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Sample records for angiogenesis imaging agent

  1. Angiogenesis and antiangiogenic agents in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomao F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Federica Tomao,1 Anselmo Papa,2 Luigi Rossi,2 Eleonora Zaccarelli,2 Davide Caruso,2 Federica Zoratto,2 Pierluigi Benedetti Panici,1 Silverio Tomao2 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Oncology Unit, ICOT, Latina, Italy Abstract: Standard treatment of cervical cancer (CC consists of surgery in the early stages and of chemoradiation in locally advanced disease. Metastatic CC has a poor prognosis and is usually treated with palliative platinum-based chemotherapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens are associated with significant adverse effects and only limited activity, making identification of active and tolerable novel targeted agents a high priority. Angiogenesis is a complex process that plays a crucial role in the development of many types of cancer. The dominant role of angiogenesis in CC seems to be directly related to human papillomavirus-related inhibition of p53 and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Both of these mechanisms are able to increase expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Activation of VEGF promotes endothelial cell proliferation and migration, favoring formation of new blood vessels and increasing permeability of existing blood vessels. Since bevacizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody binding to all isoforms of VEGF, has been demonstrated to significantly improve survival in gynecologic cancer, some recent clinical research has explored the possibility of using novel therapies directed toward inhibition of angiogenesis in CC too. Here we review the main results from studies concerning the use of antiangiogenic drugs that are being investigated for the treatment of CC. Keywords: cervical cancer, angiogenesis, human papillomavirus, bevacizumab, target therapies

  2. Imaging of angiogenesis in cardiology

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    Higuchi, Takahiro; Wester, Hans Juergen; Schwaiger, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    In the past decade, there have been major improvements in our understanding of angiogenesis at the genetic, molecular and cellular levels. Concentrated efforts in this area have led to new therapeutic approaches to ischaemic heart disease using angiogenic factors, gene therapy and progenitor cells. Despite very promising experimental results in animal studies, large clinical trials have failed to confirm the results in patients with coronary artery disease. Important questions such as selection of growth factors and donor cells, as well as the timing, dose and route of administration, have been raised and need to be answered. Molecular imaging approaches which may provide specific markers of the angiogenic process (e.g. integrin expression in endothelial cells) have been introduced and are expected to address some of these questions. Although few clinical imaging results are currently available, animal studies suggest the potential role of molecular imaging for characterisation of the angiogenetic process in vivo and for the monitoring of therapeutic effects. (orig.)

  3. A novel Tc-99 m and fluorescence labeled peptide as a multimodal imaging agent for targeting angiogenesis in a murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2016-11-01

    The serine-aspartic acid-valine (SDV) peptide binds specifically to integrin αV β3 . In the present study, we successfully developed a TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV peptide labeled with both Tc-99 m and TAMRA to target the integrin αV β3 of tumor cells; furthermore, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor of the murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV with Tc-99 m was done using ligand exchange methods. Labeling stability and cytotoxicity studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with HT-1080 and HT-29 tumors. A tumor tissue slide was prepared and analyzed using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99 m, the Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV complexes were prepared in high yield (>99%). In the gamma camera imaging study, a substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-1080 tumor (integrin αV β3 positive) and low uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-29 tumor (integrin αV β3 negative) were demonstrated. A competition study revealed that HT-1080 tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the co-injection of an excess concentration of SDV. Specific uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging and confocal microscopy studies. Our in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV in the integrin αV β3 -positive tumor. Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV could be a good candidate for a dual-modality imaging agent targeting tumor angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Radiation Dosimetry of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, a SPECT Agent for Angiogenesis Imaging

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    Kim, J [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tc-99m labeled IDA-D-[c(RGDfK){sub 2} ( {sup 99m}Tc-RGD) is a recently developed radiotracer for gamma camera or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and promising agent for the visualization of angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the internal radiation dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD in humans. Methods: Six normal controls (F:M=4:2; 68.3±3.2 years; 56.5±10.7 kg) were participated in this study. Simultaneous anterior and posterior scans of whole-body were performed using dual head gamma camera system. Before the emission scan, transmission scan was performed just before injection of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD using Co-57 flood source. After an intravenous injection of 388.7±29.3 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD, six serial emission scans were performed at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 hours post-injection. The anterior and posterior images were geometrically averaged and attenuation correction was applied using transmission scan image. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on liver, gallbladder, kidneys, urinary bladder, spleen, brain, and large intestine. Time activity curves were obtained from serial emission scan and ROIs. The number of disintegrations per unit activity administered (residence time) were calculated from the area under the curve of time activity curves and injected dose of each patient. Finally, the radiation dose for each organ and effective doses were obtained using OLINDA/EXM 1.1 software and residence time. Results: High radiation doses were reported on renal and biliary excretion tracks such as urinary bladder wall, upper large intestine, kidneys, liver and gallbladder wall and their doses were 19.15±6.84, 19.28±4.78, 15.67±0.90, 9.13±1.71 and 9.09±2.03 µGy/MBq, respectively. The effective dose and effective dose equivalent were 5.08±0.53 and 7.11±0.58 µSv/MBq, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the radiation dose of 99mTc-RGD, which has an acceptable effective radiation dose compare to the other Tc-99m labeled radio-tracers.

  5. Anatomical and microstructural imaging of angiogenesis

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    Kiessling, Fabian [University of Aachen (RWTH), Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); Razansky, Daniel [Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Center Munich, Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Munich (Germany); Alves, Frauke [University Medical Center, Department of Haematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute for Experimental Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    This article reviews and discusses different options for visualizing the microarchitecture of vessels ex vivo and in vivo with respect to reliability, practicability and availability. The investigation of angiogenesis by standard histological methods, like microvessel density counts, is limited since the three-dimensional (3-D) architecture and the functionality of vessels cannot be considered properly. Coregistration of immunostained images of vessels may be performed but is time consuming and often not sufficiently accurate. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is an alternative, but only enables 3-D stacks of less than 500 nm in thickness. Multiphoton microscopy and other advanced technologies, such as optical coherence tomography and optical frequency domain imaging, provide a deeper view into tissues and allow for in vivo imaging of microvessels, which is a precondition for longitudinal studies. Besides these microscopic techniques, the vascularization in larger tissue samples can be investigated using corrosion casts in combination with scanning electron microscopy, or microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT). Furthermore, recent improvements in {mu}CT technology open up new perspectives for in vivo scans with high resolution and tolerable X-ray doses. Also 3-D contrast-enhanced high-frequency ultrasound has been shown to be sensitive for angiogenic vessels and even distinguishing between mature and immature vessels appears feasible. Microvessel architecture can also be visualized by MRI. Here, T1-weighted angiography techniques after injection of blood pool contrast agents appear preferable. Optoacoustic tomographic imaging has more recently shown promise for high-resolution in vivo mapping of the microvasculature in rodents using intrinsic haemoglobin-based contrast and exogenous contrast agents. (orig.)

  6. Pyrazoles as potential anti-angiogenesis agents: A contemporary overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos; Tzanetou, Evangelia; Haroutounian, Serkos

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a mulit-step process by which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting vasculature. It is a key rate limiting factor in tumor growth since new blood vessels are necessary to increase tumor size. In this context it has been shown that anti-angiogenic factors can be used in cancer therapy. Among the plethora of heterocyclic compounds administered as anti-angiogenesis agents, pyrazoles constitute one of the bottlenecks of this category. Currently several pyrazole based compounds are administered or are in Phase II and III trials and new targets emerge. It is highly possible that the advent of the next two decades will lead to the discovery and use of additional pyrazoles whose anti-angiogenic profile will position them in the forefront of the battle of various malignancies. The present review is an attempt to focus on those pyrazoles that arise as anti-angiogenesis agents commenting both on the chemistry and bioactivity that these exhibit aiming to contribute to the perspectives that they hold for future research.

  7. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT

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    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life than those used for PET. In addition, SPECT is a less expensive technique than PET. Commonly used gamma emitters are: {sup 99m}Tc (E{sub max} 141 keV, T{sub 1/2} 6.02 h), {sup 123}I (E{sub max} 529 keV, T{sub 1/2} 13.0 h) and {sup 111}In (E{sub max} 245 keV, T{sub 1/2} 67.2 h). Compared to clinical SPECT, PET has a higher spatial resolution and the possibility to more accurately estimate the in vivo concentration of a tracer. In preclinical imaging, the situation is quite different. The resolution of microSPECT cameras (<0.5 mm) is higher than that of microPET cameras (>1.5 mm). In this report, studies on new radiolabelled tracers for SPECT imaging of angiogenesis in tumours are reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Boerman, O.C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life th

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  10. An open-label, multicenter, phase 2a study to assess the feasibility of imaging metastases in late-stage cancer patients with the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-selective angiogenesis imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692

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    Axelsson, Rimma [Division of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: rimma.axelsson@ki.se; Bach-Gansmo, Tore [The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Castell-Conesa, Juan [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); McParland, Brian J. [Research and Development, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Ltd., Amersham (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Background: The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is one of the angiogenesis-related membrane proteins highly expressed on the neovasculature of breast cancer and lung carcinomas. Labeling of the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin with {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 provides a potential tool for imaging angiogenesis and hence the presence of malignant lesions. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of detecting metastatic lesions in liver, lung, bone, and brain with scintigraphy using the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-avid imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 in patients with breast or lung cancer, and to assess its safety profile. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients, 15 with lung cancer and 10 with breast cancer, were recruited at 10 centers. Metastases were newly diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or bone scintigraphy, i.e., the reference standard. Patients underwent whole-body scans of approximately 10-15 min duration beginning at 45 min post-injection and a SPECT acquisition of approximately 30 min beginning at 75 min after injection of up to 1100 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692. In case of liver metastases, dynamic acquisitions of 15 min were performed starting immediately post-injection. Safety measurements were performed up to 2.5 hours after injection and included hematology, serum biochemistry, coagulation, urine analysis, vital signs, oximetry, 12-lead ECG assessments, and a physical examination. Results: In patients with breast cancer, {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 scintigraphy detected 1 of 7 liver, 4 of 5 lung, 8 of 17 bone, and 1 of 1 brain metastases. The corresponding numbers for lung cancer patients were 0 of 2, 17 of 18, 2 of 2, and 7 of 9. There was overall stability through the follow-up period for all investigated safety parameters. Conclusion: Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-NC100692 is feasible for detection of lung and brain metastases from breast and lung cancer, while the detection of liver and bone lesions is poor. The use of {sup

  11. An open-label, multicenter, phase 2a study to assess the feasibility of imaging metastases in late-stage cancer patients with the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3}-selective angiogenesis imaging agent 99mTc-NC100692

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    Axelsson, Rimma (Division of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: rimma.axelsson@ki.se; Bach-Gansmo, Tore (The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Castell-Conesa, Juan (Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)); McParland, Brian J. (Research and Development, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare Ltd., Amersham (United Kingdom))

    2010-01-15

    Background: The alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3} integrin is one of the angiogenesis-related membrane proteins highly expressed on the neovasculature of breast cancer and lung carcinomas. Labeling of the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3} integrin with 99mTc-NC100692 provides a potential tool for imaging angiogenesis and hence the presence of malignant lesions. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of detecting metastatic lesions in liver, lung, bone, and brain with scintigraphy using the alpha{sub v}beta{sub 3}-avid imaging agent 99mTc-NC100692 in patients with breast or lung cancer, and to assess its safety profile. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients, 15 with lung cancer and 10 with breast cancer, were recruited at 10 centers. Metastases were newly diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or bone scintigraphy, i.e., the reference standard. Patients underwent whole-body scans of approximately 10-15 min duration beginning at 45 min post-injection and a SPECT acquisition of approximately 30 min beginning at 75 min after injection of up to 1100 MBq 99mTc-NC100692. In case of liver metastases, dynamic acquisitions of 15 min were performed starting immediately post-injection. Safety measurements were performed up to 2.5 hours after injection and included hematology, serum biochemistry, coagulation, urine analysis, vital signs, oximetry, 12-lead ECG assessments, and a physical examination. Results: In patients with breast cancer, 99mTc-NC100692 scintigraphy detected 1 of 7 liver, 4 of 5 lung, 8 of 17 bone, and 1 of 1 brain metastases. The corresponding numbers for lung cancer patients were 0 of 2, 17 of 18, 2 of 2, and 7 of 9. There was overall stability through the follow-up period for all investigated safety parameters. Conclusion: Scintigraphy with 99mTc-NC100692 is feasible for detection of lung and brain metastases from breast and lung cancer, while the detection of liver and bone lesions is poor. The use of 99mTc-NC100692 is safe and well tolerated

  12. Differential modulation of angiogenesis by erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in a mouse model of ischaemic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel M McVicar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs are widely used to treat anaemia but concerns exist about their potential to promote pathological angiogenesis in some clinical scenarios. In the current study we have assessed the angiogenic potential of three ESAs; epoetin delta, darbepoetin alfa and epoetin beta using in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The epoetins induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells at high doses, although darbepoetin alfa was pro-angiogenic at low-doses (1-20 IU/ml. ESA-induced angiogenesis was VEGF-mediated. In a mouse model of ischaemia-induced retinopathy, all ESAs induced generation of reticulocytes but only epoetin beta exacerbated pathological (pre-retinal neovascularisation in comparison to controls (p<0.05. Only epoetin delta induced a significant revascularisation response which enhanced normality of the vasculature (p<0.05. This was associated with mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells and their localisation to the retinal vasculature. Darbepoetin alfa also increased the number of active microglia in the ischaemic retina relative to other ESAs (p<0.05. Darbepoetin alfa induced retinal TNFalpha and VEGF mRNA expression which were up to 4 fold higher than with epoetin delta (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This study has implications for treatment of patients as there are clear differences in the angiogenic potential of the different ESAs.

  13. Imaging techniques used for the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    evaluation, but also on sensitive monitoring of microvascular changes during treatment. State-of-the-art imaging techniques have the potential to visualize and characterize angiogenesis, although the technology and methodologies employed are recent and need further validation. The aim of this series......Angiogenesis has a critical role in primary tumor growth and the development of metastases. Several angiogenesis inhibitors were recently developed, being a very attractive target for digestive tumor therapy. However, individualized therapy should not only be based on the pre-treatment imaging...

  14. Assessing Tumor Angiogenesis with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Jackson, Edward F.

    2006-09-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a method able of assessing microvascular changes at high spatial resolution and without ionizing radiation. The microcirculation and structure of tumors are fundamentally chaotic in that tumor-derived factors stimulate the endothelial cells to form new small vessels (angiogenesis) and this vasculature deviates markedly from normal hierarchical branching patterns. The tumor-induced microvascular changes lead to blood flow that is both spatially and temporally more heterogeneous than the efficient and uniform perfusion of normal organs and tissues. DCE-MRI allows for the assessment of perfusion and permeability of the tumor microvasculature, including the network of vessels with diameters less than 100 μm, which are beyond the resolution of conventional angiograms. The microvessel permeability to small molecular weight contrast media as well as measures of tumor response can be assessed with different analysis techniques ranging from simple measures of enhancement to pharmacokinetic models. In this work, such DCE-MRI analysis techniques are discussed.

  15. Molecular targeting of angiogenesis for imaging and therapy

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    Brack, Simon S.; Neri, Dario [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (Switzerland); Dinkelborg, Ludger M. [Research Laboratories of Schering AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the proliferation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is an underlying process in many human diseases, including cancer, blinding ocular disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. The ability to selectively target and interfere with neovascularisation would potentially be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of angiogenesis-related diseases. This review presents the authors' views on some of the most relevant markers of angiogenesis described to date, as well as on specific ligands which have been characterised in pre-clinical animal models and/or clinical studies. Furthermore, we present an overview on technologies which are likely to have an impact on the way molecular targeting of angiogenesis is performed in the future. (orig.)

  16. Subharmonic imaging of contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, F; Shi, W T; Goldberg, B B

    2000-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents promise to improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic ultrasound imaging. It is of great importance to adapt ultrasound equipment for optimal use with contrast agents e.g., by exploiting the nonlinear properties of the contrast microbubbles. Harmonic imaging is one technique that has been extensively studied and is commercially available. However, harmonic imaging is associated with problems, due to second harmonic generation and accumulation within the tissue itself. Given the lack of subharmonic generation in tissue, one alternative is the creation of subharmonic images by transmitting at the fundamental frequency (fo) and receiving at the subharmonic (fo/2). Subharmonic imaging should have a much better lateral resolution and may be suitable for scanning deep-lying structures owing to the higher transmit frequency and the much smaller attenuation of scattered subharmonic signals. In this paper, we will review different aspects of subharmonic imaging including implementation, in-vitro gray-scale imaging and subharmonic aided pressure estimation.

  17. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  18. Imaging techniques used for the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adrian S(a)ftoiu; Peter Vilmann

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis has a critical role in primary tumor growth and the development of metastases.Several angiogenesis inhibitors were recently developed,being a very attractive target for digestive tumor therapy.However,individualized therapy should not only be based on the pre-treatment imaging evaluation,but also on sensitive monitoring of microvascular changes during treatment.State-of-theart imaging techniques have the potential to visualize and characterize angiogenesis,although the technology and methodologies employed are recent and need further validation.The aim of this series of reviews was to analyze and enhance current knowledge and future perspectives about the real-time assessment of angiogenesis in digestive cancers,used for the longitudinal monitoring of the effects of chemo-radiotherapy(including anti-angiogenic therapies),as well as for the precise targeting of drugs through molecular-based drug-delivery systems.

  19. Microultrasound Molecular Imaging of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in a Mouse Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Rychak

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency microultrasound imaging of tumor progression in mice enables noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging at excellent spatial and temporal resolution, although microultrasonography alone does not offer molecular scale data. In the current study, we investigated the use of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents bearing targeting ligands specific for molecular markers of tumor angiogenesis using high-frequency microultrasound imaging. A xenograft tumor model in the mouse was used to image vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2 expression with microbubbles conjugated to an anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody or an isotype control. Microultrasound imaging was accomplished at a center frequency of 40 MHz, which provided lateral and axial resolutions of 40 and 90 μm, respectively. The B-mode (two-dimensional mode acoustic signal from microbubbles bound to the molecular target was determined by an ultrasound-based destruction-subtraction scheme. Quantification of the adherent microbubble fraction in nine tumor-bearing mice revealed significant retention of VEGFR-2-targeted microbubbles relative to control-targeted microbubbles. These data demonstrate that contrast-enhanced microultrasound imaging is a useful method for assessing molecular expression of tumor angiogenesis in mice at high resolution.

  20. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis Using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Conjugated Microbubbles

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    Wang, Jianjun; Qin, Bin; Chen, Xucai; Wagner, William R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging of angiogenesis receptors could provide a sensitive and clinically useful method for detecting neovascularization such as occurs in malignant tumors, and responses to anti-angiogenic therapies for such tumors. We tested the hypothesis that microbubbles (MB) tagged with human VEGF121 (MBVEGF) bind to the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) in vitro and angiogenic endothelium in vivo, and that this specific binding can be imaged on a clinical ultrasound system. In this work, targeted adhesion of MBVEGF was evaluated in vitro using a parallel plate flow system containing adsorbed recombinant human KDR. There was more adhesion of MBVEGF to KDR-coated plates when the amount of VEGF121 on each MB or KDR density on the plate was increased. MBVEGF adhesion to KDR-coated plates decreased with increasing wall shear rate. On intravital microscopic imaging of bFGF-stimulated rat cremaster muscle, there was greater microvascular adhesion of MBVEGF compared to that of isotype IgG-conjugated control MB (MBCTL). To determine if MBVEGF could be used to ultrasonically image angiogenesis, ultrasound imaging was performed in mice bearing squamous cell carcinoma after intravenous injection of MBVEGF. Ultrasound videointensity enhancement in tumor was significantly higher for MBVEGF (17.3±9.7 dB) compared to MBCTL (3.8±4.4 dB, n=6, ptumor angiogenesis and could be extended to other applications such as molecular monitoring of therapeutic angiogenesis or anti-angiogenic therapies in cardiovascular disease or cancer. PMID:28165246

  1. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    adults where it is primaily found in wound healing, pregnancy and during the menstrual cycle. This thesis focus on the negative consequences of angiogenesis in cancer. It consists of a an initial overview followed by four manuscripts. The overview gives a short introduction to the process of angiogenesis......When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  2. In-vivo three-dimensional Doppler variance imaging for tumor angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane

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    Qi, Wenjuan; Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive tumor microvasculature visualization and characterization play significant roles in the detection of tumors and importantly, for aiding in the development of therapeutic strategies. The feasibility and effectiveness of a Doppler variance standard deviation imaging method for tumor angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane were tested in vivo on a rat glioma F98 tumor spheroid. Utilizing a high resolution Doppler Variance Optical Coherence Tomography (DVOCT) system with A-line rate of 20 kHz, three-dimensional mapping of a tumor with a total area of 3×2.5mm2 was completed within 15 seconds. The top-view image clearly visualized the complex vascular perfusion with the detection of capillaries as small as approximately 10μm. The results of the current study demonstrate the capability of the Doppler variance standard deviation imaging method as a non-invasive assessment of tumor angiogenesis, with the potential for its use in clinical settings.

  3. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in a subcutaneous islet transplant site in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-06-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is an established clinical therapy for select patients with type-1 diabetes. Clinically, the hepatic portal vein serves as the site for IT. Despite numerous advances in clinical IT, limitations remain, including early islet cell loss posttransplant, procedural complications, and the inability to effectively monitor islet grafts. Hence, alternative sites for IT are currently being explored, with the subcutaneous space as one potential option. When left unmodified, the subcutaneous space routinely fails to promote successful islet engraftment. However, when employing the previously developed subcutaneous "deviceless" technique, a favorable microenvironment for islet survival and function is established. In this technique, an angiocatheter was temporarily implanted subcutaneously, which facilitated angiogenesis to promote subsequent islet engraftment. This technique has been employed in preclinical animal models, providing a sufficient means to develop techniques to monitor functional aspects of the graft such as angiogenesis. Here, we utilize photoacoustic imaging to track angiogenesis during the priming of the subcutaneous site by the implanted catheter at 1 to 4 weeks postcatheter. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities shows gradual growth of vasculature in the implant position. These results demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis, thus facilitating a means to optimize and assess the pretransplant microenvironment.

  4. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy to assess mucosal angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio; Danese; Gionata; Fiorino; Erika; Angelucci; Stefania; Vetrano; Nico; Pagano; Giacomo; Rando; Antonino; Spinelli; Alberto; Malesci; Alessandro; Repici

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether narrow band imaging (NBI) is a useful tool for the in vivo detection of angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: Conventional and NBI colonoscopy was performed in 14 patients with colonic inflammation (8 ulcerative colitis and 6 Crohn’s disease). Biopsy samples were taken and CD31 expression was assayed immuno- histochemically; microvascular density was assessed by vessel count. RESULTS: In areas that were endoscopically normal but positive on NBI, ther...

  5. Improved Magnetic Resonance Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis by Avidin-Induced Clearance of Nonbound Bimodal Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geralda A.F. van Tilborg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenic, that is, newly formed, blood vessels play an important role in tumor growth and metastasis and are a potential target for tumor treatment. In previous studies, the αvβ3 integrin, which is strongly expressed in angiogenic vessels, has been used as a target for Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD-functionalized nanoparticulate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging-based visualization of angiogenesis. In the present study, the target-to-background ratio was increased by diminishing the nonspecific contrast enhancement originating from contrast material present in the blood pool. This was accomplished by the use of a so-called avidin chase, which allowed rapid clearance of non-bound paramagnetic RGD-biotin-liposomes from the blood circulation. C57BL/6 mice, bearing a B16F10 mouse melanoma, received RGD-functionalized or untargeted biotin-liposomes, which was followed by avidin infusion or no infusion. Precontrast, postcontrast, and postavidin T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired at 6.3 T. Postcontrast images showed similar percentages of contrast-enhanced pixels in the tumors of mice that received RGD-biotin-liposomes and biotin-liposomes. Post avidin infusion this percentage rapidly decreased to precontrast levels for biotin-liposomes, whereas a significant amount of contrast-enhanced pixels remained present for RGD-biotin-liposomes. These results showed that besides target-associated contrast agent, the circulating contrast agent contributed significantly to the contrast enhancement as well. Ex vivo fluorescence microscopy confirmed association of the RGD-biotin-liposomes to tumor endothelial cells both with and without avidin infusion, whereas biotin-liposomes were predominantly found within the vessel lumen. The clearance methodology presented in this study successfully enhanced the specificity of molecular magnetic resonance imaging and opens exciting possibilities for studying detection limits and targeting kinetics of site

  6. Agents described in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database for imaging carbonic anhydrase IX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is selectively expressed in a range of hypoxic tumours and is a validated endogenous hypoxia marker with prognostic significance; hence, CA IX is of great interest as a molecular imaging target in oncology. In this review, we present an overview of the different imaging agents and imaging modalities that have been applied for the in vivo detection of CA IX. The imaging agents reviewed are all entries in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) and comprise antibody, antibody fragments and small molecule imaging agents. The effectiveness of these agents for imaging CA IX in vivo gave variable performance; however, a number of agents proved very capable. As molecular imaging has become indispensable in current medical practice we anticipate that the clinical significance of CA IX will see continued development and improvements in imaging agents for targeting this enzyme.

  7. 肿瘤血管生成的PET检测%PET imaging for evaluating tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩安勤; 胡旭东; 邢力刚

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis,a main characteristic in tumors,plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis,which provides a new strategy for tumor treatment.By marking angiogenesis-related receptors,polypeptides,kinases or extracellular matrix proteins as high affinity molecular probes,PET imaging can noninvasively display integrins,VEGF/VEGFR,matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and closely monitor tumor angiogenesis and vascular-targeted treatments on the molecular level.In this paper,research progress and future development of PET imaging for evaluating tumor angiogenesis are reviewed.%肿瘤血管生成作为肿瘤的主要特征,在肿瘤生长和转移中起着重要作用,为肿瘤治疗提供了新策略.通过标记血管生成相关的受体、多肽、激酶或细胞外基质蛋白,形成高亲和力的分子探针,与肿瘤血管生成过程中产生的特异性靶分子结合,从而显示包括整合素、VEGF/VEGFR、基质金属蛋白酶(MMPs)等与血管生成关系密切的特征性血管生成因子,可从分子水平对肿瘤新生血管及血管靶向治疗疗效进行无创性检测.笔者就肿瘤血管生成PET影像学检测研究进展及未来发展作一综述.

  8. Targeted Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüll, H.; Robillard, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular Imaging allows the visualization of biological processesin vivo, offering new chances for healthcare with respect to early diagnosis and improved therapy. The new field of molecular imaging isboosted by more sensitive imaging systems and the emergence of targeted imaging agents that hom

  9. Quantiifcation of angiogenesis by CT perfusion imaging in liver tumor of rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Jie Jiang; Zai-Ren Zhang; Bao-Zhong Shen; Yong Wan; Hong Guo; Jin-Ping Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor angiogenesis is essential for primary and metastatic tumor growth. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is a new imaging method, made possible by the recent development of fast CT scanners and improved data analysis techniques, which allows measurement of the physiologic and hemodynamic properties of tissue vasculature. This study aimed to evaluate CTP in the quantiifcation of angiogenesis and to assess the relationship between tissue perfusion parameters and microvascular density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), attempting to detect the physiologic properties of angiogenesis. METHODS: Sixteen rabbits with VX2 liver tumors underwent multi-slice CT perfusion (MSCTP) on day 14 after tumor inoculation. CTP parameters included hepatic blood lfow (HBF), hepatic blood volume (HBV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability of capillary vessel surface (PS), hepatic artery index (HAI), hepatic artery perfusion (HAP), and hepatic portal perfusion (HPP). The border of the tumor was stained with CD34 and VEGF immunohistochemical stains, and MVD was measured by anti-CD34. Then, CTP parameters were determined whether they were correlated with MVD and VEGF using Pearson’s correlation coefifcient. RESULTS: The positive expression of MVD was different in the center and border of the tumor (P0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Signiifcant correlations were found between perfusion parameters and MVD and VEGF. Therefore, MSCTP can be used to evaluate tumor angiogenesisin vivo.

  10. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Bao, Jin-ku, E-mail: jinkubao@yahoo.com [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  11. Liposome imaging agents in personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Hansen, Anders Elias; Gabizon, Alberto;

    2012-01-01

    that selectively localize in tumor tissue can transport both drugs and imaging agents, which allows for a theranostic approach with great potential in personalized medicine. Radiolabeling of liposomes have for many years been used in preclinical studies for evaluating liposome in vivo performance and has been...... start to consider how to use imaging for patient selection and treatment monitoring in connection to nanocarrier based medicines. Nanocarrier imaging agents could furthermore have interesting properties for disease diagnostics and staging. Here, we review the major advances in the development...... of radiolabeled liposomes for imaging as a tool in personalized medicine....

  12. In Vivo Imaging Study of Angiogenesis in a Channelized Porous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Tamplenizza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main scientific issue hindering the development of tissue engineering technologies is the lack of proper vascularization. Among the various approaches developed for boosting vascularization, scaffold design has attracted increasing interest over the last few years. The aim of this article is to illustrate a scaffold design strategy for enhancing vascularization based on sacrificial microfabrication of embedded microchannels. This approach was combined with an innovative poly(ether urethane urea (PEUtU porous scaffold to provide an alternative graft substitute material for the treatment of tissue defects. Fluorescent and chemiluminescent imaging combined with computed tomography were used to study the behavior of the scaffold composition within living subjects by analyzing angiogenesis and inflammation processes and observing the variation in x-ray absorption, respectively. For this purpose, an IntegriSense 680 probe was used in vivo for the localization and quantification of integrin αvβ3, due to its critical involvement in angiogenesis, and a XenoLight RediJect Inflammation Probe for the study of the decline in inflammation progression during healing. Overall, the collected data suggest the advantages of embedding a synthetic vascular network into a PEUtU porous matrix to enhance in vivo tissue integration, maturation, and regeneration. Moreover, our imaging approach proved to be an efficient and versatile tool for scaffold in vivo testing.

  13. In vivo imaging study of angiogenesis in a channelized porous scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplenizza, Margherita; Tocchio, Alessandro; Gerges, Irini; Martello, Federico; Martelli, Cristina; Ottobrini, Luisa; Lucignani, Giovanni; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The main scientific issue hindering the development of tissue engineering technologies is the lack of proper vascularization. Among the various approaches developed for boosting vascularization, scaffold design has attracted increasing interest over the last few years. The aim of this article is to illustrate a scaffold design strategy for enhancing vascularization based on sacrificial microfabrication of embedded microchannels. This approach was combined with an innovative poly(ether urethane urea) (PEUtU) porous scaffold to provide an alternative graft substitute material for the treatment of tissue defects. Fluorescent and chemiluminescent imaging combined with computed tomography were used to study the behavior of the scaffold composition within living subjects by analyzing angiogenesis and inflammation processes and observing the variation in x-ray absorption, respectively. For this purpose, an IntegriSense 680 probe was used in vivo for the localization and quantification of integrin αvβ3, due to its critical involvement in angiogenesis, and a XenoLight RediJect Inflammation Probe for the study of the decline in inflammation progression during healing. Overall, the collected data suggest the advantages of embedding a synthetic vascular network into a PEUtU porous matrix to enhance in vivo tissue integration, maturation, and regeneration. Moreover, our imaging approach proved to be an efficient and versatile tool for scaffold in vivo testing.

  14. Functional CT imaging of angiogenesis in rabbit VX2 soft-tissue tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Henderson, Elizabeth; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2001-12-01

    Functional parameters such as blood flow (BF), microvessel permeability surface area product (PS), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) are physiological markers related to the changes associated with angiogenesis. In the current study we present a functional CT technique for the simultaneous measurement of these four functional parameters and the display of each parameter as a functional image over an entire tissue slice. New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX2 thigh tumours were scanned using CT with contrast media injection. The ex vivo method of radioactive microspheres was used to evaluate the accuracy of BF measurements with the functional CT technique. There was a significant linear correlation (R = 0.96) between regional CT and microsphere-measured BF values, with a slope not significantly different from unity (0.98 +/- 0.02, P precision of our CT technique was determined by the repeated scanning under steady-state conditions. The precision of CT-measured BF, PS, BV and MTT was 14%, 18%, 20% and 24%, respectively. In conclusion, BF can be measured accurately and BF, PS, BV and MTT reproducibly using our functional CT technique. Functional CT can be readily incorporated into existing imaging protocols to assess tumour angiogenesis.

  15. MR imaging of tumor angiogenesis using sterically stabilized Gd-DTPA liposomes targeted to CD105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Dong [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Feng Xiaoyuan [Department of Radiology, Hua Shan Hospital, Medical Center of FuDan University, ShangHai 200040 (China); Henning, Tobias D. [UCSF, Department of Radiology, Contrast Media Laboratory, 185 Berry Street, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Wen Li [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Lu Weiyue; Pan Hong [Department of Pharmaceutical Targeting, Institute of Pharmacy, Medical Center of FuDan University, ShangHai 200032 (China); Wu Xing [Department of Neurosurgery, Hua Shan Hospital, Medical Center of FuDan University, ShangHai 200040 (China); Zou Liguang [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China)], E-mail: cqzdwl@yahoo.com.cn

    2009-04-15

    Aim: To depict tumor angiogenesis via the expression of CD105 in tumor-bearing rats using Gd-DTPA liposomes targeted to CD105 (CD105-Gd-SLs) on MR imaging. Materials and methods: Three Gd-DTPA liposomal nanoparticles were prepared in our trial: liposomes entrapping Gd-DTPA (Gd-SLs), Gd-SLs conjugated to immunoglobulins (IgG-Gd-SLs) and CD105-Gd-SLs. Forty glioma-bearing rats were randomized into four groups: (a) Gd-DTPA; (b) Gd-SLs; (c) IgG-Gd-SLs; (d) CD105-Gd-SLs. Axial T1WI MRI images were collected at baseline and repeated at 5, 30, 60 and 120 min post-intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA or liposome. Enhancement features and contrast-to-noise ratio of each group were analyzed. After imaging, tumors were resected for immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining to assess vascularity and angiogenesis. Results: The four groups showed different enhancement features. The enhancement area was restricted for group CD105-Gd-SLs, while diffused for the other three. The degree of enhancement over time varied: group Gd-DTPA showed an early contrast enhancement at instant after injection with a peak at 30 min and a decline to baseline values at 60 min. In group CD105-Gd-SLs, the signal intensity (SI) continuously increased over 120 min. In groups IgG-Gd-SLs and Gd-SLs the SI peaked at 60 min, followed by a minor decrease for IgG-Gd-SLs and a rapid decrease for Gd-SLs almost to baseline. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence showed that the enhancement in the CD105-Gd-SLs group resulted mainly from new microvessels. While in the other three groups, mature microvessels and new microvasculature resulted in the enhancement of the tumor. Conclusion: CD105-Gd-SLs can be used to detect early tumor angiogenesis on MR images. This might provide a means to non-invasively reveal a malignant phenotype of extracerebral F98 tumor and evaluate its progression.

  16. SPECT and PET imaging of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in pre-clinical models of myocardial ischemia and peripheral vascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikx, Geert [Maastricht University Medical Centre MUMC+, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Voeoe, Stefan [Maastricht University Medical Centre MUMC+, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bauwens, Matthias [Maastricht University Medical Centre MUMC+, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Post, Mark J. [Maastricht University, Department of Physiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Maastricht University Medical Centre MUMC+, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The extent of neovascularization determines the clinical outcome of coronary artery disease and other occlusive cardiovascular disorders. Monitoring of neovascularization is therefore highly important. This review article will elaborately discuss preclinical studies aimed at validating new nuclear angiogenesis and arteriogenesis tracers. Additionally, we will briefly address possible obstacles that should be considered when designing an arteriogenesis radiotracer. A structured medline search was the base of this review, which gives an overview on different radiopharmaceuticals that have been evaluated in preclinical models. Neovascularization is a collective term used to indicate different processes such as angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. However, while it is assumed that sensitive detection through nuclear imaging will facilitate translation of successful therapeutic interventions in preclinical models to the bedside, we still lack specific tracers for neovascularization imaging. Most nuclear imaging research to date has focused on angiogenesis, leaving nuclear arteriogenesis imaging largely overlooked. Although angiogenesis is the process which is best understood, there is no scarcity in theoretical targets for arteriogenesis imaging. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  18. Multi-scale agent-based brain cancer modeling and prediction of TKI treatment response: Incorporating EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiaoqiang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis in brain cancer act as an engine for tumor initiation, expansion and response to therapy. Since the existing literature does not have any models that investigate the impact of both angiogenesis and molecular signaling pathways on treatment, we propose a novel multi-scale, agent-based computational model that includes both angiogenesis and EGFR modules to study the response of brain cancer under tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs treatment. Results The novel angiogenesis module integrated into the agent-based tumor model is based on a set of reaction–diffusion equations that describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the distributions of micro-environmental factors such as glucose, oxygen, TGFα, VEGF and fibronectin. These molecular species regulate tumor growth during angiogenesis. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR signaling pathway linked to a cell-cycle pathway to determine its phenotype. EGFR TKIs are delivered through the blood vessels of tumor microvasculature and the response to treatment is studied. Conclusions Our simulations demonstrated that entire tumor growth profile is a collective behaviour of cells regulated by the EGFR signaling pathway and the cell cycle. We also found that angiogenesis has a dual effect under TKI treatment: on one hand, through neo-vasculature TKIs are delivered to decrease tumor invasion; on the other hand, the neo-vasculature can transport glucose and oxygen to tumor cells to maintain their metabolism, which results in an increase of cell survival rate in the late simulation stages.

  19. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hao [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yunan [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Third Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound, Xinqiao Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Leigh, Bryan R. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Overexpression of CD105 (endoglin) correlates with poor prognosis in many solid tumor types. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) assessed by CD105 staining is the current gold standard for evaluating tumor angiogenesis in the clinic. The goal of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging CD105 expression. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with {sup 64}Cu. FACS analysis and microscopy studies were performed to compare the CD105 binding affinity of TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105. PET imaging, biodistribution, blocking, and ex vivo histology studies were performed on 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the ability of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105 to target tumor angiogenesis. Another chimeric antibody, cetuximab, was used as an isotype-matched control. FACS analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity between TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105, which was further validated by fluorescence microscopy. {sup 64}Cu labeling was achieved with high yield and specific activity. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 tumor uptake of the tracer was 8.0 {+-} 0.5, 10.4 {+-} 2.8, and 9.7 {+-} 1.8%ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection, respectively (n = 3), higher than most organs at late time points which provided excellent tumor contrast. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105. This is the first successful PET imaging study of CD105 expression. Fast, prominent, persistent, and CD105-specific uptake of the tracer in the 4T1 tumor was observed. Further studies are warranted and currently underway. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis of Fluorine-18 Labeled Glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe as a Potential Tumor Imaging Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyo Chul; Kim, Ji Sun; Sung, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae Ho; An, Gwang Il; Chi, Dae Yoon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul; Moon, Byung Seok; Choi, Tae Hyun; Chuna, Kwon Soo [Inha Univ., Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is an important receptor affecting tumor growth, metastatic potential on proliferating endothelial cells as well as on tumor cells of various origin, tumor-induced angiogenesis could be blocked by antagonizing the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin with RGD. Therefore, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is a target for angiogenesis imaging that might be useful in assessing tumor-induced angiogenesis and identifying tumor metastasis. To design potent radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis containing a cRGD moiety should include low hepatic uptake in vivo. Tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), naturally existed in extracellular matrix proteins, is known to be the primary binding site of the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin. The imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} receptor expression will give the information of the metastatic ability of the tumor which is not available by [{sup 18}F]FDG. Our interest in developing new radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo visualization of angiogenesis has led us to synthesize derivatives of cRGD (cyclic arginineglycine-aspartic acid) that contains glucose moiety. Because sugar-protein interaction is a key step in metastasis and angiogenesis, it has also been proposed to play an intriguing role in imaging of tumor. We designed and synthesized two fluorine-18 labeled RGD glycopeptides . N-fluorobenzyl-diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl-glucose-KRGDf, and Nfluorobenzoyl- diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl-glucose-KRGDf, from same precursor as a diagnostic tumor imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 labeled cRGD glycopeptides were prepared using two different simple labeling methods: one is reductive alkylation of an amine with [{sup 18}F]fluorobenzaldehyde and the other is amide condensation with [{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoic acid.

  1. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30-40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [64Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for analysing

  2. Development of 68Ga-Glycopeptide as an Imaging Probe for Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Tsao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was aimed to study tissue distribution and tumor imaging potential of 68Ga-glycopeptide (GP in tumor-bearing rodents by PET. Methods. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan. GP was labeled with 68Ga chloride for in vitro and in vivo studies. Computer outlined region of interest (counts per pixel of the tumor and muscle (at the symmetric site was used to determine tumor-to-muscle count density ratios. To ascertain the feasibility of 68Ga-GP in tumor imaging in large animals, PET/CT imaging of 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG were conducted in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors. Standard uptake value of tumors were determined by PET up to 45 min. To determine blood clearance and half-life of 68Ga-GP, blood samples were collected from 10 seconds to 20 min. Results. Radiochemical purity of 68Ga-GP determined by instant thin-layer chromatography was >95%. Tumor uptake values (SUV for 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors were 3.25 versus 7.04. PET images in tumor-bearing rats and rabbits confirmed that 68Ga-GP could assess tumor uptake. From blood clearance curve, the half-life of 68Ga-GP was 1.84 hr. Conclusion Our data indicate that it is feasible to use 68Ga-GP to assess tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Clinical application of several tumor imaging agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Neoplasms is one of the main diseases for harming health.It is difficult to prevent the neoplasms because the factors of bringing out them are complex.To raise survival rate the early diagnosis of tumors is very important.Radionuclide imaging is useful to detect recurrent or residual diseaseand to identificate benign or malignant tumor.Several tumorimaging agents as following have clinical significance indiagnosing tumors.

  4. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...

  5. Correlation of MR Perfusion-weighted Imaging of Prostatic Cancer with Tumor Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-bin; SHEN Jun-kang; XU Jian-ming; LI Xiao-bing

    2008-01-01

    Objective:MR perfusion-weighted imaging(PWI)has been widely applied in the research of cerebral tumor,benign and malignant musculoskeletal neoplasms and so on.The aim of this study is to explore the application of MR perfusion-weighted imaging in prostatic cancer(Pca),and evaluate the correlation of PWI features with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)and microvessel density(MVD).Methods:Twenty-eight consecutive patients who were diagnosed clinically as prostatic cancer and thirty healthy volunteers were examined by PWI.MVD and VEGF were stained with immunohistochemical methods.Some parameters of PWI,including the steepest slope of signal intensity-time curve(SSmax)and the change in relaxation rate(△R2*peak)at lesions,were analyzed.Correlation analysis was used to determine the relationship between the results of PWI and that of immunohistochemistry.Results:(1)In the healthy volunteers.the steepest slope of signal intensity-time curve(SSmax)and △R2*peak of perfusion curve were;0.430±0.011,2.01±0.7 respectively;however,in the prostatic caucer,they were 57.8±5.0,3.0±0.6 respectively;with significant difference(t=4.11,3.28,P<0.01).(2)The VEGF and MVD expression of twenty-eight Pca patients were significantly higher.Conclusion:On MR perfusion.weighted imaging,SSmax and △R2*peak Can reflect MVD and VEGF expression levels in prostatic cancer.suggesting information on tumor angiogenesis.Thus they are beneficial to the diagnosis and treatment of prostatic cancer.

  6. Angiogenesis: An improved in vitro biological system and automated image-based workflow to aid identification and characterization of angiogenesis and angiogenic modulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, A.F.; Zaltsman, A.B.; Martin, R.C.; Kuzmin, A.; Alexandrov, Y.; Roquemore, E.P.; Jessop, R.A.; Erck, M.G.M.V.; Verheijen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a general term describing formation of new tube-like microvessel sprouts that are the size of capillary blood vessels. Angiogenesis is fundamental in key stages of embryonic development, organ formation, and wound repair and is also involved in the development and progression of a va

  7. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  8. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of angiogenesis using theranostic ανβ3-targeted copper nanoparticles incorporating a sn-2 lipase-labile fumagillin prodrug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Cai, Xin; Yang, Xiaoxia; Senpan, Angana; Allen, John S.; Pan, Dipanjan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) tomography imaging is an emerging, versatile, and noninvasive imaging modality, which combines the advantages of both optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. It opens up opportunities for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis, a feature of skin pathologies including cancers and psoriasis. In this study, high-density copper oleate encapsulated within a phospholipid surfactant (CuNPs) generated a soft nanoparticle with PA contrast comparable to gold. Within the near-infrared window, the copper nanoparticles can provide a signal more than 7 times higher that of blood. ανβ3-targeted of CuNPs in a Matrigel mouse model demonstrated prominent PA contrast enhancement of the neovasculature compared to mice given nontargeted or competitively inhibited CuNPs. Incorporation of a sn-2 lipase-labile fumagillin prodrug into the CuNPs produced marked antiangiogenesis in the same model, demonstrating the theranostic potential of a PA agent for the first time in vivo. With a PA signal comparable to gold-based nanoparticles yet a lower cost and demonstrated drug delivery potential, ανβ3-targeted CuNPs hold great promise for the management of skin pathologies with neovascular features.

  9. Family of enhanced photoacoustic imaging agents for high-sensitivity and multiplexing studies in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Bodapati, Sunil; Teed, Robert; May, Salomón Y; Tabakman, Scott M; Liu, Zhuang; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Dai, Hongjie; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-06-26

    Photoacoustic imaging is a unique modality that overcomes to a great extent the resolution and depth limitations of optical imaging while maintaining relatively high contrast. However, since many diseases will not manifest an endogenous photoacoustic contrast, it is essential to develop exogenous photoacoustic contrast agents that can target diseased tissue(s). Here we present a family of novel photoacoustic contrast agents that are based on the binding of small optical dyes to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-dye). We synthesized five different SWNT-dye contrast agents using different optical dyes, creating five "flavors" of SWNT-dye nanoparticles. In particular, SWNTs that were coated with either QSY(21) (SWNT-QSY) or indocyanine green (SWNT-ICG) exhibited over 100-times higher photoacoustic contrast in living animals compared to plain SWNTs, leading to subnanomolar sensitivities. We then conjugated the SWNT-dye conjugates with cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptides to molecularly target the α(v)β(3) integrin, which is associated with tumor angiogenesis. Intravenous administration of these tumor-targeted imaging agents to tumor-bearing mice showed significantly higher photoacoustic signal in the tumor than in mice injected with the untargeted contrast agent. Finally, we were able to spectrally separate the photoacoustic signals of SWNT-QSY and SWNT-ICG in living animals injected subcutaneously with both particles in the same location, opening the possibility for multiplexing in vivo studies.

  10. Research progress of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical diagnostic modality, which has become popular in hospitals around the world. Approximately 30% of MRI exams include the use of contrast agents. The research progress of the paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents was described briefly. Three important approaches in the soluble paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents design including nonionic, tissue-specific and macromolecular contrast agents were investigated. In addition, the problems in the research and development in future were discussed.

