may have complementary and perhaps advantageous properties compared to conventional optical imaging probes and reporters.

  6. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  7. Safety of Gadoterate Meglumine (Gd-DOTA) as a Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Takahashi, Shoki

    2012-01-01

    Background: Safety is a primary concern with contrast agents used for MRI. If precautions could be taken before the repeated administration of gadolinium-based contrast media, then the awareness and management of adverse reactions would be more efficient. Objectives: To assess the safety and efficacy of gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) [Magnescope® in Japan, Dotarem® in other countries], a gadolinium-based contrast agent, in patients undergoing imaging of the brain/spinal cord and/or trunk/limb...

  8. Medical applications of nanoparticles in biological imaging, cell labeling, antimicrobial agents, and anticancer nanodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravina; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the applications of nanotechnology in the fields of medical and life sciences. Nanoparticles have shown promising applications from diagnosis to treatment of various types of diseases including cancer. In this review, we discuss the applications of nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods, nanowires, and carbon nanotubes in diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labeling, contrast agents for biological imaging, antimicrobial agents, drug delivery systems, and anticancer nanodrugs for treatment of cancer and other infectious diseases. The adverse affects of nanoparticles on human skin from daily use in cosmetics and general toxicology of nanoscale materials are also reviewed. PMID:21870454

  9. Angiogenesis and Multiple Myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Giuliani, Nicola; Storti, Paola; Bolzoni, Marina; Palma, Benedetta Dalla; Bonomini, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma is characterized by an increased microvessel density. The production of pro-angiogenic molecules is increased and the production of angiogenic inhibitors is suppressed, leading to an “angiogenic switch”. Here we present an overview of the role of angiogenesis in multiple myeloma, the pro-angiogenic factors produced by myeloma cells and the microenvironment, and the mechanisms involved in the myeloma-induced angiogenic switch. Current data s...

  10. Spectral and fluorescence imaging of immune system and tissue response to an immunogenic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging of immune system and tissue response to immunogenic agents can be important to the development of new biomaterials. Additionally, quantitative functional imaging can be useful for testing and evaluation of methods to alter or control the immune system response to implanted materials. In this preliminary study, we employ spectral imaging and fluorescence imaging to measure immune system and tissue response to implanted immunogenic agents. Poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a 50:50 composition was used to create immunogenic microparticles (MPs). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) encapsulated in the MPs was used to provoke a tissue immune response in mice and encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to fluorescently label the MPs for imaging. Control MPs did not contain LPS. The MPs were delivered at 50 particles/μL in a total volume of 20μL by subcutaneous injection in the skin of a nude mouse in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber preparation. Cultured immune cells from a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line were exogenously labeled with the fluorescent dye DiD in solution at a concentration of 8000cells/μL. Immediately after window chamber surgery and implantation of the MPs, 100μL of the fluorescent macrophage solution was administered via the tail vein. Fluorescence imaging was used to track MPs and macrophages while spectral imaging was used for imaging and measurement of hemoglobin saturation in the tissue microvasculature. Imaging was performed periodically over about three days. The spectral and fluorescence imaging combination enabled detailed observations of the macrophage response and functional effects on the tissue.

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake

  12. Novel angiogenesis inhibitory activity in cinnamon extract blocks VEGFR2 kinase and downstream signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    VEGF is one of the most critical factors that induce angiogenesis, and has thus become an attractive target for anti-angiogenesis treatment. However, most of the current anti-VEGF agents that often cause side effects cannot be recommended for long term use. Identification of natural VEGF inhibitors...

  13. Endostatin derivative angiogenesis inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Meng-jie

    2009-01-01

    Objective To throw light on the superiority of the anti-angiogenesis activity of endostatin (ES) derivatives by reviewing the recent progress in the field of ES molecular structure modification.Data sources The data used in this article were mainly from PubMed with relevant English articles published from 1971 to May 2008.The search terms were "endostatin" and "angiothesis".Study selection Articles involved in the ES molecular structure modification and the original milestone articles were selected.Results A number of ES derivatives were designed and studied to improve its clinical relevance.The modified ES with polyethylene glycol (PEG),low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and IgG Fc domain extended the circulation half-life.Meanwhile the recombinant ESs showed more potent anti-tumor activity than native ES in mouse xenografts.Mutated ES also changed its anti-angiogenesis activity.Conclusions The anti-angiogenesis treatment remains a promising tumor therapeutic strategy.New ES derivatives would be a good choice to meet the future challenge on clinical application of ES.

  14. Anti-angiogenesis therapies: their potential in cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Eichholz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Eichholz, Shairoz Merchant, Andrew M GayaDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Angiogenesis plays an important role in normal animal growth and development. This process is also vital for the growth of tumors. Angiogenesis inhibitors have a different mechanism of action to traditional chemotherapy agents and radiation therapy. The angiogenesis inhibitors can act synergistically with conventional treatments and tend to have non-overlapping toxicities. There are four drugs which have a proven role in treating cancer patients. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to and neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Sunitinib and sorafenib inhibit multiple tyrosine kinase receptors that are important for angiogenesis. Thalidomide inhibits the activity of basic fibroblast growth factor-2 (bFGF. The licensed indications and the supporting evidence are discussed. Other drugs are currently being tested in clinical trials and the most promising of these drugs are discussed. Aflibercept, also known as VEGF-trap, is a recombinant fusion protein that binds to circulating VEGF. The vascular disrupting agents act by targeting established blood vessels. These exciting new treatments have the potential to transform the management of cancer.Keywords: angiogenesis, bevacizumab, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, thalidomide, aflibercept, vascular disrupting agents

  15. Uptake of perfusion imaging agents by transplanted hearts: an experimental study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need for a reliable noninvasive marker of rejection in transplanted hearts. Endomyocardial biopsy is now the universally accepted diagnostic method of choice, but the invasiveness of the procedure and the limited size of the sample obtained makes this method far from ideal. As coronary blood flow may be expected to decrease during acute rejection, there has been interest in thallium-201 chloride (T1), a perfusion marker, as an imaging agent for diagnosing cardiac rejection. Hexakis(t-butylisonitrile)-technetium (Tc-TBI) is a representative of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals proposed as perfusion markers. We have compared the uptake of these imaging agents in a rat model of cardiac transplantation. Uptake of Tc-TBI as well as of T1 was significantly lower in rejecting than in nonrejecting hearts. This change was found in both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. Allografts in animals treated with cyclosporine (CyA) showed less severe rejection and higher uptakes of both imaging agents as compared to unmodified rejection. Our results suggest that perfusion imaging with these radionuclides is a potentially useful approach to the problem of detecting allograft rejection

  16. A naturally occurring contrast agent for OCT imaging of smokers' lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers great potential for clinical applications in terms of its cost, safety and real-time imaging capability. Improvement of its resolution for revealing sub-layers or sub-cellular components within a tissue will further widen its application. In this study we report that carbon pigment, which is frequently present in the lungs of smokers, could be used as a contrast agent to improve the OCT imaging of lung tissue. Carbon produced an intense bright OCT image at a relatively deep location. The parallel histopathological section analysis confirmed the presence of carbon pigment in such tissues. The underlying mechanism of the OCT image formation has been discussed based on a model system in which carbon particles were dispersed in agar gel. Calculations and in-depth intensity profiles of OCT revealed that higher refractive index particles with a size close to or smaller than the wavelength would greatly increase backscattering and generate a sharp contrast, while a particle size several times larger than the wavelength would absorb or obstruct the light path. The naturally occurring contrast agent could provide a diagnostic biomarker of lung tissue in smokers. Furthermore, carbon under such circumstances, can be used as an effective exogenous contrast agent, with which specific components or tissues exhibiting early tumour formation can be optically labelled to delineate the location and boundary, providing potential for early cancer detection and its treatment

  17. Perflubron as a gastrointestinal MR imaging contrast agent in the pediatric population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of orally administered perflubron for bowel recognition on MR imaging in a pediatric population. Materials and methods. A multicenter trial evaluated 39 pediatric subjects before and after ingestion of perflubron with T1-, proton-density, and T2-weighted sequences through the abdomen and/or pelvis. Post-contrast images were compared with pre-contrast images. Safety was evaluated through assessment of adverse events, clinical laboratory parameters, and vital signa. Results. With regard to efficancy analysis, improvement in the percent of bowel darkened was observed for 85% of the subjects on T1-weighted images and for 95% of the subjects on proton-density and T2-weighted images. For images of the abdominal region, the percent of bowel darkened was improved for 90-92% of the subjects across pulse sequences. Improvement rates for the images of the pelvic region ranged from 71% to 100%. For at least 75% of the subjects, proton-density and T2-weighted images of to body and tail of the pacreas, left lobe of the liver, mesenteric fat, and pathological tissue were improved relative to predosing images. Twenty-three percent of the subjects experienced some adverse effects, most of which were minor and related to the digestive system. Clinical laboratory and vital sign evaluations revealed no trends associated with the administration of perflubron. Conclusion. Perflubron is a relatively safe and effective gastrointestial MR contrast agent in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of potential practical oral contrast agents for pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a practical oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to improve differentiation of bowel from adjacent structures. In order to find a readily available, inexpensive, non-toxic, palatable solution for use in the pediatric population, several formulas, milk products and a common oral sedative were evaluated in vitro. T1, T2 and signal intensity measurements were performed on a 1.5 T system. Similac with standard iron proved to be a useful high signal intensity agent on multiple pulse sequences. Early in vivo experience in four normal volunteers indicates that this agent provides excellent delineation of the stomach and duodenum from contiguous viscera. Distal small bowel visualization is less predictabel. Further clinical trials should confirm the utility of this solution, which contains a combination of iron salts and paramagnetic metallic ions. (orig.)

  19. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-12-21

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex(®) IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist(®), Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex(®), AMAG Pharma; Sinerem(®), Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan(®), Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist(®) is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme(®)) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors. PMID:26715826

  20. Automatic Image Annotation using Image Clustering in Multi – Agent Society

    OpenAIRE

    Khorsheed, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of the internet provides tremendous resource for information in different domains (text, image, voice, and many others). This growth introduces new challenge to hit an exact match due to huge number of document returned by search engines where millions of items can be returned for certain subject. Images have been important resources for information, and billions of images are searched to fulfill user demands, which face the mentioned challenge. Automatic im...

  1. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelrich J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Estelrich,1,2 María Jesús Sánchez-Martín,1 Maria Antònia Busquets1,2 1Departament de Fisicoquímica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Nanociència I Nanotecnologia (IN2UB, Barcelona, Catalonia, SpainAbstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions, providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of

  2. Brain nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enhanced by a paramagnetic nitroxide contrast agent: preliminary report. [Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasch, R.C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Nitecki, D.E.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Enzmann, D.R.; Wesbey, G.E.; Tozer, T.N.; Tuck, L.D.; Cann, C.E.; Fike, J.R.; Sheldon, P.

    1983-11-01

    Contrast-enhancing agents for demonstrating abnormalities of the blood-brain barrier may extend the diagnostic utility of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. TES, a nitroxide stable free radical derivative, was tested as a central nervous system contrast enhancer in dogs with experimentally induced unilateral cerebritis or radiation cerebral damage. After intravenous injection of TES, the normal brain showed no change in NMR appearance, but areas of disease demonstrated a dramatic increase (up to 45%) in spin-echo intensity and a decrease in T/sub 1/, relaxation times. The areas of disease defined by TES enhancement were either not evident on the nonenhanced NMR images or were better defined after contrast administration. In-depth tests of toxicity, stability, and metabolism of this promising NMR contrast agent are now in progress.

  3. Brain nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enhanced by a paramagnetic nitroxide contrast agent: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhancing agents for demonstrating abnormalities of the blood-brain barrier may extend the diagnostic utility of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. TES, a nitroxide stable free radical derivative, was tested as a central nervous system contrast enhancer in dogs with experimentally induced unilateral cerebritis or radiation cerebral damage. After intravenous injection of TES, the normal brain showed no change in NMR appearance, but areas of disease demonstrated a dramatic increase (up to 45%) in spin-echo intensity and a decrease in T1, relaxation times. The areas of disease defined by TES enhancement were either not evident on the nonenhanced NMR images or were better defined after contrast administration. In-depth tests of toxicity, stability, and metabolism of this promising NMR contrast agent are now in progress

  4. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 106-3 x 108 labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 106 cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells. (orig.)

  5. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, UCSF Medical Center, University of California in San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, CA 94143, San Francisco (United States); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Institute of Pathology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Pichler, Bernd [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis (United States); Heinzmann, Ulrich [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J. [3. Clinic of Internal Medicine, Laboratory of Stem Cell Physiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10{sup 6}-3 x 10{sup 8} labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10{sup 6} cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells

  6. Basic and clinical studies of sup(99m)Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate for skeletal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of sup(99m)Tc-Hydroxymethylene Diphosphonate (HMDP), a new skeletal scintigraphy agent, to detect the bone lesions, was investigated by comparing with sup(99m)Tc-Methylene Diphosphonate (MDP). No significant difference in blood clearance between HMDP and MDP was observed in 5 healthy volunteers. Any difference was not seen in the urinary excretion studies between these two agents. Inorder to estimate the uptake of these agents by bone, the count ratio of normal bone to soft tissue was obtained in 22 cases with HMDP and 23 with MDP by scintimetry. This data suggested that HMDP bone to soft tissue ratio was significantly higher than that of MDP. Although this ratio of HMDP was not significantly higher than that of MDP before first 1 hour after administration, the former became gradually higher than the latter, and difference was significant 2 hour after administration. Overall, HMDP image was judged to be slightly better than MDP in qualitatively grading by three independent observers. From these results it is concluded that HMDP is a useful skeletal imaging agent. (author)

  7. Optical-based molecular imaging: contrast agents and potential medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser- and sensitive charge-coupled device technology together with advanced mathematical modelling of photon propagation in tissue has prompted the development of novel optical imaging technologies. Fast surface-weighted imaging modalities, such as fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) and 3D quantitative fluorescence-mediated tomography have now become available [1, 2]. These technical advances are paralleled by a rapid development of a whole range of new optical contrasting strategies, which are designed to generate molecular contrast within a living organism. The combination of both, technical advances of light detection and the refinement of optical contrast media, finally yields a new spectrum of tools for in vivo molecular diagnostics. Whereas the technical aspects of optical imaging are covered in more detail in a previous review article in ''European Radiology'' [3], this article focuses on new developments in optical contrasting strategies and design of optical contrast agents for in vivo diagnostics. (orig.)

  8. Kaolin as a negative gastrointestinal contrast agent in MR imaging of colorectal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the potential of the clay mineral kaolin (Kaoprompt, Upjohn, Kalamazzo, Mich.) as a negative rectal contrast agent in MR imaging that was investigated in the assessment of colorectal disease. Fifty MR examinations in patients with colorectal disease (colorectal carcinoma, 27 patients; inflammatory disease, 18 patients; miscellaneous disorders of the colon, five patients) were evaluated. All examinations were performed with T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences after rectal application of 500 mL Kaoprompt. Afterward, T1-weighted SE images enhanced with gadopentetate dimeglumine were obtained

  9. Study on N-acetylgucosaminyl transferase and the uptake of the correlated imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase(GnT) is related to the development of tumor and the cancer patients' prognosis by effecting the change of glucose's chain. Study on the transform of glycosyltransferase is benefit to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological behavior. The noninvasive diagnostic and treating methods of tumor will be provided along with the development of new imaging agent of tumor glucose analogue and its mechanism defined clearly. (authors)

  10. Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agents in Advanced X-ray Imaging Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungsook Ahn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been significant progress in the field of soft- and hard-X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications, both technically and scientifically, via developments in sources, optics and imaging methodologies. While one community is pursuing extensive applications of available X-ray tools, others are investigating improvements in techniques, including new optics, higher spatial resolutions and brighter compact sources. For increased image quality and more exquisite investigation on characteristic biological phenomena, contrast agents have been employed extensively in imaging technologies. Heavy metal nanoparticles are excellent absorbers of X-rays and can offer excellent improvements in medical diagnosis and X-ray imaging. In this context, the role of gold (Au is important for advanced X-ray imaging applications. Au has a long-history in a wide range of medical applications and exhibits characteristic interactions with X-rays. Therefore, Au can offer a particular advantage as a tracer and a contrast enhancer in X-ray imaging technologies by sensing the variation in X-ray attenuation in a given sample volume. This review summarizes basic understanding on X-ray imaging from device set-up to technologies. Then this review covers recent studies in the development of X-ray imaging techniques utilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and their relevant applications, including two- and three-dimensional biological imaging, dynamical processes in a living system, single cell-based imaging and quantitative analysis of circulatory systems and so on. In addition to conventional medical applications, various novel research areas have been developed and are expected to be further developed through AuNP-based X-ray imaging technologies.

  11. Transforming a Targeted Porphyrin Theranostic Agent into a PET Imaging Probe for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyun Shi, Tracy W.B. Liu, Juan Chen, David Green, David Jaffray, Brian C. Wilson, Fan Wang, Gang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy (PDT and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Porphyrins are also excellent metal chelators forming highly stable metallo-complexes making them efficient delivery vehicles for radioisotopes. Here we investigated the possibility of incorporating 64Cu into a porphyrin-peptide-folate (PPF probe developed previously as folate receptor (FR targeted fluorescent/PDT agent, and evaluated the potential of turning the resulting 64Cu-PPF into a positron emission tomography (PET probe for cancer imaging. Noninvasive PET imaging followed by radioassay evaluated the tumor accumulation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 64Cu-PPF. 64Cu-PPF uptake in FR-positive tumors was visible on small-animal PET images with high tumor-to-muscle ratio (8.88 ± 3.60 observed after 24 h. Competitive blocking studies confirmed the FR-mediated tracer uptake by the tumor. The ease of efficient 64Cu-radiolabeling of PPF while retaining its favorable biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and selective tumor uptake, provides a robust strategy to transform tumor-targeted porphyrin-based photosensitizers into PET imaging probes.

  12. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA)30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (KPS) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (PPS) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (PPS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (PPS), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative functional lung imaging with synchrotron radiation using inhaled xenon as contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayat, S. [TIMC-PRETA, UMR CNRS 5525, Laboratoire de Physiologie, Universite Joseph Fourier, Faculte de Medecine, Domaine de la Merci, Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: sam.bayat@imag.fr; Le Duc, G.; Berruyer, G.; Nemoz, C.; Monfraix, S.; Fiedler, S.; Thomlinson, W. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, Grenoble (France); Porra, L.; Suortti, P. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G. [Department of Radiology, University of Helsinki Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Sovijaervi, A.R.A. [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2001-12-01

    Small airways play a key role in the distribution of ventilation and in the matching of ventilation to perfusion. The purpose of this study was to introduce an imaging method that allows measurement of regional lung ventilation and evaluation of the function of airways with a small diameter. The experiments were performed at the Medical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation beams were used to obtain quantitative respiration-gated images of lungs and airways in two anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits using inhaled stable xenon (Xe) gas as a contrast agent. Two simultaneous images were acquired at two different energies, above and below the K-edge of Xe. Logarithmic subtraction of the two images yields absolute Xe concentrations. This technique is known as K-edge subtraction (KES) radiography. Two-dimensional planar and CT images were obtained showing spatial distribution of Xe concentrations within the airspaces, as well as the dynamics of filling with Xe. Bronchi down to 1 mm in diameter were visible both in the subtraction radiographs and in tomographic images. Absolute concentrations of Xe gas were calculated within the tube carrying the inhaled gas mixture, small and large bronchi, and lung tissue. Local time constants of ventilation with Xe were obtained by following the evolution of gas concentration in sequential computed tomography images. The results of this first animal study indicate that KES imaging of lungs with Xe gas as a contrast agent has great potential in studies of the distribution of ventilation within the lungs and of airway function, including airways with a small diameter. (author)

  14. Preparation and Biodistribution of 99mTc-Pamidronate as Bone Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Hong-yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Labeling of Pamidronate (PAM with 99mTc was studied by a direct labeling method in the presence of SnCl2•2H2O as reducing agent. The influences of the concentration of SnCl2•2H2O, PAM concentration and pH value, reaction time on labeling yield were investigated. The optimum labeling was determined. The results showed that the radiochemistry purity of 99mTc-PAM was more than 95%. Biodistribution studies in normal mice and rats showed very high uptake of 99mTc-PAM and long retain in bone. 99mTc-PAM was washed out from the blood very quickly. In addition, considerable uptake in the kidneys indicated this complex was excreted mainly by renal pathway. On the other hand, the radioactivity in liver, lung and heart was negligible. It could be known from SPECT images that 99mTc-PAM would be an excellent bone-imaging agent. Bone uptake of 99mTc-PAM was higher than that of 99mTc-MDP in mice. This study suggested that 99mTc-PAM was a promising bone imaging agent and further study was worthwhile.

  15. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  16. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  17. Longitudinal Studies of Angiogenesis in Hormone-Dependent Shionogi Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor P. Wade

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Vessel size imaging was used to assess changes in the average vessel size of Shionogi tumors throughout the tumor growth cycle. Changes in R2 and R2* relaxivities caused by the injection of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (ferumoxtran-10 were measured using a 2.35-T animal magnetic resonance imaging system, and average vessel size index (VSI was calculated for each stage of tumor progression: growth, regression, and relapse. Statistical analysis using Spearman rank correlation test showed no dependence between vessel size and tumor volume at any stage of the tumor growth cycle. Paired Student's t test was used to assess the statistical significance of the differences in average vessel size for the three stages of the tumor growth cycle. The average VSI for regressing tumors (15.1 ± 6.6 wm was significantly lower than that for growing tumors (35.2 ± 25.5 μm; P < .01. Relapsing tumors also had an average VSI (45.4 ± 41.8 μm higher than that of regressing tumors, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = .067. This study shows that VSI imaging is a viable method for the noninvasive monitoring of angiogenesis during the progression of a Shionogi tumor from androgen dependence to androgen independence.

  18. Inhibition of angiogenesis by S-adenosylmethionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) were investigated in endothelial cells. → Our results showed that SAM decreased proliferation of endothelial cells. → SAM influentially inhibited the percentage of cell migration. → SAM probably stopped migration as independent from its effects on proliferation. → SAM was shown to suppress in vitro angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Metastasis is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer. One of the steps in metastasis process is the formation of new blood vessels. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are common in cancer cells. In recent studies, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is a DNA methylating agent, has been found to have inhibitory effects on some carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we have used SAM to investigate whether it is effective against angiogenesis in vitro. Our results have shown that SAM can reduce the formation and organization of capillary-like structures of endothelial cells in tumoral environment. Besides, we have found SAM can block endothelial cell proliferation and the migration of cells towards growth factors-rich media. In conclusion, our study suggests that SAM may be used against angiogenesis as a natural bio-product.

  19. Development of 99mTc agents for imaging central neural system receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals that bind to central neural system (CNS) receptors in vivo are potentially useful for understanding the pathophysiology of anumber of neurological and psychiatric disorders, their diagnosis and treatment. Carbon-11 labelled compounds and positron emission tomography(PET) imaging have played a vital role in establishing the usefulness of imaging the dopaminergic, cholinergic, serotonergic and benzodiazapine receptors, and relating the receptor density to disease status. Since the use of 11C agents is constrained due to their 20 min half-life, various radiohalogenated analogues based on the structure of 11C compounds have been successfully developed, providing comparable information. Iodine- 123 is the most widely employed of these radioisotopes; it has a longer, 13 h, half-life. Through the use of 123I, there has been a steady growth in CNS receptor imaging studies employing single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). SPECT, as compared with PET, has slightly inferior image resolution but has the advantage of being readily available worldwide. However, the 123I radiopharmaceutical is expensive and the distribution system outside of the major markets is not well developed for its supply on a routine basis. The ideal radioisotope for SPECT imaging is 99mTc, due to its low cost per dose, availability through commercially available generator systems and physical decay characteristics. Over 80% of all diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging studies worldwide are conducted using this radioisotope. Development of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for imaging CNS receptors is therefore of considerable importance. On the basis of the recommendations of a consultants meeting, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated in 1996 a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Agents for Imaging CNS Receptors based on 99mTc. At that time there were no 99mTc CNS receptor imaging radiopharmaceuticals available even though work on

  20. Experimental evaluation of a hyperspectral imager for near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthman, A. S.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems have the potential to combine morphological and spectral information to provide detailed and high sensitivity readouts in biological and medical applications. As HSI enables simultaneous detection in several spectral bands, the technology has significant potential for use in real-time multiplexed contrast agent studies. Examples include tumor detection in intraoperative and endoscopic imaging as well as histopathology. A multiplexed readout from multiple disease targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. Here, we evaluate a commercial, compact, near-infrared HSI sensor that has the potential to enable low cost, video rate HSI for multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent studies in biomedical applications. The hyperspectral imager, based on a monolithically integrated Fabry-Perot etalon, has 70 spectral bands between 600-900 nm, making it ideal for this application. Initial calibration of the imager was performed to determine wavelength band response, quantum efficiency and the effect of F-number on the spectral response. A platform for wide-field fluorescence imaging in reflectance using fluorophore specific LED excitation was then developed. The applicability of the imaging platform for simultaneous readout of multiple fluorophore signals was demonstrated using a dilution series of Alexa Fluor 594 and Alexa Fluor 647, showing that nanomolar fluorophore concentrations can be detected. Our results show that the HSI system can clearly resolve the emission spectra of the two fluorophores in mixtures of concentrations across several orders of magnitude, indicating a high dynamic range performance. We therefore conclude that the HSI sensor tested here is suitable for detecting fluorescence in biomedical imaging applications.

  1. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  2. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research

  3. Development of a protease-sensitive molecular imaging agent for optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rivière, Patrick J.; Green, Anthony; Norris, James R.

    2007-02-01

    We are working to develop a molecular imaging agent that will allow for in vivo imaging of proteases by use of optoacoustic tomography. Proteases are protein-cleaving proteins known to be overactive in a number of pathologies, including cancers and vascular disease. Protease-sensitive "smart probes" have previously been developed in the context of pure optical imaging. These involve pairs of mutually quenching fluorophores attached to a backbone by protease-cleavable peptide side chains; cleaving of the side chains liberates the fluorophores and leads to increase in fluorescence. Optoacoustic imaging is sensitive not to fluorescence but to optical absorption and so a smart imaging probe for protease imaging would need to shift its absorption peak upon cleavage. Naturally, the absorption peaks of the cleaved (and, ideally, uncleaved) molecules should be in the near infrared for maximum tissue penetration. We have designed a molecule that should achieve these specifications. It comprises two active sites, derivatives of natural photosynthetic bacteriochlorophylls that absorb in the near IR, conjugated to a lysine backbone by peptide spacers specific to the protease being imaged. When these bacteriochlorophylls dimerize and stack in the uncleaved molecule, their absorption peak shifts about 20-30 nm. When they are cleaved from the molecule the absorption peak shifts back to that of bacteriochlorophyll monomers. We have performed a preliminary synthesis of the molecule and confirmed by use of a spectrometer that the pairing of the bacteriochlorophylls leads to the expected absorption shift.