  11. Quantitative assessment of tumor angiogenesis using real-time motion-compensated contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Guracar, Ismayil; Foygel, Kira; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a real-time motion compensation algorithm for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of tumor angiogenesis on a clinical ultrasound system. Materials and methods The Administrative Institutional Panel on Laboratory Animal Care approved all experiments. A new motion correction algorithm measuring the sum of absolute differences in pixel displacements within a designated tracking box was implemented in a clinical ultrasound machine. In vivo angiogenesis measurements (expressed as percent contrast area) with and without motion compensated maximum intensity persistence (MIP) ultrasound imaging were analyzed in human colon cancer xenografts (n = 64) in mice. Differences in MIP ultrasound imaging signal with and without motion compensation were compared and correlated with displacements in x- and y-directions. The algorithm was tested in an additional twelve colon cancer xenograft-bearing mice with (n = 6) and without (n = 6) anti-vascular therapy (ASA-404). In vivo MIP percent contrast area measurements were quantitatively correlated with ex vivo microvessel density (MVD) analysis. Results MIP percent contrast area was significantly different (P < 0.001) with and without motion compensation. Differences in percent contrast area correlated significantly (P < 0.001) with x- and y-displacements. MIP percent contrast area measurements were more reproducible with motion compensation (ICC = 0.69) than without (ICC = 0.51) on two consecutive ultrasound scans. Following anti-vascular therapy, motion-compensated MIP percent contrast area significantly (P = 0.03) decreased by 39.4 ± 14.6 % compared to non-treated mice and correlated well with ex vivo MVD analysis (Rho = 0.70; P = 0.05). Conclusion Real-time motion-compensated MIP ultrasound imaging allows reliable and accurate quantification and monitoring of angiogenesis in tumors exposed to breathing-induced motion artifacts. PMID:22535383

  12. Breast Lesions: Correlation of Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Patterns on MR images with Tumor Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeifangLiu; RunxianBao; YunNiu; YongYu

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI features of the early -phase enhancement rate, enhancement amplitude, and signal-intensity (SI) time course are associated with the microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of malignant and benign breast lesions. METHODS Sixty patients with breast lesions, detected with physical examination or conventional mammography, were examined pre-operatively with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI from December 1998 to June 2000. Of these 60 patients, histopathological correlation was available in 38. These 38 patients(aged 29-73 years) formed the basis of this study. SI changes during dynamic scanning were assessed quantitatively. Early-phase enhancement rate and enhancement amplitude were calculated. Time-Sl curves of the lesions were obtained and classified according to their shapes as type I (which was steady enhancement to the end of the dynamic data acquisition at 7.5rain.), type Ⅱ (plateau of SI after avid initial contrast enhancement), or type Ⅲ (washout of SI after avid initial contrast enhancement). The mean MVD and VEGF expression of the lesions were measured with immunohistochemical staining methods in all the pathologic specimens by a pathologist without knowledge of the results of the MR examination. Care was taken to ensure identical location in the plane of the MR image and pathologic specimens. The relationships among dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI features, MVD, and VEGF expression of benign and malignant breast lesions were analyzed. RESULTS Histology revealed 21 malignancies and 17 benign lesions. The mean MVD and VEGF expression for the 21 malignant lesions were significantly higher than the mean MVD and VEGF expression for the 17 benign lesions (P60%) MR early-phase enhancement rate and time-SI curve type Ⅱ or Ⅲ showed a significant association with MVD and VEGF expression. All the differences mentioned above showed statistical significance (P 0

  13. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis by MRI Study Using Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ashoor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones and it is a perquisite for the growth, invasion and metastasis of solid tumors. This complex process involves multiple steps and pathways dependent on the local balance between positive and negative regulatory factors, as well as interactions among the tumor, its vasculature and the surrounding extracellular tissue matrix. Tumors lay dormant yet viable, unable to grow beyond 2-3 mm3 in size without angiogenesis."nWith the development of novel therapies for treat-ment of several diseases, directed noninvasive imaging strategies will be critical for defining the pathophysiology of angiogenesis. Imaging modalities used to detect angiogenesis include PET, SPECT, MRI, CT, US and near-infrared optical imaging. For these modalities, methods have been developed to measure blood volume, blood flow and several other semi quantitative and quantitative kinetic hemodynamic parameters such as vascular permeability. Characteristic molecular makers of angiogenesis may be visualized with the aid of molecular imaging agents such as VEGFs or the α vß3 integrin. "nMRI is a practical modality for assessing angiogenesis over time because it is already widely used clinically to assess tumor growth and for response evaluation. Anatomical information can be co registered with functional and molecular information within a single imaging method. Moreover, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation and the commonly used contrast agent has low toxicity. "nSuper paramagnetic iron oxides (SPIO are FDA-approved contrast agents for use in magnetic reson-ance (MR imaging. Most of the administered SPIO end up in the reticuloendotelial system via endocytosis and the iron core released from the SPIO is utilized in normal iron metabolism pathways. We utilize the paramagnetic characteristics of SPIO to improve the contrast of the image in MRI."nFor the first time we will introduce a method for evaluating angiogenesis

  14. Cellular therapy of tumor angiogenesis : morphological and functional imaging using MRI and videomicroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Faye, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction : Tumor angiogenesis leads to the development of new vessels enabling the growth of the tumor. Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormalities including mural cells (perivascular muscular cells) responsible for abnormal vessel function and maturation. In this thesis, we studied cellular therapy in a tumor model by injection of mural cells using MRI and fluorescence videomicroscopy. Materiels and methods: Nude mice were injected with squamous cell TC1 tumors and animals were divi...

  15. Micro-CT imaging of tumor angiogenesis: quantitative measures describing micromorphology and vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehling, Josef; Theek, Benjamin; Gremse, Felix; Baetke, Sarah; Möckel, Diana; Maynard, Juliana; Ricketts, Sally-Ann; Grüll, Holger; Neeman, Michal; Knuechel, Ruth; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-02-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer, and its noninvasive visualization and quantification are key factors for facilitating translational anticancer research. Using four tumor models characterized by different degrees of aggressiveness and angiogenesis, we show that the combination of functional in vivo and anatomical ex vivo X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) allows highly accurate quantification of relative blood volume (rBV) and highly detailed three-dimensional analysis of the vascular network in tumors. Depending on the tumor model, rBV values determined using in vivo μCT ranged from 2.6% to 6.0%, and corresponds well with the values assessed using IHC. Using ultra-high-resolution ex vivo μCT, blood vessels as small as 3.4 μm and vessel branches up to the seventh order could be visualized, enabling a highly detailed and quantitative analysis of the three-dimensional micromorphology of tumor vessels. Microvascular parameters such as vessel size and vessel branching correlated very well with tumor aggressiveness and angiogenesis. In rapidly growing and highly angiogenic A431 tumors, the majority of vessels were small and branched only once or twice, whereas in slowly growing A549 tumors, the vessels were much larger and branched four to seven times. Thus, we consider that combining highly accurate functional with highly detailed anatomical μCT is a useful tool for facilitating high-throughput, quantitative, and translational (anti-) angiogenesis and antiangiogenesis research.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sahraei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrast agents most commonly agents used in diagnosing different diseases. Several agents have been ever introduced with different peculiar characteristics. They vary in potency, adverse reaction and other specification, so it is important to select the proper agent in different situations. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PUBMED, Web of Science (ISI, Scopus,Google Scholar by using keywords "gadolinium" and "MRI contrast Medias", "Gadofosvest", "Gadobenate" and "Gadoxetate". The most frequent contrast media agents made based on gadolinium (Gd. These are divided into two categories based on the structure of their chelating parts, linear agents and macrocyclic agents. All characteristics of contrast media factors, including efficiency, kinetic properties, stability, side effects and the rate of resolution are directly related to the structure of chelating part of that formulation.In vitro data has shown that the macrocyclic compounds are the most stable Gd-CA as they do not bind to serum proteins, they all possess similar and relatively low relaxivity and the prevalence of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF has decreased by increasing the use of macrocyclic agents in recent years. No cases of NSF have been recorded after the administration of any of the high-relaxivity protein interacting agents, the vascular imaging agent gadofosveset trisodium (Ablavar, the hepatic imaging agent gadoxetate meglumine (Eovist, and the multipurpose agent gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance. In pregnancy and lactating women, stable macrocyclic agent is recommended.

  17. Peripheral pulmonary nodules: Relationship between multi-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging and tumor angiogenesis and VEGF expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xiao-Ling

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between16-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging and tumor angiogenesis and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor expression in patients with benign and malignant pulmonary nodules, and differential diagnosis between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. Methods Sixty-four patients with benign and malignant pulmonary nodules underwent 16-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging. The CT perfusion imaging was analyzed for TDC (time density curve, perfusion parametric maps, and the respective perfusion parameters. Immunohistochemical findings of MVD (microvessel density measurement and VEGF expression was evaluated. Results The shape of the TDC of peripheral lung cancer was similar to those of inflammatory nodule. PH (peak height, PHpm/PHa (peak height ratio of pulmonary nodule to aorta, BF (blood flow, BV (blood volume value of peripheral lung cancer and inflammatory nodule were not statistically significant (all P > 0.05. Both showed significantly higher PH, PHpm/PHa, BF, BV value than those of benign nodule (all P 0.05. In the case of adenocarcinoma, BV, BF, PS, PHpm/PHa, and MVD between poorly and well differentiation and between poorly and moderately differentiation were statistically significant (all P 0.05. PH, PHpm/PHa, BV, and PS of benign nodule were significantly lower than those of peripheral lung cancer (all P Conclusion Multi-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging closely correlated with tumor angiogenesis and reflected MVD measurement and VEGF expression. It provided not only a non-invasive method of quantitative assessment for blood flow patterns of peripheral pulmonary nodules but also an applicable diagnostic method for peripheral pulmonary nodules.

  18. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ozawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs, biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  19. Development of Quantum Dot Probes for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Breast Cancer Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    U87MG) were characterized by Western Blot analysis using monoclonal antibody LM 609. Each cell type displays a different repertoire of (Xv33 on the...cells and their ability to adhere and migrate as reported in the literature. a4•, MDA-MB-231 MDA-MB-435 MDA-MB-468 MCF-7 U87MG Fig. 7 Western blot ...Brooks PC, Clark RA, Cheresh DA (1994). Requirement of vascular integrin av033 for angiogenesis. Science. 264:569-5671. 4. Haubner R, Wester HJ (2004

  20. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Dual-Modality Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Rats Using GEBP11 Peptide Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tao; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Jiinda; Han, Dong; Ma, Sai; Cao, Jianbo; Li, Xiujuan; Zhang, Ran; Qiao, Hongyu; Liang, Jimin; Liu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Liang, Shuhui; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Li, Jiayi; Cao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor progression. Tumor vasculature-targeting peptides have shown great potential for use in cancer imaging and therapy. Our previous studies have shown that GEBP11, a novel vasculature-specific binding peptide that exhibits high affinity and specificity to tumor angiogenesis, is a promising candidate for the diagnosis and targeted radiotherapy of gastric cancer. In the present study, we developed a novel magnetic resonance and fluorescence (MR/Fluo) dual-modality imaging probe by covalently coupling 2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid-coated paramagnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-MNPs) and Cy5.5 to the GEBP11 peptide. The probe Cy5.5-GEBP11-DMSA-MNPs (CGD-MNPs), with a hydrodynamic diameter of 82.8 ± 6.5 nm, exhibited good imaging properties, high stability and little cytotoxicity. In vivo MR/Fluo imaging revealed that CGD-MNPs were successfully applied to visualize tumor angiogenesis in SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models. Prussian blue and CD31 immunohistochemical staining confirmed that CGD-MNPs co-localized with tumor blood vessels. In conclusion, CGD-MNPs are promising candidates for use as MR and fluorescence imaging probes for visualizing gastric cancer angiogenesis in vivo.

  1. MMP-2/9-Specific Activatable Lifetime Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus T.M. Rood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical (molecular imaging can benefit from a combination of the high signal-to-background ratio of activatable fluorescence imaging with the high specificity of luminescence lifetime imaging. To allow for this combination, both imaging techniques were integrated in a single imaging agent, a so-called activatable lifetime imaging agent. Important in the design of this imaging agent is the use of two luminophores that are tethered by a specific peptide with a hairpin-motive that ensured close proximity of the two while also having a specific amino acid sequence available for enzymatic cleavage by tumor-related MMP-2/9. Ir(ppy3 and Cy5 were used because in close proximity the emission intensities of both luminophores were quenched and the influence of Cy5 shortens the Ir(ppy3 luminescence lifetime from 98 ns to 30 ns. Upon cleavage in vitro, both effects are undone, yielding an increase in Ir(ppy3 and Cy5 luminescence and a restoration of Ir(ppy3 luminescence lifetime to 94 ns. As a reference for the luminescence activation, a similar imaging agent with the more common Cy3-Cy5 fluorophore pair was used. Our findings underline that the combination of enzymatic signal activation with lifetime imaging is possible and that it provides a promising method in the design of future disease specific imaging agents.

  2. Development of a New Positron Emission Tomography Tracer for Targeting Tumor Angiogenesis: Synthesis, Small Animal Imaging, and Radiation Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Lalush

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer progression and correlates with disease aggressiveness and poor clinical outcomes. Affinity ligands discovered by screening phage display random peptide libraries can be engineered to molecularly target tumor blood vessels for noninvasive imaging and early detection of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we tested the ability of a phage-display-selected peptide sequence recognizing specifically bone marrow- derived pro-angiogenic tumor-homing cells, the QFP-peptide, radiolabeled with 64Cu radioisotope to selectively image tumor vasculature in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET. To prepare the targeted PET tracer we modified QFP-phage with the DOTA chelator and radiolabeled the purified QFP-phage-DOTA intermediate with 64Cu to obtain QFP-targeted radioconjugate with high radiopharmaceutical yield and specific activity. We evaluated the new PET tracer in vivo in a subcutaneous (s.c. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC mouse model and conducted tissue distribution, small animal PET/CT imaging study, autoradiography, histology, fluorescence imaging, and dosimetry assessments. The results from this study show that, in the context of the s.c. LLC immunocompetent mouse model, the QFP-tracer can target tumor blood vessels selectively. However, further optimization of the biodistribution and dosimetry profile of the tracer is necessary to ensure efficient radiopharmaceutical applications enabled by the biological specificity of the QFP-peptide.

  3. Neo-angiogenesis metabolic biomarker of tumor-genesis tracking by infrared joystick contact imaging in personalized homecare system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hoekstra, Philip; Landa, Joseph; Vydelingum, Nadarajen A.

    2014-05-01

    We describe an affordable, harmless, and administrative (AHA) metabolic biomarker (MBM) for homecare cancer screening. It may save hundreds of thousands of women's and thousands of men's lives every year from breast cancer and melanoma. The goal is to increase the specificity of infrared (IR) imagery to reduce the false alarm rate (FAR). The patient's hands are immersed in icy cold water, about 11oC, for 30 seconds. We then compare two IR images, taken before and after the cold stimulus, and the difference reveals an enhanced signal and noise ratio (SNR) at tumorigenesis sites since the contraction of capillaries under cold challenge is natural to healthy capillaries, except those newly built capillaries during angiogenesis (Folkman, Nature 1995). Concomitant with the genome and the phenome (molecular signaling by phosphor-mediate protein causing inflammation by platelet activating factor (PAF) that transform cells from benign to malignant is the amplification of nitric oxide (NO) syntheses, a short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) that dilates regional blood vessels; superseding normal autonomic nervous system regulation. A rapidly growing tumor site might implicate accumulation of ROS, for which NO can rapidly stretch the capillary bed system usually having thinning muscular lining known as Neo-Angiogenesis (NA) that could behave like Leaky In-situ Faucet Effect (LIFE) in response to cold challenge. To emphasize the state of art knowledge of NA, we mentioned in passing the first generation of an anticapillary growth drug, Avastin by Genetech; it is an antibody protein that is injected for metastasis, while the second generation drug; Sorafenib by Bayers (2001) and Sutent by Pfizer (2000) both target molecular signaling loci to block receptor associated tyrosine kinase induced protein phosphorylation in order to reverse the angiogenesis. Differentiating benign from malignant in a straightforward manner is required to achieve the wellness protocol, yet would

  4. Chitosan-based formulations of drugs, imaging agents and biotherapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, M.; Hennink, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    This preface is part of the Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews theme issue on “Chitosan-Based Formulations of Drugs, Imaging Agents and Biotherapeutics”. This special Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews issue summarizes recent progress and different applications of chitosanbased formulations.

  5. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  6. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  7. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  8. Research advance on molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis with SPECT%肿瘤血管生成的SPECT分子显像研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓梅; 张芳; 黄建敏

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Angiogenesis is one of the key requirements of tumor growth and metastasis.Tumour-induced angiogenesis is a multistep process that controlled by growth factors,cellular receptors and adhesion molecules,such as vascular endothelial growth factor,ανβ3 integrin,extracellular matrix proteins,prostate-specific membrane antige.They have become a common molecular target which has a potential value in angiogenesis molecular imaging and therapy at present.It is an important subject of modern medical imaging in developing a new imaging method which can accurate noninvasive assessment of tumor angiogenesis and tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy effect.%肿瘤血管生成与肿瘤生长、转移有着密切的关系.肿瘤血管生成被各种蛋白分子调控,其中包括血管内皮生长因子、ανβ3整合素、细胞外基质蛋白、前列腺特异性膜抗原等.它们已成为肿瘤血管生成分子影像及靶向治疗研究领域的重要分子靶点.研究并利用这些蛋白分子准确无创地评估肿瘤新生血管及肿瘤抗血管生成治疗效果的成像方法,已成为现代医学影像学的一个重要课题.

  9. 64Cu loaded liposomes as positron emission tomography imaging agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Binderup, Tina; Rasmussen, Palle;

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a highly efficient method for utilizing liposomes as imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET) giving high resolution images and allowing direct quantification of tissue distribution and blood clearance. Our approach is based on remote loading of a copper-radionuclid...

  10. Multifunctional Photosensitizer-Based Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  11. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  12. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    formulated in order to suppress inflamed cytokine expression by siRNA transfection as well as following the migration of macrophage using MRI and NIR bio-imaging. The nano-complexes could inhibit 50 % mRNA expression and 39 % protein expression. In the in vivo cell tracking NIR bio-imaging and MRI...... for chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were 150 nm in size with spherical shape, which contained PFOB in the inner core and Dox and ICG in the polymeric shell. More importantly, they could target folate receptor expressing cancer cells, which provide positive in vitro and in vivo NIR and 19F MRI results. In project...... stem cells and Raw 264.7 macrophages were chitosan-to-particles weight ratios of w0.1 and w0.01, respectively. In vivo 19F MRI results showed the possibility of capturing labeled cells indicating the potential use of PLGA PFOB in future research involving such as cell migration. . In regard of magnetic...

  13. 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane:serotonin transporter imaging agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Martarello, Laurent

    2005-01-18

    A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes and 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane families are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

  14. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  15. Angiogenesis and Its Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays critical roles in human physiology that range from reproduction and fetal growth to wound healing and tissue repair. The sophisticated multistep process is tightly regulated in a spatial and temporal manner by “on-off switch signals” between angiogenic factors, extracellular matrix components, and endothelial cells. Uncontrolled angiogenesis may lead to several angiogenic disorders, including vascular insufficiency (myocardial or critical limb ischemia and vascular overgrowth (hemangiomas, vascularized tumors, and retinopathies. Thus, numerous therapeutic opportunities can be envisaged through the successful understanding and subsequent manipulation of angiogenesis. Here, we review the clinical implications of angiogenesis and discuss pro- and antiangiogenic agents that offer potential therapy for cancer and other angiogenic diseases.

  16. Software Agent with Reinforcement Learning Approach for Medical Image Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahsa Chitsaz; Chaw Seng Woo

    2011-01-01

    Many image segmentation solutions are problem-based. Medical images have very similar grey level and texture among the interested objects. Therefore, medical image segmentation requires improvements although there have been researches done since the last few decades. We design a self-learning framework to extract several objects of interest simultaneously from Computed Tomography (CT) images. Our segmentation method has a learning phase that is based on reinforcement learning (RL) system. Each RL agent works on a particular sub-image of an input image to find a suitable value for each object in it. The RL system is define by state, action and reward. We defined some actions for each state in the sub-image. A reward function computes reward for each action of the RL agent. Finally, the valuable information, from discovering all states of the interest objects, will be stored in a Q-matrix and the final result can be applied in segmentation of similar images. The experimental results for cranial CT images demonstrated segmentation accuracy above 95%.

  17. MULTIVARIATE MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY FOR DCE-MRI IMAGE ANALYSIS IN ANGIOGENESIS STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Noyel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new computer aided detection framework for tumours acquired on DCE-MRI (Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging series on small animals. To perform this approach, we consider DCE-MRI series as multivariate images. A full multivariate segmentation method based on dimensionality reduction, noise filtering, supervised classification and stochastic watershed is explained and tested on several data sets. The two main key-points introduced in this paper are noise reduction preserving contours and spatio temporal segmentation by stochastic watershed. Noise reduction is performed in a special way to select factorial axes of Factor Correspondence Analysis in order to preserves contours. Then a spatio-temporal approach based on stochastic watershed is used to segment tumours. The results obtained are in accordance with the diagnosis of the medical doctors.

  18. Evaluation of angiogenesis in colorectal carcinoma with multidetector-row CT multislice perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Shiting, E-mail: fst1977@163.co [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Sun Canhui, E-mail: canhuisun@sina.co [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Li Ziping, E-mail: liziping163@tom.co [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Mak, Henry Ka-Fung, E-mail: makkf@hkucc.hku.h [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Peng Zhenpeng, E-mail: ppzhen@21cn.co [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Guo Huanyi, E-mail: guohuanyi@163.co [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Meng Quanfei, E-mail: mzycoco@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate the correlation between 64 multidetector-row CT (64MDCT) perfusion imaging in colorectal carcinoma and microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), 64MDCT perfusion imaging was performed in 33 patients with pathologically verified colorectal carcinoma. These images were analyzed with perfusion functional software, and time-density curves (TDC) were created for the region of interest (ROI) encompassing the tumor, the target artery and vein. The individual perfusion maps generated indicated blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability-surface area product (PS). MVD and VEGF were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 and anti-VEGF, respectively. Correlations between MVD or VEGF with CT perfusion parameters and clinicopathological factors (Dukes' stages, invasion depth, and lymph node and liver metastasis) were also investigated. MVD in the colorectal carcinoma was 22.61 {+-} 9.01 per x200 field. The scores obtained for VEGF expression were 4.15 {+-} 1.09. VEGF staining was positive in 25 of 29 tumors (86.2%). There was no significant correlation between the presence of MVD, VEGF expression and clinicopathological factors (P > 0.05). There was also no correlation between MVD, VEGF expression, and any dynamic CT parameters (P > 0.05). The BV and MTT were significantly higher in tumors demonstrating serous coat invasion than in those without it (t = -2.63, -2.24, P = 0.0137, 0.0331, respectively). BV was also significantly correlated with tumor size (r = 0.41, P = 0.02). Neither BF nor PS was correlated with clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, 64MDCT perfusion imaging, MVD, and VEGF may reflect angiogenic activity, but no significant correlation among these factors.

  19. Metal-organic frameworks as sensory materials and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Demin; Lu, Kuangda; Poon, Christopher; Lin, Wenbin

    2014-02-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of hybrid materials self-assembled from organic bridging ligands and metal ion/cluster connecting points. The combination of a variety of organic linkers, metal ions/clusters, and structural motifs can lead to an infinite array of new materials with interesting properties for many applications. In this Forum Article, we discuss the design and applications of MOFs in chemical sensing and biological imaging. The first half of this article focuses on the development of MOFs as chemical sensors by highlighting how unique attributes of MOFs can be utilized to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. We also discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed in order to develop practically useful MOF sensors. The second half of this article focuses on the design and applications of nanoscale MOFs (NMOFs) as imaging contrast agents. NMOFs possess several interesting attributes, such as high cargo loading capacity, ease of postmodification, tunable size and shape, and intrinsic biodegradability, to make them excellent candidates as imaging contrast agents. We discuss the use of representative NMOFs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and optical imaging. Although still in their infancy, we believe that the compositional tunability and mild synthetic conditions of NMOF imaging agents should greatly facilitate their further development for clinical translation.

  20. Developments Toward Diagnostic Breast Cancer Imaging Using Near-Infrared Optical Measurements and Fluorescent Contrast Agents1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Hawrysz

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of near-infrared (NIR light to interrogate deep tissues has enormous potential for molecular-based imaging when coupled with NIR excitable dyes. More than a decade has now passed since the initial proposals for NIR optical tomography for breast cancer screening using time-dependent measurements of light propagation in the breast. Much accomplishment in the development of optical mammography has been demonstrated, most recently in the application of time-domain, frequency-domain, and continuous-wave measurements that depend on endogenous contrast owing to angiogenesis and increased hemoglobin absorbance for contrast. Although exciting and promising, the necessity of angiogenesis-mediated absorption contrast for diagnostic optical mammography minimizes the potential for using NIR techniques to assess sentinel lymph node staging, metastatic spread, and multifocality of breast disease, among other applications. In this review, we summarize the progress made in the development of optical mammography, and focus on the emerging work underway in the use of diagnostic contrast agents for the molecular-based, diagnostic imaging of breast.

  1. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer.

  2. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  3. Live imaging of cysteine-cathepsin activity reveals dynamics of focal inflammation, angiogenesis, and polyp growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gounaris

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that up to 30% of detectable polyps in patients regress spontaneously. One major challenge in the evaluation of effective therapy of cancer is the readout for tumor regression and favorable biological response to therapy. Inducible near infra-red (NIR fluorescent probes were utilized to visualize intestinal polyps of mice hemizygous for a novel truncation of the Adenomatous Polyposis coli (APC gene. Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy in live mice allowed visualization of cathepsin activity in richly vascularized benign dysplastic lesions. Using biotinylated suicide inhibitors we quantified increased activities of the Cathepsin B & Z in the polyps. More than (3/4 of the probe signal was localized in CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC and CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages infiltrating the lesions. Polyposis was attenuated through genetic ablation of cathepsin B, and suppressed by neutralization of TNFalpha in mice. In both cases, diminished probe signal was accounted for by loss of MDSC. Thus, in vivo NIR imaging of focal cathepsin activity reveals inflammatory reactions etiologically linked with cancer progression and is a suitable approach for monitoring response to therapy.

  4. Role of angiogenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letilovic, Tomislav; Vrhovac, Radovan; Verstovsek, Srdan; Jaksic, Branimir; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a physiologic process of new blood vessels formation mediated by various cytokines called angiogenic and angiostatic factors. Although its potential pathophysiologic role in solid tumors has been extensively studied for more than 3 decades, enhancement of angiogenesis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other malignant hematological disorders has been recognized more recently. An increased level of angiogenesis has been documented by various experimental methods both in bone marrow and lymph nodes of patients with CLL. Although the role of angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of this disease remains to be fully elucidated, experimental data suggest that several angiogenic factors play a role in the disease progression. Biologic markers of angiogenesis were also shown to be of prognostic relevance in CLL. The current findings provide the rationale for investigating antiangiogenic agents in CLL. In the current review angiogenesis in CLL is discussed and its potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  5. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  6. In vivo imaging agents: an international market report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a global perspective of the in vivo imaging agents business to market planning executives who are working for companies that develop, produce and distribute various types of in vivo imaging agents. Others that could find this study useful include investment bankers, regulatory and governmental authorities and purchasers of these products. The study attempts to diligently provide market data by type for important geographic markets - Western Europe, the U.S.A., and Japan. A competitive intelligence section which discusses companies involved in these markets constitutes the last part of this study. These profiles are not intended to extensively evaluate each company's marketing strengths or strategies but to provide a general idea of the market presence and prospects. A combination of primary and secondary research is used for all findings. (author).

  7. Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles: Evolution of a Multimodality and Multifunctional Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M. Winter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles offer a biologically inert, highly stable, and nontoxic platform that can be specifically designed to accomplish a range of molecular imaging and drug delivery functions in vivo. The particle surface can be decorated with targeting ligands to direct the agent to a variety of biomarkers that are associated with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and thrombosis. The surface can also carry a high payload of imaging agents, ranging from paramagnetic metals for MRI, radionuclides for nuclear imaging, iodine for CT, and florescent tags for histology, allowing high sensitivity mapping of cellular receptors that may be expressed at very low levels in the body. In addition to these diagnostic imaging applications, the particles can be engineered to carry highly potent drugs and specifically deposit them into cell populations that display biosignatures of a variety of diseases. The highly flexible and robust nature of this combined molecular imaging and drug delivery vehicle has been exploited in a variety of animal models to demonstrate its potential impact on the care and treatment of patients suffering from some of the most debilitating diseases.

  8. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  9. Synthesis of serotonin transporter imaging agent [125I]ADAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chun-Xiong; WU Chun-Ying; JIANG Quan-Fu; CHEN Zheng-Ping; ZHANG Tong-Xing; LI Xiao-Ming; WANG Song-Pei

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of serotonin transporter imaging agent [125I] -2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine([125I] ADAM) was reported. The chemical structure of the labeling precursor 5- (tributylstannyl) -2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)phenylamine and all its intermediates were verified by IR,1HNMR and MS. The .radioiodinated compound was prepared using iododestannylation reaction by hydrogen peroxide. Final radiochemical purity was above 95% determined by TLC.

  10. Valine-based biphenylsulphonamide matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: ruth.oltenfreiter@ugent.be; Staelens, Ludovicus [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Kersemans, Veerle [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cornelissen, Bart [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Frankenne, Francis [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Foidart, Jean-Michel [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Gent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2006-06-15

    Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the subfamily of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) is of particular interest due to their ability to degrade type IV collagen and other non-fibrillar collagen domains and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. Whilst malignant cells often over-express various MMPs, the gelatinases have been most consistently detected in malignant tissues and associated with tumor growth, metastatic potential and angiogenesis. Radiosynthesis of carboxylic (1') and hydroxamic (2') MMPIs resulted in radiochemical yields of 70+/-5% (n=6) and 60+/-5% (n=4), respectively. Evaluation in A549-inoculated athymic mice showed a tumor uptake of 2.0+/-0.7%ID/g (3h p.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 0.5 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 4.6 at 48hp.i. for 1'. For compound 2' a tumor uptake of 0.7+/-0.2%ID/g (3hp.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 1.2 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 1.8 at 24hp.i. were observed. HPLC analysis of the blood (plasma) showed no dehalogenation or other metabolites of 1' 2hp.i. For compound 2', 65.4% of intact compound was found in the blood (plasma) and one polar metabolite (31%) was detected whereas in the tumor 91.8% of the accumulated activity was caused by intact compound and only 8.1% by the metabolite. Planar imaging, using a Toshiba GCA-9300A/hg SPECT camera, showed that tumor tissue could be visualized and that image quality improved by decreasing specific activity resulting in lower liver uptake, indicating some degree of saturable binding in the liver. In vivo evaluation of these radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers revealed that MMP inhibitors could have potential as tumor imaging agents, but that further research is necessary.

  11. Ultrasonic Analysis of Peptide- and Antibody-Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of αvβ3-Expressing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dayton

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of targeted ultrasound contrast agents is to significantly and selectively enhance the detection of a targeted vascular site. In this manuscript, three distinct contrast agents targeted to the αvβ3 integrin are examined. The αvβ3 integrin has been shown to be highly expressed on metastatic tumors and endothelial cells during neovascularization, and its expression has been shown to correlate with tumor grade. Specific adhesion of these contrast agents to αvβ3-expressing cell monolayers is demonstrated in vitro, and compared with that of nontargeted agents. Acoustic studies illustrate a backscatter amplitude increase from monolayers exposed to the targeted contrast agents of up to 13-fold (22 dB relative to enhancement due to control bubbles. A linear dependence between the echo amplitude and bubble concentration was observed for bound agents. The decorrelation of the echo from adherent targeted agents is observed over successive pulses as a function of acoustic pressure and bubble density. Frequency–domain analysis demonstrates that adherent targeted bubbles exhibit high-amplitude narrowband echo components, in contrast to the primarily wideband response from free microbubbles. Results suggest that adherent targeted contrast agents are differentiable from free-floating microbubbles, that targeted contrast agents provide higher sensitivity in the detection of angiogenesis, and that conventional ultrasound imaging techniques such as signal subtraction or decorrelation detection can be used to detect integrin-expressing vasculature with sufficient signal-to-noise.

  12. A paramagnetic CEST agent for imaging glucose by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanrong; Trokowski, Robert; Sherry, A Dean

    2003-12-17

    The europium(III) complex of a DOTA-tetraamide ligand (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N' ',N' ''-tetraacetic acids) containing two phenyl boronate pendent arms binds glucose reversibly with an association constant of 383 M-1 at pH 7. Glucose binding results in slowing of water exchange between a single Eu(III)-bound water molecule and bulk water, and this can be imaged by MRI using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging sequence. This metabolite-responsive paramagnetic CEST agent responds to changes in glucose over the physiologically important range (0-20 mM), and thus it offers the possibility of high-sensitivity MR imaging glucose in tissues using bulk water protons as antenna.

  13. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  14. PET imaging of angiogenesis after myocardial infarction/reperfusion using a one-step labeled integrin-targeted tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haokao [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Lang, Lixin; Guo, Ning; Quan, Qimeng; Hu, Shuo; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Cao, Feng [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China)

    2012-04-15

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin represents a potential target for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel one-step labeled integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeting positron emission tomography (PET) probe, {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2, for angiogenesis imaging in a myocardial infarction/reperfusion (MI/R) animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 45-min transient left coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. The myocardial infarction was confirmed by ECG, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging, and cardiac ultrasound. In vivo PET imaging was used to determine myocardial uptake of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 at different time points following reperfusion. The control peptide RAD was labeled with a similar procedure and used to confirm the specificity. Ex vivo autoradiographic analysis and CD31/CD61 double immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the PET results. Myocardial origin of the {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 accumulation was confirmed by {sup 18}F-FDG and autoradiography. PET imaging demonstrated increased focal accumulation of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 in the infarcted area which started at day 3 (0.28 {+-} 0.03%ID/g, p < 0.05) and peaked between 1 and 3 weeks (0.59 {+-} 0.16 and 0.55 {+-} 0.13%ID/g, respectively). The focal accumulation decreased but still kept at a higher level than the sham group after 4 months of reperfusion (0.31 {+-} 0.01%ID/g, p < 0.05). Pretreatment with unlabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide significantly decreased tracer uptake, indicating integrin specificity of this tracer. At 1 week after MI/R, uptake of the control tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-RAD that does not bind to integrin, in the infarcted area, was only 0.21 {+-} 0.01%ID/g. Autoradiographic imaging showed the same trend of uptake in the myocardial infarction area. The time course of focal tracer uptake was consistent with the pattern of vascular density and integrin {beta

  15. In Vivo Time-Course Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Colorectal Liver Metastases in the Same Living Mice Using Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo real-time visualization of the process of angiogenesis in secondary tumors in the same living animals presents a major challenge in metastasis research. We developed a technique for intravital imaging of colorectal liver metastasis development in live mice using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM. We also developed time-series TPLSM in which intravital TPLSM procedures were performed several times over periods of days to months. Red fluorescent protein-expressing colorectal cancer cells were inoculated into the spleens of green fluorescent protein-expressing mice. First- and second-round intravital TPLSM allowed visualization of viable cancer cells (red in hepatic sinusoids or the space of Disse. Third-round intravital TPLSM demonstrated liver metastatic colonies consisting of viable cancer cells and surrounding stroma with tumor vessels (green. In vivo time-course imaging of tumor angiogenesis in the same living mice using time-series TPLSM could be an ideal tool for antiangiogenic drug evaluation, reducing the effects of interindividual variation.

  16. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J; Sopko, V; Jakubek, J [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F, E-mail: jiri.dammer@utef.cvut.cz [Biological center of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Entomology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1{mu}m, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  17. DNA as sensors and imaging agents for metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2014-02-17

    Increasing interest in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields has created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal-ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal-ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attachment of these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detection. These sensors are highly sensitive (with a detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of "dipstick tests", portable fluorometers, computer-readable disks, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal-ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications.

  18. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  19. Dietary proteins and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-17

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  20. Gold nanoparticles as high-resolution X-ray imaging contrast agents for the analysis of tumor-related micro-vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien C.; Yong C.; Hsiang-Hsin, C.; Sheng-Feng, L.; Kang-Chao W.; Xiaoqing C.; Yeukuang, H.; Petibois, C.; Margaritondo, G.

    2012-03-12

    Angiogenesis is widely investigated in conjunction with cancer development, in particular because of the possibility of early stage detection and of new therapeutic strategies. However, such studies are negatively affected by the limitations of imaging techniques in the detection of microscopic blood vessels (diameter 3-5 {micro}m) grown under angiogenic stress. We report that synchrotron-based X-ray imaging techniques with very high spatial resolution can overcome this obstacle, provided that suitable contrast agents are used. We tested different contrast agents based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the detection of cancer-related angiogenesis by synchrotron microradiology, microtomography and high resolution X-ray microscopy. Among them only bare-AuNPs in conjunction with heparin injection provided sufficient contrast to allow in vivo detection of small capillary species (the smallest measured lumen diameters were 3-5 {micro}m). The detected vessel density was 3-7 times higher than with other nanoparticles. We also found that bare-AuNPs with heparin allows detecting symptoms of local extravascular nanoparticle diffusion in tumor areas where capillary leakage appeared. Although high-Z AuNPs are natural candidates as radiology contrast agents, their success is not guaranteed, in particular when targeting very small blood vessels in tumor-related angiography. We found that AuNPs injected with heparin produced the contrast level needed to reveal--for the first time by X-ray imaging--tumor microvessels with 3-5 {micro}m diameter as well as extravascular diffusion due to basal membrane defenestration. These results open the interesting possibility of functional imaging of the tumor microvasculature, of its development and organization, as well as of the effects of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  1. Angiogenesis and vascular targeting: Relevance for hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    The creation of a functional blood supply from the normal tissue vasculature via the process of angiogenesis is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumours. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the tumour vasculature as a therapeutic strategy, and two major...... types of vascular targeting agents (VTAs) have developed; those that inhibit the angiogenic process-angiogenesis inhibiting agents (AIAs)-and those that specifically damage the already established neovasculature-vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The tumour vasculature also plays a critical role...

  2. Thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles targeted to CD105: Synthesis, characterization and application in MR imaging of tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Song; Gong, Mingfu; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Hua [Department of Radiology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Gao, Fabao [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zou, Liguang, E-mail: zlgxqyy@163.com [Department of Radiology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To detect tumor angiogenesis in tumor-bearing mice using thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles targeted to CD105 on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles (hybrids) were prepared by reducing Au{sup 3+} on the surface of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Hybrids were stabilized with thiol-PEG-carboxyl via the Au–S covalent bond, and further conjugated with anti-CD105 antibodies through amide linkages. Characteristics of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles were evaluated. Using these nanoparticles, the labeling specificity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated in vitro. MRI T2*-weighted images were obtained at different time points after intravenous administration of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles in the tumor-bearing mice. After MR imaging, the breast cancer xenografts were immediately resected for immunohistochemistry staining and Prussian blue staining to measure the tumor microvessel density (MVD) and evaluate the labeling of blood microvessels by the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles in vivo. Results: The mean diameter of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was 56.6 ± 8.0 nm, as measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Immune activity of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was 53% of that of the anti-CD105 antibody, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The specific binding of HUVECs with the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles was proved by immunostaining and Prussian blue staining in vitro. For breast cancer xenografts, the combination of the hybrid-PEG-CD105 nanoparticles with blood microvessels was detectable by MRI after 60 min administration of the contrast agent. The T2* relative signal intensity (SI{sub R}) was positively correlated with the tumor MVD (R{sup 2} = 0.8972). Conclusion: Anti-CD105 antibody-coupled, thiol-PEG-carboxyl-stabilized core–shell Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles can efficiently target CD105 expressed

  3. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  4. High-throughput Identification of Phage-derived Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phage-displayed peptide libraries is a powerful method for selecting peptides with desired binding properties. However, the validation and prioritization of “hits” obtained from this screening approach remains challenging. Here, we describe the development and testing of a new analysis method to identify and display hits from phage-display experiments and high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay screens. We test the method using a phage screen against activated macrophages to develop imaging agents with higher specificity for active disease processes. The new methodology should be useful in identifying phage hits and is extendable to other library screening methods such as small-molecule and nanoparticle libraries.

  5. In vitro and in vivo imaging of prostate cancer angiogenesis using anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody-conjugated quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Haejin; Lee, Jiyeon; Song, Rita; Lee, Jung Han [Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory, Institute Pasteur Korea (IP-K), Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Il; Lee, Hak Jong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Clinical Research Institute, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwa [Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Authors aimed to determine the targeting ability of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) in vitro, and apply it for a xenograft prostate cancer mouse model. Conjugation reaction of QDs was performed by using the N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and sulfo-(N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide) (Sulfo-NHS). The human umbilical vein cord endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with QDs, conjugated with antiVGFR2, to see a specific binding in vitro. Fluorescent cell images were taken by a confocal microscope. The human prostate cancer cells (PC3) were injected to five nude mice on hind limbs to make the xenograft tumor model. QD-antiVEGFR2 antibody complex was injected into the tumor model and fluorescence measurements were performed at 1, 4, 9, 12, 15, and 24 hours after the injection. The specific interaction between HUVECs and QD-antiVEGFR2 antibody was clearly shown in vitro. The in vivo fluorescence image disclosed that there was an increased signal of tumor, 12 hours after the injection of QDs. By showing endothelial cells binding with QDs-antiVEGFR2 antibodyand an experimental application of the antibody for VEGFR2 imaging in the prostate cancer xenograft mouse model, we suggests that the antibody-conjugated QDs can be a potential imaging tool for angiogenesis of the cancer.

  6. Targeted contrast agents--an adjunct to whole-body imaging: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Paul; Bolster, Ferdia; Crosbie, Ian; MacMahon, Peter; O'Kennedy, Richard; Eustace, Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    This article reviews the potential use of a combination of whole-body imaging and targeted contrast agents in improving diagnostics, with a particular focus on oncology imaging. It looks at the rationale for nanoparticles and their development as targeted contrast agents. It subsequently describes many of the advances made thus far in developing tissue-specific contrast agents capable of targeting tumors that combined with whole-body imaging may enable superior cancer detection and characterization.

  7. Radiolabeled Apoptosis Imaging Agents for Early Detection of Response to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since apoptosis plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis and is associated with responses to therapy, molecular imaging of apoptotic cells could be useful for early detection of therapeutic effects, particularly in oncology. Radiolabeled annexin V compounds are the hallmark in apoptosis imaging in vivo. These compounds are reviewed from the genesis of apoptosis (cell death imaging agents up to recent years. They have some disadvantages, including slow clearance and immunogenicity, because they are protein-based imaging agents. For this reason, several studies have been conducted in recent years to develop low molecule apoptosis imaging agents. In this review, radiolabeled phosphatidylserine targeted peptides, radiolabeled bis(zinc(II-dipicolylamine complex, radiolabeled 5-fluoropentyl-2-methyl-malonic acid (ML-10, caspase-3 activity imaging agents, radiolabeled duramycin, and radiolabeled phosphonium cation are reviewed as promising low-molecular-weight apoptosis imaging agents.

  8. Imaging Therapeutic PARP Inhibition In Vivo through Bioorthogonally Developed Companion Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Reiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of small-molecule poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors are currently undergoing advanced clinical trials. Determining the distribution and target inhibitory activity of these drugs in individual subjects, however, has proven problematic. Here, we used a PARP agent for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT imaging (18F-BO, which we developed based on the Olaparib scaffold using rapid bioorthogonal conjugation chemistries. We show that the bioorthogonal 18F modification of the parent molecule is simple, highly efficient, and well tolerated, resulting in a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 17.9 ± 1.1 nM. Intravital imaging showed ubiquitous distribution of the drug and uptake into cancer cells, with ultimate localization within the nucleus, all of which were inhibitable. Whole-body PET-CT imaging showed tumoral uptake of the drug, which decreased significantly, after a daily dose of Olaparib. Standard 18F-fludeoxyglucose imaging, however, failed to detect such therapy-induced changes. This research represents a step toward developing a more generic approach for the rapid codevelopment of companion imaging agents based on small-molecule therapeutic inhibitors.

  9. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, books/NBK5330/">), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  10. Preliminary study of CT in combination with MRI perfusion imaging to assess hemodynamic changes during angiogenesis in a rabbit model of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Zhang,1 Baoqi Shi,1 Zhaoxin Liu,1 Mingmin Zhang,1 Weijing Zhang21Radiology Department, Baotou Cancer Hospital, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, 2Department of Mathematics, College of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: This study used CT (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to identify correlations between perfusion parameters for squamous cell lung carcinoma and tumor angiogenesis in a rabbit model of VX2 lung cancer.Methods: VX2 tumors were implanted in the lungs of 35 New Zealand White rabbits. CT and MRI perfusion scanning were performed on days 14, 17, 21, 25, and 28 after tumor implantation. CT perfusion parameters were perfusion, peak enhanced increment, transit time peak, and blood volume, and MRI perfusion parameters were wash in rate, wash out rate, maximum enhancement rate, and transit time peak. CT and MRI perfusion parameters were obtained at the tumor rim, in the tumor tissue, and in the muscle tissue surrounding the tumor.Results: On CT perfusion imaging, t values for perfusion, peak enhanced increment, and blood volume (tumor rim versus muscle were 16.31, 11.79, and 5.21, respectively (P 0.05. On MRI perfusion imaging, t values for wash in rate, wash out rate, and maximum enhancement rate (tumor rim versus muscle were 18.14, 8.79, and 6.02, respectively (P 0.05.Conclusion: A combination of CT and MRI perfusion imaging demonstrated hemodynamic changes in a rabbit model of VX2 lung cancer, and provides a theoretical foundation for treatment of human squamous cell lung carcinoma.Keywords: perfusion imaging, rabbits, animal model, lung, squamous carcinoma cell

  11. Mediators of ocular angiogenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yureeda Qazi; Surekha Maddula; Balamurali K. Ambati

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature. Pathologic angiogenesis in the eye can lead to severe visual impairment. In our review, we discuss the roles of both pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic molecular players in corneal angiogenesis, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, exudative macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity, highlighting novel targets that have emerged over the past decade.

  12. Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment: Focus on Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Fan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a complex multistep process involving not only genetic and epigenetic changes in the tumor cell but also selective supportive conditions of the deregulated tumor microenvironment. One key compartment of the microenvironment is the vascular niche. The role of angiogenesis in solid tumors but also in hematologic malignancies is now well established. Research on angiogenesis in general, and vascular endothelial growth factor in particular, is a major focus in biomedicine and has led to the clinical approval of several antiangiogenic agents including thalidomide, bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, temesirolimus, and everolimus. Indeed, antiangiogenic agents have significantly changed treatment strategies in solid tumors (colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and breast cancer and multiple myeloma. Here we illustrate important aspects in the interrelationship between tumor cells and the microenvironment leading to tumor progression, with focus on angiogenesis, and summarize derived targeted therapies.

  13. Targeting the tumor microenvironment: focus on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fengjuan; Schimming, Alexander; Jaeger, Dirk; Podar, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a complex multistep process involving not only genetic and epigenetic changes in the tumor cell but also selective supportive conditions of the deregulated tumor microenvironment. One key compartment of the microenvironment is the vascular niche. The role of angiogenesis in solid tumors but also in hematologic malignancies is now well established. Research on angiogenesis in general, and vascular endothelial growth factor in particular, is a major focus in biomedicine and has led to the clinical approval of several antiangiogenic agents including thalidomide, bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, temesirolimus, and everolimus. Indeed, antiangiogenic agents have significantly changed treatment strategies in solid tumors (colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and breast cancer) and multiple myeloma. Here we illustrate important aspects in the interrelationship between tumor cells and the microenvironment leading to tumor progression, with focus on angiogenesis, and summarize derived targeted therapies.

  14. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Lee M; Bhargava, Puneet; Essig, Marco; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the basic properties of available gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents, discuss their fundamental differences, and explore common and evolving applications of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast throughout the body excluding the central nervous system. A more specific aim of this article was to explore novel uses of these gadolinium-based contrast agents and applications where a particular agent has been demonstrated to behave differently or be better suited for certain applications than the other contrast agents in this class.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Monitoring of Indocyanine Green for Tumor Detection Using Photoacoustic Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Si-Hua; YIN Guang-Zhi; XING Da

    2010-01-01

    @@ We report tumor detection using a photoacoustic technique for the imaging of angiogenesis and monitoring of agent pharmacokinetics on an animal model.We take 532-nm laser pulses to excite photoacoustic signals of blood vessels with acquisition by a broadband hydrophone,and the morphological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis are successfully image depicted.Furthermore,tumor pharmacokinetics is preformed and analyzed with fast multielement photoacoustic imaging of the intravenous-injected indocyanine green (ICG).

  17. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH.

  18. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  19. In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0242 TITLE: In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0242 5b...men with false positive PSA elevation and to ensure successful biopsy for those with small cancers. Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging functional

  20. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  1. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J. [MSD lab, Department of Information Engineering, Univ of Florence, Via S.Marta, 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); Erasmus MC, ’s-Gravendijkwal 230, Faculty Building, Ee 2302, 3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tortoli, P. [MSD lab, Department of Information Engineering, Univ of Florence, Via S.Marta, 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); Verweij, M. D. [Acoustical Wavefield Imaging, ImPhys, Delft Univ Technology, van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH Delft (Netherlands); Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J., E-mail: h.vos@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus MC, ’s-Gravendijkwal 230, Faculty Building, Ee 2302, 3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Acoustical Wavefield Imaging, ImPhys, Delft Univ Technology, van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  2. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  3. Hybrid material as contrast agent in magnetic resonance images

    OpenAIRE

    Botella Asunción, Pablo; Cabrera García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a contrast agent of magnetic resonance based on a hybrid material formed by an organo-metallic core derived from Prussian blue and a silica cover, and optionally, molecules of a poly(ethylene glycol), a fluorescent agent, a radio nucleus and/or a substance that directs to specific receptors, cells or tissues, joined by covalent bonding to the surface of the inorganic cover.

  4. Angiogenesis and liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gülsüm ?zlem Elpek

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that hepatic angiogenesis,regardless of the etiology, takes place in chronic liverdiseases (CLDs) that are characterized by inflammationand progressive fibrosis. Because antiangiogenictherapy has been found to be efficient inthe prevention of fibrosis in experimental models ofCLDs, it is suggested that blocking angiogenesis couldbe a promising therapeutic option in patients withadvanced fibrosis. Consequently, efforts are beingdirected to revealing the mechanisms involved inangiogenesis during the progression of liver fibrosis.Literature evidences indicate that hepatic angiogenesisand fibrosis are closely related in both clinical andexperimental conditions. Hypoxia is a major inducer ofangiogenesis together with inflammation and hepaticstellate cells. These profibrogenic cells stand at theintersection between inflammation, angiogenesis andfibrosis and play also a pivotal role in angiogenesis.This review mainly focuses to give a clear view on therelevant features that communicate angiogenesis withprogression of fibrosis in CLDs towards the-end point ofcirrhosis that may be translated into future therapies.The pathogenesis of hepatic angiogenesis associatedwith portal hypertension, viral hepatitis, non-alcoholicfatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease are alsodiscussed to emphasize the various mechanisms involvedin angiogenesis during liver fibrogenesis.

  5. Classification and basic properties of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Laurent, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive classification of contrast agents currently used or under development for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. Agents based on small chelates, macromolecular systems, iron oxides and other nanosystems, as well as responsive, chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and hyperpolarization agents are covered in order to discuss the various possibilities of using MRI as a molecular imaging technique. The classification includes composition, magnetic properties, biodistribution and imaging applications. Chemical compositions of various classes of MRI contrast agents are tabulated, and their magnetic status including diamagnetic, paramagnetic and superparamagnetic are outlined. Classification according to biodistribution covers all types of MRI contrast agents including, among others, extracellular, blood pool, polymeric, particulate, responsive, oral, and organ specific (hepatobiliary, RES, lymph nodes, bone marrow and brain). Various targeting strategies of molecular, macromolecular and particulate carriers are also illustrated.

  6. Monocyte Subpopulations in Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Heather J.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Growing understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in angiogenesis has brought monocyte-derived cells into focus. Monocyte subpopulations are an increasingly attractive therapeutic target in many pathologic states, including cancer. Before monocyte-directed therapies can be fully harnessed for clinical use, understanding of monocyte-driven angiogenesis in tissue development and homeostasis, as well as malignancy, is required. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms by which monocytic subpopulations contribute to angiogenesis in tissue and tumor development, highlight gaps in our existing knowledge, and discuss opportunities to exploit these cells for clinical benefit. PMID:24556724

  7. Targeting angiogenesis: a review of angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Srikala S; Shepherd, Frances A

    2003-12-01

    It has now been almost 30 years since Dr J. Folkman first proposed that inhibition of angiogenesis could play a key role in treating cancer; however, it is only recently that anti-angiogenesis agents have entered the clinical setting. The search for novel therapies is particularly important in lung cancer, where the majority of patients succumb to their disease despite aggressive treatments. Several classes of agents now exist that target the different steps involved in angiogenesis. These include drugs inhibiting matrix breakdown, the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs), such as marimastat, prinomastat, BMS275291, BAY12-9566, and neovastat drugs that block endothelial cell signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) including rhuMAb VEGF, SU5416, SU6668, ZD6474, CP-547,632 and ZD4190. Drugs that are similar to endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis including endostatin, angiostatin and interferons. There has also been renewed interest in thalidomide. Drugs such as squalamine, celecoxib, ZD6126, TNP-470 and those targeting the integrins are also being evaluated in lung cancer. Despite early enthusiasm for many of these agents, Phase III trials have not yet demonstrated significant increases in overall survival and toxicity remains an issue. It is hoped that as our understanding of the complex process of angiogenesis increases, so will our ability to design more effective targeted therapies.

  8. Characterisation of contrast agent microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy research

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The high efficiency with which gas microbubbles can scatter ultrasound compared to the surrounding blood pool or tissues has led to their widespread employment as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging. In recent years their applications have been extended to include super-resolution imaging and the stimulation of localized bio-effects for therapy. The growing exploitation of contrast agents in ultrasound, and in particular these recent developments, have amplified the need to characterize and...

  9. Content-based image retrieval in the World Wide Web: a web agent for fetching portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenkelt, Olaf; Kaufmann, Oliver; Eckstein, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    This article propose a way to automatically retrieve images from the world-wide-web using a semantic description for images and an agent concept for the retrieval of images. The system represents image in a textual way, e.g. look for a portrait of the a specific person, or fetch an image showing a countryside in Southern California. This textual descriptions are fed in search machines, e.g. yahoo, alta- vista. The resulting html documents are seeked for links. The next step subsequently processes each link by fetching the document other the net, converting it to an ascii representation, and performing a full text search by using the image description. This leads to starting points of images which are retrieved via a web-agent. The image descriptions are decomposed in a set of parts containing image operations which are further processed, e.g. a set for representing the background of a portrait tries to find a homogeneous region in the image because this is likely to find in a portrait. Additional operations are performed on the foreground, i.e. the image region which contains e.g. the face of a person. The system is realized using two C++ libraries: one for building up web-agents, LIWA++, and one for processing images, HORUS.

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Systems for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Derong; Liu, Fuyao; Ma, Lina; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents play a vital role in diagnosing diseases, demand for new MRI contrast agents, with an enhanced sensitivity and advanced functionalities, is very high. During the past decade, various inorganic nanoparticles have been used as MRI contrast agents due to their unique properties, such as large surface area, easy surface functionalization, excellent contrasting effect, and other size-dependent properties. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of nanoparticle-based T1-weighted MRI contrast agents. The chemical synthesis of the nanoparticle-based contrast agents and their potential applications were discussed and summarized. In addition, the recent development in nanoparticle-based multimodal contrast agents including T1-weighted MRI/computed X-ray tomography (CT) and T1-weighted MRI/optical were also described, since nanoparticles may curtail the shortcomings of single mode contrast agents in diagnostic and clinical settings by synergistically incorporating functionality. PMID:23698781

  11. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  12. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  13. Quantitative Imaging of Cell-Permeable Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents Using X-Ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Endres

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III–diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III–1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8–amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylaminostilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF. Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 103 better than 153Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T1 analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination.

  14. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  15. Metal complex-based templates and nanostructures for magnetic resonance/optical multimodal imaging agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galindo Millan, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, new approaches directed towards simple and functional imaging agents (IAs) for magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence multimodal imaging are proposed. In Chapter 3, hybrid silver nanostructures (hAgNSs), grown using a polyamino carboxylic acid scaffold, namely 1,4,7,10-tetraaza-1-(

  16. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  17. Adaptive angiogenesis in placentas of heavy smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarrer, C; Macara, L; Leiser, R; Kingdom, J

    1999-07-24

    Smoking in pregnancy increases perinatal morbidity and mortality, suggesting impaired placental function, though placental weight is increased. We used scanning electron microscopy to show adaptive angiogenesis in term placental villi from smokers (n=4) and non-smokers (n=4). These images may aid communication of the dangers of smoking in pregnancy.

  18. Imaging of Isotopically Enhanced Molecular Targeting Agents Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, J N

    2004-02-19

    The goal of this project is to develop experimental and computational protocols to use SIMS to image the chemical composition of biological samples, focusing on optimizing sample preparation protocols and developing multivariate data analysis methods. Our results on sample preparation, molecular imaging, and multivariate analysis have been presented at several meeting abstracts (UCRL151797ABS, UCRL151797ABSREV1, UCRL151426ABS, UCRL201277, UCRL154757). A refereed paper describing our results for sample preparation and molecular imaging of various endogenous biomolecules as well as the mutagen PhIP has been accepted for publication (UCRL-JC-151797). We are also preparing two additional papers describing our multivariate analysis methods to analyze spectral data. As these papers have not been submitted, their content is included in this final report.

  19. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.;

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close...... to the dipolar limit. The agents have a single, narrow EPR line, which is analyzed as a Voigt function. The linewidth is measured as a function of the agent concentration and the oxygen concentration. The concentration broadenings are about 1–3 μT/mM and the Lorentzian linewidths at infinite dilution are less...

  20. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  1. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  2. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqib H Zehri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM, two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery.

  3. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  4. Hydrogels for therapeutic cardiovascular angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Seliktar, Dror

    2016-01-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) caused by ischemia is the most common cause of cardiac dysfunction. While growth factor or cell therapy is promising, the retention of bioactive agents in the highly vascularized myocardium is limited and prevents sustained activation needed for adequate cellular responses. Various types of biomaterials with different physical and chemical properties have been developed to improve the localized delivery of growth factor and/or cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic tissues. Hydrogels are particularly advantageous as carrier systems because they are structurally similar to the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), they can be processed under relatively mild conditions and can be delivered in a minimally invasive manner. Moreover, hydrogels can be designed to degrade in a timely fashion that coincides with the angiogenic process. For these reasons, hydrogels have shown great potential as pro-angiogenic matrices. This paper reviews a few of the hydrogel systems currently being applied together with growth factor delivery and/or cell therapy to promote therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic tissues, with emphasis on myocardial applications.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  6. Design of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography: do large bioconjugates provide an opportunity for in vivo brain imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Reader, Andrew; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Schirrmacher, Esther; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    The development of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography and other in vivo imaging modalities mostly relies on small compounds of low MW as a result of the restricted transport of larger molecules, such as peptides and proteins, across the blood-brain barrier. Besides passive transport, only a few active carrier mechanisms, such as glucose transporters and amino acid transporters, have so far been exploited to mediate the accumulation of imaging probes in the brain. An important question for the future is whether some of the abundant active carrier systems located at the blood-brain barrier can be used to shuttle potential, but non-crossing, imaging agents into the brain. What are the biological and chemical constrictions toward such bioconjugates and is it worthwhile to persue such a delivery strategy?

  7. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  8. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-05-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents.

  9. ER Stress and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, François; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2015-10-01

    Proper tissue vascularization is vital for cellular function as it delivers oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and immune cells and helps to clear cellular debris and metabolic waste products. Tissue angiogenesis occurs to satisfy energy requirements and cellular sensors of metabolic imbalance coordinate vessel growth. In this regard, the classical pathways of the unfolded protein response activated under conditions of ER stress have recently been described to generate angiomodulatory or angiostatic signals. This review elaborates on the link between angiogenesis and ER stress and discusses the implications for diseases characterized by altered vascular homeostasis, such as cancer, retinopathies, and atherosclerosis.

  10. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  11. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  12. Cancer Immunotherapy of Targeting Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianmeiHou; LingTian; YuquanWei

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy may be a useful approach to cancer therapy. This review discussed tumor angiogenesis and immunotherapy of targeting tumor angiogenesis from two main aspects: (1) active vaccination to induce effective anti-angiogenesis immunity; (2) passive immunotherapy with anti-pro-angiogenic molecules relevant antibody. Evidence from the recent years suggested that anti-angiogenic therapy should be one of the most promising approaches to cancer therapy.

  13. Pharmacology of radioiodinated hexadecenoic acid - a myocardial imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q.X.; Zhang, J.; Ji, Q.M.; Wang, Y.C.; Xie, D.F.; Hua, R.L.; He, W.Y.; Shi, X.C.; Li, Y.J.; Jiang, C.J.

    1984-04-01

    /sup 123/I- and /sup 131/I-labelled hexadecenoic acids (IHDA, radiochemical purity over 92%, dissolved in 6% bovine serum albumin solution) was investigated in vivo. ICR mice were administered IHDA via the tail vein. Maximum myocardial uptake (27.3 +- 5.1%) was reached about 0.5 min after the injection. The ratio of uptake in the heart to that in the lungs was 2.3, to that in liver 1.5 and to that in other organs 2.4 to 6.4. The dog myocardium was visualized distinctly within 3-5 min with a gamma camera after i.v. /sup 131/I-IHDA, and not interfered with by activities in the lungs, liver and other organs. The low blood levels at 20 min had little effect on the quality of the heart images.

  14. The Harvard angiogenesis story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joan W

    2014-01-01

    I shall discuss the work of researchers at Harvard Medical School who came together in the early 1990s. Scattered across various Harvard-affiliated hospitals and research centers, these individuals were unified by their interest in ocular neovascularization. Together and separately, they investigated models of ocular neovascularization, exploring tumor angiogenesis in eye development and disease.

  15. How phototherapy affects angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Mary

    2007-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for normal growth, tissue repair and regeneration. Its stimulation accelerates repair and regeneration including wound healing where these processes are delayed. Its inhibition can reduce the rate of growth of solid tumors. Phototherapy can accelerate the resolution of acute inflammation with the result that the proliferative phase of tissue repair, when angiogenesis occurs, begins earlier than in sham-irradiated controls. Evidence that angiogenesis is enhanced in dermal repair, tendon repair and bone regeneration in rodents is presented. The cellular mechanisms that control angiogenesis involve the interaction of endothelial cells, macrophages, pericytes and other cells in response, for example, to changes in the availability of oxygen in the local environment. Pericytes and macrophages modulate endothelial cell proliferation; pericytes guide endothelial cell migration. The stimulation of endothelial cell proliferation in vitro following exposure to red (660 nm) and infrared (820 nm) radiation, 15 mW, at 2-8 J/cm2 is presented. 1J/cm2 was ineffective. 820 nm irradiation, 15 mW, at 8 J/cm2 was observed to inhibit pericyte proliferation in vitro. Indirect effects on endothelial cell and pericyte proliferation followed stimulation of soluble mediator production by macrophages following exposure to red and infrared radiation. The potential clinical significance of the results obtained is discussed and the necessity of clinical trials emphasized.

  16. Studies on tumor induced angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, J L; Ambrus, C M; Forgach, P; Stadler, S; Halpern, J; Sayyid, S; Niswander, P; Toumbis, C

    1992-01-01

    Methods were developed to test angiogenic response to human tumor implants and various biologic agents in the cornea of rabbits and non-human primates (Macaca arctoides). Crude PDGF preparations were found to have significant angiogenic effect. Purified, recombinant PDGF preparations were also effective inhibitors (e.g. pentoxifylline (Px) (which also were found to release PgI2 and t-PA) inhibited human tumor implant induced angiogenesis and reduced spontaneous metastases in 3 transplantable murine tumors (Furth-Columbia Wilms' tumor in Furth-Wistar rats, C-1300 neuroblastoma in A/J mice and HM-Kim mammary carcinoma in Wistar rats) but not in the NIH adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), a metal complexing agent with special affinity to copper and anti-thyroid as well as, immune stimulating activity was shown to be anti-angiogenic and to potentiate the effect of Px. The anti-fibrinolytic agents epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA) and tranaxamic acid (t-AMCHA) were anti-angiogenic. DDTC and Px were synergistic from this point of view.

  17. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  18. Ischemia-driven angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, Y; Keshet, E

    1997-11-01

    New blood vessels usually develop in places where they are most needed. A prime example of neovascularization representing a positive feedback response to insufficient perfusion is the development of collateral blood vessels in the ischemic myocardium and leg. The recent discoveries of hypoxia-inducible transcription and angiogenic factors have provided important mechanistic links between the metabolic consequences of ischemia and compensatory angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has emerged as the key mediator of ischemia-driven angiogenesis. Environmental stresses, including hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and hypoferremia, upregulate VEGF expression at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. VEGF acts in turn on adjacent vascular beds expressing cognate receptors and induces sprouting and capillary growth toward the ischemic tissue. In addition to expanding the vasculature at sites where existing vessels have been occluded or obliterated, VEGF also functions to match the vascular density according to development and physiologic increases in oxygen consumption. Fine adjustment of the vasculature includes a step of oxygen-regulated vascular pruning mediated by VEGF in its capacity as a survival factor for newly formed vessels. Pathologic settings of ischemia-driven angiogenesis include a major component of stress-induced angiogenesis during tumor neovascularization and abnormal vessel growth associated with retinopathies. The latter represents an excessive angiogenic response to conditions of severe retinal ischemia. Further insights into the mechanism of stress-induced angiogenesis are likely to suggest new ways to augment growth of collateral vessels and to restrain unwarranted neovascularization in tumors and retinopathies. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:289-294). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  19. Palladium nanosheets as highly stable and effective contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Liming; Chen, Mei; Sun, Xiaolian; Rong, Pengfei; Zheng, Nanfeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A stable and efficient contrast agent is highly desirable for photoacoustic (PA) imaging applications. Recently gold nanostructures have been widely reported and studied for PA imaging and photothermal therapy. However, the structures of the nonspherical gold nanoparticles are easily destroyed after laser irradiation and thus may fail to complete the intended tasks. In this study, we propose to apply palladium nanosheets (PNSs), with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region, as a new class of exogenous PA contrast agents. PA and ultrasound (US) images were acquired sequentially by a portable and fast photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with a hand-held transducer. Significant and long-lasting imaging enhancement in SCC7 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was successfully observed in mice by PAT over time after tail vein administration of PNSs. The morphology and functional perfusion of the tumors were delineated in PA images due to the nanoparticle accumulation. PAT of the main organs was also conducted ex vivo to trace the fate of PNSs, which was further validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). No obvious toxic effect was observed by in vitro MTT assay and ex vivo histological examination 7 days after PNS administration. With the combination of a portable imaging instrument and signal specificity, PNSs might be applied as stable and effective agents for photoacoustic cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance.

  20. Comparison of two new angiogenesis PET tracers 68Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2 and 64Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2; in vivo imaging studies in human xenograft tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) and (64)Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) can be easily synthesized and are both promising candidates for PET imaging of integrin αVβ3 positive tumor cells. (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) showed slightly more stable tumor retention. With the advantage of in-house commercially......INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to synthesize and perform a side-by-side comparison of two new tumor-angiogenesis PET tracers (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) and (64)Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) in vivo using human xenograft tumors in mice. Human radiation burden was estimated to evaluate...... potential for future use as clinical PET tracers for imaging of neo-angiogenesis. METHODS: A (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator was used for the synthesis of (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2). (68)Ga and (64)Cu labeled NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) tracers were administrated in nude mice bearing either human glioblastoma (U87MG...

  1. Long-Lasting and Efficient Tumor Imaging Using a High Relaxivity Polysaccharide Nanogel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Minnie; Lux, Jacques; Nishimura, Tomoki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-09-14

    Clinically approved small-molecule magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are all rapidly cleared from the body and offer weak signal enhancement. To avoid repeated administration of contrast agent and improve signal-to-noise ratios, agents with stronger signal enhancement and better retention in tumors are needed. Therefore, we focused on hydrogels because of their excellent water accessibility and biodegradability. Gadolinium (Gd)-chelating cross-linkers were incorporated into self-assembled pullulan nanogels to both impart magnetic properties and to stabilize this material that has been extensively studied for medical applications. We show that these Gd-chelating pullulan nanogels (Gd-CHPOA) have the highest reported relaxivity for any hydrogel-based particles and accumulate in the 4T1 tumors in mice at high levels 4 h after injection. This combination offers high signal enhancement and lasts up to 7 days to delineate the tumor clearly for longer imaging time scales. Importantly, this long-term accumulation does not cause any damage or toxicity in major organs up to three months after injection. Our work highlights the clinical potential of Gd-CHPOA as a tumor-imaging MRI contrast agent, permitting tumor identification and assessment with a high signal-to-background ratio.

  2. RGD-based strategies for selective delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents to the tumour vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temming, K; Molema, G; Kok, RJ

    2005-01-01

    During the past decade, RGD-peptides have become a popular tool for the targeting of drugs and imaging agents to a(v)beta(3)-integrin expressing tumour vasculature. RGD-peptides have been introduced by recombinant means into therapeutic proteins and viruses. Chemical means have been applied to coupl

  3. Assessment methods for angiogenesis and current approaches for its quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Hassan AlMalki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a physiological process which describes the development of new blood vessels from the existing vessels. It is a common and the most important process in the formation and development of blood vessels, so it is supportive in the healing of wounds and granulation of tissues. The different assays for the evaluation of angiogenesis have been described with distinct advantages and some limitations. In order to develop angiogenic and antiangiogenic techniques, continuous efforts have been resulted to give animal models for more quantitative analysis of angiogenesis. Most of the studies on angiogenic inducers and inhibitors rely on various models, both in vitro, in vivo and in ova, as indicators of efficacy. The angiogenesis assays are very much helpful to test efficacy of both pro- and anti- angiogenic agents. The development of non-invasive procedures for quantification of angiogenesis will facilitate this process significantly. The main objective of this review article is to focus on the novel and existing methods of angiogenesis and their quantification techniques. These findings will be helpful to establish the most convenient methods for the detection, quantification of angiogenesis and to develop a novel, well tolerated and cost effective anti-angiogenic treatment in the near future.

  4. New dual mode gadolinium nanoparticle contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan B Ghaghada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liposomal-based gadolinium (Gd nanoparticles have elicited significant interest for use as blood pool and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. Previous generations of liposomal MR agents contained gadolinium-chelates either within the interior of liposomes (core-encapsulated gadolinium liposomes or presented on the surface of liposomes (surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes. We hypothesized that a liposomal agent that contained both core-encapsulated gadolinium and surface-conjugated gadolinium, defined herein as dual-mode gadolinium (Dual-Gd liposomes, would result in a significant improvement in nanoparticle-based T1 relaxivity over the previous generations of liposomal agents. In this study, we have developed and tested, both in vitro and in vivo, such a dual-mode liposomal-based gadolinium contrast agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THREE TYPES OF LIPOSOMAL AGENTS WERE FABRICATED: core-encapsulated, surface-conjugated and dual-mode gadolinium liposomes. In vitro physico-chemical characterizations of the agents were performed to determine particle size and elemental composition. Gadolinium-based and nanoparticle-based T1 relaxivities of various agents were determined in bovine plasma. Subsequently, the agents were tested in vivo for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA studies. Characterization of the agents demonstrated the highest gadolinium atoms per nanoparticle for Dual-Gd liposomes. In vitro, surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes demonstrated the highest T1 relaxivity on a gadolinium-basis. However, Dual-Gd liposomes demonstrated the highest T1 relaxivity on a nanoparticle-basis. In vivo, Dual-Gd liposomes resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio in CE-MRA studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dual-mode gadolinium liposomal contrast agent demonstrated higher particle-based T1 relaxivity, both in vitro and in vivo, compared to either the

  5. Gadolinium contrast agent selection and optimal use for body MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; Gupta, Shiva

    2014-07-01

    Proper selection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) for body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases requires understanding the indication for the MRI exam, the key features of the different GBCAs, and the effect that the GBCA has on the selected imaging protocol. The different categories of GBCAs require timing optimization on postcontrast sequences and adjusting imaging parameters to obtain the highest T1 contrast. Gadoxetate disodium has many advantages when evaluating liver lesions, although there are caveats and limitations that need to be understood. Gadobenate dimeglumine, a high-relaxivity GBCA, can be used for indications when stronger T1 relaxivity is needed.

  6. Erratum to: Ungersma SE, Pacheco G, Ho C, Yee SF, Ross J, van Bruggen N, Peale FV Jr, Ross S, Carano RA. Vessel imaging with viable tumor analysis for quantification of tumor angiogenesis. Magn Reson Med 2010;63:1637–1647.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungersma, Sharon E; Pacheco, Glenn; Ho, Calvin; Yee, Sharon Fong; Ross, Jed; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Peale, Franklin V; Ross, Sarajane; Carano, Richard A D

    2011-03-01

    Imaging of tumor microvasculature has become an important tool for studying angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic therapies. Ultrasmall paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for indirect imaging of vasculature offer a method for quantitative measurements of vascular biomarkers such as vessel size index, blood volume, and vessel density (Q). Here, this technique is validated with direct comparisons to ex vivo micro-computed tomography angiography and histologic vessel measurements, showing significant correlations between in vivo vascular MRI measurements and ex vivo structural vessel measurements. The sensitivity of the MRI vascular parameters is also demonstrated, in combination with a multispectral analysis technique for segmenting tumor tissue to restrict the analysis to viable tumor tissue and exclude regions of necrosis. It is shown that this viable tumor segmentation increases sensitivity for detection of significant effects on blood volume and Q by two antiangiogenic therapeutics [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and anti-neuropilin-1] on an HM7 colorectal tumor model. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor reduced blood volume by 36±3% (p<0.0001) and Q by 52±3% (p<0.0001) at 48 h post-treatment; the effects of anti-neuropilin-1 were roughly half as strong with a reduction in blood volume of 18±6% (p<0.05) and a reduction in Q of 33±5% (p<0.05) at 48 h post-treatment.

  7. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  8. Prostanoids in tumor angiogenesis: therapeutic intervention beyond COX-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, M Dolores; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Prostanoids regulate angiogenesis in carcinoma and chronic inflammatory disease progression. Although prostanoid biosynthetic enzymes and signaling have been extensively analyzed in inflammation, little is known about how prostanoids mediate tumor-induced angiogenesis. Targeted cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibition in tumor, stromal and endothelial cells is an attractive antiangiogenic strategy; however, the associated cardiovascular side effects have led to the development of a new generation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) acting downstream of COX. These agents target terminal prostanoid synthases and prostanoid receptors, which may also include several peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Here, we discuss the role of prostanoids as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and how prostanoid metabolism reflects complex cell-cell crosstalk that determines tumor growth. Finally, we discuss the potential of new NSAIDs for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent tumor development.

  9. 3D multi-object segmentation of cardiac MSCT imaging by using a multi-agent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernández, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed.

  10. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study t...... targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored....

  11. Identification of chronic myocardial infarction with extracellular or intravascular contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Hong-yu LIU; Hang L(U); Bo XIANG; Marco GRUWEL; Boguslaw TOMANEK; Roxanne DESLAURIERS; Gang-hong TIAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether extracellular or intravascular contrast agents could detect chronic scarred myocardium in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Eighteen pigs underwent a 4 week ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic myocardial infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. Eighteen hearts were divided into 2 groups. The hearts in groups Ⅰ (n=9) and Ⅱ (n=9) 收稿日期the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA, 0.05 mmol/kg) and ga-dolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 μmol/kg), respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a FLASH sequence. Delayed enhancement T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery prepared TurboFLASH sequence.Results: Wash-in of both agents resulted in a sharp and dramatic T2* signal loss of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. The magnitude and velocity of T2* signal recovery caused by wash-out of extracellular agents in normal myocardium was significantly less than that in scarred myocardium. Conversely, the T2* signal of scarred and normal myocardium recovered to plateau rapidly and simultaneously due to wash-out of intravascular agents. At the fol-lowing equilibrium, extracellular agent-enhanced T1 signal intensity was signifi-cantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas there was no significantly statistical difference in intravascular agent-enhanced T1 sig-nal intensity between scarred and normal myocardium. Conclusion: After admin-istration of extracellular agents, wash-out T2* first-pass and delayed enhanced T1 MRI could identify scarred myocardium as a hyperenhanced region. Conversely, scarred myocardium was indistinguishable from normal myocardium during first-pass and the steady state of intravascular agents.

  12. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  13. Endostatin derivative angiogenesis inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Meng-jie

    2009-01-01

    Objective To throw light on the superiority of the anti-angiogenesis activity of endostatin (ES) derivatives by reviewing the recent progress in the field of ES molecular structure modification.Data sources The data used in this article were mainly from PubMed with relevant English articles published from 1971 to May 2008.The search terms were "endostatin" and "angiothesis".Study selection Articles involved in the ES molecular structure modification and the original milestone articles were selected.Results A number of ES derivatives were designed and studied to improve its clinical relevance.The modified ES with polyethylene glycol (PEG),low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and IgG Fc domain extended the circulation half-life.Meanwhile the recombinant ESs showed more potent anti-tumor activity than native ES in mouse xenografts.Mutated ES also changed its anti-angiogenesis activity.Conclusions The anti-angiogenesis treatment remains a promising tumor therapeutic strategy.New ES derivatives would be a good choice to meet the future challenge on clinical application of ES.

  14. Fucoidan reduces secretion and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the retinal pigment epithelium and reduces angiogenesis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Dithmer

    Full Text Available Fucoidan is a polysaccharide isolated from brown algae which is of current interest for anti-tumor therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, looking at physiology, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion, and angiogenesis, thus investigating a potential use of fucoidan for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. For this study, human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and primary porcine RPE cells were used, as well as RPE/choroid perfusion organ cultures. The effect of fucoidan on RPE cells was investigated with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium--assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, phagocytosis assay and a wound healing assay. VEGF expression was evaluated in immunocytochemistry and Western blot, VEGF secretion was evaluated in ELISA. The effect of fucoidan on angiogenesis was tested in a Matrigel assay using calcein-AM vital staining, evaluated by confocal laser scanning microcopy and quantitative image analysis. Fucoidan displays no toxicity and does not diminish proliferation or phagocytosis, but reduces wound healing in RPE cells. Fucoidan decreases VEGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and RPE cells. Furthermore, it diminishes VEGF expression in RPE cells even when co-applied with bevacizumab. Furthermore, fucoidan reduces RPE-supernatant- and VEGF-induced angiogenesis of peripheral endothelial cells. In conclusion, fucoidan is a non-toxic agent that reduces VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and may be of interest for further studies as a potential therapy against exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Mechanism and its regulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manoj Kumar Gupta; Ren-Yi Qin

    2003-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is the proliferation of a network of blood vessels that penetrates into cancerous growths, supplying nutrients and oxygen and removing waste products. The process of angiogenesis plays an important role in many physiological and pathological conditions. Solid tumors depend on angiogenesis for growth and metastasis in a hostile environment. In the prevascular phase, the tumor is rarely larger than 2 to 3 mm3 and may contain a million or more cells. Up to this size, tumor cells can obtain the necessary oxygen and nutrient supplies required for growth and survival by simple passive diffusion. The properties of tumors to release and induce several angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors which play crucial roles in regulating endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, migration, apoptosis or survival, cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion through different intracellular signaling are thought to be the essential mechanisms during tumor-induced angiogenesis. Tumor angiogenesis actually starts with tumor cells releasing molecules that send signals to surrounding normal host tissue. This signaling activates certain genes in the host tissue that, in turn, make proteins to encourage growth of new blood vessels. In this review, we focus the mechanisms of tumor-induced angiogenesis, with an emphasis on the regulatory role of several angiogenic and anti-angiogenic agents during the angiogenic process in tumors. Advances in understanding the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis have led to the development of several most effective antiangiogenic and anti-metastatic therapeutic agents and also have provided several techniques for the regulation of cancer's angiogenic switch. The suggestion is made that standard cytotoxic chemotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors used in combination may produce complementary therapeutic benefits in the treatment of cancer.

  16. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  17. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  18. Clinical experience with technetium-99m teboroxime, a neutral, lipophilic myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-16

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) teboroxime is a new technetium-based myocardial perfusion imaging agent (investigational code = SQ30217 (Cardiotec, Squibb Diagnostics)). A member of a class of neutral, lipophilic, technetium-containing complexes known as boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime (BATO) complexes, this agent is chemically very different from the cationic tracer thallium-201 (Tl-201) and from the cationic technetium complex Tc-99m sestamibi (Cardiolite, Du Pont Imaging Agents). Tc-99m teboroxime has high myocardial extraction, rapid blood clearance, little lung uptake and rapid myocardial washout. A biexponential pattern of myocardial washout is demonstrated in animals and in man. Effective half-lives of the 2 washout components in man are 5.2 minutes and 3.8 hours and represent approximately 66 and 33% of the myocardial activity, respectively. The first half-life for the myocardium is approximately 11 minutes. As the agent washes out of the heart, hepatic uptake occurs, peaking at about 5 minutes after injection. The liver is the major organ of excretion and receives, along with the large bowel, the largest radiation dose. Rapid imaging protocols using standard cameras have achieved good myocardial counts from 3 planar views acquired over a 4- to 5-minute period or for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images acquired over a 10-minute period. An entire stress/rest procedure can be completed in 1 hour. Analysis of data from 155 patients from 4 centers using planar or SPECT imaging showed a sensitivity and specificity for blinded readings of 82 and 91%, respectively, when compared against overall clinical impression. 13 references.

  19. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography with microbubble contrast agent improves characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kouji Yamamoto; Katsuya Shiraki; Shigeo Nakanishi; Hiroyuki Fuke; Takeshi Nakano; Akira Hashimoto; Atsuya Shimizu; Toshinobu Hamataki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography with the use of the contrast agent Levovist for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and for the evaluation of therapeutic response.METHODS: Phantom experiments were performed to compare the contrast effects of 2nd harmonic imaging and 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography was employed to examine 36 patients with HCC (42 nodules) before and after the treatment and to compare against the findings obtained using other diagnostic imaging modalities. RESULTS: In 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography, the tumor vessels of HCCs were clearly identified during the early phase, and late-phase images clearly demonstrated the differences in contrast enhancement between the tumor and surrounding hepatic parenchyma. Blood flow within the tumor was detected in 36 nodules (85.7%)during the early phase and in all 42 nodules (100%) during the late phase using 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography,in 38 nodules (90.5%) using contrast-enhanced CT, in 34nodules (81.0%) using digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and in 42 nodules (100%) using US CO2angiography.Following transcatheter arterial embolization, 1.5Harmonic Imaging Sonography detected blood flow and contrast enhancement within the tumors that were judged to contain viable tissue in 20 of 42 nodules (47.6%).However, 6 of these 20 cases were not judged in contrastenhanced CT. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography was compared with the US CO2 angiography findings as the gold standard, and the sensitivity and specificity of these images for discerning viable and nonviable HCC after transcatheter arterial embolization were 100% and 100%,respectively.CONCLUSION: 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography permits the vascular structures of HCCs to be identified and blood flow within the tumor to be clearly demonstrated.Furthermore, 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography is potentially useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of transcatheter arterial

  20. Novel angiogenesis inhibitory activity in cinnamon extract blocks VEGFR2 kinase and downstream signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    VEGF is one of the most critical factors that induce angiogenesis, and has thus become an attractive target for anti-angiogenesis treatment. However, most of the current anti-VEGF agents that often cause side effects cannot be recommended for long term use. Identification of natural VEGF inhibitors...

  1. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, UCSF Medical Center, University of California in San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, CA 94143, San Francisco (United States); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Institute of Pathology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Pichler, Bernd [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis (United States); Heinzmann, Ulrich [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J. [3. Clinic of Internal Medicine, Laboratory of Stem Cell Physiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10{sup 6}-3 x 10{sup 8} labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10{sup 6} cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells

  2. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  3. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelrich J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Estelrich,1,2 María Jesús Sánchez-Martín,1 Maria Antònia Busquets1,2 1Departament de Fisicoquímica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Nanociència I Nanotecnologia (IN2UB, Barcelona, Catalonia, SpainAbstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions, providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of

  4. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures of the a......Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures...... of the amyloid fibrils and the disease pathology. Alzheimer’s disease is very difficult to diagnose, and much research is being performed to develop noninvasive diagnostic methods, such as imaging with small-molecule agents. The interactions between amyloid fibrils and imaging agents are challenging to examine...

  5. An in vitro study of a microbubble contrast agent using a clinical ultrasound imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sboros, V.; Moran, C. M.; Pye, S. D.; McDicken, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal insonation settings for contrast imaging are yet to be specified, mainly due to the lack of good understanding of the behaviour of the microbubbles. A satisfactory model that explains the behaviour of individual contrast agent scatterers has not yet been reported in the literature. An in vitro system based on a commercial scanner (ATL HDI3000) has been developed to investigate the backscatter of such agents. Suspensions of Definity® were introduced in an anechoic tank. The frequency of transmitted ultrasound varied from 1 to 5 MHz, pulse period from 2 to 10 periods and peak negative acoustic pressure from 0.08 to 1.7 MPa. The backscatter at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency windows from the agent was normalized in terms of the corresponding components of backscatter from a blood mimicking fluid suspension. The agent provided a dominant resonance effect at 1.6 MHz transmit frequency. Second harmonic normalized backscatter averaged around 9 dB higher than the fundamental. The normalized fundamental backscatter intensity was linear with peak negative pressure. The second harmonic at resonance peaked at 0.5 MPa suggestive of bubble disruption above such pressure. The system proved capable of illustrating the ultrasonic behaviour of Definity® in vitro, and the investigation suggested particular insonation conditions for optimal image enhancement using Definity®.

  6. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging.

  7. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  8. Pharmacological studies of dopamine transporter imaging agent 125/131I-β-CIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To prepare 125/131I-β-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β- (4-iodophenyl)tropane)as an imaging agent for dopamine transporter (DAT), the labeling method from tributylstannyl precursor with peracetic acid has been reported in this article. The radiochemical purity (RCP) of the labeled compound was over 95% determined by HPLC and TLC. The stability, partition coefficients were also determined. The pharmacological studies of the imaging agent were performed in rats, mice, rabbits and normal monkey. The ligand showed preferable uptake in brain (1.9%ID/organ in rats and 4.5%ID/organ in mice at 5 min). The ratios of striatum/cerebellum, hippocampus/cerebellum and cortex/cerebellum were 28.9, 3.97 and 4.75 at 6h in rats, and 8.52, 2.99 and 3.06 at 6h in mice, respectively. In monkey brain imaging the ratios of striatum/frontal cortex (ST/FC) and striatum/occipital cortex (ST/OC) were 5.14 and 5.97 at 4h, respectively. All of above showed the high affinity of the ligand to DAT. The compound was primarily metabolized in liver because the hepatic uptake was much higher than other organs (75.4%ID/organ at 18 h). The half-life of blood elimination was 5 min. The dose received by mice was 2500 times as high as that received by human in the test of undue toxicity, which evaluated the safety of the agent. All the results suggest that β-CIT can be used as a potential DAT imaging agent.

  9. A Gadolinium-containing Magnetic Resonance Image Contrast Agent Promotes Fibrocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Vakil, Varsha; Sung, Joanna J.; Piecychna, Marta; Crawford, Jeffrey R.; Kuo, Philip; Abu-Alfa, Ali K.; Cowper, Shawn E.; Bucala, Richard; Gomer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents such as Omniscan are associated with Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF). To determine if Omniscan can affect the differentiation of monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are found in the fibrotic lesions of NSF, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from NSF patients, hemodialysis patients without NSF, and healthy, renally sufficient controls were exposed to Omniscan in a standardized in vitro fibrocy...

  10. Angiogenesis Inhibition in Prostate Cancer: Current Uses and Future Promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny B. Aragon-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been well recognized as a fundamental part of a multistep process in the evolution of cancer progression, invasion, and metastasis. Strategies for inhibiting angiogenesis have been one of the most robust fields of cancer investigation, focusing on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family and its receptors. There are numerous regulatory drug approvals to date for the use of these agents in treating a variety of solid tumors. While therapeutic efficacy has been established, challenges remain with regards to overcoming resistance and assessing response to antiangiogenic therapies. Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among American men and angiogenesis plays a role in disease progression. The use of antiangiogenesis agents in prostate cancer has been promising and is hereby explored.

  11. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing Zhanwen; Ke Hengte; Yue Xiuli; Dai Zhifei [Nanobiotechnology Division, State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resources and Environment, School of Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang Jinrui; Zhao Bo [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu Jibin, E-mail: zhifei.dai@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: ji-bin.liu@jefferson.edu [Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  12. Chitosan oligosaccharide based Gd-DTPA complex as a potential bimodal magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Cao, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Lu, Zheng-rong; Hua, Ming-qing; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A new gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex (Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11) as a potential bimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with fluorescence was synthesized. It was synthesized by the incorporation of 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMABA) and chitosan oligosaccharide (CSn; n=11) with low polydispersity index to DTPA anhydride and then chelated with gadolinium chloride. The structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). MRI measurements in vitro were evaluated. The results indicated that Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 provided higher molar longitudinal relaxivity (r1) (12.95mM(-1)·s(-1)) than that of commercial Gd-DTPA (3.63mM(-1)·s(-1)) at 0.5T. Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 also emitted fluorescence, and the intensity was much stronger than that of Gd-DTPA. Therefore, it can be meanwhile used in fluorescent imaging for improving the sensitivity in clinic diagnosis. Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 as a potential contrast agent is preliminarily stable in vitro. The results of thermodynamic action between Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) illustrated that the binding process was exothermic and spontaneous, and the main force was van der Waals' interaction and hydrogen bond. The preliminary study suggested that Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 could be used in both magnetic resonance and fluorescent imaging as a promising bimodal contrast agent.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  14. Preparation and Biodistribution of 99mTc-Pamidronate as Bone Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Hong-yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Labeling of Pamidronate (PAM with 99mTc was studied by a direct labeling method in the presence of SnCl2•2H2O as reducing agent. The influences of the concentration of SnCl2•2H2O, PAM concentration and pH value, reaction time on labeling yield were investigated. The optimum labeling was determined. The results showed that the radiochemistry purity of 99mTc-PAM was more than 95%. Biodistribution studies in normal mice and rats showed very high uptake of 99mTc-PAM and long retain in bone. 99mTc-PAM was washed out from the blood very quickly. In addition, considerable uptake in the kidneys indicated this complex was excreted mainly by renal pathway. On the other hand, the radioactivity in liver, lung and heart was negligible. It could be known from SPECT images that 99mTc-PAM would be an excellent bone-imaging agent. Bone uptake of 99mTc-PAM was higher than that of 99mTc-MDP in mice. This study suggested that 99mTc-PAM was a promising bone imaging agent and further study was worthwhile.

  15. Correlation Study between Spiral CT Perfusion Imaging and Angiogenesis in Esophageal Carcinoma%食管癌螺旋CT灌注成像与肿瘤血管生成的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋涛; 黎海亮; 窦新民; 吴越; 刘予东

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨食管癌螺旋CT灌注成像与肿瘤血管生成的相关性.资料与方法 对50例食管癌患者行多排螺旋CT灌注扫描,分析食管癌CT灌注成像参数血容量(BV)、血流量(BF)、平均通过时间(MTT)、表面通透性(PS)与微血管密度(MVD)及血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)表达之间的关系.结果 50例食管癌中,VEGF阳性表达率为62%(31/50),阴性表达率为38%(19/50),MVD值在两组间的差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);BF值与MVD呈正相关(P<0.05),BV及PS值与MVD呈显著性正相关(P<0.01),MTT值与MVD无相关性(P>0.05);PS值与VEGF表达呈正相关(P<0.05),BF、BV及MTT与VEGF表达无相关性(P>0.05).结论 食管癌CT灌注成像能够在一定程度上反映活体的肿瘤血管生成状况.%Objective To evaluate the correlation between spiral CT perfusion imaging and angiogenesis in esophageal carcinoma. Materials and Methods Multi-detector spiral CT perfusion scan was performed in 50 patients with esophageal carcinoma. The relationship of the CT perfusion imaging parameters, including blood volume ( BV) , blood flow( BF), mean transit time( MTT) ,and permeability surface( PS),with MVD and expressions of VEGF were analyzed. Results In 50 cases,the VEGF positive expression rate was 62% (31/50),and the negative expression rate was 38% ( 19/50). The mean MVD of VEGF-positive group were significantly higher than those of negative group ( P 0.05). The PS value and VEGF expression were positively correlated( P 0.05 ). Conclusion CT perfusion parameters can reflect not only the angiogenesis of esophageal carcinoma of the MVD,but also the expression of VEGF,indicating that CT perfusion parameters can be used as an assessment of tumor angiogenesis in vivo.

  16. Longitudinal Studies of Angiogenesis in Hormone-Dependent Shionogi Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor P. Wade

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Vessel size imaging was used to assess changes in the average vessel size of Shionogi tumors throughout the tumor growth cycle. Changes in R2 and R2* relaxivities caused by the injection of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (ferumoxtran-10 were measured using a 2.35-T animal magnetic resonance imaging system, and average vessel size index (VSI was calculated for each stage of tumor progression: growth, regression, and relapse. Statistical analysis using Spearman rank correlation test showed no dependence between vessel size and tumor volume at any stage of the tumor growth cycle. Paired Student's t test was used to assess the statistical significance of the differences in average vessel size for the three stages of the tumor growth cycle. The average VSI for regressing tumors (15.1 ± 6.6 wm was significantly lower than that for growing tumors (35.2 ± 25.5 μm; P < .01. Relapsing tumors also had an average VSI (45.4 ± 41.8 μm higher than that of regressing tumors, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = .067. This study shows that VSI imaging is a viable method for the noninvasive monitoring of angiogenesis during the progression of a Shionogi tumor from androgen dependence to androgen independence.

  17. Development of the Relationship between Angiogenesis and Tumor Dormancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Tumor dormancy, a complex and still poorly understood phenomenon, has been defined by the long-term persistence of occult cancer cells during tumor progression. Recurrence and metastasis may occur just because of an activation of a small portion of the tumor cells. In our view, sustained angiogenesis is considered essential in triggering invasive tumor growth. Here we analyze the correlation between angiogenesis and tumor dormancy, the establishment of tumor dormancy models, the imaging strategies and the new biomarkers for dececting microscopic tumors before or during the angiogenic switch. It imperative to understand the role of angiogenesis in tumor dormancy, as this will accelerate the development of anti-angiogenesis techniques to induce dormancy and/or eradicate dormant disease.