  4. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  5. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David; Ley, Carsten Dan; Søgaard, Lise Vejby; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Krisjansen, Paul E.; Lund, Eva Løbner; Rowland, Ian John

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour development and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents . To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics', a simple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show that a...

  6. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Ley, Carsten Dan; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Kristjansen, Poul; Lund, E.L; Rowland, Ian

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour de- velopment and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents1,2. To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics’, a sim ple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show that...

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of 99mTc-moxifloxacin, a potential infection specific imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To synthesize and evaluate a 99mTc labeled fluroquinolone, moxifloxacin as a potential bacteria specific infection imaging agent. A radiolabeling formulation including moxifloxacin, [MoxicipTM injection, Cipla] (4 mg), sodium pertechnetate and stannous chloride (5 μg) gave the best radiolabeling efficiency and moderately stable labeled 99mTc moxifloxacin. Quality control analysis was performed by ITLC. Rats and rabbit with infectious intramuscular lesions induced in either thigh with E. Colli were used for studying biodistribution and scintigraphic imaging of the labeled product. Imaging of an infected thigh of a rabbit was performed with a γ-camera at various intervals. A good radiolabeling efficiency (90-95%) was obtained within 5 min. No purification of the labeled product was done. Labeled product retained its radiochemical purity upto 85% even at 3 h. Scintigraphy showed uptake in infectious lesions at 30 min after injection, which remains constant upto 3 h study. Abscess-to-muscle ratios were 1.60, 1.62, 1.74 and 1.75 at 30 min, 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively. Thus, 99mTc moxifloxacin, a new potential radiopharmaceutical has been developed for infection imaging agent.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-moxifloxacin, a potential infection specific imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Sankha [Radiopharmaceuticals Laboratory, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)], E-mail: sankha@veccal.ernet.in; Saha Das, Sujata [Radiopharmaceuticals Laboratory, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Chandra, Susmita; De, Kakali; Mishra, Mridula [Nuclear Medicine Department, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata (India); Ranjan Sarkar, Bharat; Sinha, Samarendu; Ganguly, Shantanu [Regional Radiation Medicine Centre, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India)

    2010-02-15

    To synthesize and evaluate a {sup 99m}Tc labeled fluroquinolone, moxifloxacin as a potential bacteria specific infection imaging agent. A radiolabeling formulation including moxifloxacin, [Moxicip{sup TM} injection, Cipla] (4 mg), sodium pertechnetate and stannous chloride (5 {mu}g) gave the best radiolabeling efficiency and moderately stable labeled {sup 99m}Tc moxifloxacin. Quality control analysis was performed by ITLC. Rats and rabbit with infectious intramuscular lesions induced in either thigh with E. Colli were used for studying biodistribution and scintigraphic imaging of the labeled product. Imaging of an infected thigh of a rabbit was performed with a {gamma}-camera at various intervals. A good radiolabeling efficiency (90-95%) was obtained within 5 min. No purification of the labeled product was done. Labeled product retained its radiochemical purity upto 85% even at 3 h. Scintigraphy showed uptake in infectious lesions at 30 min after injection, which remains constant upto 3 h study. Abscess-to-muscle ratios were 1.60, 1.62, 1.74 and 1.75 at 30 min, 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively. Thus, {sup 99m}Tc moxifloxacin, a new potential radiopharmaceutical has been developed for infection imaging agent.

  9. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL−1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4–6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2–19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound. (paper)

  10. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-01

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL-1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  11. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and baboon PET imaging of the potential adrenal imaging agent cholesteryl-p-[18f]fluorobenzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholesteryl-p-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]CFB) was investigated as a potential adrenal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for the diagnostic imaging of adrenal disorders. We describe the synthesis, biodistribution, adrenal autoradiography, and baboon PET imaging of [18F]CFB. The synthesis of [18F]CFB was facilitated by the use of a specially designed microwave cavity that was instrumental in effecting 70-83% incorporation of fluorine-18 in 60 s via [18F]fluoro-for-nitro exchange. Tissue distribution studies in mature female Sprague-Dawley rats showed good accumulation of [18F]CFB in the steroid-secreting tissues, adrenals and ovaries, at 1 h postinjection. The effectiveness of [18F]CFB to accumulate in diseased adrenals was shown through biodistribution studies in hypolipidemic rats, which showed a greater than threefold increase in adrenal uptake at 1 h and increased adrenal/liver and adrenal/kidney ratios. Analysis of the metabolites at 1 h in the blood, adrenals, spleen, and ovaries of hypolipidemic and control rats showed the intact tracer representing greater than 86%, 93%, 92%, and 82% of the accumulated activity, respectively. [18F]CFB was confirmed to selectively accumulate in the adrenal cortex versus the adrenal medulla by autoradiography. Normal baboon PET imaging with [18F]CFB effectively showed adrenal localization as early as 15 min after injection of the tracer, with enhanced adrenal contrast seen at 60-70 min. These results suggest that [18F]CFB may be useful as an adrenal PET imaging agent for assessing adrenal disorders

  12. Barium sulfate suspension as a negative oral contrast agent for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton spectroscopy with linewidth measurements and MR imaging were performed on various commercially available barium sulfate suspensions as well as inorganic sulfates and barium salts. Approximately 500 mL of 20%, 40%, 60%, and 70% wt/wt single-contrast oral barium sulfate suspensions were administered to four normal volunteers, and MR imaging was performed with both a 1.5-T and a 0.15-T MR imager. As much as 80% of the small bowel and the entire colon were well visualized with the 60% or 70% wt/wt single-contrast barium sulfate suspensions. The authors conclude that barium sulfate suspensions are useful as oral MR contrast agents

  13. Tumor Angiogenesis: Insights and Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nussenbaum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a vital process resulting in the formation of new blood vessels. It is normally a highly regulated process that occurs during human development, reproduction, and wound repair. However, angiogenesis can also become a fundamental pathogenic process found in cancer and several other diseases. To date, the inhibition of angiogenesis has been researched at both the bench and the bedside. While several studies have found moderate improvements when treating with angiogenesis inhibitors, greater success is being seen when the inhibition of angiogenesis is combined with other traditional forms of available therapy. This review summarizes several important angiogenic factors, examines new research and ongoing clinical trials for such factors, and attempts to explain how this new knowledge may be applied in the fight against cancer and other angiogenic-related diseases.

  14. The preclinical pharmacological study of dopamine transporter imaging agent [99mTc]TRODAT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the pharmacological characteristics of 99mTc-TRODAT-1 as an imaging agent for dopamine transporter. Methods: (1) The quality control of one-vial formulation produced in China. (2) Biodistribution in rats. (3) Imaging in normal and hemi-Parkinsonian model monkeys. Results: (1) The radiochemical purity of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 was about 79.9% evaluated by TLC. It was stable for 2.5 hours at room temperature. (2) The clearance of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 in the blood of rats was fast. The major portion of radioactivity was excreted by hepatobiliary system. (3) The brain uptake was moderate. But the agent had high-affinity binding to DAT which was highly concentrated in striatal area and there was no specific uptake in cerebellum. The ratio of ST/CB was high. (4) Pretreatment with haloperidol, a non-competing ligand, did not result in any significant change in the level of striatal uptake. (5) The distribution pattern as well as the brain regional uptake of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 did not display any significant difference between male and female rats at 60 min post-injection. (6) Monkeys' SPECT images clearly displayed the normal uptake and the pathologic changes in striatal area at 3 hours post-injection. The semi-quantitative analysis, ST/CB ratio, could reveal the specific uptake value for [99mTc]TRODAT-1 in reflecting the numeral and functional changes in DAT. Conclusion: [99mTc]TRODAT-1 labeled by one-vial formulation of China can be the imaging agent of DAT in clinical study. It proves to be effective and promising radiopharmaceuticals in vivo assessment of the loss of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disease

  15. Development of I-123 labeled angiostatin as a novel cancer imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Han; Lee, Sang Yoon; Choe, Yearn Seong; Paik, Jin Young; Kim, Sun A; Han, Yu Mi; Kim, Byung Tae [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    Since angiostatin is a promising anticancer agent that target tumor endothelial cells, it may have advantages over many current tumor imaging agents by overcoming problems such as poor delivery or multi-drug resistance. We therefore synthesized radiolabeled agniostatin and tested it in vivo. {sup 123}-angiostatin was synthesized using the Bolton Hunter method. {sup 123}I labeled plasminogen lysin-binding-site (LBS) was also synthesized. Blood clearance of he radiotracer was measured in SD rats, while tissue distribution was assessed in ICR mice at 1,4, and 18 hr. Pinhole scintigraphy was performed in SD rats and in nude mice bearing RR 1022 tumors at various time points. Radiochemical yield of {sup 123}I-angiostatin approximated 20%. In vivo distribution demonstrated stability of the label for at least 20 hr. {sup 123}I-angiostatin was cleared from the circulation in a biexponential manner with rapid early clearance followed by a slower rate of elimination Tissue distribution in mice showed the highest uptake in the kidneys which was the major route of excretion. This was followed by the lung, liver, and myocardium whose uptake of 1.5{approx}2% ID/gm at 1 hrs gradually decreased over time (all p<0.05). Skeletal muscle uptake was relatively low (<0.3 %ID/gm). {sup 123}I-angiostatin and {sup 123}I-LBS images in SD rates showed a similar distribution. Blood pool activity gradually cleared while tumor uptake increased over time, resulting in a high tumor to non tumor ratio at 20 hr. {sup 123}I-angiostatin has promising potential as a new tumor imaging agent. Further study is warranted to assess its mechanism of uptake and precise role in cancer imaging.

  16. Development of I-123 labeled angiostatin as a novel cancer imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since angiostatin is a promising anticancer agent that target tumor endothelial cells, it may have advantages over many current tumor imaging agents by overcoming problems such as poor delivery or multi-drug resistance. We therefore synthesized radiolabeled agniostatin and tested it in vivo. 123-angiostatin was synthesized using the Bolton Hunter method. 123I labeled plasminogen lysin-binding-site (LBS) was also synthesized. Blood clearance of he radiotracer was measured in SD rats, while tissue distribution was assessed in ICR mice at 1,4, and 18 hr. Pinhole scintigraphy was performed in SD rats and in nude mice bearing RR 1022 tumors at various time points. Radiochemical yield of 123I-angiostatin approximated 20%. In vivo distribution demonstrated stability of the label for at least 20 hr. 123I-angiostatin was cleared from the circulation in a biexponential manner with rapid early clearance followed by a slower rate of elimination Tissue distribution in mice showed the highest uptake in the kidneys which was the major route of excretion. This was followed by the lung, liver, and myocardium whose uptake of 1.5∼2% ID/gm at 1 hrs gradually decreased over time (all p123I-angiostatin and 123I-LBS images in SD rates showed a similar distribution. Blood pool activity gradually cleared while tumor uptake increased over time, resulting in a high tumor to non tumor ratio at 20 hr. 123I-angiostatin has promising potential as a new tumor imaging agent. Further study is warranted to assess its mechanism of uptake and precise role in cancer imaging

  17. Ferric ammonium citrate as a positive bowel contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and diagnostic efficacy of two different doses of ferric ammonium citrate as a paramagnetic oral contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen. Material and methods: Ninety-nine adult patients referred for MR imaging for a known or suspected upper abdominal pathology were included in this randomized multicenter double-blind clinical trial. Imaging was performed with spin-echo (T1- and T2-weighted) and gradient-echo (T1-weighted) techniques before and after administration of either 1200 mg or 2400 mg of ferric ammonium citrate dissolved in 600 ml of water. Safety analysis included monitoring of vital signs, assessment of adverse events, and laboratory testing. Efficacy with regard to organ distension, contrast distribution, bowel enhancement and delineation of adjacent structures was graded qualitatively. Results: No serious adverse events were reported for either of the two concentrations. A total of 31 minor side effects were noted, of which significantly more occurred in the higher dose group (p<0.01). The diagnostic confidence in defining or excluding disease was graded as better after contrast administration for 48% of all images. Marked or moderate enhancement of the upper gastrointestinal tract was achieved at both doses in 69.5% of cases with no evident difference between the two doses. The higher dose tended to show better results in terms of the contrast assessment parameters. Conclusion: Ferric ammonium citrate is a safe and effective oral contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen at two different dose levels. The higher dose showed a tendency toward better imaging results while the lower dose caused significantly fewer side effects. Therefore, the 1200 mg dose can be recommended in view of the risk-to-benefit ratio. (orig.)

  18. ESGAR consensus statement on liver MR imaging and clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a consensus and provide updated recommendations on liver MR imaging and the clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents. The European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) formed a multinational European panel of experts, selected on the basis of a literature review and their leadership in the field of liver MR imaging. A modified Delphi process was adopted to draft a list of statements. Descriptive and Cronbach's statistics were used to rate levels of agreement and internal reliability of the consensus. Three Delphi rounds were conducted and 76 statements composed on MR technique (n = 17), clinical application of liver-specific contrast agents in benign, focal liver lesions (n = 7), malignant liver lesions in non-cirrhotic (n = 9) and in cirrhotic patients (n = 18), diffuse and vascular liver diseases (n = 12), and bile ducts (n = 13). The overall mean score of agreement was 4.84 (SD ±0.17). Full consensus was reached in 22 % of all statements in all working groups, with no full consensus reached on diffuse and vascular diseases. The consensus provided updated recommendations on the methodology, and clinical indications, of MRI with liver specific contrast agents in the study of liver diseases. (orig.)

  19. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM-1 s-1, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T1-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T2-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles.

  20. Mesoporous europo-gadolinosilicate nanoparticles as bimodal medical imaging agents and a potential theranostic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Nicholas M K; Kennedy, Danielle F; Kirby, Nigel; Moffat, Bradford A; Muir, Benjamin W; Caruso, Rachel A; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-06-01

    The mesoporous structure of sol-gel prepared gadolinium and europium doped silicate nanoparticles has been found to be highly dependent on the formulated composition, with synthesised samples displaying both disordered and hexagonally ordered mesoporous packing symmetry. The degree of pore ordering within the nanoparticles has a strong correlation with the total lanthanide (Gd(3+) and Eu(3+) ) concentration. The gadolinosilicates are excellent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal (T1 ) agents. The longitudinal relaxivity (r1 ) and transverse (r2 ) relaxivity, a measure of MRI contrast agent efficiency, were up to four times higher than the clinically employed Omniscan (gadodiamide); with r1 up to 20.6 s(-1) mM(-1) and r2 of 66.2 s(-1) mM(-1) compared to 5.53 and 4.64 s(-1) mM(-1) , respectively, for Omniscan. In addition, the europium content of all the samples studied is below the self-quenching limit, which results in a strong luminescence response from the nanoparticles on excitation at 250 nm. The Eu-Gd silicate nanoparticles act as bimodal imaging agents for MRI and luminescence. These mesoporous nanoparticles also have the potential to serve as encapsulation and controlled release matrices for pharmaceuticals. They are therefore a promising multimodal theranostic platform. PMID:23296572

  1. ESGAR consensus statement on liver MR imaging and clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, E.; Boraschi, P.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bali, M.A.; Matos, C. [Hopital Erasme, MRI Clinics, Department of Radiology, Bruxelles (Belgium); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [The General Hospital of the Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Brancatelli, G. [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Alves, F.C. [University Hospital of Coimbra, Medical Imaging Department and Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Grazioli, L. [Spedali Civili di Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia (Italy); Helmberger, T. [Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Lee, J.M. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Manfredi, R. [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Marti-Bonmati, L. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Area Clinica de Imagen Medica, Valencia (Spain); Merkle, E.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Op De Beeck, B. [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Schima, W. [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern and Sankt Josef-Krankenhaus, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Skehan, S. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Vilgrain, V. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Hopital Beaujon, Radiology Department, Clichy, Paris (France); Zech, C. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilungsleiter Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    To develop a consensus and provide updated recommendations on liver MR imaging and the clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents. The European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) formed a multinational European panel of experts, selected on the basis of a literature review and their leadership in the field of liver MR imaging. A modified Delphi process was adopted to draft a list of statements. Descriptive and Cronbach's statistics were used to rate levels of agreement and internal reliability of the consensus. Three Delphi rounds were conducted and 76 statements composed on MR technique (n = 17), clinical application of liver-specific contrast agents in benign, focal liver lesions (n = 7), malignant liver lesions in non-cirrhotic (n = 9) and in cirrhotic patients (n = 18), diffuse and vascular liver diseases (n = 12), and bile ducts (n = 13). The overall mean score of agreement was 4.84 (SD ±0.17). Full consensus was reached in 22 % of all statements in all working groups, with no full consensus reached on diffuse and vascular diseases. The consensus provided updated recommendations on the methodology, and clinical indications, of MRI with liver specific contrast agents in the study of liver diseases. (orig.)

  2. Tunable, biodegradable gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Ezzibdeh, Rami M; Chhour, Peter; Pulaparthi, Kumidini; Kim, Johoon; Jurcova, Martina; Hsu, Jessica C; Blundell, Cassidy; Litt, Harold I; Ferrari, Victor A; Allcock, Harry R; Sehgal, Chandra M; Cormode, David P

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been proposed for many applications in medicine. Although large AuNP (>5.5 nm) are desirable for their longer blood circulation and accumulation in diseased tissues, small AuNP (nanoparticles (Au-PCPP) can perform their function as contrast agents, then subsequently break down into harmless byproducts and release the AuNP for swift excretion. Homogeneous Au-PCPP were synthesized using a microfluidic device. The size of the Au-PCPP can be controlled by the amount of polyethylene glycol-polylysine (PEG-PLL) block co-polymer in the formulation. Synthesis of Au-PCPP nanoparticles and encapsulation of AuNP in PCPP were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy and their biocompatibility and biodegradability confirmed in vitro. The Au-PCPP nanoparticles were found to produce strong computed tomography contrast. The UV-Vis absorption peak of Au-PCPP can be tuned into the near infrared region via inclusion of varying amounts of AuNP and controlling the nanoparticle size. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the potential of Au-PCPP as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Therefore, Au-PCPP nanoparticles have high potency as contrast agents for two imaging modalities, as well as being biocompatible and biodegradable, and thus represent a platform with potential for translation into the clinic. PMID:27322961

  3. An agent harms a victim: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on specific moral emotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statement 'An agent harms a victim' depicts a situation that triggers moral emotions. Depending on whether the agent and the victim are the self or someone else, it can lead to four different moral emotions: self-anger ('I harm myself'), guilt ('I harm someone'), other-anger ('someone harms me'), and compassion ('someone harms someone'). In order to investigate the neural correlates of these emotions, we examined brain activation patterns elicited by variations in the agent (self vs. other) and the victim (self vs. other) of a harmful action. Twenty-nine healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while imagining being in situations in which they or someone else harmed themselves or someone else. Results indicated that the three emotional conditions associated with the involvement of other, either as agent or victim (guilt, other-anger, and compassion conditions), all activated structures that have been previously associated with the Theory of Mind (ToM, the attribution of mental states to others), namely, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Moreover, the two conditions in which both the self and other were concerned by the harmful action (guilt and other-anger conditions) recruited emotional structures (i. e., the bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate, and basal ganglia). These results suggest that specific moral emotions induce different neural activity depending on the extent to which they involve the self and other. (authors)

  4. Nuclear and optical dual-labelled imaging agents. Design and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Gott, M D; Pietzsch, H-J; Stephan, H

    2016-04-12

    Over the last two decades, molecular imaging has been established as a valuable technology, aiming at visualization and characterization of biochemical processes on a molecular level in isolated cells, tissues and higher organisms. Within the wide scope of the various imaging techniques, dual-labelled modalities for nuclear (PET, SPECT) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging show promise owing to their comparable detection sensitivity. Novel materials offer excellent prospects for the development of new non-invasive strategies of early diagnosis and efficient monitoring of therapeutic treatments. In the field of cancer medicine, the combination of different imaging techniques such as PET/SPECT and OI for tracking down tumours and metastases, and subsequent image-guided surgery for tumour resection is particularly attractive. This review focuses on the development of promising dual-labelled agents to be applied in bimodal nuclear/optical imaging, combining radionuclides and fluorescent dyes. The discussion encompasses modular ligands as well as nanoscale systems, including antibodies and their fragments. PMID:27067792

  5. 99mTc(CO)3 - nitrofuryl thiosemicarbazone a novel infection imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To develop a potential Technetium labeled infection imaging agent 5-NTS prepared and labeled and its scintigraphic imaging done in rat model. Objective: Diagnosis of deep seated infection is a very challenging problem. Differentiation between bacterial infection and sterile inflammation is also difficult. As thiosemicarbazone compound show antibacterial activity, so a new infection imaging agent was prepared. Their in-vitro and in-vitro stability studies, through biological screening and scintigraphic imaging of the chelates labeled with 99mTc studied on infected thigh muscle tissues in rat model. Materials and Methods: Synthesis of 5-nitrofural thiosemicarbazone An equimolar mixture of 5 nitrofural and thiosemicarbazide was stirred with p-TsOH (catalytic amounts) in dry toluene. Synthesized compound characterized by 1H-NMR and ESI-MS. The synthesized compound labeled with 99mTc(CO)3 precursor and 99mTc-oxo(V) core using stannous chloride reduction method. Labeled compound was characterized by TLC in acetone, brine, and ethanol: water: acetic acid: pyridine (1:5:5:1) and also with reverse phase C-18 column. In-vitro stability study was tested in challenge assay with increasing concentration of DTPA (0, 102, 103, 104, 105 molar excess) for 4 hour. Serum stability was also done and its stability analyzed at 0, 2, 8, 18, 24 hour. Infection was induced in rats (Sprague Dawley, 200-220gm) by injecting 0.2 ml of freshly prepared harvested culture of S. aureus (2x108cfu) in left thigh muscle. One day after when the infection was apparent, radiopharmaceutical (185-259 kBq/0.1ml) was injected intravenously. For comparison sterile inflammation was induced by an intramuscular injection of 0.1ml of Terpentine oil I. P. to left thigh muscle. The infected animal with radiopharmaceuticals sacrificed at 1, 4, 8, 24 hour post injection, desired organ were collected and transferred to counting vials. Blood samples were obtained by puncture of the heart. Results: Expressed

  6. Preparation and biodistribution of 99TcmN-DCHDTC as a new blood pool imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99TcmN-DCHDTC (DCHDTC: dicyclohexyl dithiocarbamate) is prepared through a two-step ligand-exchange reaction by using SnCl2·2H2O as reduction agent and SDH (succinic dihydrazide) as a donor of nitride nitrogen atom (N3-). The radiochemical purity of the product is over 95% by TLC. 99TcmN-DCHDTC is stable over 6 h at room temperature. The IgP is 1.19. The electrophoresis results show the complex is neutral. The biodistribution results in mice indicate the complex has high blood uptake. The uptake ratios of blood/heart, blood/lung and blood/liver are 5.27, 1.31 and 1.07 at 30 min post-injection respectively. The results for the complex suggest that it will be potentially useful as a blood pool imaging agent

  7. Virus-mimicking nano-constructs as a contrast agent for near infrared photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Vullev, Valentine I.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-02-01

    We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice.We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice. Electronic supplemental information (ESI) available: Information on experimental procedure for fabrication of the nano-constructs, photoacoustic imaging, and immunogenic studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34124k

  8. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM−1 s−1, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T1-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T2-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI by measuring T1 and T2 relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T1 and T2 effects were also observed in animal experimentation

  9. Recent advances in angiogenesis, anti-angiogenesis and vascular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikfalvi, Andreas; Bicknell, Roy

    2002-12-01

    Angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels, has become a major focus of research. This has been stimulated by the therapeutic opportunities offered by the ability to manipulate the vasculature in pathologies such as cancer. Here, we present an overview of recent advances in angiogenesis. Especially noteworthy is the large volume of information from developmental studies, particularly those that involve transgenic and gene knockout mice. We also discuss the increasing repertoire of drugs with which to manipulate angiogenesis and new endothelial-specific genes with which to target the vasculature. PMID:12457776

  10. Tracer kinetic modelling of tumour angiogenesis based on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical developments in both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have helped to reduce scan times and expedited the development of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques. Since the temporal change of the image signal following the administration of a diffusible, extracellular contrast agent (CA) is related to the local blood supply and the extravasation of the CA into the interstitial space, DCE imaging can be used to assess tissue microvasculature and microcirculation. It is the aim of this review to summarize the biophysical and tracer kinetic principles underlying this emerging imaging technique offering great potential for non-invasive characterization of tumour angiogenesis. In the first part, the relevant contrast mechanisms are presented that form the basis to relate signal variations measured by serial CT and MRI to local tissue concentrations of the administered CA. In the second part, the concepts most widely used for tracer kinetic modelling of concentration-time courses derived from measured DCE image data sets are described in a consistent and unified manner to highlight their particular structure and assumptions as well as the relationships among them. Finally, the concepts presented are exemplified by the analysis of representative DCE data as well as discussed with respect to present and future applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Depending on the specific protocol used for the acquisition of DCE image data and the particular model applied for tracer kinetic analysis of the derived concentration-time courses, different aspects of tumour angiogenesis can be quantified in terms of well-defined physiological tissue parameters. DCE imaging offers promising prospects for improved tumour diagnosis, individualization of cancer treatment as well as the evaluation of novel therapeutic concepts in preclinical and early-stage clinical trials. (orig.)

  11. Tumor angiogenesis--a new therapeutic target in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, E L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Skovgaard-Poulsen, H; Kristjansen, P E

    1998-01-01

    Tumor growth is critically dependent on angiogenesis, which is sprouting of new vessels from pre-existing vasculature. This process is regulated by inducers and inhibitors released from tumor cells, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma multiforme, have...... significant angiogenic activity primarily by the expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF Anti-angiogenic therapy represents a new promising therapeutic modality in solid tumors. Several agents are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. The present review describes the principal inducers and...... inhibitors of angiogenesis in tumors and summarizes what is known about their mechanisms of action in relation to CNS tumors. Potential areas for clinical use are also discussed....