  18. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  19. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  20. Neomycin inhibits angiogenin-induced angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, G F

    1998-08-18

    A class of angiogenesis inhibitor has emerged from our mechanistic study of the action of angiogenin, a potent angiogenic factor. Neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, inhibits nuclear translocation of human angiogenin in human endothelial cells, an essential step for angiogenin-induced angiogenesis. The phospholipase C-inhibiting activity of neomycin appears to be involved, because U-73122, another phospholipase C inhibitor, has a similar effect. In contrast, genistein, oxophenylarsine, and staurosporine, inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, phosphotyrosine phosphatase, and protein kinase C, respectively, do not inhibit nuclear translocation of angiogenin. Neomycin inhibits angiogenin-induced proliferation of human endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. At 50 microM, neomycin abolishes angiogenin-induced proliferation but does not affect the basal level of proliferation and cell viability. Other aminoglycoside antibiotics, including gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, amikacin, and paromomycin, have no effect on angiogenin-induced cell proliferation. Most importantly, neomycin completely inhibits angiogenin-induced angiogenesis in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane at a dose as low as 20 ng per egg. These results suggest that neomycin and its analogs are a class of agents that may be developed for anti-angiogenin therapy.

  1. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  2. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-01

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL-1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  3. Porphyrin Nanodroplets: Sub-micrometer Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Contrast Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Forbrich, Alexander; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chen, Juan; Lewis, John D; Zheng, Gang; Zemp, Roger J

    2016-01-20

    A novel class of all-organic nanoscale porphyrin nanodroplet agents is presented which is suitable for multimodality ultrasound and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Previous multimodality photoacoustic-ultrasound agents are either not organic, or not yet demonstrated to exhibit enhanced accumulation in leaky tumor vasculature, perhaps because of large diameters. In the current study, porphyrin nanodroplets are created with a mean diameter of 185 nm which is small enough to exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Porphyrin within the nanodroplet shell has strong optical absorption at 705 nm with an estimated molar extinction coefficient >5 × 10(9) m(-1) cm(-1) , allowing both ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast in the same nanoparticle using all organic materials. The potential of nanodroplets is that they may be phase-changed into microbubbles using high pressure ultrasound, providing ultrasound contrast with single-bubble sensitivity. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging allows visualization of nanodroplets when injected intratumorally in an HT1080 tumor in the chorioallantoic membrane of a chicken embryo. Intravital microscopy imaging of Hep3-GFP and HT1080-GFP tumors in chicken embryos determines that nanodroplets accumulated throughout or at the periphery of tumors, suggesting that porphyrin nanodroplets may be useful for enhancing the visualization of tumors with ultrasound and/or photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  5. Ferric ammonium citrate as a positive bowel contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Gehl, H.B. [Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Heuck, A. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Krahe, T. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Lodemann, K.P. [Bracco-Byk Gulden GmbH, Konstanz (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and diagnostic efficacy of two different doses of ferric ammonium citrate as a paramagnetic oral contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen. Material and methods: Ninety-nine adult patients referred for MR imaging for a known or suspected upper abdominal pathology were included in this randomized multicenter double-blind clinical trial. Imaging was performed with spin-echo (T1- and T2-weighted) and gradient-echo (T1-weighted) techniques before and after administration of either 1200 mg or 2400 mg of ferric ammonium citrate dissolved in 600 ml of water. Safety analysis included monitoring of vital signs, assessment of adverse events, and laboratory testing. Efficacy with regard to organ distension, contrast distribution, bowel enhancement and delineation of adjacent structures was graded qualitatively. Results: No serious adverse events were reported for either of the two concentrations. A total of 31 minor side effects were noted, of which significantly more occurred in the higher dose group (p<0.01). The diagnostic confidence in defining or excluding disease was graded as better after contrast administration for 48% of all images. Marked or moderate enhancement of the upper gastrointestinal tract was achieved at both doses in 69.5% of cases with no evident difference between the two doses. The higher dose tended to show better results in terms of the contrast assessment parameters. Conclusion: Ferric ammonium citrate is a safe and effective oral contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen at two different dose levels. The higher dose showed a tendency toward better imaging results while the lower dose caused significantly fewer side effects. Therefore, the 1200 mg dose can be recommended in view of the risk-to-benefit ratio. (orig.)

  6. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Hollander A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antoine D’Hollander,1–3 Evelien Mathieu,1,4 Hilde Jans,1 Greetje Vande Velde,2,3 Tim Stakenborg,1 Pol Van Dorpe,1,4 Uwe Himmelreich,2,3 Liesbet Lagae1,4 1Department of Life Science Technology, Imec, 2Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Biomedical MRI Unit, 3Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center (MoSAIC, 4Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Laboratory of Solid State Physics and Magnetism, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract: The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3. Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. Keywords: SERS, gold nanostars, cancer imaging, Raman active

  7. Design of water-based ferrofluids as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, Maria F; Corrias, Anna; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Sen, Tapas; Floris, Patrizia; Bruce, Ian J

    2011-05-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and relaxometric study of ferrofluids based on iron oxide, with potential for use as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs). The effect of different cost-effective, water-based surface modification approaches which can be easily scaled-up for the large scale synthesis of the ferrofluids has been investigated. Surface modification was achieved by silanization, and/or coating with non-toxic commercial dispersants (a lauric polysorbate and a block copolymer with pigment affinic groups, namely Tween 20 and Disperbyk 190) which were added after or during iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. It was observed that all the materials synthesized functioned as negative contrast agents at physiological temperature and at frequencies covered by clinical imagers. The relaxometric properties of the magnetic nanoparticles were significantly improved after surface coating with stabilizers compared to the original iron oxide nanoparticles, with particular reference to the silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The results indicate that the optimization of the preparation of colloidal magnetic ferrofluids by surface modification is effective in the design of novel contrast agents for MRI by enabling better or more effective interaction between the coated iron oxide nanoparticles and protons present in their aqueous environment.

  8. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM-1 s-1, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T1-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T2-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles.

  9. Protein MRI contrast agent with unprecedented metal selectivity and sensitivity for liver cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Hua; Qiao, Jingjuan; Pu, Fan; Jiang, Jie; Hubbard, Kendra; Hekmatyar, Khan; Langley, Jason; Salarian, Mani; Long, Robert C; Bryant, Robert G; Hu, Xiaoping Philip; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-05-26

    With available MRI techniques, primary and metastatic liver cancers that are associated with high mortality rates and poor treatment responses are only diagnosed at late stages, due to the lack of highly sensitive contrast agents without Gd(3+) toxicity. We have developed a protein contrast agent (ProCA32) that exhibits high stability for Gd(3+) and a 10(11)-fold greater selectivity for Gd(3+) over Zn(2+) compared with existing contrast agents. ProCA32, modified from parvalbumin, possesses high relaxivities (r1/r2: 66.8 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1)/89.2 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1) per particle). Using T1- and T2-weighted, as well as T2/T1 ratio imaging, we have achieved, for the first time (to our knowledge), robust MRI detection of early liver metastases as small as ∼0.24 mm in diameter, much smaller than the current detection limit of 10-20 mm. Furthermore, ProCA32 exhibits appropriate in vivo preference for liver sinusoidal spaces and pharmacokinetics for high-quality imaging. ProCA32 will be invaluable for noninvasive early detection of primary and metastatic liver cancers as well as for monitoring treatment and guiding therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery.

  10. ESGAR consensus statement on liver MR imaging and clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, E.; Boraschi, P.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bali, M.A.; Matos, C. [Hopital Erasme, MRI Clinics, Department of Radiology, Bruxelles (Belgium); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [The General Hospital of the Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Brancatelli, G. [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Alves, F.C. [University Hospital of Coimbra, Medical Imaging Department and Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Grazioli, L. [Spedali Civili di Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia (Italy); Helmberger, T. [Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Lee, J.M. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Manfredi, R. [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Marti-Bonmati, L. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Area Clinica de Imagen Medica, Valencia (Spain); Merkle, E.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Op De Beeck, B. [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Schima, W. [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern and Sankt Josef-Krankenhaus, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Skehan, S. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Vilgrain, V. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Hopital Beaujon, Radiology Department, Clichy, Paris (France); Zech, C. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilungsleiter Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    To develop a consensus and provide updated recommendations on liver MR imaging and the clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents. The European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) formed a multinational European panel of experts, selected on the basis of a literature review and their leadership in the field of liver MR imaging. A modified Delphi process was adopted to draft a list of statements. Descriptive and Cronbach's statistics were used to rate levels of agreement and internal reliability of the consensus. Three Delphi rounds were conducted and 76 statements composed on MR technique (n = 17), clinical application of liver-specific contrast agents in benign, focal liver lesions (n = 7), malignant liver lesions in non-cirrhotic (n = 9) and in cirrhotic patients (n = 18), diffuse and vascular liver diseases (n = 12), and bile ducts (n = 13). The overall mean score of agreement was 4.84 (SD ±0.17). Full consensus was reached in 22 % of all statements in all working groups, with no full consensus reached on diffuse and vascular diseases. The consensus provided updated recommendations on the methodology, and clinical indications, of MRI with liver specific contrast agents in the study of liver diseases. (orig.)

  11. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  12. Biodegradable microparticles with surface dimples as a bi-modal imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ri; Lim, Yong Taik; Cho, Kuk Young

    2013-03-12

    Fabrication of physically engineered colloids and their application to the biological fields is emerging importance because of their potential to provide an enhanced performance without altering the chemical properties of biomaterials used. A facile approach is reported to fabricate sub-10-μm-sized PLGA microparticle with small dimples covering the surface by droplet imprinting. Optical and magnetic resonance bioimaging agents are easily co-encapsulated inside the microparticles to obtain a bi-modal imaging agent. Cell internalization efficacy of dimpled particles in DC 2.4 cell is enhanced compared with conventional smooth round-shaped colloids. Our result indicates that morphology-controlled microparticles show promise as a cell labeling with improved cell interaction.

  13. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  14. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial perfusion using the paramagnetic contrast agent manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, S; Lange, R A; Kulkarni, P V; Katz, J; Parkey, R W; Willerson, J T; Peshock, R M

    1989-08-01

    Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging studies have indicated that coronary occlusion does not produce sufficient changes in standard tissue relaxation times to allow the detection of acute ischemia. To identify acute myocardial perfusion abnormalities, the use of the paramagnetic agent manganese gluconate combined with calcium gluconate (MnGlu/CaGlu) was investigated in canine models of acute coronary artery occlusion. In vitro studies showed that MnGlu/CaGlu was a more efficient relaxing agent than gadolinium-DTPA (relaxivity of 7.8 versus 5.1 s-1 mM-1) and demonstrated affinity for normal myocardium. The distribution of MnGlu/CaGlu as measured by manganese-54 tracer studies was proportional to myocardial blood flow in both normal and ischemic tissue. Hearts excised from dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of 0.035 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu were imaged ex vivo using a relatively spin-lattice relaxation time (T1)-weighted gradient reversal technique (repetition time [TR] 50 ms and echo time [TE] 9 ms). These images showed increased signal intensity in the normally perfused myocardium with a mean signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.55 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD). In vivo images obtained in nine dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of the same dose of MnGlu/CaGlu demonstrated the region of hypoperfused myocardium in six dogs with a signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.64 +/- 0.23 (p less than 0.05 versus control). When a higher dose of 0.1 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu was utilized and in vivo imaging was performed using a relatively spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted (TR gated, TE 60 ms) spin-echo sequence in six dogs, the signal intensity of normal myocardium was decreased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer.

  16. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  17. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  18. Aptamer-conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles as Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Mohammad; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Mehrgardi, Masoud A.; Aghaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer is the most effective way to improve the survival rate in women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high spatial resolution and good anatomic details, and its lower sensitivity can be improved by using targeted molecular imaging. In this study, AS1411 aptamer was conjugated to Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles for specific targeting of mouse mammary carcinoma (4T1) cells that overexpress nucleolin. In vitro cytotoxicity of aptamer-conjugated nanoparticles was assessed on 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 (control) cells. The ability of the synthesized nanoprobe to target specifically the nucleolin overexpressed cells was assessed with the MRI technique. Results show that the synthesized nanoprobe produced strongly darkened T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with 4T1 cells, whereas the MR images of HFFF-PI6 cells incubated with the nanoprobe are brighter, showing small changes compared to water. The results demonstrate that in a Fe concentration of 45 μg/mL, the nanoprobe reduced by 90% MR image intensity in 4T1 cells compared with the 27% reduction in HFFF-PI6 cells. Analysis of MR signal intensity showed statistically significant signal intensity difference between 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 cells treated with the nanoprobe. MRI experiments demonstrate the high potential of the synthesized nanoprobe as a specific MRI contrast agent for detection of nucleolin-expressing breast cancer cells. PMID:28028501

  19. High-frequency subharmonic pulsed-wave Doppler and color flow imaging of microbubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, A; Goertz, D E; Karshafian, R; Cherin, E; Brown, A S; Burns, P N; Foster, F S

    2008-07-01

    A recent study has shown the feasibility of subharmonic (SH) flow imaging at a transmit frequency of 20 MHz. This paper builds on these results by examining the performance of SH flow imaging as a function of transmit pressure. Further, we also investigate the feasibility of SH pulsed-wave Doppler (PWD) imaging. In vitro flow experiments were performed with a 1-mm-diameter wall-less vessel cryogel phantom using the ultrasound contrast agent Definity and an imaging frequency of 20 MHz. The phantom results show that there is an identifiable pressure range where accurate flow velocity and power estimates can be made with SH imaging at 10 MHz (SH10), above which velocity estimates are biased by radiation force effects and unstable bubble behavior, and below which velocity and power estimates are degraded by poor SNR. In vivo validation of SH PWD was performed in an arteriole of a rabbit ear, and blood velocity estimates compared well with fundamental (F20) mode PWD. The ability to suppress tissue signals using SH signals may enable the use of higher frame rates and improve sensitivity to microvascular flow or slow velocities near large vessel walls by reducing or eliminating the need for clutter filters.

  20. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  1. Radiolabeled phosphonium salts as mitocondrial voltage sensors for positron emission tomography myocardial imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Yon; Min, Jung Joon [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine,Chonnam National University Medical School and Hwasun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Despite substantial advances in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, {sup 18}F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals remain necessary to diagnose heart disease because clinical use of current PET tracers is limited by their short half-life. Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts penetrate the mitochondrial membranes and accumulate in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in response to negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Radiolabeled tetraphenyl phosphonium cation derivatives have been developed as myocardial imaging agents for PET. In this review, a general overview of these radiotracers, including their radiosynthesis, in vivo characterization, and evaluation is provided and clinical perspectives are discussed.

  2. Tissue sensitive imaging and tomography without contrast agents for small animals with Timepix based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanova, E.; Schyns, L. E. J. R.; Ludwig, D.; Jakubek, J.; Le Pape, A.; Sefc, L.; Lotte, S.; Sykora, V.; Turecek, D.; Uher, J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2017-01-01

    The tissue type resolving X-ray radiography and tomography can be performed even without contrast agents. The differences between soft tissue types such as kidney, muscles, fat, liver, brain and spleen were measured based on their spectral response. The Timepix based X-ray imaging detector WidePIX2×5 with 300 μm thick silicon sensors was used for most of the measurements presented in this work. These promising results are used for further optimizations of the detector technology and radiographic methods.

  3. A Potential Dubin-Johnson Syndrome Imaging Agent: Synthesis, Biodistribution, and MicroPET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongsoo Yoo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS is caused by a deficiency of the human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT. A new lipophilic copper-64 complex of 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl-10-(tetradecyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane (5 was prepared and evaluated for potential as a diagnostic tool for DJS. The prepared ligand was labeled with 64Cu citrate in high radiochemical purity. In vivo uptake and clearance of the complex was determined through biodistribution studies using normal Sprague-Dawley rats and mutant cMOAT-deficient (TR− rats. In normal rats, the radioactive copper complex was cleared quickly from the body exclusively through the hepatic pathway. The 64Cu complex was taken up rapidly by the liver and quickly excreted into the small intestine and then the upper large intestine, whereas < 1% ID/organ was found in the kidney at all time points post injection. Whereas activity was accumulated continuously in the liver of TR− rats, it was not excreted into the small intestine. MicroPET studies of normal and TR rats were consistent with biodistribution data and showed dramatically different images. This study strongly suggests that cMOAT is involved in excretion of 64Cu-5. The significant difference between the biodistribution data and microPET images of the normal and TR− rats demonstrates that this new 64Cu complex may allow noninvasive diagnosis of DJS in humans.

  4. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  5. Crystal structures of Two Potential Tumor Imaging Agents and Therapeutic Agents-Copper(II)Ternary Complexes With Salicylidene-tyrosinato Schiff Base and Nitrogen-donor Chelating Lewis Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhao WANG; Guan Liang CAI; Ling XIA; Jun Jian YAO; Hong Yan CHEN; Zhao Xing MENG; Bo Li LIU

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structures of two potential tumor imaging agents and therapeutic agents -copper(II) complexes with salicylidene-tyrosinato Schiff base and nitrogen-donor chelating Lewis base,[Cu(sal-tyr)(bipy)] 1 and [Cu(sal-tyr)(phen)]·2CH3OH 2, are presented. Our work is helpful to get deep understanding of novel 64Cu tumor imaging agents and therapeutic agents.

  6. Evaluation of microbubbles as contrast agents for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbubbles (MBs can serve as an ultrasound contrast agent, and has the potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Due to the relatively low effect of MBs on MRI, it is necessary to develop new MBs that are more suitable for MRI. In this study, we evaluate the properties of SonoVue® and custom-made Fe(3O(4-nanoparticle-embedded microbubbles (Fe(3O(4-MBs in terms of contrast agents for ultrsonography (US and MRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 20 HepG2 subcutaneous-tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups (i.e., n = 10 mice each group, one for US test and the other for MRI test. Within each group, two tests were performed for each mouse. The contrast agent for the first test is SonoVue®, and the second is Fe(3O(4-MBs. US was performed using a Technos(MPX US system (Esaote, Italy with a contrast-tuned imaging (CnTI™ mode. MRI was performed using a 7.0T Micro-MRI (PharmaScan, Bruker Biospin GmbH, Germany with an EPI-T(2* sequence. The data of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR from the region-of-interest of each US and MR image was calculated by ImageJ (National Institute of Health, USA. In group 1, enhancement of SonoVue® was significantly higher than Fe(3O(4-MBs on US (P0.05. The SNR analysis of the enhancement process reveals a strong negative correlation in both cases (i.e., SonoVue® r = -0.733, Fe(3O(4-MBs r = -0.903, with P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: It might be important to change the Fe(3O(4-MBs' shell structure and/or the imagining strategy of US to improve the imaging quality of Fe(3O(4-MBs on US. As an intriguing prospect that can be detected by US and MRI, MBs are worthy of further study.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai; Xiang Wang; Xing Yao; Yong-Liang Lu; Jin-Liang Ping; Jian-Fang He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) andin situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylineosin (HE) staining.RESULTS: MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues.CONCLUSION: MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo.

  8. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression.

  9. Preparation, purification and primary bioevaluation of radioiodinated ofloxacin. An imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandil, Shaban; Seddik, Usama; Hussien, Hiba; Shaltot, Mohamed [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Cyclotron Project; El-Tabl, Abdou [Monofia Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Science

    2015-07-01

    The broad-spectrum antibiotic agents have been demonstrated as promising diagnostic tools for early detection of infectious lesions. We set out ofloxacin (Oflo), a second-generation fluoroquinolone, for the radioiodination process. In particular, this was carried out with {sup 125}I via an electrophilic substitution reaction. The radiochemical yield was influenced by different factors; drug concentration, different oxidizing agents, e.g. chloramine-T, iodogen and n-bromosuccinimide, pH of medium, reaction time, temperature and different organic media. These parameters were studied to optimize the best conditions for labeling with ofloxacin. We found that radiolabeling in ethanol medium showed a 70% radiochemical yield of {sup 125}I-ofloxacin. The radioiodination was determined by means of TLC and HPLC. The cold labeled Oflo ({sup 127}I-Oflo) was prepared and controlled by HPLC. The cold labeled Oflo was also confirmed by NMR and MS techniques. Furthermore, biodistribution studies for labeled {sup 125}I-Oflo were examined in two independent groups (3 mice in each one); control and E. Coli-injected (inflamed). The radiotracer showed a good localization in muscle of thigh for inflamed group as compared to control. In conclusion, ofloxacine might be a promising target as an anti-inflammatory imaging agent.

  10. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  11. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-07

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner.

  12. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF AN ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENT (LEVOVIST) IN COLOR DOPPLER IMAGING OF LIVER NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of using an ultrasound contrast agent(levovist)to enhance the color Doppler imaging of liver neoplasms.Thirty patients with hepatic tumors were enrolled in this study.After intravenous administration of levovist,the color Doppler signals of normal hepatic vessels were enhanced.In various hepatic tumors,the different patterns of tumor vascularity were observed,which had not been demonstrated in conventional non-contrast color Doppler imaging.In 11 of 16 patients with hepatocarcinoma,additoal color Doppler signals were observed in the central part of the tumors.On the contrary,3 patients with metastatic liver lesions the enhanced color Doppler signal appear only at the peripheral of tumors.A typical rim-like color enhancement was seen in 2 of the 3 cases.In six patients with hpatic hemangiomas contrast-enhanced color Doppler imaging demonstrated the blood vessels at the margin of the neoplasms.Contrast-enhanced color Doppler imaging improves the visualization of the hepatic neoplasm vascularity.This technique holds great promise for detecting small liver tumors and differentiating hepatic neoplasms.

  13. Zero echo time magnetic resonance imaging of contrast-agent-enhanced calcium phosphate bone defect fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Ventura, Manuela; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank; Heerschap, Arend

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are widely used bone substitutes. However, CPCs have similar radiopacity as natural bone, rendering them difficult to be differentiated in classical X-ray and computed tomography imaging. As conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bone is cumbersome, due to low water content and very short T(2) relaxation time, ultra-short echo time (UTE) and zero echo time (ZTE) MRI have been explored for bone visualization. This study examined the possibility to differentiate bone and CPC by MRI. T(1) and T(2)* values determined with UTE MRI showed little difference between bone and CPC; hence, these materials were difficult to separate based on T(1) or T(2) alone. Incorporation of ultra-small particles of iron oxide and gadopentetatedimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; 1 weight percentage [wt%] and 5 wt% respectively) into CPC resulted in visualization of CPC with decreased intensity on ZTE images in in vitro and ex vivo experiments. However, these additions had unfavorable effects on the solidification time and/or mechanical properties of the CPC, with the exception of 1% Gd-DTPA alone. Therefore, we tested this material in an in vivo experiment. The contrast of CPC was enhanced at an early stage postimplantation, and was significantly reduced in the 8 weeks thereafter. This indicates that ZTE imaging with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent could be a valid radiation-free method to visualize CPC degradation and bone regeneration in preclinical experiments.

  14. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  15. Modeling contrast agent flow in cerebral aneurysms: comparison of CFD with medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Vali, Alireza; Sigovan, Monica; Lawton, Michael; Saloner, David; Boussel, Loic

    2016-11-01

    PURPOSE: The flow in cerebral aneurysms is routinely assessed with X-ray angiography, an imaging technique based on a contrast agent injection. In addition to requiring a patient's catheterization and radiation exposure, the X-ray angiography may inaccurately estimate the flow residence time, as the injection alters the native blood flow patterns. Numerical modeling of the contrast transport based on MRI imaging, provides a non-invasive alternative for the flow diagnostics. METHODS: The flow in 3 cerebral aneurysms was measured in vivo with 4D PC-MRI, which provides time-resolved, 3D velocity field. The measured velocities were used to simulate a contrast agent transport by solving the advection-diffusion equation. In addition, the flow in the same patient-specific geometries was simulated with CFD and the velocities obtained from the Navier-Stokes solution were used to model the transport of a virtual contrast. RESULTS: Contrast filling and washout patterns obtained in simulations based on MRI-measured velocities were in agreement with those obtained using the Navier-Stokes solution. Some discrepancies were observed in comparison to the X-ray angiography data, as numerical modeling of the contrast transport is based on the native blood flow unaffected by the contrast injection. NIH HL115267.

  16. Iodinated Australian brown snake venom peptides as potential thrombus imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, M.J.; Eu, P.; Kelly, M.J. [Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1997-09-01

    Full text: A 54 kDa protein component isolated from the venom of Australian brown snake, Pseudonaja textilis textilis, which was found to activate prothrombin, was investigated for its potential as a thrombus imaging agent. Haematological affinity of the iodinated peptide was tested in vitro. The peptide was labelled with {sup 125}l using the lodogen method. Fresh blood samples were allowed to clot over a 24-hour period. The clots were then washed three times with 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and incubated for 30 min with purified labelled peptide or free radioiodine. For each sample, the percentage uptake in the clot was then calculated to determine specific and non-specific uptake. The degree of binding to cellular components of blood (CCB) was established by incubating fresh heparinised blood for 30 min with labelled peptide. Preliminary studies indicate that the radiolabelled peptide has a statistically significant specific affinity for formed thrombus, with only minor uptake in cellular blood components. These results suggest that further investigation of this agent for thrombus imaging is warranted. 1 tab.

  17. Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance image contrast agent promotes fibrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Varsha; Sung, Joanna J; Piecychna, Marta; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Kuo, Phillip; Abu-Alfa, Ali K; Cowper, Shawn E; Bucala, Richard; Gomer, Richard H

    2009-12-01

    Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents such as Omniscan are associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). To determine if Omniscan can affect the differentiation of monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are found in the fibrotic lesions of NSF, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from NSF patients, hemodialysis patients without NSF, and healthy, renally sufficient controls were exposed to Omniscan in a standardized in vitro fibrocyte differentiation protocol. When added to PBMCs, the gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agent Omniscan generally had little effect on fibrocyte differentiation. However, 10(-8) to 10(-3) mg/mL Omniscan reduced the ability of the fibrocyte differentiation inhibitor serum amyloid P (SAP) to decrease fibrocyte differentiation in PBMCs from 15 of 17 healthy controls and one of three NSF patients. Omniscan reduced the ability of SAP to decrease fibrocyte differentiation from purified monocytes, indicating that the Omniscan effect does not require the presence of other cells (such as T cells) in the PBMCs. Omniscan also reduced the ability of a different fibrocyte differentiation inhibitor, interleukin-12, to decrease fibrocyte differentiation. These data suggest that Omniscan interferes with the regulatory action of signals that inhibit the differentiation of monocytes to fibrocytes. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2009;30:1284-1288. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  19. Dextran coated bismuth-iron oxide nanohybrid contrast agents for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naha, Pratap C; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hecht, Elizabeth; Chorny, Michael; Chhour, Peter; Blankemeyer, Eric; Yates, Douglas M; Witschey, Walter R T; Litt, Harold I; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cormode, David P

    2014-12-14

    Bismuth nanoparticles have been proposed as a novel CT contrast agent, however few syntheses of biocompatible bismuth nanoparticles have been achieved. We herein report the synthesis of composite bismuth-iron oxide nanoparticles (BION) that are based on a clinically approved, dextran-coated iron oxide formulation; the particles have the advantage of acting as contrast agents for both CT and MRI. BION were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. BION CT phantom images revealed that the X-ray attenuation of the different formulations was dependent upon the amount of bismuth present in the nanoparticle, while T2-weighted MRI contrast decreased with increasing bismuth content. No cytotoxicity was observed in Hep G2 and BJ5ta cells after 24 hours incubation with BION. The above properties, as well as the yield of synthesis and bismuth inclusion efficiency, led us to select the Bi-30 formulation for in vivo experiments, performed in mice using a micro-CT and a 9.4 T MRI system. X-ray contrast was observed in the heart and blood vessels over a 2 hour period, indicating that Bi-30 has a prolonged circulation half-life. Considerable signal loss in T2-weighted MR images was observed in the liver compared to pre-injection scans. Evaluation of the biodistribution of Bi-30 revealed that bismuth is excreted via the urine, with significant concentrations found in the kidneys and urine. In vitro experiments confirmed the degradability of Bi-30. In summary, dextran coated BION are biocompatible, biodegradable, possess strong X-ray attenuation properties and also can be used as T2-weighted MR contrast agents.

  20. F-18 Polyethyleneglycol stilbenes as PET imaging agents targeting A{beta} aggregates in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung Meiping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Maier, Donna L. [Department of Neuroscience, AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE 19850 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States) and Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes a novel series of {sup 18}F-labeled polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-stilbene derivatives as potential {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaque-specific imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). In these series of compounds, {sup 18}F is linked to the stilbene through a PEG chain, of which the number of ethoxy groups ranges from 2 to 5. The purpose of adding PEG groups is to lower the lipophilicity and improve bioavailability. The syntheses of the 'cold' compounds and the {sup 18}F-labeled PEG stilbene derivatives are successfully achieved. All of the fluorinated stilbenes displayed high binding affinities in an assay using postmortem AD brain homogenates (K {sub i}=2.9-6.7 nM). Labeling was successfully performed by a substitution of the mesylate group of 10a-d by [{sup 18}F]fluoride giving the target compounds [{sup 18}F]12a-d (EOS, specific activity, 900-1500 Ci/mmol; radiochemical purity >99%). In vivo biodistribution of these novel {sup 18}F ligands in normal mice exhibited excellent brain penetrations and rapid washouts after an intravenous injection (6.6-8.1 and 1.2-2.6% dose/g at 2 and 60 min, respectively). Autoradiography of postmortem AD brain sections of [{sup 18}F]12a-d confirmed the specific binding related to the presence of A{beta} plaques. In addition, in vivo plaque labeling can be clearly demonstrated with these {sup 18}F-labeled agents in transgenic mice (Tg2576), a useful animal model for Alzheimer's disease. In conclusion, the preliminary results strongly suggest these fluorinated PEG stilbene derivatives are suitable candidates as A{beta} plaque imaging agents for studying patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Tumour angiogenesis regulation by the miR-200 family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecot, Chad V.; Ivan, Cristina; Lu, Chunhua; Wu, Sherry; Han, Hee-Dong; Shah, Maitri Y.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Liu, Yuexin; Kim, Sang Bae; Unruh, Anna; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Huang, Li; Zand, Behrouz; Moreno-Smith, Myrthala; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Taylor, Morgan; Dalton, Heather J.; Sehgal, Vasudha; Wen, Yunfei; Kang, Yu; Baggerly, Keith A.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ram, Prahlad T.; Ravoori, Murali K.; Kundra, Vikas; Zhang, Xinna; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Massion, Pierre P.; Calin, George A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Zhang, Wei; Sood, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The miR-200 family is well known to inhibit the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, suggesting it may therapeutically inhibit metastatic biology. However, conflicting reports regarding the role of miR-200 in suppressing or promoting metastasis in different cancer types have left unanswered questions. Here we demonstrate a difference in clinical outcome based on miR-200's role in blocking tumour angiogenesis. We demonstrate that miR-200 inhibits angiogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms by targeting interleukin-8 and CXCL1 secreted by the tumour endothelial and cancer cells. Using several experimental models, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of miR-200 delivery in ovarian, lung, renal and basal-like breast cancers by inhibiting angiogenesis. Delivery of miR-200 members into the tumour endothelium resulted in marked reductions in metastasis and angiogenesis, and induced vascular normalization. The role of miR-200 in blocking cancer angiogenesis in a cancer-dependent context defines its utility as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:24018975

  2. Module-based multiscale simulation of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mac Gabhann Feilim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical modeling of angiogenesis has been gaining momentum as a means to shed new light on the biological complexity underlying blood vessel growth. A variety of computational models have been developed, each focusing on different aspects of the angiogenesis process and occurring at different biological scales, ranging from the molecular to the tissue levels. Integration of models at different scales is a challenging and currently unsolved problem. Results We present an object-oriented module-based computational integration strategy to build a multiscale model of angiogenesis that links currently available models. As an example case, we use this approach to integrate modules representing microvascular blood flow, oxygen transport, vascular endothelial growth factor transport and endothelial cell behavior (sensing, migration and proliferation. Modeling methodologies in these modules include algebraic equations, partial differential equations and agent-based models with complex logical rules. We apply this integrated model to simulate exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The simulation results compare capillary growth patterns between different exercise conditions for a single bout of exercise. Results demonstrate how the computational infrastructure can effectively integrate multiple modules by coordinating their connectivity and data exchange. Model parameterization offers simulation flexibility and a platform for performing sensitivity analysis. Conclusions This systems biology strategy can be applied to larger scale integration of computational models of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, or other complex processes in other tissues under physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. An agent harms a victim: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on specific moral emotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kedia, G. [INSERM, Inst Hlth et Med Res, U797, Res Unit Neuroimaging Psychiat, F-91401 Orsay (France); Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, Orsay (France); Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L. [Univ Paris Sud, U797, Paris (France); Kedia, G.; Hilton, D. [Univ Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Berthoz, S. [Paris Descartes Univ, U797, Paris (France); Wessa, M. [Univ Heidelber, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, D-6800 Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The statement 'An agent harms a victim' depicts a situation that triggers moral emotions. Depending on whether the agent and the victim are the self or someone else, it can lead to four different moral emotions: self-anger ('I harm myself'), guilt ('I harm someone'), other-anger ('someone harms me'), and compassion ('someone harms someone'). In order to investigate the neural correlates of these emotions, we examined brain activation patterns elicited by variations in the agent (self vs. other) and the victim (self vs. other) of a harmful action. Twenty-nine healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while imagining being in situations in which they or someone else harmed themselves or someone else. Results indicated that the three emotional conditions associated with the involvement of other, either as agent or victim (guilt, other-anger, and compassion conditions), all activated structures that have been previously associated with the Theory of Mind (ToM, the attribution of mental states to others), namely, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Moreover, the two conditions in which both the self and other were concerned by the harmful action (guilt and other-anger conditions) recruited emotional structures (i. e., the bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate, and basal ganglia). These results suggest that specific moral emotions induce different neural activity depending on the extent to which they involve the self and other. (authors)

  4. Angiogenesis in female reproductive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Neovascularization, i.e. new blood vessels formation, can be divided into two different processes: vasculogenesis, whereby a primitive vascular network is established during embryogenesis from multipotential mesenchymal progenitors; and angiogenesis, which refers to the new blood vessels formation from pre-existing vessels[1,2]. Angiogenesis contributes to the most process throughout the whole life span from embryonic development to adult growth[2]. In this meaning, neovascularization is usually used to imply angiogenesis. Under physiological condi-tions, angiogenesis is a strictly regulated event and rarely happens in most adult tissues except for fracture or heal-ing of wounds[2,3]. However, a notable phenomenon is that the tissues of ovary and uterine endometrium are unique in the cycle-specific changes in vascularity that occur in each estrous/menstrual cycle. Active angiogenesis occurs in placenta to satisfy the needs of embryonic implantation and development. Defects in angiogenesis are associated with some gynecopathies including luteal phase defect, endometriosis, pregnancy loss and preeclampsia[4].

  5. High-resolution wide-field imaging of perfused capillaries without the use of contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson DA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Darin A Nelson1, Zvia Burgansky-Eliash1,2, Hila Barash1, Anat Loewenstein3, Adiel Barak4, Elisha Bartov2, Tali Rock2, Amiram Grinvald51Optical Imaging Ltd, Rehovot, Israel; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Medical Center & Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel; 5Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IsraelPurpose: Assessment of capillary abnormalities facilitates early diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of common retinal pathologies. Injected contrast agents like fluorescein are widely used to image retinal capillaries, but this highly effective procedure has a few disadvantages, such as untoward side effects, inconvenience of injection, and brevity of the time window for clear visualization. The retinal function imager (RFI is a tool for monitoring retinal functions, such as blood velocity and oximetry, based on intrinsic signals. Here we describe the clinical use of hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs as an intrinsic motion-contrast agent in the generation of detailed noninvasive capillary-perfusion maps (nCPMs.Patients and methods: Multiple series of nCPM images were acquired from 130 patients with diabetic retinopathy, vein occlusion, central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, or metabolic syndrome, as well as from 37 healthy subjects. After registration, pixel value distribution parameters were analyzed to locate RBC motion.Results: The RFI yielded nCPMs demonstrating microvascular morphology including capillaries in exquisite detail. Maps from the same subject were highly reproducible in repeated measurements, in as much detail and often better than that revealed by the very best fluorescein angiography. In patients, neovascularization and capillary nonperfusion areas were clearly observed. Foveal avascular

  6. Trackable and Targeted Phage as Positron Emission Tomography (PET Agent for Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibo Li, Qiaoling Jin, Chiunwei Huang, Siva Dasa, Liaohai Chen, Li-peng Yap, Shuanglong Liu, Hancheng Cai, Ryan Park, Peter S Conti

    2011-01-01

    partially blocked at 1 h time point. Phage-RGD particle was also used as the competitive ligand. In this case, the tumor uptake was significantly reduced and the value was kept at low level consistently. Conclusion: In this report, we constructed a PET trackable nanoplatform based on phage particle and demonstrated the imaging capability of these targeted agents. We also demonstrated that the choice of chelator could have significant impact on imaging results of nano-agents. The method established in this research may be applicable to other receptor/ligand systems for theranostic agent construction, which could have an immediate and profound impact on the field of imaging/therapy and lay the foundation for the construction of next generation cancer specific theranostic agents.

  7. Evaluation of 7 {alpha}-O-IADPN as a new potential SPECT opioid receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.F.; Mao, S.Y. [Fujian Medical College, Fuzhou (China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Tafani, J.A.M.; Coulais, Y.; Guiraud, R. [Hospital Purpan, Toulouse (France). Service Central de medicine Nucleaire; Zajac, J.M. [LPTF-CNRS, Toulouse (France)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: A new iodinated diprenorphine antagonist analogue, [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}.-O-IADPN, [E] - 17-(cyclopropylmethyl) -4,5 (x-epoxy- 18,19-dihydro-3-hydroxy-6-methoxy-7 {alpha}-[1-(3-iodoallyl)oxy-1-methylethyl]-6,14-endo-ethenomorphinan for in vivo and in vitro studies as a potential central nervous system (CNS) opioid receptor imaging agent was developed. In vivo biodistribution and metabolism of 7 {alpha}-O-lADPN in rat demonstrated that 0.16% of the iodinated compound was presented in mouse brain with a degradation-resistant at the first 60 min, and that 36% of the total cerebral radioactivity and 63% of its specific binding to opioid receptors were observed 20 min after i.v. injection. The cerebral radioactivity in mouse brain concentrated in the basal ganglion and cortex, and displayed a remarkably high target-to-non-target ratio (cortex/cerebellum = 60 min post-injection). The in vitro binding studies showed that [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}-O-IADPN binds non selectively to multiple opioid receptors {mu} = 8 K) with a very high affinity (Ki = 0.4 + 0.2 nM). Ex vivo autoradiography results in mouse further confirmed the high uptake and retention of this agent in basal ganglion region and cortex. The planar imaging of monkey brains after i.v. injection of [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}-O-IADPN clearly displayed that multiple opioid receptors can be visualized. With the excellent in vitro affinity and in vivo stability to deiodination and high target-to-nontarget ratio, [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}- O-IADPN appears to be useful as a CNS opioid receptor imaging probe for SPECT in primate and non-primate.

  8. The preclinical pharmacological study of dopamine transporter imaging agent 18F-FP-β-CIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaomin; CHEN Zhengping; WANG Songpei; TANG Jie; LIN Yansong; ZHU Zhaohui; FANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    The paper is to study pharmacologic characteristics of 18F-FP-β-CIT (18F-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2β- carbomethoxy-3β- (4-iodophenyl)nortropane) as an imaging agent for dopamine transporter. The radiochemical purity of 18F-FP-β-CIT in aqueous solution was over 95% after standing at room temperature for 4h. Biodistribution displayed rapid uptake in rat brain (1.375 %ID/organ at 5min and 0.100 %ID/organ at 180 min) and the striatal uptake was 1.444,0.731, 0.397, 0.230 and 0.146 %ID/g at 5, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min, respectively. The values of striatum/cerebellum,striatum/frontal cortex and striatum / hippocampus in rat's brain at 30 min were 3.38, 2.17 and 2.40 respectively. The uptake in striatum can be blocked by β-CFT, suggesting that 18F-FP-β-CIT binds to DAT peculiarly. The compound was rapidly cleared from monkey's blood. The striatal uptake was bilaterally decreased in the left-sided lesioned PD rats, compared with normal control. Brain PET imaging studies in normal monkey showed that 18F-FP-β-CIT was concentrated in striatum. The test of undue toxicity showed that the dose received by mice was 1250 times as by human, which indicates that 18F-FP-β-CIT is very safe. So 18F-FP-β-CIT is a promising PET imaging agent for DAT with safety and validity.

  9. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  10. Mouse Aortic Ring Assay: A New Approach of the Molecular Genetics of Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson Véronique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, a key step in many physiological and pathological processes, involves proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. To study the role of two enzymatic families, serine-proteases and matrix metalloproteases in angiogenesis, we have adapted to the mouse, the aortic ring assay initially developed in the rat. The use of deficient mice allowed us to demonstrate that PAI-1 is essential for angiogenesis while the absence of an MMP, MMP-11, did not affect vessel sprouting. We report here that this model is attractive to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis, to identify, characterise or screen "pro- or anti-angiogenic agents that could be used for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Approaches include using recombinant proteins, synthetic molecules and adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  11. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  12. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tanveer [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan (Pakistan); Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Ilsu, E-mail: ilrhee@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook [Division of Science Education, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University and Hospital, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Derac [Department of Physics, Hannam University, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T{sub 1}-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T{sub 2}-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents for MRI by measuring T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} effects were also observed in animal experimentation.

  13. {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridines as PET agents for amyloid plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung Meip ing [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2007-01-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain is a potentially valuable tool for studying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It may also be applicable for measuring the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs aimed at lowering A{beta} plaques in the brain. We have successfully reported a series of {sup 18}F-labeled fluoropegylated stilbenes for PET imaging studies. Encouraging results clearly demonstrated the usefulness of {sup 18}F-labeled stilbenes as potential A{beta} plaque-imaging agents. In the present study, we applied a similar approach to a styrylpyridine backbone structure. Among all derivatives examined (E)-2-(2-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)-5-(4-dimethylaminostyryl) -pyridine (2) displayed high binding affinity in postmortem AD brain homogenates (K {sub i}=2.5{+-}0.4 nM, with [{sup 125}I]IMPY as radioligand). No-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]2 was successfully prepared by [{sup 18}F]fluoride displacement of the corresponding tosylate precursor with a high labeling yield (30-40%) and a high radiochemical purity (>99%). Specific activity at the end of synthesis was determined to be 1500-2000 Ci/mmol. The tracer [{sup 18}F]2 showed adequate lipophilicity (log P=3.22). In vivo biodistribution of [{sup 18}F]2 in normal mice exhibited excellent initial brain penetration and rapid washout (7.77% and 1.03% dose/g in the brain at 2 and 30 min after intravenous injection, respectively) - properties that are highly desirable for A{beta}-plaque-specific brain imaging agents. Autoradiography of AD brain sections and homogenate binding with postmortem AD brain tissues confirmed the high binding signal of [{sup 18}F]2 due to the presence of A{beta} plaques. These preliminary results suggest that novel PET tracers may be potentially useful for the imaging of A{beta} plaques in the living human brain.

  14. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-18

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  15. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  16. Copper and angiogenesis: unravelling a relationship key to cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Fukai, Tohru; Glesne, David

    2009-01-01

    1. Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from existing vasculature, is a critical process in normal physiology as well as several physiopathologies. A desire to curb the supportive role angiogenesis plays in the development and metastasis of cancers has driven exploration into anti-angiogenic strategies as cancer therapeutics. Key to this, angiogenesis additionally displays an exquisite sensitivity to bioavailable copper. Depletion of copper has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis in a wide variety of cancer cell and xenograft systems. Several clinical trials using copper chelation as either an adjuvant or primary therapy have been conducted. Yet, the biological basis for the sensitivity of angiogenesis remains unclear. Numerous molecules important to angiogenesis regulation have been shown to be either directly or indirectly influenced by copper, yet a clear probative answer to the connection remains elusive. 2. Measurements of copper in biological systems have historically relied on techniques that, although demonstrably powerful, provide little or no information as to the spatial distribution of metals in a cellular context. Therefore, several new approaches have been developed to image copper in a biological context. One such approach relies on synchrotron-derived X-rays from third-generation synchrotrons and the technique of high resolution X-ray fluorescence microprobe (XFM) analysis. 3. Recent applications of XFM approaches to the role of copper in regulating angiogenesis have provided unique insight into the connection between copper and cellular behaviour. Using XFM, copper has been shown to be highly spatially regulated, as it is translocated from perinuclear areas of the cell towards the tips of extending filopodia and across the cell membrane into the extracellular space during angiogenic processes. Such findings may explain the heightened sensitivity of this cellular process to this transition metal and set a new paradigm for the kinds of

  17. Aptamer-Modified Temperature-Sensitive Liposomal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kunchi; Liu, Min; Tong, Xiaoyan; Sun, Na; Zhou, Lu; Cao, Yi; Wang, Jine; Zhang, Hailu; Pei, Renjun

    2015-09-14

    A novel aptamer modified thermosensitive liposome was designed as an efficient magnetic resonance imaging probe. In this paper, Gd-DTPA was encapsulated into an optimized thermosensitive liposome (TSL) formulation, followed by conjugation with AS1411 for specific targeting against tumor cells that overexpress nucleolin receptors. The resulting liposomes were extensively characterized in vitro as a contrast agent. As-prepared TSLs-AS1411 had a diameter about 136.1 nm. No obvious cytotoxicity was observed from MTT assay, which illustrated that the liposomes exhibited excellent biocompatibility. Compared to the control incubation at 37 °C, the liposomes modified with AS1411 exhibited much higher T1 relaxivity in MCF-7 cells incubated at 42 °C. These data indicate that the Gd-encapsulated TSLs-AS1411 may be a promising tool in early cancer diagnosis.

  18. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongalsky, M. B.; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T2) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g.s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  19. Primary study of a novel Tc-tricarbonyl cocaine analogue as the potential DAT imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaobo; ZHU Lin; DING Shaoke; LIU Boli

    2005-01-01

    The convenient preparation of organometallic precursor fac-[99mTc(CO)3 (H2O)3]+ opens a new route to design new radiopharmaceuticals. Based on this precursor, a new cocaine analogue, Tropyn, is designed and synthesized, and "2+1" mixed-ligands approach is used to prepare a neutral complex [99mTc(CO)3(Tropyn)I]. Biodistribution in mice and rats proves that it has sufficient brain uptake. Rat regional brain biodistribution indicates that the complex is highly concentrated in the striatum (ST) with rapid clearance in the cortex (CT) and hippocampus (HP), which make it valuable for further investigation as the potential Second-Generation DAT imaging agent.