  12. Synthesis of Novel Neutrophil-Specific Imaging Agents for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Yi; Kundu, Bijoy; Fairchild, Karen D.; Locke, Landon; Berr, Stuart S.; Linden, Joel; Pan, Dongfeng

    2007-01-01

    A neutrophil specific peptide, cinnamoyl-F(D)LF(D)LFK (cFLFLFK), was conjugated consecutively with a polyethylene glycol moiety (3.4 K) and 2,2′,2″,2‴-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrayl)tetraacetic acid (DOTA) to form cFLFLFK-PEG-DOTA. After 64Cu labeling, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging was successfully able to detect mouse lung inflammation.

  13. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  14. Luteal angiogenesis and its control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woad, Kathryn J; Robinson, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones, is critical to luteal structure and function. In addition, it is a complex and tightly regulated process. Not only does rapid and extensive angiogenesis occur to provide the corpus luteum with an unusually high blood flow and support its high metabolic rate, but in the absence of pregnancy, the luteal vasculature must rapidly regress to enable the next cycle of ovarian activity. This review describes a number of key endogenous stimulatory and inhibitory factors, which act in a delicate balance to regulate luteal angiogenesis and ultimately luteal function. In vitro luteal angiogenesis cultures have demonstrated critical roles for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting, although other factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and platelet-derived growth factor were important modulators in the control of luteal angiogenesis. Post-transcriptional regulation by small non-coding microRNAs is also likely to play a central role in the regulation of luteal angiogenesis. Appropriate luteal angiogenesis requires the coordinated activity of numerous factors expressed by several cell types at different times, and this review will also describe the role of perivascular pericytes and the importance of vascular maturation and stability. It is hoped that a better understanding of the critical processes underlying the transition from follicle to corpus luteum and subsequent luteal development will benefit the management of luteal function in the future. PMID:27177965

  15. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  16. Experimental comparison of three background subtraction agents for monoclonal antibody imaging of ovarian carcinoma xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual-isotope background subtraction imaging can be used to enhance lesion detection in imaging studies using monoclonal antibodies. The best agent for background subtraction has not been determined, however. The author compared Tc-99m human serum albumin, Tc-99m red blood cells, and I-123-labeled nonspecific murine myeloma immunoglobulin (UPC-10) for their ability to enhance imaging of ovarian carcinoma xenografts in groups of nude mice 24 hours after they were injected with I-131 5G6.4 tumor-specific intact immunoglobulin. Using dual-isotope dynamic background subtraction, tumor imaging was most clear with Tc-99m red blood cells, second best with Tc-99m human serum algumin, and least clear with I-123 UPC-10. while verification in humans will be essential, these animal findings suggest that dual-isotope monoclonal antibody imaging of tumors is enhanced most with Tc-99m red blood cells and least with an isotype-matched monoclonal antibody

  17. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T C; Lee, Nancy Y; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  18. Measurements of some basic constants of 68Ga(BAT-TECH) as an imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetic properties of a new myocardial imaging agent 68Ga(BAT-TECH) are investigated and its thermodynamic constants are measured. The results are as follows: Citrate→BAT-TECH exchange reaction order is second-order; reaction rate k = 0.50 l/mol·s; activation energy Ea = 56.6 kJ/mol; the stability constant of 68Ga(BAT-TECH) lgβ = 14.9; the acid dissociation constants of BAT-TECH pK1 = 4.62, pK2 = 7.68, pK-3 = 8.68, pK4 = 11.2

  19. Synthesis of a biphosphonate (HEDP) as a bone imaging agent with 99mTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last three decades, 99mTc-MDP and 99mTc-HEDP have been used as diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for bone imaging agents. The radioisotope Department after many investigations decided to develop the synthesis of a biphosphonate derivative, named 1-hydroxy-ethylidene-1, 1-disodium phosphonate (HEDP). In this article, we discuss the method of synthesis, formulation, and labeling of lyophilised kit with 99mTc. The results show that our kit has a high radiochemical purity (>95%), according to the US pharmacopoeia. In addition, the stability of lyophilised HEDP kit is more than one year at 4-8degC

  20. New type PET imaging agent excluding 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET is a very sensitive technology, yet it still has limitation such as low specificity. In this way, tracers used to study amino acid uptake, protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, changes of other substrates of tricarboxylic aciol cycle metabolism, tumor hypoxia, immunological activity and receptor are expected to be new tumor imaging agent. The study and possible use of short half-life radiopharmaceuticals (excluding FDG) in oncology with positron emission tomography are reviewed in this article, those that include 18F and 11C labeled compounds. (authors)

  1. Peptidyl Molecular Imaging Contrast Agents Using a New Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Byunghee; Pagel, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    A versatile method is disclosed for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of molecular imaging contrast agents. A DO3A moiety was derivatized to introduce a CBZ-protected amino group and then coupled to a polymeric support. CBZ cleavage with Et2AlCl/thioanisole was optimized for SPPS. Amino acids were then coupled to the aminoDOTA loaded resin using conventional step-wise Fmoc SPPS to create a product with DOTA coupled to the C-terminus of the peptide. In a second study, the DO3A moiety was co...

  2. Radiolabeled Phosphonium Salts as Mitochondrial Voltage Sensors for Positron Emission Tomography Myocardial Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Despite substantial advances in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals remain necessary to diagnose heart disease because clinical use of current PET tracers is limited by their short half-life. Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts penetrate the mitochondrial membranes and accumulate in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in response to negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Radiolabeled tetraphenylphosphonium cation derivatives have been developed as myocardial imaging agents for PET. In this review, a general overview of these radiotracers, including their radiosynthesis, in vivo characterization, and evaluation is provided and clinical perspectives are discussed. PMID:27540422

  3. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  4. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of 68Ga-NOTA-IF7 as a tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of developing a new tumor imaging agent, the IFLLWQR (Ile-Phe-Leu-Leu-Trp-Glu-Arg, IF7) was conjugated with 1, 4, 7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N'-triacetic acid (NOTA) and labeled with 68Ga. In the optimal conditions, the whole radio-synthesis was accomplished within 20 min. The decay-corrected radiochemical yield was more than 92 %. The radiochemical purity of 68Ga-NOTA-IF7 was more than 95 %. MicroPET studies showed a high tumor uptake at 15 min post-injection with 7.52 ± 0.16 %ID/g. The ratios of tumor to muscle uptake were 20.61 ± 0.31, 13.14 ± 0.21, 2.39 ± 0.12 at 15 min, 30 min and 60 min post-injection, respectively. 68Ga-NOTA-IF7 is a promising radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging. (author)

  5. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression.

  6. Evaluation of microbubbles as contrast agents for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbubbles (MBs can serve as an ultrasound contrast agent, and has the potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Due to the relatively low effect of MBs on MRI, it is necessary to develop new MBs that are more suitable for MRI. In this study, we evaluate the properties of SonoVue® and custom-made Fe(3O(4-nanoparticle-embedded microbubbles (Fe(3O(4-MBs in terms of contrast agents for ultrsonography (US and MRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 20 HepG2 subcutaneous-tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups (i.e., n = 10 mice each group, one for US test and the other for MRI test. Within each group, two tests were performed for each mouse. The contrast agent for the first test is SonoVue®, and the second is Fe(3O(4-MBs. US was performed using a Technos(MPX US system (Esaote, Italy with a contrast-tuned imaging (CnTI™ mode. MRI was performed using a 7.0T Micro-MRI (PharmaScan, Bruker Biospin GmbH, Germany with an EPI-T(2* sequence. The data of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR from the region-of-interest of each US and MR image was calculated by ImageJ (National Institute of Health, USA. In group 1, enhancement of SonoVue® was significantly higher than Fe(3O(4-MBs on US (P0.05. The SNR analysis of the enhancement process reveals a strong negative correlation in both cases (i.e., SonoVue® r = -0.733, Fe(3O(4-MBs r = -0.903, with P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: It might be important to change the Fe(3O(4-MBs' shell structure and/or the imagining strategy of US to improve the imaging quality of Fe(3O(4-MBs on US. As an intriguing prospect that can be detected by US and MRI, MBs are worthy of further study.

  7. Rhodamine-123: Radioiodination and evaluation as an agent for imaging and radiotherapy of certain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) is a cationic lypophilic fluorescent dye which localizes in the mitochondria of living cells. The compound subsequently clears through normal cells but is selectively retained in carcinoma cells. As a result, the compound exhibits anticarcinoma activity both in vitro and in vivo. This high selectivity prompted us to evaluate Rhodamine-123 as an agent for imaging and radiotherapy. Accordingly in the present study Rh-123 was labeled with iodine-125 by chloramine-T. Tissue distributions were studied for C-3Hf/SED brown mice bearing 1 cm diameter implanted SCC VII carcinoma; CDF-1 mice with MB49 bladder carcinoma, nude mice with human CX-1 colon carcinoma and brown mice with murine mammary tumor. The results indicated that (i) initially the radioactivity was taken up by the liver (3.4%), thyroid (3.8%), kidney (2.3%) and tumor (0.8%); (ii) the radioactivity from all the normal tissues cleared within 24 hours but not from the tumors (iii) in tumors the radioactivity remained unchanged. This resulted in higher tumor/blood (1.2%) and tumor/muscle (4.2%) ratios which allows detection of the tumors by gamma camera imaging techniques. In the case of nude mice with human imaging CX-1 colon carcinoma and brown mice with murine mammary tumor the tumor/muscle ratios were interestingly much higher - 8.9% and 9.3%, respectively. These results clearly show that radioiodinated Rh-123 is a potential agent for imaging and radiotherapy of certain tumors

  8. Preparation, purification and primary bioevaluation of radioiodinated ofloxacin. An imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandil, Shaban; Seddik, Usama; Hussien, Hiba; Shaltot, Mohamed [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Cyclotron Project; El-Tabl, Abdou [Monofia Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Science

    2015-07-01

    The broad-spectrum antibiotic agents have been demonstrated as promising diagnostic tools for early detection of infectious lesions. We set out ofloxacin (Oflo), a second-generation fluoroquinolone, for the radioiodination process. In particular, this was carried out with {sup 125}I via an electrophilic substitution reaction. The radiochemical yield was influenced by different factors; drug concentration, different oxidizing agents, e.g. chloramine-T, iodogen and n-bromosuccinimide, pH of medium, reaction time, temperature and different organic media. These parameters were studied to optimize the best conditions for labeling with ofloxacin. We found that radiolabeling in ethanol medium showed a 70% radiochemical yield of {sup 125}I-ofloxacin. The radioiodination was determined by means of TLC and HPLC. The cold labeled Oflo ({sup 127}I-Oflo) was prepared and controlled by HPLC. The cold labeled Oflo was also confirmed by NMR and MS techniques. Furthermore, biodistribution studies for labeled {sup 125}I-Oflo were examined in two independent groups (3 mice in each one); control and E. Coli-injected (inflamed). The radiotracer showed a good localization in muscle of thigh for inflamed group as compared to control. In conclusion, ofloxacine might be a promising target as an anti-inflammatory imaging agent.

  9. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  10. Preparation, purification and primary bioevaluation of radioiodinated ofloxacin. An imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad-spectrum antibiotic agents have been demonstrated as promising diagnostic tools for early detection of infectious lesions. We set out ofloxacin (Oflo), a second-generation fluoroquinolone, for the radioiodination process. In particular, this was carried out with 125I via an electrophilic substitution reaction. The radiochemical yield was influenced by different factors; drug concentration, different oxidizing agents, e.g. chloramine-T, iodogen and n-bromosuccinimide, pH of medium, reaction time, temperature and different organic media. These parameters were studied to optimize the best conditions for labeling with ofloxacin. We found that radiolabeling in ethanol medium showed a 70% radiochemical yield of 125I-ofloxacin. The radioiodination was determined by means of TLC and HPLC. The cold labeled Oflo (127I-Oflo) was prepared and controlled by HPLC. The cold labeled Oflo was also confirmed by NMR and MS techniques. Furthermore, biodistribution studies for labeled 125I-Oflo were examined in two independent groups (3 mice in each one); control and E. Coli-injected (inflamed). The radiotracer showed a good localization in muscle of thigh for inflamed group as compared to control. In conclusion, ofloxacine might be a promising target as an anti-inflammatory imaging agent.

  11. Crimson carrier, a long-acting contrast agent for in vivo near-infrared imaging of injured and diseased muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Suresh I; Martinez, Carlo O; Abraham, Jinu; McCleish, Amanda T; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Rubin, Brian P; Shireman, Paula K; Keller, Charles

    2010-08-01

    The near-infrared wavelengths (700-900 nm) are the most suitable optical window for light penetration and deep tissue imaging in small animals. Herein we report a near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent, crimson carrier, which acts as a blood pool contrast agent to detect and quantify injury and disease in live animals. After determining the excitation-emission spectra and pharmacokinetics, crimson carrier was injected into myoinjured mice to monitor their recovery. Crimson carrier was also used to image transgenic mice with spontaneous tumors. Crimson carrier has maximal excitation and emission wavelengths of 745 nm and 820 nm, respectively. Elimination occurs predominantly via urinary excretion. We demonstrate the utility of this contrast agent for serial imaging of traumatized muscle as well as muscle tumors. The unique long-acting pharmacokinetics and urinary excretion route characteristics make crimson carrier a contrast agent of choice for the visualization of tumors and injured muscle or other tissues in live animal studies. PMID:20544935

  12. Preparation and biological behavior of 99m Tc(V)-DMS as a tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 99m Tc - labelled radiopharmaceutical has been developed for tumor imaging under commercial name of DMS-PENTATEC. We used for the preparation 2,3 meso dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), as ligand, and SnCl2 x 2H2O, as reducing agent. The mass ratio DMSA: SnCl2 is 1:0.43 in the mixture of inositol, ascorbic acid and natrium chloride as the antioxidant system. The labelling with 99m Tc was performed at an alkaline pH (7.5 - 8.5) with the result of a new coordination complex DMS - 99m Tc(V) with higher uptake by the tumor cells. The biological studies were made on Wistar London rats with Walker tumors. After intravenous (i.v.) administration of 30 mCi DMS - 99m Tc(V), the biodistribution measurements were carried out at 5 min, 15 min, 30 min and 60 min for the tumors and following organs: blood, liver, spleen, kidneys. The DMS - 99m Tc(V) accumulates quantitatively in the tumor 30 min after i.v. injection. The present study provides a good basis for DMS-99'm Tc(V) clinical application as a tumor imaging agent, mainly for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, medullar thyroid cancers and soft-tissue tumors. (authors)

  13. Preparation and animal studies of a novel potential cerebral perfusion imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate a novel potential SPECT cerebral blood flow perfusion imaging agent. Methods: N2S tridentate α-mercaptol-propyl-1, 2-benzenediamine (MPBDA) was obtained from chemical synthesis IR and was labelled with 99Tcm. Biodistribution analysis in 25 mice was performed after intravenous injection of 100 μL 555 - 740 kBq of 99Tcm-MPBDA. Dynamic acquisition was performed after rapid intravenous injection of 218.3 - 333 MBq 99Tc-MPBDA or 99Tcm-ECD, while whole body imaging and brain perfusion imaging were done after 70 min in 2 normal monkeys. Preclinical studies including toxicity and pyrogen tests in mice and rabbits were undertaken. Results: The radiochemical synthetic yield and radiochemical purity of MPBDA labelled with 99Tcm were more than 95% and 97%, respectively. Mice biodistribution test showed the 99Tcm-MPBDA can concentrate in brain with good retention, and blood clearance Ty2 99Tcm-ECD (2.9% ID). SPECT imaging of cerebral gray and white matter showed good contrast with a clear contour. No toxic side affect in mice and rabbits after 99Tcm-MPBDA injection was found. Conclusion: Investigated 99Tcm-MPBDA has almost the same property as 99Tcm-ECD. It is safe and reliable in vivo

  14. Hybrid graphene/Au activatable theranostic agent for multimodalities imaging guided enhanced photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Guohao; Yang, Kai; Chen, Minglong; Tian, Rui; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has been increasingly investigated. However, there are still challenges in strategies that can further enhance photoconversion efficiency and improve photothermal tumor ablation effect of current nanomaterials. Herein, we developed a fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging guided PTT agent by seeding Gold (Au) nanoparticles onto graphene oxide (GO). Near infrared dye (Cy5.5) labeled-matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) substrate (CP) was conjugated onto the GO/Au complex (GA) forming tumor targeted theranostic probe (CPGA), whereCy5.5 fluorescent signal is quenched by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) capacity from both GO and Au, yet it can boost strong fluorescence signals after degradation by MMP-14. The photothermal effect of GA hybrid was found significantly elevated compared with Au or GO alone. After intravenous administration of CPGA into SCC7 tumor-bearing mice, high fluorescence and PA signals were observed in the tumor area over time, which peaked at the 6 h time point (tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 3.64 ± 0.51 for optical imaging and 2.5 ± 0.27 for PA imaging). The tumors were then irradiated with a laser, and an excellent tumor inhibition was observedwithoutrecurrence. Our studies further encourage applications of the hybrid nanocomposite for image-guided enhanced PTT in biomedical applications, especially in cancer theranostics. PMID:26691399

  15. F-18 Polyethyleneglycol stilbenes as PET imaging agents targeting Aβ aggregates in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a novel series of 18F-labeled polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-stilbene derivatives as potential β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque-specific imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). In these series of compounds, 18F is linked to the stilbene through a PEG chain, of which the number of ethoxy groups ranges from 2 to 5. The purpose of adding PEG groups is to lower the lipophilicity and improve bioavailability. The syntheses of the 'cold' compounds and the 18F-labeled PEG stilbene derivatives are successfully achieved. All of the fluorinated stilbenes displayed high binding affinities in an assay using postmortem AD brain homogenates (K i=2.9-6.7 nM). Labeling was successfully performed by a substitution of the mesylate group of 10a-d by [18F]fluoride giving the target compounds [18F]12a-d (EOS, specific activity, 900-1500 Ci/mmol; radiochemical purity >99%). In vivo biodistribution of these novel 18F ligands in normal mice exhibited excellent brain penetrations and rapid washouts after an intravenous injection (6.6-8.1 and 1.2-2.6% dose/g at 2 and 60 min, respectively). Autoradiography of postmortem AD brain sections of [18F]12a-d confirmed the specific binding related to the presence of Aβ plaques. In addition, in vivo plaque labeling can be clearly demonstrated with these 18F-labeled agents in transgenic mice (Tg2576), a useful animal model for Alzheimer's disease. In conclusion, the preliminary results strongly suggest these fluorinated PEG stilbene derivatives are suitable candidates as Aβ plaque imaging agents for studying patients with Alzheimer's disease

  16. Study on folate receptor PET imaging agent 18F-flurophenethyl folate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is aimed at synthesizing an 18F-labelled folate derivative that can be used as folate-receptor induced tumor PET imaging agent. Under the optimal reaction and testing specification formulated during the cold-labeling experiments, 18F labeling of folic acid was achieved in three steps of 18F pre-labeling,bromination and esterification. The receptor binding property of the newly-synthesized folate radio-derivative was studied through β-lactoglobulin binding test. Tumor-bearing nude mice injected with the new compound were used to study whether the derivative can accumulate within tumor issue. Preliminary studies in vitro and in vivo showed that this new PET agent still possessed receptor binding qualities of folic acid. 18F-flurophenethyl folate remained good affinity and specificity with β-lactoglobulin. Accumulation of activities in tumor tissues was found in tumor-bearing nude mice. A new folate receptor ligand: 18F-flurophenethyl folate was synthesized,with high yield and good stability. Since the pre-labeling method was used, the fluorine labeling was not directly imposed upon folic acid.In this way, the structure destruction, which happens in high temperature reaction of folic acid, can be avoided. The synthesized folate derivative remained the binding structural quality of folic acid and could bind with the folate-binding protein: β-lactoglobulin. Through the folate receptors located on tumor tissues, 18F-flurophenethyl folate accumulated in the tumor tissue, exhibiting its potential as a tumor PET imaging agent. (authors)

  17. A novel functional CT contrast agent for molecular imaging of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Chaudhary, Ahmed; Chmura, Steven J.; Pelizzari, Charles; Rajh, Tijana; Wietholt, Christian; Kurtoglu, Metin; Aydogan, Bulent

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) labeled gold nanoparticle (AuNP-2-DG) as a functionally targeted computed tomography (CT) contrast agent to obtain high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information of tumor in a single CT scan. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were fabricated and were conjugated with 1-DG or 2-DG. 1-DG provides an excellent comparison since it is known to interfere with the ability of the glucose transporter to recognize the sugar moiety. The human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line, A-549, was chosen for the in vitro cellular uptake assay. Three groups of cell samples were incubated with the 1-DG or 2-DG labeled AuNP and the unlabeled AuNP. Following the incubation, the cells were washed with sterile phosphate buffered saline to remove the excess AuNPs and spun using a centrifuge. The cell pellets were imaged using a microCT scanner immediately after the centrifugation. Internalization of AuNP-2-DG is verified using transmission electron microscopy imaging. Significant contrast enhancement in the cell samples incubated with the AuNP-2-DG with respect to the cell samples incubated with the unlabeled AuNP and the AuNP-1-DG was observed in multiple CT slices. Results from our in vitro experiments suggest that the AuNP-2-DG may be used as a functional CT contrast agent to provide high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information in a single CT scan. These results justify further in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the feasibility of using the AuNP-2-DG as a functional CT contrast agent in radiation therapy settings.

  18. A novel functional CT contrast agent for molecular imaging of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) labeled gold nanoparticle (AuNP-2-DG) as a functionally targeted computed tomography (CT) contrast agent to obtain high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information of tumor in a single CT scan. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were fabricated and were conjugated with 1-DG or 2-DG. 1-DG provides an excellent comparison since it is known to interfere with the ability of the glucose transporter to recognize the sugar moiety. The human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line, A-549, was chosen for the in vitro cellular uptake assay. Three groups of cell samples were incubated with the 1-DG or 2-DG labeled AuNP and the unlabeled AuNP. Following the incubation, the cells were washed with sterile phosphate buffered saline to remove the excess AuNPs and spun using a centrifuge. The cell pellets were imaged using a microCT scanner immediately after the centrifugation. Internalization of AuNP-2-DG is verified using transmission electron microscopy imaging. Significant contrast enhancement in the cell samples incubated with the AuNP-2-DG with respect to the cell samples incubated with the unlabeled AuNP and the AuNP-1-DG was observed in multiple CT slices. Results from our in vitro experiments suggest that the AuNP-2-DG may be used as a functional CT contrast agent to provide high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information in a single CT scan. These results justify further in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the feasibility of using the AuNP-2-DG as a functional CT contrast agent in radiation therapy settings.

  19. Preparation of a novel potential perfusion imaging agent and animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To search for a novel potential SPECT cerebral blood flow perfusion imaging agent of our country knowledge property right, and to prove its SPECT cerebral perfusion imaging characteristics by animal studies. Tridentated MBPDA with N2S obtained form chemical synthesis and characterized by IR, 1H, 13C NMR, element analysis and MS, and ECD provided by Shanghai Hongqi Medicinal Factory were labeled with technetium-99m under optional conditions, respectively. Biodistribution in 40 Kung Ming mice was measured at different time points after intravenous injection of 555 ∼ 740 KBq 99Tcm-MBPDA. The uptake percent dose per organ (%ID/organ) and per gram tissue (%ID/g) were calculated. Dynamic imaging of 30 scintigrams at a rate of 2 s/frame 28 at 30 s/frame, and 50 at 60 s/frame using GE Starcam 400 AC/4000i SPECT in 2 monkeys was immediately acquired after rapid injection of 218.3 ∼ 333 MBq of 99Tcm-MBPDA or 99Tcm-ECD, and SPECT monkey whole body and cerebral tomographic imaging were performed at 70 min postinjection, and images were processed and reconstructred to be transverse, coronal and sagittal sections. Acute toxic animal trials using 2 groups of mice (n=5, each group) and apyrogen experiment in 3 rabbits were studied respectively. The radiochemical purity of 99Tcm-MBPDA abd 99Tcm-ECD was more than 95% and 97% Biodistribution results in mice showed high brain uptake and good retention, and the brain uptake percents at 2, 5, 15, 30 and 60 min postinjection were 1.85 ± 0.38, 1.80±0.02, 1.32±0.02, 1.16±0.23, and 1.17±0.05 %ID. Sixty-three point two percent of initial activity remained in brain 60 min postinjection. The blood clearance half time was less than 15 min (6.19±0.07%ID). The brain/blood ratio was 7.3 at 60 min postinjection. The cerebral dynamic blood flow perfusion imaging in monkey demonstrated at 2 min after administration to attain the maximum radioactivity of 99Tcm-MBPDA in the brain. In comparison with activity at 2 min (99Tcm-MBPDA) and 5 min

  20. Preparation and animal studies of 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 as a dopamine transporter imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop 99Tcm labelled dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging agent 99Tcm-(2β-[N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl) ethylenediamin] methyl, 3β-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane (TRODAT-1) for evaluating changes of DAT in patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods: TRODAT-1 was synthesized from cocaine by stepwise reactions adding two aminoethanethiol units. Using SnCl2 as reducing agent, and in the presence of Naglucoheptonate, 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 was prepared. Animal studies have been performed in rats and normal monkeys. Results: The structure of TRODAT-1 was confirmed by IR, 1HNMR and MS. Radiochemical purity of 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 was over 90%, and stable for 24 h at room temperature. The partition coefficient in octanol and buffer was 132 and 154 at pH 7.0 and 7.4 respectively. Biodistribution displayed relatively low uptake in rat brain (0.28 and 0.12% ID/org at 2 min and 60 min post injection, respectively), but high uptake in liver (16.7% ID/organ at 60 min), steady uptake in kidney (maintained 3% ID/organ). The major radioactivity was excreted by hepatobiliary systems. The distribution in rat's brain showed that striatal uptake were 0.193, 0.189, 0.142 and 0.136% ID/g at 2, 30, 60 and 120 min, respectively. The ratios of striatal to cerebellar, striatal to hippocampal and striatal to cortical were 4.45 2.55 and 3.15 at 120 min post injection, respectively. Brain image studies in monkeys indicated that TRODAT was uptake and retained in the basal ganglia, where containing DAT abundantly. Ratio of regional brain uptakes of striatum/cerebellum was 1.56 as measured by SPECT imaging at 120 min. Conclusions: Above results showed the stable, neutral and lipophilic complex 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 can cross the blood brain barrier, and be selectively concentrated by the striatal area, where containing DAT abundantly. High quality images of monkeys were also obtained. It suggested that 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 may be a promising agent for clinical application

  1. Targeting Angiogenesis for Controlling Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Subhasree Roy Choudhury; Surajit Karmakar; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a progressive solid tumor in childhood, continues to be a clinical challenge. It is highly vascular, heterogeneous, and extracranial tumor that originates from neural crest. Angiogenesis, genetic abnormalities, and oncogene amplification are mainly responsible for malignant phenotype of this tumor. Survivability of malignant neuroblastoma patients remains poor despite the use of traditional therapeutic strategies. Angiogenesis is a very common and necessary pre-requisite for tu...