  20. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongalsky, M. B., E-mail: mgongalsky@gmail.com; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perepukhov, A. M.; Maximychev, A. V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, M. V. [Research Center for MRI and MRS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, A. N. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pirogov, Yu. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Center for MRI and MRS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T{sub 1}) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g·s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  2. New calcium-selective smart contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kirti Dhingra; Forgács, Attila; Uh, Hyounsoo; Beyerlein, Michael; Maier, Martin E; Petoud, Stéphane; Botta, Mauro; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2013-12-23

    Calcium plays a vital role in the human body and especially in the central nervous system. Precise maintenance of Ca(2+) levels is very crucial for normal cell physiology and health. The deregulation of calcium homeostasis can lead to neuronal cell death and brain damage. To study this functional role played by Ca(2+) in the brain noninvasively by using magnetic resonance imaging, we have synthesized a new set of Ca(2+) -sensitive smart contrast agents (CAs). The agents were found to be highly selective to Ca(2+) in the presence of other competitive anions and cations in buffer and in physiological fluids. The structure of CAs comprises Gd(3+)-DO3A (DO3A=1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) coupled to a Ca(2+) chelator o-amino phenol-N,N,O-triacetate (APTRA). The agents are designed to sense Ca(2+) present in extracellular fluid of the brain where its concentration is relatively high, that is, 1.2-0.8 mM. The determined dissociation constant of the CAs to Ca(2+) falls in the range required to sense and report changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels followed by an increase in neural activity. In buffer, with the addition of Ca(2+) the increase in relaxivity ranged from 100-157%, the highest ever known for any T1-based Ca(2+)-sensitive smart CA. The CAs were analyzed extensively by the measurement of luminescence lifetime measurement on Tb(3+) analogues, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD), and (17)O NMR transverse relaxation and shift experiments. The results obtained confirmed that the large relaxivity enhancement observed upon Ca(2+) addition is due to the increase of the hydration state of the complexes together with the slowing down of the molecular rotation and the retention of a significant contribution of the water molecules of the second sphere of hydration.

  3. Closed-form solution of the convolution integral in the magnetic resonance dispersion model for quantitative assessment of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, S; Janssen, A J E M; Lavini, C; de la Rosette, J J; Wijkstra, H; Mischi, M

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis and treatment is still limited due to the lack of reliable imaging methods for cancer localization. Based on the fundamental role played by angiogenesis in cancer growth and development, several dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging methods have been developed to probe tumor angiogenic vasculature. In DCE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pharmacokinetic modeling allows estimating quantitative parameters related to the physiology underlying tumor angiogenesis. In particular, novel magnetic resonance dispersion imaging (MRDI) enables quantitative assessment of the microvascular architecture and leakage, by describing the intravascular dispersion kinetics of an extravascular contrast agent with a dispersion model. According to this model, the tissue contrast concentration at each voxel is given by the convolution between the intravascular concentration, described as a Brownian motion process according to the convective-dispersion equation, with the interstitium impulse response, represented by a mono-exponential decay, and describing the contrast leakage in the extravascular space. In this work, an improved formulation of the MRDI method is obtained by providing an analytical solution for the convolution integral present in the dispersion model. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by means of dedicated simulations in terms of estimation accuracy, precision, and computation time. Moreover, a preliminary clinical validation was carried out in five patients with proven PCa. The proposed method allows for a reduction by about 40% of computation time without any significant change in estimation accuracy and precision, and in the clinical performance.

  4. Targeting Potassium Channels for Increasing Delivery of Imaging Agents and Therapeutics to Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Sanyasihally Ningaraj

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Every year in the US, 20,000 new primary and nearly 200,000 metastatic brain tumor cases are reported. The cerebral microvessels/ capillaries that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB not only protect the brain from toxic agents in the blood but also pose a significant hindrance to the delivery of small and large therapeutic molecules. Different strategies have been employed to circumvent the physiological barrier posed by blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB. Studies in our laboratory have identified significant differences in the expression levels of certain genes and proteins between normal and brain tumor capillary endothelial cells. In this study, we validated the non-invasive and clinically relevant Dynamic Contrast Enhancing-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI method with invasive, clinically irrelevant but highly accurate Quantitative Autoradiography (QAR method using rat glioma model. We also showed that DCE-MRI metric of tissue vessel perfusion-permeability is sensitive to changes in blood vessel permeability following administration of calcium-activated potassium (BKCa channel activator NS-1619. Our results show that human gliomas and brain tumor endothelial cells that overexpress BKCa channels can be targeted for increased BTB permeability for MRI enhancing agents to brain tumors. We conclude that monitoring the outcome of increased MRI enhancing agents’ delivery to microsatellites and leading tumor edges in glioma patients would lead to beneficial clinical outcome.

  5. A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -polymer for liver magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Xue, Rong; You, Tianyan; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-07-01

    A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -copolymer (ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd) has been developed as a potential liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd consisted of a poly (aspartic acid-co-leucine) unit bound with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (Gd-DOTA) via the linkage of ethylenediamine. In vitro, the biodegradable experiment and cytotoxicity assay showed the biodegradability and biocompatibility of this gadolinium-polymer. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd presented an increase in relaxivity of 2.4 times than the clinical Gd-DOTA. In vivo, gadolinium (III)-copolymer was mainly accumulated in the liver, and it could be excreted via the renal and hepatobiliary mechanism. The average enhancement of ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd (60.71±5.93%, 50-80 min) in liver was 2.62-fold greater than that of Gd-DOTA (23.16±3.55%, 10-30 min). ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd could be as a potential liver MRI contrast agent with a long time-window.

  6. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorine-18 labeled glyburide analogs as {beta}-cell imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, A.; Shiue, C.-Y. E-mail: Shiue@rad.upenn.edu; Feng, Q.; Shiue, G.G.; Deng, S.; Pourdehnad, M.T.; Schirrmacher, R.; Vatamaniuk, M.; Doliba, N.; Matschinsky, F.; Wolf, B.; Roesch, F.; Naji, A.; Alavi, A.A

    2004-05-01

    Glyburide is a prescribed hypoglycemic drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients. We have synthesized two of its analogs, namely N-{l_brace}4-[{beta}-(2-(2'-fluoroethoxy)-5-chlorobenzenecarboxamido)ethyl] benzenesulfonyl{r_brace}-N'-cyclohexylurea (2-fluoroethoxyglyburide, 8b) and N-{l_brace}4-[{beta}-(2-(2'-fluoroethoxy)-5-iodobenzenecarboxamido)ethyl]benzenesulfonyl {r_brace}-N'-cyclohexylurea (2-fluoroethoxy-5-deschloro-5-iodoglyburide, 8a), and their fluorine-18 labeled analogs as {beta}-cell imaging agents. Both F-18 labeled compound 8a and compound 8b were synthesized by alkylation of the corresponding multistep synthesized hydroxy precursor 4a and 4b with 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl tosylate in DMSO at 120 degree sign C for 20 minutes followed by HPLC purification in an overall radiochemical yield of 5-10% with a synthesis time of 100 minutes from EOB. The octanol/water partition coefficients of compounds 8a and 8b were 141.21 {+-} 27.77 (n = 8) and 124.33 {+-} 21.61 (n = 8), respectively. Insulin secretion experiments of compounds 8a and 8b on rat islets showed that both compounds have a similar stimulating effect on insulin secretion as that of glyburide. In vitro binding studies showed that {approx}2% of compounds 8a and 8b bound to {beta}TC3 and Min6 cells and that the binding was saturable. Preliminary biodistribution studies in mice showed that the uptake of both compounds 8a and 8b in liver and small intestine were high, whereas the uptake in other organs studied including pancreas were low. Additionally, the uptake of compound 8b in vivo was nonsaturable. These results tend to suggest that compounds 8a and 8b may not be the ideal {beta}-cell imaging agents.

  8. Quasi-cubic magnetite/silica core-shell nanoparticles as enhanced MRI contrast agents for cancer imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos L Campbell

    Full Text Available Development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents that can be readily applied for imaging of biological tissues under clinical settings is a challenging task. This is predominantly due to the expectation of an ideal MR agent being able to be synthesized in large quantities, possessing longer shelf life, reasonable biocompatibility, tolerance against its aggregation in biological fluids, and high relaxivity, resulting in better contrast during biological imaging. Although a repertoire of reports address various aforementioned issues, the previously reported results are far from optimal, which necessitates further efforts in this area. In this study, we demonstrate facile large-scale synthesis of sub-100 nm quasi-cubic magnetite and magnetite/silica core-shell (Mag@SiO2 nanoparticles and their applicability as a biocompatible T2 contrast agent for MRI of biological tissues. Our study suggests that silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles reported in this study can potentially act as improved MR contrast agents by addressing a number of aforementioned issues, including longer shelf life and stability in biological fluids. Additionally, our in vitro and in vivo studies clearly demonstrate the importance of silica coating towards improved applicability of T2 contrast agents for cancer imaging.

  9. Angiogenesis in the corpus luteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulff Christine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The corpus luteum (CL is a site of intense angiogenesis. Within a short period, this is followed either by controlled regression of the microvascular tree in the non-fertile cycle, or maintenance and stabilisation of the new vasculature a conceptual cycle. The molecular regulation of these diverse aspects is examined. The CL provides a unique model system in which to study the cellular and molecular regulation of angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been found to have a major role in the CL. By targeting its action at specific stages of the luteal phase in vivo by antagonists, profound inhibitory effects on luteal angiogenesis and function are observed.

  10. Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Nanoparticles as Fluorophore-Free Contrast Agents for Multicolor Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the fabrication of self-assembled polyelectrolyte nanoparticles that provide a multicolor optical imaging modality. Poly(γ-glutamic acid(γ-PGA formed self-assembled nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions with two different cationic polymers: poly(L-lysine(PLL and chitosan. The self-assembled γ-PGA/PLL and γ-PGA/chitosan nanoparticles were crosslinked by glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking of the ionic self-assembled nanoparticles with glutaraldehyde not only stabilized the nanoparticles but also generated a strong autofluorescence signal. Fluorescent Schiff base bonds (C=N and double bonds (C=C were generated simultaneously by crosslinking of the amine moiety of the cationic polyelectrolytes with monomeric glutaraldehyde or with polymeric glutaraldehyde. The unique optical properties of the nanoparticles that resulted from the crosslinking by glutaraldehyde were analyzed using UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observed that the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles could be regulated by adjusting the crosslinker concentration and the reaction time. The nanoparticles also exhibited high performance in the labeling and monitoring of therapeutic immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells. These self-assembled nanoparticles are expected to be a promising multicolor optical imaging contrast agent for the labeling, detection, and monitoring of cells.

  11. Preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of 99Tcm-TADP as bone imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xiaohong; LUO Shineng; NIU Guosai; YE Wanzhong; YANG Min; WANG Hongyong; XIA Yongmei

    2008-01-01

    TADP, 2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid, was synthesized by three step reactions from the raw material 1H-1,2,4-triazole. 99Tcm-TADP was prepared with 5 mg TADP at Ph 7.0 by joining 99TcmO4 with SnCl2·2H2O in aqueous solution for 10 min at room temperature. Both labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99Tcm-TADP were more than 95%. The biodistribution in rats and bone scan in rabbits were also studied. The uptake of organ was expressed as %ID/g. The results showed that the bone uptake is up to 17.17%ID/g which is the maximum of bone uptake at 30 min after injection of 99Tcm-TADP in rats, bone-to-muscle and bone-to-blood uptake ratios were 61.32 and 13.21, respectively. The clear bone image of rabbit was obtained at 120 min after injection of 99Tcm-TADP and clearance in soft tissue was visible. The preparation of 99Tcm-TADP was convenient and 99Tcm-TADP exhibited high uptake in bone, and it would be a potential new bone imaging agent.

  12. New radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor tracers as potential tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.oltenfreiter@rug.ac.be; Staelens, Ludovicus; Lejeune, Annabelle; Dumont, Filip; Frankenne, Francis; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Slegers, Guido

    2004-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a positive correlation between tumor progression and expression of extracellular proteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-2 and MMP-9 have become attractive targets for cancer research because of their increased expression in human malignant tumor tissues of various organs, providing a target for medical imaging techniques. Radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitors 2-(4'-[{sup 123}I]iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-propionic acid (9) and 2-(4'-[{sup 123}I]iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-propionamide (11) were synthesized by electrophilic aromatic substitution of the tributylstannyl derivatives and resulted in radiochemical yields of 60% {+-} 5% (n = 3) and 70% {+-} 5% (n = 6), respectively. In vitro zymography and enzyme assays showed high inhibition capacities of the inhibitors on gelatinases. In vivo biodistribution showed no long-term accumulation in organs and the possibility to accumulate in the tumor. These results warrant further studies of radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers as potential SPECT tumor imaging agents.

  13. Anti-angiogenesis therapy for lung cancer:the shore and the other shore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Zhang; Jingjing Liu; Hui Li; Ying Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is known to be an important event in tumor growth. In preclinical and clinical researches, anti-angiogenesis therapy has made great progress, but there are stil many problems for future anti-an-giogenesis therapy. Here, we review recently completed clinical trials of emerging antiangiogenic agents in patients with non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC) and discuss the chal enges of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-ECC as a PET renal imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizaei, Alireza; Jaililan, Amir Reza; Mazidi, Mohammad; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Yousefnia, Hassan; Shabani, Gholamli; Ardaneh, Khosro [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geramifar, Patham; Beiki, Davood [Research Center for Nuclear Medicine, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Development of a gallium-68-labeled renal tracer can be a good substitute for Tc-99m, a known SPECT tracer. In this study, effort was made to develop {sup 68}Ga-ethylenecysteamine cysteine ({sup 68}Ga-ECC). Ga-ECC was prepared using generator-based {sup 68}GaCl3 and ethylenecysteamine cysteine (ECC) at optimized conditions. Stability of the complex was checked in human serum followed by partition coefficient determination of the tracer. The biodistribution of the tracer in rats was studied using tissue counting and PET/CT imaging up to 120 min. Ga-ECC was prepared at optimized conditions in 15 min at 90 °C (radiochemical purity ≈97 ± 0.88 % ITLC, >99 % HPLC, specific activity: 210 ± 5 GBq/mM). {sup 68}Ga-ECC was a water-soluble complex based on partition coefficient data (log P; −1.378) and was stable in the presence of human serum for 2 h at 37 °C. The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated high kidney excretion of the tracer in 10–20 min. The SUV{sub max} ratios of the liver to left kidney were 0.38 and 0.39 for 30 and 90 min, respectively, indicating high kidney uptake. Initial biodistribution results showed significant kidney and urinary excretion of the tracer comparable to that of the homologous {sup 99m}Tc compound. The complex could be a possible PET kidney imaging agent with a fast imaging time.

  15. Size effect of Au/PAMAM contrast agent on CT imaging of reticuloendothelial system and tumor tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jian; Liu, Ransheng; Zhang, Aixu; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-entrapped Au nanoparticles were synthesized with distinct sizes to figure out the size effect of Au-based contrast agent on CT imaging of passively targeted tissues. Au/PAMAM nanoparticles were first synthesized with narrow distribution of particles size of 22.2 ± 3.1, 54.2 ± 3.7, and 104.9 ± 4.7 nm in diameters. Size effect leads no significant difference on X-ray attenuation when Au/PAMAM was ≤0.05 mol/L. For CT imaging of a tumor model, small Au/PAMAM were more easily internalized via endocytosis in the liver, leading to more obviously enhanced contrast. Similarly, contrast agents with small sizes were more effective in tumor imaging because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Overall, the particle size of Au/PAMAM heavily affected the efficiency of CT enhancement in imaging RES and tumors.

  16. Tumor angiogenesis--a new therapeutic target in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, E L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Skovgaard-Poulsen, H

    1998-01-01

    Tumor growth is critically dependent on angiogenesis, which is sprouting of new vessels from pre-existing vasculature. This process is regulated by inducers and inhibitors released from tumor cells, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma multiforme, have...... significant angiogenic activity primarily by the expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF Anti-angiogenic therapy represents a new promising therapeutic modality in solid tumors. Several agents are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. The present review describes the principal inducers...

  17. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  18. Angiogenesis inhibitors under study for the treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Frances A; Sridhar, Srikala S

    2003-08-01

    Several classes of agents now exist that target the different steps involved in angiogenesis. These include drugs inhibiting matrix breakdown, the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs), such as marimastat, prinomastat, BMS275291, BAY12-9566, and neovastat. Trials of this class of agents have all been negative to date. Drugs that block endothelial cell signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) including rhuMAb VEGF, SU5416, SU6668, ZD6474, CP-547,632 and ZD4190 are all in earlier stages of clinical trial. Drugs that are similar to endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis including interferons have also been evaluated without success. Endostatin has been shown to have an acceptable toxicity profile, but clinical evidence of activity has not yet been demonstrated. There has also been renewed interest in thalidomide. Drugs such as squalamine, celecoxib, ZD6126, TNP-470 and those targeting the integrins are also being evaluated in lung cancer. Despite early enthusiasm for many of these agents, Phase III trials have not yet demonstrated significant increases in overall survival and toxicity remains an issue. It is hoped that as our understanding of the complex process of angiogenesis increases, so will our ability to design more effective targeted therapies.

  19. An intelligent nanotheranostic agent for targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging, and imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Hangrong; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Ming; Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; Zheng, Shuguang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Lixin; Xu, Huixiong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-04-09

    A novel multifunctional nanotheranostic agent with targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging and ultrasound imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (MSNC-PEG-HA(SS)-PFH, abbreviated as MPH(SS)-PFH) capabilities is developed. The redox-responsive guest molecule release and ultrasound imaging functions can be both integrated in such a "smart" theranostic agent, which is accomplished by the redox-triggered transition from the crosslinking state to retrocrosslinking state of the grafted polyethylene glycol-disulfide hyaluronic acid molecules on the particle surface when reaching a reducing environment in vitro. More importantly, under the tailored ultrasound imaging guiding, in vivo Hela tumor-bearing nude mice can be thoroughly and spatial-accurately ablated during HIFU therapy, due to the targeted accumulation, responsive ultrasound imaging guidance and the synergistic ablation functions of nanotheranostic agent MPH(SS)-PFH in the tumors. This novel multifunctional nano-platform can serve as a promising candidate for further studies on oncology therapy, due to its high stability, responsive and indicative ultrasound imaging of tumors, and enhanced HIFU therapeutic efficiency and spatial accuracy under ultrasound-guidance.

  20. Studies of Jovian atmospheric structure and coloring agents using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Paul Douglas

    The coloring agents, or chromophores, that are embedded within Jupiter's vertical aerosol structure have not been identified and are poorly characterized. In this dissertation, we present two studies of chromophores in the context of the jovian atmospheric structure. In the first study, we analyzed images acquired with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We employed a radiative transfer code to retrieve single scattering albedo spectra, o0(lambda), for particles in Jupiter's tropospheric haze at seven wavelengths in the near-UV and visible regimes. All o0 curves were absorbing in the blue, and o0(lambda) increased monotonically to approximately unity as wavelength increased. We found accurate fits to all o0(lambda) curves using an empirically derived functional form: o 0(lambda) = 1 -- A exp(--Blambda ). The best-fit parameters for the mean o 0(lambda) curve were A = 25.4 and B = 0.0149 for lambda in units of nm. We performed a principal component analysis (PCA) on our o0(lambda) results and found that one or two chromophores were sufficient to produce the variations in o0(lambda). A PCA of reflectance spectra, I/F(lambda) for the same jovian locations resulted in principal components (PCs) with roughly the same variances as the o0(lambda) PCA, but they did not result in a one-to-one mapping of PC amplitudes between the o 0(lambda) PCA and I/F(lambda) PCA. We suggest that statistical analyses performed on I/F(lambda) have limited applicability to the characterization of chromophores in the jovian atmosphere due to the sensitivity of I/F(lambda) to horizontal variations in the vertical aerosol distribution. In the second study, we collected and analyzed images of Jupiter from 470--900 nm in 2-nm increments. We acquired our data with the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera using the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We retrieved o0(lambda) for four jovian locations

  1. Iron oxide nanorods as high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Tyagi, Himanshu; Bahadur, D.; Aslam, M.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods.An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00055f

  2. Novel 99mTc labeled σ receptor ligand as a potential tumor imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A novel 99mTc labeled complex, [N-[2-((2-oxo-2-(4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato]Technetium(V) oxide (PPPE-MAMA′-99mTcO) ([99mTc]-2) has been designed and prepared based on the integrated approach. The corresponding rhenium complex (PPPE-MAMA′-ReO)(Re-2) has been prepared and characterized. In vitro competition binding assays show moderate affinity of Re-2 towards σ1 and σ2 receptors with Ki values of 8.67 ± 0.07 and 5.71 ± 1.88 μmol, respectively. Planar images obtained at 0.5 h, 4 h, 20 h after I.v. Injection indicate the accumulation of [99mTc]-2 in MCF-7 human breast tumor bearing mice at 20 h. Furthermore, the accumulation of [99mTc]-2 has been inhibited at 20 h after co-injection of [99mTc]-2 plus haloperidol (1 mg/kg). Biodistribution studies of [99mTc]-2 display an in vivo tumor uptake of 0.14% ± 0.01% ID/g at 24 h post I.v. Injection with a tumor/muscle ratio of 6.02 ± 0.87. The above results suggest that [99mTc]-2, derived from a previously published lead compound, retains certain tumor uptake and affinity for σ receptors. [99mTc]-2 may be used as a basis for further structural modifications to develop tumor imaging agents with high affinity for σ receptors.

  3. Paired-agent imaging for resection during surgery (PAIRS) of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Chen, Eunice; Gunn, Jason R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is correlated with poor prognosis. Complete surgical resection of HNSCC tumors has a large impact on patient survival, where detection of tumor at or close to surgical margins increases the risk of death at 5-years by 90%. In addition, large surgical margins can greatly increase the morbidity experienced by the patient due to functional and cosmetic damage of oral and facial structures. Single fluorescence targeting agents are often used for tumor detection in in vivo pre-clinical imaging; however, the arising signal is qualitative at best because it is a complex mixture of vascular perfusion, vascular leakage, inhibited lymphatic clearance, and receptor binding. In vivo ratiometric receptor concentration imaging (RCI) allows quantification of receptor expression (hence identification of cancerous tissue) by utilizing co-administered paired-agents consisting of a targeted agent and non-targeted perfusion agent to reference the plasma delivery and leakage. A panel of HNSCC tumors with varying levels of EGFR expression (SCC-15 >SCC-25 > SCC-09) have been imaged using ABY-029, a clinically relevant anti-EGFR affibody labeled with IRDye 800CW, and affibody control imaging agent labeled with IRDye 680RD. RCI maps of in vivo tissue have been created and are spatially correlated with EGFR and CD31 immunohistochemistry and basic H and E staining. The RCI threshold parameters for distinguishing tumor from normal tissues (skin and muscle) and the accuracy of margin detection in these tumors will be presented. RCI surgical resection will be further developed using a novel multi-channel, gated fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) imaging system that is capable of performing RCI in normal room light.

  4. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats.

  5. Bimodal Imaging Probes for Combined PET and OI: Recent Developments and Future Directions for Hybrid Agent Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Seibold

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging—and especially positron emission tomography (PET—has gained increasing importance for diagnosis of various diseases and thus experiences an increasing dissemination. Therefore, there is also a growing demand for highly affine PET tracers specifically accumulating and visualizing target structures in the human body. Beyond the development of agents suitable for PET alone, recent tendencies aim at the synthesis of bimodal imaging probes applicable in PET as well as optical imaging (OI, as this combination of modalities can provide clinical advantages. PET, due to the high tissue penetration of the γ-radiation emitted by PET nuclides, allows a quantitative imaging able to identify and visualize tumors and metastases in the whole body. OI on the contrary visualizes photons exhibiting only a limited tissue penetration but enables the identification of tumor margins and infected lymph nodes during surgery without bearing a radiation burden for the surgeon. Thus, there is an emerging interest in bimodal agents for PET and OI in order to exploit the potential of both imaging techniques for the imaging and treatment of tumor diseases. This short review summarizes the available hybrid probes developed for dual PET and OI and discusses future directions for hybrid agent development.

  6. Comparison of Folate Receptor Targeted Optical Contrast Agents for Intraoperative Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoperative imaging can identify cancer cells in order to improve resection; thus fluorescent contrast agents have emerged. Our objective was to do a preclinical comparison of two fluorescent dyes, EC17 and OTL38, which both target folate receptor but have different fluorochromes. Materials. HeLa and KB cells lines were used for in vitro and in vivo comparisons of EC17 and OTL38 brightness, sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution. In vivo experiments were then performed in mice. Results. The peak excitation and emission wavelengths of EC17 and OTL38 were 470/520 nm and 774/794 nm, respectively. In vitro, OTL38 required increased incubation time compared to EC17 for maximum fluorescence; however, peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR was 1.4-fold higher compared to EC17 within 60 minutes (p<0.001. Additionally, the SBR for detecting smaller quantity of cells was improved with OTL38. In vivo, the mean improvement in SBR of tumors visualized using OTL38 compared to EC17 was 3.3 fold (range 1.48–5.43. Neither dye caused noticeable toxicity in animal studies. Conclusions. In preclinical testing, OTL38 appears to have superior sensitivity and brightness compared to EC17. This coincides with the accepted belief that near infrared (NIR dyes tend to have less autofluorescence and scattering issues than visible wavelength fluorochromes.

  7. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  8. 1,2-hydroxypyridonates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging: TREN-1,2-HOPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Christoph J; Moore, Evan G; Xu, Jide; Avedano, Stefano; Botta, Mauro; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2007-10-29

    1,2-Hydroxypyridinones (1,2-HOPO) form very stable lanthanide complexes that may be useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray diffraction of single crystals established that the solid-state structures of the Eu(III) and the previously reported [Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 5452] Gd(III) complex are identical. The recently discovered sensitizing properties of 1,2-HOPO chelates for Eu(III) luminescence [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 10 067] allow for direct measurement of the number of water molecules coordinated to the metal center. Fluorescence measurements of the Eu(III) complex corroborate that, in solution, two water molecules coordinate the lanthanide (q = 2) as proposed from the analysis of NMRD profiles. In addition, fluorescence measurements have verified the anion binding interactions of lanthanide TREN-1,2-HOPO complexes in solution, studied by relaxivity, revealing only very weak oxalate binding (KA = 82.7 +/- 6.5 M-1). Solution thermodynamic studies of the metal complex and free ligand have been carried out using potentiometry, spectrophotometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The metal ion selectivity of TREN-1,2-HOPO supports the feasibility of using 1,2-HOPO ligands for selective lanthanide binding [pGd = 19.3 (2), pZn = 15.2 (2), pCa = 8.8 (3)].

  9. Design and synthesis of calcium responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent: Its relaxation and luminescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Datta, Anupama; Chauhan, Kanchan; Kumaran, S Senthil; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kadiyala, K Ganesh; Pal, Sunil; Thirumal, M; Mishra, Anil K

    2014-07-23

    Calcium concentration modulation both inside and outside cell is of considerable interest for nervous system function in normal and pathological conditions. MRI has potential for very high spatial resolution at molecular/cellular level. Design, synthesis and evaluation of Gd-DO3A-AME-NPHE, a calcium responsive MRI contrast agent is presented. The probe is comprised of a Gd(3+)-DO3A core coupled to iminoacetate coordinating groups for calcium induced relaxivity switching. In the absence of Ca(2+) ions, inner sphere water binding to the Gd-DO3A-AME-NPHE is restricted with longitudinal relaxivity, r1 = 4.37 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T. However, addition of Ca(2+) triggers a marked enhancement in r1 = 6.99 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T (60% increase). The construct is highly selective for Ca(2+) over competitive metal ions at extracellular concentration. The r1 is modulated by changes in the hydration number (0.2 to 1.05), which was confirmed by luminescence emission lifetimes of the analogous Eu(3+) complex. T1 phantom images establish the capability of complex of visualizing changes in [Ca(2+)] by MRI.

  10. Quantitative myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: the impact of pulsatile flow on contrast agent bolus dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graafen, Dirk; Hamer, Julia; Weber, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M, E-mail: graafen@uni-mainz.de [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be quantified using T{sub 1}-weighted first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a tracer-kinetic model, like MMID4. This procedure requires the knowledge of an arterial input function which is usually estimated from the left ventricle (LV). Dispersion of the contrast agent bolus may occur between the LV and the tissue of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate the dispersion under conditions of physiological pulsatile blood flow, and to simulate its effect on MBF quantification. The dispersion was simulated in coronary arteries using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. Simulations were accomplished on straight vessels with stenosis of different degrees and shapes. The results show that dispersion is more pronounced under resting conditions than during hyperemia. Stenosis leads to a reduction of dispersion. In consequence, dispersion results in a systematic MBF underestimation between -0.4% and -9.3%. The relative MBF error depends not only on the dispersion but also on the actual MBF itself. Since MBF under rest is more underestimated than under stress, myocardial perfusion reserve is overestimated between 0.1% and 4.5%. Considering other sources of errors in myocardial perfusion MRI, systematic errors of MBF by bolus dispersion are relatively small.

  11. Preparation of new technetium-99m NNS/X complexes and selection for brain imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qiange; CHEN Xiangji; MIAO Yubin; LIU Boli

    2004-01-01

    Based on excellent experiment results of 99mTcO-MPBDA-Cl, two new ligands MPTDA and MPDAA are synthesized. Then series of 99mTcO3+ complexes are prepared through adding different halide anions, followed by tests of physical chemistry qualities and biodistribution experiments. And results of these experiments show that complexes formed with MPTDA and MPDAA have better lipophilicity than those formed with MPBDA, still maintain the good brain retention ability of this type of compounds, but radioactivity uptake in blood is higher than that of 99mTcO-MPBDA and ratios of brain/blood are reduced. Obvious affections are fetched out on brain uptake and retention if fluoride, bromide or iodide anions are added. Results of experiments can be explained in reason with theoretic computation. It is confirmed that 99mTcO-MPBDA-Cl has potential to develop a new type of brain imaging agent considering integrated factors such as brain uptake, retention and toxicity.

  12. Solvation effects on brain uptakes of isomers of 99mTc brain imaging agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of electrostatic hydration free energies of the isomers of the 99mTc-BAT and 99mTc-DADT complexes is carried out using the computer simulation technique. The results show that not only a correlation exists between the logarithm of the brain uptake and the electrostatic hydration free energy for the isomers of 99mTc-brain radiopharmaceuticals, but also a linear relationship exists between the logarithm of the ratio of the brain uptake of the syn isomer to that of the anti one and the difference between the electrostatic hydration free energy of the syn-isomer and that of the anti one. Furthermore, the investigation on the important factors influencing the brain uptakes of 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals and the reasons of the different biodistribution of the isomers of the 99mTc-complexes is explored at the molecular level. The results may provide a reference for the rational drug design of brain imaging agents.

  13. Efficient, Non-Iterative Estimator for Imaging Contrast Agents With Spectral X-Ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    An estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements is described. The estimator is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required to represent the attenuation coefficient of high atomic number materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters are computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. The estimator first computes a linearized maximum likelihood estimate of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients. Corrections for errors in the initial estimates are computed by interpolation with calibration phantom data. The final estimate is the initial estimate plus the correction. The performance of the estimator is measured using a Monte Carlo simulation. Random photon counting with pulse height analysis data are generated. The mean squared errors of the estimates are compared to the CRLB. The random data are also processed with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. Previous implementations of iterative estimators required advanced physics instruments not usually available in clinical institutions. The estimator mean squared error is essentially equal to the CRLB. The estimator outputs are close to those of the iterative estimator but the computation time is approximately 180 times shorter. The estimator is efficient and has advantages over alternate approaches such as iterative estimators.

  14. A Novel imaging agent for acetylcholinesterase: 2-[F-18]fluoro-CP-118,954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Choi, Y. S; Baek, J. Y.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Kim, B. T [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, E. Y.; Kim, Y. R.; Kim, S. E [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    AcetyIcholinesterase (AChE) is an important cholinergic marker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Although many AChE inhibitors were developed as radioligands for AChE imaging, most of them showed a uniform regional brain distribution. In this study, 2-fluoro-CP-118,954 with excellent anti-AChE activity (IC{sub 50} = 0.74 nM) was prepared as the radioligand, 2-[F-18]fluoro-CP-118,954 ([F-l8]) and evaluated for AChE imaging. [F-l8] was prepared by reductive alkylation of CP-144,885 (Pfizer Inc. U.S.A.) with 2-[F-l8]fIuorobenzaldehyde at 130 .deg. for 15 min, followed by HPLC purification. Mice were injected with the radioligand [F-18] via tail vein. At the indicated time points (5, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min), samples of bone and brain tissues were removed, weighed, and counted. Blocking experiments were carried out in mice by coinjection of the radioligand with, a dopamine receptor antagonist, or a sigma receptor agonist, and samples of brain tissues were collected at 60 min postinjection, weighed and counted. The radioligand [F-l8] was synthesized in 20-35% radiochemical yield and with high specific activity (40-42 GBq/mol). Tissue distribution studies demonstrated that the regional brain distribution of [F-18] was welI correlated with the known density of AChE in mouse brain, with the highest striatum to cerebellum uptake ratio (4.5) at 60 min postinjection. The high level of uptake was also shown at all time points in the olfactory tubercle that is known to have the dopaminergic neurons and also have high AChE staining in rat brain. The uptake in both the striatum and olfactory tubercle was not blocked by either dopamine receptor antagonists or a sigma receptor agonist. On the other hand, significant blocking of the uptake by suggested high specific binding of [F-l8] to AChE. This study demonstrated that [F-18] is a suitable imaging agent for AChE.

  15. Derivation of attenuation map for attenuation correction of PET data in the presence of nanoparticulate contrast agents using spectral CT imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghadiri, Hossein; Shiran, Mohammad Bagher; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Uptake value in quantitative PET imaging is biased due to the presence of CT contrast agents when using CT-based attenuation correction. Our aim was to examine spectral CT imaging to suppress inaccuracy of 511 keV attenuation map in the presence of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents. Using a s

  16. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion.

  17. {sup 18}F-Labelled metomidate analogues as adrenocortical imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, Maria; Karimi, Farhad [Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 576, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Lindhe, Orjan [Uppsala Imanet, GE Healthcare, Box 967, S-751 09 Uppsala (Sweden); Langstroem, Bengt [Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 576, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: bengt.langstrom@biorg.uu.se

    2009-05-15

    Introduction: Two- and one-step syntheses of {sup 18}F-labelled analogues of metomidate, such as 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (1), 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (2), 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-bromophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (3), 3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-bromophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (4) and 3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (5) are presented. Methods: Analogues 1-5 were prepared by a two-step reaction sequence that started with the synthesis of either 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate or 3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate. These were used as {sup 18}F-alkylating agents in the second step, in which they reacted with the ammonium salt of a 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid. One-step-labelling syntheses of 1, 2 and 5 were also explored. Analogues 1-4 were biologically validated by frozen-section autoradiography and organ distribution. Metabolite analysis was performed for 2 and 3. Results: The radiochemical yield of the two-step synthesis was in the range of 10-29% and that of the one-step synthesis was 25-37%. Using microwave irradiation in the one-step synthesis of 1 and 2 increased the radiochemical yield to 46{+-}3% and 79{+-}30%, respectively. Conclusion: Both the frozen-section autoradiography and organ distribution results indicated that analogue 2 has a potential as an adrenocortical imaging agent, having the highest degree of specific adrenal binding and best ratio of adrenal to organ uptake among the compounds studied.

  18. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; DeBoef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality. PMID:28106110

  19. Boron nitride nanotubes for boron neutron capture therapy as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichetti, L., E-mail: luca.menichetti@ifc.cnr.it [CNR-National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Clinical Physiology, via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); De Marchi, D. [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio per la Ricerca Medica e la Sanita Pubblica, CNR-Regione Toscana, via Trieste 41, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Calucci, L. [CNR-National Research Council of Italy, ICCOM-Institute of OrganoMetallic Chemistry, via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ciofani, G.; Menciassi, A. [Italian Institute of Technology c/o Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, viale R. Piaggio 34, 56025 Pontedera (Italy); Forte, C. [CNR-National Research Council of Italy, ICCOM-Institute of OrganoMetallic Chemistry, via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The applicability of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) containing Fe paramagnetic impurities as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. The measurement of longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of water protons in homogeneous aqueous dispersions of BNNTs wrapped with poly(L-lysine) at different concentrations allowed longitudinal (r{sub 1}) and transverse (r{sub 2}) relaxivities to be determined at 3 T. The r{sub 2} value was comparable to those of commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating that Fe-containing BNNTs have the potential to be used as T{sub 2} contrast-enhancement agents in MRI at 3 T.

  20. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate as a breast cancer imaging agent in a xenograft animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, Juan Pablo [Nuclear Medicine Center, Clinical Hospital, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11600 (Uruguay); Cabral, Pablo [Nuclear Investigations Center, School of Science, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11400 (Uruguay); Alonso, Omar [Nuclear Medicine Center, Clinical Hospital, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11600 (Uruguay); Savio, Eduardo [Department of Radiochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11800 (Uruguay); Daibes Figueroa, Said [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Zhang Xiuli [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Ma Lixin [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States); Deutscher, Susan L. [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Quinn, Thomas P., E-mail: quinnt@missouri.ed [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: The use of [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate has been reported as an infarct-avid agent with the potential for very early detection of myocardial infarction. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate has also been postulated as an agent for non-invasive detection of tumors. The aim of our study was to develop a Glucarate kit and evaluate [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate as a potential cancer imaging agent in female SCID mice bearing human MDA-MB-435 breast tumors. Methods: Glucarate in a kit formulation was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc and evaluated for radiolabelling efficiency and radiochemical purity. The Glucarate kit stability was assessed by monthly quality controls. The pharmacokinetics of [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate were determined in female SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma tumors at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 24 h. Nuclear imaging studies were performed with a micro-single photon emission tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) system at 2 h post injection, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed for tumor morphology analysis and metastatic deposit localization. Results: The Glucarate kits exhibited a stable shelf life of 6 months. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate was obtained with radiochemical purity greater than 95%. Biodistribution studies demonstrated moderate tumor uptake coupled with high renal clearance. Tumor-to-muscle ratios were 4.85 and 5.14 at 1 and 4 h post injection. MRI analysis showed tumors with dense cellular growth and moderate central necrosis. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate uptake in the primary MDA-MB-435 shoulder tumors and metastatic lesions were clearly visualized with micro-SPECT/CT imaging. Conclusions: Selective tumor uptake and rapid clearance from nontarget organs makes [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate a potential agent for breast cancer imaging that awaits validation in a clinical trial.

  1. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Stubbs, J.B. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems of Oak Ridge, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  2. Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B): a novel attack on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlin, Jennifer L; Mulder, Karen E; Mackey, John R

    2010-07-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical hallmark of malignancy, and attempts to inhibit this process have characterized the age of biologic anticancer therapies for solid tumors. VEGF receptor-2 is the premier receptor responsible for many of the cancer-driven VEGF-induced spectrum of biologic changes, including modification of blood vessel structure and function, proliferation and migration. Unlike all clinically approved angiogenesis inhibitors, the fully human monoclonal antibody ramucirumab (IMC-1121B) specifically and potently inhibits VEGF receptor-2. Phase I clinical trials have shown safety across a wide range of ramucirumab doses with impressive, albeit early, evidence of both stable disease and partial responses in a variety of tumor types. In this article, we review the current data on ramucirumab and make comparisons with commercially available antiangiogenic agents.

  3. Development of polymer-coated nanoparticle imaging agents for diagnostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairdolf, Brad A.

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States, with over 500,000 deaths expected this year. While significant progress has been made in the treatment and management of cancer, challenges remain because of the complexity and the heterogeneous nature of the disease. The improvement that has been seen in survival rates reflects advancements not only in treatment, but also in early stage detection and diagnostics for certain cancers. In particular, early stage detection and treatment of cancer before it has metastasized to other organs has resulted in a dramatic improvement in patient survival rates. One area of research that has shown considerable promise in further advancing diagnostics and early cancer detection is nanotechnology. Specifically, semiconductor and metal nanoparticles have great potential to provide advanced technology platforms for ultrasensitive and multiplexed detection of disease markers and probe disease on the molecular level. Because they are in the same size regime as biological molecules, these nanoparticles exhibit unique interactions with proteins, nucleic acids and other biomarkers of interest for detecting and diagnosing disease. However, high-quality nanoparticles are often unsuited for use in complex biological environments because of their coatings and surface chemistry. In this dissertation, we describe the design and development of polymer-coated nanoparticle imaging agents for use in blood, cell and tissue diagnostic applications. First, low-molecular weight, amphiphilic polymers, with hydrocarbon chains capable of noncovalent interactions with nanoparticle surface ligands and a hydrophilic backbone to render the nanoparticle water soluble, were synthesized and characterized for use in nanoparticle coating applications. We demonstrate that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between the nanoparticle surface, the amphiphilic polymer and the aqueous solvent were able to drive the coating and water

  4. The Impact of “Omic” and Imaging Technologies on Assessing the Host Immune Response to Biodefence Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Tree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interactions between host and pathogen is important for the development and assessment of medical countermeasures to infectious agents, including potential biodefence pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Ebola virus, and Francisella tularensis. This review focuses on technological advances which allow this interaction to be studied in much greater detail. Namely, the use of “omic” technologies (next generation sequencing, DNA, and protein microarrays for dissecting the underlying host response to infection at the molecular level; optical imaging techniques (flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy for assessing cellular responses to infection; and biophotonic imaging for visualising the infectious disease process. All of these technologies hold great promise for important breakthroughs in the rational development of vaccines and therapeutics for biodefence agents.

  5. Biocompatible Low-Retention Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yushuang; Liao, Rufang; Liu, Haijuan; Li, Huan; Xu, Haibo; Zhou, Qibing

    2015-05-01

    Although superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been developed as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acute iron overload due to the persistently high retention of SPIOs in the liver and spleen that are slowly converted to ferroproteins is a serious safety concern. Here, we report that the addition of poly-L-lysine polymers to an SPIO hydroxyethyl starch solution produced tightly controlled, monodispersed nanoparticles in a size-dependent manner as effective contrast agents for the MRI of liver tumors. High MRI contrast was demonstrated with an orthotopic liver tumor model at a low injection dose. Simultaneously, rapid bioclearance of excess iron in the lung and spleen and in blood serum was observed within 24 h post-injection. The full excretion of excess iron was confirmed in urine post-intravenous injection, suggesting that the effective clearance of SPIOs could be achieved with our SPIO nanoclusters as a liver imaging contrast agent to resolve acute iron overload in the clinical usage of SPIOs as a contrast agent.

  6. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  7. Folate-targeted gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for tumor fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Taro; Kawano, Kumi; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    To enhance tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals via the selective accumulation of contrast agents, we prepared folate-modified gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Folate-modified nanoparticles were comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid lipid, cationic cholesterol derivatives, folate-conjugated PEG-lipid, and Cy7-PEG-lipid. Folate receptor-mediated cellular nanoparticle association was examined in KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor. The biodistribution of nanoparticles after their intravenous injection into KB tumor-bearing mice was measured. Mice were imaged through in vivo fluorescence imaging and MRI 24 h after nanoparticle injection, and the intensity enhancement of the tumor MRI signal was evaluated. Increased cellular association of folate-modified nanoparticles was inhibited by excess free folic acid, indicating that nanoparticle association was folate receptor-mediated. Irrespective of folate modification, the amount of nanoparticles in blood 24 h after injection was ca. 10% of the injected dose. Compared with non-modified nanoparticles, folate-modified nanoparticles exhibited significant accumulation in tumor tissues without altering other biodistribution, as well as enhanced tumor fluorescence and MRI signal intensity. The results support the feasibility of MRI- and in vivo fluorescence imaging-based tumor visualization using folate-modified nanoparticles and provide opportunities to develop folate targeting-based imaging applications.

  8. Metal-based nanorods as molecule-specific contrast agents for reflectance imaging in 3D tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Javier, David J.; Nitin, Nitin; Roblyer, Darren M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Anisotropic metal-based nanomaterials have been proposed as potential contrast agents due to their strong surface plasmon resonance. We evaluated the contrast properties of gold, silver, and gold-silver hybrid nanorods for molecular imaging applications in three-dimensional biological samples. We used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to predict the contrast properties of different types of nanorods embedded in biological model systems of increasing complexity. The predicted contrast propertie...

  9. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents. Final technical report, January 31, 1990--August 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  10. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbin, Tania [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Spearman, Peter [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, University of Kingston, Penrhyn Road Kingston upon Thames Surrey KT1 2EE, London (United Kingdom); Benderbous, Soraya, E-mail: soraya.benderbous@univ-tlse3.fr [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa, E-mail: hafsa.korri-youssoufi@u-psud.fr [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35–65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T{sub 1}-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r{sub 1} of 38.35 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~ 4 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics. - Highlights: • Synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles with small size • Study of loading properties with gadolinium porphyrins • In vitro properties of the conjugated complex as contrast agent for MRI imaging • Comparison of MRI properties with commercial contrast agent Gd-DOTA.

  11. Multi-stimuli responsive Cu2S nanocrystals as trimodal imaging and synergistic chemo-photothermal therapy agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Romero Aburto, Rebeca; Mitcham, Trevor; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2015-04-01

    A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies.A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methodology and additional experimental results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07139e

  12. Angiogenesis and Anti-Angiogenic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Demirer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels in our body is developed by vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. There have been new advances in molecular pathology and tumor biology areas in recent years. Angiogenesis is modulated by the balance between angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting angiogenesis have been in use in various malign or non-malign diseases. Inhibition of angiogenesis in malign diseases is a very attractive subject in medicine and studies are going on about long term affects and toxicities. Inhibition of angiogenesis is not an only treatment choice alone. It is a supplemental treatment option applied with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. It has been used in colorectal carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, glioblastoma, heoatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, tyroid medullary cancer.

  13. Luminescence Enhanced Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) Co-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Imaging Agents In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunfei; He, Wangmei; Li, Fang; Perera, Thalagalage Shalika Harshani; Gan, Lin; Han, Yingchao; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Dai, Honglian

    2016-04-27

    Biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescent nano material can be used as an alternative bioimaging agent for early cancer diagnosis, which is crucial to achieve successful treatment. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocyrstals have good biocompatibility and biodegradability, and can be used as an excellent host for luminescent rare earth elements. In this study, based on the energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Eu(3+), the luminescence enhanced imaging agent of Eu/Gd codoping HAP (HAP:Eu/Gd) nanocrystals are obtained via coprecipitation with plate-like shape and no change in crystal phase composition. The luminescence can be much elevated (up to about 120%) with a nonlinear increase versus Gd doping content, which is due to the energy transfer ((6)PJ of Gd(3+) → (5)HJ of Eu(3+)) under 273 nm and the possible combination effect of the cooperative upconversion and the successive energy transfer under 394 nm, respectively. Results demonstrate that the biocompatible HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals can successfully perform cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The intracellular HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals display good biodegradability with a cumulative degradation of about 65% after 72 h. This biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescence enhanced HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystal has the potential to act as a fluorescent imaging agent in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Ovarian Carcinoma Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    proteins with large extracellular segments that pair to create heterodimers with distinct adhesive capabilities (29). In mammals , 18 a and 8 h subunits...segments that pair to create heterodimers (αβ) with distinct adhesive capabilities. In mammals , 18 α and 8 β subunits assemble into 24 different...vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor ( FGF ), epidermal growth factor (EGF), etc.] and antiangiogenic molecules

  15. Hypoxia independent drivers of melanoma angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eMeierjohann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis is a process which is traditionally regarded as the tumor`s response to low nutrient supply occurring under hypoxic conditions. However, hypoxia is not a prerequisite for angiogenesis. The fact that even single tumor cells or small tumor cell aggregates are capable of attracting blood vessels reveals the early metastatic capability of tumor cells. This review sheds light on the hypoxia independent mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis in melanoma.

  16. PLGA nanoparticles from nano-emulsion templating as imaging agents: Versatile technology to obtain nanoparticles loaded with fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaguera, C; Feiner-Gracia, N; Calderó, G; García-Celma, M J; Solans, C

    2016-11-01

    The interest in polymeric nanoparticles as imaging systems for biomedical applications has increased notably in the last decades. In this work, PLGA nanoparticles, prepared from nano-emulsion templating, have been used to prepare novel fluorescent imaging agents. Two model fluorescent dyes were chosen and dissolved in the oil phase of the nano-emulsions together with PLGA. Nano-emulsions were prepared by the phase inversion composition (PIC) low-energy method. Fluorescent dye-loaded nanoparticles were obtained by solvent evaporation of nano-emulsion templates. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with the fluorescent dyes showed hydrodynamic radii lower than 40nm; markedly lower than those reported in previous studies. The small nanoparticle size was attributed to the nano-emulsification strategy used. PLGA nanoparticles showed negative surface charge and enough stability to be used for biomedical imaging purposes. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%, which was also attributed to the nano-emulsification approach as well as to the low solubility of the dyes in the aqueous component. Release kinetics of both fluorescent dyes from the nanoparticle dispersions was pH-independent and sustained. These results indicate that the dyes could remain encapsulated enough time to reach any organ and that the decrease of the pH produced during cell internalization by the endocytic route would not affect their release. Therefore, it can be assumed that these nanoparticles are appropriate as systemic imaging agents. In addition, in vitro toxicity tests showed that nanoparticles are non-cytotoxic. Consequently, it can be concluded that the preparation of PLGA nanoparticles from nano-emulsion templating represents a very versatile technology that enables obtaining biocompatible, biodegradable and safe imaging agents suitable for biomedical purposes.

  17. Studies on Lung Cancer Angiogenesis-Application of Interventional Therapy (A Report of 56 Cases)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Zhang; Jun Guo; Hailong Qian; Baoqi Shi; Jigang Zhang; Chunjing Li; Ailing Yang; Zhuang Tian

    2007-01-01

    three times in 30 with NSCLC and four times in 9 cases.Among the total cases,13 received radiotherapy during interventional therapy,with a radiation dose of 5,000-7,000 cGy;The CR rate was 78.7%(37/47),PR was 14.9%(7/47) and the rate of non-remission was 6.4% (3/47).CONCLUSION Using imaging technology,analysis of angiogenesis of lung cancers was employed to accurately detect and quantify angiogenesis.This analysis was combined for interventional therapy.using embolizing agents and large doses of the anti-tumor drugs and angiogenesis inhibitors.The agents were selectively delivered into the tumor vessels to eliminate the primary lumor,in order to depress distant metastases and thus enhance the curative effect of the therapy.

  18. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  19. New molecular connections in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiling Xu; David Wilkinson

    2010-01-01

    @@ In vertebrates, oxygen and nutrients are delivered to tissues by the circula-tion of blood through vessels, comprised of a branched network of endothelial tubes termed the vasculature. Crucial for the formation of blood vessels during development is the process of angiogenesis, in which new sprouts form from pre-existing vessels in a complex cascade of cellular events. This involves the activation of an endothelial cell in the vessel to become a highly exploratory 'tip' cell that migrates to invade the surrounding tissues, while remaining tightly connected to the fol-lowing cells that subsequently generate the tubular structures of a new vessel.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of 4-[F-18]fluoro thalidomide for the in vivo studies of angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Jeong, K. H.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Kim, B. T. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Thalidomide has been recently rediscovered for its possible utility as an antitumor agent, although it was marketed as a sedative in the 1950s and later found to be a potent teratogen. In this study, therefore, F-18 labeled thalidomide was synthesized and evaluated for the in vivo studies of angiogenesis. 4-[F-18]Fluoro thalidomide ([F-18]1) was prepared by labeling of 4-trimethylammonium thalidomide triflate with TBA[F-18]F in DMSO (90 .deg. C, 10 min) and purified by HPLC. The triflate salt was prepared from 3-fluoro phthalic anhydride in 3 steps. [F-18]1 was incubated with HUVEC cells at 37 .deg. C for 15, 30, 60, and 120 min, respectively. Dynamic PET images of [F-18]1 was obtained in mice implanted with LLC cells. In vitro metabolism study of [F-18]1 was carried out using mouse, rabbit, or human liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH, and the metabolites obtained from the mouse liver microsomal incubation of 1 were analyzed using LC-MS. Radiochemical yield of [F-18]1 was 50-60%, and the specific activity was 42-120 GBq/imol. The HUVEC cell uptake of [F-18]1 increased with time (100% at 15 min and 241% at 120 min). PET images showed that the radioactivity was accumulated in the liver, the kidneys and the bladder of the mice, and brain uptake was shown from 40 min postinjection. However, there was low level of radioactivity uptake in tumor. [F-18]1 was not metabolized by mouse, rabbit, or human liver microsomes but was hydrolyzed significantly at physiological pH. The hydrolyzed product was further analyzed by LC-MS, showing a mass peak corresponding to that of 4-fluoro-N-(o-carboxybenzoyl)glutamic acid imide. This result suggests that [F-18]1 is easily hydrolyzed at physiological pH and thus may not be suitable for the in vivo studies of tumor angiogenesis at least in rodents, although it was reported that the hydrolysis product of thalidomide may be responsible for its angiogenesis activity in humans.

  1. Toluhydroquinone, the secondary metabolite of marine algae symbiotic microorganism, inhibits angiogenesis in HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nan-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Il; Choi, Woo-Suk; Son, Byeng-Wha; Seo, Yong-Bae; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Gun-Do

    2015-03-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the existing ones, occurs during embryo development and wound healing. However, most malignant tumors require angiogenesis for their growth and metastasis as well. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis has been focused as a new strategy of cancer therapies. To treat cancer, there are marine microorganism-derived secondary metabolites developed as chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we used toluhydroquinone (2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone), one of the secondary metabolites isolated from marine algae symbiotic fungus, Aspergillus sp. We examined the effects of toluhydroquinone on angiogenesis using HUVECs. We identified that toluhydroquinone inhibited the activity of β-catenin and down-regulated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling which are crucial components during angiogenesis. In addition, the expression and activity of MMPs are reduced by the treatment of toluhydroquinone. In conclusion, we confirmed that toluhydroquinone has inhibitory effects on angiogenic behaviors of human endothelial cells, HUVECs. Our findings suggest that toluhydroquinone can be proposed as a potent anti-angiogenesis drug candidate to treat cancers.

  2. Normal Wound Healing and Tumor Angiogenesis as a Game of Competitive Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Dodd, Oliver; Dashevsky, Olga; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2016-01-01

    Both normal wound healing and tumor angiogenesis are mitigated by the sequential, carefully orchestrated release of growth stimulators and inhibitors. These regulators are released from platelet clots formed at the sites of activated endothelium in a temporally and spatially controlled manner, and the order of their release depends on their affinity to glycosaminoglycans (GAG) such as heparan sulfate (HS) within the extracellular matrix, and platelet open canallicular system. The formation of vessel sprouts, triggered by angiogenesis regulating factors with lowest affinities for heparan sulfate (e.g. VEGF), is followed by vessel-stabilizing PDGF-B or bFGF with medium affinity for HS, and by inhibitors such as PF-4 and TSP-1 with the highest affinities for HS. The invasive wound-like edge of growing tumors has an overabundance of angiogenesis stimulators, and we propose that their abundance out-competes angiogenesis inhibitors, effectively preventing inhibition of angiogenesis and vessel maturation. We evaluate this hypothesis using an experimentally motivated agent-based model, and propose a general theoretical framework for understanding mechanistic similarities and differences between the processes of normal wound healing and pathological angiogenesis from the point of view of competitive inhibition.

  3. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  4. Angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Elisabeth I

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains a significant public health problem, with limited therapeutic options in the setting of castrate-resistant metastatic disease. Angiogenesis inhibition is a relatively novel antineoplastic approach, which targets the reliance of tumor growth on the formation of new blood vessels. This strategy has been used successfully in other solid tumor types, with the FDA approval of anti-angiogenic agents in breast, lung, colon, brain, and kidney cancer. The application of anti-angiogenic therapy to prostate cancer is reviewed in this article, with attention to efficacy and toxicity results from several classes of anti-angiogenic agents. Ultimately, the fate of anti-angiogenic agents in prostate cancer rests on the eagerly anticipated results of several key phase III studies.

  5. Cell-permeable Ln(III) chelate-functionalized InP quantum dots as multimodal imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Tamang, Sudarsan; Imbert, Daniel; Poillot, Cathy; Giardiello, Marco; Tisseyre, Céline; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Fries, Pascal Henry; de Waard, Michel; Reiss, Peter; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2011-10-25

    Quantum dots (QDs) are ideal scaffolds for the development of multimodal imaging agents, but their application in clinical diagnostics is limited by the toxicity of classical CdSe QDs. A new bimodal MRI/optical nanosized contrast agent with high gadolinium payload has been prepared through direct covalent attachment of up to 80 Gd(III) chelates on fluorescent nontoxic InP/ZnS QDs. It shows a high relaxivity of 900 mM(-1) s(-1) (13 mM(-1 )s(-1) per Gd ion) at 35 MHz (0.81 T) and 298 K, while the bright luminescence of the QDs is preserved. Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates were also successfully grafted to the InP/ZnS QDs. The absence of energy transfer between the QD and lanthanide emitting centers results in a multicolor system. Using this convenient direct grafting strategy additional targeting ligands can be included on the QD. Here a cell-penetrating peptide has been co-grafted in a one-pot reaction to afford a cell-permeable multimodal multimeric MRI contrast agent that reports cellular localization by fluorescence and provides high relaxivity and increased tissue retention with respect to commercial contrast agents.

  6. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  7. Intercellular imaging by a polyarginine derived cell penetrating peptide labeled magnetic resonance contrast agent,diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO You-min; LIU Min; YANG Jun-le; GUO Xiao-juan; WANG Si-cen; DUAN Xiao-yi; WANG Peng

    2007-01-01

    Background The cellular plasma membrane represents a natural barrier to many exogenous molecules including magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Cell penetrating peptide (CPP) is used to internalize proteins, peptides, and radionuclide. This study was undertaken to assess the value of a new intracellular MR contrast medium, CPP labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (Gd-DTPA) in molecular imaging in vitro. Methods Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and Gd-DTPA respectively labeled with CPP (FITC-CPP, Gd-DTPA-CPP) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. Human hepatic cancer cell line-HepG2 was respectively stained by FITC-CPP and FITC to observe the uptake and intracellular distribution. HepG2 was respectively incubated with 100 nmol/ml Gd-DTPA-CPP for 0, 10, 30, 60 minutes, and imaged by MR for studying the relationship between the incubation time and T1WI signal. The cytotoxicity to NIH3T3 fibroblasts cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay (MTT). Results The molecular weights of CPP labeled imaging agents, which were determined by MALDI mass spectrometry (FITC-CPP MW=2163.34, Gd-DTPA-CPP MW=2285.99), were similar to the calculated molecular weights. Confocal microscopy suggested HepG2 translocated FITC-CPP in cytoplasm and nucleus independent with the incubation temperature. MR images showed HepG2 uptaken Gd-DTPA-CPP had a higher T1 weighted imaging (T1WI) signal, and that the T1WI signal intensity was increasing in a time-dependent manner (r=0.972, P=0.001), while the signal intensity between the cells incubated by Gd-DTPA for 60 minutes and the controlled cells was not significantly different (P=0.225). By MTT, all concentrations from 50 nmol/ml to 200 nmol/ml had no significant (F=0.006, P=1.000) effect on cell viability of mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts, compared with the control group. Conclusions The newly constructed CPP based on polyarginine can translocate cells by carrying FITC

  8. Angiogenic Factor AGGF1 Activates Autophagy with an Essential Role in Therapeutic Angiogenesis for Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenkun; Hu, Changqing; Song, Qixue; Ye, Jian; Xu, Chengqi; Wang, Annabel Z.; Wang, Qing Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AGGF1 is an angiogenic factor with therapeutic potential to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI). However, the underlying mechanism for AGGF1-mediated therapeutic angiogenesis is unknown. Here, we show for the first time that AGGF1 activates autophagy, a housekeeping catabolic cellular process, in endothelial cells (ECs), HL1, H9C2, and vascular smooth muscle cells. Studies with Atg5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin A1 (Baf) and chloroquine demonstrate that autophagy is required for AGGF1-mediated EC proliferation, migration, capillary tube formation, and aortic ring-based angiogenesis. Aggf1+/- knockout (KO) mice show reduced autophagy, which was associated with inhibition of angiogenesis, larger infarct areas, and contractile dysfunction after MI. Protein therapy with AGGF1 leads to robust recovery of myocardial function and contraction with increased survival, increased ejection fraction, reduction of infarct areas, and inhibition of cardiac apoptosis and fibrosis by promoting therapeutic angiogenesis in mice with MI. Inhibition of autophagy in mice by bafilomycin A1 or in Becn1+/- and Atg5 KO mice eliminates AGGF1-mediated angiogenesis and therapeutic actions, indicating that autophagy acts upstream of and is essential for angiogenesis. Mechanistically, AGGF1 initiates autophagy by activating JNK, which leads to activation of Vps34 lipid kinase and the assembly of Becn1-Vps34-Atg14 complex involved in the initiation of autophagy. Our data demonstrate that (1) autophagy is essential for effective therapeutic angiogenesis to treat CAD and MI; (2) AGGF1 is critical to induction of autophagy; and (3) AGGF1 is a novel agent for treatment of CAD and MI. Our data suggest that maintaining or increasing autophagy is a highly innovative strategy to robustly boost the efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:27513923

  9. Complex role of matrix metalloproteinases in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANGQINGXIANGAMY

    1998-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) play a significant role in regulating angiogenesis,the process of new blood vessel formation.Interstitial collagenase (MMP-1),72kDa gelatinase A/type IV collagenase (MMP-2),and 92 kDA gelatinase B/type IV collagenase (MMP-9) dissolve extracellular matrix (ECM) and may initiate and promote angiogenesis.TIMP-1,TIMP-2,TIMP-3,and possibly,TIMP-4 inhibit neovascularization.A new paradign is emerging that matrilysin (MMP-7),MMP-9,and metalloelastase (MMP-12) may block angiogenesis by converting plasminogen to angiostatin,which is one of the most potent angiogenesis antagonists.MMPs and TIMPs play a complex role in regulating angiogenesis.An understanding of the biochemical and cellular pathways and mechanisms of angiogenesis will provide important information to allow the control of angiogenesis,e.g.the stimulation of angiogenesis for coronary collateral circulation formation;while the inhibition for treating arthritis and cancer.

  10. Immunotherapy of tumor by targeting angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jianmei; TIAN Ling; WEI Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy represents a new strategy for the development of anti-cancer therapies. In recent years, there has been made great progress in anti-angiogenic therapy. As far as the passive immunotherapy is concerned, a recombinant humanized antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-Avastin has been approved by FDA as the first angiogenesis inhibitor to treat colorectal cancer. For active specific immunotherapy, various strategies for cancer vaccines, including whole endothelial cell vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, DNA vaccines, and peptides or protein vaccines, have been developed to break immune tolerance against important molecules associated with tumor angiogenesis and induce angiogenesis-specific immune responses. This article reviews the angiogenesis-targeted immunotherapy of tumor from the above two aspects.

  11. Methylene blue microbubbles as a model dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound and activatable photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mansik; Song, Wentao; Huynh, Elizabeth; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Jeesu; Helfield, Brandon L; Leung, Ben Y C; Goertz, David E; Zheng, Gang; Oh, Jungtaek; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging are highly complementary modalities since both use ultrasonic detection for operation. Increasingly, photoacoustic and ultrasound have been integrated in terms of hardware instrumentation. To generate a broadly accessible dual-modality contrast agent, we generated microbubbles (a standard ultrasound contrast agent) in a solution of methylene blue (a standard photoacoustic dye). This MB2 solution was formed effectively and was optimized as a dual-modality contrast solution. As microbubble concentration increased (with methylene blue concentration constant), photoacoustic signal was attenuated in the MB2 solution. When methylene blue concentration increased (with microbubble concentration held constant), no ultrasonic interference was observed. Using an MB2 solution that strongly attenuated all photoacoustic signal, high powered ultrasound could be used to burst the microbubbles and dramatically enhance photoacoustic contrast (>800-fold increase), providing a new method for spatiotemporal control of photoacoustic signal generation.

  12. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  13. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles as new, smart contrast agents for cancer early detection using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouffouk, Fouzi; Simão, Teresa; Dornelles, Daniel F; Lopes, André D; Sau, Pablo; Martins, Jorge; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Alrokayan, Salman A; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; dos Santos, Nuno R

    2015-01-01

    Early cancer detection is a major factor in the reduction of mortality and cancer management cost. Here we developed a smart and targeted micelle-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), able to turn on its imaging capability in the presence of acidic cancer tissues. This smart contrast agent consists of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles formed by self-assembly of a diblock copolymer (poly(ethyleneglycol-b-trimethylsilyl methacrylate)), loaded with a gadolinium hydrophobic complex ((t)BuBipyGd) and exploits the acidic pH in cancer tissues. In vitro MRI experiments showed that (t)BuBipyGd-loaded micelles were pH-sensitive, as they turned on their imaging capability only in an acidic microenvironment. The micelle-targeting ability toward cancer cells was enhanced by conjugation with an antibody against the MUC1 protein. The ability of our antibody-decorated micelles to be switched on in acidic microenvironments and to target cancer cells expressing specific antigens, together with its high Gd(III) content and its small size (35-40 nm) reveals their potential use for early cancer detection by MRI.

  14. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbin, Tania; Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène; Spearman, Peter; Benderbous, Soraya; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2015-01-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35-65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T1-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r1 of 38.35 mM(-1) s(-1), which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~4 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics.

  15. Preparation and biodistribution assessment of {sup 111}In-BPAMD as a novel agent for bone SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    An early diagnosis of bone metastases is very important for providing a profound decision on a subsequent therapy. In this study, a new agent for SPECT-imaging of bone metastases, {sup 111}In-(4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl) acetic acid ({sup 111}In-BPAMD) complex has been developed with specific activity of 2.85 TBq/mmol. Radiochemical purity of the radiolabeled complex was checked by instant thin layer chromatography method indicated high radiochemical purity > 95% at the optimal conditions. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature and in human serum at least for 48 h. Hydroxyapatite (HA) binding assay showed high binding ability of the radiolabeled complex even at the low amounts of HA. Also, log P measurements highlighted the strong hydrophilic nature of the complex. Biodistribution studies as well as planar imaging after injection of the complex into the male Syrian mice showed major accumulation of the labelled compound in the bone tissue. Totally, the obtained results indicated that {sup 111}In-BPAMD has interesting characteristics as an agent for SPECT-imaging of the bone metastases.

  16. In Vivo Monitoring of Neovascularization in Tumour Angiogenesis by Photoacoustic Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Liang-Zhong; XING Da; GU Huai-Min; ZHOU Fei-Fan; YANG Di-Wu; ZENG Lv-Ming; YANG Si-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is presented to in vivo monitor neovascularization in tumout angiogenesis with high resolution and high contrast images in a rat. With a circular scan system, the photoacoustic signal, generated by laser pulses at a wavelength of 532nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, is captured by a hydrophone with a diameter of 1 mm and a sensitivity of 850nV/Pa. The vascular structure around the rat tumour is imaged clearly, with optimal contrast, because blood has strong absorption near this wavelength. Serial noninvasive photoacoustic images of neovascularization in tumour angiogenesis are also obtained consecutively from a growing tumour implanted under the skin of a rat over a period of two weeks. This work demonstrates that PAT can potentially provide a powerful tool for tumour angiogenesis detection in cancer research. It will bring us closer to clinical applications for tumour diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  17. Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    macromolecule as a contrast agent for MR angiography: preparation, properties, and animal studies. Radiology 1993;187(3):701- 706. 6. Frenzel T...Investigative radiology 2008;43(12):817-828. 7. Sieber MA, Lengsfeld P, Frenzel T, Golfier S, Schmitt-Willich H, Siegmund F, Walter J, Weinmann HJ

  18. Computed Tomography Imaging of Solid Tumors Using a Liposomal-Iodine Contrast Agent in Companion Dogs with Naturally Occurring Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan B Ghaghada

    Full Text Available Companion dogs with naturally occurring cancer serve as an important large animal model in translational research because they share strong similarities with human cancers. In this study, we investigated a long circulating liposomal-iodine contrast agent (Liposomal-I for computed tomography (CT imaging of solid tumors in companion dogs with naturally occurring cancer.The institutional animal ethics committees approved the study and written informed consent was obtained from all owners. Thirteen dogs (mean age 10.1 years with a variety of masses including primary and metastatic liver tumors, sarcomas, mammary carcinoma and lung tumors, were enrolled in the study. CT imaging was performed pre-contrast and at 15 minutes and 24 hours after intravenous administration of Liposomal-I (275 mg/kg iodine dose. Conventional contrast-enhanced CT imaging was performed in a subset of dogs, 90 minutes prior to administration of Liposomal-I. Histologic or cytologic diagnosis was obtained for each dog prior to admission into the study.Liposomal-I resulted in significant (p 1 cm demonstrated a heterogeneous pattern of intra-tumoral signal with visibly higher signal enhancement at the post-24 hour time point. Extra-hepatic, extra-splenic tumors, including histiocytic sarcoma, anaplastic sarcoma, mammary carcinoma and lung tumors, were visualized with a heterogeneous enhancement pattern in the post-24 hour scan.The long circulating liposomal-iodine contrast agent enabled prolonged visualization of small and large tumors in companion dogs with naturally occurring cancer. The study warrants future work to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the Liposomal-I agent in various types of naturally occurring canine tumors.

  19. Stimuli-Responsive Biodegradable Hyperbranched Polymer-Gadolinium Conjugates as Efficient and Biocompatible Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Zhu, Hongyan; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-04-27

    The efficacy and biocompatibility of nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents depend on optimal molecular structures and compositions. Gadolinium [Gd(III)] based dendritic macromolecules with well-defined and tunable nanoscale sizes are excellent candidates as multivalent MRI contrast agents. Here, we propose a novel alternate preparation of biodegradable hyperbranched polymer-gadolinium conjugates via a simple strategy and report potentially efficient and biocompatible nanoscale MRI contrast agents for cancer diagnosis. The enzyme-responsive hyperbranched poly(oligo-(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-gadolinium conjugate (HB-POEGMA-Gd) was prepared via one-step reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and Gd(III) chelating, and the cRGDyK functionalized polymer (HB-POEGMA-cRGD-Gd) was obtained via click chemistry. By using an enzyme similar to lysosomal cathepsin B, hyperbranched conjugates of high molecular weights (MW) (180 and 210 kDa) and nanoscale sizes (38 and 42 nm) were degraded into low MW (25 and 30 kDa) and smaller products (4.8 and 5.2 nm) below the renal threshold. Conjugate-based nanoscale systems had three-fold more T1 relaxivity compared to clinical agent diethylenediaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-Gd. Animal studies with the nanoscale system offered greater tumor accumulation and enhanced signal intensity (SI) in mouse U87 tumors of which the greatest activity was conferred by the cRGDyK moiety functionalized hyperbranched conjugate. In vitro cytotoxicity, hemocompatibility and in vivo toxicity studies confirmed no adverse events. This design strategy for multifunctional Gd(III)-labeled biodegradable dendritic macromolecules may have significant potential as future efficient, biocompatible polymeric nanoscale MRI diagnostic contrast agents for cancer.

  20. Contrast enhanced cartilage imaging: Comparison of ionic and non-ionic contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: ewiener@roe.med.tu-muenchen.de; Woertler, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Institute of Pathology, Technical University Munich, Troger Str. 18, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Settles, Marcus [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Our objective was to compare relaxation effects, dynamics and spatial distributions of ionic and non-ionic contrast agents in articular cartilage at concentrations typically used for direct MR arthrography at 1.5 T. Dynamic MR-studies over 11 h were performed in 15 bovine patella specimens. For each of the contrast agents gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, gadoteridol and mangafodipir trinatrium three patellae were placed in 2.5 mmol/L contrast solution. Simultaneous measurements of T {sub 1} and T {sub 2} were performed every 30 min using a high-spatial-resolution 'MIX'-sequence. T {sub 1}, T {sub 2} and {delta}R {sub 1}, {delta}R {sub 2} profile plots across cartilage thickness were calculated to demonstrate the spatial and temporal distributions. The charge is one of the main factors which controls the amount of the contrast media diffusing into intact cartilage, but independent of the charge, the spatial distribution across cartilage thickness remains highly inhomogeneous even after 11 h of diffusion. The absolute {delta}R {sub 2}-effect in cartilage is at least as large as the {delta}R {sub 1}-effect for all contrast agents. Maximum changes were 5-12 s{sup -1} for {delta}R {sub 1} and 8-15 s{sup -1} for {delta}R {sub 2}. This study indicates that for morphologically intact cartilage only the amount of contrast agents within cartilage is determined by the charge but not the spatial distribution across cartilage thickness. In addition, {delta}R {sub 2} can be considered for quantification of contrast agent concentrations, since it is of the same magnitude and less time consuming to measure than {delta}R {sub 1}.

  1. Facile Preparation of a New Gadofullerene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent with High 1H Relaxivity

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Chunying; Corwin, Frank D.; Zhang, Jianfei; Chen, Zhijian; Reid, Jonathan E.; Sun, Minghao; Xu, Wei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Wang, Chunru; Fatouros, Panos P.; Alan R Esker; Gibson, Harry W.; Dorn, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on the trimetallic nitride templated (TNT) metallofullerene, Gd3N@C80, was synthesized by a facile method in high yield. The observed longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, for water hydrogens in the presence of the water-soluble gadofullerene 2, Gd3N@C80(OH)~26(CH2CH2COOM)~16 (M = Na or H), are 207 and 282 mM-1s-1 (per C80 cage) at 2.4 T, respectively; these values are 50 times larger than those of Gd3+ poly(aminocarbo...

  2. Combined perfusion and doppler imaging using plane-wave nonlinear detection and microbubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Williams, Ross; Milot, Laurent; Bruce, Matthew; Burns, Peter N

    2014-12-01

    Plane-wave imaging offers image acquisition rates at the pulse repetition frequency, effectively increasing the imaging frame rates by up to two orders of magnitude over conventional line-by-line imaging. This form of acquisition can be used to achieve very long ensemble lengths in nonlinear modes such as pulse inversion Doppler, which enables new imaging trade-offs that were previously unattainable. We first demonstrate in this paper that the coherence of microbubble signals under repeated exposure to acoustic pulses of low mechanical index can be as high as 204 ± 5 pulses, which is long enough to allow an accurate power Doppler measurement. We then show that external factors, such as tissue acceleration, restrict the detection of perfusion at the capillary level with linear Doppler, even if long Doppler ensembles are considered. Hence, perfusion at the capillary level can only be detected with ultrasound through combined microbubbles and Doppler imaging. Finally, plane-wave contrast-enhanced power and color Doppler are performed on a rabbit kidney in vivo as a proof of principle. We establish that long pulse-inversion Doppler sequences and conventional wall-filters can create an image that simultaneously resolves both the vascular morphology of veins and arteries, and perfusion at the capillary level with frame rates above 100 Hz.

  3. 靶向超声微泡对结肠癌新生血管分子成像的实验研究%Molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis with VEGFR2 targeting microbubbles in colon cancer bearing nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    位红芹; 何洁; 杨莉; 纪丽景; 张霞; 王冬晓; 文戈; 谷英士; 李颖嘉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of tumor neovascularization imaging in a nude mouse model of colon cancer by contrast ultrasound molecular imaging (UMI) of VEGF receptor 2 (kinase insert domain receptor,KDR).Methods Targeted microbubbles (MBt) were built by conjugating K237,a small peptide with high affinity for KDR,to liposome microbubbles through a biotin-avidin bridge.Control microbubbles (MBc) with control peptide were prepared by the same method.Nude mice models of LS174T human colon cancer were established.MBt and MBc were injected intravenously in twelve mice in random order with an interval of 30 min.MBt were injected in another six mice after K237-peptide blocking.UMI was performed in all mice at 5 min postinjection to observe the imaging difference and measure the video intensity (Ⅵ) of tumor tissues in different groups.One-way analysis of variance and the least significant difference t test were performed to analyze the difference of tumor VI in the groups with MBt,MBc and K237 blocking.Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression and distribution of KDR in tumor tissue and adjacent tumor tissues.Results K237 peptide was successfully conjugated to the surface of microbubbles through biotin-avidin mediation.Ultrasound imaging signal of the tumor was high in the MBt group,while there were no significant enhancement in the groups of K237 blocking and MBc.The VI in MBt,MBc and K237 blocking groups was significantly different (F =39.130,P < 0.01).There was a significant difference of VI in the MBt group compared to the MBc group (30.18 ± 9.56 vs 8.28 ± 4.74,t =6.91,P <0.01).In the K237 blocking group Ⅵ was significantly lower than that in the MBt group (9.23 ± 3.44 vs 30.18 ± 9.56,t =4.91,P < 0.01).Immunohistochemistry results showed that KDR was highy expressed in tumor tissue.Conclusions KDR-targeting liposome contrast microbubbles may specifically and efficiently link to tumor vascular endothelial cells in vivo.Thus it may be

  4. In vivo detection of copper ions by magnetic resonance imaging using a prion-based contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Satoshi; Umemoto, Tomohiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yezdimer, Eric M; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Abnormal distributions of transition metals inside the body are potential diagnostic markers for several diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, and cancer. In this article, we demonstrate that P57/Gd, a novel prion-based contrast agent, can selectively image tissues with excessive copper accumulation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). P57/Gd selectivity binds copper(II) over other physiologically relevant cations such as zinc, iron, manganese, and calcium. To simulate a metabolic copper disorder, we treated mice with an intraperitoneal injection of a CuSO(4) solution to induce a renal copper overload. The MRI signal intensities from the renal cortex and medulla of copper spiked animals that were administered P57/Gd were found to correlate with the ex vivo copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  5. A Compressive Sensing Approach for 3D Breast Cancer Microwave Imaging With Magnetic Nanoparticles as Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevacqua, Martina T; Scapaticci, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    In microwave breast cancer imaging magnetic nanoparticles have been recently proposed as contrast agent. Due to the non-magnetic nature of human tissues, magnetic nanoparticles make possible the overcoming of some limitations of conventional microwave imaging techniques, thus providing reliable and specific diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a Compressive Sensing inspired inversion technique is introduced for the reconstruction of the magnetic contrast induced within the tumor. The applicability of Compressive Sensing theory is guaranteed by the fact that the underlying inverse scattering problem is linear and the searched magnetic perturbation is sparse. From the numerical analysis, performed in realistic conditions in 3D geometry, it has been pointed out that the adoption of this new tool allows improving resolution and accuracy of the reconstructions, as well as reducing the number of required measurements.

  6. Optical Imaging of Cells with Gold Nanoparticle Clusters as Light Scattering Contrast Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2011-01-01

    developments in advanced cytometry research by pointing out potential new research directions. A brief description of the FDTD method focusing on the features associated with its application to modeling of light scattering and OPCM cell imaging experiments is provided. The examples include light scattering...... from OPCM imaging of single biological cells in conditions of controlled refractive index matching (RIM) and labeling by diffused and clustered gold NPs. The chapter concludes with a discussion and suggestions for future research....

  7. Time-domain imaging with quench-based fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Walter J.; Solomon, Metasebya; Sudlow, Gail P.; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Time-domain diffuse optical imaging was performed to assess the FRET and quenching in living mice with orthotopic breast cancer. Tumor contrast enhancement was accompanied by increased fluorescence lifetime after administration of quenched probes selective for matrix metalloproteinases while no significant change was observed for non-quenched probes for integrin receptors. These results demonstrate the utility of timedomain imaging for detection of cancer-related enzyme activity in vivo.

  8. Near-infrared dye-loaded magnetic nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agent for enhanced tumor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Gao; Zhi-Fei Dai; Chang-Hui Li; Xiao-Long Liang; Zi-Jian Deng; Dong Peng; Yu-Shen Jin; Yan Ma; Yan-Yan Li; Yu-Kun Zhu; Jian-Zhong Xi; Jie Tian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) has attracted extensive interest because of its optical absorption contrast and ultrasonic detection. This study aims to develop a biocompatible and biodegradable PA contrast agent particularly promising for clinical applications in human body. Methods: In this study, we presented a PA contrast agent: 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)] (DSPE-PEG)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with indocyanine green (ICG). We used ICG and SPIO NPs because both drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Given the strong absorption of near-infrared laser pulses, SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs with a uniform diameter of ~28 nm could significantly enhance PA signals. Results: We demonstrated the contrast enhancement of these NPs in phantom and animal experiments, in which thein vivo circulation time of SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs was considerably longer than that of free ICG. These novel NPs also displayed a high efficiency of tumor targeting. Conclusions: SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs are promising PAT contrast agents for clinical applications.

  9. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  10. Radiolabelled D/sub 2/ agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents: Progress report for period February 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.

    1988-10-15

    Targeted studies completed include the evaluation of tritiated N-0437, evaluation of /sup 35/S-cysteamine, evaluation of /sup 18/F-FDG and initiation of synthetic efforts towards the synthesis of iodinated N-0437 and pergolide analogs. The direction of the project has been changed due to several factors which include the decided lack of favorable experimental results, the excellence of results using muscarinic receptor ligands in pituitary, brain and heart and the contention of the DOE review panel that the original grant proposal was based on flawed assumptions together with their perceived lack of importance to pituitary imaging. In the final year of this grant, three studies will be completed. The first study is the continuation of synthetic efforts to prepare iodinated N-0437 and pergolide analogs for possible use as brain imaging agents. The second study is directed towards completion of biochemical evaluation of various muscarinic receptor analogs for heart, brain and (possible) pituitary imaging. The third study is to probe the use of quaternized D/sub 2/ receptor ligands for imaging peripheral dopaminergic receptors (including the pituitary). 14 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  11. Multifunctional biocompatible chitosan-polypyrrole nanocomposites as novel agents for photoacoustic imaging-guided photothermal ablation of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Quang Bui, Nhat; Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Santha Moorthy, Madhappan; Oh, Yun-Ok; Song, Kyeongeun; Seo, Hansu; Yoon, Min; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-01-01

    Cancer nanotechnology is emerging as one of the promising strategies combining photothermal therapy (PTT) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for the treatment of breast cancer and it has received considerable attention in the recent years because it is minimally invasive, prevents damage to non-targeted regions, permits fast recovery, and involves breast cancer imaging. The present study demonstrates multifunctional biocompatible chitosan-polypyrrole nanocomposites (CS-PPy NCs) as novel agents for photoacoustic imaging-guided photothermal ablation of cancer because of their biocompatibility, conductivity, stability, and strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance. The CS-PPy NCs are spherical in shape and range 26–94 nm in size with a mean value of 50.54 ± 2.56 nm. The in vitro results demonstrated good biocompatibility of CS-PPy NCs, which can be used in PTT for cancer cells under 808-nm NIR laser irradiation. Tumor-bearing mice fully recovered after treatment with CS-PPy NCs and NIR 808-nm laser irradiation compared to the corresponding control groups. Our research highlights the promising potential of using CS-PPy NCs for photoacoustic imaging-guided photothermal ablation of cancer in preclinical animals, which should be verified in future clinical trials. PMID:28252638

  12. Use of DES-treated rats as an animal model for assessment of pituitary adenoma imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.; Marshall, J.C.; Lloyd, R.V.; Sherman, P.S.; Fisher, S.J.; Valoppi, V.L.; Rogers, W.L.; Wieland, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) secreting pituitary adenomas are the most common type of pituitary tumors. An imaging agent which specifically localized in prolactinomas would be of considerable clinical value. Tritiated spiroperidol (/sup 3/HSp) was selected for initial evaluation as a possible imaging agent based on: (1) demonstrated localization in the pituitary and (2) demonstrated binding to human PRL-secreting tumor tissue. DES was implanted in Fischer F344 rats which induced prolactinoma formation. /sup 3/HSp concentrations in pituitary and other tissues of DES-treated rats were assessed in female rats and correlation studies showed that a 5-fold increase in serum PRL was associated with a 6-fold increase in both pituitary weight and % dose/organ accumulation of /sup 3/HSp. The number of pituitary D/sub 2/ receptors per mg of protein in tissue homogenates was similar in both normal and DES-treated females. A blocking study with (+)-butaclamol demonstrated a D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated component to /sup 3/HSp localization. In summary, an animal model for prolactinoma was characterized. An assessment of /sup 3/HSp accumulation indicates that radiolabelled spiroperidol shows excellent potential for detecting PRL-secreting tumors of the pituitary.

  13. Biodegradable human serum albumin nanoparticles as contrast agents for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharin, Waralee; Schmithals, Christian; Pleli, Thomas; Köberle, Verena; Korkusuz, Hüdayi; Huebner, Frank; Zeuzem, Stefan; Korf, Hans W; Vogl, Thomas J; Rittmeyer, Claudia; Terfort, Andreas; Piiper, Albrecht; Gelperina, Svetlana; Kreuter, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Tumor visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle-based contrast agents may improve the imaging of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In particular, human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles appear to be a suitable carrier due to their safety and feasibility of functionalization. In the present study HSA nanoparticles were conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) using carbodiimide chemistry. The nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and a diameter of 235±19nm. For better optical visualization in vitro and in vivo, the HSA-Gd nanoparticles were additionally labeled with rhodamine 123. As shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the fluorescent nanoparticles were readily taken up by Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. After 24h incubation in blood serum, less than 5% of the Gd(III) was released from the particles, which suggests that this nanoparticulate system may be stable in vivo and, therefore, may serve as potentially safe T1 MRI contrast agent for MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Mechanical and Chemical Signaling in Angiogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials describes the most recent advances in angiogenesis research at all biological length scales: molecular, cellular and tissue, in both in vivo and in vitro settings.  Angiogenesis experts from diverse fields including engineering, cell and developmental biology, and chemistry have contributed chapters which focus on the mechanical and chemical signals which affect and promote blood vessel growth. Specific emphasis is given to novel methodologies and biomaterials that have been developed and applied to angiogenesis research. 

  15. Anti-VEGF Agents for Ocular Angiogenesis and Vascular Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Kimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review articles describing intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF drug trials, while discussing the mechanisms of the action of anti-VEGF antibodies, and also evaluating their outcomes. Intraocular injections of anti-VEGF drug are considered to be an effective treatment for macular edema after retinal vein occlusion, however, recurrent/persistent edema is common. The recent reports may lead to a shift in treatment paradigm for DME, from laser photocoagulation, to newer approaches using anti-VEGF drugs. There have been several well-publicized prospective, randomized studies that demonstrated the efficacy of intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF drugs for patients with AMD. Adjuvant bevacizumab for neovascular glaucoma may prevent further PAS formation, and it is likely to open up a therapeutic window for a panretinal photocoagulation and trabeculectomy. Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (IVB results in a substantial decrease in bleeding from the retinal vessels or new vessels during a standard vitrectomy. IVB has also been reported to be effective for inducing the regression of new vessels in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The use of bevacizumab in stage 4 or 5 retinopahty of permaturity (ROP is to reduce the plus sign to help reduce hemorrhage during the subsequent vitrectomy. Some authors reported cases of resolution of stage 4 A ROP after bevacizumab injection.

  16. Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Wang, Yu; Pogue, Brian W.; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2015-07-01

    The development of methods to accurately quantify cell-surface receptors in living tissues would have a seminal impact in oncology. For example, accurate measures of receptor density in vivo could enhance early detection or surgical resection of tumors via protein-based contrast, allowing removal of cancer with high phenotype specificity. Alternatively, accurate receptor expression estimation could be used as a biomarker to guide patient-specific clinical oncology targeting of the same molecular pathway. Unfortunately, conventional molecular contrast-based imaging approaches are not well adapted to accurately estimating the nanomolar-level cell-surface receptor concentrations in tumors, as most images are dominated by nonspecific sources of contrast such as high vascular permeability and lymphatic inhibition. This article reviews approaches for overcoming these limitations based upon tracer kinetic modeling and the use of emerging protocols to estimate binding potential and the related receptor concentration. Methods such as using single time point imaging or a reference-tissue approach tend to have low accuracy in tumors, whereas paired-agent methods or advanced kinetic analyses are more promising to eliminate the dominance of interstitial space in the signals. Nuclear medicine and optical molecular imaging are the primary modalities used, as they have the nanomolar level sensitivity needed to quantify cell-surface receptor concentrations present in tissue, although each likely has a different clinical niche.

  17. Click Chemistry in the Development of Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-10-01

    Click chemistry provides fast, convenient, versatile, and reliable chemical reactions that take place between pairs of functional groups of small molecules that can be purified without chromatographic methods. Due to the fast kinetics and low or no elimination of byproducts, click chemistry is a promising approach that is rapidly gaining acceptance in drug discovery, radiochemistry, bioconjugation, and nanoscience applications. Increasing use of click chemistry in synthetic procedures or as a bioconjugation technique in diagnostic imaging is occurring because click reactions are fast, provide a quantitative yield, and produce a minimal amount of nontoxic byproducts. This review summarizes the recent application of click chemistry in magnetic resonance imaging and discusses the directions for applying novel click reactions and strategies for further improving magnetic resonance imaging performance.

  18. Multifunctional polyelectrolyte microcapsules as a contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenok, Alexey M; Jose, Jithin; Trochet, Philippe; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Gorin, Dmitry A

    2016-08-01

    The polyelectrolyte microcapsules that can be accurate either visualized in biological media or in tissue would enhance their further in vivo application both as a carrier of active payloads and as a specific sensor. The immobilization of active species, for instance fluorescent dyes, quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, in polymeric shell enables visualization of capsules by optical imaging techniques in aqueous solution. However, for visualization of capsules in complex media an instrument with high contrast modality requires. Herein, we show for the first time photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of multifunctional microcapsules in water and in blood. The microcapsules exhibit greater photoacoustic intensity compare to microparticles with the same composition of polymeric shell presumably their higher thermal expansion. Photoacoustic intensity form microcapsules dispersed in blood displays an enhancement (2-fold) of signal compare to blood. Photoacoustic imaging of microcapsules might contribute to non-invasive carrier visualization and further their in vivo distribution.

  19. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo.

  20. Non-degradable contrast agent with selective phagocytosis for cellular and hepatic magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fei-Yan [Nanchang University, College of Chemistry (China); Gu, Zhe-Jia [Nanchang University, Institute for Advanced Study (China); Zhao, Dawen [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Tang, Qun, E-mail: tangqun@ncu.edu.cn [Nanchang University, Institute for Advanced Study (China)

    2015-09-15

    Degradation is the long-existing toxic issue of metal-containing inorganic medicine. In this paper, we fully investigated the degradation of dextran-coated KMnF{sub 3} nanocube in the in vitro and in vivo surroundings. Different from the general decomposing and ion releasing events, this special agent is resistant to acidic environment, as well as ion exchange. Non-degradability was proved by simulated and real cellular experiments. Moreover, it can be engulfed in the macrophage cells and kept stable in the lysosome. Due to its stability and highly selective phagocytosis, implanted liver cancer can be clearly visualized after administration.

  1. KR-31831, benzopyran derivative, inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis of HUVECs through suppressing KDR expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shi-Young; Seo, Eun-Hee; Song, Hyun Seok; Jung, Seung-Youn; Lee, Young-Kyoung; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yung-Jin

    2008-06-01

    Angiogenesis is important in the development and progression of cancer, therefore the therapeutic approach based on anti-angiogenesis may represent a promising therapeutic option. KR-31831 is a novel anti-ischemic agent. Previously, we reported the anti-angiogenic activity of KR-31831. In the present study we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying anti-angiogenic activity of KR-31831. We show that KR-31831 inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation and tube formation via release of intracellular Ca2+ and phosphorylation of extra-cellular regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk 1/2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Moreover, the expression of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2, known as Flk-1 or KDR) was reduced by the treatment of KR-31831. These results suggest that KR-31831 may have inhibitory effects on tumor angiogenesis through down-regulation of KDR expression.

  2. A sustained release formulation of chitosan modified PLCL:poloxamer blend nanoparticles loaded with optical agent for animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Amalendu P; Zeglam, Karim; Mukerjee, Anindita; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Thamake, Sanjay, E-mail: Jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-07-22

    The objective of this study was to develop optical imaging agent loaded biodegradable nanoparticles with indocynanine green (ICG) using chitosan modified poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL):poloxamer (Pluronic F68) blended polymer. Nanoparticles were formulated with an emulsification solvent diffusion technique using PLCL and poloxamer as blend-polymers. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and chitosan were used as stabilizers. The particle size, shape and zeta potential of the formulated nanoparticles and the release kinetics of ICG from these nanoparticles were determined. Further, biodistribution of these nanoparticles was studied in mice at various time points until 24 h following intravenous administration, using a non-invasive imaging system. The average particle size of the nanoparticles was found to be 146 {+-} 3.7 to 260 {+-} 4.5 nm. The zeta potential progressively increased from - 41.6 to + 25.3 mV with increasing amounts of chitosan. Particle size and shape of the nanoparticles were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which revealed the particles to be smooth and spherical in shape. These nanoparticles were efficiently delivered to the cytoplasm of the cells, as observed in prostate and breast cancer cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In vitro release studies indicated sustained release of ICG from the nanoparticles over a period of seven days. Nanoparticle distribution results in mice showing improved uptake and accumulation with chitosan modified nanoparticles in various organs and slower clearance at different time points over a 24 h period as compared to unmodified nanoparticles. The successful formulation of such cationically modified nanoparticles for encapsulating optical agents may lead to a potential deep tissue imaging technique for tumor detection, diagnosis and therapy.

  3. A sustained release formulation of chitosan modified PLCL:poloxamer blend nanoparticles loaded with optical agent for animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amalendu P.; Zeglam, Karim; Mukerjee, Anindita; Thamake, Sanjay; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop optical imaging agent loaded biodegradable nanoparticles with indocynanine green (ICG) using chitosan modified poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL):poloxamer (Pluronic F68) blended polymer. Nanoparticles were formulated with an emulsification solvent diffusion technique using PLCL and poloxamer as blend-polymers. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and chitosan were used as stabilizers. The particle size, shape and zeta potential of the formulated nanoparticles and the release kinetics of ICG from these nanoparticles were determined. Further, biodistribution of these nanoparticles was studied in mice at various time points until 24 h following intravenous administration, using a non-invasive imaging system. The average particle size of the nanoparticles was found to be 146 ± 3.7 to 260 ± 4.5 nm. The zeta potential progressively increased from - 41.6 to + 25.3 mV with increasing amounts of chitosan. Particle size and shape of the nanoparticles were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which revealed the particles to be smooth and spherical in shape. These nanoparticles were efficiently delivered to the cytoplasm of the cells, as observed in prostate and breast cancer cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In vitro release studies indicated sustained release of ICG from the nanoparticles over a period of seven days. Nanoparticle distribution results in mice showing improved uptake and accumulation with chitosan modified nanoparticles in various organs and slower clearance at different time points over a 24 h period as compared to unmodified nanoparticles. The successful formulation of such cationically modified nanoparticles for encapsulating optical agents may lead to a potential deep tissue imaging technique for tumor detection, diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Imaging liver metastases with a new oral manganese-based contrast agent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Moller, J.M.; Dekker, H.M.; Barentsz, J.O.; Thomsen, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was a preliminary evaluation of a new oral, manganese-based, liver-specific contrast medium (CMC-001; CMC Contrast AB, Malmoe, Sweden) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver metastases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included

  5. Notch in Pathological Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Branching of Dopaminergic Axons. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(38): 11973-11981. BOOK CHAPTERS 1. Uh, M.K., Kandel , J., Kitajewski, J. Evaluating Tumor Angiogenesis. 2nd ed. 980. New York: Springer, 2013. 341-51. Print.