  2. High-resolution wide-field imaging of perfused capillaries without the use of contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson DA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Darin A Nelson1, Zvia Burgansky-Eliash1,2, Hila Barash1, Anat Loewenstein3, Adiel Barak4, Elisha Bartov2, Tali Rock2, Amiram Grinvald51Optical Imaging Ltd, Rehovot, Israel; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Medical Center & Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel; 5Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IsraelPurpose: Assessment of capillary abnormalities facilitates early diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of common retinal pathologies. Injected contrast agents like fluorescein are widely used to image retinal capillaries, but this highly effective procedure has a few disadvantages, such as untoward side effects, inconvenience of injection, and brevity of the time window for clear visualization. The retinal function imager (RFI is a tool for monitoring retinal functions, such as blood velocity and oximetry, based on intrinsic signals. Here we describe the clinical use of hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs as an intrinsic motion-contrast agent in the generation of detailed noninvasive capillary-perfusion maps (nCPMs.Patients and methods: Multiple series of nCPM images were acquired from 130 patients with diabetic retinopathy, vein occlusion, central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, or metabolic syndrome, as well as from 37 healthy subjects. After registration, pixel value distribution parameters were analyzed to locate RBC motion.Results: The RFI yielded nCPMs demonstrating microvascular morphology including capillaries in exquisite detail. Maps from the same subject were highly reproducible in repeated measurements, in as much detail and often better than that revealed by the very best fluorescein angiography. In patients, neovascularization and capillary nonperfusion areas were clearly observed. Foveal avascular

  3. Tissue-specific MR contrast agents. Impact on imaging diagnosis and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    tumor vascularity and precise location. Unfortunately, however, its performance in depicting tumor vascularity was suggested to be less than that of multi detector row CT (MDCT) or dynamic MR using Gd-DTPA. Further investigation is needed to determine the true usefulness of Gd-EOB-DTPA in the imaging diagnosis of liver tumors. A number of other promising tissue-specific contrast agents currently are under development, including blood pool agents, lymphatic or lymph nodal agents, blood vessel wall agents, and so on. We, as radiologists, should keep in mind that the true efficacy and roles of these tissue-specific agents need to be evaluated not only from the viewpoint of diagnostic accuracy but also with reference to their socioeconomic aspects, particularly in this era of the Diagnosis-Related Group/Prospective Payment System. (author)

  4. Trackable and Targeted Phage as Positron Emission Tomography (PET Agent for Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibo Li, Qiaoling Jin, Chiunwei Huang, Siva Dasa, Liaohai Chen, Li-peng Yap, Shuanglong Liu, Hancheng Cai, Ryan Park, Peter S Conti

    2011-01-01

    partially blocked at 1 h time point. Phage-RGD particle was also used as the competitive ligand. In this case, the tumor uptake was significantly reduced and the value was kept at low level consistently. Conclusion: In this report, we constructed a PET trackable nanoplatform based on phage particle and demonstrated the imaging capability of these targeted agents. We also demonstrated that the choice of chelator could have significant impact on imaging results of nano-agents. The method established in this research may be applicable to other receptor/ligand systems for theranostic agent construction, which could have an immediate and profound impact on the field of imaging/therapy and lay the foundation for the construction of next generation cancer specific theranostic agents.

  5. Angiogenesis in female reproductive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Neovascularization, i.e. new blood vessels formation, can be divided into two different processes: vasculogenesis, whereby a primitive vascular network is established during embryogenesis from multipotential mesenchymal progenitors; and angiogenesis, which refers to the new blood vessels formation from pre-existing vessels[1,2]. Angiogenesis contributes to the most process throughout the whole life span from embryonic development to adult growth[2]. In this meaning, neovascularization is usually used to imply angiogenesis. Under physiological condi-tions, angiogenesis is a strictly regulated event and rarely happens in most adult tissues except for fracture or heal-ing of wounds[2,3]. However, a notable phenomenon is that the tissues of ovary and uterine endometrium are unique in the cycle-specific changes in vascularity that occur in each estrous/menstrual cycle. Active angiogenesis occurs in placenta to satisfy the needs of embryonic implantation and development. Defects in angiogenesis are associated with some gynecopathies including luteal phase defect, endometriosis, pregnancy loss and preeclampsia[4].

  6. Mouse Aortic Ring Assay: A New Approach of the Molecular Genetics of Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson Véronique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, a key step in many physiological and pathological processes, involves proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. To study the role of two enzymatic families, serine-proteases and matrix metalloproteases in angiogenesis, we have adapted to the mouse, the aortic ring assay initially developed in the rat. The use of deficient mice allowed us to demonstrate that PAI-1 is essential for angiogenesis while the absence of an MMP, MMP-11, did not affect vessel sprouting. We report here that this model is attractive to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis, to identify, characterise or screen "pro- or anti-angiogenic agents that could be used for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Approaches include using recombinant proteins, synthetic molecules and adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  7. Radiohalogenated 4-anilinoquinazoline-based EGFR-TK inhibitors as potential cancer imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in tumors underlines the recent interest in EGFR as attractive target for the development of new cancer imaging agents. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) based on the anilinoquinazoline scaffold have been explored as potential probes for EGFR imaging. However, up to now, no optimal radiotracer is available. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of three novel halogenated 6-substituted 4-anilinoquinazoline based EGFR-TKIs. Radiosynthesis (125I and 18F) of the corresponding analogues was also performed. Methods: 6a, 6b and 8 were obtained by reaction of 6-amino-4-anilinoquinazoline (5) with 3-/4-iodobenzoyl and 4-fluorobenzoyl chlorides. Inhibition of EGFR autophosphorylation and A431 cellular proliferation were assessed by Western blot and MTT assays. 125I-anilinoquinazolines [125I]6a/b were prepared via destannylation of the corresponding tributylstannyl precursors with [125I]NaI. Cellular uptake studies were conducted in A431 cells. Optimization of the radiosynthesis of the 18F-anilinoquinazoline [18F]8 was attempted by nucleophilic substitution of the trimethylammonium- and nitro-6-substituted 4-anilinoquinazoline precursors. Results: 6a, 6b and 8 were synthesized in high chemical yield. All of them are inhibitors of EGFR autophosphorylation (0.15050125I]6a/b, obtained in high radiochemical purity and specific activity, were highly taken up by A431 cells. Biodistribution profile in mice indicated fast blood clearance and hepatobiliary excretion. Despite all attempts, [18F]8 was only formed in 4% yield, hampering further biological evaluation. Conclusions: This study suggests that these quinazoline derivatives can act as EGFR-TKI, warranting further modifications in the chemical structure in order to be explored as potential molecular imaging agents for single photon emission computerized tomography and positron emission tomography.

  8. 99mTc-Alafosfalin: an antibiotic peptide infection imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolabeled antibiotic peptide 99mTc-alafosfalin was assessed as an infection imaging agent in a rat model by comparison with 99mTc-DTPA and 99mTc-leukocytes. 99mTc-alafosfalin was prepared via an instant cold kit and 99mTc-leukocytes were prepared using 99mTc-stannous fluoride colloid in an ex vivo labeling procedure of whole blood. In separate experiments, the three radiotracers were administered to rats infected with staphylococcus aureus. Quantitative biodistribution studies were performed as well as scintigraphic images and histopathology. 99mTc-alafosfalin is a stable product, obtained in high radiochemical purity (>95%). This agent was mainly renally excreted, with low liver, spleen and bone uptake, and resulted in a mean ratio of infected/non-infected thighs of 4.3/1.0 at 4 hr post radiotracer injection. 99mTc-DTPA gave a corresponding ratio of 1.9/1.0 and 99mTc-leukocytes gave 20.0/1.0 at the same time point. An in vitro assay found the level of 99mTc-alafosfalin binding to staphylococcus aureas higher than 99mTc-DTPA (10% versus 1% respectively). 99mTc-alafosfalin accumulates at sites of infection in a rat model better than the perfusion molecule 99mTc-DTPA, yet less than 99mTc-leukocytes. The distribution characteristics of this 99mTc-antibiotic peptide would be an advantage in imaging abdominal and soft tissue infection

  9. The preclinical pharmacological study of dopamine transporter imaging agent 18F-FP-β-CIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaomin; CHEN Zhengping; WANG Songpei; TANG Jie; LIN Yansong; ZHU Zhaohui; FANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    The paper is to study pharmacologic characteristics of 18F-FP-β-CIT (18F-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2β- carbomethoxy-3β- (4-iodophenyl)nortropane) as an imaging agent for dopamine transporter. The radiochemical purity of 18F-FP-β-CIT in aqueous solution was over 95% after standing at room temperature for 4h. Biodistribution displayed rapid uptake in rat brain (1.375 %ID/organ at 5min and 0.100 %ID/organ at 180 min) and the striatal uptake was 1.444,0.731, 0.397, 0.230 and 0.146 %ID/g at 5, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min, respectively. The values of striatum/cerebellum,striatum/frontal cortex and striatum / hippocampus in rat's brain at 30 min were 3.38, 2.17 and 2.40 respectively. The uptake in striatum can be blocked by β-CFT, suggesting that 18F-FP-β-CIT binds to DAT peculiarly. The compound was rapidly cleared from monkey's blood. The striatal uptake was bilaterally decreased in the left-sided lesioned PD rats, compared with normal control. Brain PET imaging studies in normal monkey showed that 18F-FP-β-CIT was concentrated in striatum. The test of undue toxicity showed that the dose received by mice was 1250 times as by human, which indicates that 18F-FP-β-CIT is very safe. So 18F-FP-β-CIT is a promising PET imaging agent for DAT with safety and validity.

  10. Synthesis and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of biocompatible branched copolymer nanocontrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson AW

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander W Jackson,1,* Prashant Chandrasekharan,2,* Jian Shi,3 Steven P Rannard,4 Quan Liu,5 Chang-Tong Yang,6 Tao He1,7 1Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (ICES, 2Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A* STAR, 3Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; 5School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 7School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, HeFei University of Technology, Anhui, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Branched copolymer nanoparticles (Dh =20–35 nm possessing 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid macrocycles within their cores have been synthesized and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI nanosized contrast agents in vivo. These nanoparticles have been generated from novel functional monomers via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The process is very robust and synthetically straightforward. Chelation with gadolinium and preliminary in vivo experiments have demonstrated promising characteristics as MRI contrast agents with prolonged blood retention time, good biocompatibility, and an intravascular distribution. The ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively target tumor cells through the enhanced permeability and retention effect is also demonstrated. These novel highly functional nanoparticle platforms have succinimidyl ester-activated benzoate functionalities within their corona, which make them suitable for future peptide conjugation and subsequent active cell-targeted MRI or the conjugation of fluorophores for bimodal imaging. We have also demonstrated that these branched copolymer nanoparticles are able to noncovalently

  11. The effect of a gadolinium-based contrast agent on diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate in detail the effect of gadolinium contrast on diffusion tensor imaging scans. As the present literature offers conflicting results, we have included a large selection of indices in the analysis. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients harboring an intra-axial contrast enhancing brain tumor were included in this study. Two diffusion tensor imaging scans were performed—one natively, and the second following a gadolinium contrast agent application. Maps of the invariant indices fractional anisotropy (FA), linear, planar, and spherical indices, trace, eigenvalues λ1, λ2, λ3 as well as of the components of the diffusion tensor matrix Dxx, Dyy, Dzz, Dxy, Dxz and Dyz were co-registered and compared statistically with matching ROI pairs in the contrast enhancing areas, peritumoral edema and the normal appearing white matter. Results: We have observed a significant increase in the FA and disproportional decrease of the eigenvalues in the post-contrast scans. In accordance with these findings, the spherical index was decreased and the linear and planar indices were increased. There was a significant decrease of all diagonal components of the diffusion tensor matrix. These changes have been strongest in the contrast enhancing areas, but there were also significant changes in the peritumoral edema and the normal appearing white matter. Conclusion: Diffusion tensor imaging scans performed after gadolinium contrast agent administration may display artificially increased FA values due to disproportional changes of the measured eigenvalues. The distortion of the diffusion measurement is strongest in, but not limited to the contrasting areas.

  12. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  13. Micro-CT Based Experimental Liver Imaging Using a Nanoparticulate Contrast Agent: A Longitudinal Study in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Boll, Hanne; Nittka, Stefanie; Doyon, Fabian; Neumaier, Michael; Marx, Alexander; Kramer, Martin; Groden, Christoph; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Micro-CT imaging of liver disease in mice relies on high soft tissue contrast to detect small lesions like liver metastases. Purpose of this study was to characterize the localization and time course of contrast enhancement of a nanoparticular alkaline earth metal-based contrast agent (VISCOVER ExiTron nano) developed for small animal liver CT imaging. Methodology ExiTron nano 6000 and ExiTron nano 12000, formulated for liver/spleen imaging and angiography, respectively, were intra...

  14. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent. (paper)

  15. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tanveer [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan (Pakistan); Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Ilsu, E-mail: ilrhee@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook [Division of Science Education, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University and Hospital, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Derac [Department of Physics, Hannam University, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T{sub 1}-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T{sub 2}-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents for MRI by measuring T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} effects were also observed in animal experimentation.

  16. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  17. Radiolabelling and evaluation of a novel sulfoxide as a PET imaging agent for tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [18F]FMISO is the most widely validated PET radiotracer for imaging hypoxic tissue. However, as a result of the pharmacokinetics of [18F]FMISO a 2 h wait between tracer administration and patient scanning is required for optimal image acquisition. In order to develop hypoxia imaging agents with faster kinetics, we have synthesised and evaluated several F-18 labelled anilino sulfoxides. In this manuscript we report on the synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel fluoroethyltriazolyl propargyl anilino sulfoxide. The radiolabelling of the novel tracer was achieved via 2-[18F]fluoroethyl azide click chemistry. Radiochemical yields were 23 ± 4% based on 2-[18F]fluoroethyl azide and 7 ± 2% based on K[18F]F. The radiotracer did not undergo metabolism or defluorination in an in vitro assay using S9 liver fractions. Imaging studies using SK-RC-52 tumors in BALB/c nude mice have indicated that the tracer may have a higher pO2 threshold than [18F]FMISO for uptake in hypoxic tumors. Although clearance from muscle was faster than [18F]FMISO, uptake in hypoxic tumors was slower. The average tumor to muscle ratio at 2 h post injection in large, hypoxic tumors with a volume greater than 686 mm3 was 1.7, which was similar to the observed ratio of 1.75 for [18F]FMISO. Although the new tracer showed improved pharmacokinetics when compared with the previously synthesised sulfoxides, further modifications to the chemical structure need to be made in order to offer significant in vivo imaging advantages over [18F]FMISO

  18. Quantitative analysis of lung perfusion using contrast agent-supported dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging allows the non-invasive determination of regional pulmonary perfusion with T1-weighted imaging sequences. The regional pulmonary blood flow rPBF, regional pulmonary blood volume rPBV and regional mean transit time rMTT are quantified based on the first pass of a contrast agent bolus through the lung Parenchyma and the indicator dilution theory. In this work the Tikhonov-regularization method was used with a modified version of the L-curve-criterion MLCC and with the residue function model RFM in order to quantify the lung perfusion for each image voxels. Both methods were compared to the standard method truncated singular value decomposition tSVD using simulated and real data sets of healthy volunteers and patients. tSVD yields the most precise results for rPBF, rMTT and rPBV. For instance, the standard deviation of rPBF was about 37% and 48% smaller than that of MLCC and RFM for typical lung perfusion parameters. In contrast Tikhonov regularization, the tSVD solution curves are often over- or underregularized. Moreover, they deviate stronger from their true curve up to 42%. Concerning the determined rPBF values, MLCC was more precise than RFM in the simulations at SNR < 30. A clear delineation of normal and pathological lung tissue was possible using all considered methods on the calculated parameter maps. Especially for patient data sets, the Tikhonov regularization yielded the most detailed parameter maps. In contrast to MLCC, RFM did not yield erroneous single voxels with very high rPBF values above 300 ml/min·100ml in regions of low rPBF values smaller than 20 ml/min·100ml. The range of validity of the linear relation between MR-Signal and contrast agent concentration (e. g. Magnevist) was investigated. For a TWIST-sequence with typical parameters used in clinical routine, the linear range is present up to a contrast agent concentration of 1 mmol/l. In the simulations, a CA-concentration in the pulmonary

  19. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  20. 3-iodobenzylamine conjugate of 2-nitroimidazole, a new potential hypoxia imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different analogs of 2-nitroimidazole, including misonidazole, have been reported to have a radiosensitizing effect and when radiolabeled, useful for imaging hypoxic tissue. Recently, 4-fluorobenzylamine conjugate of 2-nitroimidazole was proposed as a suitable PET hypoxia imaging agent. The authors, therefore, synthesized the 3-iodo counterpart of this compound for use in planar imaging. 1-(2-nitroimidazol)-acetyl-3-iodoobenzylamide (NAIB), was synthesized by first reacting 3-iodobenzylamine and bromoacetylbromide. The product was then reacted with 2-nitroimidazole. The final product was purified and identified by Mass Spectroscopy (MS), NMR, and Microanalysis which showed C37.26, H2.92, and N14.26%; calculated for C12H11IN4O3: C37.30, H2.85, and N14.51%. Radioiodine exchange failed using all reported methods. However, a modification of the solid state exchange method was highly successful, yielding more than 95% radioiodine exchange, even when a very small amount of cold precursor was used to obtain a high specific-activity product

  1. Visualising and quantifying angiogenesis in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jakobsen, Anders; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumour growth and dissemination. We have recently shown that blood vessel density, determined by image analysis based on microRNA-126 (miRNA-126) in situ hybridization (ISH) in the primary tumours of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC), is predictive of...

  2. Generation of superparamagnetic liposomes revealed as highly efficient MRI contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Marie-Sophie; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Ménager, Christine; Clément, Olivier; Barratt, Gillian; Grabielle-Madelmont, Cécile; Gazeau, Florence; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2005-08-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanocrystals stable at neutral pH and in isotonic aqueous media were synthesized and encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) and distearoyl-SN-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(poly(ethylene glycol))-2000] (DSPE-PEG(2000), 5 mol %), formed by film hydration coupled with sequential extrusion. The nonentrapped particles were removed by flash gel exclusion chromatography. The magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were homogeneous in size (195 +/- 33 hydrodynamic diameters from quasi-elastic light scattering). Iron loading was varied from 35 up to 167 Fe(III)/lipid mol %. Physical and superparamagnetic characteristics of the iron oxide particles were preserved after liposome encapsulation as shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and magnetization curve recording. In biological media, MFLs were highly stable and avoided ferrofluid flocculation while being nontoxic toward the J774 macrophage cell line. Moreover, steric stabilization ensured by PEG-surface-grafting significantly reduced liposome association with the macrophages. The ratios of the transversal (r2) and longitudinal (r1) magnetic resonance (MR) relaxivities of water protons in MFL dispersions (6 < r2/r1 < 18) ranked them among the best T2 contrast agents, the higher iron loading the better the T2 contrast enhancement. Magnetophoresis demonstrated the possible guidance of MFLs by applying a magnetic field gradient. Mouse MR imaging assessed MFLs efficiency as contrast agents in vivo: MR angiography performed 24 h after intravenous injection of the contrast agent provided the first direct evidence of the stealthiness of PEG-ylated magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes. PMID:16045355

  3. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Primary study of a novel Tc-tricarbonyl cocaine analogue as the potential DAT imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaobo; ZHU Lin; DING Shaoke; LIU Boli

    2005-01-01

    The convenient preparation of organometallic precursor fac-[99mTc(CO)3 (H2O)3]+ opens a new route to design new radiopharmaceuticals. Based on this precursor, a new cocaine analogue, Tropyn, is designed and synthesized, and "2+1" mixed-ligands approach is used to prepare a neutral complex [99mTc(CO)3(Tropyn)I]. Biodistribution in mice and rats proves that it has sufficient brain uptake. Rat regional brain biodistribution indicates that the complex is highly concentrated in the striatum (ST) with rapid clearance in the cortex (CT) and hippocampus (HP), which make it valuable for further investigation as the potential Second-Generation DAT imaging agent.

  5. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T2) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g·s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics

  6. Synthesis and 131I labelling of epidepride as a dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S-(-)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-iodo-2, 3-dimethoxybenzamide (Epidepride) and its iodine labeling precursor S-(-)-N-[(1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-tributyltin-2, 3-dimethoxybenzamide are synthesized from 3-methoxy salicylic acid. The labeling precursor is labeled with 131I by hydrogen peroxide method, and 131I-epidepride is gained, its radiolabelling yield (RLY) and the radiochemical purity (RCP) are all over 95%. The RCP of 131I-epidepride is over 90% under 4 degree C after 15 days. 131I-epidepride has high affinity to dopamine D2 receptor. The striatal uptake can be blocked completely by spiperone. The striatum and cerebellum uptake ratio can reach 237 at 320 min in rats. The results show that 131I-epidepride may be used as a dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent for SPECT

  7. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongalsky, M. B., E-mail: mgongalsky@gmail.com; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perepukhov, A. M.; Maximychev, A. V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, M. V. [Research Center for MRI and MRS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, A. N. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pirogov, Yu. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Center for MRI and MRS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T{sub 1}) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g·s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  8. [18F]-labeled 2-methoxyphenylpiperazine derivative as a potential brain positron emission tomography imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the synthesis and characterization of N-(3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzamide ([18F]MPP3F). The total reaction time for [18F]MPP3F, including final high-performance liquid chromatography purification, was about 3 h. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yield was 18.4±3.1%. The radiochemical purity was >98%. Biodistribution in mice showed that [18F]MPP3F is a potential brain imaging agent for positron emission tomography. The brain uptake of [18F]MPP3F was 6.59±0.77% Injected Dose/g at 2 min post-injection time. A brain-to-blood ratio of 3.67 was reached at 15 min after injection.

  9. Technetium-99m-dimethylglyoxime ([sup 99m]Tc-DMG) as renal imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonaylo, V.N. (Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas); Stahl, Adriana; Pomilio, A.B.; Vitale, A.A. (Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales); Canellas, C.O. (Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1993-06-01

    Dimethylglyoxime (DMG) labelled with [sup 99m]Tc is presented as a renal imaging agent. The behaviour of this complex was analysed at different pH by means of UV spectral data and using DMG-calcium chloride as a reference complex. Biokinetic data were evaluated in two biological models, Sprague-Dawley rats and Didelphis albiventris argentine opossum. Biodistribution in rats demonstrated fast and specific renal excretion. Time-activity values over both kidneys could be quantified for this complex. Renographic studies led to mean time-to maximum values on twelve assays of 2.0 [+-] 0.1 min and a mean relative function of 53.0 [+-] 2.3 and 47.0 [+-] 3.2 for right and left kidneys, respectively. [sup 99m]Tc-DMG showed specificity for the renal excretion pathway and therefore seems to be a very useful radiopharmaceutical for renal function studies. (Author).

  10. Technetium-99m-dimethylglyoxime (99mTc-DMG) as renal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimethylglyoxime (DMG) labelled with 99mTc is presented as a renal imaging agent. The behaviour of this complex was analysed at different pH by means of UV spectral data and using DMG-calcium chloride as a reference complex. Biokinetic data were evaluated in two biological models, Sprague-Dawley rats and Didelphis albiventris argentine opossum. Biodistribution in rats demonstrated fast and specific renal excretion. Time-activity values over both kidneys could be quantified for this complex. Renographic studies led to mean time-to maximum values on twelve assays of 2.0 ± 0.1 min and a mean relative function of 53.0 ± 2.3 and 47.0 ± 3.2 for right and left kidneys, respectively. 99mTc-DMG showed specificity for the renal excretion pathway and therefore seems to be a very useful radiopharmaceutical for renal function studies. (Author)

  11. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of 99mTc-carboxymethylthioethyl iminodiacetic acid as renal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ligand carboxymethylthioethyl iminodiacetic acid (CMT-IDA), an analogue of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) has been radiolabeled with technetium-99m to study its renal clearance and determine its potential as a renal tubular imaging agent. (99mTc(CO)3CMT-IDA)2- could be obtained in >98% radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC. Stability, hydrophilicity and plasma protein binding studies were carried out and were found to be comparable to that of (99mTc(CO)3NTA)2-. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal Swiss mice at 10 min. p.i. and 2 h.p.i. The complex has shown renal clearance of (71.0±5.9)% ID at 10 min. p.i., which increased to (84.1±10.6)% at 2 h.p.i., with no major uptake in vital organs. (author)

  12. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Demonstration of a sucrose-derived contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of the GI tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gary V; Navath, Suryakiran; Sewda, Kamini; Rao, Venkataramanarao; Foroutan, Parastou; Alleti, Ramesh; Moberg, Valerie E; Ahad, Ali M; Coppola, Domenico; Lloyd, Mark C; Gillies, Robert J; Morse, David L; Mash, Eugene A

    2013-04-01

    A scaffold bearing eight terminal alkyne groups was synthesized from sucrose, and copies of an azide-terminated Gd-DOTA complex were attached via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The resulting contrast agent (CA) was administered by gavage to C3H mice. Passage of the CA through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was followed by T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a period of 47h, by which time the CA had exited the GI tract. No evidence for leakage of the CA from the GI tract was observed. Thus, a new, orally administered CA for MRI of the GI tract has been developed and successfully demonstrated. PMID:23481651

  14. Aptamer-Modified Temperature-Sensitive Liposomal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kunchi; Liu, Min; Tong, Xiaoyan; Sun, Na; Zhou, Lu; Cao, Yi; Wang, Jine; Zhang, Hailu; Pei, Renjun

    2015-09-14

    A novel aptamer modified thermosensitive liposome was designed as an efficient magnetic resonance imaging probe. In this paper, Gd-DTPA was encapsulated into an optimized thermosensitive liposome (TSL) formulation, followed by conjugation with AS1411 for specific targeting against tumor cells that overexpress nucleolin receptors. The resulting liposomes were extensively characterized in vitro as a contrast agent. As-prepared TSLs-AS1411 had a diameter about 136.1 nm. No obvious cytotoxicity was observed from MTT assay, which illustrated that the liposomes exhibited excellent biocompatibility. Compared to the control incubation at 37 °C, the liposomes modified with AS1411 exhibited much higher T1 relaxivity in MCF-7 cells incubated at 42 °C. These data indicate that the Gd-encapsulated TSLs-AS1411 may be a promising tool in early cancer diagnosis. PMID:26212580

  15. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongalsky, M. B.; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T2) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g.s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  16. Fluorescent Heterodoped Nanotetrapods as Synergistically Enhancing Positive and Negative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Alipour, A; Soran-Erdem, Z; Kelestemur, Y; Aykut, Z G; Demir, H V

    2016-05-18

    In this work, we report Mn-Fe heterodoped ZnSe tetrapod nanocrystals (NCs) synthesized to synergistically enhance contrast in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed NCs were prepared using a customized heteroarchitecture such that the manganese (Mn) is confined in the core and iron (Fe) in the branches of the tetrapods. The elemental composition and profile of these NCs were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Photoluminescence quantum yield of these heterodoped NCs in water is ∼30%. Magnetic measurements reveal the simultaneous presence of superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior in these NCs because of the coexistence of Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) dopants. Their potential as simultaneous positive and negative MRI contrast agents was demonstrated by relaxivity measurements and in vivo MRI. From the in vivo studies, we also found that these NCs (with a hydrodynamic diameter of 20 nm) are excreted from the body within 24 h after the injection. Therefore, these heterodoped tetrapods NCs, while being fluorescent and safe, hold great future as a synergistically enhancing dual-modal MRI contrast agent. PMID:27139918

  17. The Renal Problems in X-Ray Based Imaging Techniques Using lodinated Radiographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Andreucci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iodinated radiographic contrast agents (IRCA are pharmaceuticals commonly used for improving the visibility of internal organs and structures in X-ray based imaging techniques such as radiography, angiography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans, and for performing cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions. Like all other pharmaceuticals, however, these agents are not completely devoid of risk. The main risk is their nephrotoxicity. Following the description of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy (CIN and its pathogenesis, the conditions favoring the development of CIN are discussed in depth. The main predisposing condition is a pre-existing renal impairment, particularly when associated with diabetes mellitus. Then, measures to prevent CIN are suggested. The important rules in CIN prevention are: monitoring renal function, discontinuation of potentially nephrotoxic drugs, use of either iodixanol or iopamidol at the lowest dosage possible. Above all, the main procedure for prevention of CIN is an adequate hydration of the patient with either isotonic sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate solutions.

  18. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  19. A targeted nanoglobular contrast agent from host-guest self-assembly for MR cancer molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Han, Zhen; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    The clinical application of nanoparticular Gd(III) based contrast agents for tumor molecular MRI has been hindered by safety concerns associated with prolonged tissue retention, although they can produce strong tumor enhancement. In this study, a targeted well-defined cyclodextrin-based nanoglobular contrast agent was developed through self-assembly driven by host-guest interactions for safe and effective cancer molecular MRI. Multiple β-cyclodextrins attached POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane) nanoglobule was used as host molecule. Adamantane-modified macrocyclic Gd(III) contrast agent, cRGD (cyclic RGDfK peptide) targeting ligand and fluorescent probe was used as guest molecules. The targeted host-guest nanoglobular contrast agent cRGD-POSS-βCD-(DOTA-Gd) specifically bond to αvβ3 integrin in malignant 4T1 breast tumor and provided greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding non-targeted agent. The agent also provided significant fluorescence signal in tumor tissue. The histological analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed its specific and effective targeting to αvβ3 integrin. The targeted imaging agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular MR and fluorescent imaging. PMID:26874280

  20. Glipizide, an antidiabetic drug, suppresses tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Cuiling; Zhou, Qin; Li, Bin; Yang, Yang; Cao, Liu; Ye, Yuxiang; Li, Jiangchao; Ding, Yi; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jintao; He, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qianqian; Lan, Tian; Kenneth Ka Ho, Lee; Li, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is involved in the development, progression and metastasis of various human cancers. Herein, we report the discovery of glipizide, a widely used drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, as a promising anticancer agent through the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. By high-throughput screening (HTS) of an FDA approved drug library utilizing our in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and yolk sac membrane (YSM) models, glipizide has been identified to significantly inhibit bl...

  1. Biological evaluation of 99mTC cis-Pt iminoacetic acid complexes as tumour imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodistributions of three new 99mTc labelled cis-platinum bifunctional tumour imaging agents were examined in mice bearing a certain type of sarcoma between 15 minutes and 24 hours post injection. The three complexes were excreted primarily via the renal pathway into the urine but at quite different rates. All complexes had some affinity for the tumour, but complexes III had the greatest, with tumour to blood and tumour to muscle rates at 24 hours in excess of 10:1 and 18:1. Biodistribution results were calculated using Tiscon Program. Suggesting that the three complexes may be useful as tumour imaging agents. (M.E.L.)

  2. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Qing Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs.

  3. Radiolabeled biomolecules for early cancer detection and therapy via angiogenesis targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouziotis, P. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece)]. E-mail: pennybil@yahoo.gr; Psimadas, D. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece): Biomedica Life Sciences SA, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Fani, M. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece): Biomedica Life Sciences SA, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Gourni, E. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece); Loudos, G. [Biomedical Simulations and Imaging Laboratory, N.T.U.A., Athens, Hellas (Greece); Xanthopoulos, S. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece); Archimandritis, S.C. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece); Varvarigou, A.D. [Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , 153 10 Athens, Hellas (Greece)

    2006-12-20

    Tumors cannot grow or metastasize without the formation of new blood vessels, i.e. without angiogenesis. A variety of anti-angiogenic agents leading to angiogenesis inhibition are in the clinical trial phase, among which are: (i) molecules which inhibit the action of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors, VEGF and (ii) molecules which obstruct migration, differentiation and proliferation of endothelial cells, via their binding to receptors of the {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrins. Certain derivatives of the abovementioned categories, labeled with radionuclides, which emit {gamma}-radiation or {beta}-particles or positrons, have been proposed and are being evaluated as possible radiopharmaceuticals, for the detection and/or treatment of primary or metastatic cancer at an early stage. For the study of angiogenesis the following have been described: (a) antibodies targeting VEGF, labeled with radionuclides emitting {beta}- and/or {gamma}-radiation, which can be applied for the diagnosis and, possibly, for the treatment of cancer (b) peptide derivatives which contain the amino-acid sequence RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and compete for the {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrins, with the proteins of the stroma. It has been found that these radiolabeled biomolecules localize in tumors and can be used for the visualization and, possibly, for tumor eradication of primary and metastatic cancer. In our laboratory radiolabeling of biomolecules by beta and/or gamma emitters is a principal research goal. In the present work we are presenting our results on the labeling of monoclonal antibodies and peptides with {beta}- and {gamma}-emitting isotopes, as well as on their in vivo evaluation in experimental animal models, by use of specially dedicated imaging devices.

  4. Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Nanoparticles as Fluorophore-Free Contrast Agents for Multicolor Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the fabrication of self-assembled polyelectrolyte nanoparticles that provide a multicolor optical imaging modality. Poly(γ-glutamic acid(γ-PGA formed self-assembled nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions with two different cationic polymers: poly(L-lysine(PLL and chitosan. The self-assembled γ-PGA/PLL and γ-PGA/chitosan nanoparticles were crosslinked by glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking of the ionic self-assembled nanoparticles with glutaraldehyde not only stabilized the nanoparticles but also generated a strong autofluorescence signal. Fluorescent Schiff base bonds (C=N and double bonds (C=C were generated simultaneously by crosslinking of the amine moiety of the cationic polyelectrolytes with monomeric glutaraldehyde or with polymeric glutaraldehyde. The unique optical properties of the nanoparticles that resulted from the crosslinking by glutaraldehyde were analyzed using UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observed that the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles could be regulated by adjusting the crosslinker concentration and the reaction time. The nanoparticles also exhibited high performance in the labeling and monitoring of therapeutic immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells. These self-assembled nanoparticles are expected to be a promising multicolor optical imaging contrast agent for the labeling, detection, and monitoring of cells.

  5. Preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of 99Tcm-TADP as bone imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xiaohong; LUO Shineng; NIU Guosai; YE Wanzhong; YANG Min; WANG Hongyong; XIA Yongmei

    2008-01-01

    TADP, 2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid, was synthesized by three step reactions from the raw material 1H-1,2,4-triazole. 99Tcm-TADP was prepared with 5 mg TADP at Ph 7.0 by joining 99TcmO4 with SnCl2·2H2O in aqueous solution for 10 min at room temperature. Both labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99Tcm-TADP were more than 95%. The biodistribution in rats and bone scan in rabbits were also studied. The uptake of organ was expressed as %ID/g. The results showed that the bone uptake is up to 17.17%ID/g which is the maximum of bone uptake at 30 min after injection of 99Tcm-TADP in rats, bone-to-muscle and bone-to-blood uptake ratios were 61.32 and 13.21, respectively. The clear bone image of rabbit was obtained at 120 min after injection of 99Tcm-TADP and clearance in soft tissue was visible. The preparation of 99Tcm-TADP was convenient and 99Tcm-TADP exhibited high uptake in bone, and it would be a potential new bone imaging agent.

  6. sup(99m)Tc-labelled Cu(I)-EHDP, a potential skeletal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP has been prepared with high labelling yield applying for the first time the method of instantly formed cuprous ions in the mixture. A gelchromatography column scanning technique has been to study the sup(99m)Tc fractions in the preparation. The study of the influence of pH-value on the amount of sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP fraction shows that pH 1.6-1.7 gave the best labelling results. The formation rate of sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP complex with a high labelling yield was fast and achieved within a few mins. This suggests the reduction of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate to Tc (IV). The final preparation was found stable for at least 4 hrs after mixing the reactants with the sup(99m)Tc-eluate. Comparative biokinetic studies of sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP and sup(99m)Tc-Sn-EHDP in rabbits and mice showed a high bone uptake and fast elimination of sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP from the skeleton. No significant difference was found in the plasma protein binding of sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP and sup(99m)Tc-Sn-EHDP in rats as assessed by the GCS-technique. Radionuclide imaging in rabbits, using a gamma camera, showed sup(99m)Tc-Cu-EHDP to be a good bone-imaging agent. (orig.)

  7. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC.

  8. New radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor tracers as potential tumor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have demonstrated a positive correlation between tumor progression and expression of extracellular proteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-2 and MMP-9 have become attractive targets for cancer research because of their increased expression in human malignant tumor tissues of various organs, providing a target for medical imaging techniques. Radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitors 2-(4'-[123I]iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-propionic acid (9) and 2-(4'-[123I]iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-propionamide (11) were synthesized by electrophilic aromatic substitution of the tributylstannyl derivatives and resulted in radiochemical yields of 60% ± 5% (n = 3) and 70% ± 5% (n = 6), respectively. In vitro zymography and enzyme assays showed high inhibition capacities of the inhibitors on gelatinases. In vivo biodistribution showed no long-term accumulation in organs and the possibility to accumulate in the tumor. These results warrant further studies of radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers as potential SPECT tumor imaging agents

  9. New radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor tracers as potential tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.oltenfreiter@rug.ac.be; Staelens, Ludovicus; Lejeune, Annabelle; Dumont, Filip; Frankenne, Francis; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Slegers, Guido

    2004-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a positive correlation between tumor progression and expression of extracellular proteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-2 and MMP-9 have become attractive targets for cancer research because of their increased expression in human malignant tumor tissues of various organs, providing a target for medical imaging techniques. Radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitors 2-(4'-[{sup 123}I]iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-propionic acid (9) and 2-(4'-[{sup 123}I]iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-propionamide (11) were synthesized by electrophilic aromatic substitution of the tributylstannyl derivatives and resulted in radiochemical yields of 60% {+-} 5% (n = 3) and 70% {+-} 5% (n = 6), respectively. In vitro zymography and enzyme assays showed high inhibition capacities of the inhibitors on gelatinases. In vivo biodistribution showed no long-term accumulation in organs and the possibility to accumulate in the tumor. These results warrant further studies of radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers as potential SPECT tumor imaging agents.

  10. Ginseng Metabolites on Cancer Chemoprevention: An Angiogenesis Link?

    OpenAIRE

    Chong-Zhi Wang; Yi Cai; Samantha Anderson; Chun-Su Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been introduced for the treatment of cancer. Based on the fact that many anticancer agents have been developed from botanical sources, there is a significant untapped resource to be found in natural products. American ginseng is a commonly used herbal medicine in the U.S., which possesses antioxidant properties. After oral ingestion, natural ginseng saponins are biotransformed to their metabolites by the ent...

  11. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  12. In vivo PET imaging of beta-amyloid deposition in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease with a high specific activity PET imaging agent [18F]flutemetamol

    OpenAIRE

    Snellman, Anniina; Rokka, Johanna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Eskola, Olli; Salmona, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Scheinin, Mika; Solin, Olof; Rinne, Juha O; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the applicability of 18F-labelled amyloid imaging positron emission tomography (PET) agent [18F]flutemetamol to detect changes in brain beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in vivo in APP23, Tg2576 and APPswe-PS1dE9 mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. We expected that the high specific activity of [18F]flutemetamol would make it an attractive small animal Aβ imaging agent. Methods: [18F]flutemetamol uptake in the m...

  13. Radioiodination of central nerves system dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent. IBZM preparation and preclinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study preparation of central nerves system dopamine D2 imaging agent 131I-IBZM and its preclinical investigation, peracetic acid was used as the oxidant for preparing radioiodinated 125I-IBZM and 131I-IBZM, D2 binding properties of IBZM were examined by in vitro binding saturation analysis, rat whole body and regional brain biodistribution, rat brain autoradiography and rabbit SPECT static imaging, etc. The results are: 1. The radiolabelling yields of 125I-IBZM and 131I-IBZM were 84.18% +- 3.06% and 78.50% +- 3.47%. The radiochemical purity were over 95% after being isolated by HPLC; and were over 90% after being isolated by organic extraction. 2. Scatchard plot of D2 receptor saturation binding analysis showed: Kd = 0.53 +- 0.06 nmol/L, Bmax = 466.45 +- 45.88 fmol/mg protein. 3. The rat brain autoradiography and analysis showed that there was high 125I-IBZM uptake in striatal area 2 hr after injection, the striatal/cerebellum ratio was 6.22 +- 0.48; the high 125-IBZM uptake can be blocked by haloperidol--a special dopamine D2 receptor antagonist. 4. 131I-IBZM rat biodistribution and rabbit SPECT planar imaging showed good initial brain uptake and retention, the initial uptake of rat brain was 1.893 +- 0.147% ID/g at 2 min and 1.044 +- 0.135% ID/g at 60 min. The results showed that the radioiodinated IBZM had high affinity, saturation and specificity to rat's and rabbit's central nerves system dopamine D2 receptors

  14. Preparation and evaluation of 68Ga-ECC as a PET renal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a gallium-68-labeled renal tracer can be a good substitute for Tc-99m, a known SPECT tracer. In this study, effort was made to develop 68Ga-ethylenecysteamine cysteine (68Ga-ECC). Ga-ECC was prepared using generator-based 68GaCl3 and ethylenecysteamine cysteine (ECC) at optimized conditions. Stability of the complex was checked in human serum followed by partition coefficient determination of the tracer. The biodistribution of the tracer in rats was studied using tissue counting and PET/CT imaging up to 120 min. Ga-ECC was prepared at optimized conditions in 15 min at 90 °C (radiochemical purity ≈97 ± 0.88 % ITLC, >99 % HPLC, specific activity: 210 ± 5 GBq/mM). 68Ga-ECC was a water-soluble complex based on partition coefficient data (log P; −1.378) and was stable in the presence of human serum for 2 h at 37 °C. The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated high kidney excretion of the tracer in 10–20 min. The SUVmax ratios of the liver to left kidney were 0.38 and 0.39 for 30 and 90 min, respectively, indicating high kidney uptake. Initial biodistribution results showed significant kidney and urinary excretion of the tracer comparable to that of the homologous 99mTc compound. The complex could be a possible PET kidney imaging agent with a fast imaging time

  15. Preparation and evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-ECC as a PET renal imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizaei, Alireza; Jaililan, Amir Reza; Mazidi, Mohammad; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Yousefnia, Hassan; Shabani, Gholamli; Ardaneh, Khosro [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geramifar, Patham; Beiki, Davood [Research Center for Nuclear Medicine, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Development of a gallium-68-labeled renal tracer can be a good substitute for Tc-99m, a known SPECT tracer. In this study, effort was made to develop {sup 68}Ga-ethylenecysteamine cysteine ({sup 68}Ga-ECC). Ga-ECC was prepared using generator-based {sup 68}GaCl3 and ethylenecysteamine cysteine (ECC) at optimized conditions. Stability of the complex was checked in human serum followed by partition coefficient determination of the tracer. The biodistribution of the tracer in rats was studied using tissue counting and PET/CT imaging up to 120 min. Ga-ECC was prepared at optimized conditions in 15 min at 90 °C (radiochemical purity ≈97 ± 0.88 % ITLC, >99 % HPLC, specific activity: 210 ± 5 GBq/mM). {sup 68}Ga-ECC was a water-soluble complex based on partition coefficient data (log P; −1.378) and was stable in the presence of human serum for 2 h at 37 °C. The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated high kidney excretion of the tracer in 10–20 min. The SUV{sub max} ratios of the liver to left kidney were 0.38 and 0.39 for 30 and 90 min, respectively, indicating high kidney uptake. Initial biodistribution results showed significant kidney and urinary excretion of the tracer comparable to that of the homologous {sup 99m}Tc compound. The complex could be a possible PET kidney imaging agent with a fast imaging time.

  16. Release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelet alpha granules: modulation of physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M.; Markens, Beth A.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    An association between platelets, angiogenesis, and cancer has long been recognized, but the mechanisms linking them remains unclear. Platelets regulate new blood vessel growth through numerous stimulators and inhibitors of angiogenesis by several pathways, including differential exocytosis of angiogenesis regulators. Herein, we investigated the differential release of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors from platelets. Activation of human platelets with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimul...

  17. 99Tcm-LL1: a potential new bone marrow imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juweid, M; Dunn, R M; Sharkey, R M; Rubin, A D; Hansen, H J; Goldenberg, D M

    1997-02-01

    LL1, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to HLA Class-II-like antigen (li determinant) on the surface of B-lymphocytes, monocytes and histiocytes, was evaluated as an agent for bone marrow imaging. Six patients with diverse diseases (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, n = 2; multiple myeloma, n = 1; polycythaemia vera, n = 1; lung cancer, n = 1; breast cancer, n = 1) were given low protein doses (< 1 mg) of 99Tcm (30 mCi) labelled Fab' of LL1. 99Tcm-sulphur colloid (SC) imaging was performed in three patients for comparison. Both planar and single photon emission tomographic images were acquired using Sopha gamma cameras. As early as 2 h post-MAb injection, excellent bone marrow images were achieved in all patients, demonstrating both normal or hyperproliferative marrow, as well as 'cold' bone marrow abnormalities such as radiation defects or cancer metastases. Similar to SC, relatively high uptake of LL1 was found in the liver and spleen. However, the bone marrow-to-liver and -spleen uptake ratios were approximately 19-fold higher (0.75 vs 0.04) and 6-fold higher (1.23 vs 0.22), respectively, with LL1 than with SC. The higher bone marrow uptake allowed clearly superior visualization of the thoracic spine when compared to SC. The mean T1/2 of blood and whole-body clearance were 0.4 and 66 h, respectively. The highest radiation absorbed doses (in cGy mCi-1) were observed in the spleen (0.47 +/- 0.24), kidneys (0.25 +/- 0.09) and liver (0.14 +/- 0.04). The bone marrow dose was only 0.05 +/- 0.02 cGy mCi-1. These results indicate that bone marrow imaging with 99Tcm-LL1 is feasible, and that LL1 may be a suitable alternative to SC because of better visualization of the lower thoracic spine. Potential applications include the improved detection of bone marrow metastases of solid tumours and the assessment of haematological disorders. PMID:9076770

  18. The role of angiomotin in angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Levchenko, Tanya

    2004-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays key roles during embryonic development, female reproduction and wound repair. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from of pre-existing capillaries, is a process tightly regulated by a balance between positive and negative regulators. Unregulated angiogenesis may lead to several angiogenic diseases, and is thought to be crucial for tumor growth and metastasis. The initial recognition of tumor angiogenesis as a therapeutic target began in the 19...

  19. Angiogenesis inhibitors under study for the treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Frances A; Sridhar, Srikala S

    2003-08-01

    Several classes of agents now exist that target the different steps involved in angiogenesis. These include drugs inhibiting matrix breakdown, the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs), such as marimastat, prinomastat, BMS275291, BAY12-9566, and neovastat. Trials of this class of agents have all been negative to date. Drugs that block endothelial cell signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) including rhuMAb VEGF, SU5416, SU6668, ZD6474, CP-547,632 and ZD4190 are all in earlier stages of clinical trial. Drugs that are similar to endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis including interferons have also been evaluated without success. Endostatin has been shown to have an acceptable toxicity profile, but clinical evidence of activity has not yet been demonstrated. There has also been renewed interest in thalidomide. Drugs such as squalamine, celecoxib, ZD6126, TNP-470 and those targeting the integrins are also being evaluated in lung cancer. Despite early enthusiasm for many of these agents, Phase III trials have not yet demonstrated significant increases in overall survival and toxicity remains an issue. It is hoped that as our understanding of the complex process of angiogenesis increases, so will our ability to design more effective targeted therapies. PMID:12867064

  20. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments

    OpenAIRE

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression and resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included conjugation of 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS)...

  1. Iron oxide nanorods as high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Tyagi, Himanshu; Bahadur, D.; Aslam, M.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods.An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00055f

  2. Experimental hypoxia and embryonic angiogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nanka, O.; Valášek, P.; Dvořáková, Marta; Grim, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 235, č. 3 (2006), s. 723-733. ISSN 1058-8388 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Experimental hypoxia * Embryonic angiogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2006

  3. Paired-agent imaging for resection during surgery (PAIRS) of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Chen, Eunice; Gunn, Jason R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is correlated with poor prognosis. Complete surgical resection of HNSCC tumors has a large impact on patient survival, where detection of tumor at or close to surgical margins increases the risk of death at 5-years by 90%. In addition, large surgical margins can greatly increase the morbidity experienced by the patient due to functional and cosmetic damage of oral and facial structures. Single fluorescence targeting agents are often used for tumor detection in in vivo pre-clinical imaging; however, the arising signal is qualitative at best because it is a complex mixture of vascular perfusion, vascular leakage, inhibited lymphatic clearance, and receptor binding. In vivo ratiometric receptor concentration imaging (RCI) allows quantification of receptor expression (hence identification of cancerous tissue) by utilizing co-administered paired-agents consisting of a targeted agent and non-targeted perfusion agent to reference the plasma delivery and leakage. A panel of HNSCC tumors with varying levels of EGFR expression (SCC-15 >SCC-25 > SCC-09) have been imaged using ABY-029, a clinically relevant anti-EGFR affibody labeled with IRDye 800CW, and affibody control imaging agent labeled with IRDye 680RD. RCI maps of in vivo tissue have been created and are spatially correlated with EGFR and CD31 immunohistochemistry and basic H and E staining. The RCI threshold parameters for distinguishing tumor from normal tissues (skin and muscle) and the accuracy of margin detection in these tumors will be presented. RCI surgical resection will be further developed using a novel multi-channel, gated fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) imaging system that is capable of performing RCI in normal room light.

  4. Novel 99mTc labeled σ receptor ligand as a potential tumor imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A novel 99mTc labeled complex, [N-[2-((2-oxo-2-(4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato]Technetium(V) oxide (PPPE-MAMA′-99mTcO) ([99mTc]-2) has been designed and prepared based on the integrated approach. The corresponding rhenium complex (PPPE-MAMA′-ReO)(Re-2) has been prepared and characterized. In vitro competition binding assays show moderate affinity of Re-2 towards σ1 and σ2 receptors with Ki values of 8.67 ± 0.07 and 5.71 ± 1.88 μmol, respectively. Planar images obtained at 0.5 h, 4 h, 20 h after I.v. Injection indicate the accumulation of [99mTc]-2 in MCF-7 human breast tumor bearing mice at 20 h. Furthermore, the accumulation of [99mTc]-2 has been inhibited at 20 h after co-injection of [99mTc]-2 plus haloperidol (1 mg/kg). Biodistribution studies of [99mTc]-2 display an in vivo tumor uptake of 0.14% ± 0.01% ID/g at 24 h post I.v. Injection with a tumor/muscle ratio of 6.02 ± 0.87. The above results suggest that [99mTc]-2, derived from a previously published lead compound, retains certain tumor uptake and affinity for σ receptors. [99mTc]-2 may be used as a basis for further structural modifications to develop tumor imaging agents with high affinity for σ receptors.

  5. "Smart" gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging: an imaging contrast agent responsive to the cancer microenvironment and signal amplification via pH-induced aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaejung; Kim, Jeesu; Hwang, Sekyu; Jeon, Mansik; Jeong, Sanghwa; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Sungjee

    2016-07-01

    'Smart' gold nanoparticles can respond to mild acidic environments, rapidly form aggregates, and shift the absorption to red and near-infrared. They were used as a photoacoustic imaging agent responsive to the cancer microenvironment, and have demonstrated the cancer-specific accumulation at the cellular level and an amplified signal which is twice higher than the control in vivo. PMID:27292365

  6. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agent with three esters and carboxylic methyl cellulose as main shell materials: Its preparation and imaging evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜永峰; 万明习; 周晓东

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study on the preparation process of a new surfactant-based microbubble ultrasound contrast agent and to evaluate its contrast effects in vivo. Methods: Microbubble ultrasound contrast agent with three ester surfactants and other additives as its shell materials was prepared by sonication. Sulfur hexafluoride was adopted as the inner gas of the microbubbles. New methods through the combination of optical microscope and some softwares were used to measure the size distribution and the concentration of the microbubbles. Some parameters such as the pH value of the phosphate buffer, quantity of the carboxylic methyl cellulose in the shell materials, selection of the ultrasound power and process time, were studied. Six hybirded dogs were used to verify the in vivo contrast imaging of the contrast agent using second harmonic power Doppler modality. Safety and persistent time of the agent inner animal body were also investigated. Results: Ultrasound contrast agent prepared in the experiment had an average microbubble diameter of 3.95 microns with concentration of 3.6×109 microbubbles per millilitre. Carboxylic methyl cellulose was found as an important shell material which had obviously effect on the microbubble stability and production even with a little quantity. The buffer pH value also had a key role on the microbubble formation and the final production. When the buffer pH value reached 7.4, there was no microbubble produced. Under the approximate microbubble production, process time could be shorten with the increasing ultrasound power. The obvious ultrasound contrast imaging effects were detected in the dog's heart chamber and liver as well as kidney using only one millilitre agent when diluted. The agent was found safe to the dogs. At the same time, persistent time of the agent was found over 20 min in the dog's body. Conclusion: The new ultrasound contrast agent prepared in the experiment has high microbubble production and concentration, narrow

  7. Study of Tissue Phantoms, Tissues, and Contrast Agent with the Biophotoacoustic Radar and Comparison to Ultrasound Imaging for Deep Subsurface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwi, R.; Telenkov, S.; Mandelis, A.; Gu, F.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the imaging capability of our wide-spectrum frequency-domain photoacoustic (FD-PA) imaging alias "photoacoustic radar" methodology for imaging of soft tissues is explored. A practical application of the mathematical correlation processing method with relatively long (1 ms) frequency-modulated optical excitation is demonstrated for reconstruction of the spatial location of the PA sources. Image comparison with ultrasound (US) modality was investigated to see the complementarity between the two techniques. The obtained results with a phased array probe on tissue phantoms and their comparison to US images demonstrated that the FD-PA technique has strong potential for deep subsurface imaging with excellent contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. FD-PA images of blood vessels in a human wrist and an in vivo subcutaneous tumor in a rat model are presented. As in other imaging modalities, the employment of contrast agents is desirable to improve the capability of medical diagnostics. Therefore, this study also evaluated and characterized the use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as PA contrast agents.

  8. Preparation, biodistribution, and scintigraphic evaluation of (99m)Tc-clindamycin: an infection imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Saira; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim; Roohi, Samina; Haque, Asma; Qasim, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial infection is found to be the cause of death throughout the world. Nuclear medicine imaging with the help of radiopharmaceuticals has great potential for treating infections. In the present work, clindamycin, a lincosamide antibiotic, was labeled with technetium-99 m (~380 MBq). Clindamycin has been proven to be efficient for treating serious infections caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. Quality control, characterization, biodistribution, and scintigraphy of radiolabeled clindamycin were done, and labeling efficiency was determined by ascending paper chromatography. More than 95 % labeling efficiency with technetium-99 m ((99m)Tc) was achieved at pH 6-7 while using 2.5-3 μg SnCl2 · H2O as a reducing agent and 100 μg of ligand at room temperature. The characterization of the compound was performed by using electrophoresis, HPLC and shake flask assay. Electrophoresis indicates the neutral behavior of (99m)Tc-clindamycin. HPLC analysis confirms the single specie of the labeled compound, while shake flask assay confirms high lipophilicity. The biodistribution studies of (99m)Tc-clindamycin were performed Sprague Dawley rats bearing bacterial infection. Scintigraphy and biodistribution studies showed a high uptake of (99m)Tc-clindamycin in the liver, heart, lung, and stomach as well as at S. aureus-infected sites in rabbits. PMID:25113549

  9. Comparison of Folate Receptor Targeted Optical Contrast Agents for Intraoperative Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoperative imaging can identify cancer cells in order to improve resection; thus fluorescent contrast agents have emerged. Our objective was to do a preclinical comparison of two fluorescent dyes, EC17 and OTL38, which both target folate receptor but have different fluorochromes. Materials. HeLa and KB cells lines were used for in vitro and in vivo comparisons of EC17 and OTL38 brightness, sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution. In vivo experiments were then performed in mice. Results. The peak excitation and emission wavelengths of EC17 and OTL38 were 470/520 nm and 774/794 nm, respectively. In vitro, OTL38 required increased incubation time compared to EC17 for maximum fluorescence; however, peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR was 1.4-fold higher compared to EC17 within 60 minutes (p<0.001. Additionally, the SBR for detecting smaller quantity of cells was improved with OTL38. In vivo, the mean improvement in SBR of tumors visualized using OTL38 compared to EC17 was 3.3 fold (range 1.48–5.43. Neither dye caused noticeable toxicity in animal studies. Conclusions. In preclinical testing, OTL38 appears to have superior sensitivity and brightness compared to EC17. This coincides with the accepted belief that near infrared (NIR dyes tend to have less autofluorescence and scattering issues than visible wavelength fluorochromes.

  10. Evaluation of 99mTc-ceftazidime as bacterial infection imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although our understanding of microorganisms has advanced significantly and antimicrobial therapy has become increasingly available, infection remains a major cause of patient morbidity and mortality. The use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of infection is increasing due to their ability to distinguish between septic and aseptic inflammation. A wide range of radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed to visualize infection and inflammation scintigraphically. Ceftazidime a cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections was investigated to label with 99mTc. Labeling was performed using sodium dithionite as reducing agent at 100 deg C for 10 min and radiochemical analysis involved ITLC and HPLC methods. The stability of labeled antibiotic was checked in the presence of human serum at 37 deg C up to 24 h. The maximum radiolabeling yield was 95.4 ± 2.0 % corresponding to a specific activity of 178 GBq/mmol. Bacterial binding assay was performed with S. aureus and the in vivo distribution was studied in mice. Images showed minimal accumulation in nontarget tissues, with an average target/nontarget ratio of % 1.4 ± 0.2. (author)

  11. Solvation effects on brain uptakes of isomers of 99mTc brain imaging agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of electrostatic hydration free energies of the isomers of the 99mTc-BAT and 99mTc-DADT complexes is carried out using the computer simulation technique. The results show that not only a correlation exists between the logarithm of the brain uptake and the electrostatic hydration free energy for the isomers of 99mTc-brain radiopharmaceuticals, but also a linear relationship exists between the logarithm of the ratio of the brain uptake of the syn isomer to that of the anti one and the difference between the electrostatic hydration free energy of the syn-isomer and that of the anti one. Furthermore, the investigation on the important factors influencing the brain uptakes of 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals and the reasons of the different biodistribution of the isomers of the 99mTc-complexes is explored at the molecular level. The results may provide a reference for the rational drug design of brain imaging agents.

  12. Preparation of new technetium-99m NNS/X complexes and selection for brain imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Qiange; CHEN; Xiangji; MIAO; Yubin; LIU; Boli

    2004-01-01

    Based on excellent experiment results of 99mTcO-MPBDA-Cl, two new ligands MPTDA and MPDAA are synthesized. Then series of 99mTcO3+ complexes are prepared through adding different halide anions, followed by tests of physical chemistry qualities and biodistribution experiments. And results of these experiments show that complexes formed with MPTDA and MPDAA have better lipophilicity than those formed with MPBDA, still maintain the good brain retention ability of this type of compounds, but radioactivity uptake in blood is higher than that of 99mTcO-MPBDA and ratios of brain/blood are reduced. Obvious affections are fetched out on brain uptake and retention if fluoride, bromide or iodide anions are added. Results of experiments can be explained in reason with theoretic computation. It is confirmed that 99mTcO-MPBDA-Cl has potential to develop a new type of brain imaging agent considering integrated factors such as brain uptake, retention and toxicity.

  13. Study on the biodistribution of deuterated biomolecules in mice aiming at new Γ imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterated compounds (2H-compounds) labeled with 14C prepared from deuterated algae, Chlorella ellipsoidea, were examined for their time-coursed distribution in mice after intravenous administration. The 14C-2H-compounds were fractionated and isolated from algae grown in practically 100 mol% 2H2O in the presence of 14C-bicarbonate. The fractions obtained were the 'basic' and 'acid' fractions, composed mainly of amino acids and sugar phosphates, respectively, and glucose, galactose, and lipid fractions. All fractions were examined for their biodistribution in mice bearing Ehrlich solid tumor in comparison with the fractions isolated from ordinary Chlorella (1H-Chlorella). 2H-Compounds thus examined showed some behaviors different from 1H-compounds. The 2H-'basic' fraction distributed more slowly in heart, lung and liver than the 1H-fraction. The 2H-specific large distribution in tumor was also observed on this fraction. The 2H-dependent characteristics in the distribution of glucose and galactose differed. The 2H-glucose level was lower in blood and higher in brain, resulting in a brain/blood ratio approximately twice that of 1H-glucose, while 2H-galactose did not show such a characteristic. These findings may be useful for the application of 2H-biomolecules to functional radio-imaging agents for nuclear medicine. (author)

  14. A new bone marrow imaging agent: preparation of 99mTc-polyphase liposomes and its animals experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here a new bone marrow imaging agent, 99mTc-polyphase liposomes (99mTc-PL) was reported. It was labelled with 99mTc using the stannous chloride method, the labelling rate was over 95% (n = 20). Imaging studies of the bone marrow in rabbits showed that the bone marrow was visulized at 30 min, and was more distinct at 1 ∼ 3.5 h. Tissue distribution of 99mTc-PL in rabbits (n = 9) revealed that the bone marrow uptake rate of 99mTc-PL was greater than bone uptake rate at three time phases (6.6%, 1.5h, 14%, 3.5h, 5%, 24h versus 0.6%, 1.5h, 0,4%, 3.5h, 0.4%, 24h, P 99mTc-PL may be useful as a new bone marrow imaging agent

  15. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors' ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  16. A new bone imaging agent, 99Tcm-BIPrDP, its preparation and biological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of 99Tcm-1-hydroxy-3-(2-butyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl) propane-1, 1-diphosphonic acid (BIPrDP) as a new bone imaging agent. Methods: BIPrDP was synthesized by three steps from the raw material 2-butyl-1H-imidazole. 99Tcm-BIPrDP were prepared with mixed BIPrDP (50 mg/ml, 100 μl) and freshly eluted Na99TcmO4 (37.0 MBq) in the presence of the reducing agent SnCl2 (1 rng/ml, 100 μl) at boiling temperature for 30 min. The labeling yield and stability of 99Tcm-BIPrDP were measured with TLC. Partition coefficient in octanol-water and plasma protein binding ratio to human heparin anticoagulation plasma of 99Tcm-BIPrDP was checked. ICR mice were sacrificed at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min after tail vein injection of 0.2 ml (7.4 MBq) freshly prepared 99Tcm-BIPrDP.Samples of blood, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, bone, muscle, gonad, intestine, stomach and brain were taken, weighed and the gamma counts measured. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled compound in different organs was calculated and expressed as % ID/g. Bone-to-organ uptake ratios were calculated by the % ID/g values. The kinetics of blood clearance was calculated. Bone imaging was performed in New Zealand rabbit after intravenous injection of 99Tcm-BIPrDP. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the % ID/g at different times points. Results: Radiolabeling yield of 99Tcm-BIPrDP was more than 95% and the labeled complex was stable at least up to 6 h in vitro. The octanol-water partition coefficients (log P) for 99Tcm-BIPrDP were-2.396 ± 0.035 and-2.242 ± 0.025 at pH values of 7.0 and 7.4, respectively. The plasma protein binding rate of 99Tcm-BIPrDP was (47.07 ± 0.05)%. The bone uptake of 99Tcm-BIPrDP in mice reached a maximum of 19.20 % ID/g at 30 min after injection, and this high level of uptake persisted 4 h later at 18.98 % ID/g. Kidney uptake was highest among all the non-target organs,but decreased from 24.50 % ID/g at 5 min to 5.22 % ID/g at 4 h

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    OpenAIRE

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; Banga, Jasvinder Paul; O’Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Clarke, Susan E. M.; Ballinger, James R.; Szanda, Istvan; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Blower, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters 123I-iodide, 131I-iodide and 99mTc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate 18F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([18F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. Methods [18F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF4 − with [18F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumin...

  18. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion. PMID:23980505

  19. High-resolution three-dimensional scanning optical image system for intrinsic and extrinsic contrast agents in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yueqing; Qian, Zhiyu; Chen, Jinxian; Blessington, Dana; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Chance, Britton

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the theory and development of a three-dimensional (3D) imaging instrument capable of determining the biochemical properties of tissue by measuring the absorption or fluorescence of different intrinsic and extrinsic agents simultaneously. A bifurcated optical fiber bundle, serving to deliver the excitation light and collect the emission or reflection light, scans over the flat tissue surface retrieving optical signals in each pixel. Two-dimensional (2D) images of a series of subsequent sections are obtained after signal conversion and processing to yield a 3D image. Manipulation of the scanning step and diameter size of the fibers within the bundle, the spatial resolution of the instrument attains a maximum of 40 × 40 × 10 μm3. The wavelength range is extended from ultraviolet to the near infrared (NIR) through specialized optical design, typically employed for the NIR extrinsic contrast agents study. The instrument is most applicable in situations involving the measurement of fluorescence or absorption at any specific wavelength within the spectrum range. Flavoprotein and nicotinamide adeine dinucleotide are the two typical intrinsic agents indicating the oxidization and reduction status of the tissue sample, with their fluorescence detected at wavelengths of 540 and 440 nm, respectively. Oxy and deoxy hemoglobin are two other significant intrinsic agents for evaluating the blood oxygenation saturation by recording their absorptions at two different wavelengths of 577 and 546 nm. These intrinsic agents were measured in this study for comparison of biochemical properties of rat liver in different gas inhalation treatments. Indocyanine green, a NIR extrinsic contrast agent measured at wavelengths of 780 nm/830 nm as excitation/emission can indicate blood pooling by displaying the distribution of blood vessels within a 9 L tumor. The advantage of high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and broad applied potentiality were demonstrated by the

  20. Utility of tumor-avid photosensitizers in developing bifunctional agents for tumor imaging and/or phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Chen, Yihui; Zawada, Robert H.; Oseroff, Allan; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2006-02-01

    HPPH (a chlorophyll-a analog) was linked with a cyanine dye and the resulting conjugate was found to be an efficient tumor imaging (fluorescence imaging) and photosensitizing agent (PDT). Our preliminary results suggest that tumor-avid porphyrin-based compounds can be used as vehicles for delivering the desired fluorophores to tumor for fluorescence imaging. In an early diagnosis of microscopic lesions in pre-clinical studies (C3H mice implanted with RIF tumors) the HPPH-cyanine dye conjugate showed tumor-imaging capability (λ ex: 780 nm, λ em: 860 nm) at the non- therapeutic doses that are 100 fold lower than those used therapeutically. Compared to the cyanine dye, the corresponding HPPH-conjugate showed enhanced long-term tumor imaging ability.

  1. [A new lymph node imaging agent--99mTc-polyphase liposome oleatis (99mTc-plo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B F

    1988-07-01

    A new lymph node radio-imaging agent, technetium-99m polyphase liposome oleatis (99mTc-plo), has recently been developed. Polyphase liposome oleatis was labelled with radionuclide by stannous chloride method. The labelled rate was 90% or more as technically identified by thin layer chromatography, external gamma-camera imaging and radioautography. In animal experiment, 0.2-0.3 ml (0.2 mci) of the 99mTc-plo was injected subcutaneously into the toes web of rats. After half an hour, the regional lymph nodes of popliteal fossa were visualized very clearly. The imaging figures may keep their distinct shadow up to 24 hours. The tested rabbits were sacrificed 10 hours after 99mTc-plo injection for detecting various kinds of tissue and organ with a scintillation counter. The regional lymph nodes revealed the highest uptake rate of the new agent, 12,116; 1,303; 1,615 times higher than that of the adjacent muscles, liver and spleen, respectively. In clinical experiment, 0.2-0.3 ml (0.5-0.8 mci) of the 99mTc-plo was injected subcutaneously into the toes web of patients. Half an hour later, the lymph nodes of inguinal, external iliac and common iliac regions appeared in sequence. If the new agent is injected perianally, the internal iliac lymph nodes will be seen. No side effect was observed in both types of experiment. This new agent has been tried in rats, rabbits and dogs with similar positive results. The new lymph node imaging technique is simple, safe, reliable and reproducible. This agent, being directed toward the lymph nodes and possessing affinity to cancer cells, is expected to be supplementary method to CT and B-ultrasonography for detecting lymphoid malignancy and lymph node metastasis. PMID:3248482

  2. An improved kit formulation of a dopamine transporter imaging agent: [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1, the first Tc-99m-labeled tracer for imaging CNS dopamine transporters in humans, was reported. This tracer displayed excellent specific binding to dopamine transporters in the basal ganglia region of the brain, thus it is potentially useful for the diagnosis of deficit of dopamine transporters in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. Preparation of [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1 was previously achieved by a multistep kit formulation. It is highly desirable to further improve the preparation by developing a simplified one-vial formulation with a reduced amount of TRODAT-1 ligand for routine clinical use. To achieve this goal, a series of studies to optimize labeling efficiency by varying a combination of factors (amount of free ligand, reaction reagents, and reaction pH) was carried out. [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1 prepared by this new kit formulation was evaluated by assessing the brain uptake and target (striatum) versus nontarget (cerebellum) ratios in rats. Appropriate amounts of various ingredients for a one-vial kit formulation providing ≥90% radiolabeling yields were identified. The most consistent and reliable formulation contained 10 μg of TRODAT-1 (a reduction of free ligand from 200 μg to 10 μg), 32 μg of SnCl2, 10 mg of sodium glucoheptonate, and 840 μg of disodium EDTA in one vial as a lyophilized kit. It is feasible to reconstitute the vial with [Tc-99m]pertechnetate (0.5-2 mL , ≤1110 MBq, 30 mCi), resulting in a final solution with a pH value of 4.5-5.0. [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1, prepared by this new kit, was stable at room temperature for 6 h. Biodistribution studies of this agent in rats with the new formulation showed similar regional brain distribution as compared with those obtained with the previous preparation (high striatum-to-cerebellum ratio). In conclusion, using this lyophilized one-vial kit formulation, [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1 can be prepared with greater than 90% radiochemical purity. This simplified kit will

  3. Magnetic field perturbation in proton MR imaging - A study of a contrast agent and of distortions due to metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perturbations of the static magnetic field in proton MR imaging (NMR imaging, MRI, MRT) result in image distortion and/or signal loss. An investigation of a superparamagnetic contrast agent for MR imaging has been performed. Magnetite particles were embedded in biodegradable starch spheres with a diameter of one micrometer. Animal experiments showed that the agent was quickly accumulated in the reticulo-endothelial system (RES), causing a decrease in signal intensity in this region. Diffusion within the locally generated magnetic field perturbation is responsible for signal loss in spin-echo images. Furthermore, the magnetic properties of various aneurysm clips were investigated to determine which clips could be used safely in a clinical MR investigation. MR artifacts caused by the metallic clips were studied using a geometric phantom. Non-ferromagnetic clips were concluded to be safe for examinations with medium field (0.3 tesla) MR imaging systems. A comparison study between MR and CT was performed on patients harbouring intracranial, nonferromagnetic aneurysm clips. The artifacts close to the clips were equally serve for MR and CT, but at some distance, the MR images were much less affected than the CT images. Finally, a computer program capable of simulating any realistic MR imaging situation has been developed. Raw data matrices are obtained by solving the Bloch equations. Corrections for intravascular spin behaviour have been implemented together with efficient algorithms. A quantitative investigation of signal displacement and signal loss, caused by small metallic implants, has been performed by computer simulation. An exact expression for the magnetic field outside a homogeneous ellipsoid in an external magnetic field has been derived. Distortions in MR images, caused by perturbing ellipsoids of different shapes and orientations, were studied. (30 refs.) (au)

  4. Influence of background correction in the estimation of myocardial uptake of 99mTc labelled perfusion imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of different corrections for background activity in the estimation of low organ uptake of radiopharmaceuticals have been examined using myocardial perfusion imaging agents. Estimates of myocardial uptake of 99mTc-labelled MIBI and tetrofosmin were made both at rest and after exercise. Patients were given one or other of the agents (12 MIBI; 17 tetrofosmin) and the measurements at rest and after exercise were made within a week of each other using a planar gamma camera method incorporating an attenuation-corrected, geometric mean technique. Myocardial uptakes were estimated using two different background corrections and also with no background subtraction. Mean values were in the range 1.3 to 3.0% and showed that, for both agents, uptakes estimated with and without background correction could differ by a factor of two. Although the study was not designed to compare myocardial uptakes of the two agents, a background correction which accounted separately for activity in tissue over- and under-lying the heart resulted in similar mean values for tetrofosmin (1.7% both at rest and after exercise) and for MIBI (1.8% rest; 1.9% exercise). For both agents, no significant difference was observed between myocardial uptakes at rest and after exercise measured at about two hours post-injection. (author) The effects of different corrections for background activity in the estimation of low organ uptake of radiopharmaceuticals have been examined using myocardial perfusion imaging agents. Estimates of myocardial uptake of Tc-labelled MIBI and tetrofosmin were made both at rest and after exercise. Patients were given one or other of the agents (12 MIBI; 17 tetrofosmin) and the measurements at rest and after exercise were made within a week of each other using a planar gamma camera method incorporating an attenuation-corrected, geometric mean technique. Myocardial uptakes were estimated using two different background corrections and also with no background subtraction

  5. Preparation and Biodistribution of Technetium-99m-Labeled Bis- Misonidazole (MISO) as an Imaging Agent for Tumour Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Fan, Di; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhe; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumour hypoxia is an important aspect in determining the course of tumour therapy. In this study, we developed a novel imaging agent, (99m)Tc-ethylenedicysteine-bis-misonidazole ((99m)Tc-EC-MISO), for diagnosing tumour hypoxia. We used 2-nitroimidazole as a reactant to synthesize the amino derivative of misonidazole (MISO) in the first step and then conjugated the di-amino derivative of MISO to the chelating agent ethylenedicysteine (EC) for labelling (99m)Tc in the second step. (99m)Tc-pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4-) was reduced by tin chloride (SnCl2) for radiolabeling. The radiochemical purity was up to 94%. Tissue biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were conducted on subcutaneous gliomal tumour-bearing mice. The tumour-to-muscle ratio in the (99m)Tc-EC-MISO group increased with time, up to 4.6 at 4 h after injection. SPECT/CT imaging confirmed that the tumours could be visualized clearly with (99m)Tc-EC-MISO at 2 h. By introducing a second 2-nitroimidazole redox centre, an apparent hypoxic accumulation of this novel (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agent in the tumour was observed. PMID:25938423

  6. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate as a breast cancer imaging agent in a xenograft animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, Juan Pablo [Nuclear Medicine Center, Clinical Hospital, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11600 (Uruguay); Cabral, Pablo [Nuclear Investigations Center, School of Science, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11400 (Uruguay); Alonso, Omar [Nuclear Medicine Center, Clinical Hospital, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11600 (Uruguay); Savio, Eduardo [Department of Radiochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11800 (Uruguay); Daibes Figueroa, Said [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Zhang Xiuli [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Ma Lixin [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States); Deutscher, Susan L. [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Quinn, Thomas P., E-mail: quinnt@missouri.ed [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: The use of [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate has been reported as an infarct-avid agent with the potential for very early detection of myocardial infarction. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate has also been postulated as an agent for non-invasive detection of tumors. The aim of our study was to develop a Glucarate kit and evaluate [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate as a potential cancer imaging agent in female SCID mice bearing human MDA-MB-435 breast tumors. Methods: Glucarate in a kit formulation was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc and evaluated for radiolabelling efficiency and radiochemical purity. The Glucarate kit stability was assessed by monthly quality controls. The pharmacokinetics of [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate were determined in female SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma tumors at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 24 h. Nuclear imaging studies were performed with a micro-single photon emission tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) system at 2 h post injection, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed for tumor morphology analysis and metastatic deposit localization. Results: The Glucarate kits exhibited a stable shelf life of 6 months. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate was obtained with radiochemical purity greater than 95%. Biodistribution studies demonstrated moderate tumor uptake coupled with high renal clearance. Tumor-to-muscle ratios were 4.85 and 5.14 at 1 and 4 h post injection. MRI analysis showed tumors with dense cellular growth and moderate central necrosis. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate uptake in the primary MDA-MB-435 shoulder tumors and metastatic lesions were clearly visualized with micro-SPECT/CT imaging. Conclusions: Selective tumor uptake and rapid clearance from nontarget organs makes [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate a potential agent for breast cancer imaging that awaits validation in a clinical trial.

  7. Toward a Novel Strategy for Magnetic–Resonance Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Tumor Angiogenesis: Nickel Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Incorporated into Radiation-Functionalized Polymer Nano-Carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more recent research activity of the Irradiated Polymers team focused mainly on nanostructures membranes for nanofiltration and nanofluidic systems in biomedical and energy fields. The so called track-etched membranes were made by chemical revealing of tracks induced from swift heavy ions irradiations in collaboration with the CIRIL laboratory (GANIL, France). The background experience of the tem about electron-polymer interaction allowed us to predict the behavior of the radio-induced grafting, namely radografting, inside ion-tracks. It was the necessary to adapt our detection tools to chemical modification of picomole range and to nanometer scale architecture of these membranes. Consequently, we resorted to the use of high-cost techniques such as small angle neutron scattering to be able to characterize accurately polymer membrane nanopores. In parallel, more accessible techniques like gas permeation have been developed for a rapid evaluation of nanopore radii. The labeling of introduced chemical functionalities with fluorescent probes was a very effective mean to visualize very few amounts of molecules by confocal microscopy and to localize, for the first time, the radiografting inside theetched tracks. The study of such nanostructures has enlarged our perspectives and collaborations. Indeed, it pushed us to electrodeposite metallic nanowires and to create conductive polymer nanotubes to study the conduction in nanochannels of such systems (Biosensors and optoelectronic applications) and to study the ionic conduction in nano-channels filled of hydrogen (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell application). More recently, since January 2007, we are developing a subject on another kind of polylmer device on which we are applying our known-how in radiografting. It is about the functionalized fluoropolymer nanoparticles for medical imaging. In the following, I describe in more details some of the recent works being carried out at our laboratory on the irradiated

  8. Radiochemical and biological evaluation of a new brain serotonin1A receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical and biological evaluations are made of a new bidentate radioligand as a potential brain serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor imaging agent. The bidentate part of the complex was a derivative of the well known serotonin1A receptor antagonist molecule, namely WAY 100635; the monodentate parts were thiocresol, thiosalicylic acid and thio-2-naphthol. The labelling procedure was performed through the 99mTc(V)-glucoheptonate precursor. The bidentate + monodentate complex formed during the reaction in the case of thiocresol was identified as 99TcO(o-CH3-C6H4-N(CH2-CH2)2N-CH2CH2S)( p-C6H4CH3)2 (99mTc-1). Its labelling efficiency and stability were determined by thin layer chromatography, the organic solvent extraction method and high performance liquid chromagraphy. The biodistribution of the labelled compound was found by using male Wistar rats. On the basis of these data, kinetic curves were constructed for different organs and the dosimetry for humans was calculated. The brain uptake and pharmacokinetics were followed by planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats. Average brain count density was calculated and different regional count densities (counts/gram tissue) were obtained for the hippocampus and other receptor-rich regions. A detailed SPECT study was carried out after administration of 99mTc-1 to a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca cynomolgus). The results found show that, of three investigated aromatic thiol compounds, the labelling efficiency was the highest in the case of thiocresol as the monodentate part. Therefore all further studies were carried out using thiocresol. The labelling efficiency of this bidentate complex was about 80%, and the molecule was stable for up to one hour. The biodistribution data show that more than 0.1% of the injected dose is present in the rat brains a few minutes after administration, and the metabolic pathway is through the hepatobiliary system. From the results obtained with the study of the

  9. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Stubbs, J.B. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems of Oak Ridge, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  10. Angiogenesis in obesity and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bråkenhielm, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of blood vessel growth from pre-existing vasculatures. In the adult, it is involved in certain physiological processes, such as in organ and tissue regeneration, wound healing, and in female reproductive cycles. Like during embryonic development, the growth and expansion of adult tissues is dependent on neovascularization. The adipose tissue has a unique capacity to substantially increase or decrease in size throughout adult life. This indicates t...

  11. Recent Progress in Therapeutic Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial disease are devastating status of acute vessel occlusion in diseased vessels that are already narrowed enough by atherosclerotic process. People are now focused on therapeutic angiogenesis against the ischemic diseases, to supply and growth of new vessels into the ischemic tissue. Recently, we and others performed autologous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cell or endothelial progenitor cell and gene therapy using hepatocyte growth fa...

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters 123I-iodide, 131I-iodide and 99mTc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate 18F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([18F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. [18F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF4- with [18F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. [18F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. [18F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. (orig.)

  13. An IP-10 (CXCL10-derived peptide inhibits angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecelia C Yates-Binder

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a critical role in processes such as organ development, wound healing, and tumor growth. It requires well-orchestrated integration of soluble and matrix factors and timely recognition of such signals to regulate this process. Previous work has shown that newly forming vessels express the chemokine receptor CXC receptor 3 (CXCR3 and, activation by its ligand IP-10 (CXCL10, both inhibits development of new vasculature and causes regression of newly formed vessels. To identify and develop new therapeutic agents to limit or reverse pathological angiogenesis, we identified a 21 amino acid fragment of IP-10, spanning the α-helical domain residues 77-98, that mimic the actions of the whole IP-10 molecule on endothelial cells. Treatment of the endothelial cells with the 22 amino acid fragment referred to as IP-10p significantly inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial motility and tube formation in vitro, properties critical for angiogenesis. Using a Matrigel plug assay in vivo, we demonstrate that IP-10p both prevented vessel formation and induced involution of nascent vessels. CXCR3 neutralizing antibody was able to block the inhibitory effects of the IP-10p, demonstrating specificity of the peptide. Inhibition of endothelial function by IP-10p was similar to that described for IP-10, secondary to CXCR3-mediated increase in cAMP production, activation of PKA inhibiting cell migration, and inhibition of VEGF-mediated m-calpain activation. IP-10p provides a novel therapeutic agent that inhibits endothelial cell function thus, allowing for the modulation of angiogenesis.

  14. Effect of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd extract on tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiumao; Wei, Lihui; Xu, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Liu, Xianxiang; Peng, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become an attractive target of anticancer chemotherapy. However, drug resistance and cytotoxicity against non-tumor associated endothelial cells limit the long-term use and the therapeutic effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors, thus increasing the necessity for the development of multi-target agents with minimal side effects. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas, which have relatively fewer side effects and have been used clinically to treat various types of diseases, including cancer, for thousands of years, are considered to be multi-component and multi-target agents exerting their therapeutic function in a more holistic way. Hedyotis Diffusa Willd (EEHDW) has long been used as an important component in several TCM formulas to treat various types of cancer. Although recently we reported that EEHDW promotes cancer cell apoptosis via activation of the mitochondrial-dependent pathway, the precise mechanism of its tumoricidalactivity still remains to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated the angiogenic effects of the ethanol extract of EEHDW. Cell cycle analysis was perfomed using flow cytometry. Cell viability was analyzed using MTT assay. We found that EEHDW inhibited angiogenesis in vivo in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). In addition, we observed that EEHDW dose- and time-dependently inhibited the prolife-ration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by blocking the cell cycle G1 to S progression. Moreover, EEHDW inhibited the migration and tube formation of HUVECs. Furthermore, EEHDW treatment down-regulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF-A in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells and HUVECs. Our findings suggest that inhibiting tumor angiogenesis is one of the mechanisms by which EEHDW is involved in cancer therapy. PMID:21887465

  15. A second generation MRI contrast agent for imaging zinc ions in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M.; Lubag, Angelo J. M.; López, Jorge A.; Andreu-de-Riquer, Gabriel; Alvarado-Monzón, José C.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2012-01-01

    A Zn2+ specific GdDOTA derivative containing two bis-(3-pyrazolyl) units was prepared and characterized. Unlike a previously reported Zn2+ binding agent, the new agent binds to human albumin both in the presence and absence of Zn2+.

  16. A natural small molecule voacangine inhibits angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Voacangine exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. ► Voacangine inhibits tumor-induced angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α. ► Voacangine could be the basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, plays a critical role in normal and pathological phenotypes, including solid tumor growth and metastasis. Accordingly, the development of new anti-angiogenic agents is considered an efficient strategy for the treatment of cancer and other human diseases linked with angiogenesis. We have identified voacangine, isolated from Voacanga africana, as a novel anti-angiogenic agent. Voacangine inhibits the proliferation of HUVECs at an IC50 of 18 μM with no cytotoxic effects. Voacangine significantly suppressed in vitro angiogenesis, such as VEGF-induced tube formation and chemoinvasion. Moreover, the compound inhibits in vivo angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. In addition, voacangine decreased the expression levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and its target gene, VEGF, in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the naturally occurring compound, voacangine, is a novel anti-angiogenic compound.

  17. Utility decay rates of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast based on redox-sensitive paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability and applicability of the combination of paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agent and T1-weighted gradient echo (GE)-based dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement for redox imaging are described. The time courses of T1-weighted GE MRI signal intensities according to first-order paramagnetic loss of a nitroxyl contrast agent were simulated for several experimental conditions. The apparent decay rate calculated based on decreasing T1-weighted MRI contrast (kMRI) can show an approximate value of the original decay rate (ktrue) discretionarily given for simulation with suitable experimental parameters. The difference between kMRI and ktrue can be sufficiently small under T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) scan conditions (repetition time=75 ms, echo time=3 ms, and flip angle=45deg), with a conventional redox-sensitive nitroxyl contrast agent, such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) and/or 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-N-oxyl (carbamoyl-PROXYL), and with intravenous (i.v.) doses of below 1.5 γmol/g body weight (b.w.) for mice. The results of this simulation suggest that the kMRI of nitroxyl contrast agents can be the primary index of redox status under biological conditions. (author)

  18. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml-1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  19. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml−1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic. (paper)

  20. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  1. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well. (paper)

  2. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents. Final technical report, January 31, 1990--August 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  3. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbin, Tania [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Spearman, Peter [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, University of Kingston, Penrhyn Road Kingston upon Thames Surrey KT1 2EE, London (United Kingdom); Benderbous, Soraya, E-mail: soraya.benderbous@univ-tlse3.fr [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa, E-mail: hafsa.korri-youssoufi@u-psud.fr [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35–65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T{sub 1}-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r{sub 1} of 38.35 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~ 4 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics. - Highlights: • Synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles with small size • Study of loading properties with gadolinium porphyrins • In vitro properties of the conjugated complex as contrast agent for MRI imaging • Comparison of MRI properties with commercial contrast agent Gd-DOTA.

  4. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35–65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T1-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r1 of 38.35 mM−1 s−1, which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~ 4 mM−1 s−1 at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics. - Highlights: • Synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles with small size • Study of loading properties with gadolinium porphyrins • In vitro properties of the conjugated complex as contrast agent for MRI imaging • Comparison of MRI properties with commercial contrast agent Gd-DOTA

  5. Luminescence Enhanced Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) Co-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Imaging Agents In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunfei; He, Wangmei; Li, Fang; Perera, Thalagalage Shalika Harshani; Gan, Lin; Han, Yingchao; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Dai, Honglian

    2016-04-27

    Biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescent nano material can be used as an alternative bioimaging agent for early cancer diagnosis, which is crucial to achieve successful treatment. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocyrstals have good biocompatibility and biodegradability, and can be used as an excellent host for luminescent rare earth elements. In this study, based on the energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Eu(3+), the luminescence enhanced imaging agent of Eu/Gd codoping HAP (HAP:Eu/Gd) nanocrystals are obtained via coprecipitation with plate-like shape and no change in crystal phase composition. The luminescence can be much elevated (up to about 120%) with a nonlinear increase versus Gd doping content, which is due to the energy transfer ((6)PJ of Gd(3+) → (5)HJ of Eu(3+)) under 273 nm and the possible combination effect of the cooperative upconversion and the successive energy transfer under 394 nm, respectively. Results demonstrate that the biocompatible HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals can successfully perform cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The intracellular HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals display good biodegradability with a cumulative degradation of about 65% after 72 h. This biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescence enhanced HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystal has the potential to act as a fluorescent imaging agent in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27043792

  6. Angiogenesis and Anti-Angiogenic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Demirer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels in our body is developed by vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. There have been new advances in molecular pathology and tumor biology areas in recent years. Angiogenesis is modulated by the balance between angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting angiogenesis have been in use in various malign or non-malign diseases. Inhibition of angiogenesis in malign diseases is a very attractive subject in medicine and studies are going on about long term affects and toxicities. Inhibition of angiogenesis is not an only treatment choice alone. It is a supplemental treatment option applied with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. It has been used in colorectal carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, glioblastoma, heoatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, tyroid medullary cancer.

  7. Comparison of two new angiogenesis PET tracers 68Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2 and 64Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2; in vivo imaging studies in human xenograft tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to synthesize and perform a side-by-side comparison of two new tumor-angiogenesis PET tracers (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) and (64)Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) in vivo using human xenograft tumors in mice. Human radiation burden was estimated to evaluate...

  8. Chemokine Regulation of Angiogenesis During Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in wound healing. A defect in the formation of a neovasculature induces ulcer formation. One of the challenges faced by the clinician when devising strategies to promote healing of chronic wounds is the initiation of angiogenesis and the formation of a stable vasculature to support tissue regeneration. Understanding the molecular factors regulating angiogenesis during wound healing will lead to better therapies for healing chronic wounds.

  9. Studies on Lung Cancer Angiogenesis-Application of Interventional Therapy (A Report of 56 Cases)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Zhang; Jun Guo; Hailong Qian; Baoqi Shi; Jigang Zhang; Chunjing Li; Ailing Yang; Zhuang Tian

    2007-01-01

    three times in 30 with NSCLC and four times in 9 cases.Among the total cases,13 received radiotherapy during interventional therapy,with a radiation dose of 5,000-7,000 cGy;The CR rate was 78.7%(37/47),PR was 14.9%(7/47) and the rate of non-remission was 6.4% (3/47).CONCLUSION Using imaging technology,analysis of angiogenesis of lung cancers was employed to accurately detect and quantify angiogenesis.This analysis was combined for interventional therapy.using embolizing agents and large doses of the anti-tumor drugs and angiogenesis inhibitors.The agents were selectively delivered into the tumor vessels to eliminate the primary lumor,in order to depress distant metastases and thus enhance the curative effect of the therapy.

  10. Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Determination of Fractional Tumor Blood Volume: A Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Response to the Vascular Disrupting Agent ZD6126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess tumor fractional blood volume (ξ), determined in vivo by susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a noninvasive imaging biomarker of tumor response to the vascular disrupting agent ZD6126. Methods and Materials: The transverse MRI relaxation rate R2* of rat GH3 prolactinomas was quantified prior to and following injection of 2.5 mgFe/kg feruglose, an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide intravascular contrast agent, and ξ (%) was determined from the change in R2*. The rats were then treated with either saline or 50 mg/kg ZD6126, and ξ measured again 24 hours later. Following posttreatment MRI, Hoechst 33342 (15 mg/kg) was administered to the rats and histological correlates from composite images of tumor perfusion and necrosis sought. Results: Irrespective of treatment, tumor volume significantly increased over 24 hours. Saline-treated tumors showed no statistically significant change in ξ, whereas a significant (p = 0.002) 70% reduction in ξ of the ZD6126-treated cohort was determined. Hoechst 33342 uptake was associated with viable tumor tissue and was significantly (p = 0.004) reduced and restricted to the rim of the ZD6126-treated tumors. A significant positive correlation between posttreatment ξ and Hoechst 33342 uptake was obtained (r = 0.83, p = 0.002), providing validation of the MRI-derived measurements of fractional tumor blood volume. Conclusions: These data clearly highlight the potential of susceptibility contrast MRI with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents to provide quantitative imaging biomarkers of fractional tumor blood volume at high spatial resolution to assess tumor vascular status and response to vascular disrupting agents

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (T...

  12. STTARR: a radiation treatment and multi-modal imaging facility for fast tracking novel agent development in small animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small animal models play a pivotal role in the pipeline development of novel agents and strategies in personalized cancer therapy. The Spatio-Temporal Targeting and Amplification of Radiation Response Program (STTARR) consists of an animal imaging and precision radiation facility designed to provide innovative biologic imaging and targeted radiation treatment strategies in small animals. The design is to mirror the imaging and radiation treatment facility in a modern cancer center. The STTARR features imaging equipment of small animal scale including CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, Optical devices as well as image guided irradiators. The fleet of imaging and irradiation equipment provides a platform for identification of biological targets of the specific molecular pathways that influence both tumor progression and a patient's response to radiation therapy. Examples will be given in the utilization of the imaging facilities for development in novel approaches in cancer therapy including a PET-FAZA study for hypoxia measurement in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. In addition, the cone-beam image guided small animal irradiator developed at our institute will also be described. The animal platform (couch) provides motion in 3 dimensions to position the animal to the isocentre of the beam. A pair of rotational arms supporting the X-ray/detector pair enables acquisition of cone-beam images of the animal which give rise to image guided precision of 0.5 mm. The irradiation energy ranges from 50 to 225 kVp at a dose rate from 10-400 cGy/min. The gantry is able to direct X-ray beam of different directions to give conformal radiation treatment to the animal. A dedicated treatment planning system is able to perform treatment planning and provide commonly used clinical metrics in the animal treatment plan. Examples will be given to highlight the use of the image guided irradiator for research of drug/irradiation regimen in animal models. (author)

  13. Fabrication and imaging study of ultrasound/fluorescence bi-modal contrast agent based on polymeric microbubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To fabricate an ultrasound/fluorescence bi-modal contrast agent by encapsulating fluorescent quantum dots into polymeric ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. Methods: Polylactic acid (PLA, 500 mg), (1R)-(+)-camphor (50 mg) and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (0.5 ml, 2.3 μmol/L)were dissolved or dispersed in dichloromethane (10 ml) to form in an organic phase. Ammonium carbonate solution and poly (vinyl alcohol) solution were employed as the internal and external water phase, respectively. The fluorescent microbubbles were generated using double emulsion solvent evaporation and lyophilization methods. The morphology and illumination were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Synchronized contrast-enhanced ultrasound and fluorescence imaging was acquired by injecting fluorescent microbubbles into the silicone tube coupled to a self-made ultrasound/fluorescence imaging device. Ultrasound/fluorescence bi-modal in vivo imaging was acquired on the kidney of New Zealand rabbits and suckling mice. Results: The fluorescent microbubbles were hollow spheres with an averaged diameter of (1.62 ± 1.47) μm. More than 99% of these microbubbles were less than 8 μm in diameter, which met the size criteria for ultrasound contrast agents. The fluorescence emission peak of the microbubbles appeared at 632 nm, indicating that good luminescence properties of quantum dots were maintained. In vitro ultrasound/fluorescence imaging showed no echoic signal when the silicone tube was filled with saline, but there was a strong echo when filled with fluorescent microbubbles. The liquid column with fluorescent microbubbles emitted red luminescence under ultraviolet irradiation. The kidney of the rabbit was remarkably enhanced after the administration of fluorescent microbubbles. Bright fluorescence could be observed at the injection site of the suckling mice via subcutaneous injection. Conclusions: A bi-modal but single contrast agent

  14. Biologically inspired autonomous agent navigation using an integrated polarization analyzing CMOS image sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkaer, M.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Van Hoof, C.; Theuwissen, A.

    2010-01-01

    The navigational strategies of insects using skylight polarization are interesting for applications in autonomous agent navigation because they rely on very little information for navigation. A polarization navigation sensor using the Stokes parameters to determine the orientation is presented. The

  15. Polymeric oral contrast agents for MR imaging of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper develops polymeric MR T1 and T2 contrast agents to improve recognition of abnormal structures within the gastrointestinal tract. The T1 and T2 relaxivities of both the paramagnetic agent Gd-DTPA and supraparamagnetic ferrite particles were measured at 0.5 T in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of several water-soluble polymers, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), cellulose, and cellulose/xanthan mixtures

  16. Contrast enhancement of laser speckle skin image: use of optical clearing agent in conjunction with micro-needling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Jinhee; Ko, Chang-Yong; Lee, Yong-Heum; Kwon, Kiwoon; Kim, Han Sung; Lee, Kyoung Joung; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging modality is one of widely used methods to evaluate blood flow because of its simplicity. However, laser speckle image has a limitation in the evaluation of subcutaneous blood flow due to its low contrast perfusion image. Various methods have been tried to enhance the perfusion image contrast. Such methods presented positive results in some degree. However, it could not be fundamental solutions due to low penetration depth of lasers restricted by optical tissue scattering property. This study suggests a method to enhance the perfusion image contrast of laser speckle imaging modality by increasing the penetration depth of lasers. An optical clearing agent (glycerol) was topically applied on skin treated with micro-needle roller in order to reduce the time period of optical tissue clearing and therefore, enhance the penetration depth of laser. In this study, we investigated the effect of glycerol and micro-needling methods in the contrast enhancement of laser speckle perfusion skin image and presented the results of in-vitro and in-vivo animal experiment.

  17. Toluhydroquinone, the secondary metabolite of marine algae symbiotic microorganism, inhibits angiogenesis in HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nan-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Il; Choi, Woo-Suk; Son, Byeng-Wha; Seo, Yong-Bae; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Gun-Do

    2015-03-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the existing ones, occurs during embryo development and wound healing. However, most malignant tumors require angiogenesis for their growth and metastasis as well. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis has been focused as a new strategy of cancer therapies. To treat cancer, there are marine microorganism-derived secondary metabolites developed as chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we used toluhydroquinone (2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone), one of the secondary metabolites isolated from marine algae symbiotic fungus, Aspergillus sp. We examined the effects of toluhydroquinone on angiogenesis using HUVECs. We identified that toluhydroquinone inhibited the activity of β-catenin and down-regulated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling which are crucial components during angiogenesis. In addition, the expression and activity of MMPs are reduced by the treatment of toluhydroquinone. In conclusion, we confirmed that toluhydroquinone has inhibitory effects on angiogenic behaviors of human endothelial cells, HUVECs. Our findings suggest that toluhydroquinone can be proposed as a potent anti-angiogenesis drug candidate to treat cancers. PMID:25776491

  18. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  19. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopep...

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 18F-FB-NGA as a hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor PET imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) is a hepatic membrane receptor that uniquely exists on the surface of mammalian hepatocytes, and has been used as target of liver functional imaging agents for many years. We labeled the Galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) with 18F to get a PET molecular probe 18F-FB-NGA and evaluated its ability as a liver functional PET imaging agent. The 18F-FB-NGA was prepared with NGA by conjugation with N- succinimidyl-4-18F-fluorobenzoate (18F-SFB) and purified with PD-10 desalting column. The radiolabeling yield and radiochemical purity of 18F-FB-NGA were determined by radio-HPLC. Starting with 18F-F-, the total time for '18F-FB -NGA was about 120±310 min. The decay-corrected radiochemical yield is about 25-30%. The radiochemical purity of purified 18F-FB-NGA was more than 98%. Labeled with 185-1850 MBq 18F-SFB, the specific activity of 18F-FB- NGA was estimated to be 7.83-78.3 TBq/mmol. Biodistribution of 18F-FB-NGA in normal mice was investigated after injection through the tail vein. The results showed that the liver accumulated 39.4 7±3.42 and 12.12±6.11% ID/g at 10 and 30 min after injection, respectively. Dynamic MicroPET images in mice were acquired with and without block after injection of the radiotracer, respectively. High liver activity accumulation was observed at 5 min after injection in normal group. On the contrary, the liver accumulation was significantly lower after block, indicating the specific binding to ASGP-R. 18F-FB-NGA is probably a potential PET liver imaging agent. (authors)

  1. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  2. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. ► Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. ► Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  3. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized an...

  4. New molecular connections in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiling Xu; David Wilkinson

    2010-01-01

    @@ In vertebrates, oxygen and nutrients are delivered to tissues by the circula-tion of blood through vessels, comprised of a branched network of endothelial tubes termed the vasculature. Crucial for the formation of blood vessels during development is the process of angiogenesis, in which new sprouts form from pre-existing vessels in a complex cascade of cellular events. This involves the activation of an endothelial cell in the vessel to become a highly exploratory 'tip' cell that migrates to invade the surrounding tissues, while remaining tightly connected to the fol-lowing cells that subsequently generate the tubular structures of a new vessel.

  5. Chitosan-coated ferrite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a T2 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles coated with biocompatible chitosan were synthesized for use as an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agent. The coating was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the ferrite nanoparticles. A dynamic light-scattering spectrometer (DLS) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used to measure the average diameter of the coated nanoparticles, which was 67.0 nm. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurements showed strong bonding of the chitosan molecules to the surfaces of the ferrite nanoparticles. The spin-lattice (T1) and the spin-spin (T2) relaxation times of the nuclear spins (hydrogen protons) in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of coated ferrite nanoparticles were determined using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. Using these data, we found that the T1 and the T2 relaxivities of the nuclear spins in aqueous solutions of ferrite nanoparticles were 0.00291 and 0.0691 ppm-1sec-1, respectively. In particular, the value of the T2 relaxivity was much larger than that of the commercial contrast agent GD-DTPA (gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid). A 31.7% intensity loss in the T2 image of a rabbit liver was observed after injecting the aqueous solution of coated nanoparticles into the rabbit, which shows that our coated ferrite nanoparticles can be used as a T2 MRI contrast agent.

  6. Reduction of tumstatin in asthmatic airways contributes to angiogenesis, inflammation, and hyperresponsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K; Boustany, Sarah; Moir, Lyn M; Weckmann, Markus; Lau, Justine Y; Grafton, Karryn; Baraket, Melissa; Hansbro, Philip M; Hansbro, Nicole G; Foster, Paul S; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Angiogenesis is a prominent feature of remodeling in asthma. Many proangiogenic factors are up-regulated in asthma, but little is known about levels of endogenous antiangiogenic agents. Collagen IV is decreased in the airway basement membrane in asthma. It has six alpha chains, of which t

  7. Intercellular imaging by a polyarginine derived cell penetrating peptide labeled magnetic resonance contrast agent,diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO You-min; LIU Min; YANG Jun-le; GUO Xiao-juan; WANG Si-cen; DUAN Xiao-yi; WANG Peng

    2007-01-01

    Background The cellular plasma membrane represents a natural barrier to many exogenous molecules including magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Cell penetrating peptide (CPP) is used to internalize proteins, peptides, and radionuclide. This study was undertaken to assess the value of a new intracellular MR contrast medium, CPP labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (Gd-DTPA) in molecular imaging in vitro. Methods Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and Gd-DTPA respectively labeled with CPP (FITC-CPP, Gd-DTPA-CPP) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. Human hepatic cancer cell line-HepG2 was respectively stained by FITC-CPP and FITC to observe the uptake and intracellular distribution. HepG2 was respectively incubated with 100 nmol/ml Gd-DTPA-CPP for 0, 10, 30, 60 minutes, and imaged by MR for studying the relationship between the incubation time and T1WI signal. The cytotoxicity to NIH3T3 fibroblasts cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay (MTT). Results The molecular weights of CPP labeled imaging agents, which were determined by MALDI mass spectrometry (FITC-CPP MW=2163.34, Gd-DTPA-CPP MW=2285.99), were similar to the calculated molecular weights. Confocal microscopy suggested HepG2 translocated FITC-CPP in cytoplasm and nucleus independent with the incubation temperature. MR images showed HepG2 uptaken Gd-DTPA-CPP had a higher T1 weighted imaging (T1WI) signal, and that the T1WI signal intensity was increasing in a time-dependent manner (r=0.972, P=0.001), while the signal intensity between the cells incubated by Gd-DTPA for 60 minutes and the controlled cells was not significantly different (P=0.225). By MTT, all concentrations from 50 nmol/ml to 200 nmol/ml had no significant (F=0.006, P=1.000) effect on cell viability of mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts, compared with the control group. Conclusions The newly constructed CPP based on polyarginine can translocate cells by carrying FITC

  8. Intravital Fluorescence Videomicroscopy to Study Tumor Angiogenesis and Microcirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vajkoczy

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis and microcirculation play a central role in growth and metastasis of human neoplasms, and, thus, represent a major target for novel treatment strategies. Mechanistic analysis of processes involved in tumor vascularization, however, requires sophisticated in vivo experimental models and techniques. Intravital microscopy allows direct assessment of tumor angiogenesis, microcirculation and overall perfusion. Its application to the study of tumor-induced neovascularization further provides information on molecular transport and delivery, intra- and extravascular cell-to-cell and cell-tomatrix interaction, as well as tumor oxygenation and metabolism. With the recent advances in the field of bioluminescence and fluorescent reporter genes, appropriate for in vivo imaging, the intravital fluorescent microscopic approach has to be considered a powerful tool to study microvascular, cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor growth.

  9. Derivation of attenuation map for attenuation correction of PET data in the presence of nanoparticulate contrast agents using spectral CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake value in quantitative PET imaging is biased due to the presence of CT contrast agents when using CT-based attenuation correction. Our aim was to examine spectral CT imaging to suppress inaccuracy of 511 keV attenuation map in the presence of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents. Using a simulation study we examined an image-based K-edge ratio method, in which two images acquired from energy windows located above and below the K-edge energy are divided by one another, to identify the exact location of all contrast agents. Multiple computerized phantom studies were conducted using a variety of NP contrast agents with different concentrations. The performance of the proposed methodology was compared to conventional single-kVp and dual-kVp methods using wide range of contrast agents with varying concentrations. The results demonstrate that both single-kVp and dual-kVp energy mapping approaches produce inaccurate attenuation maps at 511 keV in the presence of multiple simultaneous contrast agents. In contrast, the proposed method is capable of handling multiple simultaneous contrast agents, thus allowing suppression of 511 keV attenuation map inaccuracy. Attenuation map produced by spectral CT clearly outperforms conventional single-kVp and dual-kVp approaches in the generation of accurate attenuation maps in the presence of multiple contrast agents. (author)

  10. Curcumin inhibition of angiogenesis and adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth of new blood vessels or angiogenesis is necessary for the growth of adipose tissue. Adipokines produced by fat cells stimulate this process. Some dietary polyphenols with antiangiogenic activity may suppress adipose tissue growth not only by inhibiting angiogenesis, but also by interferin...

  11. Complex role of matrix metalloproteinases in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANGQINGXIANGAMY

    1998-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) play a significant role in regulating angiogenesis,the process of new blood vessel formation.Interstitial collagenase (MMP-1),72kDa gelatinase A/type IV collagenase (MMP-2),and 92 kDA gelatinase B/type IV collagenase (MMP-9) dissolve extracellular matrix (ECM) and may initiate and promote angiogenesis.TIMP-1,TIMP-2,TIMP-3,and possibly,TIMP-4 inhibit neovascularization.A new paradign is emerging that matrilysin (MMP-7),MMP-9,and metalloelastase (MMP-12) may block angiogenesis by converting plasminogen to angiostatin,which is one of the most potent angiogenesis antagonists.MMPs and TIMPs play a complex role in regulating angiogenesis.An understanding of the biochemical and cellular pathways and mechanisms of angiogenesis will provide important information to allow the control of angiogenesis,e.g.the stimulation of angiogenesis for coronary collateral circulation formation;while the inhibition for treating arthritis and cancer.

  12. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [{sup 18}F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; O' Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Szanda, Istvan; Blower, Philip J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Banga, Jasvinder Paul [King' s College London, Division of Cell and Gene Based Therapy, London (United Kingdom); Clarke, Susan E.M.; Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Cheng, Sheue-Yann [National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Bethesda (United States)

    2010-11-15

    The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters {sup 123}I-iodide, {sup 131}I-iodide and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate {sup 18}F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([{sup 18}F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. [{sup 18}F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF{sub 4} {sup -} with [{sup 18}F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. [{sup 18}F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. [{sup 18}F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. (orig.)

  14. Mn3[Co(CN)6]2@SiO2 Core-shell Nanocubes: Novel bimodal contrast agents for MRI and optical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yimin Huang; Lin Hu; Tingting Zhang; Hao Zhong; Jiajia Zhou; Zhenbang Liu; Haibao Wang; Zhen Guo; Qianwang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Nanoprobes with dual modal imaging of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) can serve as promising platforms for clinical diagnosis. A wide range of molecules and nanoparticles have been investigated as agents for contrast enhanced MRI and fluorescence imaging in cancer diagnosis. However, a single material with dual modal imaging of MRI and TPF is rarely reported. We found that Mn3[Co(CN)6]2 nanocubes can serve as agents for both T1- and T2-weighted MRI, and TPF ...

  15. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Velroyen

    Full Text Available The investigation of dedicated contrast agents for x-ray dark-field imaging, which exploits small-angle scattering at microstructures for contrast generation, is of strong interest in analogy to the common clinical use of high-atomic number contrast media in conventional attenuation-based imaging, since dark-field imaging has proven to provide complementary information. Therefore, agents consisting of gas bubbles, as used in ultrasound imaging for example, are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate an experimental contrast agent based on microbubbles consisting of a polyvinyl-alcohol shell with an iron oxide coating, which was originally developed for multimodal imaging and drug delivery. Its performance as a possible contrast medium for small-animal angiography was examined using a mouse carcass to realistically consider attenuating and scattering background signal. Subtraction images of dark field, phase contrast and attenuation were acquired for a concentration series of 100%, 10% and 1.3% to mimic different stages of dilution in the contrast agent in the blood vessel system. The images were compared to the gold-standard iodine-based contrast agent Solutrast, showing a good contrast improvement by microbubbles in dark-field imaging. This study proves the feasibility of microbubble-based dark-field contrast-enhancement in presence of scattering and attenuating mouse body structures like bone and fur. Therefore, it suggests a strong potential of the use of polymer-based microbubbles for small-animal dark-field angiography.

  16. Preparation and biodistribution assessment of {sup 111}In-BPAMD as a novel agent for bone SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    An early diagnosis of bone metastases is very important for providing a profound decision on a subsequent therapy. In this study, a new agent for SPECT-imaging of bone metastases, {sup 111}In-(4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl) acetic acid ({sup 111}In-BPAMD) complex has been developed with specific activity of 2.85 TBq/mmol. Radiochemical purity of the radiolabeled complex was checked by instant thin layer chromatography method indicated high radiochemical purity > 95% at the optimal conditions. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature and in human serum at least for 48 h. Hydroxyapatite (HA) binding assay showed high binding ability of the radiolabeled complex even at the low amounts of HA. Also, log P measurements highlighted the strong hydrophilic nature of the complex. Biodistribution studies as well as planar imaging after injection of the complex into the male Syrian mice showed major accumulation of the labelled compound in the bone tissue. Totally, the obtained results indicated that {sup 111}In-BPAMD has interesting characteristics as an agent for SPECT-imaging of the bone metastases.

  17. Bone and soft tissue tumors: the role of contrast agents for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important modality for the imaging evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors. Although there is general agreement on the value of unenhanced MR in detection, diagnosis and staging, intravenous use of gadolinium-contrast media (gd-CM) is indicated in selected cases. The purpose of this article is to review the basic pharmacokinetic principles and imaging techniques for static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging and to highlight the most important indications for administration of gd-CM in patients with musculsokeletal tumors and tumor-like lesions: adding specificity in tissue characterization, staging of local extent and biopsy planning, monitoring preoperative chemotherapy and detection of recurrence

  18. Gold nano-rods as a targeting contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Huang, S.-W.; Day, K. C.; O'Donnell, M.; Day, M.; Kotov, N.; Ashkenazi, S.

    2007-02-01

    We have studied the potential of gold nanorods to target cancer cells and provide contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The elongated "rod" shape of these nanoparticles provides a mechanism to tune their plasmon peak absorption wavelength. The absorption peak is shifted to longer wavelengths by increasing the aspect ratio of the rods. Particles 15 nm in diameter and 45 nm long were prepared using a seed mediated growth method. Their plasmon absorption peak was designed to be at 800 nm for increased penetration depth into biological tissue. They were conjugated with a specific antibody to target prostate cancer cells. We have applied photoacoustics to image a prostate cell culture targeted by conjugated gold particles. Images confirm the efficiency of conjugated particle binding to the targeted cell membranes. Photoacoustic detection of a single cell layer is demonstrated. To evaluate the applicability of the technique to clinical prostate cancer detection, we have imaged phantom objects mimicking a real tissue with small (2 mm size) inclusions of nanoparticle gel solution. Our photoacoustic imaging setup is based on a modified commercial ultrasonic scanner which makes it attractive for fast implementation in cancer diagnosis in clinical application. In addition, the setup allows for dual mode operation where a photoacoustic image is superimposed on a conventional B-mode ultrasound image. Dual mode operation is demonstrated by imaging a mouse with gold nanorod gel solution implanted in its hind limb.

  19. Detection of coronary artery disease by stress myocardial perfusion imaging using a novel pharmacological stress agent - Higenamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This study was to test the feasibility of Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using a novel pharmacological stress agent - Higenamine (HG). Methods: Pharmacological stress using HG and exercise Tc-99m-MIBI myocardial SPECT imaging were performed in 33 patients (22 patients with, and 11 without CAD). HG was infused with the start dose of 0.5μg/min per kg (0.5μg every 3 min), gradually increased to peak dose of 4μg/min per kg. Tc-99m-MIBI was injected intravenously and myocardial SPECT imaging were performed one hour later. Exercise imaging was performed within 6 days. Imagings were semi-quantitatively assessed with 4-point and 9 segments system. Results: Diastolic blood pressure slightly decreased, systolic blood pressure did not change significantly. No side effect was observed. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of myocardial SPECT with HG stress for the detection of CAD was 82%(42/51), 95% (40/42) and 88% (82/93), respectively. Concordance between HG and exercise in 33 patients was 94% (159/170). Conclusion: Tc-99m-MIBI SPECT during pharmacological stress with HG might be a safe and useful technique in the identification of myocardial ischemia

  20. Development of Novel Radiogallium-Labeled Bone Imaging Agents Using Oligo-Aspartic Acid Peptides as Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuma Ogawa; Atsushi Ishizaki; Kenichiro Takai; Yoji Kitamura; Tatsuto Kiwada; Kazuhiro Shiba; Akira Odani

    2013-01-01

    (68)Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) has great potential as a radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Because poly-glutamic and poly-aspartic acids have high affinity for hydroxyapatite, to develop new bone targeting (68)Ga-labeled bone imaging agents for PET, we used 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) as a chelating site and conjugated aspartic acid peptides of varying lengths. Subsequently, we compared Ga complexes, Ga-DOTA...

  1. The role of dopamine transporter imaging agent [99mTc]TRODAT-1 in hemi-parkinsonism rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between the determination of dopamine level by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection (ECD) and the detection of dopamine transporter (DAT) counts using autoradiography with DAT image agent [99mTc]TRODAT-1. For striatal lesions, pretreatment of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the medial forebrain bundle shows that autoradiogaphic labeling of striatum region is reduced to near-background level. Using HPLC with ECD, unilateral 6-OHDA treatment is associated with significant (p99mTc]TRODAT-1 for the evaluation of animal DAT

  2. Preparation and quality control of a new brain perfusion imaging agent 99mTc-ECD kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-ECD is a valuable brain imaging agent. It is prepared by ligand exchange reaction between 99mTc-GH and ECD. The best labelling conditions are pH 5 ∼ 7, ECD over 0.1 mg, SnCl2 · 2H2O over 0.005 mg and Na-GH over 5 mg. It is consisted of two kits, one is ECD (0.5 mg) and supplements cryodesiccation, another is Na-GH (8 mg). SnCl2 · 2H2O (0.08 mg) and supplements cryodesiccation. The methods of quality control were reported

  3. Development of Novel Radiogallium-Labeled Bone Imaging Agents Using Oligo-Aspartic Acid Peptides as Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Takai, Kenichiro; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    68Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) has great potential as a radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Because poly-glutamic and poly-aspartic acids have high affinity for hydroxyapatite, to develop new bone targeting 68Ga-labeled bone imaging agents for PET, we used 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) as a chelating site and conjugated aspartic acid peptides of varying lengths. Subsequently, we compared Ga complexes, Ga-DOTA-(As...

  4. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and baboon PET imaging of the potential adrenal imaging agent cholesteryl-p-[{sup 18}f]fluorobenzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonson, Stephanie D.; Welch, Michael J. E-mail: welch@mirlink.wustl.edu

    1999-01-01

    Cholesteryl-p-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate ([{sup 18}F]CFB) was investigated as a potential adrenal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for the diagnostic imaging of adrenal disorders. We describe the synthesis, biodistribution, adrenal autoradiography, and baboon PET imaging of [{sup 18}F]CFB. The synthesis of [{sup 18}F]CFB was facilitated by the use of a specially designed microwave cavity that was instrumental in effecting 70-83% incorporation of fluorine-18 in 60 s via [{sup 18}F]fluoro-for-nitro exchange. Tissue distribution studies in mature female Sprague-Dawley rats showed good accumulation of [{sup 18}F]CFB in the steroid-secreting tissues, adrenals and ovaries, at 1 h postinjection. The effectiveness of [{sup 18}F]CFB to accumulate in diseased adrenals was shown through biodistribution studies in hypolipidemic rats, which showed a greater than threefold increase in adrenal uptake at 1 h and increased adrenal/liver and adrenal/kidney ratios. Analysis of the metabolites at 1 h in the blood, adrenals, spleen, and ovaries of hypolipidemic and control rats showed the intact tracer representing greater than 86%, 93%, 92%, and 82% of the accumulated activity, respectively. [{sup 18}F]CFB was confirmed to selectively accumulate in the adrenal cortex versus the adrenal medulla by autoradiography. Normal baboon PET imaging with [{sup 18}F]CFB effectively showed adrenal localization as early as 15 min after injection of the tracer, with enhanced adrenal contrast seen at 60-70 min. These results suggest that [{sup 18}F]CFB may be useful as an adrenal PET imaging agent for assessing adrenal disorders.

  5. 64Cu radiolabeled nano-materials as bimodal contrast agent for optical imaging and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent nano-crystals made of semiconductor material, also called Quantum Dots, are ideal agents for long-term or real-time optical imaging. They have been found to outperform traditional organic fluorescent dyes in many ways (size-tunable optical properties, high quantum yields, high extinction coefficients, resistance to photo bleaching). We have developed a microwave method for the synthesis of highly luminescent water soluble CdTexS1-x nano-crystals (Φ= 53% at 600 nm). Their surface functionalization has been developed and controlled using a Nile-Red derivative as a fluorescent marker. The same coupling strategy will be used to incorporate 64Cu-radiotracers for PET imaging at the surface of the Quantum Dots. A large variety of poly-aza-macrocyclic ligands, have been studied in order to optimize the in vivo stability of the 64Cu-radiolabeled complexes and their efficiency as radiopharmaceuticals

  6. I-123-labelled heptadecanoic acid as myocardial imaging agent: comparison with thallium-201 and first-pass nuclear ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the use of 123I-iodoheptadecanoic acid (HA) as a myocardial imaging agent in eight patients and six normals are presented. It was shown that 123I-HA gave comparable results to the widely used radiopharmaceutical 201Tl. However the advantages of using 123I-HA are that the 159 KeV energy is better suited to the conventional gamma camera, it gives a lower radiation dose to the patient and has a lower cost per study. 123I-HA also has an important advantage in its potential for studying regional myocardial metabolic activity; in one patient, a defect due to ischaemia was seen at rest with 123I-HA but required stress to make it evident with 201Tl imaging. (U.K.)

  7. Technical Report (Final): Development of Solid State Reagents for Preparing Radiolabeled Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, George W

    2011-05-20

    The goal of this research was on the development of new, rapid, and efficient synthetic methods for incorporating short-lived radionuclides into agents of use in measuring dynamic processes. The initial project period (Year 1) was focused on the preparation of stable, solid state precursors that could be used to efficiently incorporate short-lived radioisotopes into small molecules of use in biological applications (environmental, plant, and animal). The investigation included development and evaluation of new methods for preparing carbon-carbon and carbon-halogen bonds for use in constructing the substrates to be radiolabeled. The second phase (Year 2) was focused on developing isotope incorporation techniques using the stable, boronated polymeric precursors. The final phase (Year 3), was focused on the preparation of specific radiolabeled agents and evaluation of their biodistribution using micro-PET and micro-SPECT. In addition, we began the development of a new series of polymeric borane reagents based on polyethylene glycol backbones.

  8. LipoCEST and cellCEST imaging agents: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Delli Castelli, Daniela; Di Gregorio, Enza; Terreno, Enzo; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    From the early days of CEST agents' disclosure, it was evident that their potential for in vivo applications was strongly hampered by the intrinsic low sensitivity. Therefore, much work has been devoted to seek out suitable routes to achieve strong CEST contrast enhancement. The use of nanosized systems turned out to be a strategic choice, because a very large amount of CEST agents can be delivered at the site of interest. However, the breakthrough innovation in term of increase of sensitivity was found by designing the lipoCEST agents. The naturally inspired, liposomes vesicles, when loaded with paramagnetic lanthanide-based shift reagents, can be transformed into CEST probes. The large number of water molecules entrapped inside the inner cavity of the nanovesicles represents an enormous pool of exchanging protons for the generation of CEST contrast, whereas the presence of the shift reagent increases the separation in chemical shift of their nuclear magnetic resonance signal from that of the bulk water, thus allowing for a proper exchange regime for the activation of CEST contrast. From lipoCEST, it has been rather straightforward to evolve to cellCEST in order to exploit the cytoplasmatic water molecules as source of the CEST effect, once cells have been loaded with the proper shift reagent. The red blood cells were found to be particularly suitable for the development of the cellCEST concept. Finally, an understanding of the main determinants of the CEST effects in nanosized and cellular-sized agents has allowed the design of innovative lipoCEST/RBC aggregates for potential theranostic applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:602-618. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810631

  9. Iodine-123-labeled pH shift brain-imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIPDM is an 123I-labeled agent with a distribution in brain reflecting regional perfusion. This compound is neutral and lipid soluble at blood pH and freely crosses the blood-brain barrier. At the lower pH in brain, it picks up a hydrogen ion and becomes positively charged. In this form the molecule is not lipid soluble and it is trapped in brain

  10. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  11. Synthesis and application of novel near infrared cyanine dyes and optical imaging agents

    OpenAIRE

    Norouzi, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The use of fluorescent imaging probes for the real time detection of cellular malfunctions, such as enzyme over expression has shown promise. Fluorescent dyes with absorption and emission values below 600 nm are limited in their in vivo applications due to high background auto-fluorescence and low resolution images. Employing near infrared (NIR) fluorophores such as cyanine dyes can overcome this disadvantage. Cyanine dyes can be synthesised using solution or solid-phase tec...

  12. Time-domain imaging with quench-based fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Walter J.; Solomon, Metasebya; Sudlow, Gail P.; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Time-domain diffuse optical imaging was performed to assess the FRET and quenching in living mice with orthotopic breast cancer. Tumor contrast enhancement was accompanied by increased fluorescence lifetime after administration of quenched probes selective for matrix metalloproteinases while no significant change was observed for non-quenched probes for integrin receptors. These results demonstrate the utility of timedomain imaging for detection of cancer-related enzyme activity in vivo.

  13. Tropoelastin incorporation into a dermal regeneration template promotes wound angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Kong, Yvonne; Wang, Xue-Qing; Chong, Cassandra; Fathi, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba; Panas, Eleni; Kemnitzer, John; Daniels, Robert; Kimble, Roy M; Maitz, Peter K; Li, Zhe; Weiss, Anthony S

    2015-03-11

    Severe burn injury results in substantial skin loss and cannot be treated by autografts. The Integra Dermal Regeneration Template (IDRT) is the leading synthetic skin substitute because it allows for wound bed regeneration and wound healing. However, all substitutes suffer from slow blood vessel ingrowth and would benefit considerably from enhanced vascularization to nurture tissue repair. It is shown here that by incorporating the human elastic protein tropoelastin into a dermal regeneration template (TDRT) we can promote angiogenesis in wound healing. In small and large animal models comprising mice and pigs, the hybrid TDRT biomaterial and IDRT show similar contraction to autografts and decrease wound contraction compared to open wounds. In mice, TDRT accelerates early stage angiogenesis by 2 weeks, as evidenced by increased angiogenesis fluorescent radiant efficiency in live animal imaging and the expression of endothelial cell adhesion marker CD146. In the pig, a full thickness wound repair model confirms increased numbers of blood vessels in the regenerating areas of the dermis closest to the hypodermis and immediately below the epidermis at 2 weeks post-surgery. It is concluded that including tropoelastin in a dermal regeneration template has the potential to promote wound repair through enhanced vascularization. PMID:25469903

  14. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Hisahiro [Chiba University, Department of Frontier Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Kazama, Toshiki [Chiba University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  15. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  16. Targeting and imaging study of paclitaxel-loaded and Herceptin-targeted ultrasound contrast agent with ultrasound in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To further explore the affinity of paclitaxel-loaded and trastuzumab (Herceptin) -targeted poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) -COOH ultrasound contrast agent (Pac-PLGA-HER) for human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and study their effect on ultrasound imaging in vitro. Methods: Paclitaxel-loaded PLGA-COOH ultrasound contrast agents (Pac-PLGA) were prepared by the double emulsion technique and conjugated with Herceptin monoclonal antibody by 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hyalroxysuccinimide (NHS). MCF-7 cells were plated in culture dishes for 24 h and divided into 4 groups with 3 dishes in each group, i. e. Pac-PLGA group, Pac-PLGA-HER group, ultrasound + Pac-PLGA-HER group and antibody blocking group. Binding of polymer ultrasound contrast agents to MCF-7 cells was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. In vitro experiments were employed to study the effects of Pac-PLGA-HER on the enhancement of ultrasound imaging as compared with Pac-PLGA, the control group. Independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis with the help of DFY. Results: The average diameter of Pac-PLGA-HER was (596 ± 12) nm. In the in vitro targeting study,a number of Pac-PLGA-HER bound with MCF-7 cells tightly; while, no conjugation was observed in the control group. During in vitro ultrasound imaging,the average sound intensity of Pac-PLGA-HER and Pac-PLGA was (134.50 ± 10.19) and (135.11 ±11.49) dB (t=-0.097, P>0.05) and the average grey scale was 147.83 ± 11.12 and 148.50 ± 12.63 (t=-0.097, P>0.05), respectively. There was no difference between the two. Conclusion: Pac-PLGA-HER could bind to high HER2-expressing MCF-7 cells specifically and effectively and was an effective ultrasound contrast agent in vitro. (authors)

  17. Use of DES-treated rats as an animal model for assessment of pituitary adenoma imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.; Marshall, J.C.; Lloyd, R.V.; Sherman, P.S.; Fisher, S.J.; Valoppi, V.L.; Rogers, W.L.; Wieland, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) secreting pituitary adenomas are the most common type of pituitary tumors. An imaging agent which specifically localized in prolactinomas would be of considerable clinical value. Tritiated spiroperidol (/sup 3/HSp) was selected for initial evaluation as a possible imaging agent based on: (1) demonstrated localization in the pituitary and (2) demonstrated binding to human PRL-secreting tumor tissue. DES was implanted in Fischer F344 rats which induced prolactinoma formation. /sup 3/HSp concentrations in pituitary and other tissues of DES-treated rats were assessed in female rats and correlation studies showed that a 5-fold increase in serum PRL was associated with a 6-fold increase in both pituitary weight and % dose/organ accumulation of /sup 3/HSp. The number of pituitary D/sub 2/ receptors per mg of protein in tissue homogenates was similar in both normal and DES-treated females. A blocking study with (+)-butaclamol demonstrated a D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated component to /sup 3/HSp localization. In summary, an animal model for prolactinoma was characterized. An assessment of /sup 3/HSp accumulation indicates that radiolabelled spiroperidol shows excellent potential for detecting PRL-secreting tumors of the pituitary.

  18. Biodegradable human serum albumin nanoparticles as contrast agents for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharin, Waralee; Schmithals, Christian; Pleli, Thomas; Köberle, Verena; Korkusuz, Hüdayi; Huebner, Frank; Zeuzem, Stefan; Korf, Hans W; Vogl, Thomas J; Rittmeyer, Claudia; Terfort, Andreas; Piiper, Albrecht; Gelperina, Svetlana; Kreuter, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Tumor visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle-based contrast agents may improve the imaging of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In particular, human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles appear to be a suitable carrier due to their safety and feasibility of functionalization. In the present study HSA nanoparticles were conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) using carbodiimide chemistry. The nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and a diameter of 235±19nm. For better optical visualization in vitro and in vivo, the HSA-Gd nanoparticles were additionally labeled with rhodamine 123. As shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the fluorescent nanoparticles were readily taken up by Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. After 24h incubation in blood serum, less than 5% of the Gd(III) was released from the particles, which suggests that this nanoparticulate system may be stable in vivo and, therefore, may serve as potentially safe T1 MRI contrast agent for MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24365328

  19. Studies of technetium and rhenium diphosphine complexes, and some cationic technetium complexes of Schiff base ligands, as myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal of this research is the development of an efficacious /sup 99m/Tc myocardial imaging agent. This thesis describes (i) the application of inorganic and analytical techniques to the preparation and characterization of cationic technetium-99 and rhenium complexes in macroscopic amounts, and (ii) the preparation and biological evaluation of these, and other, complexes using /sup 99m/Tc and 186Re at the very low concentrations of these isotopes encountered in nuclear medicine. The 99Tc and Re complexes have been characterized by classical chemical techniques including (1) single-crystal x-ray analysis, (2) elemental analysis, (3) spectroscopy (IR, visible-UV, and/or NMR), (4) extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis (EXAFS), (5) electrochemistry, and (6) high performance liquid chromatography analysis (HPLC). The /sup 99m/Tc complexes have been characterized by comparison of their HPLC retention times with the retention times of standard solutions of their 99Tc analogues. Thus HPLC comprises the link between macroscopic 99Tc chemistry and microscopic /sup 99m/Tc chemistry. Cationic diphosphine complexes of technetium were prepared in the V, III, and I oxidation states. These cationic complexes, prepared with /sup 99m/Tc, were evaluated as myocardial imaging agents in different animal models. In vivo evaluation of the 186Re-diphosphine analogs has provided insight into the role played by oxidation-reduction processes in determining myocardial accumulation of the /sup 99m/Tc-diphosphine complexes

  20. Estimation of cardiac output by first-pass data with technetium-99m-labeled myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99m-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion imaging agent was used for estimation of cardiac output by means of first-pass radionuclide angiography performed in the anterior projection. Region of interests (ROIs) were assigned over right ventricle, left ventricle and whole chest, and time activity curves (TACs) were obtained. Cardiac output indices (COIs) were calculated by the following equation; COI=p3/2·Qc/∫0tA(s)ds, where p=number of pixels of the ventricular ROI, Qc=the peak count rate of the TAC obtained from the whole chest's ROI and ∫0tA(s)ds=the area under ventricular TAC. The COI(y) determined by ROI over the left ventricle yield the best correlation with the cardiac output by conventional radionuclide method (x) (y=0.0381x+6.22, r=0.828, n=48, p<0.001). In conclusion, cardiac output can be easily measured with first pass data using myocardial perfusion imaging agent. (author)