  6. Slit-Robo signaling in ocular angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Tang, Shibo; London, Nyall R; Li, Dean Y; Zhang, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Slit-Robo signaling was firstly discovered as a major repellent pathway at the midline of the central nervous system. Intense investigation found that this pathway also plays an important role in other biological process including angiogenesis. Robo4 is the vascular endothelial cell specific member of Robo family. It was found that Slit-Robo signaling can inhibit endothelial cell migration, tube formation and vascular permeability. Slit-Robo signaling also plays an important role in embryonic and tumor angiogenesis. In animal model of ocular angiogenesis, addition of Slit inhibited laser induced choroidal neovascularization, oxygen induced retinopathy and VEGF induced retinal permeability in a Robo4 dependent manner. Recent data demonstrates that Robo1 and Robo4 form a heterodimer in endothelial cells, The role of this heterodimer in counteracting VEGF signaling is unknown. Further investigation is required to better understand Slit-Robo signaling and develop novel therapy for angiogenesis.

  7. Aberrant angiogenesis: The gateway to diabetic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic cum vascular syndrome with resultant abnormalities in both micro- and macrovasculature. The adverse long-term effects of diabetes mellitus have been described to involve many organ systems. Apart from hyperglycemia, abnormalities of angiogenesis may cause or contribute toward many of the clinical manifestations of diabetes. These are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular abnormalities of the retina, kidneys, and fetus, impaired wound healing, increased risk of rejection of transplanted organs, and impaired formation of coronary collaterals. A perplexing feature of the aberrant angiogenesis is that excessive and insufficient angiogenesis can occur in different organs in the same individual. The current article hereby reviews the molecular mechanisms including abnormalities in growth factors, cytokines, and metabolic derangements, clinical implications, and therapeutic options of dealing with abnormal angiogenesis in diabetes.

  8. Galectins in angiogenesis: consequences for gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Sandra M; Conrad, Melanie L; Freitag, Nancy; Barrientos, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Members of the galectin family have been shown to exert several roles in the context of reproduction. They contribute to placentation, maternal immune regulation and facilitate angiogenesis encompassing decidualisation and placenta formation during pregnancy. In the context of neo-vascularisation, galectins have been shown to augment signalling pathways that lead to endothelial cell activation, cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in vitro in addition to angiogenesis in vivo. Angiogenesis during gestation ensures not only proper foetal growth and development, but also maternal health. Consequently, restriction of placental blood flow has major consequences for both foetus and mother, leading to pregnancy diseases. In this review we summarise both the established and the emerging roles of galectin in angiogenesis and discuss the possible implications during healthy and pathological gestation.

  9. Therapeutic Angiogenesis for Treating Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Deveza, Jeffrey Choi, Fan Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and is often associated with partial or full occlusion of the blood vessel network in the affected organs. Restoring blood supply is critical for the successful treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic angiogenesis provides a valuable tool for treating cardiovascular diseases by stimulating the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. In this review, we discuss strategies developed for therapeutic angiogenesis using single or combinations of biological signals, cells and polymeric biomaterials. Compared to direct delivery of growth factors or cells alone, polymeric biomaterials provide a three-dimensional drug-releasing depot that is capable of facilitating temporally and spatially controlled release. Biomimetic signals can also be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds to allow environmentally-responsive or cell-triggered release of biological signals for targeted angiogenesis. Recent progress in exploiting genetically engineered stem cells and endogenous cell homing mechanisms for therapeutic angiogenesis is also discussed.

  10. Semaphorin signaling in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsuko Sakurai; Colleen Doci; J Silvio Gutkind

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis,the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vasculature,is essential for many physiological processes,and aberrant angiogenesis contributes to some of the most prevalent human diseases,including cancer.Angiogenesis is controlled by delicate balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic signals.While pro-angiogenic signaling has been extensively investigated,how developmentally regulated,naturally occurring anti-angiogenic molecules prevent the excessive growth of vascular and lymphatic vessels is still poorly understood.In this review,we summarize the current knowledge on how semaphorins and their receptors,plexins and neuropilins,control normal and pathological angiogenesis,with an emphasis on semaphorin-regulated anti-angiogenic signaling circuitries in vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells.This emerging body of information may afford the opportunity to develop novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies.

  11. Poly(acrylic acid) Bridged Gadolinium Metal-Organic Framework-Gold Nanoparticle Composites as Contrast Agents for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Bimodal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chixia; Zhu, Liping; Lin, Feng; Boyes, Stephen G

    2015-08-19

    Imaging contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have received significant attention in the development of techniques for early stage cancer diagnosis. Gadolinium (Gd)(III), which has seven unpaired electrons and a large magnetic moment, can dramatically influence the water proton relaxation and hence exhibits excellent MRI contrast. On the other hand, gold (Au), which has a high atomic number and high X-ray attenuation coefficient, is an ideal contrast agent candidate for X-ray-based CT imaging. Gd metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles with tunable size, high Gd(III) loading and multivalency can potentially overcome the limitations of clinically utilized Gd chelate contrast agents. In this work, we report for the first time the integration of GdMOF nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the preparation of a MRI/CT bimodal imaging agent. Highly stable hybrid GdMOF/AuNPs composites have been prepared by using poly(acrylic acid) as a bridge between the GdMOF nanoparticles and AuNPs. The hybrid nanocomposites were then evaluated in MRI and CT imaging. The results revealed high longitudinal relaxivity in MRI and excellent CT imaging performance. Therefore, these GdMOF/AuNPs hybrid nanocomposites potentially provide a new platform for the development of multimodal imaging probes.

  12. Angiogenesis in male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthan Rani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer is a rare but aggressive and devastating disease. This disease presents at a later stage and in a more advanced fashion than its female counterpart. The immunophenotype also appears to be distinct when compared to female breast cancer. Angiogenesis plays a permissive role in the development of a solid tumor and provides an avenue for nutrient exchange and waste removal. Recent scrutiny of angiogenesis in female breast cancer has shown it to be of significant prognostic value. It was hypothesized that this holds true in invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast. In the context of male breast cancer, we investigated the relationship of survival and other clinico-pathological variables to the microvascular density of the tumor tissue. Methods Seventy-five cases of primary male breast cancer were identified using the records of the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency over a period of 26 years. Forty-seven cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast had formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks that were suitable for this study. All cases were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for the angiogenic markers (cluster designations 31 (CD31, 34 (CD34 and 105 (CD105, von Willebrand factor (VWF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Microvascular density (MVD was determined using average, centre, and highest microvessel counts (AMC, CMC, and HMC, respectively. Statistical analyses compared differences in the distribution of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD, tumor size, node status and age at diagnosis. In addition, MVD values were compared within each marker, between each marker, and were also compared to clinico-pathological data. Results Advanced age and tumor size were related to shorter survival times. There were no statistically significant differences in distributions of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD variables. There was no

  13. Neomycin inhibits angiogenin-induced angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    A class of angiogenesis inhibitor has emerged from our mechanistic study of the action of angiogenin, a potent angiogenic factor. Neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, inhibits nuclear translocation of human angiogenin in human endothelial cells, an essential step for angiogenin-induced angiogenesis. The phospholipase C-inhibiting activity of neomycin appears to be involved, because U-73122, another phospholipase C inhibitor, has a similar effect. In contrast, genistein, oxophenylarsine, an...

  14. Piperine, a dietary phytochemical, inhibits angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor progression. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has diverse physiological actions including killing of cancer cells; however, the effect of piperine on angiogenesis is not known. Here we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation and G1/S transition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without causing cell death. Piperine also inhibited HUVEC migration and tubule formation in vitro, as well as collagen-induce...

  15. Inhibiting angiogenesis with human single-chain variable fragment antibody targeting VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hossien; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Dehbidi, Gholamreza Rafiei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific angiogenesis factor which has crucial roles in the angiogenesis of tumors. Anti-angiogenesis agents can inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells. Single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have the same affinity as whole antibodies and smaller size, thus result in more tissue permeability and higher production yield. In this research we aim to isolate a human scFv antibody against VEGF that inhibits angiogenesis. For that, we have used human scFv phage library to isolate a specific scFv antibody against binding site of VEGF. The human scFv phage library was amplified according to the manufacture protocol and panned against recombinant VEGF. ScFv antibody was isolated after five rounds of panning. Phage ELISA was used for detection of the highest affinity binder (HR6). Soluble HR6 scFv was expressed in non-suppressor strain of Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified using Ni-NTA chromatography. In vivo and in vitro function of the HR6 scFv was analyzed by chorioallantoic membrane assay and endothelial cell proliferation assay on VEGF stimulated HUVECs. Result of the cross reactivity showed that HR6 scFv specifically bounds to VEGF. The affinity was calculated to be 1.8×10(-7)M. HR6 could stop HUVEC proliferation in a dose dependent manner and anti-angiogenesis activity was observed using 10μg of HR6 in chorioallantoic membrane assay. In this work, we demonstrate that a HR6 scFv selected from human library phage display specifically blocks VEGF signaling, furthermore, this scFv has an anti-angiogenesis effect and because of its small size has more tissue diffusion. The HR6 antibody was isolated form a human library thus, it is not immunogenic for humans and could serve as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer.

  16. Anti-angiogenesis in prostate cancer:knocked down but not out

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marijo Bilusic; Yu-Ning Wong

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a very complex physiological process, which involves multiple pathways that are dependent on the homeostatic balance between the growth factors (stimulators and inhibitors). This tightly controlled process is stimulated by angiogenic factors, which are present within the tumor and surrounding tumor-associated stromal cells. The dependence of tumor propagation, invasion and metastasis on angiogenesis makes the inhibitors of new blood vessel formation attractive drugs for treating the malignancies. Angiogenesis can be disrupted by several distinct mechanisms:by inhibiting endothelial cells, by interrupting the signaling pathways or by inhibiting other activators of angiogenesis. This strategy has shown therapeutic beneift in several types of solid tumors, leading to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of anti-angiogenic agents in the treatment of kidney, non-small cell lung, colon and brain cancers. Although no angiogenesis inhibitors have been approved for patients with metastatic prostate cancer, therapies that target new blood vessel formation are still an emerging and promising area of prostate cancer research.

  17. Anti-angiogenesis in prostate cancer: knocked down but not out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijo Bilusic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a very complex physiological process, which involves multiple pathways that are dependent on the homeostatic balance between the growth factors (stimulators and inhibitors. This tightly controlled process is stimulated by angiogenic factors, which are present within the tumor and surrounding tumor-associated stromal cells. The dependence of tumor propagation, invasion and metastasis on angiogenesis makes the inhibitors of new blood vessel formation attractive drugs for treating the malignancies. Angiogenesis can be disrupted by several distinct mechanisms: by inhibiting endothelial cells, by interrupting the signaling pathways or by inhibiting other activators of angiogenesis. This strategy has shown therapeutic benefit in several types of solid tumors, leading to Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of anti-angiogenic agents in the treatment of kidney, non-small cell lung, colon and brain cancers. Although no angiogenesis inhibitors have been approved for patients with metastatic prostate cancer, therapies that target new blood vessel formation are still an emerging and promising area of prostate cancer research.

  18. Hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles as molecular specific agents for MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Timothy A [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bankson, James [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Aaron, Jesse [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Sokolov, Konstantin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Nanoparticles which consist of a plasmonic layer and an iron oxide moiety could provide a promising platform for development of multimodal imaging and therapy approaches in future medicine. However, the feasibility of this platform has yet to be fully explored. In this study we demonstrated the use of gold-coated iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles for combined molecular specific MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. The gold layer exhibits a surface plasmon resonance that provides optical contrast due to light scattering in the visible region and also presents a convenient surface for conjugating targeting moieties, while the iron oxide cores give strong T{sub 2} (spin-spin relaxation time) contrast. The strong optical absorption of the plasmonic gold layer also makes these nanoparticles a promising agent for photothermal therapy. We synthesized hybrid nanoparticles which specifically target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a common biomarker for many epithelial cancers. We demonstrated molecular specific MRI and optical imaging in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that receptor-mediated aggregation of anti-EGFR hybrid nanoparticles allows selective destruction of highly proliferative cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 700 nm wavelength, a significant shift from the peak absorbance of isolated hybrid nanoparticles at 532 nm.

  19. Preclinical Validation of the Heparin-Reactive Peptide p5+14 as a Molecular Imaging Agent for Visceral Amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Jonathan S.; Martin, Emily B.; Richey, Tina; Stuckey, Alan C.; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Williams, Angela; Foster, James S.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Penney; Uberbacher, Ed; Cheng, Xiaolin; Kennel, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid is a complex pathologic matrix comprised principally of paracrystalline protein fibrils and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Systemic amyloid diseases are rare, thus, routine diagnosis is often challenging. The glycosaminoglycans ubiquitously present in amyloid deposits are biochemically and electrochemically distinct from those found in the healthy tissues due to the high degree of sulfation. We have exploited this unique property and evaluated heparin-reactive peptides, such as p5+14, as novel agents for specifically targeting and imaging amyloid. Herein, we demonstrate that radiolabeled p5+14 effectively bound murine AA amyloid in vivo by using molecular imaging. Biotinylated peptide also reacted with the major forms of human amyloid in tissue sections as evidenced immunohistochemically. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the peptide also binds synthetic amyloid fibrils that lack glycosaminoglycans implying that the dense anionic motif present on heparin is mimicked by the amyloid protein fibril itself. These biochemical and functional data support the translation of radiolabeled peptide p5+14 for the clinical imaging of amyloid in patients. PMID:25923515

  20. Preclinical Validation of the Heparin-Reactive Peptide p5+14 as a Molecular Imaging Agent for Visceral Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Wall

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathologic matrix comprised principally of paracrystalline protein fibrils and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Systemic amyloid diseases are rare, thus, routine diagnosis is often challenging. The glycosaminoglycans ubiquitously present in amyloid deposits are biochemically and electrochemically distinct from those found in the healthy tissues due to the high degree of sulfation. We have exploited this unique property and evaluated heparin-reactive peptides, such as p5+14, as novel agents for specifically targeting and imaging amyloid. Herein, we demonstrate that radiolabeled p5+14 effectively bound murine AA amyloid in vivo by using molecular imaging. Biotinylated peptide also reacted with the major forms of human amyloid in tissue sections as evidenced immunohistochemically. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the peptide also binds synthetic amyloid fibrils that lack glycosaminoglycans implying that the dense anionic motif present on heparin is mimicked by the amyloid protein fibril itself. These biochemical and functional data support the translation of radiolabeled peptide p5+14 for the clinical imaging of amyloid in patients.

  1. Heterobivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Confocal microscope, Flow cytometer, Triple Quadrupole LC-MS, Q-ToF LC/MS, Fluorescence microplate reader, Agilent HPLC System, Lyophilizer, and CO2...or signaling activity (3). Due to high sensitivity and non-invasive detection, imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS...functions are gaining favor over the anatomic techniques of computed tomography (CT) and MR, which merely detect enlarged tissue, revealing nothing of its

  2. Upconversion nanoparticles as a contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging in live mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Swarup Kumar; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Joseph, James; Lin, Manjing; He, Tingchao; Tong, Yan; Sun, Handong; Yu, Sidney Wing-Kwong; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-08-27

    An inclusion complex of NaYF4 :Yb(3+) ,Er(3+) upconversion nanoparticles with α-cyclodextrin in aqueous conditions exhibits luminescence quenching when excited at 980 nm. This non-radiative relaxation leads to an unprecedented photoacoustic signal enhancement. In vivo localization of α-cyclodextrin-covered NaYF4 :Yb(3+) ,Er(3+) is demonstrated using photoacoustic tomography in live mice, showing its high capability for photoacoustic imaging.

  3. Targeted Fe-filled carbon nanotube as a multifunctional contrast agent for thermoacoustic and magnetic resonance imaging of tumor in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenzheng; Lou, Cunguang; Qiu, Jieshan; Zhao, Zongbin; Zhou, Quan; Liang, Minjie; Ji, Zhong; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) can map the microwave absorption distribution of targets, which depends on the electrical and magnetic properties. Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with good electrical properties have been used as TAI contrast agents, the negligible magnetic absorption hinders its application for sensitive detection. In order to exploit CNTs with electrical and magnetic absorption properties as agent of TAI, the ferromagnetic material-filled multi-walled CNTs (MMWCNTs) are investigated. In this study, the folic acid conjugated plain multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) and MMWCNTs were injected through the tail-vein of mice separately, and TAI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The results show the MMWCNTs can clearly image the size and edge of the tumor with the TAI contrast enhancement of 67% and T2 signal intensity decrease of four fifths compared to MWCNTs. This study demonstrated the hybrid particles have the potential to be a high-sensitive contrast agent for accurate tumor detection. From the Clinical Editor: Novel imaging modalities are emerging. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) relies on the absorption distribution of microwave of targets. In this article the authors investigate the use of ferromagnetic material-filled multi-walled CNTs as contrast agents for both TAI and MRI in an in-vivo model for tumors. The positive findings would imply that the application of dual-modality probe could provide more accurate imaging for the clinical setting.

  4. Erythropoietin blockade inhibits the induction of tumor angiogenesis and progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Hardee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The induction of tumor angiogenesis, a pathologic process critical for tumor progression, is mediated by multiple regulatory factors released by tumor and host cells. We investigated the role of the hematopoietic cytokine erythropoietin as an angiogenic factor that modulates tumor progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescently-labeled rodent mammary carcinoma cells were injected into dorsal skin-fold window chambers in mice, an angiogenesis model that allows direct, non-invasive, serial visualization and real-time assessment of tumor cells and neovascularization simultaneously using intravital microscopy and computerized image analysis during the initial stages of tumorigenesis. Erythropoietin or its antagonist proteins were co-injected with tumor cells into window chambers. In vivo growth of cells engineered to stably express a constitutively active erythropoietin receptor EPOR-R129C or the erythropoietin antagonist R103A-EPO were analyzed in window chambers and in the mammary fat pads of athymic nude mice. Co-injection of erythropoietin with tumor cells or expression of EPOR-R129C in tumor cells significantly stimulated tumor neovascularization and growth in window chambers. Co-injection of erythropoietin antagonist proteins (soluble EPOR or anti-EPO antibody with tumor cells or stable expression of antagonist R103A-EPO protein secreted from tumor cells inhibited angiogenesis and impaired tumor growth. In orthotopic tumor xenograft studies, EPOR-R129C expression significantly promoted tumor growth associated with increased expression of Ki67 proliferation antigen, enhanced microvessel density, decreased tumor hypoxia, and increased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. R103A-EPO antagonist expression in mammary carcinoma cells was associated with near-complete disruption of primary tumor formation in the mammary fat pad. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that erythropoietin is an

  5. Radiolabelled D/sub 2/ agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents: Progress report for period February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, C.A.

    1987-11-07

    Three D/sub 2/ agonists, /sup 3/H-DHEC, /sup 3/H-BrCr and /sup 3/H-ADTN, were evaluated with /sup 3/H-DHEC showing the most promise as a potential prolactinoma imaging agent. Concentration vs time plots for all three compounds in normal and in DES-treated pituitary tissue are reported. The exceptional D/sub 2/ receptor affinity of N-0437 has prompted synthetic efforts towards preparation of iodo-N-0437 in spite of a lack of preliminary tissue distribution data. An evaluation of /sup 18/F-FDG uptake in the prolactinoma model and as a muscarinic ligand in control animals were evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.

    2016-06-10

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  7. Engineered collagen hydrogels for the sustained release of biomolecules and imaging agents: promoting the growth of human gingival cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Park, Hoyoung; Kim, Taeho; Jeong, Yoon; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gilad, Assaf A; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-01-01

    We present here the in vitro release profiles of either fluorescently labeled biomolecules or computed tomography contrast nanoagents from engineered collagen hydrogels under physiological conditions. The collagen constructs were designed as potential biocompatible inserts into wounded human gingiva. The collagen hydrogels were fabricated under a variety of conditions in order to optimize the release profile of biomolecules and nanoparticles for the desired duration and amount. The collagen constructs containing biomolecules/nanoconstructs were incubated under physiological conditions (ie, 37°C and 5% CO2) for 24 hours, and the release profile was tuned from 20% to 70% of initially loaded materials by varying the gelation conditions of the collagen constructs. The amounts of released biomolecules and nanoparticles were quantified respectively by measuring the intensity of fluorescence and X-ray scattering. The collagen hydrogel we fabricated may serve as an efficient platform for the controlled release of biomolecules and imaging agents in human gingiva to facilitate the regeneration of oral tissues.

  8. Gadolinium(III-DOTA Complex Functionalized with BODIPY as a Potential Bimodal Contrast Agent for MRI and Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ceulemans

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of a novel gadolinium(III DOTA complex functionalized with a boron-dipyrromethene derivative (BODIPY is described. The assembly of the complex relies on azide diazotransfer chemistry in a copper tube flow reactor. The azide thus formed is coupled directly with an alkyne via click chemistry, resulting into a paramagnetic and luminescent gadolinium(III complex. Luminescent data and relaxometric properties of the complex have been evaluated, suggesting the potential applicability of the complexes as a bimodal contrast agent for magnetic resonance and optical imaging. The complex displays a bright emission at 523 nm with an absorption maximum of 507 nm and high quantum yields of up to 83% in water. The proton relaxivity of the complex measured at 310 K and at frequencies of 20 and 60 MHz had the values of 3.9 and 3.6 s−1·mM−1, respectively.

  9. Non-Specific Zn2+ Ion Sensing Using Ultrasmall Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticle as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bony, Badrul Alam; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2016-03-01

    The gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are well-known potential candidates for a positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent owing to their large longitudinal water proton relaxivity (r1) value with r2/r1 ratio close to one (r2 = transverse water proton relaxivity). In addition they may be used to sense metal ions because their r1 and r2 values can be altered in the presence of metal ions. This may allow us to study metabolic processes involving metal ions and to diagnose disease related to abnormal concentrations of metal ions in the body in a non-invasive way. In this study ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles were for the first time applied to non-specifically sense Zn2+ ions in aqueous solution. We explored this by measuring r1 and r2 values in the presence of Zn2+ ions in solution.

  10. Image intensifier-guided injection of corticosteroid and local anesthetic agent for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Kate L; Chin, Kuen Foo; Noorani, Ali M; Nairn, David S

    2010-08-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. The condition is potentially self-limiting and can respond to conservative treatment, but patients may opt for surgery if the treatments fail. Surgical intervention is associated with potential complications. This study set out to explore the efficacy of the specific nonsurgical intervention offered to treatment-resistant cases in a local clinical setting. The technique involves image intensifier-guided injection of corticosteroid and local anesthetic agents under general anesthesia. Nineteen patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis of over 12 months' duration received injections. A simple follow-up questionnaire was given to patients after the procedure that focused on their subjective opinion of any change in their pain. They were also asked if the injection had solved their problems with heel pain. The improvements that the patients reported were found to be statistically significant (P = .012).

  11. Dopamine-containing gadolinium complex as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xin; ZHAO Qi; YANG Lian; YAN Guoping; XU Wei; ZHOU Chengkai; ZHANG Qiao; LI Liang; LIU Fan; GUO Junfang

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic bisdopamide (Gd-DTPA-2DA) was synthesized by the incorporation of dopamine to diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and further reaction with gadolinium chloride.In vitro and in vivo properties were also evaluated.Gadolinium complex Gd-DTPA-2DA possessed higher relaxation effectiveness and less cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than that of Gd-DTPA.Moreover,Gd-DTPA-2DA greatly enhanced the contrast of MR images of the brains,provided prolonged intravascular duration,and produced highly contrasted visualization of the brain.

  12. Dual-Modality Activity-Based Probes as Molecular Imaging Agents for Vascular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withana, Nimali P; Saito, Toshinobu; Ma, Xiaowei; Garland, Megan; Liu, Changhao; Kosuge, Hisanori; Amsallem, Myriam; Verdoes, Martijn; Ofori, Leslie O; Fischbein, Michael; Arakawa, Mamoru; Cheng, Zhen; McConnell, Michael V; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are cellular mediators of vascular inflammation and are involved in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. These immune cells secrete proteases such as matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins that contribute to disease formation and progression. Here, we demonstrate that activity-based probes (ABPs) targeting cysteine cathepsins can be used in murine models of atherosclerosis to noninvasively image activated macrophage populations using both optical and PET/CT methods. The probes can also be used to topically label human carotid plaques demonstrating similar specific labeling of activated macrophage populations.

  13. An Imaging System to Monitor Efficacy of Adenovirus-Based Virotherapy Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Acad. Sci. U.SA. 97, 12278–12282. Zinn, K.R., Buchsbaum, D.J., Chaudhuri, T.R., Mountz, J.M., Grizzle, W.E., Rogers , B.E., 2000. Noninvasive...K.R., Chaudhuri, T.R., Krasnykh, V.N., Buchsbaum, D.J., Belousova, N., Grizzle, W.E., Curiel, D.T., Rogers , B.E., 2002. Gamma Camera Dual Imaging With...incorporation of polypeptide ligands into the fiber protein. J Virol 2002; 76: 8621–8631. 62 Chartier C, Degryse E, Gantzer M, Dieterle A, Pavirani A

  14. Synthesis and biodistribution of a new 99mTc nitrido complex as a potential myocardial and cerebral imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JunBo; Wang, XueBin; Li, ChunYun

    2002-06-01

    The bis(N-methyl, N-cyclohexyl dithiocarbamato) nitrido technetium-99m complex [99mTcN(MECHDTC)2] (MECHDTC: N-methyl, N-cyclohexyl dithiocarbamato) has been synthesized through a ligand-exchange reaction. The two-step procedure consisted of an initial reaction of 99mTcO4- with succinic dihydrazide in the presence of stannous chloride as reducing agent and propylenediamine tetraacetic acid as complexant, and successive addition of sodium salt of N-methyl, N-cyclohexyl dithiocarbamate. The radiochemical purity of the complex was over 90%, as measured by thin layer chromatography. No decomposition of the complex at room temperature was observed over a period of 6 h. Its partition coefficient indicated that it was a lipophilic complex. The electrophoresis results showed that the complex was neutral. Biodistribution in mice showed that the complex accumulated in the heart and brain with high uptake. The heart/blood, heart/lung and brain/blood ratios were 5.55, 2.11 and 1.10, respectively, at 30 min post-injection, suggesting that this compound is a potential myocardial and cerebral imaging agent.

  15. In vivo long-term magnetic resonance imaging activity of ferritin-based magnetic nanoparticles versus a standard contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Elsa; Fiorini, Silvia; Tambalo, Stefano; Busquier, Heriberto; Callejas-Fernández, José; Marzola, Pasquina; Gálvez, Natividad; Domínguez-Vera, José M

    2014-07-10

    New long-circulating maghemite nanoparticles of 4 and 6 nm, coated with an apoferritin protein capsid, exhibit useful properties to act as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. A full in vivo study of the so-called apomaghemites reveals that their long-term MRI properties are better than those of a standard superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) widely used in biomedical applications. The biodistribution of apomaghemites and standard SPIO was investigated by MRI in mice at two different concentrations, 6 and 2.5 mg of Fe·kg(-1), over 60 days. Significant differences are found at low dose (2.5 mg of Fe·kg(-1)). Thus, whereas apomaghemites are active for MR bioimaging of liver for 45 days, standard SPIO is not effective beyond 7 days. On the basis of our data, we may concluded that apomaghemites can act as new long-term MRI liver contrast agents, allowing first the diagnosis of a liver pathology and then monitoring after treatment without the need for a second injection.

  16. The study of photoacoustic imaging without nanoparticles as a contrast agent for anti-body drug monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hee; Kang, Jeeun; Wilson, Brian; Song, Tai-Kyong; Kim, Young Il

    2015-03-01

    As an emerging hybrid Imaging, Photoacoustic became a powerful tool that can scan disease at the deeper site in tissue and monitor of drug delivery in vivo. PAI system used nano-particle as contrast agent to enhance the PA signal in deeper site in tissue. So this makes that PAI's application have some limitation for monitoring of all kinds of anti-body drug, because of various anti-body's absorption excitation. In this study, we designed a PAI system with a tunable pulse OPO laser (from 450~700nm excitation wavelength) to show the optimal wavelength for monitoring of the antibody drug; doxorubicin having peak absorption at near 500nm excitation without any nano-particle combine. We made a gelatin phantoms having 4 different concentration doxorubicin as an anti-body drug; Doxorubicin concentration were in- 0mg/ml, 0.5mg/ml, 1mg/ml, and 2mg/ml. We found that 500nm is optimization wavelength to produce PA peak signal and PAI can be tool to monitor of anti-body drug without contrast agent.

  17. Antibody-conjugated gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles as multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Day

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Emily S Day, Lissett R Bickford, John H Slater, Nicholas S Riggall, Rebekah A Drezek, Jennifer L WestDepartment of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: The goal of this study was to develop near-infrared (NIR resonant gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles (GGS-NPs as dual contrast and therapeutic agents for cancer management via multiphoton microscopy followed by higher intensity photoablation. We demonstrate that GGS-NPs exposed to a pulsed, NIR laser exhibit two-photon induced photoluminescence that can be utilized to visualize cancerous cells in vitro. When conjugated with anti-HER2 antibodies, these nanoparticles specifically bind SK-BR-3 breast carcinoma cells that overexpress the HER2 receptor, enabling the cells to be imaged via multiphoton microscopy with an incident laser power of 1 mW. Higher excitation power (50 mW could be employed to induce thermal damage to the cancerous cells, producing extensive membrane blebbing within seconds leading to cell death. GGS-NPs are ideal multifunctional agents for cancer management because they offer the ability to pinpoint precise treatment sites and perform subsequent thermal ablation in a single setting.Keywords: cancer, nanomedicine, multiphoton microscopy, photoluminescence, photothermal therapy, theranostics

  18. Facile Preparation of a New Gadofullerene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent with High 1H Relaxivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chunying; Corwin, Frank D.; Zhang, Jianfei; Chen, Zhijian; Reid, Jonathan E.; Sun, Minghao; Xu, Wei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Wang, Chunru; Fatouros, Panos P.; Esker, Alan R.; Gibson, Harry W.; Dorn, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on the trimetallic nitride templated (TNT) metallofullerene, Gd3N@C80, was synthesized by a facile method in high yield. The observed longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, for water hydrogens in the presence of the water-soluble gadofullerene 2, Gd3N@C80(OH)~26(CH2CH2COOM)~16 (M = Na or H), are 207 and 282 mM-1s-1 (per C80 cage) at 2.4 T, respectively; these values are 50 times larger than those of Gd3+ poly(aminocarboxylate) complexes, such as commercial Omniscan® and Magnevist®. This high 1H relaxivity for this new hydroxylated and carboxylated gadofullerene derivative provides high signal enhancement at significantly lower Gd concentration as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo MRI studies. Dynamic light scattering data reveal a unimodal size distribution with an average hydrodynamic radius of ca. 78 nm in pure water (pH = 7), which is significantly different from other hydroxylated or carboxylated fullerene and metallofullerene derivatives reported to date. Agarose gel infusion results indicate that the gadofullerene 2 displayed diffusion properties different from that of commercial Omniscan® and those of PEG5000 modified Gd3N@C80. The reactive carboxyl functionality present on this highly efficient contrast agent may also serve as a precursor for biomarker tissue-targeting purposes. PMID:19445504

  19. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  20. Novel Cs-Based Upconversion Nanoparticles as Dual-Modal CT and UCL Imaging Agents for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuxin; Li, Luoyuan; Guo, Quanwei; Wang, Lu; Liu, Dongdong; Wei, Ziwei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide-based contrast agents have attracted increasing attention for their unique properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics. To date, many of these agents have been studied extensively in cells and small animal models. However, performance of these theranostic nanoparticles requires further improvement. In this study, a novel CsLu2F7:Yb,Er,Tm-based visual therapeutic platform was developed for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy. Due to the presence of the heavy a...

  1. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of {sup 18}F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Limin [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Qu Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F., E-mail: kunghf@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Introduction: Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [{sup 18}F]2) and p-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [{sup 18}F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [{sup 18}F]1). Methods: FEP ([{sup 18}F]2) and FPP ([{sup 18}F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results: FEP ([{sup 18}F]2) and FPP ([{sup 18}F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11-37%) and high specific activity (21-69 GBq/{mu}mol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([{sup 18}F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion: Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([{sup 18}F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET.

  2. Phenotypic transition maps of 3D breast acini obtained by imaging-guided agent-based modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jonathan; Enderling, Heiko; Becker-Weimann, Sabine; Pham, Christopher; Polyzos, Aris; Chen, Chen-Yi; Costes, Sylvain V

    2011-02-18

    We introduce an agent-based model of epithelial cell morphogenesis to explore the complex interplay between apoptosis, proliferation, and polarization. By varying the activity levels of these mechanisms we derived phenotypic transition maps of normal and aberrant morphogenesis. These maps identify homeostatic ranges and morphologic stability conditions. The agent-based model was parameterized and validated using novel high-content image analysis of mammary acini morphogenesis in vitro with focus on time-dependent cell densities, proliferation and death rates, as well as acini morphologies. Model simulations reveal apoptosis being necessary and sufficient for initiating lumen formation, but cell polarization being the pivotal mechanism for maintaining physiological epithelium morphology and acini sphericity. Furthermore, simulations highlight that acinus growth arrest in normal acini can be achieved by controlling the fraction of proliferating cells. Interestingly, our simulations reveal a synergism between polarization and apoptosis in enhancing growth arrest. After validating the model with experimental data from a normal human breast line (MCF10A), the system was challenged to predict the growth of MCF10A where AKT-1 was overexpressed, leading to reduced apoptosis. As previously reported, this led to non growth-arrested acini, with very large sizes and partially filled lumen. However, surprisingly, image analysis revealed a much lower nuclear density than observed for normal acini. The growth kinetics indicates that these acini grew faster than the cells comprising it. The in silico model could not replicate this behavior, contradicting the classic paradigm that ductal carcinoma in situ is only the result of high proliferation and low apoptosis. Our simulations suggest that overexpression of AKT-1 must also perturb cell-cell and cell-ECM communication, reminding us that extracellular context can dictate cellular behavior.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of stem cell apoptosis in arthritic joints with a caspase activatable contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Ye, Deju; Lenkov, Olga D; Donig, Jessica S; Martin, John E; Castillo, Rostislav; Derugin, Nikita; Sennino, Barbara; Rao, Jianghong; Daldrup-Link, Heike

    2015-02-24

    About 43 million individuals in the U.S. encounter cartilage injuries due to trauma or osteoarthritis, leading to joint pain and functional disability. Matrix-associated stem cell implants (MASI) represent a promising approach for repair of cartilage defects. However, limited survival of MASI creates a significant bottleneck for successful cartilage regeneration outcomes and functional reconstitution. We report an approach for noninvasive detection of stem cell apoptosis with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on a caspase-3-sensitive nanoaggregation MRI probe (C-SNAM). C-SNAM self-assembles into nanoparticles after hydrolysis by caspase-3, leading to 90% amplification of (1)H MR signal and prolonged in vivo retention. Following intra-articular injection, C-SNAM causes significant MR signal enhancement in apoptotic MASI compared to viable MASI. Our results indicate that C-SNAM functions as an imaging probe for stem cell apoptosis in MASI. This concept could be applied to a broad range of cell transplants and target sites.

  4. Aβ-binding molecules: Possible application as imaging probes and as anti-aggregation agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As amyloid β (Aβ) is at the centre of pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Aβ aggregate-specific probes for in vivo studies of Aβ are potentially important for the early diagnosis and the assessment of new treatment strategies in the AD brain by noninvasive imaging. Several series of compounds derived from Congo red (CR) and Thioflavin T (ThT) have been evaluated as potential probes for the Aβ imaging. They include a diversity of core structures contributing to their affinities to Aβ. Small-molecule inhibi- tors were known to inhibit the formation of Aβ oligomers and fibrils. This inhibition has to be performed in such a way that these inhibitors bind to Aβ in the binding channel where Aβ-binding probes should sit. Therefore, several of them were used as novel core structures to develop Aβ probes, with their de- rivatives exhibiting good Aβ affinities. This approach will facilitate the design of a variety of candidates for Aβ probe molecules and anti-aggregation-therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the finding of Aβ probes with diverse core structures recognized by binding sites on Aβs will likely provide a promising per- spective for the design of 99mTc-labeled probe-derived molecules.

  5. Radioiodination and biological evaluation of Cladribine as potential agent for tumor imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayoumi, Noha Anwer; Amin, Abeer M.; El-Kolaly, Mohamed T. [Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Lab Center; Ismail, Nasser S.M.; Abouzid, Khaled A.M. [Ain-Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Pharmaceutical Chemistry Dept.

    2015-07-01

    Cladribine, a purine analogue antimetabolite, was radioiodinated with {sup 125}I via direct electrophilic substitution reaction. The maximum radiochemical yield (92.5 ± 0.8%) was obtained when the reaction was done at ambient temperature for 30 min using 100 μg of Cladribine and 10 μg N-chlorosuccinamide (NCS) in 150 μL of 0.2 M phosphate buffer, pH 7. In vitro stability studies of HPLC purified {sup 125}I-Cladribine sample dissolved in 0.5 ml of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 7 at ambient temperature showed that {sup 125}I-Cladribine is stable up to 12 h post labeling. Biodistribution results revealed excretion of {sup 125}I-Cladribine mainly by kidneys. The uptake of {sup 125}I-Cladribine in the induced Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma was 2.8 ± 0.4%ID/g at 1 h post injection with maximum tumor/muscle ratio of 5.5. The good uptake of {sup 125}I-Cladribine confirms the molecular docking studies results which indicate that iodinated Cladribine binds with polymerase enzyme with a good-CDOCKER energy. As a result, radioiodinated Cladribine may be used as a valuable agent for tumor diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Quercetin on Angiogenesis of Experimental Mammary Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingquan Kong; Kainan Wu; Hui Lin

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the inhibitory effects of quercetin on angiogenesis of experimental mammary carcinoma.METHODS A 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced animal model of mammary carcinoma was established in rats. Seventy-nine female Sprague-Dawly rats were randomized into 4 groups namely, DMBA, DMBA with tamoxifen (TAM), DMBA with quercetin and control agents identified as group A, B, C and D respectively. Treatment was for 28 weeks. Samples of breast tissues were collected for histopathological observation and microvessel density (MVD) estimation by light microscopy. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the protein product of H-ras were examined by immunohistochemical staining.tumor diameter of group A (76.2%, 2.37cm) were significantly higher than that in group B (40.9%, 1.82cm), C (45.5%, 1.71cm) and D (0%, 0cm) (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between groups B and C (P >0.05), which indicated that quercetin inhibited the incidence and growth of ing for VEGF, bFGF and the H-ras protein product showed significant differences between groups A and B, as well as groups A and C (P < 0.05), but no significant difference between groups B and C (P>0.05).CONCLUSION Quercetin can reduce the DMBA- induced mammary carcinoma incidence and tumor growth.The following mechanisms may be recausing inhibition of proliferation of the tumor cells and tumor angiogenesis.as VEGF and bFGF, so that angiogenesis in the mammary carcinomas is suppressed, with decreased mammary MVD in the rats receiving quercetin treatment.

  7. Interleukin 16- (IL-16- Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA. Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16 by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P<0.05 and late stages (P<0.001. Higher intensities of ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  8. Cancer nanotechnology: a new commercialization pipeline for diagnostics, imaging agents, and therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Hinkal, George; Panaro, Nicholas J.; Hook, Sara; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2011-06-01

    Nanotechnology - the science and engineering of manipulating matter at the molecular scale to create devices with novel chemical, physical and biological properties - has the potential to radically change oncology. Research sponsored by the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer has led to the development of nanomaterials as platforms of increasing complexity and devices of superior sensitivity, speed and multiplexing capability. Input from clinicians has guided researchers in the design of technologies to address specific needs in the areas of cancer therapy and therapeutic monitoring, in vivo imaging, and in vitro diagnostics. The promising output from the Alliance has led to many new companies being founded to commercialize their nanomedical product line. Furthermore, several of these technologies, which are discussed in this paper, have advanced to clinically testing.

  9. Preventing Radiobleaching of Cyanine Fluorophores Enhances Stability of Nuclear/NIRF Multimodality Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Reinier; Heskamp, Sandra; Rijpkema, Mark; Bos, Desirée L.; Goldenberg, David M.; McBride, William J.; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Cai, Weibo; Boerman, Otto C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the large interest in nuclear/optical multimodality imaging, the effect of radiation on the fluorescence of fluorophores remains largely unexplored. Herein, we report on the radiobleaching of cyanine fluorophores and describe conditions to provide robust radioprotection under practical (pre)clinical settings. We determined the radiosensitivity of several cyanine fluorescent compounds, including IRDye 800CW (800CW) and a dual modality imaging tetrapeptide containing DOTA as chelator and Dylight 800 as fluorophore, exposed to increasing activities of 111In, 68Ga, or 213Bi (γ, EC/β, and α emitter, respectively). An activity and type of radiation-dependent radiation-induced loss of fluorescence, radiobleaching, of 800CW was observed upon incubation with escalating activities of 111In, 68Ga, or 213Bi. 68Ga showed the largest radiolytic effect, followed by 111In and 213Bi. The addition of oxygen radical scavengers including ethanol, gentisic acid, and ascorbic acid (AA), provided a concentration dependent radioprotective effect. These results supported the hypothesis of a free radical-mediated radiobleaching mechanism. AA provided the most robust radioprotection over a wide range of concentrations and preserved fluorescence at much higher radioactivity levels. Overall, both near-infrared fluorescent compounds displayed similar sensitivity, except for 213Bi-irradiated solutions, where the dual modality construct exhibited enhanced radiolysis, presumably due to direct radiation damage from α particles. Concurrently, AA was not able to preserve fluorescence of the dual-modality molecule labeled with 213Bi. Our findings have important consequences for several research areas including ROS sensing, radiation-mediated drug release (uncaging), fluorescent dosimetry, and in the preparation of dual-modality radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:28042311

  10. Synthesis and tissue distribution of substituted [{sup 125}I]iodophenylamine derivatives: Possible brain imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaffari, M.A.; Ali, H.; Rousseau, J.; Lier, J.E. van

    1997-02-01

    The synthesis and brain uptake in mice of the radioidinated derivatives of N,N-dimethyl-N'-(idodimethoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanediamine, as well as the N-substituted derivatives of (iodoalkylphenyl)isopropyl, iodoalkylphenylethylamine and 3,4-(methylenedioxy)phenyl-amphetamine (MDA) are described. These compounds contain structural features of both IMP and HIPDM, the cerebral perfusion agents currently in clinical use. The radiolabeled analogs were obtained via the [{sup 125}I]I exchange method, or by [{sup 125}I]NaI treatment of the iodo-free precursor in the presence of an oxidant. Following intravenous injection in mice, all compounds showed important radioactivity concentrations in the lungs and kidneys. The N-substituted (iodoalkylphenyl)isopropyl and iodoalkylphenyl-ethylamine derivatives displayed a high initial brain uptake (>10%IDg{sup -1}) followed by a rapid clearance phase, resulting in lower brain-to-blood ratios as those reported for IMP and HIPDM. In contrast, N,N-dimethyl-N'-(iododimethoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanediamine derivatives featuring the iodo substituent on the benzene carbon adjacent to the methyl amine group and the methoxy substituents on the 2,5- or 2,4-positions, showed low but more persistant brain uptake. Combined with fast blood clearance, this resulted in high brain-to-blood ratios at later time points. Among all compounds tested, the highest brain-to-blood ratio was observed with compound N,N-dimethyl-N'-(6-iodo-3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanediamine (27e), reaching a maximum of >20 at 12 h post-injection.

  11. Rare-Earth doped particles as dual-modality contrast agent for minimally-invasive luminescence and dual-wavelength photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-09

    Multi-modal imaging is an emerging area that integrates multiple imaging modalities to simultaneously capture visual information over many spatial scales. Complementary contrast agents need to be co-developed in order to achieve high resolution and contrast. In this work, we demonstrated that rare-earth doped particles (REDPs) can be employed as dual-modal imaging agents for both luminescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to achieve intrinsic high contrast, temporal and spatial resolution, reaching deeper depth. REDPs synthesized with different surfactants (citric acid, polyacrylic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium citrate) exhibit tunable emission properties and PA signal amplitudes. Amongst these samples, sodium citrate-modified REDPs showed the strongest PA signals. Furthermore, since REDPs have multiple absorption peaks, they offer a unique opportunity for multi-wavelength PA imaging (e.g. PA signals were measured using 520 and 975 nm excitations). The in vivo PA images around the cortical superior sagittal sinus (SSS) blood vessel captured with enhanced signal arising from REDPs demonstrated that in addition to be excellent luminescent probes, REDPs can also be used as successful PA contrast agents. Anisotropic polyacrylic acid-modified REDPs were found to be the best candidates for dual-modal luminescence and PA imaging due to their strong luminescence and PA signal intensities.

  12. Intraindividual, randomized comparison of the macrocyclic contrast agents gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine in breast magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, Eva M.; Renz, Diane M.; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Karle, Bettina [Clinic of Radiation Therapy, Helios Clinics, Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten [SCOSSIS Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany); Ingod-Heppner, Barbara [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Campus Charite Mitte, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Reles, Angela [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Charite-Partner-Practice, Interdisciplinary Breast Center, Berlin (Germany); Engelken, Florian J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander; Taupitz, Matthias [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-25

    To compare intraindividually two macrocyclic contrast agents - gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) - for dynamic and quantitative assessment of relative enhancement (RE) in benign and malignant breast lesions. This was an ethically approved, prospective, single-centre, randomized, crossover study in 52 women with suspected breast lesions referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each patient underwent one examination with gadobutrol and one with Gd-DOTA (0.1 mmol/kg BW) on a 1.5 T system 1 - 7 days apart. Dynamic, T1-weighted, 3D gradient echo sequences were acquired under identical conditions. Quantitative evaluation with at least three regions of interest (ROI) per lesion was performed. Primary endpoint was RE during the initial postcontrast phase after the first and second dynamic acquisition, and peak RE. All lesions were histologically proven; differences between the examinations were evaluated. Forty-five patients with a total of 11 benign and 34 malignant lesions were assessed. Mean RE was significantly higher for gadobutrol than Gd-DOTA (p < 0.0001). Gadobutrol showed significantly less washout (64.4 %) than Gd-DOTA (75.4 %) in malignant lesions (p = 0.048) Gadobutrol has higher RE values compared with Gd-DOTA, whereas Gd-DOTA shows more marked washout in malignant lesions. This might improve the detection of breast lesions and influence the specificity of breast MRI-imaging. (orig.)

  13. Syntheses and biological evaluation of F-18 and I-123 labeled porphyrins as potential tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Ji, D. Y. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, B. S.; Lee, T. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, K. C.; Ahn, G. I.; Yang, S. D.; Choi, C. W.; Jun, K. S. [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Photofrin has currently been approved for general use by licensing authorities to treatment for solid tumor and cancer using photodynamic therapy (PDT) that treat to photochemical effect induced by light. Recently, meso-tetra(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin has been developed as one of best tumor localizer and also shown a favorable tissue distribution. We have studied to develop I-123 labeled meso-tetra(3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrins for tumor imaging. We have studied to develop iodine-123 labeled meso-tetra(3-carboxymethoxy phenyl)porphyrin for tumor imaging agent. The radioiodinated porphyrin compound was obtained by the iodination reaction of tin precursor (50 ig) of porphyrin with Na-123I (200 {mu}L, 100-200 mCi), in the presence of peracetic acid (40 {mu}L) in ethanol. Iodine-123 labeled porphyrin derivative was obtained in 20-30% radiochemical yield and purified by HPLC at 2 mL/min using EtOH/water gradient condition and the fraction at 24-26 min was collected and characterized to desired compound by co injection with cold porphyrin analogue. Total time was around 120 min. The in vitro and in vivo of I-123 labeled porphyrin derivative is under studying.

  14. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Chiu Liu; Zan Shen; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Marie CM Lin

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971,scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of antiangiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has Received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy.

  15. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High

  16. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong; Muneoka, Ken

    2014-06-01

    The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti-angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551-559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium-derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration.

  17. Perfusion computed tomography evaluation of angiogenesis in liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Feng [Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Clinical Pain, Beijing (China); Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Department of Radiology, Nanchong City, Sichuan Province (China); Du, Yong; Xu, Xiao Xue; Li, Yang [Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Department of Radiology, Nanchong City, Sichuan Province (China); Ni, Jia Xiang [Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Clinical Pain, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiang Ping [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, Chengdu City, Sichuan Province (China); Li, Jin Dong [Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Department of General Surgery, Nanchong City, Sichuan Province (China); Zhang, Qing [Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Department of Ultrasound, Nanchong City, Sichuan Province (China)

    2010-06-15

    To investigate the value of computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging for assessment of angiogenesis in liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with histologically proven liver cancer underwent CT perfusion examination. We compared the following perfusion parameters in the tumour area versus the non-tumour area: total blood flow (TBF), hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP), hepatic portal perfusion (HPP) and hepatic arterial perfusion index (HAPI). Slices of postoperative specimen were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and anti-CD34 immunohistochemistry. The slices were evaluated with emphasis on the CD34-positive neovasculature in the tumour parenchyma. Tumour microvascular density (MVD) was calculated according to the Weidner method. Pearson correlation was used to detect correlations between tumour MVD and tumour perfusion parameters. TBF and HPP in the tumour area were lower than in the non-tumour area (P < 0.05). HAP and HAPI in the tumour area were higher than those of the non-tumour area (P < 0.05). TBF and HAP in the tumour area correlated with MVD in the tumour (P < 0.05), with correlation coefficients of 0.849 and 0.829, respectively. CT perfusion imaging can quantitatively assess the blood supply and its distribution in liver cancer. TBF or HAP may be a useful parameter in assessing angiogenesis of liver cancer. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of Angiogenesis Using Micro-Computed Tomography in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Savai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative evaluation of lung tumor angiogenesis using immunohistochemical techniques has been limited by difficulties in generating reproducible data. To analyze intrapulmonary tumor angiogenesis, we used high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT of lung tumors of mice inoculated with mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1 or human adenocarcinoma (A549 cell lines. The lung vasculature was filled with the radiopaque silicone rubber, Microfil, through the jugular vein (in vivo application or pulmonary artery (ex vivo application. In addition, human adenocarcinoma lung tumor-bearing mice treated site-specifically with humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab against vascular endothelial growth factor. Quantitative analysis of lung tumor microvessels imaged with micro-CT showed that more vessels (mainly small, <0.02 mm2 were filled using the in vivo (5.4% compared with the ex vivo (2.1% method. Furthermore, bevacizumab-treated lung tumor-bearing mice showed significantly reduced lung tumor volume and lung tumor angiogenesis compared with untreated mice as assessed by micro-CT. Interestingly, microvascularization of mainly the smaller vessels (<0.02 mm2 was reduced after bevacizumab treatment. This observation with micro-CT was nicely correlated with immunohistochemical measurement of microvessels. Therefore, micro-CT is a novel method for investigating lung tumor angiogenesis, and this might be considered as an additional complementary tool for precise quantification of angiogenesis.

  19. Handheld and mobile hyperspectral imaging sensors for wide-area standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of targets in complex background with a high degree of autonomy. HSI is beneficial for the detection of threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Two HSI techniques that have proven to be valuable are Raman and shortwave infrared (SWIR) HSI. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have numerous size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations that make their potential integration onto a handheld or field portable platform difficult. The systems that are field-portable do so by sacrificing system performance, typically by providing an inefficient area search rate, requiring close proximity to the target for screening, and/or eliminating the potential to conduct real-time measurements. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focused on sensor design and detection results.

  20. Highly biocompatible TiO2:Gd3+ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 of size ~25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r1 relaxivity which is ~2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r1 values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd3+ ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml-1. The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for

  1. Moderation of calpain activity promotes neovascular integration and lumen formation during VEGF-induced pathological angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mien V Hoang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful neovascularization requires that sprouting endothelial cells (ECs integrate to form new vascular networks. However, architecturally defective, poorly integrated vessels with blind ends are typical of pathological angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF, thereby limiting the utility of VEGF for therapeutic angiogenesis and aggravating ischemia-related pathologies. Here we investigated the possibility that over-exuberant calpain activity is responsible for aberrant VEGF neovessel architecture and integration. Calpains are a family of intracellular calcium-dependent, non-lysosomal cysteine proteases that regulate cellular functions through proteolysis of numerous substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a mouse skin model of VEGF-driven angiogenesis, retroviral transduction with dominant-negative (DN calpain-I promoted neovessel integration and lumen formation, reduced blind ends, and improved vascular perfusion. Moderate doses of calpain inhibitor-I improved VEGF-driven angiogenesis similarly to DN calpain-I. Conversely, retroviral transduction with wild-type (WT calpain-I abolished neovessel integration and lumen formation. In vitro, moderate suppression of calpain activity with DN calpain-I or calpain inhibitor-I increased the microtubule-stabilizing protein tau in endothelial cells (ECs, increased the average length of microtubules, increased actin cable length, and increased the interconnectivity of vascular cords. Conversely, WT calpain-I diminished tau, collapsed microtubules, disrupted actin cables, and inhibited integration of cord networks. Consistent with the critical importance of microtubules for vascular network integration, the microtubule-stabilizing agent taxol supported vascular cord integration whereas microtubule dissolution with nocodazole collapsed cord networks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings implicate VEGF-induction of calpain activity and impairment of

  2. Mesoscopic and continuum modelling of angiogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, F.

    2014-03-11

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones in response to chemical signals secreted by, for example, a wound or a tumour. In this paper, we propose a mesoscopic lattice-based model of angiogenesis, in which processes that include proliferation and cell movement are considered as stochastic events. By studying the dependence of the model on the lattice spacing and the number of cells involved, we are able to derive the deterministic continuum limit of our equations and compare it to similar existing models of angiogenesis. We further identify conditions under which the use of continuum models is justified, and others for which stochastic or discrete effects dominate. We also compare different stochastic models for the movement of endothelial tip cells which have the same macroscopic, deterministic behaviour, but lead to markedly different behaviour in terms of production of new vessel cells. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  3. COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, D P

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.

  4. Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongwei; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Yin, Xin; Fuster, Mark M; Arreola, Alexandra; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Generali, Daniele; Nagaraju, Ganji P; El-Rayes, Bassel; Ribatti, Domenico; Chen, Yi Charlie; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Nowsheen, Somaira; Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S Salman; Helferich, Bill; Yang, Xujuan; Guha, Gunjan; Bhakta, Dipita; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Aquilano, Katia; Chen, Sophie; Halicka, Dorota; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bilsland, Alan; Keith, W Nicol; Jensen, Lasse D

    2015-12-01

    Deregulation of angiogenesis--the growth of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature--is a main driving force in many severe human diseases including cancer. As such, tumor angiogenesis is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients to growing tumors, and therefore considered an essential pathologic feature of cancer, while also playing a key role in enabling other aspects of tumor pathology such as metabolic deregulation and tumor dissemination/metastasis. Recently, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a clinical anti-cancer strategy in line with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, which underscore the critical importance of the angiogenic switch during early tumor development. Unfortunately the clinically approved anti-angiogenic drugs in use today are only effective in a subset of the patients, and many who initially respond develop resistance over time. Also, some of the anti-angiogenic drugs are toxic and it would be of great importance to identify alternative compounds, which could overcome these drawbacks and limitations of the currently available therapy. Finding "the most important target" may, however, prove a very challenging approach as the tumor environment is highly diverse, consisting of many different cell types, all of which may contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the tumor cells themselves are genetically unstable, leading to a progressive increase in the number of different angiogenic factors produced as the cancer progresses to advanced stages. As an alternative approach to targeted therapy, options to broadly interfere with angiogenic signals by a mixture of non-toxic natural compound with pleiotropic actions were viewed by this team as an opportunity to develop a complementary anti-angiogenesis treatment option. As a part of the "Halifax Project" within the "Getting to know cancer" framework, we have here, based on a thorough review of the literature, identified 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the

  5. In Vitro Longitudinal Relaxivity Profile of Gd(ABE-DTTA, an Investigational Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akos Varga-Szemes

    Full Text Available MRI contrast agents (CA whose contrast enhancement remains relatively high even at the higher end of the magnetic field strength range would be desirable. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate such a desired magnetic field dependency of the longitudinal relaxivity for an experimental MRI CA, Gd(ABE-DTTA.The relaxivity of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA was measured by Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD in the range of 0.0002 to 1T. Two MRI and five NMR instruments were used to cover the range between 1.5 to 20T. Parallel measurement of a Gd-DTPA sample was performed throughout as reference. All measurements were carried out at 37°C and pH 7.4.The relaxivity values of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA measured at 1.5, 3, and 7T, within the presently clinically relevant magnetic field range, were 15.3, 11.8, 12.4 s-1mM-1 and 18.1, 16.7, and 13.5 s-1mM-1, respectively. The control 4 mM Gd-DTPA relaxivities at the same magnetic fields were 3.6, 3.3, and 3.0 s-1mM-1, respectively.The longitudinal relaxivity of Gd(ABE-DTTA measured within the presently clinically relevant field range is three to five times higher than that of most commercially available agents. Thus, Gd(ABE-DTTA could be a practical choice at any field strength currently used in clinical imaging including those at the higher end.

  6. KSHV-Mediated Angiogenesis in Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravinkumar Purushothaman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, also known as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, is a malignant human oncovirus belonging to the gamma herpesvirus family. HHV-8 is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS and two other B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases: primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD. KS is an invasive tumor of endothelial cells most commonly found in untreated HIV-AIDS or immuno-compromised individuals. KS tumors are highly vascularized and have abnormal, excessive neo-angiogenesis, inflammation, and proliferation of infected endothelial cells. KSHV directly induces angiogenesis in an autocrine and paracrine fashion through a complex interplay of various viral and cellular pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors. KS is believed to originate due to a combination of KSHV’s efficient strategies for evading host immune systems and several pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory stimuli. In addition, KSHV infection of endothelial cells produces a wide array of viral oncoproteins with transforming capabilities that regulate multiple host-signaling pathways involved in the activation of angiogenesis. It is likely that the cellular-signaling pathways of angiogenesis and lymph-angiogenesis modulate the rate of tumorigenesis induction by KSHV. This review summarizes the current knowledge on regulating KSHV-mediated angiogenesis by integrating the findings reported thus far on the roles of host and viral genes in oncogenesis, recent developments in cell-culture/animal-model systems, and various anti-angiogenic therapies for treating KSHV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

  7. KSHV-Mediated Angiogenesis in Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Uppal, Timsy; Sarkar, Roni; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is a malignant human oncovirus belonging to the gamma herpesvirus family. HHV-8 is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and two other B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases: primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD). KS is an invasive tumor of endothelial cells most commonly found in untreated HIV-AIDS or immuno-compromised individuals. KS tumors are highly vascularized and have abnormal, excessive neo-angiogenesis, inflammation, and proliferation of infected endothelial cells. KSHV directly induces angiogenesis in an autocrine and paracrine fashion through a complex interplay of various viral and cellular pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors. KS is believed to originate due to a combination of KSHV’s efficient strategies for evading host immune systems and several pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory stimuli. In addition, KSHV infection of endothelial cells produces a wide array of viral oncoproteins with transforming capabilities that regulate multiple host-signaling pathways involved in the activation of angiogenesis. It is likely that the cellular-signaling pathways of angiogenesis and lymph-angiogenesis modulate the rate of tumorigenesis induction by KSHV. This review summarizes the current knowledge on regulating KSHV-mediated angiogenesis by integrating the findings reported thus far on the roles of host and viral genes in oncogenesis, recent developments in cell-culture/animal-model systems, and various anti-angiogenic therapies for treating KSHV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:27447661

  8. Study on Angiogenesis Factor of Human Osteosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Angiogenesis factor of human osteosarcoma was partially purified and its biological features were studied. The active peptide with 8000 to 10 000 u molecular weight in the conditioned medium obtained from the cultivation of human osteosarcoma cells were partially purified by ultrafiltration, chromatography and dialysis. The angiogenic effects of the fractions were assessed by proliferation assay of human umbilical vein and pig aorta thoracic endothelial cells. The results showed that the chromatography fractions of 4 to 6 could significantly promote the proliferation of the endothelial cells. It was suggested that the human osteosarcoma cells could synthesize and secrete angiogenesis factor with a molecular weight of 8000 to 10 000 u.

  9. In Vivo Models of Muscle Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important determinant of tissue function, from delivery of oxygen and other substrates to removal of waste products, in health and disease (e.g., adaptive or pathological remodelling). The phenotype and functional responses of endothelial cells are conditioned by systemic humoral signals and local environmental factors, including the haemodynamic forces that act upon them. Here we describe some interventions that have been helpful in unraveling the integrative nature of the complex in vivo response, and quantitative assessment of angiogenesis in muscle.

  10. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Seung Hyeok [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Experimental Animals, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K. [Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  11. Detection of occult endoleaks after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm using magnetic resonance imaging with a blood pool contrast agent: preliminary observations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Sandra; Prokop, M.; Verhagen, H.J.; Adriaensen, M.E.; Moll, F.L.; Bartels, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether blood pool contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualize endoleaks that are occult on computed tomography (CT) in patients with nonshrinking aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Written informed consent was obta

  12. Dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Wasi Ahmad, Md; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-09-01

    A new type of dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd3+ (8S7/2) plays an important role in T1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy3+ (6H15/2) has the potential to be used in T2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy2O3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd3+ and Dy3+ and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T1 and T2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (davg = 1.0 nm) showed large r1 and r2 values (r2/r1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R1 and R2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T1 and T2 MR images.

  13. MoS2-Gd Chelate Magnetic Nanomaterials with Core-Shell Structure Used as Contrast Agents in in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Rajeshkumar; Su, Yu-An; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih; Jeng, Ru-Jong

    2016-01-27

    Despite their frequent usages as contrast agents for in vivo MRI imaging, paramagnetic molecules continue to suffer from low resolution, physicochemical instability, and high toxicity. Herein, we present a molybdenum disulfide and gadolinium complex, as an alternative core-shell magnetic nanomaterial that exhibits enhanced paramagnetic property; 4.5-times longer water proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) when compared to commercial gadolinium contrast agents; as well as lowered toxicity, extended blood circulation time, increased stability, and desirable excretion characteristic. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed smooth core-shell nanoparticles 100 nm in size with a shell width of approximately 10 nm. These findings suggest that the synthesized nanomaterial possesses high potential as a positive contrast agent for the enhancement of MRI imaging.

  14. Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois, Cristina [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Particle Physics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, Ilja [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems, Department of Empirical Inference, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Werner, Matthias K. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kupferschlaeger, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); cmi-experts GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Clinical PET/MR acquisition protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could potentially affect PET quantification following MR-based attenuation correction (AC). We assessed the effect of oral and intravenous (IV) MRCA on PET quantification in PET/MR imaging. We employed two MRCA: Lumirem {sup registered} (oral) and Gadovist {sup registered} (IV). First, we determined their reference PET attenuation values using a PET transmission scan (ECAT-EXACT HR+, Siemens) and a CT scan (PET/CT Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens). Second, we evaluated the attenuation of PET signals in the presence of MRCA. Phantoms were filled with clinically relevant concentrations of MRCA in a background of water and {sup 18}F-fluoride, and imaged using a PET/CT scanner (Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens) and a PET/MR scanner (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Third, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant volumes of MRCA on MR-based AC using human pilot data: a patient study employing Gadovist {sup registered} (IV) and a volunteer study employing two different oral MRCA (Lumirem {sup registered} and pineapple juice). MR-based attenuation maps were calculated following Dixon-based fat-water segmentation and an external atlas-based and pattern recognition (AT and PR) algorithm. IV and oral MRCA in clinically relevant concentrations were found to have PET attenuation values similar to those of water. The phantom experiments showed that under clinical conditions IV and oral MRCA did not yield additional attenuation of PET emission signals. Patient scans showed that PET attenuation maps are not biased after the administration of IV MRCA but may be biased, however, after ingestion of iron oxide-based oral MRCA when segmentation-based AC algorithms are used. Alternative AC algorithms, such as AT and PR, or alternative oral contrast agents, such as pineapple juice, can yield unbiased attenuation maps. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to markedly increased attenuation

  15. Allergic-like Reactions to the MR Imaging Contrast Agent Gadobutrol: A Prospective Study of 32 991 Consecutive Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Sarah; Talbot, Nancy; Kucharczyk, Walter; Mandell, Daniel M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency and severity of allergic-like reactions to gadobutrol. Materials and Methods Data collection during the study period was part of a hospital quality assurance initiative to confirm the safety of gadobutrol after its introduction at this institute from 2010 to 2013. The study also included an electronic health records review approved by the institutional review board of the University Health Network, Toronto. The institutional review board waived the requirement for informed consent. At the time of each reaction to contrast material, the patient's age and sex, whether premedication was given, the contrast agent used, the volume injected, the patient's symptoms, and the treatment administered were recorded. Allergic-like reactions from physiologic reactions were differentiated and the frequency and severity of allergic-like reactions, the prevalence of risk factors for reactions, the frequency of reactions despite the use of premedication (a "breakthrough reaction"), and the frequency of delayed reactions were calculated. A χ(2) test to determine whether there was a difference in reaction rates during the 4 years of the study was performed. Results The frequency of allergic-like reactions to gadobutrol was 0.32% (96 reactions among 30 373 gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance [MR] imaging examinations) during the study period. These 96 reactions occurred in 82 patients. There was only one severe reaction. There were identifiable risk factors in 40 of the 82 patients (48.8%). Of the 82 patients with an allergic-like reaction, 28 (34.1%) received a gadolinium-based contrast agent before and had no reaction. A total of 12 of 33 (36.4%) breakthrough reactions occurred, and there were 15 of 96 (15.6%) reactions with a delayed onset. Conclusion The frequency of allergic-like reactions to gadobutrol is very low, accounting for 96 reactions among 30 373 gadobutrol-enhanced MR imaging examinations (0.32%), and severe reactions are rare. In

  16. Potential use of {sup 68}Ga-apo-transferrin as a PET imaging agent for detecting Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vijay, E-mail: vijay.kumar@swahs.health.nsw.gov.a [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Sydney (Australia); Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney (Australia); Discipline of Imaging, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Boddeti, Dilip K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Sydney (Australia); Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney (Australia); Evans, Scott G. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Sydney (Australia); Roesch, Frank [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Howman-Giles, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney (Australia); Discipline of Imaging, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: {sup 67}Ga citrate has been extensively used to detect infection and inflammation since 1971. However, its clinical utility is compromised due to several limitations. The present project explored whether {sup 68}Ga-apo-transferrin ({sup 68}Ga-TF), when prepared in vitro, is a useful agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of bacterial infection. Methods: An infection was induced in male Wistar rats by injecting 5x10{sup 5} CFU units of Staphyococcus aureus in the right thigh muscle. {sup 68}Ga-TF was synthesized by mixing {sup 68}GaCl{sub 3} with apo-transferrin (TF, 2 mg) in sodium carbonate (0.1 M, pH 7.0) and incubating at 40{sup o}C for 1 h. Animals were injected with 10-15 MBq of {sup 68}Ga-TF containing approximately 0.2 mg TF and imaged at different time intervals using Siemens Biograph PET-CT. Results: When {sup 68}Ga-TF were injected in the infected rats, the infection lesion was detectable within 20 min post injection. The biodistribution showed the uptake at the lesion increased with time as shown by significantly increased standard uptake values for up to 4 h post injection. There was a considerable decrease in the background activity during the same period of study, giving higher target-to-muscle ratios. Blood pool activity at 3 h post injection was insignificant. {sup 68}GaCl{sub 3} (when not conjugated to TF) did not localize at the infection lesion up to 120 min post injection. Conclusion: The preliminary results suggest that {sup 68}Ga-TF is capable of detecting S. aureus infection in the rat model, within an hour after intravenous injection.

  17. Hepatic Gadolinium Deposition and Reversibility after Contrast Agent-enhanced MR Imaging of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Natalia; Gregori, Massimo; Zennaro, Floriana; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Simeone, Roberto; Zanon, Davide

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To determine if hepatic gadolinium deposition occurs in pediatric patients with iron overload but normal renal and hepatic function who undergo gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Design and execution of this study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Institute for Research in Maternal and Child Health Burlo Garofolo of Trieste (reference no. 1105/2015). Because of the retrospective nature of the study, the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Twenty-one recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who underwent GBCA-enhanced MR imaging for suspected infection or relapse followed by liver biopsy comprised the study group. The number of GBCA-enhanced MR examinations and cumulative gadolinium dose for each patient was analyzed by comparing liver histologic analysis and iron and gadolinium liver concentration (GLC). Eight patients had siderosis and underwent chelation therapy. The study group was compared with four control patients who were never exposed to GBCA. Statistical analysis was performed with Spearman rank coefficient for correlation. Results All 21 patients had positive correlations between GLC and total GBCA dose (r = 0.4486; P < .05) and between GLC and liver iron concentration (r = 0.56; P < .05). Patients who underwent deferoxamine therapy had a significant reduction of GLC (from 0.64 μg/g ± 0.29 to 0.20 μg/g ± 0.17 [standard deviation]; P < .05). Conclusion In the presence of siderosis, a transmetallation mechanism may be set off between ferric ion and gadoterate meglumine. Deferoxamine appears capable of binding to gadolinium ion. Further studies of the safety of GBCAs in severe siderosis are needed. Chelation should be considered in patients with iron overload and a history of GBCA exposure. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  18. Role of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryeom, Sandra; Folkman, Judah

    2009-03-01

    New blood vessel growth via angiogenesis is a fundamental process in both physiological and pathological conditions. Physiological angiogenesis is critical during embryogenesis and placental development, whereas pathological angiogenesis plays an important role in the progression of many diseases, most notably tumor growth. Tumor angiogenesis is well accepted to be regulated by a balance of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors produced both by tumor cells and surrounding stromal cells. For many years, investigation of antiangiogenic therapies for cancer has focused on the proangiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor; its receptors; or downstream signaling pathways. However, more recently with the identification of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, studies have turned toward understanding the role of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins in preventing disease progression. Clinical clues have suggested that specific populations may have dysregulated angiogenesis due to differential expression of endogenous angiogenesis regulators. For example, individuals with Down syndrome may possess a systemic antiangiogenic state with a significantly decreased incidence of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Our work suggests that endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors may be the master regulators controlling progression of angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as vascular anomalies and cancer. The molecular regulation of angiogenesis is not yet fully understood; however, the Down syndrome population may give us insights toward novel therapies for controlling angiogenesis in disease.

  19. Hard X-ray in-line outline imaging for blood vessels: first generation synchrotron radiation without contrast agents in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Phase-contrast X-ray imaging which reduces radiation exposure, is a promising technique for observing the inner structures of biological soft tissues without the aid of contrast agents.The present study intends to depict blood vessels of rabbits and human livers with hard X-ray in-line out line imaging without contrast agents using synchrotron radiation. Methods: All samples were fixed with formalin and sliced into 6 mm sections. The imaging experiments were performed with Fuji-IX80 films on the 4W1A light beam of the first generation synchrotron radiation in Beijing, China. The device of the ex periment, which supplies a maximum light spot size of 20× 10 mm was similar to that of in-line holography. The photon energy was set at 8 KeV and high quality imagines were obtained by altering the distance between the sample and the film. Results: The trees of rabbit-liver blood vessels and the curved vessels of the cirrhotic human liver were revealed on the images, where vessels < 20 μm in diameter were differentiated. Conclusion: These results show that the blood vessels of liver samples can be revealed by using hard X-ray in-line outline imaging with the first generation synchrotron radiation without contrast agents.

  20. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

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    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  1. Angiogenesis and the inception of pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, Kitty

    2006-01-01

    Vascular maladaptation prior and during implantation may lead to serious complications during pregnancy, perinatally, but also later in life (Barker hypothesis). The consequences later in life often appear to be related to endothelial dysfunction. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels fro

  2. Orchestration of angiogenesis by immune cells

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    Antonino eBruno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the tumor microenvironment plays a major role in cancer and is indispensable for tumor progression. The tumor microenvironment involves many players going well beyond the malignant-transformed cells, including stromal, immune and endothelial cells. The non-malignant cells can acquire tumor-promoting functions during carcinogenesis. In particular, these cells can orchestrate the symphony of the angiogenic switch, permitting the creation of new blood vessels that allows rapid expansion and progression toward malignancy.Considerable attention within the context of tumor angiogenesis should focus not only on the endothelial cells, representing a fundamental unit, but also on immune cells and on the inflammatory tumor infiltrate. Immune cells infiltrating tumors typically show a tumor-induced polarization associated with attenuation of anti-tumor functions and generation of pro-tumor activities, among these angiogenesis. Here we propose a scenario suggesting that the angiogenic switch is an immune switch arising from the pro-angiogenic polarization of immune cells. This view links immunity, inflammation and angiogenesis to tumor progression. Here we review the data in the literature and seek to identify the conductors of this orchestra. We also suggest that interrupting the immune -> inflammation -> angiogenesis -> tumor progression process can delay or prevent tumor insurgence and malignant disease.

  3. The effect of platelet rich plasma on angiogenesis in ischemic flaps in VEGFR2-luc mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Vinogradov, Alexandra; Zor, Fatih; Kweider, Nisreen; Lippross, Sebastian; Liehn, Elisa Anamaria; Naziroglu, Mustafa; Hölzle, Frank; Wruck, Christoph; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2013-04-01

    To improve skin flap healing, one promising strategy in reconstructive surgery might be to optimize platelet rich plasma (PRP) bioactivity and the ischemia-altered expression of genes. We studied both the effect of PRP on ischemic flaps, and whether in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a suitable method for the longitudinal monitoring of angiogenesis in surgical wounds. Axial murine skin flaps were created in four experimental groups. In vivo measurements of VEGFR2 expression levels were made every other day until the 14th day. The local VEGF level and microvessel density were quantified on the 14th day via ELISA and immunohistochemistry, and flap survival rates were measured. We demonstrated that PRP and induced ischemia have a beneficial influence on angiogenesis and flap healing. Combining the two resulted in a significantly robust increase in angiogenesis and flap survival rate that was corroborated by bioluminescence imaging of VEGFR2 activity. This study shows that angiogenic effects of PRP may be potentialized by the stimulus of induced ischemia during free flap harvesting, and thus the two procedures appear to have a synergistic effect on flap healing. This study further demonstrates that BLI of modulated genes in reconstructive surgery is a valuable model for longitudinal in vivo evaluation of angiogenesis.

  4. Treatment of hypertension and renal injury induced by the angiogenesis inhibitor sunitinib: preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankhorst, Stephanie; Kappers, Mariëtte H W; van Esch, Joep H M; Smedts, Frank M M; Sleijfer, Stefan; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Baelde, Hans J; Danser, A H Jan; van den Meiracker, Anton H

    2014-12-01

    Common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibition are hypertension and renal injury. To determine the most optimal way to prevent these adverse effects and to explore their interdependency, the following drugs were investigated in unrestrained Wistar Kyoto rats exposed to the angiogenesis inhibitor sunitinib: the dual endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan; the calcium channel blocker amlodipine; the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril; and the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor sildenafil. Mean arterial pressure was monitored telemetrically. After 8 days, rats were euthanized and blood samples and kidneys were collected. In addition, 24-hour urine samples were collected. After sunitinib start, mean arterial pressure increased rapidly by ≈30 mm Hg. Coadministration of macitentan or amlodipine largely prevented this rise, whereas captopril or sildenafil did not. Macitentan, captopril, and sildenafil diminished the sunitinib-induced proteinuria and endothelinuria and glomerular intraepithelial protein deposition, whereas amlodipine did not. Changes in proteinuria and endothelinuria were unrelated. We conclude that in our experimental model, dual endothelin receptor antagonism and calcium channel blockade are suitable to prevent angiogenesis inhibition-induced hypertension, whereas dual endothelin receptor antagonism, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition can prevent angiogenesis inhibition-induced proteinuria. Moreover, the variable response of hypertension and renal injury to different antihypertensive agents suggests that these side effects are, at least in part, unrelated.

  5. Bee products prevent VEGF-induced angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima Satoshi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a key regulator of pathogenic angiogenesis in diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. Bee products [royal jelly (RJ, bee pollen, and Chinese red propolis] from the honeybee, Apis mellifera, have been used as traditional health foods for centuries. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of bee products using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods In an in vitro tube formation assay, HUVECs and fibroblast cells were incubated for 14 days with VEGF and various concentrations of bee products [RJ, ethanol extract of bee pollen, ethanol extract of Chinese red propolis and its constituent, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE]. To clarify the mechanism of in vitro angiogenesis, HUVEC proliferation and migration were induced by VEGF with or without various concentrations of RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE. Results RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE significantly suppressed VEGF-induced in vitro tube formation in the descending order: CAPE > Chinese red propolis >> bee pollen > RJ. RJ and Chinese red propolis suppressed both VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation and migration. In contrast, bee pollen and CAPE suppressed only the proliferation. Conclusion Among the bee products, Chinese red propolis and CAPE in particular showed strong suppressive effects against VEGF-induced angiogenesis. These findings indicate that Chinese red propolis and CAPE may have potential as preventive and therapeutic agents against angiogenesis-related human diseases.

  6. A peptide fusion protein in hibits angiogenesis and tumorgrowth by blocking VEGF binding to KDR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding to its tyrosine kinase receptors (KDR/FLK1, Flt-1) induces angiogenesis. In search of the peptides blocking VEGF binding to its receptor KDR/FLK1 to inhibit tumor- angiogenesis and growth, we screened a phage display peptide library with KDR as target protein, and some candidate peptides were isolated. In this study, we cloned the DNA fragment coding the peptide K237 from the library, into a vector pQE42 to express fusion protein DHFR-K237 in E. coli M15. The affection of fusion protein DHFR-K237 on endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis was investigated. In vitro, DHFR-K237 could completely block VEGF binding to KDR and significantly inhibit the VEGF-medi- ated proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cells. In vivo, DHFR-K237 inhibited angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioa- llantoric membrane and tumor growth in nude mice. These results suggest that K237 is an effective antagonist of VEGF binding to KDR, and could be a potential agent for cancer biotherapy.

  7. Radiation-Force Assisted Targeting Facilitates Ultrasonic Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhao

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic molecular imaging employs contrast agents, such as microbubbles, nanoparticles, or liposomes, coated with ligands specific for receptors expressed on cells at sites of angiogenesis, inflammation, or thrombus. Concentration of these highly echogenic contrast agents at a target site enhances the ultrasound signal received from that site, promoting ultrasonic detection and analysis of disease states. In this article, we show that acoustic radiation force can be used to displace targeted contrast agents to a vessel wall, greatly increasing the number of agents binding to available surface receptors. We provide a theoretical evaluation of the magnitude of acoustic radiation force and show that it is possible to displace micron-sized agents physiologically relevant distances. Following this, we show in a series of experiments that acoustic radiation force can enhance the binding of targeted agents: The number of biotinylated microbubbles adherent to a synthetic vessel coated with avidin increases as much as 20-fold when acoustic radiation force is applied; the adhesion of contrast agents targeted to αvβ3 expressed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells increases 27-fold within a mimetic vessel when radiation force is applied; and finally, the image signal-to-noise ratio in a phantom vessel increases up to 25 dB using a combination of radiation force and a targeted contrast agent, over use of a targeted contrast agent alone.

  8. Angiogenesis PET Tracer Uptake (68Ga-NODAGA-E[(cRGDyK]2 in Induced Myocardial Infarction in Minipigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rasmussen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is part of the healing process following an ischemic injury and is vital for the post-ischemic repair of the myocardium. Therefore, it is of particular interest to be able to noninvasively monitor angiogenesis. This might, not only permit risk stratification of patients following myocardial infarction, but could also facilitate development and improvement of new therapies directed towards stimulation of the angiogenic response. During angiogenesis endothelial cells must adhere to one another to form new microvessels. αvβ3 integrin has been found to be highly expressed in activated endothelial cells and has been identified as a critical modulator of angiogenesis. 68Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK]2 (RGD has recently been developed by us as an angiogenesis positron-emission-tomography (PET ligand targeted towards αvβ3 integrin. In the present study, we induced myocardial infarction in Göttingen minipigs. Successful infarction was documented by 82Rubidium-dipyridamole stress PET and computed tomography. RGD uptake was demonstrated in the infarcted myocardium one week and one month after induction of infarction by RGD-PET. In conclusion, we demonstrated angiogenesis by noninvasive imaging using RGD-PET in minipigs hearts, which resemble human hearts. The perspectives are very intriguing and might permit the evaluation of new treatment strategies targeted towards increasing the angiogenetic response, e.g., stem-cell treatment.

  9. Synthesis of a new adrenal cortex imaging agent 6. beta. -/sup 131/I-iodomethyl-19-nor cholest-5(10)-en-3. beta. -ol (NP-59)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Hetzel, K.R.; Ice, R.D.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1975-04-10

    A new adrenal cortex imaging agent, 6..beta..-/sup 131/I-iodomethyl-19-nor-cholest-5(10)-en-3..beta..-ol (NP-59) (I) was synthesized by the homallylic rearrangement of 19-iodocholesterol or directly from cholest-5-ene-3..beta.., 19-diol-19-toluene-p-sulfonate via homoallylic rearrangement with the iodide ion as a nucleophile and subsequent exchange with Na/sup 131/I. NP-59 appears to concentrate 5 times better than 19-iodocholesterol in the rat adrenal and is currently being evaluated as a possible diagnostic agent in man.

  10. Synthesis, radiosynthesis, in vitro and preliminary in vivo evaluation of biphenyl carboxylic and hydroxamic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors as potential tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: ruth.oltenfreiter@ugent.be; Staelens, Ludovicus [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Hillaert, Ulrik [Laboratory for Medicinal Chemistry, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Heremans, An; Noel, Agnes [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Frankenne, Francis [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2005-06-01

    Excess matrix degradation is one of the hallmarks of cancer and is an important factor in the process of tumor progression. It is implicated in invasion, metastasis, growth, angiogenesis and migration. Many characteristics of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) make them attractive therapeutic and diagnostic targets. MMP expression is upregulated at the tumor site, with localization of activity in the tumor or the surrounding stroma, providing a target for medical imaging techniques. Radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitors 2-(4'-[{sup 123}I] iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-methyl-butyric acid (9) and 2-(4'-[{sup 123}I] iodo-biphenyl-4-sulfonylamino)-3-methyl-butyramide (11), their unlabelled standards and precursors were synthesized. Radioiodination was conducted by electrophilic aromatic substitution of the tributylstannyl precursors and resulted in radiochemical yields of 70+/-5% (n=6) and 60+/-5% (n=4), respectively. In vitro zymography and enzyme assays showed for both hydroxamic acid and carboxylic acid compounds a good inhibition activity and a high selectivity for MMP-2. In vivo biodistribution in NMRI mice showed no long-term accumulation in organs and the possibility to accumulate in the tumor in a later phase of this study.

  11. Specific targeting of angiogenesis in lung cancer with RGD-conjugated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles using a 4.7T magnetic resonance scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Can; LIU Dong-bo; LONG Guo-xian; WANG Jun-feng; MEI Qi; HU Guang-yuan; QIU Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is an essential step for tumor development and metastasis.The cell adhesion molecule αvβ3 integrin plays an important role in angiogenesis and is a specific marker of tumor angiogenesis.A novel αvβ3 integrintargeted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging contrast agent utilizing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO) (referred to as RGD-USPIO) was designed and its uptake by endothelial cells was assessed both in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the angiogenic profile of lung cancer.Methods USPIO were coated with-NH3+ and conjugated with RGD peptides.Prussian blue staining was performed to evaluate the specific uptake of RGD-USPIO by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs).Targeted uptake and subcellular localization of RGD-USPIO in HUVECs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The ability of RGD-USPIO to noninvasively assess αvβ3 integrin positive vessels in lung adenocarcinoma A549 tumor xenografts was evaluated with a 4.7T MR scanner.Immunohistochemistry was used to detect αvβ3 integrin expression and vessel distribution in A549 tumor xenografts.Results HUVECs internalized RGD-USPIO significantly more than plain USPIO.The uptake of RGD-USPIO by HUVECs could be competitively inhibited by addition of free RGD.A significant decrease in T2 signal intensity (SI) was observed at the periphery of A549 tumor xenografts at 30 minutes (P <0.05) and 2 hours (P <0.01) after RGD-USPIO was injected via the tail vein.Angiogenic blood vessels were mainly distributed in the periphery of tumor xenografts with positive αvβ3 integrin expression.Conclusions RGD-USPIO could specifically label αvβ3 integrin and be taken up by HUVECs.This molecular MR imaging contrast agent can specifically evaluate the angiogenic profile of lung cancer using a 4.7T MR scanner.

  12. Complexity analysis of angiogenesis vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Vijay; Tyrell, James A.; Tong, Ricky T.; Brown, Edward B.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Roysam, Badrinath

    2005-04-01

    Tumor vasculature has a high degree of irregularity as compared to normal vasculature. The quantification of the morphometric complexity in tumor images can be useful in diagnosis. Also, it is desirable in several other medical applications to have an automated complexity analysis to aid in diagnosis and prognosis under treatment. e.g. in diabetic retinopathy and in arteriosclerosis. In addition, prior efforts at segmentation of the tumor vasculature using matched filtering, template matching and splines have been hampered by the irregularity of these vessels. We try to solve both problems by introducing a novel technique for vessel detection, followed by a tracing-independent complexity analysis based on a combination of ideas. First, the vessel cross-sectional profile is modeled using a continuous and everywhere differentiable family of super-Gaussian curves. This family generates rectangular profiles that can accurately localize the vessel boundaries in microvasculature images. Second, a robust non-linear regression algorithm based on M-estimators is used to estimate the parameters that optimally characterize the vessel"s shape. A framework for the quantitative analysis of the complexity of the vasculature based on the vessel detection is presented. A set of measures that quantify the complexity are proposed viz. Squared Error, Entropy-based and Minimum Description Length-based Shape Complexities. They are completely automatic and can deal with complexities of the entire vessel unlike existing tortuousity measures which deal only with vessel centerlines. The results are validated using carefully constructed phantom and real image data with ground truth information from an expert observer.

  13. Gadolinium Nanoparticles Conjugated with Therapeutic Bifunctional Chelate as a Potential T1 Theranostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Gang Ho; Jung, Ki-Hye; Jung, Jae-Chang; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Jongmin; Ryeom, Hun-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin

    2016-05-01

    This work is directed toward the synthesis of two types of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (Gd-oxide NPs), abbreviated as Gd@SiO2-DO3A and Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA, with diameters of 50-60 nm. The synthesis involves sequential coating of Gd-oxide NPs with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES), followed by functionalization of the aminopropylsilane group with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-trisacetic acid conjugates of benzothiazoles (DO3A-BTA). Gd@SiO2-DO3A and Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA exhibit high water solubility and colloidal stability. The r1 relaxivities of both Gd@SiO2-DO3A and Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA are higher than those of the corresponding low-molecular-weight magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI CAs), and their r2/r1 ratios are close to 1, indicating that both can be used as potential T1 MRI CAs. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA was excreted via both hepatobiliary and renal pathways. Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA exhibits a strong intracellular uptake property in a series of tumor cell lines, and has significant anticancer characteristics against cell lines such as SK-HEP-1, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and Hep-3B.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging with a new contrast agent for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Biasutti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Used as contrast agents for brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, markers for beta-amyloid deposits might allow early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of such a diagnostic test, MRI+CLP (contrastophore-linker-pharmacophore, should it become clinically available. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the cost-effectiveness of MRI+CLP to that of standard diagnosis using currently available cognition tests and of standard MRI, and investigated the impact of a hypothetical treatment efficient in early AD. The primary analysis was based on the current French context for 70-year-old patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI. In alternative "screen and treat" scenarios, we analyzed the consequences of systematic screenings of over-60 individuals (either population-wide or restricted to the ApoE4 genotype population. We used a Markov model of AD progression; model parameters, as well as incurred costs and quality-of-life weights in France were taken from the literature. We performed univariate and probabilistic multivariate sensitivity analyses. The base-case preferred strategy was the standard MRI diagnosis strategy. In the primary analysis however, MRI+CLP could become the preferred strategy under a wide array of scenarios involving lower cost and/or higher sensitivity or specificity. By contrast, in the "screen and treat" analyses, the probability of MRI+CLP becoming the preferred strategy remained lower than 5%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is thought that anti-beta-amyloid compounds might halt the development of dementia in early stage patients. This study suggests that, even should such treatments become available, systematically screening the over-60 population for AD would only become cost-effective with highly specific tests able to diagnose early stages of the disease. However, offering a new diagnostic test based on beta-amyloid markers to elderly patients with MCI might prove

  15. Targeting angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms using combined polymer therapeutics.

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    Ehud Segal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an immense clinical need for novel therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms such as osteosarcomas and bone metastases. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target bone metastases and calcified neoplasms using combined polymer-bound angiogenesis inhibitors. Using an advanced "living polymerization" technique, the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT, we conjugated the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALN, and the potent anti-angiogenic agent TNP-470 with N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA copolymer through a Glycine-Glycine-Proline-Norleucine linker, cleaved by cathepsin K, a cysteine protease overexpressed at resorption sites in bone tissues. In this approach, dual targeting is achieved. Passive accumulation is possible due to the increase in molecular weight following polymer conjugation of the drugs, thus extravasating from the tumor leaky vessels and not from normal healthy vessels. Active targeting to the calcified tissues is achieved by ALN's affinity to bone mineral. METHODS AND FINDING: The anti-angiogenic and antitumor potency of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We show that free and conjugated ALN-TNP-470 have synergistic anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity by inhibiting proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial and human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Evaluation of anti-angiogenic, antitumor activity and body distribution of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was performed on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID male mice inoculated with mCherry-labeled MG-63-Ras human osteosarcoma and by modified Miles permeability assay. Our targeted bi-specific conjugate reduced VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability by 92% and remarkably inhibited osteosarcoma growth in mice by 96%. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report to describe a new concept of a narrowly-dispersed combined

  16. Age-related macular degeneration: beyond anti-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David L

    2014-01-06

    Recently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies for neovascular age-related macular degeneration have been developed. These agents, originally developed for their anti-angiogenic mechanism of action, probably also work through an anti-permeability effect in preventing or reducing the amount of leakage from submacular neovascular tissue. Other treatment modalities include laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin, and submacular surgery. In reality, these latter treatments can be similarly categorized as anti-angiogenic because their sole aim is destroying or removing choroidal neovascularization (CNV). At the cellular level, CNV resembles stereotypical tissue repair that consists of several matricellular components in addition to neovascularization. In the retina, the clinical term CNV is a misnomer since the term may more appropriately be referred to as aberrant submacular repair. Furthermore, CNV raises a therapeutic conundrum: To complete or correct any reparative process in the body, angiogenesis becomes an essential component. Anti-angiogenic therapy, in all its guises, arrests repair and causes the hypoxic environment to persist, thus fueling pro-angiogenesis and further development of CNV as a component of aberrant repair. However, we realize that anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy preserves vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration, albeit temporarily and therefore, repeated treatment is needed. More importantly, however, anti-angiogenic therapy demonstrates that we can at the very least tolerate neovascular tissue beneath the macula and preserve vision in contrast to our historical approach of total vascular destruction. In this clinical scenario, it may be possible to look beyond anti-angiogenesis if our goal is facilitating submacular repair without destroying the neurosensory retina. Thus, in this situation of neovascular tolerance, it may be timely to consider treatments that facilitate

  17. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Azizian, Gholamreza; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Haghgoo, Soheila; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Zohdiaghdam, Reza; Rafiei, Behrooz; Gorji, Ensieh

    2012-01-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was o...

  18. Advances and challenges in skeletal muscle angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olfert, I Mark; Baum, Oliver; Hellsten, Ylva;

    2016-01-01

    during health, but poorly controlled in disease - resulting in either excessive capillary growth (pathological angiogenesis) or losses in capillarity (rarefaction). Given that skeletal muscle comprises nearly 40% of body mass in humans, skeletal muscle capillary density has a significant impact...... on metabolism, endocrine function, and locomotion, and is tightly regulated at many different levels. Skeletal muscle is also high adaptable, and thus one of the few organ systems which can be experimentally manipulated (e.g. by exercise) to study physiologic regulation of angiogenesis. This review will focus...... on 1) the methodological concerns that have arisen in determining skeletal muscle capillarity, and 2) highlight the concepts that are reshaping our understanding of the angio-adaptation process. We also summarize selected new findings (physical influences, molecular changes and ultrastructural...

  19. Toll-Like Receptors in Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Grote

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are known as pattern-recognition receptors related to the Toll protein of Drosophila. After recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of microbial origin, the TLRs alert the immune system, and initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. The TLR system, though, is not confined solely to the leukocyte-mediated immune defense against exogenous pathogens. Besides myeloid cells, TLR expression has been reported in multiple tissues and cell types, including epithelial and endothelial cells. Moreover, despite the microbial patterns that are commonly accepted as TLR ligands, there is increasing evidence that TLRs also recognize host-derived molecules. In this regard, recent studies point to an involvement of TLRs in various chronic inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and even cancer. A common feature of these disorders is an enhanced so-called inflammation-induced angiogenesis. However, inflammation-induced angiogenesis is not solely a key component of pathogen defense during acute infection or chronic inflammatory disorders, but also plays a critical role in repair mechanisms, e.g., wound healing and subsequent tissue regeneration. Interestingly, the latest research could coincidentally demonstrate that TLR activation promotes angiogenesis in various inflammatory settings in response to both exogenous and endogenous ligands, although the precise mode of action of TLRs in this context still remains ambiguous. The objective of this review is to present evidence for the implication of TLRs in angiogenesis during physiological and pathophysiological processes, and the potential clinical relevance for new treatment regimes involving TLR modulation.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Farjami Shayesteh, Saber; Heidari, Zahra; Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION-BBN in human blood serum. DSPION-BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION-BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T2-weighted and T2*-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION-BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T2*-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors.