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Sample records for anger

  1. Learn to manage your anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controlling Your Anger Before it Controls You. www.apa.org/topics/anger/control.aspx . Accessed September 18, ... Psychologist Can Help You Manage Your Anger. www.apa.org/topics/anger/help.aspx . Accessed April 28, ...

  2. Learn to manage your anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Anger can put a strain on your relationships or cause problems at school or work. Anger management can help ... Find ways to relax . Learning to relax your body and mind can help you calm down. There are many ...

  3. Anger Management and Factors that Influence Anger in Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Koçer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are limited data regarding anger and its management with respect to physicians and many other professionals. Our objective was to evaluate anger expression and control in physicians. Material and Methods: The physicians of the Düzce School of Medicine were the participants in the study. Physicians were assigned to either an internal medicine or a surgery study group. Each group contained physicians from several specialties. The Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, and the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories were administered to all participants. The physicians (n=158 were evaluated and compared with controls (n=105 in terms of anger control and sociodemographic variables. Results: Anger-control scores were higher in physicians (p<0.01 and in those who willingly chose the medical profession (p<0.05. Age, number of years as a physician, and the specialty were negatively correlated with anger management in physicians working in the surgical disciplines (p<0.01. Only Beck anxiety and depression scores were positively correlated with anger-trait scores and anger-in scores for physicians working in the internal medicine disciplines (p<0.01.Conclusion: Physicians were relatively successful in coping with anger. A willingness to choose the medical profession was a factor influencing anger control. Age was the major factor affecting anger management in physicians.

  4. Guilt, Anger, and Retribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    those who do not. I shall argue that (a) is false on empirical grounds; and that there are no particularly good reasons to believe (b). Finally, I will consider and reject the claim that anger, as opposed to guilt, can afford the type of epistemic justification needed by positive retributivism...

  5. ANGER MANAGEMENT AMONG STUDENTS

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    SUDARSHAN DEVIDAS KHAPARDE

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The health of mind and body are unquestionably interrelated as both positive and negative emotions have a tremendous ability to affect the quality of our life emotions are powerful forces influencing our everyday affairs. From the time we join the nursery class, our educational system focuses on making us intellectuals and shaping us good products for the job markets. In fact, no emphasis is laid in our curriculum on teaching children to manage their anxiety, anger, inner conflicts and emotions, learning to manage emotions can ensure achievement of mental and physical serenity. In anger child may refuse to go school, to eat to play and to talk. He may complain of different problems, may fight with others, may be unable to sleep and become a problem child. If not managed properly these students may become slaves to anger, crying and aggression. On the other hand, students who know how to manage their emotions will be successful. High intelligence will be of no use to those who lack this skill and who may and up with less self respect and poor self awareness. Cognitive ability is not the sole critical determinant of our life. One also needs good communication and interpersonal skills which one can acquire only through anger management. We parents, teachers and social workers, can play a vital role in helping students handle their anger and develop emotional security with fair and consistent limits and responsibilities. There are several ways through which we can effectively help students to understand their emotions, recognize the feeling of others, differentiate between feelings and actions, act in more acceptable ways and most importantly be good role models for our little ones. Each one teach one is a good policy.

  6. Topiramate for anger control: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese Bindu; Rajeev A; Norrish Mark; Al Khusaiby Saleh

    2010-01-01

    Background : Uncontrolled anger while being most commonly associated with personality disorders could also be part of many other conditions such as chronic low back ache and post-traumatic stress disorder. The intensity of anger as an emotional state at a particular time is known as "State Anger," whereas how often angry feelings are experienced over time is known as "Trait Anger." Anger could also manifest as expression of anger toward other persons or objects in the environment (Anger-Out),...

  7. Anger Management and Factors that Influence Anger in Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Koçer; Abdulkadir Koçer; Fatih Canan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There are limited data regarding anger and its management with respect to physicians and many other professionals. Our objective was to evaluate anger expression and control in physicians. Material and Methods: The physicians of the Düzce School of Medicine were the participants in the study. Physicians were assigned to either an internal medicine or a surgery study group. Each group contained physicians from several specialties. The Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Invento...

  8. Anger Management and Factors that Influence Anger in Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Koçer, Emel; Koçer, Abdulkadir; Canan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There are limited data regarding anger and its management with respect to physicians and many other professionals. Our objective was to evaluate anger expression and control in physicians. Material and Methods: The physicians of the Düzce School of Medicine were the participants in the study. Physicians were assigned to either an internal medicine or a surgery study group. Each group contained physicians from several specialties. The Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expressi...

  9. Understanding Anger: Managing This Constant Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the psychology of anger as a basis for dealing with anger-related problems that arise at camp. Camp staff may have problems with anger that are not identified by staff screening. The camp staff manual should contain a written policy regarding overt displays of anger. Guidelines suggest the use of anger during conflict resolution. (CDS)

  10. The Metacognitive Anger Processing (MAP) Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum

    2015-01-01

    preliminary studies was to apply a metacognitive framework to anger and put forward a new anger self-report scale, the Metacognitive Anger Processing (MAP) scale, intended as a supplement to existing measures of anger disposition and to enhance anger treatment targets. METHOD: The new measure was tested in a...... nonclinical and a clinical sample together with measures of anger and metacognition to establish factor structure, reliability, concurrent, and convergent validity. RESULTS: The MAP showed a reliable factor structure with three factors - Positive Beliefs about anger, Negative Beliefs about anger, and...... Rumination; good internal reliability, and test-retest reliability. The subscales showed positive correlations with anger and the pattern of correlation with the general metacognitive measure supported the idea that the MAP represents dimensions of metacognition as it relates to anger. CONCLUSIONS: The...

  11. Anger and health risk behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Staicu, ML; Cuţov, M

    2010-01-01

    The present paper makes a research about negative effects of anger and hostile conduct on peoples' health status. We have studied scientific articles published between 2000 and 2010, that did not contradict our initial assumption. The literature demonstrates that anger, wheatear suppressed or expressed, can determine various diseases, it can influence the conduct of people suffering from bulimia nervosa or it can be the cause of the growing number of car accidents. In order to avoid these ris...

  12. Anger profiles in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versella, Mark V; Piccirillo, Marilyn L; Potter, Carrie M; Olino, Thomas M; Heimberg, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) exhibit elevated levels of anger and anger suppression, which are both associated with increased depression, diminished quality of life, and poorer treatment outcomes. However, little is known about how anger experiences differ among individuals with SAD and whether any heterogeneity might relate to negative outcomes. This investigation sought to empirically define anger profiles among 136 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD and to assess their association with distress and impairment. A latent class analysis was conducted utilizing the trait subscales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 as indicators of class membership. Analysis revealed four distinct anger profiles, with greatest distress and impairment generally demonstrated by individuals with elevated trait anger, a greater tendency to suppress the expression of anger, and diminished ability to adaptively control their anger expression. These results have implications for tailoring more effective interventions for socially anxious individuals. PMID:26590429

  13. Trait Anger, Anger Expression, and Suicide Attempts among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Stephanie S.; Goldston, David B.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Franklin, Joseph C.; Mayfield, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the relationship between anger, anger expression, and suicidal behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed findings. In a prospective, naturalistic study, we examined how trait anger and anger expression influenced the likelihood of suicide attempts among 180 adolescents followed for up to 13.3 years after…

  14. Considering anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective

    OpenAIRE

    R.J.R. Blair

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to consider anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Five main claims are made: First, reactive aggression is the ultimate behavioral expression of anger and thus we can begin to understand anger by understanding reactive aggression. Second, neural systems implicated in reactive aggression (amygdala, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray; the basic threat system) are critically implicated in anger. Factors such as exposure to extreme threat that increase the r...

  15. The Impact of Anger on Sexual Satisfaction in Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Claude; Laughrea, Kathleen; Lafontaine, Marie-France

    2001-01-01

    Explored the effect of different forms of anger (state anger, trait anger, and anger expression) on sexual satisfaction in marriage, noting differences between the genders. Data on 192 French-Canadian heterosexual couples recruited from clinical and non-clinical populations highlighted several links between anger and sexual satisfaction as well as…

  16. Social support, social comparison, and anger

    OpenAIRE

    Murat İskender; Taşkın Tanrıkulu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of social support, social comparison, anger and anger expression. Participants were 258 high school students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Multidimensional Scale for Social Support, the Social Comparison Scale, and the State-Trait Anger Scale. The hypothesis model was tested correlational analysis. According to results social support was related positively to social comparison. Also social comparison was rel...

  17. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Anita Dingle

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency has yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18 to 34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 minutes of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 minutes of silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive a...

  18. Considering anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, R J R

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to consider anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Five main claims are made: First, reactive aggression is the ultimate behavioral expression of anger and thus we can begin to understand anger by understanding reactive aggression. Second, neural systems implicated in reactive aggression (amygdala, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray; the basic threat system) are critically implicated in anger. Factors such as exposure to extreme threat that increase the responsiveness of these systems, should be (and are in the context of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), associated with increased anger. Third, regions of frontal cortex implicated in regulating the basic threat system, when dysfunctional (e.g., in the context of lesions) should be associated with increased anger. Fourth, frustration occurs when an individual continues to do an action in the expectation of a reward but does not actually receive that reward, and is associated with anger. Individuals who show impairment in the ability to alter behavioral responding when actions no longer receive their expected rewards should be (and are in the context of psychopathy) associated with increased anger. Fifth, someone not doing what another person wants them to do (particularly if this thwarts the person's goal) is frustrating and consequently anger inducing. The response to such a frustrating social event relies on the neural architecture implicated in changing behavioral responses in non-social frustrating situations. PMID:22267973

  19. Anger attacks in obsessive compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh Prakash Painuly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research on anger attacks has been mostly limited to depression, and only a few studies have focused on anger attacks in obsessive compulsive disorder. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study all new obsessive compulsive disorder patients aged 20-60 years attending an outpatient clinic were assessed using the anger attack questionnaire, irritability, depression and anxiety scale (for the direction of the aggressive behavior and quality of life (QOL. Results: The sample consisted of 42 consecutive subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder, out of which 21 (50% had anger attacks. The obsessive compulsive disorder subjects with and without anger attacks did not show significant differences in terms of sociodemographic variables, duration of illness, treatment, and family history. However, subjects with anger attacks had significantly higher prevalence of panic attacks and comorbid depression. Significantly more subjects with anger attacks exhibited aggressive acts toward spouse, parents, children, and other relatives in the form of yelling and threatening to hurt, trying to hurt, and threatening to leave. However, the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of QOL, except for the psychological domain being worse in the subjects with anger attacks. Conclusion: Anger attacks are present in half of the patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, and they correlate with the presence of comorbid depression.

  20. Topiramate for anger control: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Bindu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Uncontrolled anger while being most commonly associated with personality disorders could also be part of many other conditions such as chronic low back ache and post-traumatic stress disorder. The intensity of anger as an emotional state at a particular time is known as "State Anger," whereas how often angry feelings are experienced over time is known as "Trait Anger." Anger could also manifest as expression of anger toward other persons or objects in the environment (Anger-Out, holding in or suppressing angry feelings (Anger-In and controlling angry feelings by preventing the expression of anger toward other persons or objects in the environment or controlling suppressed angry feelings by calming down or cooling off (Anger Control. Objective : To prove the effectiveness of topiramate in the control of anger as compared to placebo and to disprove that its use leads to psychiatric adverse events by systematically reviewing the available randomized controlled trials. Materials and Methods : The basic search was performed in MEDLINE (1966 through November 2008 combined with the optimal search strategy for randomized controlled trials described in the Cochrane Reviewers′ Handbook. To update this search, we regularly screened citations from PubMed till November 2008 for eligible studies or reviews that might include eligible studies. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL was searched using the terms "topiramate" and "anger or aggression." In addition, we screened bibliographies of reviews and identified articles. Randomized clinical trials wherein study participants were aggressive adults were included. Results : We could arrive at a weighted mean difference of -3.16 (-3.64 to -2.68 in State Anger. The reduction in the score was highest in borderline personality disorder (BPD patients as compared to those with low back ache. Trait Anger dropped by -2.93 (-3.49 to -2.37, especially in female BPD patients. Anger In

  1. Do episodes of anger trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, J; Hallqvist, J; Diderichsen, Finn;

    1999-01-01

    Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility.......Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility....

  2. Transdiagnostic cognitive processes in high trait anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John M

    2011-03-01

    Trait anger is a personality construct that refers to stable individual differences in the propensity to experience anger as an emotional state. The objective of this paper is to review relevant empirical studies in order to determine whether the transdiagnostic cognitive processes that have been identified across the DSM-IV Axis I disorders (specifically, selective attention, memory biases, reasoning biases and recurrent negative thinking) are also an underlying characteristic of high trait anger. On the basis of the review it is concluded that, whilst the research base is limited, there is good evidence that high trait anger is associated with selective attention to hostile social cues, the tendency to interpret the behaviour of others as indicating potential hostility and the tendency to ruminate over past anger-provoking experiences. The range of cognitive processes identified in high trait anger is consistent with those identified in the Axis I disorders. It is concluded that these findings provide support for (i) the broad applicability of the transdiagnostic approach as a theoretical framework for understanding a range of psychological conditions, not limited to the Axis I disorders, and (ii) the validity of conceptualising high trait anger as an aspect of personality functioning that is maintained, at least in part, by cognitive processes. Cognitive and motivational factors (specifically, beliefs and goals) that may underlie the hostile information-processing biases and recurrent negative thinking associated with high trait anger are discussed, and consideration is given to the clinical relevance of the findings of the review. PMID:21094569

  3. Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  4. RORSCHACH SPACE RESPONSES AND ANGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Anna Maria; Chiorri, Carlo; Denevi, Simona

    2015-08-01

    In this study, three different subtypes of Space responses to the Rorschach test were hypothesized: S-fusion, S-reversal, and S-integration. The relationship between these subtypes and feelings of anger and aggression was investigated. The Rorschach test, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were administered to 50 university students. Scores on the STAXI-2 were positively associated with S-fusion and negatively associated with S-integration. No significant associations of S subtypes with aggression were found. The findings support the hypothesis that different figure-ground relationships, shown in the subtypes of S responses, indicate different psychological processes. PMID:26107109

  5. Anger in School Managers: Continuity, Direction, Control and Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Mustafa; Iskender, Murat; Cardak, Mehmet; Dusunceli, Betul

    2012-01-01

    School managers undertake an important duty in structuring of education institutions. In the study carried out in this context; anger conditions, continuity, and direction of anger, anger control levels and anger styles of school managers who are the decision makers in schools were examined according to the ages, working periods, duty types, ways…

  6. The Ways of Religious Coping With Anger

    OpenAIRE

    YEĞİN, Hüseyin İbrahim

    2010-01-01

    Negative thoughts and behaviors accompanying the sense of anger adversely affect our psychological and social life. In this context, while psychology helps us in in dealing and coping with the feelings of anger to find solutions, religion shows us to tackle the same problem from a different angle. In this study, the psychological aspect of anger, which is one of basic human emotion, and the ways of dealing with it from a religious point of view are examined. It is to be noted that, in coping...

  7. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheshin Arik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n=38 were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n=80 & n=144. Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff’s fear level. Staff’s responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients’ requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff’s response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  8. Analysis of anger expression style--continuous anger and personality types of professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Sahan, Hasan; Tekin, Murat; Ulukan, Mehmet; Mehtap, Bekir

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the anger expression styles, the continuous anger and personality types of players who play football in the professional league. The research group consisted of 133 soccer players who are playing in sports teams in the Turkish Super League: Ankara Sport Club, Gençlerbirliği Sports Club and Hacettepe Sports Club in the first league, Turk Telekom sports in the second league, and Keçiören Gücü Sports and Ankarademir Sports playing in the third league in the 2008-2009 football season. The Eysenck personality inventory was modified to Turkish by Bayar in 1983, having been developed by Eysenck and Eysenck in 1975 and the continuous anger-anger style scale (SOTO) was modified to Turkish by Ozer in 1994. The state trait anger scale (STAS) was originally developed by Spielberger in 1983. All these were used on soccer players participating in the study to determine the continuous anger and anger styles in this study. In the interpretation of data, a meaningfulness of p extrovert, neurotic, false). In addition, a significant relationship was found between psychoticism, extrovert, neurotic, and lie sub-dimensions and the personality type sub-dimensions of professional players' constant anger-anger expression styles. PMID:22397242

  9. How Can I Deal with My Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... angry. Tools to Tame a Temper: Self-Awareness & Self-Control Because anger can be powerful, managing it is ... challenging. It takes plenty of self-awareness and self-control to manage angry feelings. And these skills take ...

  10. Customer Anger and Incentives for Quality Provision

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Heyes; Sandeep Kapur

    2012-01-01

    Emotions are a significant determinant of consumer behaviour. A customer may get angry if he feels that he is being treated unfairly by his supplier and that anger may make him more likely to switch to an alternative provider. We model the strategic interaction between firms that choose quality levels and anger-prone customers who pick their supplier based on their expectations of suppliers' quality. Strategic interaction can allow for multiple equilibria including some in which no firm inves...

  11. Self-report of anger in repressors

    OpenAIRE

    HYNEK, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is focused on repressive coping style and self-reports of the anger. In the theoretical part are elaborated chapters concerning the definition of emotion, emotion regulation, coping and repressive coping style. The Repressors are characterized by unconscious denial of their own anxiety and self-image distortion within the low susceptibility to negative emotions. The research study focuses on the expression of anger by repressors and their comparison with other groups. Respondents (...

  12. Aggression, anger and violence in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    M.J. Masango

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the roots of aggression, anger and violence in South Africa and the rest of the world. The paper is divided into four parts: Aggression, Anger, Catharsis and Violence. As a result of violence against other human beings, especially women and children, a profound respect for human dignity has been lost. People have become extremely aggressive. The last few decades have created a culture of violence because of the suppression or oppression of feelings. The article argues that...

  13. Aggression, anger and violence in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Masango

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the roots of aggression, anger and violence in South Africa and the rest of the world. The paper is divided into four parts: Aggression, Anger, Catharsis and Violence. As a result of violence against other human beings, especially women and children, a profound respect for human dignity has been lost. People have become extremely aggressive. The last few decades have created a culture of violence because of the suppression or oppression of feelings. The article argues that frustration yields anger that leads to violent acts. The root cause of violence is frustration, which finally (if not attended to produces anger, anxiety, conflict and the eruption of violence. Suicide bombers in Palestine and other parts of the world demonstrate this type of aggression, anger and violence. Anger, on the one hand, is a good defense mechanism. It helps people cope with frustration. Violence, on the other hand, is used as a means of dominance, especially against women and children. In a political situation it is used as a means of changing social structures.

  14. Extreme metal music and anger processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Anita Dingle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency has yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18 to 34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 minutes of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 minutes of silence (control. Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS. Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier rather it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners.

  15. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Leah; Dingle, Genevieve A

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger, and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency have yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18-34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 min of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 min silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased) in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier; rather, it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners. PMID:26052277

  16. Anger perceptually and conceptually narrows cognitive scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2015-07-01

    For the last 50 years, research investigating the effect of emotions on scope of cognitive processing was based on models proposing that affective valence determined cognitive scope. More recently, our motivational intensity model suggests that this past work had confounded valence with motivational intensity. Research derived from this model supports the idea that motivational intensity, rather than affective valence, explains much of the variance emotions have on cognitive scope. However, the motivational intensity model is limited in that the empirical work has examined only positive affects high in approach and negative affects high in avoidance motivation. Thus, perhaps only approach-positive and avoidance-negative states narrow cognitive scope. The present research was designed to clarify these conceptual issues by examining the effect of anger, a negatively valenced approach-motivated state, on cognitive scope. Results revealed that anger narrowed attentional scope relative to a neutral state and that attentional narrowing to anger was similar to the attentional narrowing caused by high approach-motivated positive affects (Study 1). This narrowing of attention was related to trait approach motivation (Studies 2 and Study 3). Anger also narrowed conceptual cognitive categorization (Study 4). Narrowing of categorization related to participants' approach motivation toward anger stimuli. Together, these results suggest that anger, an approach-motivated negative affect, narrows perceptual and conceptual cognitive scope. More broadly, these results support the conceptual model that motivational intensity per se, rather than approach-positive and avoidance-negative states, causes a narrowing of cognitive scope. PMID:26011662

  17. Experience and expression of anger among Australian prisoners and the relationship between anger and reintegration variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkfield, Alison J; Graffam, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    We examined the experience and expression of anger among a group of Australian prisoners prior to and following prison release, as well as the relationship between anger and several reintegration variables. Participants were 79 adult prisoners (54 male, 25 female) who completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI-2) 1 month prior to release and again at 1 to 4 weeks and 3 to 4 months post-release. A postrelease questionnaire was also administered at the two postrelease points focusing on the quality of life conditions experienced following release. Mean state and trait anger scores were significantly higher at pre-release than post-release. As well, higher levels of anger expression and anger control were reported at pre-release compared with post-release. Higher age was related to lower state anger at post-release, whereas several variables were related to trait anger at post-release. Theoretical implications for reintegration theory are discussed, together with practical applications. PMID:23267242

  18. Examining Player Anger in World of Warcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jane; Coulson, Mark; Foreman, Nigel

    This questionnaire study of the sources of anger in World of Warcraft applies classical quantitative measurement scale construction to a new problem, generating a host of questionnaire items that could find use in future studies, and identifying four major categories of events that cause negative effect among players. First, 33 players provided examples of in-game scenarios that had made them angry, and their responses were culled to create a 93-item battery rated by hundreds of player respondents in terms of anger intensity and anger frequency. An iterative process of factor analysis and scale reliability assessment led to a 28-item instrument measuring four anger-provoking factors: Raids/Instances, Griefers, Perceived Time Wasting, and Anti-social Players. These anger-causing scenarios were then illustrated by concrete examples from player and researcher experiences in World of Warcraft. One striking finding is that players become angry at other players' negative behavior, regardless of whether that behavior was intended to harm.

  19. Is cyberbullying related to trait or state anger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigro, Antonia; Schneider, Barry H; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto; Pallini, Susanna; Brunner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Anger is a powerful emotion shared by victims and bullies in both physical and electronic forms of bullying. However, little is known about the specific roles of trait anger and state anger in involvement in bullying episodes. The purpose of this study was to verify which component of anger, trait or state, is more strongly related to physical and cyberbullying and victimization. Students between the ages 11-19 (N = 716, 392 female, 324 male) completed the state trait anger expression inventory-2 child and adolescent and a measure of victimization and bullying. Results for cyberbullying suggested a major vulnerability among bullies and victims to experience anger as a personality trait as well some links between state anger, cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Moreover, the outward, explosive expression of anger appears to be common among cyber and physical bullies. Implications for intervention programs are discussed. PMID:25081097

  20. The impact of music on affect during anger inducing drives

    OpenAIRE

    Zwaag, M. van der; Fairclough, S.; Spiridon, E.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Driver anger could be potentially harmful for road safety and long-term health. Because of its mood inducing properties, music is assumed to be a potential medium that could prevent anger induction duringdriving. In the current study the influence of music on anger, mood, skin conductance, and systolic blood pressure was investigated during anger inducing scenarios in a driving simulator. 100 participants were split into five groups: four listened to different types of music (high/ low energy...

  1. Cognitive-Behavioral Conceptualization and Treatment of Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Anger is conceptualized within a broad cognitive-behavioral (CBT) framework emphasizing triggering events; the person's pre-anger state, including temporary conditions and more enduring cognitive and familial/cultural processes; primary and secondary appraisal processes; the anger experience/response (cognitive, emotional, and physiological…

  2. The impact of music on affect during anger inducing drives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaag, M. van der; Fairclough, S.; Spiridon, E.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Driver anger could be potentially harmful for road safety and long-term health. Because of its mood inducing properties, music is assumed to be a potential medium that could prevent anger induction duringdriving. In the current study the influence of music on anger, mood, skin conductance, and systo

  3. Driving anger and its expressions: further evidence of validity and reliability for the driving anger expression inventory french adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    VILLIEUX, A; Delhomme, P.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide further evidence of validity and reliability for the Driving Anger Expression Inventory (DAX) French adaptation (Villieux & Delhomme, 2008, Le Travail Humain, 71(4), 359-384) and to investigate the relationships between driving anger, how people express their anger while driving, and traffic violations among young drivers in France. Method: The French adaptations of the DAX, of the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), and of the Extended Violations Scale were admi...

  4. The art of anger: reward context turns avoidance responses to anger-related objects into approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Henk; Ruys, Kirsten I; Veling, Harm; Renes, Robert A; de Groot, Jasper H B; van Nunen, Anna M; Geertjes, Sarit

    2010-10-01

    Anger has a special status among the emotions in that it can elicit avoidance as well as approach motivation. This study tested the ignored role of reward context in potentiating approach rather than avoidance responses toward objects associated with anger. In Experiment 1, angry and neutral facial expressions were parafoveally paired with common objects, and responses to the objects were assessed by subjective reports of motivation to obtain them. In Experiment 2, objects were again paired with angry or neutral faces outside of participants' awareness, and responses toward the objects were indexed by physical effort expended in attempting to win them. Results showed that approach motivation toward anger-related objects can be observed when responding is framed in terms of rewards that one can obtain, whereas avoidance motivation occurs in the absence of such a reward context. These findings point to the importance of a reward context in modulating people's responses to anger. PMID:20855898

  5. Anger Management in Parent-Adolescent Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an outcome investigation of the role of anger management in parent-adolescent conflict. Eighteen parent-adolescent dyads were randomly assigned either to a conflict resolution group treatment or combined conflict management and conflict resolution group treatment. Findings suggest that the combination treatment group parents and teens…

  6. Application of Trait Anger and Anger Expression Styles Scale New Modelling on University Students from Various Social and Cultural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in anger traits of university students and teacher candidates studying in various social and cultural regions, of Batman and Denizli, Turkey. Modelling anger and anger expression style scale according to some variables such as age, gender, education level, number of siblings, parents'…

  7. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  8. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Qu

    Full Text Available Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings.

  9. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel S. Karp, principal investigator

    2004-12-14

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  10. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  11. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Todd E [Institute of Imaging Science, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Department of Physics, and Program in Chemical and Physical Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Furenlid, Lars R, E-mail: todd.e.peterson@vanderbilt.edu [Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging, Department of Radiology, and College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-09-07

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. (topical review)

  12. Exploring relationships among anger, perceived organizational support, and workplace outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Olivia A; Vandenberg, Robert J; Dejoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G

    2009-07-01

    The present study examines anger within a perceived organizational support (POS) theory framework. Using structural equation modeling, the authors explored relationships among POS, anger, and workplace outcomes in a sample of 1,136 employees in 21 stores of a U.S. retail organization. At both individual and store levels, low POS was directly associated with greater anger. At the individual level, anger partially mediated relationships among low POS and turnover intentions, absences, and accidents on the job. Anger had direct and indirect effects on alcohol consumption and health-related risk taking. At the store level, anger had direct negative effects on inventory loss and turnover. The authors interpret these findings in light of social exchange theory and emotion regulation theory. PMID:19586225

  13. Anger in psychological disorders: Prevalence, presentation, etiology and prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ephrem; Johnson, Sheri L

    2016-06-01

    Anger is present as a key criterion in five diagnoses within DSM-5: Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder. This review amasses scientific literature demonstrating that within each of these disorders, anger is a central clinical feature that is highly prevalent and predictive of important outcomes. For each disorder, we also discuss the phenomenology and etiology of anger. Although models of anger have been quite distinct across these disorders, few empirical studies have truly tested whether anger stems from different etiological factors across these different conditions. We end with a discussion of transdiagnostic research that draws from cognitive psychology, affective science, and the neuroscience of anger, and that also fits with integrative approaches to treatment. PMID:27188635

  14. Analysis of Anger Expression Style – Continuous Anger and Personality Types of Professional Soccer Players

    OpenAIRE

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Hasan ŞAHAN; Tekin, Murat; Ulukan, Mehmet; MEHTAP, Bekir

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the anger expression styles, the continuous anger and personality types of players who play football in the professional league. The research group consisted of 133 soccer players who are playing in sports teams in the Turkish Super League: Ankara Sport Club, Gençlerbirliði Sports Club and Hacettepe Sports Club in the first league, Turk Telekom sports in the second league, and Keçiören Gücü Sports and Ankarademir Sports playing in the third...

  15. ANGER CORRELATED WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL VARIABLES IN RURAL YOUTH

    OpenAIRE

    Puskar, Kathryn; Ren, Dianxu; Bernardo, Lisa Marie; Haley, Tammy; Hetager Stark, Kirsti

    2008-01-01

    Uncontrolled anger is a contributing force in the three leading causes of adolescent death: homicide, suicide, and injuries. Anger may be one of the early warning signs which could lead to violent behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between anger experience and expression with the potential correlates of life events, perceived social support, self-esteem, optimism, drug use, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in rural adolescents. The participants (n=193) were ag...

  16. From Chaos to Calm understanding Anger in Urban Adolescent Males

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, June M.

    2010-01-01

    From Chaos to Calm Understanding Anger in Urban Adolescent Males by June Mardell Montgomery (ABSTRACT) This work is based on the premise that uncontrolled anger contributes to the violence committed by adolescent boys 13-17 years of age. In fact, in all countries, young males are both the principal perpetrators and victims of homicide (World Health Organization, 2002). Identifying the underlying reasons for the anger is instrumental in controlling this emotion and in develop...

  17. Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Claire A. J. Bloxsom; Christopher Marsh,; Clive R. Hollin

    2011-01-01

    The association between anger and criminal, particularly violent, behaviour is firmly established in the literature. However, most of the extant research has been conducted with clinical and legally sanctioned forensic populations. The present study sought to examine anger in a non forensic population using a self-report measure of delinquency. The Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI; Novaco, 2003) and the Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire (Elliot & Ageton, 1980) were com...

  18. The Role Of Socialization Process In The Creation Of Gender Differences In Anger

    OpenAIRE

    ÜNAL, Halime

    2004-01-01

    There is a general belief that women do not express their anger as men do. Contrary to this general belief, this paper argues that women express their anger but they express it differently. Previous research has indicated that there are important gender differences in expression of anger and anger provoking situations. For example, women generally have expressed their anger through indirect ways (e.g. verbal aggression) while men have expressed their anger through physical aggression. After d...

  19. Anger and assaultiveness of male forensic patients with developmental disabilities : links to volatile parents

    OpenAIRE

    Novaco, Raymond; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    This study with 107 male forensic patients with developmental disabilities investigated whether exposure to parental anger and aggression was related to anger and assaultiveness in a hospital, controlling for background variables. Patient anger and aggression were assessed by self-report, staff-ratings, and archival records. Exposure to parental anger/aggression, assessed by a clinical interview, was significantly related to patient self-reported anger, staff-rated anger and aggression, and p...

  20. Dalbybogen / The Dalby Book. Angersfragmentet / The Angers Fragment. Hamburgbibelen / The Hamburg Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Dalbybogen / The Dalby Book; Angersfragmentet / The Angers Fragment; Hamburgbibelen / The Hamburg Bible......Dalbybogen / The Dalby Book; Angersfragmentet / The Angers Fragment; Hamburgbibelen / The Hamburg Bible...

  1. The interpersonal effects of anger and happines in negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. van Kleef; C.K.W. de Dreu

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the interpersonal effects of anger and happiness in negotiations. In the course of a computer-mediated negotiation, participants received information about the emotional state (anger, happiness, or none) of their opponent. Consistent with a strategic-choice perspective

  2. Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. J. Bloxsom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between anger and criminal, particularly violent, behaviour is firmly established in the literature. However, most of the extant research has been conducted with clinical and legally sanctioned forensic populations. The present study sought to examine anger in a non forensic population using a self-report measure of delinquency. The Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI; Novaco, 2003 and the Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire (Elliot & Ageton, 1980 were completed by male and female university students. The total anger score was associated with overall delinquency and specifically with crimes against the person and against property. Males reported higher levels of anger and a greater involvement in criminal acts. The practical implications of the findings within a legal context are discussed.

  3. Bicultural adolescents' anger regulation: in between two cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novin, Sheida; Banerjee, Robin; Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the anger-regulation strategies of bicultural individuals who are brought up with two distinct cultures that might carry contradictory demands about how to regulate emotions. With a sample of 525 adolescents in the Netherlands and Morocco, we found that bicultural Moroccan-Dutch adolescents' anger regulation in response to hypothetical peer conflict were largely similar to those of their Dutch peers. In fact, both the Dutch and the Moroccan-Dutch adolescents' anger regulation differed in the same ways from the Moroccan group, with greater acting out and less calm verbalisation, reflection, and diversion in the former than in the latter. Additionally, our findings indicate that Moroccan-Dutch adolescents' identification with the Dutch as well as with the Moroccan culture is related to more anger verbalisation and less externalising anger regulation. These results are interpreted in light of the complex cultural position faced by bicultural adolescents. PMID:21824014

  4. Anger and effortful control moderate aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Sanna; Hodges, Ernest V E; Peets, Kätlin; Salmivalli, Christina

    2016-08-01

    The effects of anger and effortful control on aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations were investigated among a total of 311 Finnish fifth and sixth graders (mean age = 11.9 years). Self-reported aggressive cognitions (i.e., normative- and self-efficacy beliefs about aggression) were expected to be associated with higher peer-reported aggressive behaviour. Teacher reported anger and effortful control were hypothesised, and found, to moderate the effects of aggressive cognitions on aggression, such that the effects were strongest for children who were high in anger and low in effortful control, as compared to other conditions. Furthermore, under the conditions of high anger and high effortful control, self-efficacy was negatively related to aggression. Thus, aggression is a result of a complex, hierarchically organised motivational system, being jointly influenced by aggressive cognitions, anger and effortful control. The findings support the importance of examining cognitive and emotional structures jointly when predicting children's aggressive behaviour. PMID:26042460

  5. Anger as a Train and State, Anger Management Methods, and People\\\\\\'s Tendency towards Collective Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Nikdel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   Ethnic disputes and collective aggressions are observable in each period of history and are more evident in traditional and nomadic communities. This issue has had many life and property damages in the past and present times and it has also prevented social development to flourish. Based on the damages of collective aggression, the researchers attempt to study the fundamental causes of this problem. It is assumed that state-trait anger and anger control methods are effective variables on people's tendency toward collective aggression. Therefore, determining the effective factors on collective aggression is of great importance from social, family and individual aspects. The theoretical framework of the present study is the combination of psychological and social- psychological theories regarding collective aggression. According the theories regarding collective aggression and relevant researches, collective aggression stems from different factors and reasons as a multi-dimensional social phenomenon. In a general classification, these factors are divided into individual and social factors. Based on various researches regarding social reasons of tendency to collective aggression, only the individual and psychological causes have been investigated. Indeed, this study evaluated state-trait anger and anger control method variables as individual and psychological factors related to tendency to collective aggression.     Materials & Methods   The study method is non-experimental -anger ationneral BB Asianasurest time and it also and it is a survey in terms of type and cross section in terms of time. The study population is all citizens of the Kohgiluye and Buyerahmad province whose age is between 14 and 50 years old. Based on the latest census, they include 325204 individuals. The sample size is 400 based on Cochran’s formula. The sampling method is stratified random. Two questionnaires were used to measure the variables: a

  6. An Investigation of Anger and Anger Expression in Terms of Coping with Stress and Interpersonal Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Coskun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anger and anger expression styles with respect to coping with stress and interpersonal problem-solving. The participants were 468 (258 female and 210 male, between 17-30 years old) university students. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and multiple hierarchical regression analysis were…

  7. The Effects of Cognitive--Behavioral Therapy on Trait Anger and Paranoid Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio; Jozefowicz-Simbeni, Debra M. Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates a cognitive-behavioral anger treatment approach to reduce anger and paranoid ideation on men (n = 32) in treatment for anger problems and compares levels of paranoid ideation with a sample of men ( n = 27) who sought mental health treatment for non-anger issues. Method: A pre- and posttest design is used to evaluate…

  8. Children's Self-Reports about Anger Regulation: Direct and Indirect Links to Social Preference and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearing, Karen F.; And Others

    2002-01-01

    Assessed direct relations between three aspects of self-reported anger regulation and peer-rated social preference and aggression as well as indirect relations between these constructs as mediated by observed anger expression. Interviewed 274 second-graders following anger-arousing games. Found that anger regulation was only indirectly related to…

  9. The Investigation of Drug Addiction Potential among Medical Students: Role of Subjective Components of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agha Yusefi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Given that drug addiction is not merely related to a specific individual or group, and few studies have investigated the role of anger in the development of drug addiction, this study was done to investigate the role of the components of anger in predicting addiction potential. Method: A descriptive-correlation research design was used for the conduct of this study. The number of 309 medical students in Kermanshah city was selected using stratified cluster sampling and completed Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Scale (STAS and Zargar’s addiction potential questionnaire. Results: The results showed that ate anger, trait anger, anger expression-out (AXO, anger expression-in (AXI, the overall index for the expression of anger were significantly associated with addiction potential. Similarly, anger control-out (ACO, anger control-in (ACI were correlated with addiction potential. In addition, the regression analysis results indicated that the components of state anger and anger expression-in (AXI together can predict 35% of changes related to addiction potential. Conclusion: State anger and anger expression-in (AXI as subjective components of anger have a significant role in predicting addiction potential among medical students. Anger management programs for medical students, as the most important segment of the society in the field of public health, are recommended to assign more credit to these two components.

  10. The effects of music on anger and psychological symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Fahri

    2011-01-01

    In this study, individuals who prefer to listen to music in everyday life tried to determine whether the effects on anger and psychological states. The sample group consisted of total 288 individuals who 188 girl and 100 men. The data used in this study obtained from The State Trait Anger Scale and Anger Expression Scale and Brief Symptoms Inventory. Analysis of the data, mean and standard deviation values, and one-way analysis of variance (One Way ANOVA) were used. As a result of the finding...

  11. Depression is more than just sadness: A case of excessive anger and its management in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Sahu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available People with depressive illness often have symptoms of overt or suppressed anger. Those with anger traits face exaggerated problem during symptomatic period of depression. Pharmacological management helps in control of depressive and anxiety symptoms, but rarely address anger symptoms. Non-pharmacological management like cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT is effective in depression as well as in anger management, but is not used frequently in anger associated or exacerbated by depression. We present the case of a 27-year-old male suffering from moderate depressive episode with associated anger outburst. He underwent CBT, which resulted in a significant decrease in anger symptoms as well as in severity of depression.

  12. Rumination on anger and sadness in adolescence: Fueling of fury and deepening of despair

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, M.; Moretti, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined anger rumination and sadness rumination in clinic-referred adolescents (N=121). Factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger and sadness rumination measures loaded onto 2 factors tapping anger rumination and sadness rumination, respectively. Structural equation modeling confirmed unique relations between each form of rumination and specific emotional or behavioral problems. Anger and anger rumination were independent predictors of aggression, suggesting that both the ...

  13. The effects of music on anger and psychological symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahri Sezer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, individuals who prefer to listen to music in everyday life tried to determine whether the effects on anger and psychological states. The sample group consisted of total 288 individuals who 188 girl and 100 men. The data used in this study obtained from The State Trait Anger Scale and Anger Expression Scale and Brief Symptoms Inventory. Analysis of the data, mean and standard deviation values, and one-way analysis of variance (One Way ANOVA were used. As a result of the findings of this study, individuals who prefer to listen to music in everyday life situations of anger and psychological symptoms revealed that over a significant effect.

  14. Interpersonal Conflict: Effects of Variations in Manner of Expressing Anger and Justification for Anger upon Perceptions of Appropriateness, Competence, and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, Kenneth K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how an expression of anger affects the receiver's perceptions of anger in a close interpersonal relationship. Reports that findings contradicted conventional wisdom and research findings on assertive communication. (MM)

  15. Nicotine-induced brain metabolism associated with anger provocation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamner Larry D; Whalen Carol K; Loughlin Sandra E; Leslie Frances M; Potkin Steven G; Gehricke Jean-G; Mbogori James; Fallon James H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cortico-limbic brain activity associated with anger may be susceptible to nicotine and, thus, may contribute to smoking initiation and nicotine addiction. The purpose of the study was to identify the brain regions that are most reactive to nicotine and show the greatest association with anger task performance. Twenty adult nonsmokers (9 women, 11 men) participated in two laboratory sessions to assess brain metabolism with fluoro deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Topography (FDG-PET) in...

  16. Nicotine-induced brain metabolism associated with anger provocation

    OpenAIRE

    Gehricke, Jean-G; Potkin, Steven G; Leslie, Frances M.; Loughlin, Sandra E.; Whalen, Carol K; Jamner, Larry D; Mbogori, James; Fallon, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Cortico-limbic brain activity associated with anger may be susceptible to nicotine and, thus, may contribute to smoking initiation and nicotine addiction. The purpose of the study was to identify the brain regions that are most reactive to nicotine and show the greatest association with anger task performance. Twenty adult nonsmokers (9 women, 11 men) participated in two laboratory sessions to assess brain metabolism with fluoro deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Topography (FDG-PET) in response...

  17. PRIMARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS' CONFLICT APPROACHES AND THEIR ANGER EXPRESSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Argon, Türkan; AÇIKGÖZ, Abdurrahman

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study to determine the school administrators' conflict approaches and their levels of anger expressions and to examine if there is a meaningful relationship between these two levels or not. In the study, relational survey model was used. While administrators believed they use classical conflict management at "completely agree level", use modern conflict approach at "unsure level"; use anger control approach at "moderate level&qu...

  18. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni; Gramaglia Carla; Marzola Enrica; Amianto Federico; Zuccolin Maria; Fassino Secondo

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive sy...

  19. The Symbolic Meditation of Luck and Anger in Lucky Jim

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秋婷

    2016-01-01

    Lucky Jim is set around 1950s. The novel is under the influence of"Angry Young Men" movement which has encouraged many authors to produce angry novels that criticize the outdated social and political values and condemn the distinctive class differentiation. This essay analyzes the luck and anger of Jim Dixon from the perspective of"Political Unconscious". And the deeper reasons that are dug out behind luck and anger reflect readers' symbolic meditation towards a whole generation of people.

  20. The influence of working memory on the anger superiority effect

    OpenAIRE

    Moriya, J.; Koster, Ernst; De Raedt, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    The anger superiority effect shows that an angry face is detected more efficiently than a happy face. However, it is still controversial whether attentional allocation to angry faces is a bottom-up process or not. We investigated whether the anger superiority effect is influenced by top-down control, especially working memory (WM). Participants remembered a colour and then searched for differently coloured facial expressions. Just holding the colour information in WM did not modulate the ange...

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study of Proneness to Anger

    OpenAIRE

    Mick, Eric; Mcgough, James,; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Jean A. Frazier; Kennedy, David; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. Methods With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger S...

  2. Anger, anxiety and depression in females with diffuse alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçil Aldemir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Present study aims to compare control group patients and patients with diffuse alopecia in order to understand the nature of the relationship between symptoms and level of anger and to see whether patient group has higher number of symptoms than control group. Methods: 43 female patients who were diagnosed diffuse alopecia in dermatology clinic and 52 age-and-gender-matched control participants were included in the study. 20% of patients (n=19 with androgenetic alopecia, 10.5% of patients (n=10 with diffuse alopecia areata and 14.7% of patients (n=14 with telogen effluvium participated in study. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and The Trait Anger and Anger Expression Scale (TAAES were filled by the participants. Also patients were followed up by a standard hospital form recording alopecia. Results: It was found that patients with alopecia revealed significantly more depression (p<0,001 and anxiety (p<0,001 scores than control group. Also trait anger (β = 0,216, Wald Z = 3,697, Exp(B= 1,241, p<0,05 and anxiety (β = -0.466, Wald Z = 5,008, Exp(B= 0.628, p<0,05 scores significantly predicted alopecia group. Additionally total time period for alopecia significantly and positively correlated with depression (r= 0,402, p<0.01 and anxiety (r=0,393, p<0,01 scores. Comparing patient groups with each other, trait anger and expressed anger were significantly different across groups. Conclusion: Patient group reported more anxiety and depressive symptoms than control group. In treatment of patients with alopecia, bidirectional relationship between alopecia and psychological symptoms should be in consideration. Collaboration with psychiatry is suggested in order to improve treatment efficacy and patients’ life satisfaction. In addition anger management seems essential in treatment of patients with diffuse alopecia.

  3. Binge eating & childhood emotional abuse: The mediating role of anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinson, Marjorie C; Hornik-Lurie, Tzipi

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies reveal that childhood emotional abuse (CEA) is the trauma most clearly associated with adult eating pathology. Yet, relatively little is understood about psychological mechanisms linking these distal experiences. Anger's mediational role in the relationship between CEA and adult binge eating (BE) is explored in a community-based sample of 498 adult women (mean age 44). Detailed telephone interviews assess BE (7 items), CEA (single item), and unresolved anger (single item) along with self-criticism (modified Rosenberg self-esteem scale), depression and anxiety symptoms (BSI sub-scales). Statistical analyses include Pearson correlations, Baron and Kenny's steps for mediation, and Preacher and Hayes bootstrapping method to test proposed multiple mediators simultaneously. Findings reveal significantly more respondents (n = 476 with complete data) with serious BE behaviors report a history of CEA compared to women with considerable and/or minimal BE (53% vs 37%, p = 0.002 respectively). Significant correlations are found among all study variables. Mediation analyses focus on anger together with self-criticism, depression and anxiety. Findings reveal anger and self-criticism fully mediate the CEA-BE relationship. In contrast, depression and anxiety symptoms are not significant mediators in a model that includes anger and self-criticism. Although additional research is warranted to more fully understand complex causal processes, in the interim, treatment interventions should be broadened to include assessments of anger among adult women with BE behaviors, especially those with histories of childhood abuse. Additionally, prevention strategies that incorporate learning how to express anger directly and positively may be particularly effective in reducing various disordered eating behaviors among women and girls. PMID:27208594

  4. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneezy, Uri; Imas, Alex

    2014-01-28

    We propose that individuals use anger strategically in interactions. We first show that in some environments angering people makes them more effective in competitions, whereas in others, anger makes them less effective. We then show that individuals anticipate these effects and strategically use the option to anger their opponents. In particular, they are more likely to anger their opponents when anger negatively affects the opponents' performances. This finding suggests people understand the effects of emotions on behavior and exploit them to their advantage. PMID:24474756

  5. Hostility, Anger and Risk of Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Masoudnia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The previous researches about the etiology of coronary artery atherosclerosis have accentuated on clinical and medical risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, positive family background, myocardial ischemia history in family, atherogenic diet, increase of A lipoprotein, inflammatory factors such as increase of cross-reactive protein and so on. Although factors in behavioral medicine are recognized as an independent risk factor in coronary artery atherosclerosis, few researches have been done on hostility and anger. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between normal people(Control group and people with coronary artery atherosclerosis(Case group with regards to hostility and anger. Methods: This study was performed as a case-control design. Data was collected from seventy-seven patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis who had referred to Afshar Hospital Professional Heart Clinic in Yazd city and seventy-eight normal people were used as control. Two groups completed the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire(BPAQ to measure their hostility and anger. Results: The results of the analysis showed that there was a statistically significant difference regarding hostility(p<.05 and anger(p<.001 between the two groups. Hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the sociodemographic and clinical variables(step 1 explained 35.5 % to 47.4%, while hostility and anger(step 2 explained 6.7% to 9% of the variance in incidence of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are strong risk factors for coronary artery atherosclerosis or CAD in Iran. Therefore, in order to decrease the incidence rate of coronary artery atherosclerosis in Iran, alongside medical interventions, attention should also be paid towards behavioral interventions in order to modify hostile and angrily behavior.

  6. A Prospective Study of Trait Anger and PTSD Symptoms in Police

    OpenAIRE

    Meffert, Susan M.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Henn-Haase, Clare; McCaslin, Shannon; Inslicht, Sabra; Chemtob, Claude; Neylan, Thomas; Marmar, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    It is unknown whether anger is a risk factor for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, arises as a consequence of PTSD, or both. Two hypotheses were tested in 180 police recruits: Greater trait anger during training will predict greater PTSD symptoms at one year; greater PTSD symptoms at one year will predict greater state anger at one year. Both hypotheses were confirmed, suggesting that trait anger is a risk factor for PTSD symptoms, but that PTSD symptoms are al...

  7. COMT but not serotonin-related genes modulates the influence of childhood abuse on anger traits.

    OpenAIRE

    Perroud, Nader; Jaussent, Isabelle; Guillaume, Sébastien; Bellivier, Frank; Baud, Patrick; Jollant, Fabrice; Leboyer, Marion; Lewis, Cathryn,; Malafosse, Alain; Courtet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    International audience Anger-related traits are regulated by genes as well as early environmental factors. Both childhood maltreatment and genes underlie vulnerability to suicidal behaviors, possibly by affecting the constitution of intermediate phenotypes such as anger traits. The aim of this study was to test the interaction between nine candidate genes and childhood maltreatment in modulating anger-related traits in 875 adult suicide attempters. The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventor...

  8. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gneezy, Uri; Imas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Emotions play a critical role in social interactions and decision-making. We present evidence that individuals understand the behavioral effects of emotions, particularly anger, and use them strategically in interactions. In our study, individuals competed on a task, and one of them was given the opportunity to anger the other. The first task was strength-based, where we expected anger to improve performance. Other participants competed on a mental task in which we expected anger to impair pe...

  9. Rumination on Anger and Sadness in Adolescence: Fueling of Fury and Deepening of Despair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Maya; Moretti, Marlene M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined anger rumination and sadness rumination in clinic-referred adolescents (N = 121). Factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger and sadness rumination measures loaded onto 2 factors tapping anger rumination and sadness rumination, respectively. Structural equation modeling confirmed unique relations between each form of…

  10. Design and evaluation of a virtual environment for the treatment of anger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.P.; Hattangadi, N.; Meziane, Z.; Pul, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy is often used for anger treatment. An important element of this therapy is exposure to anger evoking stimuli. In this paper virtual reality is put forward as a technology that can effectively create these stimuli by exposing patients to social scenes that include anger

  11. Profiles of Observed Infant Anger Predict Preschool Behavior Problems: Moderation by Life Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of…

  12. Anger-Control Group Counseling for Women Recovering from Alcohol or Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Two experimental conditions, a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger-control treatment incorporating empowerment strategies and a relapse-prevention treatment without the anger-control component, were compared to assess their impact on levels of trait anger and attributional styles of women recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Participants…

  13. The Effects of Anger Management Groups in a Day School for Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Millicent H.; Bry, Brenna H.

    1999-01-01

    Reports the results of an anger management program for emotionally disturbed adolescents (N=7) who scored in the clinical range on the Conduct subscale of the Conners Teacher Rating Scale. The program included psychoeducation, anger discrimination training, and training on prosocial responses to anger. Results indicate evidence of positive…

  14. Expression of Anger in Depressed Adolescents: The Role of the Family Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    The expression of anger is considered to be abnormal in depression, yet its role is only poorly understood. In the present study we sought to clarify this role by examining the moderating influence of the family environment on overall levels of anger expression and anger reactivity in depressed and non-depressed adolescents during conflictual…

  15. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger-aggression relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J L G; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts to the insulting participant. Individuals who received tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity behaved more aggressively when they were angry. No relation between anger and aggression was observed in the increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham condition. These results concur with the motivational direction model of frontal asymmetry, in which left frontal activity is associated with anger. We propose that anger with approach motivational tendencies is more likely to result in aggression. PMID:21421731

  16. Anger after Childbirth: An Overlooked Reaction to Postpartum Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Lobel, Marci; DeLuca, Robyn Stein

    2002-01-01

    Other than postpartum depression, little is known about women's emotional responses to childbirth and subsequent stressors. Anger was explored on the basis of theory and evidence that it is a likely emotional response in this context. During their third trimester of pregnancy and approximately six weeks after delivery, 163 participants completed…

  17. Gender context of coping with anger in older adolescents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janošová, Pavlína

    Vilnius: Mykolas Romeris University, 2009. s. 125-125. [European conference on Developmental Psychology /14./. 18.08.2009-22.08.2009, Vilnius] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700250801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : late adolescence * coping with anger * gender Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  18. Hypertensive Patients and Normotensive Individuals: Differences in Anger Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sahraian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: : Hypertension (HTN is a common condition with increasing prevalence rate. Hypertensive patients have a high prevalence of mental disorders, including anger.. Objectives: : The present study aimed to investigate the score of anger in hypertensive patients in comparison to the individuals with normal blood pressure in Shiraz.. Patients and Methods: : This case-control study was conducted on 100 patients with HTN and 107 normal controls with the mean age of 52.48 and 53.78 years, respectively. These patients had referred to Shiraz HTN clinic in 2013. All the patients completed the Multidimensional Anger Inventory (MAI and the results were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software, 2010.. Results: : The participants were matched regarding age and other demographic factors which might have influenced HTN. Distributions of these factors were partly similar and the differences were not significant. The HTN group obtained higher scores in all dimensions. Besides, the differences were significant in all subscales, except for anger.. Conclusions: : In line with the previous researches, the present study indicated that high level of aggression was correlated to high blood pressure. Therefore, it is necessary to have psychological interventions along with other interventions for hypertensive patients. Overall, this research confirmed biopsycho approach to psychosomatic diseases..

  19. New Attacks on Animal Researchers Provoke Anger and Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on firebomb attacks at the homes of two animal researchers which have provoked anger and unease. The firebomb attacks, which set the home of a neuroscientist at the University of California at Santa Cruz aflame and destroyed a car parked in the driveway of another university researcher's home, have left researchers and…

  20. Examining the Links between Strain, Situational and Dispositional Anger, and Crime: Further Specifying and Testing General Strain Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Paul; Piquero, Alex R.; Capowich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Explored whether relationships between strain, anger, and deviant outcomes varied when using trait- or situational-based measures of anger, noting whether people with higher trait anger had increased likelihood of experiencing strain, becoming angry from strain, and responding deviantly. Relying on trait-based static indicators of anger was…

  1. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison Among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Mansournia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents’ behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70, karateka (n=66, swimmers (n=59, and non athletes (n=96. One stage cluster sampling method was used to select judoka, karateka, and swimmers from sport clubs in Tehran. Students of governmental schools at the same area were chosen as the non-athletes group. The “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” questionnaire was utilized to assess the anger rate.Findings: The mean age of participants was 12.90(±2.06 years. The total anger rates were 45.40 (±5.61 in judoka, 41.53(±5.63 in karateka, 41.19(±5.33 in swimmers, and 45.44 (±8.58 in non athletes. In total anger scale karateka and swimmers had a significantly lower score compared to judoka and non athletes. In instrumental anger subscale the difference was significant just between karateka and non athletes. In reactive anger subscale judoka showed higher scores than swimmers. In anger control subscale the difference was significant between judoka and swimmers and also judoka and karateka. The difference of anger control between karateka and non athletes was significant.Conclusion: The findings of this study propose a difference in the anger rate between judoka and karateka. In contrary to the results of previous studies, judo training may have no influence on anger control, while karate training could be beneficial.

  2. Attentional Bias to Negative Emotion as a Function of Approach and Withdrawal Anger Styles: An ERP Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; Silton, Rebecca Levin; Sass, Sarah M.; Fisher, Joscelyn E.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Although models of emotion have focused on the relationship between anger and approach motivation associated with aggression, anger is also related to withdrawal motivation. Anger-out and anger-in styles are associated with psychopathology and may disrupt the control of attention within the context of negatively valenced information. The present study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine whether anger styles uniquely predict attentional bias to negative stimuli during an emot...

  3. Population heterogeneity of trait anger and differential associations of trait anger facets with borderline personality features, neuroticism, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and alcohol problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubke, Gitta H; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; de Moor, Marleen H M; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-12-15

    Anger is an emotion consisting of feelings of variable intensity ranging from mild irritation to intense fury. High levels of trait anger are associated with a range of psychiatric, interpersonal, and health problems. The objectives of this study were to explore heterogeneity of anger as measured by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS), and to assess the association of the different anger facets with a selection of psychiatric disorders covering externalizing and internalizing problems, personality disorders, and substance use. Factor mixture models differentiated between a high and low scoring class (28% vs. 72%), and between three factors (anger-temperament, anger-reaction, and immediacy of an anger response). Whereas all psychiatric scales correlated significantly with the STAS total score, regressing the three STAS factors on psychiatric behaviors model showed a more detailed pattern. Only borderline affect instability and depression were significantly associated with all three factors in both classes whereas other problem behaviors were associated only with 1 or 2 of the factors. Alcohol problems were associated with immediacy only in the high scoring class, indicating a non-linear relation in the total sample. Taking into account these more specific associations is likely to be beneficial when investigating differential treatment strategies. PMID:26454404

  4. A study on trait angeranger expression and friendship commitment levels of primary school 2nd stage students who play – do not play sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Kırımoğlu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the state of trait anger-anger expression and friendship commitment levels depending on the fact whether 2nd-stage-students in primary schools played sports or not.Personal Information Form, Trait Anger-Anger Expression Scales and Inventory of Peer Attachment were used in order to collect the data.The population of the research was consisted of the students who studied in 2nd stage of 40 primary state schools that belonged to National Education Directorate of Hatay Province between 2009-2010 academic year. Sample group was made up by 853 students of 21 primary schools who were selected from the population (262 boy students and 149 girl students who played sports as registered players; 233 boy students and 209 girl students who did not play sports..To sum up; the comparison of the scores of trait anger and external anger of the participant students who played sports yielded a statistically significant difference in terms of sex variable (p< 0.05. As for the sedentary group, boys had higher scores of internal anger and external anger than girls. In the comparison of the scores of friendship commitment in sedentary students in terms of sex variable, it was found out that there was a statistically significant difference between girls and boys, which was in favour of boys (p<0.05.

  5. Cross-cultural assessment of emotions: The expression of anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolete S. Moscoso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to focus on unique issues that are encountered in the crosscultural adaptation of measures of emotions. We take into consideration the cross-cultural equivalence of the concept of emotion, and how cultural differences influence the meaning of words that are utilized to describe these concepts. The critical need to take the state-trait distinction into account in adapting measures of emotional states and personality traits is then discussed. The effects of language and culture in adapting measures of the experience, expression, and control of anger in Latin-America are also reviewed. The construction of the Latin American Multicultural State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory is described.

  6. The mediating role of anger in the relationship between PTSD symptoms and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Wang, Xin; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2015-03-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger (Olatunji, Ciesielski, & Tolin, 2010; Orth & Wieland, 2006). Individuals may seek urgent coping to deal with the distress of anger, which is a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion (Novaco & Chemtob, 2002); possibly in the form of impulsive actions consistent with impulsivity's association with anger (Milligan & Waller, 2001; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001). This could be 1 of the explanations for the relationship between PTSD and impulsivity (Kotler, Julian, Efront, & Amir, 2001; Ledgerwood & Petry, 2006). The present study assessed the mediating role of anger between PTSD (overall scores and subscales of arousal and negative alterations in mood/cognitions) and impulsivity, using gender as a covariate of impulsivity. The PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), Dimensions of Anger Reaction scale-5, and the UPPS Impulsivity Scale were administered to a sample of 244 undergraduate students with a trauma history. Results based on 1000 bootstrapped samples indicated significant direct effects of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on anger, of anger on impulsivity, and of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on impulsivity. Further, anger significantly mediated the relationship between PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) and impulsivity, consistent with the hypothesized models. Results suggest that impulsivity aims at coping with distressing anger, possibly explaining the presence of substance usage, and other impulsive behaviors in people with PTSD. Further, anger probably serves as a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion coupled with PTSD symptoms. PMID:25793689

  7. Anger Recognition in Speech Using Acoustic and Linguistic Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Polzehl, Tim; Alexander SCHMITT; Metze, Florian; Wagner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present study elaborates on the exploitation of both linguistic and acoustic feature modeling for anger classification. In terms of acoustic modeling we generate statistics from acoustic audio descriptors, e.g. pitch, loudness, spectral characteristics. Ranking our features we see that loudness and MFCC seems most promising for all databases. For the English database also pitch features are important. In terms of linguistic modeling we apply probabilistic and entropy-b...

  8. Anger superiority effect: The importance of dynamic emotional facial expressions

    OpenAIRE

    F.Ceccarini; C.Caudek

    2013-01-01

    A rapid response to a threatening face in a crowd is important to successfully interact in social environments. Visual search tasks have been employed to determine whether there is a processing advantage for detecting an angry face in a crowd, compared to a happy face. The empirical findings supporting the anger superiority effect (ASE), however, have been criticized on the basis of possible low-level visual confounds and because of the limited ecological validity of the stimuli. Moreover, a ...

  9. Secure Base Priming Diminishes Conflict-Based Anger and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Donald G; Lane, René A; Koren, Tamara; Bartholomew, Kim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a visual representation of a secure base (i.e. a secure base prime) on attenuating experimentally produced anger and anxiety. Specifically, we examined the assuaging of negative emotions through exposure to an image of a mother-infant embrace or a heterosexual couple embracing. Subjects seated at a computer terminal rated their affect (Pre Affect) using the Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) then listened to two sets of intense two person conflicts. After the first conflict exposure they rated affect again (Post 1 AAC). Following the second exposure they saw a blank screen (control condition), pictures of everyday objects (distraction condition) or a photo of two people embracing (Secure Base Prime condition). They then reported emotions using the Post 2 AAC. Compared to either control or distraction subjects, Secure Base Prime (SBP) subjects reported significantly less anger and anxiety. These results were then replicated using an internet sample with control, SBP and two new controls: Smiling Man (to control for expression of positive affect) and Cold Mother (an unsmiling mother with infant). The SBP amelioration of anger and anxiety was replicated with the internet sample. No control groups produced this effect, which was generated only by a combination of positive affect in a physically embracing dyad. The results are discussed in terms of attachment theory and research on spreading activation. PMID:27606897

  10. Genome-wide association study of proneness to anger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Mick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. METHODS: With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Scale in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study (n = 8,747. RESULTS: Subjects were, on average, 54 (range 45-64 years old at baseline enrollment, 47% (n = 4,117 were male, and all were of European descent by self-report. The mean Angry Temperament and Angry Reaction scores were 5.8 ± 1.8 and 7.6 ± 2.2. We observed a nominally significant finding (p = 2.9E-08, λ = 1.027 - corrected pgc = 2.2E-07, λ = 1.0015 on chromosome 6q21 in the gene coding for the non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, Fyn. CONCLUSIONS: Fyn interacts with NDMA receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3-gated channels to regulate calcium influx and intracellular release in the post-synaptic density. These results suggest that signaling pathways regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, which are relevant to memory, learning, and neuronal survival, may in part underlie the expression of Angry Temperament.

  11. Children's dynamic RSA change during anger and its relations with parenting, temperament, and control of aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G; Chocol, Caroline; Nuselovici, Jacob N; Utendale, William T; Simard, Melissa; Hastings, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of child temperament on the association between maternal socialization and 4-6-year-old children's dynamic respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) change in response to anger-themed emotional materials (N=180). We used latent growth curve modeling to explore adaptive patterns of dynamic RSA change in response to anger. Greater change in RSA during anger-induction, characterized by more initial RSA suppression and a subsequent return to baseline, was related to children's better regulation of aggression. For anger-themed materials, low levels of authoritarian parenting predicted more RSA suppression and recovery for more anger-prone children, whereas more authoritative parenting predicted more RSA suppression and recovery for less anger-prone children. These findings suggest that children's adaptive patterns of dynamic RSA change can be characterized by latent growth curve modeling, and that these patterns may be differentially shaped by parent socialization experiences as a function of child temperament. PMID:23274169

  12. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lara Rohlf

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6-10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92 participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection.

  13. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlf, Helena L; Krahé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6-10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92) participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection. PMID:25964767

  14. The impact of incidental fear and anger on in- and outgroup attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukowski Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the impact of two specific negative emotions of anger and fear on intergroup attitudes. In Study 1 we measured emotions of anger and fear and in Study 2 we evoked these emotions incidentally, that is independently of any intergroup context. In both studies we measured attitudes towards the ingroup (Polish and the outgroup (Gypsies.We expected that fear would lead to more positive ingroup attitudes and anger to more negative outgroup attitudes. The results of the correlational study (Study 1 confirmed the predictions regarding anger and decreased outgroup evaluations, and the experimental study (Study 2 revealed that fear enhanced positivity towards the ingroup, but anger increased negativity towards the outgroup. The impact of fear and anger on social attitudes in the specific context of a negatively self-stereotyped ingroup is discussed.

  15. Ruminations on rumination: anger and sadness rumination in a normative and clinical sample

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, Maya

    2006-01-01

    Anger rumination and sadness rumination were examined concurrently in a normative sample of adults (Study 1) and a clinical adolescent sample (Study 2). The purpose of this research was to assess if rumination on anger and sadness have distinct emotional and behavioural associations, and whether it is warranted to conceptualize them as separate constructs. In both studies, factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger rumination and sadness rumination measures loaded onto two fact...

  16. Rain with chances of a thunderstorm: on the role of anger in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoeven, Floortje Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Since heterogeneity in depressed patients makes treatment decisions difficult and treatment often unsuccessful, we seek to identify certain subtypes of depression. 30 to 40% of depressed patients have anger regulation problems; from irritability to anger attacks. What is the significance of anger in depression? Does it signify a subtype of depression? In the NESDA cohort, we compared a large sample of currently depressed patients with irritability to currently depressed patients without irrit...

  17. The role of personality and blame attribution in prisoners' experience of anger.

    OpenAIRE

    Jane L Wood; Newton, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The emotion of anger has gained researchers' interest in recent years [Novaco (1994) In: J. Monahan & M. J. Steadman (Eds.), Violence and mental disorder.- developments in risk assessment. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press; (1997) Legal and Criminological Psychology, 2, 77]. However, it is still unclear what influences the expression of anger. The current study investigated the relationship between anger, personality and blame attribution in Icelandic prisoners. Sixty-nine male offende...

  18. The clinic of anger : from psychopathology to the adequacy of punishment

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe, Paule; Scholl, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Not every fit of anger is good. But some are not to be avoided either. And fits of anger have not all the same aetiology. The authors try to understand the various psychopathological and\\or neuropsychological mechanisms that could explain anger whether in babies, children, teenagers or adults. Anger can arise from the feeling of being overwhelmed – coming by an overflow of the possibilities of management of the ego – (¬¬as a consequence of excessive intake of sensory or emotional information...

  19. An 18-month Follow-up of Anger in Female Karate Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ziaee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of anger scores in female karate athletes during 18 months, and to compare anger scores in adolescents who continue or stop training karate.Method:The sample consisted of 18 female elite karate athletes, practicing modern style of karate. To measure anger and its subscales, participants were asked to complete “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” (AARS questionnaire in both stages of the study. Athletes were divided in to two groups of “stayer” (n=12 and “quitter” (n=6 if they continued practicing karate or stopped it, respectively. In order to study the changes of anger score with time, paired T test was used.Results:In analysis of changes in anger scores with time, there was a statistically significant increase in instrumental anger (p=0.001 and non-significant increase in other anger scores among 14-year-old girls who continued practicing karate.Conclusion :Increased instrumental anger in female karate athletes could be due to the impact of participation in a combative sport. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously due to limitations of the study.

  20. Impact of anger expression on blood pressure levels in white-color workers with low-coping behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ohira, Tetsuya; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sankai, Tomoko; Imano, Hironori; Shimamoto, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    To examine the relationships between anger expression and blood pressure (BP) levels and their effect modification by stress coping behaviors, the authors analyzed data from a cross-sectional study of 790 Japanese male workers aged 20–60 years. We used the Spielberger anger expression scales to measure anger-out, anger-in, and anger-control. Relationships between anger expression scales and mean systolic and diastolic BP levels were examined in the total sample and in two subgroups of high an...

  1. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz

    2016-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders. PMID:27231675

  2. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders. PMID:27231675

  3. Language choice in expressing anger among Arab-English Londoners

    OpenAIRE

    Dewaele, Jean Marc; Qaddourah, I.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to partially replicate the study in Dewaele (2013). We want to determine whether the independent variables linked to the preference of the first (L1) or second language (L2) for the communication of anger among a large heterogeneous group of long-time multilinguals from all over the world (Dewaele 2013) have similar effects in one relatively homogeneous linguistic and cultural group, namely 110 English-speaking Arabs living in London (UK). The analysis of quan...

  4. Seeing Enemies? A systematic review of anger bias in the perception of facial expressions among anger-prone and aggressive populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellentin, Angelina Isabella; Dervisevic, Ajla; Stenager, Elsebeth;

    2015-01-01

    that mediates aggression in individuals susceptible to externalizing behavior. This paper therefore aims to clarify whether anger-prone and aggressive populations are emotionally biased towards perceiving others as angry and hostile when processing facial expressions in neuropsychological paradigms. A...

  5. Let Me Go: The Influences of Crawling Experience and Temperament on the Development of Anger Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton Roben, Caroline K.; Bass, Anneliese J.; Moore, Ginger A.; Murray-Kolb, Laura; Tan, Patricia Z.; Gilmore, Rick O.; Buss, Kristin A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Teti, Laureen O.

    2012-01-01

    Infants' emerging ability to move independently by crawling is associated with changes in multiple domains, including an increase in expressions of anger in situations that block infants' goals, but it is unknown whether increased anger is specifically because of experience with being able to move autonomously or simply related to age. To examine…

  6. Empathy and Observed Anger and Aggression in Five-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Janet; Roberts, William

    2004-01-01

    In Roberts and Strayer (1996), we reported that emotional expressiveness and anger were important predictors of empathy for school-age children, and that empathy strongly predicted prosocial behaviors aggregated across methods and sources. In this paper, we report how empathy was associated with direct observations of anger and aggression in peer…

  7. The Mediating Role of Anger in the Relationship Between PTSD Symptoms and Impulsivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contractor, A. A.; Armour, C.; Wang, X.;

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger (Olatunji, Ciesielski, & Tolin, 2010; Orth & Wieland, 2006). Individuals may seek urgent coping to deal with the distress of anger, which is a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion (Novaco & Chem...

  8. Anger Coping Method and Skill Training for Chinese Children with Physically Aggressive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Annis L. C.; Tsang, Sandra K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aggression hinders development in the child and creates numerous problems in the family, school and community. An indigenous Anger Coping Training program for Chinese children with aggressive behavior and their parents aimed to help reactively aggressive children in increasing anger coping methods and enhancing problem-solving abilities. This…

  9. Dynamic Changes in Anger, Externalizing and Internalizing Problems: Attention and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmeen; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low levels of dispositional anger and a good attention span are critical to healthy social emotional development, with attention control reflecting effective cognitive self-regulation of negative emotions such as anger. Using a longitudinal design, we examined attention span as a moderator of reciprocal links between changes in anger…

  10. The Predictors of Indonesian Senior High School Students' Anger at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernawati, Lucia; Rahayu, Esti; Soejowinoto, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the correlation between senior high school students' anger at school and the quality relationship of parents-adolescents, peer pressure, narcissistic personality, and school climate. The instruments used were student anger at school inventory, scale of adolescent and family attachment, peer pressure inventory,…

  11. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  12. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  13. Emotions in context : Anger causes ethnic bias but not gender bias in men but not women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Toon; Pollet, Thomas V.; Teixeira, Catia P.; Demoulin, Stephanie; Roberts, S. Craig; Little, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Emotions influence information processing because they are assumed to carry valuable information. We predict that induced anger will increase ethnic but not gender intergroup bias because anger is related to conflicts for resources, and ethnic groups typically compete for resources, whereas gender g

  14. Can expressions of anger enhance creativity? A test of the emotions as social information (EASI) model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, Gerben A.; Anastasopoulou, Christina; Nijstad, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether expressions of anger can enhance creative performance. Building on the emotions as social information (EASI) model (Van Kleef, 2009), we predicted that the interpersonal effects of anger expressions on creativity depend on the target's epistemic motivation (EM) the desire to

  15. Sex Differences in the Relationship of Anger and Depression: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jody L.; Gray, Elizabeth A.; Fuqua, Dale R.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory scales revealed that women scored significantly higher than men on depression, whereas there were no significant differences on any of the six anger scales. These findings support further research on functional affective differences between men…

  16. Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Anger Experience and Expression among Partner Assaultive Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    The author investigated the acute effects of alcohol intoxication on anger experience and expression among 46 maritally violent (MV) and 56 maritally nonviolent (NV) men randomly assigned to receive alcohol, placebo, or no alcohol. Participants completed an anger-arousing articulated thoughts in simulated situations (ATSS) paradigm and imagined…

  17. Reduction of assaultive behavior following anger treatment of forensic hospital patients with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaco, Raymond W; Taylor, John L

    2015-02-01

    Anger is related to violence prior to hospitalization, during hospitalization, and after discharge. Meta-analyses have established treatment efficacy in reducing anger, but few studies have addressed whether reduced anger leads to lowered aggressive behavior. This study concerns individually-delivered anger treatment, specialized for offenders with intellectual disabilities, delivered twice weekly for 18 sessions to 50 forensic hospital patients. Assessments involved patient self-report of anger, staff ratings of anger and aggression, and case records of assaultive incidents. Physical assault data were obtained from records 12 months pre-treatment and 12 months post-treatment. Significant reductions in assaults following treatment were found by GEE analyses, controlling for age, gender, length of stay, IQ, and pre-hospital violence. Following treatment, physical attacks reduced by more than half, dropping from approximately 3.5 attacks per patient 6 months prior to treatment, versus approximately 1 attack per patient in the 6-12 month interval post-treatment. In hierarchical regressions, controlling for IQ, reduction in physical assaults was associated with pre-to post-treatment change in anger level. These findings buttress the efficacy of anger treatment for patients having histories of violence and have significance for patient mental health, hospital staff well-being, therapeutic milieu, hospital management, and service delivery costs. PMID:25569340

  18. Anger, Violence, and Academic Performance: A Study of Troubled Minority Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jacqueline; Barner, Celious III; Hudson, Betsy; Rosignon-Carmouche, Lee A.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the relationship between anger, violence, and academic performance among troubled adolescents participating in a risk reduction intervention that stressed emotional confrontation and behavior change support. Surveys indicated that anger management was unrelated to violence or academic performance. Loss of control over time, concentration,…

  19. Effects of Pessimism and Explanatory Style on Development of Anger in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Peter; Smith, Douglas C.; Curtis, David

    2003-01-01

    Assesses high school students' levels of dispositional optimism and pessimism, explanatory style and anger in relation to the school setting. Results suggest that anger management programs focusing on cognitive restructuring and related strategies can be a powerful means for reducing aggressive behaviors at school. (Contains 38 references.) (GCP)

  20. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive symptomatology: patients with Anorexia Binge-Purging and Bulimia Nervosa were more likely to be diagnosed with MD. Irritable mood was found in the 73% of patients with MD. High Harm Avoidance (HA and low Self-Directedness (SD predicted MD independently of severity of the ED symptomatology, several clinical variables, and ED diagnosis. Assessing both personality and depressive symptoms could be useful to provide effective treatments. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the pathogenetic role of HA and SD for ED and MD.

  1. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  2. Validation of the Novaco Anger Scale-Provocation Inventory (Danish) With Nonclinical, Clinical, and Offender Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum; Novaco, Raymond; Heinola-Nielsen, Vivian;

    2015-01-01

    Anger has high prevalence in clinical and forensic settings, and it is associated with aggressive behavior and ward atmosphere on psychiatric units. Dysregulated anger is a clinical problem in Danish mental health care systems, but no anger assessment instruments have been validated in Danish...... aggressive behavior in hospital. Regression analyses showed that higher scores on NAS increase the risk of having acted aggressively in the past and of acting aggressively in the future....... investigated with samples of 477 nonclinical, 250 clinical, 167 male prisoner, and 64 male forensic participants. Anger prevalence and its relationship with other anger measures, anxiety/depression, and aggression were examined. NAS-PI was found to have high reliability, concurrent validity, and discriminant...

  3. The Relationship of Spiritual Beliefs and Involvement with the Experience of Anger and Stress in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterowd, Carrie; Harrist, Steve; Thomason, Nancy; Worth, Sheri; Carlozzi, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of spiritual beliefs and involvement with anger and stress in college students. The spirituality scales were positively related to perceived stress and most of the anger subscales. When stress was controlled, the spirituality subscales still contributed significantly to anger.

  4. Anger Emotional Stress Influences VEGF/VEGFR2 and Its Induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiao, Mingqi; Wu, Jibiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We discuss the influence of anger emotional stress upon VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Methods. We created a rat model of induced anger (anger-out and anger-in) emotional response using social isolation and resident-intruder paradigms and assessed changes in hippocampus' VEGF content, neuroplasticity, and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Results. The resident-intruder method successfully generated anger-out and anger-in models that differed significantly in composite aggression score, aggression incubation, open field behavior, sucrose preference, and weight gain. Anger emotional stress decreased synaptic connections and VEGFR2 expression. Anger emotional stress led to abnormal expression of VEGF/VEGFR2 mRNA and protein and disorderly expression of key factors in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Fluoxetine administration ameliorated behavioral abnormalities and damage to hippocampal neurons caused by anger emotional stress, as well as abnormal expression of some proteins in VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Conclusion. This research provides a detailed classification of anger emotion and verifies its influence upon VEGF and the VEGF-induced signaling pathway, thus providing circumstantial evidence of mechanisms by which anger emotion damages neurogenesis. As VEGFR2 can promote neurogenesis and vasculogenesis in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, these results suggest that anger emotional stress can result in decreased neurogenesis. PMID:27057362

  5. The effect of anger management levels and communication skills of Emergency Department staff on being exposed to violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GozdeYildiz Das

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the effect of anger management levels and communication skills of emergency department staff on their frequency of being exposed to violence. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey between 11 April and 15 October 2013 by using a questionnaire including descriptive features, anger management scale, and communication skills scale applied to 283 health personnel working in children and adult emergency department clinics. Results Statistically significant differences were found between the health workers’ ages and their anger control levels, marital status and anger-in and anger control levels, working position and anger-in levels, and between anger-in, anger-out and anger control levels based on their level of education. Statistically significant differences were also found between age and communication levels based on the personnel’s working position. Statistically significant difference between the anger-in subscale of health personnel based on their state of being exposed to violence was found (78.4% of the health workers had been exposed to violence. Conclusion In the in-service programs of institutions, there should be trainings conducted about anger management and effective communication techniques so that the health personnel can be aware of their own feelings and express anger in a suitable way.

  6. Anger is more influential than joy: sentiment correlation in weibo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Fan

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed the tremendous growth of the online social media. In China, Weibo, a Twitter-like service, has attracted more than 500 million users in less than five years. Connected by online social ties, different users might share similar affective states. We find that the correlation of anger among users is significantly higher than that of joy. While the correlation of sadness is surprisingly low. Moreover, there is a stronger sentiment correlation between a pair of users if they share more interactions. And users with larger number of friends possess more significant sentiment correlation with their neighborhoods. Our findings could provide insights for modeling sentiment influence and propagation in online social networks.

  7. SPECIFIC EFFECTS OF ANGER RUMINATION ON PARTICULAR EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinfang; Yang, Yin; Qian, Mingyi; Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene

    2015-12-01

    The effects of two types of rumination on different kinds of executive functions were investigated. Fifty-nine participants (M age = 22.8 yr., SD = 2.5) were assigned to one of three conditions and instructed either to: (1) ruminate in a self-distanced way, (2) ruminate in a self-immersed way, or (3) think about the layout of their campus following anger induction. Afterward, the participants were directed to finish tasks designed to assess three kinds of executive functions: shifting, inhibition, and updating. Results showed that self-immersed rumination impaired shifting ability the most, while participants engaged in self-distanced rumination showed the worst performance on the inhibition task. No significant difference was found in the updating task. These results suggest that rumination influenced particular executive functions in different ways. PMID:26595287

  8. Suicidal behavior among alcohol dependents: Relationship with anger and personality dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol dependents have high percentage of nonfatal suicidal behaviors. There is no substantial data on anger and personality correlates of suicidal behaviors among alcohol users. The present work explored the relationship of anger and personality with suicidal behaviors among alcohol-dependent individuals. Materials and Methods: Sociodemographic data sheet, State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI, and Neo Five-Factor Inventory (NFFI were administered on 30 subjects who had lifetime history of suicidal attempt. Results: A total of 80% attempted suicide in the intoxicated states, 56.7% were high on trait anger, and 60% were high on anger expression outward. A significant negative correlation was found between expressing feelings (verbally/physically openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness. A significant positive correlation was found between anger expression inward and neuroticism. Conclusions: It helped in understanding the psychological variables associated with suicidal behavior among alcohol-dependent individuals and has implications for addressing neuroticism openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness for bringing change in anger expression.

  9. Modeling anger and aggressive driving behavior in a dynamic choice-latent variable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaf, Mazen; Abou-Zeid, Maya; Kaysi, Isam

    2015-02-01

    This paper develops a hybrid choice-latent variable model combined with a Hidden Markov model in order to analyze the causes of aggressive driving and forecast its manifestations accordingly. The model is grounded in the state-trait anger theory; it treats trait driving anger as a latent variable that is expressed as a function of individual characteristics, or as an agent effect, and state anger as a dynamic latent variable that evolves over time and affects driving behavior, and that is expressed as a function of trait anger, frustrating events, and contextual variables (e.g., geometric roadway features, flow conditions, etc.). This model may be used in order to test measures aimed at reducing aggressive driving behavior and improving road safety, and can be incorporated into micro-simulation packages to represent aggressive driving. The paper also presents an application of this model to data obtained from a driving simulator experiment performed at the American University of Beirut. The results derived from this application indicate that state anger at a specific time period is significantly affected by the occurrence of frustrating events, trait anger, and the anger experienced at the previous time period. The proposed model exhibited a better goodness of fit compared to a similar simple joint model where driving behavior and decisions are expressed as a function of the experienced events explicitly and not the dynamic latent variable. PMID:25460097

  10. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorys eCastelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP in the facial region.Methods: 45 MP patients (mean (SD age: 38.9 (11.6 and 45 female healthy controls (mean (SD age: 37.8 (13.7 were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (Beck Depression Inventory – short form, anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y, emotional distress (Distress Thermometer, anger (State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory - 2 and alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale.Results: the MP patients showed significantly higher scores in the depression, anxiety and emotional distress inventories. With regard to anger, only the Anger Expression-In scale showed a significant difference between the groups, with higher scores for the MP patients. In addition, the MP patients showed significantly higher alexithymic scores, in particular in the Difficulty in identifying feelings (F1 subscale of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20. Alexithymia was positively correlated with the Anger Expression-In scale. Both anger and alexithymia showed significant positive correlations with anxiety scores, but only anger was positively correlated with depression. Conclusion: A higher prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms associated with a higher prevalence of alexithymia and expression-in modality to cope with anger was found in the MP patients. Because the presence of such psychological aspects could contribute to generate or exacerbate the suffering of these patients, our results highlight the need to include accurate investigation of psychological aspects in MP patients in normal clinical practice in order to allow clinicians to carry out more efficacious management and treatment strategies.

  11. Anger as a predictor of suicidal ideation in middle-school students in Korea: gender difference in threshold point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongeun; Choi, Heeseung; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi; Shin, Dong-soo

    2009-01-01

    Studies on gender differences in suicidal ideation and anger are limited. Furthermore, these studies focused on linear relationships, which limits the full understanding of the complex relationships and hampers identification of high-risk groups for suicidal tendencies. Hence, this study aims to assess the gender differences in: (1) the level of suicidal ideation and anger; (2) predictors for suicidal ideation; and (3) the varying association between suicidal ideation and anger. The target population for this cross-sectional, correlational study was adolescents aged 13 to 15 years living in South Korea. A total of 258 adolescents (160 boys and 98 girls) completed the Multidimensional Anger Inventory and Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, multiple linear, and spline regression analysis. Girls reported significantly higher scores in both anger and suicidal ideation. While anger was a significant predictor for suicidal ideation only in boys, both school life satisfaction and anger were significant predictors of suicidal ideation in girls. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, the spline regression revealed a significant threshold point in the relationship between anger and suicidal ideation, particularly among girls. At the threshold anger point of 117.67, 12.5% of girls belonged to the high-risk group. The gender-specific patterns of the relationship between suicidal ideation and anger and the existence of threshold points confirmed the need for targeted suicidal preventive programs focusing on controlling anger. PMID:19764277

  12. Comparison of Drivers' Aggression Frequency on and off the Road According to the Propensity to Experience Anger While driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herrero-Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An important question in the study of driving anger is whether drivers express anger the same way on and off the road. With the aim of analyzing the between-group and within-group differences in a heterogeneous sample of 157 drivers divided in high, moderate and low-driving anger, four ways of expressing anger were assessed (verbally, physically, displacedly and adaptatively, both in general and behind the wheel. The between-group results showed that high anger drivers scored higher than low angered in all types of desadaptative expression on the road (η2 = .08 - .16 as well as in the physical (η2 = .06 and displaced (η2= .10 ways off the road. The within-group comparisons evidenced high equivalence in each of the three groups about the preference of anger expressions on and off the road, concluding the apparent equivalence of the behavior in all the contexts. Clinical and road safety implications are discussed.

  13. Myths And Reality About Anger In The Workplace: What Do Managers Need To Know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley J. Bennington

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing categorization of workplace data ignores an opportunity to provide more distinct and relevant information on workplace incidents. This article describes current reporting of violence in the workplace and what issues must be addressed to be of better service to organizations. In addition to knowing statistical realities, managers must become very self-aware of their reactions to anger as a part of the overall anger management strategy of the organization. Emotional Intelligence research provides valuable tools for managers and supervisors to improve their responses to anger in the workplace.

  14. Visual search for emotional expressions: Effect of stimulus set on anger and happiness superiority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Ruth A; Becker, Stefanie I; Lipp, Ottmar V

    2016-06-01

    Prior reports of preferential detection of emotional expressions in visual search have yielded inconsistent results, even for face stimuli that avoid obvious expression-related perceptual confounds. The current study investigated inconsistent reports of anger and happiness superiority effects using face stimuli drawn from the same database. Experiment 1 excluded procedural differences as a potential factor, replicating a happiness superiority effect in a procedure that previously yielded an anger superiority effect. Experiments 2a and 2b confirmed that image colour or poser gender did not account for prior inconsistent findings. Experiments 3a and 3b identified stimulus set as the critical variable, revealing happiness or anger superiority effects for two partially overlapping sets of face stimuli. The current results highlight the critical role of stimulus selection for the observation of happiness or anger superiority effects in visual search even for face stimuli that avoid obvious expression related perceptual confounds and are drawn from a single database. PMID:25861807

  15. Anger: A Neglected Group Treatment Issue with Cardiac Transplantation Recipients and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstam, Varda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the group process, specifically as it evolved with respect to anger in cardiac transplantation recipients and their families. Discusses the implications of these findings for professionals working in group settings with recipients and their families. (JBJ)

  16. The impact of relaxing music on prisoners' levels of anxiety and anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensimon, Moshe; Einat, Tomer; Gilboa, Avi

    2015-04-01

    Listening to relaxing music was found to reduce state anxiety and state anger among various populations. Nonetheless, the impact of relaxing music in prisons has not yet been studied. The current study examines the impact of relaxing music on levels of state anxiety and state anger among a random sample of 48 criminal prisoners. Main findings are as follows: (a) level of state anxiety decreased among the treatment group compared with the comparison group and (b) level of state anger decreased among the treatment group compared with the comparison group. Findings are discussed in light of other studies that have shown positive effects of exposure to relaxing music on levels of anxiety and anger among other populations. The final part of the study provides practical recommendations for prison administrators regarding implementation of programs of relaxing music in various prison facilities. PMID:24265309

  17. The Relationship between Students Problematic Internet Usage and Their Anger Expression Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvan Emine Ata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The research was carried out analytically to examine the relationship between students problematic internet usage and their anger expression manners. METHOD : The population sample of the research consists of 360 students, selected among 1592 students with stratified sampling, that are studying in Educational Faculty, Vocational School and Health School of Agri Ibrahim Cecen University in 2008�2009 academic year. A determined number of students, selected from each school according to basic random sampling method, is included in the research. In the research, �Personal Information Form�, �Problematic Internet Usage Scale� (PIUS and �Trait Anger and Anger Expression Scale� are used. The data are analyzed by means of frequency distribution and correlation analysis. FINDINGS: %74,5 of students were 18�22 age range, %55 of them men, %69,7 had nuclear family, %71,1 has well economic conditions and %49,4 were living with their families during education. The average PIUS of students is 60.6119.50, and when the subgroup point averages are considered, the internet negative consequences point average is calculated as 26.4510.37, social benefit/ social welfare point average as 18.837.31 and excessive usage point average is calculated as 15.35.20. Trait anger point average of students is determines as 22.336.43, anger control point averages as 21.104.83, interior anger point averages as 16.634.04 and exterior anger point average is determined as 15.814.35. A positive relationship is detected between students` problematic internet usage scale total point and trait anger (r=0.27, p=0.00, interior anger (r= 0.18, p=0.00, exterior anger (r= 014, p= 0.00 point averages. RESULT: A meaningful lower relationship is found proportionately between students� problematic internet usage and their anger expression manner. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 473-480

  18. Ruminating on rumination: Are rumination on anger and sadness differentially related to aggression and depressed mood?

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, M.; Moretti, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor for aggression and depression, yet few studies have incorporated both aggression and depression in a unitary model that reflects how rumination predicts these distinct conditions. The current study examined rumination on anger and sadness to assess their unique relations with aggression and depressed mood, respectively. Analogous anger rumination and sadness rumination questionnaires were used to minimize measurement variance, and were completed by 226 undergraduat...

  19. Personality predictors of speeding in young drivers: Anger vs. sensation seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Delhomme, Patricia; CHAURAND, Nadine; PARAN, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Among personality factors, sensation seeking and anger are the main predictors of voluntary risky behaviors. The studies that compare the impact of these factors show that anger is a greater predictor of voluntary risky driving behaviors than sensation seeking. However, these studies usually average data from several risky behaviors, and it is possible that analyzing data from individual risky behaviors would yield different results. Speeding in particular corresponds more closely to the defi...

  20. Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members

    OpenAIRE

    Worthen, M; Rathod, SD; Cohen, G.; Sampson, L; Ursano, R; Gifford, R; Fullerton, C; Galea, S.; Ahern, J.

    2014-01-01

    Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n=1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PT...

  1. Amygdala-Orbitofrontal Resting State Functional Connectivity is Associated with Trait Anger

    OpenAIRE

    Fulwiler, Carl E.; King, Jean A; Zhang, Nanyin

    2012-01-01

    An important distinction in research on the neural mechanisms of emotion regulation involves the relatively limited duration of emotional states vs. emotional traits which are defined as the stable tendency to experience particular emotions in daily life. Neuroimaging investigations of the regulation of anger states point to involvement of reciprocal changes in prefrontal cortex and amygdala activity, but the neural substrate of trait anger has received less attention. We used resting-state f...

  2. Beware the angry leader: Trait anger and trait anxiety as predictors of petty tyranny

    OpenAIRE

    Kant, Leo; SKOGSTAD, Anders; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Einarsen, Ståle

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the general aggression model and theories of victimization and temperamental goodness-of-fit, we investigated trait anger and trait anxiety as antecedents of petty tyranny: employing a multilevel design with data from 84 sea captains and 177 crew members. Leader trait anger predicted subordinate-reported petty tyranny. Subordinate trait anxiety was associated with subordinate-reported petty tyranny. Theassociation between leader traitanger and subordinate-reported pe...

  3. Positive correlation between serum interleukin-1β and state anger in rugby athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Mirko; Speranza, Lorenza; Franceschelli, Sara; Ialenti, Valentina; Iezzi, Irene; Patruno, Antonia; Rizzuto, Alessia; Robazza, Claudio; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Felaco, Mario; Grilli, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several studies reported a relationship between immune system activation and anger expression. Consequently, the aim of this study was to explore immunitary molecular mechanisms that potentially underlie anger expression. To this end, we applied the Frustration-Aggression Theory in a contact sport model, utilizing the nearing of sporting events to trigger anger feelings. In parallel, we evaluated the activation of immune system at mRNA levels. We enrolled 20 amateur rugby players (age ± SD, 27.2 ± 4.5) who underwent psychological assessment to evaluate anger, with the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), before rugby matches; at the same time blood samples were taken to analyze the variations of gene expression by microarray. During the 2 hr before each game, a significant increase was verified in the Rage State (RS) score compared to the score ascertained 72 hr before. At the same time, we found modulation in expression profile, in particular increased expression of gene that encodes interleukin l-β (IL-1β). In a regression analysis, RS score was related to IL-1β, and the potential risk factors age, body mass index, smoking, and drinking. The levels of cytokine were positively and independently related to RS score. Our results suggest that the nearing of sporting event can trigger anger state feelings and activate immune system in rugby players. We propose the IL-1β as a potential biological marker of anger. However, further research is necessary to clarify the correlation between cytokine and anger. PMID:23208827

  4. Effects of mental workloads on depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Azzem Ozkan; Mahmut Ozdevecioglu; Yasemin Kaya; Filiz Özşahin Koç

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals. A model was created in keeping with the main objective of the study, and regression analysis was carried out on the questionnaire responses from 168 accounting professionals employed in Kayseri. The results revealed the significant positive impacts of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sens...

  5. Effects of mental workloads on depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzem Ozkan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals. A model was created in keeping with the main objective of the study, and regression analysis was carried out on the questionnaire responses from 168 accounting professionals employed in Kayseri. The results revealed the significant positive impacts of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals.

  6. Anger, Cognition, Ideology: What Crash Can Show Us About Emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue J. Kim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract (E: Sue J. Kim’s essay “Anger, Cognition, Ideology: What Crash Can Show Us About Emotion” argues for the relevance and importance of cognitive studies to ethnic and postcolonial literary studies, and vice versa. After surveying recent developments in the field of cognitive studies, the essay combines cultural and cognitive approaches in order to examine anger in and around the 2005 Paul Haggis film Crash.

     

    Abstract (F: Dans cet article, l’auteur fait un plaidoyer pour l’application des études cognitives aux études ethniques et postcoloniales et inversement. L’essai présente d’abord un survol des récents développements dans le domaine des études cognitives, puis combine les approches culturelles et cognitives dans une lecture détaillée du thème de la colère dans le film Crash de Paul Haggis (2005.

     

  7. Chronic anger as a precursor to adult antisocial personality features: The moderating influence of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Samuel W; Perlman, Susan B; Byrd, Amy L; Raine, Adrian; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin A

    2016-01-01

    Anger is among the earliest occurring symptoms of mental health, yet we know little about its developmental course. Further, no studies have examined whether youth with persistent anger are at an increased risk of exhibiting antisocial personality features in adulthood, or how cognitive control abilities may protect these individuals from developing such maladaptive outcomes. Trajectories of anger were delineated among 503 boys using annual assessments from childhood to middle adolescence (ages ∼7-14). Associations between these trajectories and features of antisocial personality in young adulthood (age ∼28) were examined, including whether cognitive control moderates this association. Five trajectories of anger were identified (i.e., childhood-onset, childhood-limited, adolescent-onset, moderate, and low). Boys in the childhood-onset group exhibited the highest adulthood antisocial personality features (e.g., psychopathy, aggression, criminal charges). However, boys in this group were buffered from these problems if they had higher levels of cognitive control during adolescence. Findings were consistent across measures from multiple informants, replicated across distinct time periods, and remained when controlling for general intelligence and prior antisocial behavior. This is the first study to document the considerable heterogeneity in the developmental course of anger from childhood to adolescence. As hypothesized, good cognitive control abilities protected youth with persistent anger problems from developing antisocial personality features in adulthood. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:26618654

  8. The relationship between adult health and childhood maltreatment, as moderated by anger and ethnic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoza, Kimberly A; Wilson, Denise T; Widmann, Wendy A; Riley, Michelle A; Robertson, Thomas W; Maiello, Elizabeth; Villot, Nikisha; Manzella, Dana J; Ortiz-Garcia, Alberto L

    2014-03-01

    Childhood maltreatment, anger, and racial/ethnic background were examined in relation to physical health, psychological well-being, and blood pressure outcomes. This study used data from a diverse sample of African American, Latino, and Caucasian participants (N=198). Results from a series of multiple regressions indicated anger and total childhood maltreatment were robust predictors of poorer health. Although correlational analyses found maltreatment from the mother and father were associated with poorer health outcomes, when considered as part of the regression models, only a relationship between maltreatment from the mother and physical health was found. Greater anger scores were linked with lower blood pressure, particularly systolic blood pressure. Generally, more psychological and physical symptom reporting was found with greater anger scores, and higher levels of total maltreatment also predicted physical symptoms. The pattern of interactions indicated anger was more detrimental for African American participant's (and marginally so for Latino participant's) physical health. Interestingly, interactions also indicated total childhood maltreatment was related to fewer symptoms for Latino participants. Although child maltreatment may be viewed as a moral and/or human rights issue, this study provides evidence that it can also be viewed as a public health issue. Our study demonstrated that known health risk factors such as anger and maltreatment may operate in a different pattern dependent on ethnic/cultural background. The findings suggest health and health disparities research would benefit from greater exploration of the differential impact of certain moderating variables based on racial/ethnic background. PMID:24582658

  9. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Ayano; Kim, Min-Sun; Oshio, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control), independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned). The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed. PMID:27303332

  10. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eAkutsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control, independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned. The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed.

  11. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Ayano; Kim, Min-Sun; Oshio, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control), independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned). The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed. PMID:27303332

  12. Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Military Population: Differences by Trauma Context and Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Worthen, M; Rathod, SD; Cohen, G.; Sampson, L; Ursano, R; Gifford, R; Fullerton, C; Galea, S.; Ahern, J.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. Studies have found a stronger association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in military populations than in nonmilitary populations. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain this difference: Military populations are more prone to anger than nonmilitary populations, and traumas experienced on deployment create more anger than nondeployment traumas. To examine these hypotheses, we evaluated the associat...

  13. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management style

    OpenAIRE

    Bülent Gündüz; Binali Tunç; Yusuf İnandı

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches i...

  14. Neural substrates involved in anger induced by audio-visual film clips among patients with alcohol dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mi-Sook; Lee, Bae Hwan; Sohn, Jin-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the neural circuitry underlying anger processing among alcoholics. The purpose of this study was to examine the altered brain activity of alcoholic individuals during transient anger emotion. Methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 18 male patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence in an inpatient alcohol treatment facility and 16 social drinkers with similar demographics were scanned during the viewing of anger-provoking film clips. R...

  15. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Helps with Anger Issues in the Severe and Persistently Mentally Ill (SPMI) Population

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Ann Edins

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study conducted which used Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) to help with anger issues in people who have been previously diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI). Fifty-six participants were studied and questioned in depth for an understanding of their anger issues; as they relate to their diagnosis. Some of the questions that were considered were as follows: Is anger a direct result of their diagnosis? Is the medication they take somehow responsible? ...

  16. The relationship of anger and cognitive distortions with violence in violent offenders’ population: A meta-analytic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Pintea; Simona V. Chereji; Daniel David

    2012-01-01

    In the present meta-analysis, the magnitude of the relationship between cognitive distortions and anger and violent behaviour of incarcerated offenders, based on selected data for the relationship between anger and violence, and cognitive distortions and violence was empirically assessed. Out of nineteen studies included for analysis nine of them contain statistical indicators regarding the relationship between anger and violence, and fourteen studies regarding cognitive distortions and viole...

  17. Influence of music therapy on coping skills and anger management in forensic psychiatric patients: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, S.; Thaut, Michael H.; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavior of forensic psychiatric patients? To investigate this question, first a literature review is offered on music therapy and anger management in forensic psychiatry. Then, an explorative study is p...

  18. Determination of the Relation between Metabolic Syndrome and Anger in Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2015-09-01

    Material and Methods: The study included 78 obese women presenting to the diet outpatient clinic of Kahramanmaras Onikisubat Public Health Center between 1 June and 30 August 2014. Results: The mean age of the participants was 38.1+/-11.1 years (min=18, max=62. Forty-two participants (53.8% were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome, but 36 (46.2% did not fulfill the criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Forty-six participants (59.0% had obesity, 16 (20.5% had severe obesity and 16 (20.5% had morbid obesity. The participants diagnosed as metabolic syndrome had 21.1+/-5.4 and those without metabolic syndrome had 22.7+/-6.4 for the subscale of continuous anger. The participants with metabolic syndrome got significantly higher scores for continuous anger (p=0.011. The participants with metabolic syndrome and those without metabolic syndrome had similar scores for the subscale anger-in (p=0.058 and the subscale anger control (p=0.196. The participants with metabolic syndrome got significantly lower scores for the subscale anger-out (p=0.004. Conclusion: The study revealed that obese women diagnosed as metabolic syndrome had lower scores for Continuous Anger-Anger Manner Scale. Offering social and psychological support for people treated for obesity is important for mental health of these people. Follow-up of the patients offered treatment for obesity by a team including a psychiatrist can increase these patients' compliance with their diet and help to prevent comorbid psychopathologies. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 525-533

  19. High Anger Expression is Associated with Reduced Cortisol Awakening Response and Health Complaints in Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The extant evidence suggests a robust positive association between expression (anger expression-out) and suppression (anger expression-in) of anger and compromised health. Nevertheless, the underlying psychobiological mechanisms which explain these relationships are not well understood. This study examined whether anger expression would predict general health, cortisol awakening response (CAR) and evening cortisol levels in a community sample of 156 healthy young adults of both genders. Participants were distributed into two groups according to their anger expression scores: high and low anger expression (HAE and LAE, respectively). Findings indicated that those with HAE had worse self-reported health (p = .02) and higher CAR than the LAE group (p = .04). Moreover, high levels of anger expression-out (p self-reported health in both groups. On the other hand, high anger expression-out was associated with flattened CAR but only in the HAE group (p < .01). This study reinforces the need to develop effective strategies to provide mechanisms to regulate anger expression by promoting personal growth and positive skills that enhance individuals' well-being and quality of life and, in turn, their own health. PMID:27125918

  20. Study Finds Chronic Anger In U.S.Workplace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆小鹿

    1999-01-01

    据调查,美国近1/4的工人在工作场所长期感到“愤怒”。 其后果是严重的:Angry employees tend to have less energy snd interest inthe job. 怒从何来?下句中的5个由by引导的介词短语道出了全部真情: Employees are most likely to be angered ba a boss or supervisor(主管),by afellow employee or by others in the workplace not being productive,by tightdeadlines(催逼甚紧的最后期限)or by heavy workloads(工作量). 其中第2、3个介词短语(by a fellow employee or by others in the workplacenot being productive)不可忽视,分词短语折射出了工人的精神状态:anger的原由之一竟是伙伴的not being productive! 本文对这种现象有一“高屋建瓴”的分析: A turbulent(喧闹的)economic environment that has produced,on the onehand,productivity and growth and. on the other,wrenching(带来痛苦的)change and uncertainty,has buffeted(冲击)the workplace. 问题的两个方面通过上句的 on the one hand和 on the other讲得一清二楚。 这种anger也会演变,演变成本文所说的 workplace aggression,其最高形式是 resort to(诉诸)violence. 本文的末段出现了一个大家已经很熟悉的词汇:rampages(疯狂?

  1. Female murderers: Examination of the relationship between childhood traumatic experiences and anger expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrem Akduman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Adverse childhood period and abuse experiences may lead to some problems later in life. One of these problems is aggressive behavior, which is thought to be a reflection of the child’s increasing anger (Page, 2004; Olive, 2007.  Based on the fact that negative childhood experiences can lead to aggressive emotions, investigating the relationship between traumatic childhood experiences and female convicts’ aggression expression styles was considered important. Sample of the research consists of 77 females who are homicide convicts selected from correctional institutes in three different cities. Data gathered from the participants were examined by using the Turkish versions of The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and The State-Trait Anger Scale. A positive and meaningful relationship between childhood trauma experiences and trait anger levels of participants was observed. In addition, there was a significant relationship between childhood trauma experiences and domestic violence as well as perceived problematic relationship with family members during childhood. Trait anger and internal anger were also found to be significantly related to perceived problematic relationship with family members during childhood.   Results of the analyses were discussed in detail.

  2. Efektivitas Anger Management Training Untuk Menurunkan Agresivitas Pada Remaja Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrizulhaidi Nasrizulhaidi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui efektivitas anger management training untuk menurunkan agresivitas pada remaja disruptive behavior disorders. Subjek penelitian dipilih melalui screening dengan skala CPRS (Conduct Problem Risk Screen dan pengukuran agresivitas dengan skala Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BAQ. AMT (Anger Management Training berupa psikoedukasi, yang mempelajari tentang pemahaman dasar marah, ekspresi marah dan akibatnya, mengidentifikasi diri saat marah, mengontrol pikiran marah dan menentukan tingkat kemarahan. Selanjutnya memahami anger management melalui film, relaksasi otot dan pernapasan, cara menyelesaikan konflik, cara mengontrol marah dan perencanaan dalam mengontrol marah. Adapun metode intervensi yang digunakan terdiri dari diskusi kasus, latihan individual, presentasi dan modelling perilaku. Penempatan subjek dengan random assignment dibagi menjadi dua kelompok. Kelompok eksperimen berjumlah 10 orang, mendapat AMT selama 3 kali pertemuan dan setiap pertemuan memerlukan waktu 120 menit. Sementara subjek di kelompok kontrol juga berjumlah 10 orang, namun tidak mendapatkan perlakuan. Dapat disimpulkan anger management efektif untuk menurunkan agresivitas. Dalam hal ini subjek di kelompok eksperimen mengalami penurunan agresivitas setelah mendapat AMT dan subjek di kelompok kontrol mengalami peningkatan agresivitas karena tidak mendapatkan AMT. Selain itu AMT dapat pula diberikan pada individu yang memiliki kemampuan di bawah rata-rata, dengan memodifikasi program yang lebih berbentuk operasional konkrit. Kata kunci: anger management training, agresivitas, disruptive behavior disorders

  3. Emotion-relevant impulsivity predicts sustained anger and aggression after remission in bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anger and aggression are of concern even during remission for persons with bipolar I disorder, although there is substantial variability in the degree of anger and aggression across individuals. Little research is available to examine psychological models of anger and aggression for those with remitted bipolar disorder, and that was the goal of this study. Participants were 58 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, who were followed with monthly symptom severity interviews until they achieved remission, and then assessed using the Aggression-Short Form. We examined traditional predictors of clinical parameters and trauma exposure, and then considered three trait domains that have been shown to be elevated in bipolar disorder and have also been linked to aggression outside of bipolar disorder: emotion-relevant impulsivity, approach motivation, and dominance-related constructs. Emotion-relevant impulsivity was related to anger, hostility, verbal aggression, and physical aggression, even after controlling for clinical variables. Findings extend the importance of emotion-relevant impulsivity to another important clinical outcome and suggest the promise of using psychological models to understand the factors driving aggression and anger problems that persist into remission among persons with bipolar disorder. PMID:26437231

  4. ストレス課題における心臓血管系反応に対する怒り表出性の検討 : anger expression-inの効果

    OpenAIRE

    石原, 俊一

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that anger expressions such as anger-in, anger-out, and anger-control contribute to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). In the 1980s, an increased number of studies indicated that anger and hostility were directly related to CHD. Dembroski et al. reported the relationship between angiographically documented coronary arteriosclerosis and anger and hostility. Williams et al. found a relationship between the scale of hostility in the Minnesota Multiph...

  5. Lesson Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum within an Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Emily L.; Carlson, John S.; Guthrie, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Four fourth-grade boys participated in an anger management group using "Seeing Red: An Anger Management and Peacemaking Curriculum for Kids" facilitated by a school psychology intern and her supervisor (J. Simmonds, 2003). The group met for 30 min weekly for a total of 14 sessions. Lessons consisted of practicing skills and strategies related to…

  6. Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This commentary responds to "Lessons Learned From Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School," E. L. Sportsman, J. S. Carlson, and K. M. Guthrie's (2010/this issue) account of an anger control intervention's implementation and effectiveness in an elementary school setting. The accompanying article…

  7. Influence of music therapy on coping skills and anger management in forensic psychiatric patients : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, S.; Thaut, Michael H.; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavi

  8. The Relationship between the Recognition of Facial Expressions and Self-Reported Anger in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Kate A.; Rose, John

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study aims to examine the relationship between how individuals with intellectual disabilities report their own levels of anger, and the ability of those individuals to recognize emotions. It was hypothesized that increased expression of anger would be linked to lower ability to recognize facial emotional expressions and increased…

  9. The Relation of Brain Behavioral Systems, D Personality Type, Anger and Hostility in People with Gum Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Akbari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gum disease is a chronic bacterial infection that affects the gum structures. Given the importance of psychological factors and their impact on physical condition such as gum disease, the aim of this study was to investigate D personality type, brain behavioral systems and anger and hostility in people with gum disease. Materials and Methods: In this causal-comparative study, 50 women with and 50 women without gum disease (age range from 14 to 37 were selected using purposive sampling method and completed the questionnaires of multidimensional anger (Sigel, 1986, D personality type scale, Behavioral inhibition/activation system. MANOVA was used for data analysis. Results: Data analysis showed that groups had significant differences in behavioral inhibition system, behavioral activation system and its components (response to drives, fun seeking, reward responsiveness, D personality type and its components (negative affectivity, social inhibition, anger-arousal, hostile attitude and anger-in (p<0.05, but there were no differences in anger arousing situations and anger-out between them. Conclusion: People with gum disease score higher in BIS, and lower in BAS than normal people, and score higher in D personality type and its components, anger-arousal, hostile outlook, and anger-in. This suggests that psychological factors play a significant role in developing and continuing gum disease and possibly other psychosomatic disorders. So this study focuses on the decisive role of psychological treatments in prevention and promotion of physical and psychological health of people.

  10. Effects of anger and sadness on attentional patterns in decision making: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Cai

    2014-02-01

    Past research examining the effect of anger and sadness on decision making has associated anger with a relatively more heuristic decision-making approach. However, it is unclear whether angry and sad individuals differ while attending to decision-relevant information. An eye-tracking experiment (N=87) was conducted to examine the role of attention in links between emotion and decision making. Angry individuals looked more and earlier toward heuristic cues while making decisions, whereas sad individuals did not show such bias. Implications for designing persuasive messages and studying motivated visual processing were discussed. PMID:24765709

  11. The Role of Anger Rumination and Autism Spectrum Disorder-Linked Perseveration in the Experience of Aggression in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Fritz, Matthew S.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    This study (a) examined the role of anger rumination as a mediator of the relation between social anxiety and the experience of anger, hostility, and aggression, in the general population, and (b) evaluated the degree to which the presence of autism spectrum disorder characteristics moderates the indirect influence of anger rumination. We then…

  12. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction for African-American Men through Health Empowerment and Anger Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Torrance; Braithwaite, Harold; Johnson, Larry; Harris, Catrell; Katkowsky, Steven; Troutman, Adewale

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine impact of CVD risk reduction intervention for African-American men in the Atlanta Empowerment Zone (AEZ) designed to target anger management. Design: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test was employed as a non-parametric alternative to the t-test for independent samples. This test was employed because the data used in this analysis…

  13. He drove forward with a yell: anger in medicine and Homer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, A; Marshall, R; Levine, D

    2014-06-01

    We use Homer and Sun Tzu as a background to better understand and reformulate confrontation, anger and violence in medicine, contrasting an unproductive 'love of war' with a productive 'art of war' or 'art of strategy'. At first glance, it is a paradox that the healing art is not pacific, but riddled with militaristic language and practices. On closer inspection, we find good reasons for this cultural paradox yet regret its presence. Drawing on insights from Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey, we argue for better understanding of confrontation, anger, bullying, intimidation and violence in medicine in order to change the culture. For example, equating medicine with war is not a given condition of medicine but a convenient metaphor with historical origins and a historical trajectory. Other, non-martial metaphors, such as medicine as collaboration, may be more appropriate in an age of team-based care. Taking lessons from Homer, we suggest three key ways in which cold-hearted confrontation and anger in medicine can be transformed into productive, warm-hearted engagement: the transformation of angry impulse into (1) reflection, (2) moral courage and (3) empathy. Thinking with Homer can offer an aesthetically and morally charged alternative to the current body of literature on topics, such as anger in doctors, and how this may be 'managed', without recourse to an instrumental economy where emotions are viewed as commodities, and emotional responses can be 'trained' through communication skills courses. PMID:24194554

  14. The Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (1994 Version) in Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI, 1994 version) in Dutch violent forensic psychiatric patients and secondary vocational students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the subscale structure of the NAS was carried out, reliability was investigated, and relations were calculated between…

  15. Factor Structure of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5: Relationships Among Symptom Clusters, Anger, and Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Contractor, Ateka; Shea, Tracie; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    Scarce data are available regarding the dimensional structure of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and how factors relate to external constructs. We evaluated six competing models of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, including Anhedonia, Externalizing Behaviors, and Hybrid models, using confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 412 trauma-exposed college students. We then examined whether PTSD symptom clusters were differentially related to measures of anger and impulsivity using Wald chi-square tests. The seven-factor Hybrid model was deemed optimal compared with the alternatives. All symptom clusters were associated with anger; the strongest association was between externalizing behaviors and anger (r = 0.54). All symptom clusters, except reexperiencing and avoidance, were associated with impulsivity, with the strongest association between externalizing behaviors and impulsivity (r = 0.49). A seven-factor Hybrid model provides superior fit to DSM-5 PTSD symptom data, with the externalizing behaviors factor being most strongly related to anger and impulsivity. PMID:26669984

  16. State narcissism and aggression: The mediating roles of anger and hostile attributional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caina; Sun, Ying; Ho, Man Yee; You, Jin; Shaver, Phillip R; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-07-01

    Prior research has documented a relationship between narcissism and aggression but has focused only on dispositional narcissism without considering situational factors that may increase narcissism temporarily. This study explored the possibility that an increase in state narcissism would foster aggressive responding by increasing anger and hostile attributional bias following unexpected provocation among 162 college students from China. We created a guided-imagination manipulation to heighten narcissism and investigated its effects on anger, aroused hostile attribution bias, and aggressive responses following a provocation with a 2 (narcissism/neutral manipulation) × 2 (unexpected provocation/positive evaluation condition) between-subjects design. We found that the manipulation did increase self-reported state narcissism. The increase in state narcissism in turn heightened aggression, and this relation was mediated by increased anger. Regardless of the level of state narcissism, individuals were more aggressive after being provoked and this effect of provocation was mediated by hostile attributional bias. The findings indicate that narcissism can be temporarily heightened in a nonclinical sample of individuals, and that the effect of state narcissism on aggression is mediated by anger. Differences between state and trait narcissism and possible influences of culture are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:333-345, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27283271

  17. Pre-Service Classroom Teachers' Emotional Intelligence and Anger Expression Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin Baltaci, Hulya; Demir, Kamile

    2012-01-01

    In this study in which the pre-service classroom teachers' emotional intelligence and the ways of their anger expression styles were examined, correlational survey model was used. In total 342 students, 189 of whom were females and 153 of whom were males, constituted the participants of the research. The students are the first year and the senior…

  18. Enhanced sensitivity and response bias for male anger in women with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veague, Heather Barnett; Hooley, Jill M

    2014-03-30

    Interpersonal difficulties, which are characteristic of Borderline personality disorder (BPD), may be related to problems with social cognition. We explored facial emotion recognition in 44 women (15 with BPD, 15 healthy controls, and 14 with a history of childhood trauma but no BPD) examining the role of BPD and abuse history in the ability to detect fearful, angry and happy cues in emotional faces. In Task 1, participants viewed pictures of morphed faces containing different percentages of specific emotions and reported the emotion they saw. In Task 2, participants were asked to increase the intensity of a specific emotion on an initially neutral face until they could detect that emotion in the face. Across both tasks, BPD predicted the earlier detection of anger in male faces. BPD symptoms also predicted the misidentification of anger in male faces containing no anger cues. Although participants with BPD were slower to recognize happiness in male faces, their overall ability to recognize happiness was unimpaired. Abuse history did predict problems with happiness recognition. Finally, recognition of fear was unrelated to abuse history and BPD. Findings suggest that BPD is associated with a bias toward seeing anger in males and that this is independent of abuse history. PMID:24485062

  19. Communicating anger and contempt in intergroup conflict : Exploring their relational functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bartholomeus

    2015-01-01

    Although the experience of anger in intergroup conflict is typically viewed as a destructive force that is best kept under wraps, the current dissertation suggests that its communication can help de-escalate intergroup conflict because of its relational function. Specifically, this entails that the

  20. Anger and attitudinal reactions to negative feedback: The effects of emotional instability and power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemann, Jana; Wisse, Barbara; Rus, Diana; Van Yperen, Nico W.; Sassenberg, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Feedback is a basic tool that is used to stimulate learning and performance at all organizational levels. However, negative feedback can sometimes evoke defensive responses such as feelings of anger or the repudiation of the feedback. In two experiments we explored whether people’s negating response

  1. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  2. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants' anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  3. Analyzing the traditional and anti-traditional features in Look Back in Anger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 张宪

    2009-01-01

    The thesis takes John Osborne' s play Look Back in Anger as an example to analyze the new features in British dramas after the World War II. The thesis sums up the revolution of postwar drama by comparing with the traditional features of British dramas in the aspects of its writing style, language and the two sexual relationships.

  4. Posttraumatic Anger, Recalled Peritraumatic Emotions, and PTSD in Victims of Violent Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, M. J. J.; Winkel, F. W.; Bogaerts, S.

    2011-01-01

    A mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design was employed to explore the association between posttraumatic anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; symptoms) in victims of civilian violence. It was speculated that this relationship is mainly due to concurrent recalled peritraumatic emotions. Such emotions may be interpreted to result from…

  5. The Colors of Anger, Envy, Fear, and Jealously: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupka, Ralph B.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studies to what extent emotion words--anger, envy, fear, and jealousy--reminded samples of Americans, Germans, Mexicans, Poles and Russians, of 12 terms of color. Responses from 661 undergraduates suggest that cross-modal associations originate in universal human experiences and in culture-specific variables, such as language, mythology, and…

  6. Frontal cortical asymmetry may partially mediate the influence of social power on anger expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong eLi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies.

  7. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  8. Respect-Based Control and Anger as Determinants of Children's Socio-Emotional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awong, Tsasha; Grusec, Joan E.; Sorenson, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Shortly after the birth of their infants, teenage working-class mothers were assessed on attitudes toward the need for deference to family authority (respect-based control) and anger. Their children's internalizing and externalizing problems and self-esteem were assessed approximately 12 years later. High respect-based control was linked to higher…

  9. The Role of Depressed Mood and Anger in the Relationship between Family Conflict and Delinquent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigfusdottir, Inga-Dora; Farkas, George; Silver, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on R. Agnew's (Foundation for a general strain theory of crime and delinquency. Criminology 30: 47-87, 1992) general strain theory, this paper examines whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of family conflict on delinquency. We examine data on 7,758 students, 14-16 years old, attending the compulsory 9th and 10th grades of…

  10. Maternal Socialization of Children's Anger, Sadness, and Physical Pain in Two Communities in Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Vaishali Vidhatri; Martini, Tanya Susan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recognition of cultural influences in child socialization, little is known about socialization of emotion in children from different cultures. This study examined (a) Gujarati Indian mothers' reports concerning their beliefs, affective and behavioral responses to their children's displays of anger, sadness, and physical pain, and (b)…

  11. Anger Expression Styles of Hearing Impaired Individuals Doing Sport and Those Not Doing Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the anger expression styles between the sportive hearing impaired individuals and the sedentary hearing impaired individuals. In the sportive hearing impaired group, there were 170 participants: 62 females and 108 males doing basketball, volleyball and football teams as licensed sportsmen in various clubs…

  12. Group process as a mechanism of change in the group treatment of anger and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James; Holman, Krista; Seymour, Bailey; Dinges, Brandy; Ronan, George F

    2015-04-01

    Angry reactions can present unique challenges to the process of conducting group therapy, especially when providing group treatment to participants who have histories of angry or aggressive behavior. This article briefly reviews relevant literature and describes a group-based violence reduction training program (VRTP). The VRTP conceptualizes anger and aggression from a frustration-aggression framework and employs treatment derived from research in the area of social problem-solving. An emphasis is placed on how fostering group experiences consistent with Irving Yalom's classic work on the theory and practice of group therapy can reinforce skill acquisition and general treatment responsiveness. Management of the group process is a plausible mechanism of change in group treatment of anger. We highlight the challenges and benefits of dealing with anger-infused communication while ensuring the integrity of the overall group process. Case examples are provided for illustration of VRTP. Future research can answer important questions about group process and mechanisms of change in group-based treatments for anger and aggression. PMID:25760784

  13. Anger among Allies: Audre Lorde's 1981 Keynote Admonishing the National Women's Studies Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lester C.

    2011-01-01

    This essay argues that Audre Lorde's 1981 keynote speech, "The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism," has much to contribute to communication scholars' understanding of human biases and rhetorical artistry. The significance of Lorde's subject is one reason for devoting critical attention to her speech, because, in contemporary public life in…

  14. Anger expression, violent behavior, and symptoms of depression among male college students in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane Yemane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is an important global public health problem. Given the scarcity of studies involving African youths, this study was conducted to evaluate the associations of anger expression and violent behavior with symptoms of depression among male college students. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics and violent behavior among 1,176 college students in Awassa, Ethiopia in June, 2006. The questionnaire incorporated the Spielberger Anger-Out Expression (SAOE scale and symptoms of depression were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Multivariable logistic regression procedures were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. Results Symptoms of depression were evident in 23.6% of participants. Some 54.3% of students reported committing at least one act of violence in the current academic year; and 29.3% of students reported high (SAOE score ≥ 15 levels of anger-expression. In multivariate analysis, moderate (OR = 1.97; 95%CI 1.33–2.93 and high (OR = 3.23; 95%CI 2.14–4.88 outward anger were statistically significantly associated with increased risks of depressive symptoms. Violent behavior was noted to be associated with depressive symptoms (OR = 1.82; 95%CI 1.37–2.40. Conclusion Further research should be conducted to better characterize community and individual level determinants of anger-expression, violent behavior and depression among youths.

  15. THE ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANGER EXPRESSION AND EMPATHIC DISPOSITIONS OF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anger level and emphatic concern of young wrestlers and determine the relationship between anger expression and empathic dispositions of Turkish young national wrestling team players. The study was conducted in 46 wrestlers from Turkish young national wrestling team whose ages differed from 17 to 20 (19.0 ± 0.82. The Interpersonal Reactivity Index: IRI which was developed by Davis (1980 and translated into Turkish by Engeler (2005 and the Anger Expression Inventory which was developed by Spielberger (1988 and translated into Turkish by Özer (1994 have been used for collecting data. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk tests were employed to test whether or not scores obtained from the inventory followed a normal distribution before the statistical analyses of the data were initiated and it was found out that observation values did not follow a normal distribution. Since there is not a normal distribution of the data non-parametric correlation test Spearman Correlation was performed. Statistical analyses of the data obtained were performed using Portable IBM SPSS Statistics v19 program. Minimum and maximum values of the mean scores obtained from the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and Anger Expression Inventory subscales were presented in tables. The analysis showed that there is a significant relationship (p<0.05 between anger expression and empathic dispositions of Turkish young national wrestling team players. This situation was observed frequently athletes who are dealing with combat sports. This result is consistent with the literature.

  16. Effects of expression ways and traits of anger emotion on autonomic nerve in the emotion recovery stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹向红

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of expression ways and traits of anger emotion on autonomic nerve in the emotion recovery stage.Methods The 48 healthy undergraduate students were recruited as subjects,who were

  17. Filipino Mothers’ Self-Efficacy in Managing Anger and in Parenting, and Parental Rejection as Predictors of Child Delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Daganzo, Mary Angeline A.; Peña Alampay, Liane; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The authors tested a model in which Filipino mothers’ self-efficacy in managing anger/irritation influenced child delinquency via two parenting variables: parental self-efficacy and parental rejection. Structured interviews were conducted with 99 mothers twice with an interval of one year with efficacy beliefs and rejection measured in the first year and child delinquency data collected in the following year. Path analyses showed that self-efficacy in managing anger/irritation negatively pred...

  18. Emotion Control Values and Responding to an Anger Provocation inAsian-American and European-American Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Mauss, Iris B.; Butler, Emily A.; Nicole A Roberts; Chu, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined whether Asian-American (AA) versus European-American (EA) women differed in experiential, expressive, or autonomic physiological responding to a laboratory anger provocation and assessed the mediating role of values about emotional control. Results indicate that AA participants reported and behaviorally displayed less anger than EA participants, while there were no group differences in physiological responses. Observed differences in emotional responses were part...

  19. Longitudinal Pathways from Marital Hostility to Child Anger During Toddlerhood: Genetic Susceptibility and Indirect Effects via Harsh Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Kimberly A.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David

    2011-01-01

    We examined direct and indirect pathways from marital hostility to toddler anger/frustration via harsh parenting and parental depressive symptoms, with an additional focus on the moderating role of genetic influences as inferred from birth parent anger/frustration. Participants were 361 linked triads of birth mothers, adoptive parents, and adopted children who were 9 (T1) and 18 (T2) months old across the study period. Results indicated an indirect effect from T1 marital hostility to T2 toddl...

  20. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving 201Tl (n = 120) or 99mTc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress (99mTc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress (99mTc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, 201Tl 92 %, 99mTc-Low 86 %, 99mTc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p 201Tl or 99mTc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 ± 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 ± 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  1. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Fourquet, Nicolas [Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique [AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); INSERM U 773 Inserm and Denis Diderot University, Paris (France); Koehl, Gregoire; Roch, Veronique [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Imbert, Laetitia [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Centre Alexis Vautrin, Department of Radiotherapy, Vandoeuvre (France); Poussier, Sylvain [INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Fay, Renaud [INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique CIC-P 9501, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM U961, Nancy (France); Hopital de Brabois, CHU-Nancy, Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-03-15

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving {sup 201}Tl (n = 120) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, {sup 201}Tl 92 %, {sup 99m}Tc-Low 86 %, {sup 99m}Tc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p < 0.001). This larger extent was mainly observed in 50 obese patients who were in the {sup 201}Tl or {sup 99m}Tc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 {+-} 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 {+-} 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  2. Sibling bullying perpetration: associations with gender, grade, peer perpetration, trait anger, and moral disengagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, Ibrahim; Campbell, Marilyn A

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated bullying among siblings in both traditional and cyber forms, and the associations of gender, grade, peer bullying perpetration, trait anger, and moral disengagement. The participants were 455 children in Grades 5 to 12 (262 girls and 177 boys with 16 unknown gender) who had a sibling. As the number of siblings who only bullied by technology was low, these associations were not able to be calculated. However, the findings showed that the percentage of sibling traditional bullying perpetration (31.6%) was higher than peer bullying perpetration (9.8%). Sibling bullies reported engaging in complex behaviors of perpetration and victimization in both the physical and in cyber settings, although the number was small. Gender, trait anger, moral disengagement, and bullying peers at school (but not grade) were all significantly associated with sibling traditional bullying perpetration. The implications of the findings are discussed for bullying intervention and prevention programs to understand childhood bullying in diverse contexts. PMID:25038224

  3. The characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Mohammadifar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was conducted to compare the characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideation. Method: This research was and the causal-comparative research method which is categorized in descriptive one. Sample in this study was included 300 addicts referred to the addiction treatment clinic in Semnan province. By convenience sampling with considering of entry criteria 300 addicts selected and based on the suicidal ideation scores were categorized to two groups with and without suicide ideation. Suicide ideation, buss and Perry’s aggression and borderline personality questionnaires administered among selected sample. Findings: Borderline personality traits, anger, hostility and aggression were higher in suicidal addicts in comparison of non-suicidal. Conclusion: Seems essential screening and identifying addicts which features high aggression and borderline personality for prevention of suicide.

  4. [The effects of media violence on aggression: focus on the role of anger evoked by provocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, S; Endo, K; Yoshida, F

    2001-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of anger evoked by earlier provocation on cognition, emotion, and aggressive behavior after being exposed to media violence. Sixty male undergraduates participated in the experiment. Before viewing one of three videos (either highly violent, violent with high entertainment, or nonviolent), half of the subjects were provoked by a confederate posing as another subject. Subjects' heart rates and eyeblink rates were recorded while viewing the video. After viewing the video, subjects described their thoughts that occurred while watching the video and rated their affective reactions toward the video. Finally, subjects' aggressive behavior toward the confederate was measured. Results of covariance structure analysis suggested that (a) anger evoked by provocation and high level of violence in videos additively elicited negative cognition and affect, which further facilitated aggressive behavior, and (b) high level of entertainment in videos elicited positive cognition and affect, which alleviated negative cognition and affect. PMID:11494654

  5. Group-based Compunction and Anger: Their Antecedents and Consequences in Relation to Colonial Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Figueiredo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Group-based emotions can be experienced by group members for the past misdeeds of their ingroup towards an outgroup.. The present study examines distinct antecedents and consequences of group-based compunction and anger in two countries with a history of colonization (Portugal, N = 280 and the Netherlands, N = 184. While previous research has focused mainly on ingroup-focused antecedents of group-based emotions, such as ingroup identification and perceptions of responsibility, our research also analyzed outgroup-focused variables, such as outgroup identification and meta-perceptions. Multiple group structural equation modeling showed that group-based compunction and group-based anger have similar antecedents (exonerating cognitions, collectivism, outgroup identification and meta-perceptions. Furthermore, the results showed that the two emotions have distinct but related consequences for the improvement of intergroup relations (compensation, subjective importance of discussing the past and forgiveness assignment.

  6. Easier contagion and weaker ties make anger spread faster than joy in social media

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Rui; Zhao, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Similar to face-to-face communication in daily life, more and more evidence suggests that human emotion also spread in online social media through virtual interactions. However, the mechanism underlying the emotion contagion, like whether different feelings diffuse unlikely or how the spread is coupled with the social network, is rarely investigated. Indeed, because of the costly expense and spatio-temporal limitations, it is challenging for conventional questionnaires or controlled experiments. While given the instinct of collecting natural affective responses of massive connected individuals, online social media offer us an ideal proxy to tackle this issue from the perspective of computational social science. In this paper, based on the analysis of millions of tweets in Weibo, a Twitter-like service in China, we surprisingly find that anger is more contagious than joy, indicating that it can sparkle more angry follow-up tweets and anger prefers weaker ties than joy for the dissemination in social network, i...

  7. The Relationship Between Exposure to Violence and Anger in Thai Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtongkam, Nualnong; Ward, Paul R; Day, Andrew; Winefield, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    Youth violence is a serious public health problem in Thailand, and yet is poorly understood and is thought to vary considerably between metropolitan and rural areas. This article reports the findings of a cross-sectional study involving 1,170 technical college students who completed self-report questionnaires assessing the frequency of violent acts, antisocial behavior, and angry emotion. There were no differences in self-reported violent activities between metropolitan and rural participants, but those attending colleges in the metropolitan areas reported more acts involving weapons. Scores on the measure of anger expression predicted physical and verbal assault, specifically punching and name calling, suggesting that the implementation of interventions which help students to improve control over anger may be a useful violence prevention approach. PMID:25814506

  8. Khat use and trait anger: effects on affect regulation during an acute stressful challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Stephan; al'Absi, Mustafa; Khalil, Najat Sayem; Al Habori, Molham

    2011-01-01

    Khat (Catha edulis) is a widely used stimulating drug often consumed in daily routine in Yemen and East African countries. Chewing khat acutely elicits states of euphoria and feelings of well-being which later shift into emotional instability and low mood. Little is known about emotional regulation in habitual khat chewers. In this study, we compared self-reports on trait anger as well as positive and negative affect responses to a mental arithmetic challenge. Participants included 135 men and women from Yemen who chew khat regularly, occasionally or not at all. Participants attended a laboratory session that involved resting periods and performing a math challenge. Analyses of variance and regression show that regular khat chewing is associated with higher trait anger, more pronounced negative responses during stress and less pronounced positive emotional states. These results suggest that regular khat chewing is associated with disturbances in emotion regulation processes. PMID:21860244

  9. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, R.A., E-mail: riedelra@ornl.gov; Donahue, C.; Visscher, T.; Montcalm, C.

    2015-09-11

    We describe the design and performance of a 157 mm×157 mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of <1.2 mm with distortion <0.5 mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1 mm{sup 3}) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low values of the refinement parameter R{sub w}(F)

  10. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Gündüz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches is significantly associated with and predicted the conflict management styles. Administrators’ anger control level is significant predictor of "integration" style, and emotion-focused stress management is significant predictors of “compromises", "domination" and "avoidance" styles. However, problem-focused (positive and emotion-focused (negative approaches are significant predictors of the "compromise" style. Administrators who uses integration style has low levels of anger and can control their anger. Administrators who tend to emotion-focused to stress cope uses compromise, avoidance, and domination styles. However, the administrators who tend to emotion-focused and problem-focused to stress cope use consensus style.

  11. Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Military Population: Differences by Trauma Context and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Studies have found a stronger association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in military populations than in nonmilitary populations. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain this difference: Military populations are more prone to anger than nonmilitary populations, and traumas experienced on deployment create more anger than nondeployment traumas. To examine these hypotheses, we evaluated the association between anger and PTSD severity among never-deployed military service members with nondeployment traumas (n = 226) and deployed service members with deployment traumas (n = 594) using linear regression. We further examined these associations stratified by gender. Bivariate associations between anger and PTSD severity were similar for nondeployment and deployment events; however, gender modified this association. For men, the association for deployment events was stronger than for nondeployment events (β = .18, r = .53 vs. β = .16, r = .37, respectively), whereas the reverse was true for women (deployment: β = .20, r = .42 vs. nondeployment: β = .25, r = .65). Among men, findings supported the hypothesis that deployment traumas produce stronger associations between PTSD and anger and are inconsistent with hypothesized population differences. In women, however, there was not a clear fit with either hypothesis. PMID:26580844

  12. How do ADHD children perceive their cognitive, affective, and behavioral aspects of anger expression in school setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghighi Habib

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anger is an ignored research area in children and young adolescents with Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in the school setting. This study compares school anger dimensions in children and young adolescents with ADHD and a control group. Methods The subjects were a clinical sample of 67 children and young adolescents with ADHD and their parents, with a sample of 91 children from the community of similar age and gender as control group. Anger was measured by the Farsi version of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory (MSAI. Results The scores of the two components of "Hostile Outlook" and "Positive Coping" were different between the groups. The mean scores for the Anger components did not statistically differ between the children with ADHD and ODD and ADHD without ODD, boys and girls, or different types of ADHD. Conclusion Children with ADHD do not report higher rates of experience of anger and they do not apply destructive strategies more than the control group. However, children with ADHD appear to have a more hostile outlook toward school and their coping strategy is weaker than that of the control group.

  13. Female murderers: Examination of the relationship between childhood traumatic experiences and anger expression

    OpenAIRE

    İrem Akduman; Dilek Çelik; Nurhan Tiftik

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood period and abuse experiences may lead to some problems later in life. One of these problems is aggressive behavior, which is thought to be a reflection of the child’s increasing anger (Page, 2004; Olive, 2007).  Based on the fact that negative childhood experiences can lead to aggressive emotions, investigating the relationship between traumatic childhood experiences and female convicts’ aggression expression styles was considered important. Sample of the research consis...

  14. Group-based Compunction and Anger: Their Antecedents and Consequences in Relation to Colonial Conflicts

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Figueiredo; Bertjan Doosje; Joaquim Pires Valentim

    2016-01-01

    Group-based emotions can be experienced by group members for the past misdeeds of their ingroup towards an outgroup.. The present study examines distinct antecedents and consequences of group-based compunction and anger in two countries with a history of colonization (Portugal, N = 280 and the Netherlands, N = 184). While previous research has focused mainly on ingroup-focused antecedents of group-based emotions, such as ingroup identification and perceptions of responsibility, our research a...

  15. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors. Progress Report (1999-2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  16. SPORT’S EFFECT ON ANGER LEVEL FOR PEOPLE WITH MENTAL DISABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    MUSTAFA YILDIZ; AYSEN SONUC

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study is to research sport’s effect on anger level for the young with mental disability. 25 educable, mentally disabled individuals who receive special education in rehabilitation center, are between ages 10-19, have no physical disability preventing functional abilities that necessary for the study, have never took place in any sports organizations. “Exercise Program” was applied to experimental group 8 weeks long twice a week. Sessions elapsed nearly 60 minutes. Before and after...

  17. The characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideas

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Mohammadifar; Elahe Zareie, M.K; Mahmood Najafi; Mahmood Manteqi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to compare the characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideation. Method: This research was and the causal-comparative research method which is categorized in descriptive one. Sample in this study was included 300 addicts referred to the addiction treatment clinic in Semnan province. By convenience sampling with considering of entry criteria 300 addicts selected and based on the su...

  18. ANTS2 package: simulation and experimental data processing for Anger camera type detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Morozov, A; Solovov, V.; Martins, R.; Neves, F.; Domingos, V.; Chepel, V.

    2016-01-01

    ANTS2 is a simulation and data processing package developed for position sensitive detectors with Anger camera type readout. The simulation module of ANTS2 is based on ROOT package from CERN, which is used to store the detector geometry and to perform 3D navigation. The module is capable of simulating particle sources, performing particle tracking, generating photons of primary and secondary scintillation, tracing optical photons and generating photosensor signals. The reconstruction module f...

  19. Peer victimization and subsequent disruptive behavior in school: The protective functions of anger regulation coping

    OpenAIRE

    Kaynak, Övgü; Lepore, Stephen J; Kliewer, Wendy; Jaggi, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Peer victimization is linked to adjustment problems in youth, including aggressive behavior, yet not all victimized youth are aggressive. The present study investigated whether youth’s anger regulation coping might attenuate the positive association between peer victimization and subsequent aggressive behavior. Longitudinal data from 485 7th-grade students (55% female, mean age = 12.84 years) and their teachers were collected in the fall and six months later. Teacher ratings of youth aggressi...

  20. Anger and emotional distress in patients with migraine and tension–type headache

    OpenAIRE

    Perozzo, P; Savi, L; L. Castelli; Valfrè, W.; Lo Giudice, R.; Gentile, S.; I. Rainero; Pinessi, L.

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of anger and emotional distress in migraine and tension– type headache patients. Two hundred and one headache patients attending the Headache Center of the University of Turin were selected for the study and divided into 5 groups: (1) migraine, (2) episodic tension–type headache, (3) chronic tension–type headache, (4) migraine associated with episodic tension–type headache and (5) migraine associated with chronic tension–typ...

  1. The Impact of Anger Control Training on Resiliency in Adolescents with Addiction Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Rasouli

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Aggression and acting out behaviors can lead to drug use and acceptance in deviated groups. This project had planned to determine the impact of anger control training on resiliency enhancement in high school boys. Method: design of this research was pre experimental with pre-test post-test kind by control group. Sample includes of 30 high school students (15 experiment group, 15 in control group) selected by cluster sampling method. The students were randomly assigned in two experi...

  2. Anger expression, violent behavior, and symptoms of depression among male college students in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Berhane Yemane; Gelaye Bizu; Terasaki Dale J; Williams Michelle A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is an important global public health problem. Given the scarcity of studies involving African youths, this study was conducted to evaluate the associations of anger expression and violent behavior with symptoms of depression among male college students. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics and violent behavior among 1,176 college students in Awassa, Ethiopia in June, 2006. Th...

  3. Performance of a semiconductor SPECT system: comparison with a conventional Anger-type SPECT instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; MIYAGAWA, MASAO; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Ishimura, Hayato; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2012-01-01

    Objective The performance of a new single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanner with a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detector (Discovery NM 530c; D530c) was evaluated and compared to a conventional Anger-type SPECT with a dual-detector camera (Infinia). Methods Three different phantom studies were performed. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) was measured using line sources placed at different locations in a cylindrical phantom. Uniformity was measured us...

  4. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Lorys; De Santis, Federica; Giorgi, Ilaria; Deregibus, Andrea; Tesio, Valentina; Leombruni, Paolo; Granieri, Antonella; Debernardi, Cesare; Torta, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP) in the facial region. Methods: 45 MP patients [mean (SD) age: 38.9 (11.6)] and 45 female healthy controls [mean (SD) age: 37.8 (13.7)] were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (B...

  5. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorys eCastelli; Federica eDe Santis; Ilaria eDe Giorgi; Andrea eDeregibus; Valentina eTesio; Paolo eLeombruni; Antonella eGranieri; Cesare eDebernardi; Riccardo eTorta

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP) in the facial region.Methods: 45 MP patients (mean (SD) age: 38.9 (11.6)) and 45 female healthy controls (mean (SD) age: 37.8 (13.7)) were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (Beck ...

  6. Khat Use and Trait Anger: Effects on Affect Regulation during an Acute Stressful Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Bongard, Stephan; al'Absi, Mustafa; Khalil, Najat Sayem; Al Habori, Molham

    2011-01-01

    Khat (Catha edulis) is a widely used stimulating drug often consumed in daily routine in Yemen and East African countries. Chewing khat acutely elicits states of euphoria and feelings of well-being which later shift into emotional instability and low mood. Little is known about emotional regulation in habitual khat chewers. In this study, we compared self-reports on trait anger as well as positive and negative affect responses to a mental arithmetic challenge. Participants included 135 men an...

  7. Anger Suppression, Interdependent Self-Construal, and Depression among Asian American and European American College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Rebecca Y. M.; Park, Irene J. K.

    2010-01-01

    The present study tested a theoretical model of emotion regulation (Yap, Sheeber, & Allen, 2007) in a sample of Asian American and European American college students (N = 365). Specifically, the mediating role of anger suppression in the effect of temperament and family processes on depressive symptoms was tested across race and levels of interdependent self-construal (a culturally based self orientation emphasizing connectedness with others). Next, the moderation of the suppression—depressio...

  8. When anger dominates the mind: Increased motor corticospinal excitability in the face of threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; de Gelder, Beatrice; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-09-01

    Threat demands fast and adaptive reactions that are manifested at the physiological, behavioral, and phenomenological level and are responsive to the direction of threat and its severity for the individual. Here, we investigated the effects of threat directed toward or away from the observer on motor corticospinal excitability and explicit recognition. Sixteen healthy right-handed volunteers completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) task and a separate three-alternative forced-choice emotion recognition task. Single-pulse TMS to the left primary motor cortex was applied to measure motor evoked potentials from the right abductor pollicis brevis in response to dynamic angry, fearful, and neutral bodily expressions with blurred faces directed toward or away from the observer. Results showed that motor corticospinal excitability increased independent of direction of anger compared with fear and neutral. In contrast, anger was better recognized when directed toward the observer compared with when directed away from the observer, while the opposite pattern was found for fear. The present results provide evidence for the differential effects of threat direction on explicit recognition and motor corticospinal excitability. In the face of threat, motor corticospinal excitability increases independently of the direction of anger, indicative of the importance of more automatic reactions to threat. PMID:27325519

  9. Anger and Gender Effects in Observed Supervisor-Subordinate Dyadic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb; Hulin

    1997-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of a supervisor's anger and supervisor's and subordinate's gender on evaluations made by observers of interacting supervisor-subordinate dyads. In a laboratory experiment, 370 undergraduates viewed one of eight video-tapes representing the conditions of the 2 (gender of supervisor) x 2 (gender of subordinate) x 2 (presence or absence of anger) design and then completed evaluations of the supervisor and the subordinate. A field study using 265 employees from three organizations replicated the laboratory results. In spite of constant dialogue in the interactions across all eight conditions, supervisors expressing anger were rated lower and female supervisors were rated higher by observers. Subordinates were rated higher when interacting with an angry supervisor and when interacting with a male supervisor. Main effects of supervisor's gender may reflect over-evaluation of unexpected, albeit average, performance. The joint supervisor and subordinate effects are interpreted as reflecting a dyadic rating effect in which high ratings assigned to one member of the dyad are accompanied by lower ratings assigned to the other member. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. PMID:9606168

  10. The motivation behind serial sexual homicide: is it sex, power, and control, or anger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Wade C; Husted, David S; Safarik, Mark E; O'Toole, Mary Ellen

    2006-07-01

    Controversy exists in the literature and society regarding what motivates serial sexual killers to commit their crimes. Hypotheses range from the seeking of sexual gratification to the achievement of power and control to the expression of anger. The authors provide theoretical, empirical, evolutionary, and physiological support for the argument that serial sexual murderers above all commit their crimes in pursuit of sadistic pleasure. The seeking of power and control over victims is believed to serve the two secondary purposes of heightening sexual arousal and ensuring victim presence for the crime. Anger is not considered a key component of these offenders' motivation due to its inhibitory physiological effect on sexual functioning. On the contrary, criminal investigations into serial sexual killings consistently reveal erotically charged crimes, with sexual motivation expressed either overtly or symbolically. Although anger may be correlated with serial sexual homicide offenders, as it is with criminal offenders in general, it is not causative. The authors further believe serial sexual murderers should be considered sex offenders. A significant proportion of them appear to have paraphilic disorders within the spectrum of sexual sadism. "sexual sadism, homicidal type" is proposed as a diagnostic subtype of sexual sadism applicable to many of these offenders, and a suggested modification of DSM criteria is presented. PMID:16882237

  11. Fear and Anger have Opposite Effects on Risk Seeking in the Gain Frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne eHabib

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotions strongly influence our decisions, particularly those made under risk. A classic example of the effect of emotion on decision making under risk is the framing effect, which involves predictable shifts in preferences when the same problem is formulated in different ways. According to dual process theories, this bias could stem from an affective heuristic belonging to an intuitive type of reasoning. In this study, we examined whether specific incidental negative emotions (i.e., fear and anger influence framing susceptibility and risk-taking identically. In each trial, participants received an initial amount of money, and pictures of angry or fearful faces were presented to them. Finally, participants chose between a sure option and a gamble option of equally expected value in a gain or loss frame. Risk-taking was modulated by emotional context: fear and anger influenced risk-taking specifically in the gain frame and had opposite effects. Fear increased risk-averse choices, whereas anger decreased risk-averse choices, leading to a suppression of the framing effect. These results confirm that emotions play a key role in framing susceptibility.

  12. Exploring factors related to the anger superiority effect in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, T; Cornish, K; Rinehart, N J

    2016-07-01

    Despite face and emotion recognition deficits, individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) appear to experience the anger superiority effect, where an angry face in a crowd is detected faster than a neutral face. This study extended past research to examine the impacts of ecologically valid photographic stimuli, gender and anxiety symptoms on the anger superiority effect in children with and without ASD. Participants were 81, 7-12year old children, 42 with ASD matched on age, gender and perceptual IQ to 39 typically developing (TYP) children. The photographic stimuli did not impact on task performance in ASD with both groups exhibiting the anger superiority effect. There were no gender differences and no associations with anxiety. Age was associated with the effect in the TYP but not ASD group. These findings confirm a robust effect of speeded detection of threat in ASD which does not appear to be confounded by gender or anxiety, but may have different underlying age-associated mechanisms. PMID:27258410

  13. Anger suppression, interdependent self-construal, and depression among Asian American and European American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Rebecca Y M; Park, Irene J K

    2010-10-01

    The present study tested a theoretical model of emotion regulation (Yap, Sheeber, & Allen, 2007) in a sample of Asian American and European American college students (N = 365). Specifically, the mediating role of anger suppression in the effect of temperament and family processes on depressive symptoms was tested across race and levels of interdependent self-construal (a culturally based self orientation emphasizing connectedness with others). Next, the moderation of the suppression-depression relation was tested by race and interdependent self-construal. Results indicated that the hypothesized model fit well across Asian American and European American students, as well as those with high versus low levels of interdependent self-construal. Anger suppression was a significant mediator of the hypothesized indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Moreover, race and interdependent self-construal moderated the suppression-depression link, such that Asian American status and a stronger interdependent self-construal attenuated the relation between anger suppression and depressive symptoms. Understanding both universal and culture-specific aspects of emotion regulation in the development of depressive symptoms will be essential for sound theory, future research, and effective prevention and intervention efforts across diverse populations. PMID:21058815

  14. Imagine no religion: Heretical disgust, anger and the symbolic purity of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Ryan S; Preston, Jesse L; Salomon, Erika; Relihan-Johnson, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Immoral actions, including physical/sexual (e.g., incest) and social (e.g., unfairness) taboos, are often described as disgusting. But what about immoral thoughts, more specifically, thoughts that violate religious beliefs? Do heretical thoughts taint the purity of mind? The present research examined heretical disgust using self-report measures and facial electromyography. Religious thought violations consistently elicited both self-reported disgust and anger. Feelings of disgust also predicted harsh moral judgement, independent of anger, and were mediated by feelings of "contamination". However, religious thought violations were not associated with a disgust facial expression (i.e., levator labii muscle activity) that was elicited by physically disgusting stimuli. We conclude that people (especially more religious people) do feel disgust in response to heretical thoughts that is meaningfully distinct from anger as a moral emotion. However, heretical disgust is not embodied in a physical disgust response. Rather, disgust has a symbolic moral value that marks heretical thoughts as harmful and aversive. PMID:25899719

  15. Moderators and mediators of the stress-aggression relationship: executive function and state anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Jenessa; Verona, Edelyn; Kalkhoff, Will; Kilmer, Ashley

    2011-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of executive function (i.e., EF) and anger/hostility on the relationship between stress (across individual stress domains, as well as at the aggregate level) and aggression. Two independent groups of participants-a college sample and a low-income community sample-were administered a battery of self-report measures concerning the subjective experience of stress, aggressive behaviors, and feelings of state anger and hostility in the last month, along with a battery of well-validated neuropsychological tests of EF. Across both samples, the stress domains that demonstrated the strongest associations with aggression were those involving chronic strains of daily living (e.g., job, financial, health) versus interpersonal stressors (e.g., family, romantic). In the community sample, analyses also revealed a significant interaction between perceived stress (aggregated across domains) and EF in predicting aggressive behavior. Specifically, participants with relatively low EF abilities, across different EF processes, showed a stronger relationship between different domains of stress and aggression in the last month. Similar effects were demonstrated in the college sample, although the interaction was not significant. In both samples, experiences of anger and hostility in the last month mediated the relationship between perceived stress (aggregate) and aggressive behavior among those low, but not high, in EF. These findings highlight the importance of higher-order cognitive processes in regulating appropriate affective and behavioral responses across different types of individuals, particularly among those experiencing high levels of stress. PMID:21401226

  16. Analyse of the Medical Students, Coping Style Among anger - out Group and Anger - in Group%医学生愤怒、郁怒情绪与特质应对方式的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡凤; 陶海燕; 乔明琦; 张惠云

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To supply the theory support of the psychological mechanism of anger in TCM, we carryed out the research about coping style of people which were anger - in or anger - out. Methods: The students were differentiated by STAXI - 2,and were assessed by Trait Coping Style Questionnaire(TCSQ). The data was analysed by SPSS 13.0. Results: There were significant difference on negative coping style among anger - out group and normal group ( P < 0. 001 ), and as well as both negative coping stycle and positive coping style among anger - in group and normal group, and anger - in group and anger - out group ( P <0.001 ). Conclusion :The anger - in group has more tendency than anger - out group in the negative coping stycle ,and we also researched the correlations about disease of anger on the side of coping style.%目的:分析愤怒、郁怒人群特质应对方式的相关性研究,为探讨怒产生及诱发情志病证的心理机制提供理论支持.方法:以状态一特质怒表达量表(STAXI-2)作为筛选工具,区分出愤怒、郁怒人群,使用特质应对方式问卷(TCSQ)对学生人群进行调查分析,采用SPSS 13.0对数据进行统计分析.结果:愤怒组与正常组在消极应对方面存在显著性差异(P<0.001),郁怒组与愤怒组、正常组在消极应对、积极应对方面均存在显著性差异(P<0.001).结论:愤怒、郁怒人群均倾向于采取消极应对方式处理问题,且郁怒人群的倾向性更大,进一步揭示了怒致病与应对方式的相关性,为中医情志病因学研究增添新的手段和方法.

  17. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger–aggression relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts ...

  18. Self-mutilative behaviors in male substance-dependent inpatients and relationship with anger and aggression: mediator effect of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cuneyt; Cınar, Ozgul; Evren, Bilge; Celik, Selime

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of self-mutilation (SM) with anger and aggression in male substance-dependent inpatients. Also, we wanted to evaluate the mediator effect of childhood trauma on these relationships while controlling variables such as age, substance of dependence (alcohol/drug), and negative effect. Participants were consecutively admitted 200 male substance-dependent inpatients. Patients were investigated with the Self-mutilative Behaviour Questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Reports, the Buss-Perry's Aggression Questionnaire, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Rate of being married, current age, and age onset of regular substance use were lower, whereas being unemployed and history of childhood trauma (HCT) were higher in group with SM (n = 124, or 62.0%). Higher mean scale scores were found in SM group. Predictors of SM were being younger, impaired anger control, and physical aggression in logistic regression model. Being younger and the outward expression of anger (anger-out) predicted SM in the subgroup of patients without HCT, whereas being younger, severity of anger, and the inward expression of anger (anger-in) predicted SM in the subgroup of patients with HCT. Thus, to reduce self-mutilative behavior among substance-dependent patients, clinicians must improve anger control, particularly in younger patients. Type of strategy for coping with anger, which must be worked on, may differ in different subgroup patients, that is, focusing anger toward self among those with HCT, whereas anger toward others among those without. PMID:21632037

  19. The relationship of anger and cognitive distortions with violence in violent offenders’ population: A meta-analytic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pintea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present meta-analysis, the magnitude of the relationship between cognitive distortions and anger and violent behaviour of incarcerated offenders, based on selected data for the relationship between anger and violence, and cognitive distortions and violence was empirically assessed. Out of nineteen studies included for analysis nine of them contain statistical indicators regarding the relationship between anger and violence, and fourteen studies regarding cognitive distortions and violence. The results indicated a strong relationship both between anger and violence, and between cognitive distortions and violent behaviour. Furthermore, the moderating effect of the type of instruments (self-reported vs. observational behavioural measurements used for violence assessment was tested. The results indicated that the type of instruments had no significant influence on the cognition-violence relationship, QB(1 = 0.12, p > .05, while in case of the anger-violence relationship, a significant moderating effect was identified, QB(1 = 14.26, p < .01, which supports a higher effect size when violence was measured by a self-reported than when was measured by behavioural observation.

  20. Examining the Direct and Indirect Effects of Fear and Anger on Criminal Decision Making Among Known Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Jeff A

    2015-12-01

    Deterrence represents the central theoretical core of the American criminal justice system, yet relatively little attention has been paid to how emotions like fear and anger may relate to deterrence. Psychological research has debated whether negative emotions each have similar impacts on decision making (valence approaches) or if distinct emotions have unique impacts (appraisal tendency approaches). This study explores the direct and indirect influences of fear and anger on hypothetical drunk driving likelihood, including their impact on cost perceptions. Surveys were administered to 1,013 male and female incarcerated felony offenders in the Southwestern United States. Using a multivariate path model and controlling for a number of other individual factors, current fear related to increased cost perceptions and anger to decreased costs. Anger also maintained a direct influence on drunk driving, whereas fear did not. Despite their shared negative valence, fear and anger appear to have dissimilar influences on cost perceptions and criminal decision making. A better understanding of these processes may lead to improved crime prevention approaches. PMID:24927741

  1. Hostility, physical aggression and trait anger as predictors for suicidal behavior in Chinese adolescents: a school-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study explored the extent to which trait aggression is associated with suicidal behavior in a nationwide school-based sample of adolescents. METHODS: A nationwide sample of 14,537 high school students in urban areas of China was recruited. Information concerning suicide ideation, plans, attempts, trait aggression and other risk factors was collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Multivariate regression analyses were employed to predict suicidal behavior. RESULTS: Approximately 18.5% of students reported suicide ideation, 8.7% reported suicide plans, and 4.1% reported attempts during the past one year. Hostility and trait anger had a significant positive association with suicidal ideation. Hostility and physical aggression were positively related to suicide plans. Hostility had a positive correlation with suicide attempts, while trait anger was inversely associated with suicide attempts. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that hostility, physical aggression and trait anger may be able to be used to predict suicidal behavior among adolescents. Suicide prevention programs should target at attenuating the severity of hostility, anger and physical aggression. But teachers and parents should also give close attention to students with low trait anger.

  2. The Effects of Subjective Loss of Control on Risk-taking Behavior: The Mediating Role of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit M. Beisswingert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger. An experimental paradigm for inducing externally caused and consequently externally attributed loss of control which should lead to experiences of anger was developed and pretested in a Pilot Study. The relationship between loss of control experiences, anger and risk-taking behavior was investigated using two separate student samples from Germany (N = 84, 54% female and China (N = 125; 64% female. In line with our hypotheses, results showed that anger mediated the link between subjective loss of control experiences and increasing risk-taking behavior. Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results’ cross-cultural generalizability. These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

  3. Influence of Music Therapy on Coping Skills and Anger Management in Forensic Psychiatric Patients: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, Stefan; Thaut, Michael H; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-07-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavior of forensic psychiatric patients? To investigate this question, first a literature review is offered on music therapy and anger management in forensic psychiatry. Then, an explorative study is presented. In the study, a pre- and post-test design was used with a random assignment of patients to either treatment or control condition. Fourteen participants' complete datasets were collected. All participants received "treatment as usual." Nine of the participants received a standardized, music therapy anger management program; the five controls received, unplanned, an aggression management program. Results suggested that anger management skills improved for all participants. The improvement of positive coping skills and diminishing of avoidance as a coping skill were measured to show greater changes in music therapy participants. When controlling for the exact number of treatment hours, the outcomes suggested that music therapy might accelerate the process of behavioral changes. PMID:24379454

  4. The association between driving anger and driving outcomes: A meta-analysis of evidence from the past twenty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingru; Chan, Alan H S

    2016-05-01

    Through the use of meta-analysis, this study investigated the relationships between driving anger and five types of driving outcomes (aggressive driving, risky driving, driving errors, near misses and accidents). The moderating effects of three variables (age, study publication year, and participants' country of origin) on these relationships were also examined. A total of 51 studies published over the past two decades met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The results showed that driving anger significantly predicted all three types of aberrant driving, with zero-order correlations of 0.312, 0.243, and 0.179 with aggressive driving, risky driving and driving errors, respectively. The correlations between driving anger and accident-related conditions, though at relatively weaker levels, were still statistically significant. Tests for effects of the moderating variables suggested that driving anger was a stronger predictor of risky driving among young drivers than among old drivers. Also, the anger-aggression association was found to decrease over time and vary across countries. The implications of the results and the directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26918282

  5. The influence of self-generated emotions on physical performance: an investigation of happiness, anger, anxiety, and sadness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathschlag, Marco; Memmert, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The present study examined the relationship between self-generated emotions and physical performance. All participants took part in five emotion induction conditions (happiness, anger, anxiety, sadness, and an emotion-neutral state) and we investigated their influence on the force of the finger musculature (Experiment 1), the jump height of a counter-movement jump (Experiment 2), and the velocity of a thrown ball (Experiment 3). All experiments showed that participants could produce significantly better physical performances when recalling anger or happiness emotions in contrast to the emotion-neutral state. Experiments 1 and 2 also revealed that physical performance in the anger and the happiness conditions was significantly enhanced compared with the anxiety and the sadness conditions. Results are discussed in relation to the Lazarus (1991, 2000a) cognitive-motivational-relational (CMR) theory framework. PMID:23535977

  6. Relationships between perceived teachers' controlling behaviour, psychological need thwarting, anger and bullying behaviour in high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Vello; Koka, Andre; Hagger, Martin S

    2015-07-01

    We tested a model of the associations between students' perceptions of their physical education teacher's controlling behaviour, perceptions of basic psychological need thwarting, anger and bullying behaviour. School students (N = 602; M age = 12.88, SD = 1.37) from 10 schools completed measures of perceived teachers' controlling behaviour and perceived thwarting of the psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness in physical education context and self-reported bullying and anger. A well-fitting structural equation model demonstrated that students' perceptions of the negative conditional regard and intimidation exhibited by the teacher had significant indirect effect on students' feelings of anger and bullying behaviour through the perceived psychological need thwarting in physical education. Findings suggest that physical education teachers who avoid the use of negative conditional regard and intimidation in their classes have students who perceive less need thwarting and report less bullying behaviour. PMID:25968108

  7. Emotions in “the world”: Cultural practices, products, and meanings of anger and shame in two individualist cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelBoiger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Three studies tested the idea that people’s cultural worlds are structured in ways that promote and highlight emotions and emotional responses that are beneficial in achieving central goals in their culture. Based on the idea that U.S. Americans strive for competitive individualism, while (Dutch-speaking Belgians favor a more egalitarian variant of individualism, we predicted that anger and shame, as well as their associated responses, would be beneficial to different extents in these two cultural contexts. A questionnaire study found that cultural practices promote beneficial emotions (anger in the United States, shame in Belgium and avoid harmful emotions (shame in the United States: Emotional interactions were perceived to occur more or less frequently to the extent that they elicited culturally beneficial or harmful emotions. Similarly, a cultural product analysis showed that popular children’s books from the United States and Belgium tend to portray culturally beneficial emotions more than culturally harmful emotions. Finally, a word association study of the shared cultural meanings surrounding anger and shame provided commensurate evidence at the level of the associated response. In each language network, anger and shame were imbued with meanings that reflected the cultural significance of the emotion: While culturally consistent emotions carried relatively stronger connotations of emotional yielding (e.g., giving in to anger and aggressing against the offender in the United States, culturally inconsistent emotions carried relatively stronger connotations of emotional containment (e.g., a stronger emphasis on controlling anger and moving away from the aggressor in Belgium.

  8. Exposure to media violence and bullying at school: mediating influences of anger and contact with delinquent friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Kim, Myungja

    2004-10-01

    This study assessed a model of mediating influences of anger and contact with delinquent friends in the relationship between exposure to media violence and bullying at school. Data came from 560 Korean junior high school students who were living with their parents. Analysis indicated that, as hypothesized, exposure to media-portrayed violence was directly associated with bullying at school. Anger and contact with delinquent friends mediated this relationship. In addition, two alternative models were estimated, neither supported by the data, further sustaining the validity of the hypothesized model. Implications and directions for research are discussed. PMID:15587236

  9. An Empirical Test of Rejection- and Anger-Related Interpretation Bias in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; McNally, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    The authors tested whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by interpretation bias for disambiguating stimuli in favor of threatening interpretations, especially concerning abuse, abandonment, rejection, and anger-core emotional triggers for BPD patients. A mixed sample of 106 patients with marked BPD traits and nonpatients were assessed with SCID I and II and were presented with vignettes depicting ambiguous social interactions. Interpretations of these vignettes were assessed both in a closed and an open answer format. Results showed that BPD traits were related to a rejection- (closed and open answer formats) and an anger-related interpretation bias (closed answer option only). Cluster C traits were associated with self-blame interpretations. Aside from further validating the cognitive model of BPD, these findings denote interpretation bias as a key feature in patients with BPD that might contribute to their emotional hyperreactivity and interpersonal problems. These findings also highlight the importance of therapeutically normalizing interpretative bias in BPD and cluster C patients. PMID:25893553

  10. Depression and Anger as Risk Factors Underlying the Relationship between Maternal Substance Involvement and Child Abuse Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Denise; Cohen, Lisa R.; Caldeira, Nathilee A.; Flom, Peter; Wasserman, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how emotion regulation deficits in the area of anger arousal and reactivity are associated with child abuse potential in mothers with substance use and depressive disorders in order to identify targeted areas for prevention and treatment. Methods: A sample of 152 urban mothers was interviewed on measures of substance…

  11. The 2016 election makes no sense. But this should not distract attention from the legitimate anger many Americans feel

    OpenAIRE

    Pruessen, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Violence at Donald Trump’s rallies signals the intensity of anger in the US political arena. It is far from the only sign, however, and Ron Pruessen argues that we close a window on important characteristics of the current American landscape if we confine our reactions to simply castigating such “madhouse” behavior.

  12. Fathers' Forgiveness as a Moderator between Perceived Unfair Treatment by a Family of Origin Member and Anger with Own Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Rim; Enright, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how forgiveness mediates and moderates between fathers' perceived unfair treatment (PUT) from a family of origin member and anger with the child (AWC). Eighty married fathers who have at least one child between the ages of 2 and 7 years individually completed the Opening Questionnaire, the Enright Forgiveness Inventory, the…

  13. Fear and Anger Reactivity Trajectories from 4 to 16 Months: The Roles of Temperament, Regulation, and Maternal Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L.; Karrass, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Two goals guided this study: (a) describe changes in infant fear and anger reactivity from 4 to 16 months and (b) examine the degree to which infant temperament, attentional regulation, and maternal sensitivity predict reactivity trajectories. Participants included 143 mothers and infants (57% male) who visited the laboratory at 4, 8, 12, and 16…

  14. Anger, Anxiety, and Depression as Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease: The Problems and Implications of Overlapping Affective Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Jerry; Bunde, James

    2005-01-01

    Several recent reviews (e.g., L. C. Gallo & K. Matthews, 2003; A. Rozanski, J. A. Blumenthal, & J. Kaplan, 1999; R. Rugulies, 2002) have identified 3 affective dispositions--depression, anxiety, and anger-hostility--as putative risk factors for coronary heart disease. There are, however, mixed and negative results. Following a critical summary of…

  15. Anger and hostility in adolescents: relationships with self-reported attachment style and perceived parental rearing styles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, P.; Meesters, C.; Morren, M.; Moorman, L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine relationships between self-reported attachment style and parental rearing behaviors, on the one hand, and anger/hostility, on the other hand, in a sample of nonclinical adolescents (N=441). METHOD: Participants completed (a) a single-item measure of attachment style; (b) a ques

  16. Judgments of Aggressive, Withdrawn and Prosocial Behavior: Perceived Control, Anger, Pity and Sympathy in Young Dutch Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Frits A.; Bokhorst, Koos; Bruinsma, Cees; van Boxtel, Herman W.

    2002-01-01

    Examines first- and second-grade children's judgments of aggressive, withdrawn, and prosocial behavior by means of fictional scenarios. Results reveal that aggressive children were perceived as more responsible for their behavior and elicited more feelings of anger, while withdrawn children were more likely to be chosen as a friend and elicited…

  17. The Role of Youth Anger in Explaining Links between Parenting and Early Adolescent Prosocial and Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Sheffield Morris, Amanda; Cui, Lixian; Henry, Carolyn S.; Criss, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the role of youth anger regulation and reactivity in the link between parenting and social adjustment among a sample of 84 youth residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods in a mid-southwestern city. Using path analysis, findings indicate that parents' responsive and discipline-related behaviors…

  18. Neural Computation as a Tool to Differentiate Perceptual from Emotional Processes: The Case of Anger Superiority Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermillod, Martial; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Lundqvist, Daniel; Niedenthal, Paula M.

    2009-01-01

    Research findings in social and cognitive psychology imply that it is easier to detect angry faces than happy faces in a crowd of neutral faces [Hansen, C. H., & Hansen, R. D. (1988). Finding the face in the crowd--An anger superiority effect. "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology," 54(6), 917-924]. This phenomenon has been held to have…

  19. Associations between Sadness and Anger Regulation Coping, Emotional Expression, and Physical and Relational Aggression among Urban Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Kliewer, Wendy; Goodman, Kimberly L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between self-reports of sadness and anger regulation coping, reluctance to express emotion, and physical and relational aggression between two cohorts of predominantly African-American fifth (N = 191; 93 boys and 98 girls) and eighth (N = 167; 73 boys and 94 girls) graders. Multiple regression analyses indicated…

  20. Chinese Children's Effortful Control and Dispositional Anger/Frustration: Relations to Parenting Styles and Children's Social Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Wang, Yun; Reiser, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Relations among authoritative and authoritarian parenting styles, children's effortful control and dispositional anger/frustration, and children's social functioning were examined for 425 first and second graders (7-10 years old) in Beijing, China. Parents reported on parenting styles; parents and teachers rated children's effortful control,…

  1. Vivre au-delà des ponts à Angers (1380-1499)

    OpenAIRE

    Mérand, Anne-Claire

    2006-01-01

    Dans les deux derniers siècles du Moyen Âge, l’abbaye féminine du Ronceray s’affirme comme l’un des principaux centres de pouvoir de la ville d’Angers de par la notoriété que lui confèrent l’origine noble de ses bénédictines mais aussi la sacralité de ce haut lieu de dévotion mariale. L’importance des possessions des religieuses et des revenus qui en découlent renforce encore l’influence des moniales dans la cité. Celles-ci dominent de fait près de la moitié de la ville tant au niveau économi...

  2. Pregnancy anxiety and comorbid depression and anger: effects on the fetus and neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Yando, Regina; Bendell, Debra

    2003-01-01

    One hundred sixty-six women were classified as experiencing high or low anxiety during the second trimester of pregnancy. The high anxiety women also had high scores on depression and anger scales. In a follow-up across pregnancy, the fetuses of the high anxiety women were noted to be more active and to experience growth delays. The high anxiety mothers' high prenatal norepinephrine and low dopamine levels were followed by their neonates having low dopamine and serotonin levels. The high anxiety mothers' newborns also had greater relative right frontal EEG activation and lower vagal tone. Finally, the newborns of high anxiety mothers spent more time in deep sleep and less time in quiet and active alert states and showed more state changes and less optimal performance on the Brazelton Neonatal Behavior Assessment Scale (motor maturity, autonomic stability and withdrawal). These data highlight the need for prenatal intervention for elevated anxiety symptoms during pregnancy. PMID:12768648

  3. Reading Nostalgia, Anger, and the Home in Joyce Carol Oates’s Foxfire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Hillsburg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article draws from Svetlana Boym’s concept of reflective nostalgia to explore the intersections between violence, memory, and the home in Joyce Carol Oates’s novel Foxfire. Through reflective nostalgia, Maddy is able to link the abuse she and her friends endure to various iterations of the home. Reflective nostalgia also allows Maddy to draw connections between anger and the domestic realm, and to write the members of FOXFIRE back into dominant narratives that largely exclude their lived experiences. Ultimately, this paper argues that because nostalgia often centers on the home, it is ideally suited to foreground the untenable nature of idyllic or hegemonic constructions of the domestic realm.

  4. ANTS2 package: simulation and experimental data processing for Anger camera type detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A; Martins, R; Neves, F; Domingos, V; Chepel, V

    2016-01-01

    ANTS2 is a simulation and data processing package developed for position sensitive detectors with Anger camera type readout. The simulation module of ANTS2 is based on ROOT package from CERN, which is used to store the detector geometry and to perform 3D navigation. The module is capable of simulating particle sources, performing particle tracking, generating photons of primary and secondary scintillation, tracing optical photons and generating photosensor signals. The reconstruction module features several position reconstruction methods based on the statistical reconstruction algorithms (including GPU-based implementations), artificial neural networks and k-NN searches. The module can process simulated as well as imported experimental data containing photosensor signals. A custom library for B-spline parameterization of spatial response of photosensors is implemented which can be used to calculate and parameterize the spatial response of a detector. The package includes a graphical user interface with an ex...

  5. Breastfeeding experience differentially impacts recognition of happiness and anger in mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Kathleen M; Kamboj, Sunjeev K; Curran, H Valerie; Grossmann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Breastfeeding is a dynamic biological and social process based on hormonal regulation involving oxytocin. While there is much work on the role of breastfeeding in infant development and on the role of oxytocin in socio-emotional functioning in adults, little is known about how breastfeeding impacts emotion perception during motherhood. We therefore examined whether breastfeeding influences emotion recognition in mothers. Using a dynamic emotion recognition task, we found that longer durations of exclusive breastfeeding were associated with faster recognition of happiness, providing evidence for a facilitation of processing positive facial expressions. In addition, we found that greater amounts of breastfed meals per day were associated with slower recognition of anger. Our findings are in line with current views of oxytocin function and support accounts that view maternal behaviour as tuned to prosocial responsiveness, by showing that vital elements of maternal care can facilitate the rapid responding to affiliative stimuli by reducing importance of threatening stimuli. PMID:25387686

  6. Comparison of Ga-67 citrate images obtained with rectilinear scanner and large-field Anger camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods for Ga-67 citrate imaging were compared on 20 patients. Scans were performed using approximately equal procedure time with two instruments: a dual 5-in. rectilinear scanner with medium-energy collimator, with a single window spanning both the 93-keV and the 185-keV spectral peaks; and a large-field (15-in. diam) Anger camera equipped with moving table, medium-energy collimator, and three windows covering the 93-keV, 185-keV, and 300-keV peaks separately. Sixteen abnormal sites and 24 normal sites were selected for comparison. Each site was evaluated by four physicians experienced in interpreting Ga-67 citrate images. The observers performed significantly better using the images obtained with the large-field camera (three windows) than with the dual 5-in. scanner

  7. Heterosexual Men's Anger in Response to Male Homosexuality: Effects of Erotic and Non-Erotic Depictions of Male-Male Intimacy and Sexual Prejudice

    OpenAIRE

    Hudepohl, Adam D.; Parrott, Dominic J.; Zeichner, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The present study compared effects of erotic and non-erotic depictions of male-male intimacy on the experience of anger in heterosexual men. Data came from three independent laboratory studies designed to elicit anger in response to erotic or non-erotic depictions of male-male and male-female intimacy. All participants completed a measure of sexual prejudice and anger was assessed before and after viewing the erotic or non-erotic video. Among high-prejudiced men, viewing erotic and non-erotic...

  8. Hot spur or tranquil? : The adaptation of psychometric anger assessment instruments and their evaluation and application on violent and nonviolent samples in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, Judit

    2005-01-01

    Anger is a negatively toned emotion and biopsychosocially functional alarm, which automatically activates a colorful arsenal of affective, cognitive, physiological, and behavioral action impulses in the face of experienced irritations and provocations. Anger, on the other hand, is a mixed blessing and a subject of admiration and condemnation since the days of Plato, Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. This usual and passionate human emotion has also been closely associated with phenomena of human p...

  9. The Feelings Group: A Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation of the Outcomes of a Smaller Anger Management Group for Clients who have a Learning Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Richard; Jeffrey, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Referrals concerning problems with anger for people with learning disability (LD) are relatively common as they are thought to be prone to difficulty in managing their anger (Willner, et al., 2002), a problem associated with aggressive behaviour (Novaco, 1994). Aggression is also prevalent in this population, with obvious inherent risks to themselves and others (Harris, 1993; Kiely & Pankhurst, 1998). Research on direct therapy in people with a learning disability (LD) indicates that there...

  10. Violent and nonviolent video games differentially affect physical aggression for individuals high vs. low in dispositional anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Christopher R; Bartholow, Bruce D; Saults, J Scott

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous experiments have shown that exposure to violent video games (VVG) causes increases in aggression, relatively few studies have investigated the extent to which this effect differs as a function of theoretically relevant individual difference factors. This study investigated whether video game content differentially influences aggression as a function of individual differences in trait anger. Participants were randomly assigned to play a violent or nonviolent video game before completing a task in which they could behave aggressively. Results showed that participants high in trait anger were the most aggressive, but only if they first played a VVG. This relationship held while statistically controlling for dimensions other than violent content on which game conditions differed (e.g. frustration, arousal). Implications of these findings for models explaining the effects of video games on behavior are discussed. PMID:21905039

  11. Adaptive algorithms of position and energy reconstruction in Anger-camera type detectors: experimental data processing in ANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The software package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations), developed for simulation of Anger-type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging was extended to include a module for experimental data processing. Data recorded with a sensor array containing up to 100 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) in a custom configuration can be loaded and the positions and energies of the events can be reconstructed using the Center-of-Gravity, Maximum Likelihood or Least Squares algorithm. A particular strength of the new module is the ability to reconstruct the light response functions and relative gains of the photomultipliers from flood field illumination data using adaptive algorithms. The performance of the module is demonstrated with simulated data generated in ANTS and experimental data recorded with a 19 PMT neutron detector. The package executables are publicly available at http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/

  12. History of suicide attempt in male substance-dependent inpatients and relationship to borderline personality features, anger, hostility and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cuneyt; Cinar, Ozgul; Evren, Bilge; Celik, Selime

    2011-11-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between severity of borderline personality features and history of suicide attempt (HSA) in male substance-dependent inpatients and the effect of anger, hostility and aggression on this relationship. Further, the effect of some variables that may be related to suicide and/or borderline personality, such as age at inception of regular substance use, substance of dependence (alcohol/drug), depression, and both state and trait anxiety, were controlled. Participants were 200 consecutively admitted male substance-dependent inpatients. Patients were investigated with the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI), the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Among substance-dependent inpatients, 33.0% (n=66) were identified as the group with HSA. Mean scores employment status, marital status and duration of education did not differ between groups, whereas current age and age at onset of regular substance use were lower in group with HSA. Mean scores of BPI, AQ and its subscales (anger, hostility and physical/verbal aggression), BDI and STAI were higher in the HSA group. In addition, the rates of drug dependency and borderline personality disorder were higher in this group. The severity of borderline personality symptoms was highly correlated with subscales of the AQ, depression and anxiety, whereas it was negatively correlated with age at onset of regular substance use. The severity of anger and borderline personality features predicted HSA in the logistic regression model. Results suggest that, to reduce the risk of suicide attempt among substance-dependent patients, the feeling of anger must be the target of evaluation and treatment among those with borderline personality features. PMID:21872941

  13. Alcohol Abuse Mediates the Association between Baseline T/C Ratio and Anger Expression in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators

    OpenAIRE

    Ángel Romero-Martínez; Marisol Lila; Luis Moya-Albiol

    2015-01-01

    The imbalance between testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) levels has been proposed as a possible marker of risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Moreover, it could be related to a high probability of adopting risky behaviors such as alcohol abuse which, in turn, promotes the onset of IPV. This study tested the potential mediating effect of alcohol consumption on the relationship between baseline T/C ratio and anger expression in IPV perpetrators and non-violent controls. Alcohol consumption...

  14. Associations between Sadness and Anger Regulation Coping, Emotional Expression, and Physical and Relational Aggression among Urban Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Kliewer, Wendy; Goodman, Kimberly L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between self reports of sadness and anger regulation coping, reluctance to express emotion, and physical and relational aggression among two cohorts of predominantly African-American fifth (N = 191; 93 boys and 98 girls) and eighth (N = 167; 73 boys and 94 girls) graders. Multiple regression analyses indicated unique associations between relational aggression and expressive reluctance and sadness regulation coping. In contrast, physical aggression, but not rel...

  15. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., “block effect”) in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels

  16. The Use of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-II With Forensic Populations: A Psychometric Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamborg, Sara; Tully, Ruth J; Browne, Kevin D

    2016-08-01

    The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-II (STAXI-II) is a psychometric assessment that measures the experience, expression, and control of anger in research and clinical settings. Although the STAXI-II is extensively used and its psychometric properties supported, no psychometric critique has yet specifically assessed its utility with forensic populations. The aim of this critique was to explore the validity and reliability of the STAXI-II when used with forensic samples. It was found that the psychometric properties of the STAXI-II, when used with forensic populations, are satisfactory. However, gaps in research and issues that need to be addressed in practice have been highlighted. Although STAXI-II provides a comprehensive measure of anger, it does not capture all aspects of the construct. In addition, the tool does not contain an inherent validity scale, indicating the need to control for social desirability responding when administering the STAXI-II. Practical implications, limitations, and future research will be discussed. PMID:25899599

  17. Rejected by peers-attracted to antisocial media content: rejection-based anger impairs moral judgment among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Xanthe S; Konijn, Elly A

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage during which both peers and the media have a strong influence. Both peer rejection and the use of morally adverse media are associated with negative developmental outcomes. This study examines processes by which peer rejection might drive adolescents to select antisocial media content by tying together developmental research on peer rejection and research on media effects. Assumed underlying mechanisms are rejection-based anger and frustration and the adolescent's moral judgment. A between-participants experimental design manipulated peer rejection versus acceptance in adolescents (Mage = 13.88 years; N = 74) and young adults (Mage = 21.37 years; N = 75), applying the Cyberball paradigm. Measures included the State Anger Inventory (STAXI) to assess feelings of rejection and the newly devised Media, Morals, and Youth Questionnaire (MMaYQue) to assess media preferences and moral judgment of media content. Using bootstrapping analyses, a double mediation was established: Higher levels of state anger in peer-rejected adolescents induced more tolerable moral judgments of antisocial media content, subsequently instigating a preference for antisocial media content. In contrast, the young adult sample showed no relations between peer rejection and antisocial media preference. Results are discussed within a downward spiral framework of combined peer and media influences. PMID:22799588

  18. Attachment-based family therapy and emotion-focused therapy for unresolved anger: The role of productive emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Gary M; Shahar, Ben; Sabo, Daphna; Tsvieli, Noa

    2016-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that emotional processing is a central and common change mechanism across various types of therapies (Diener & Hilsenroth, 2009; Foa, Huppert, & Cahill, 2006; Greenberg, 2011). This study examined whether 10 weeks of attachment-based family therapy (ABFT), characterized by the use of in-session young adult-parent dialogues, were more effective than 10 weeks of individual emotion-focused therapy (EFT), characterized by the use of imaginal dialogues, in terms of facilitating productive emotional processing among a sample of 32 young adults presenting with unresolved anger toward a parent. This study also examined whether greater amounts of productive emotional processing predicted more favorable treatment outcomes. In contrast to our expectations, we found significantly more productive emotional processing in individual EFT than in conjoint ABFT. Results also showed that while both treatments led to significant and equivalent decreases in unresolved anger, state anger, attachment anxiety, and psychological symptoms, only ABFT was associated with decreases in attachment avoidance. Although amount of emotional processing did not explain the unique decrease in attachment avoidance in ABFT, greater amounts of productive emotional processing predicted greater decreases in psychological symptoms (but not other outcome measures) across both treatments. PMID:26828910

  19. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hao, E-mail: penghao@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McMaster University, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2015-10-21

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., “block effect”) in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  20. Anger elicitation in Tonga and Germany: The impact of culture on cognitive determinants of emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndreaBender

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive appraisal of an event is crucial for the elicitation and differentiation of emotions, and causal attributions are an integral part of this process. In an interdisciplinary project comparing Tonga and Germany, we examined how cultural differences in attribution tendencies affect emotion assessment and elicitation. Data on appraising causality and responsibility and on emotional responses were collected through questionnaires based on experimentally designed vignettes, and were related to culture-specific values, norms, and the prevailing self-concept. The experimental data support our hypothesis that—driven by culturally defined self-concepts and corresponding attribution tendencies—members of the two cultures cognitively appraise events in diverging manners and consequently differ in their emotional responses. Ascription of responsibility to self and/or circumstances, in line with a more interdependent self-concept, co-varies with higher ratings of shame, guilt and sadness, whereas ascription of responsibility to others, in line with a less interdependent self-concept, co-varies with higher ratings of anger. These findings support the universal contingency hypothesis and help to explain cultural differences in this domain on a fine-grained level.

  1. NPS: A Tested Platform for Political Transformation Against Anger & Apathy in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allah Nawaz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Political inaction is a major ‘Barrier’ to the progress of democratic values and systems in a society. It is more critical in the developing countries like Pakistan. A huge body of research on political apathy and anger in Pakistan is reporting over and over on the causes and consequences of this pathetic psychology. All that is true however, rays of hope are always there provided nations continue searching for the opportunities through scientific and rigorous research accompanied with sincerity and sense of responsibility at all the decision making levels of the state. This paper postulates a solution model for the issue in the perspectives of Pakistan by capitalizing on the role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in the Instant Political Transformation of the developing countries like Egypt & Lybia. The New Public Sphere (NPS is populated with Global Civil Society (GCS where International Citizens are connected together 24/7 from any corner of the Global Village and involved in use of ICT for Social Activism. Pakistan now has millions of Internet and Cell-users who are the part of GCS and waiting for a ‘Trigger’ to switch from the ‘Informal Activism to Formal & Political Activism’ through NPS.

  2. The effects of negative emotions on sensory perception: Fear but not anger decreases tactile sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Kelley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotions and sensory perceptions are closely intertwined. Of the five senses sight has been by far the most extensively studied sense in emotion research. Relatively less is known about how emotions influence the other four senses. Touch is essential for nonverbal communication in both humans and other animals. The current investigation tested competing hypotheses about the effect of fear on tactile perception. One hypothesis based on evolutionary considerations predicts that fear enhances sensory perception, including tactile sensitivity. A competing hypothesis based on research on peripheral psychophysiology predicts that fear should decrease tactile sensitivity. Two experiments that induced negative emotional states and measured two-point discrimination ability found that fear reduces tactile sensitivity relative to anger or a neutral control condition (Studies 1 and 2. These findings did not appear to be driven by participants’ naïve beliefs about the influence of emotions on touch (Study 3. The results represent the first evidence of the causal impact of emotional states on tactile sensitivity, are consistent with prior evidence for the peripheral physiological effects of fear, and offer novel empirical grounds for developing and advancing theories of emotional influences on sensory perception.

  3. Adolescent RSA responses during an anger discussion task: Relations to emotion regulation and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lixian; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Harrist, Amanda W; Larzelere, Robert E; Criss, Michael M; Houltberg, Benjamin J

    2015-06-01

    The current study examined associations between adolescent respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during an angry event discussion task and adolescents' emotion regulation and adjustment. Data were collected from 206 adolescents (10-18 years of age, M age = 13.37). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration data were collected from adolescents, and RSA values and respiration rates were computed. Adolescents reported on their own emotion regulation, prosocial behavior, and aggressive behavior. Multilevel latent growth modeling was employed to capture RSA responses across time (i.e., linear and quadratic changes; time course approach), and adolescent emotion regulation and adjustment variables were included in the model to test their links to RSA responses. Results indicated that high RSA baseline was associated with more adolescent prosocial behavior. A pattern of initial RSA decreases (RSA suppression) in response to angry event recall and subsequent RSA increases (RSA rebound) were related to better anger and sadness regulation and more prosocial behavior. However, RSA was not significantly linked to adolescent aggressive behavior. We also compared the time course approach with the conventional linear approach and found that the time course approach provided more meaningful and rich information. The implications of adaptive RSA change patterns are discussed. PMID:25642723

  4. The 'Righteous Anger' of the PowerlessInvestigating Dalit Outrage over Caste Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Jaoul

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution brings to our attention a Dalit ('untouchable' protest movement against caste violence (the 2006 Khairlanji massacre. Although anger is supposedly an emotion used in an open and demonstrative manner by the powerful as a means to enact their domination, the Dalit movement engaged in acts of ‘emotion work’ that upset such a social mapping of emotions. The paper engages critically with the sterile and biased concept of ‘axiological neutrality’ and advocates instead the heuristic possibilities enabled by the ethnographers’ personal exposure to the emotion work performed by social movements. The protest’s ideological stance illustrates the politically marginalised Dalits’ appropriation of democratic conceptions through the language of injustice and outrage. Two different sets of actors involved in the protest are distinguished: human rights and progressive activists of the peasant NGO movement on the one hand, and the local anti-caste movement of Dalits on the other. The distinct kinds of emotion work each set of actors performed, and the framing of the massacre as an outrage to moral values, highlights how, in the mobilisation for Dalit rights, the popular language of communal outrage and the language of democratic rights articulate with and support one another.

  5. ANTS2 package: simulation and experimental data processing for Anger camera type detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Martins, R.; Neves, F.; Domingos, V.; Chepel, V.

    2016-04-01

    ANTS2 is a simulation and data processing package developed for position sensitive detectors with Anger camera type readout. The simulation module of ANTS2 is based on ROOT package from CERN, which is used to store the detector geometry and to perform 3D navigation. The module is capable of simulating particle sources, performing particle tracking, generating photons of primary and secondary scintillation, tracing optical photons and generating photosensor signals. The reconstruction module features several position reconstruction methods based on the statistical reconstruction algorithms (including GPU-based implementations), artificial neural networks and k-NN searches. The module can process simulated as well as imported experimental data containing photosensor signals. A custom library for B-spline parameterization of spatial response of photosensors is implemented which can be used to calculate and parameterize the spatial response of a detector. The package includes a graphical user interface with an extensive set of configuration, visualization and analysis tools. ANTS2 is being developed with the focus on the iterative (adaptive) reconstruction of the detector response using flood field irradiation data. The package is implemented in C++ programming language and it is a multiplatform, open source project.

  6. Do Dynamic Compared to Static Facial Expressions of Happiness and Anger Reveal Enhanced Facial Mimicry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymarczyk, Krystyna; Żurawski, Łukasz; Jankowiak-Siuda, Kamila; Szatkowska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Facial mimicry is the spontaneous response to others' facial expressions by mirroring or matching the interaction partner. Recent evidence suggested that mimicry may not be only an automatic reaction but could be dependent on many factors, including social context, type of task in which the participant is engaged, or stimulus properties (dynamic vs static presentation). In the present study, we investigated the impact of dynamic facial expression and sex differences on facial mimicry and judgment of emotional intensity. Electromyography recordings were recorded from the corrugator supercilii, zygomaticus major, and orbicularis oculi muscles during passive observation of static and dynamic images of happiness and anger. The ratings of the emotional intensity of facial expressions were also analysed. As predicted, dynamic expressions were rated as more intense than static ones. Compared to static images, dynamic displays of happiness also evoked stronger activity in the zygomaticus major and orbicularis oculi, suggesting that subjects experienced positive emotion. No muscles showed mimicry activity in response to angry faces. Moreover, we found that women exhibited greater zygomaticus major muscle activity in response to dynamic happiness stimuli than static stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that people mimic positive emotions and confirm the importance of dynamic stimuli in some emotional processing. PMID:27390867

  7. Optimal design of Anger camera for bremsstrahlung imaging: Monte Carlo evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eWalrand

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A conventional Anger camera is not adapted to bremsstrahlung imaging and, as a result, even using a reduced energy acquisition window, geometric x-rays represent less than 15% of the recorded events. This increases noise, limits the contrast, and reduces the quantification accuracy.Monte Carlo simulations of energy spectra showed that a camera based on a 30mm-thick BGO crystal and equipped with a high energy pinhole collimator is well adapted to bremsstrahlung imaging. The total scatter contamination is reduced by a factor ten versus a conventional NaI camera equipped with a high energy parallel hole collimator enabling acquisition using an extended energy window ranging from 50 to 350 keV. By using the recorded event energy in the reconstruction method, shorter acquisition time and reduced orbit range will be usable allowing the design of a simplified mobile gantry. This is more convenient for use in a busy catheterization room. After injecting a safe activity, a fast SPECT could be performed without moving the catheter tip in order to assess the liver dosimetry and estimate the additional safe activity that could still be injected.Further long running time Monte Carlo simulations of realistic acquisitions will allow assessing the quantification capability of such system. Simultaneously, a dedicated bremsstrahlung prototype camera reusing PMT-BGO blocks coming from a retired PET system is currently under design for further evaluation.

  8. Clinical utility of scintimammography: From the Anger-camera to new dedicated devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, Orazio [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: oschil@tiscali.it; Danieli, Roberta [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Romano, Pasquale [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Cossu, Elsa [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Simonetti, Giovanni [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy)

    2006-12-20

    Scintimammography is a functional imaging technique which uses a radiation detection camera to detect radionuclide tracers in the patient's breasts. Tracers are designed to accumulate in tumours more than in healthy tissue: the most used are Tc-99 m sestamibi and Tc-99 m tetrofosmin. Scintimammography is useful in some clinical indications as an adjunct to mammography: it is recommended for those lesions where additional information is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. Patients with dubious mammograms may benefit from this test, as well as women with dense breasts or with implants. Scintimammography is a valuable diagnostic tool also in patients with locally advanced breast cancer for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, using an Anger-camera this technique shows a high sensitivity only for cancers >1 cm. Since other modalities are increasingly employed for the early identification of small abnormalities, the issue of detecting small cancers is critical for the future development and clinical utility of breast imaging with radiopharmaceuticals. The use of high-resolution cameras dedicated for breast imaging is the best option to improve the detection of small cancers: they allow higher flexibility in patient positioning, and the availability of mammography-like projections. Moreover, the detector can be placed directly in contact with the breast allowing a mild compression with reduction of the breast's thickness, thus increasing the target-to-background ratio and the sensitivity. These new devices have the potential of increasing the total number of breast scintigraphies performed thereby enhancing the role of nuclear medicine in breast cancer imaging.

  9. Clinical utility of scintimammography: From the Anger-camera to new dedicated devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintimammography is a functional imaging technique which uses a radiation detection camera to detect radionuclide tracers in the patient's breasts. Tracers are designed to accumulate in tumours more than in healthy tissue: the most used are Tc-99 m sestamibi and Tc-99 m tetrofosmin. Scintimammography is useful in some clinical indications as an adjunct to mammography: it is recommended for those lesions where additional information is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. Patients with dubious mammograms may benefit from this test, as well as women with dense breasts or with implants. Scintimammography is a valuable diagnostic tool also in patients with locally advanced breast cancer for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, using an Anger-camera this technique shows a high sensitivity only for cancers >1 cm. Since other modalities are increasingly employed for the early identification of small abnormalities, the issue of detecting small cancers is critical for the future development and clinical utility of breast imaging with radiopharmaceuticals. The use of high-resolution cameras dedicated for breast imaging is the best option to improve the detection of small cancers: they allow higher flexibility in patient positioning, and the availability of mammography-like projections. Moreover, the detector can be placed directly in contact with the breast allowing a mild compression with reduction of the breast's thickness, thus increasing the target-to-background ratio and the sensitivity. These new devices have the potential of increasing the total number of breast scintigraphies performed thereby enhancing the role of nuclear medicine in breast cancer imaging

  10. A study of Anger camera sensitivity and linearity as a function of spatial orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of an ECT quality assurance program, the authors have investigated the effect of Anger camera orientation on system linearity, sensitivity, and pulse height stability. Data have been acquired from two Siemens ZLC 7500 cameras using 2'' photomultiplier tubes from two different vendors. Each PMT is individually shielded with mu-metal. Point source sensitivity and position stability were studied using 1 mm Co-57 point sources mounted within tantalum well-collimators fixed onto the crystal facing. Measured variations in sensitivity as a function of rotation were 0.35% RMS and 1.2% peak-peak. Centroid position variations were 0.27 mm RMS and 1.0 mm peak-peak. The observed sensitivity variations increased markedly (≅x4) if the camera was not shielded from backscatter. The position variation, however, was only weakly affected (≅x1.15). Pulse height stability and flood uniformity variations with orientation were studied by fixing a Co-57 flood source to the collimator and acquiring 20 million count flood images. Images corresponding to the average energy signal at each pixel (Z-map) were simultaneously recorded. The variation in regional flood count density, analyzed over 1'' x 1'' regions of interest, was comparable to that found in the point source experiments. Regional and global Z-map data varied approximately sinusoidally with angle - 0.6% (RMS) and 1.7% (peak-peak). Direct measurement of the pulse height spectra versus angle yielded similar results. These data imply that variations of camera sensitivity and linearity during gantry rotation are small and relatively uniform over the detector area. Recent simulations in this laboratory indicate that ECT reconstructions are insensitive to such variations

  11. Clinical utility of scintimammography: From the Anger-camera to new dedicated devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Romano, Pasquale; Cossu, Elsa; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    Scintimammography is a functional imaging technique which uses a radiation detection camera to detect radionuclide tracers in the patient's breasts. Tracers are designed to accumulate in tumours more than in healthy tissue: the most used are Tc-99 m sestamibi and Tc-99 m tetrofosmin. Scintimammography is useful in some clinical indications as an adjunct to mammography: it is recommended for those lesions where additional information is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. Patients with dubious mammograms may benefit from this test, as well as women with dense breasts or with implants. Scintimammography is a valuable diagnostic tool also in patients with locally advanced breast cancer for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, using an Anger-camera this technique shows a high sensitivity only for cancers >1 cm. Since other modalities are increasingly employed for the early identification of small abnormalities, the issue of detecting small cancers is critical for the future development and clinical utility of breast imaging with radiopharmaceuticals. The use of high-resolution cameras dedicated for breast imaging is the best option to improve the detection of small cancers: they allow higher flexibility in patient positioning, and the availability of mammography-like projections. Moreover, the detector can be placed directly in contact with the breast allowing a mild compression with reduction of the breast's thickness, thus increasing the target-to-background ratio and the sensitivity. These new devices have the potential of increasing the total number of breast scintigraphies performed thereby enhancing the role of nuclear medicine in breast cancer imaging.

  12. 驾驶员驾驶经验对驾驶愤怒的影响%Effects of Drivers’ Driving Experience on Driving Anger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭双; 王君; 常若松

    2015-01-01

    驾驶愤怒研究起源于对“路怒”的关注。驾驶愤怒是驾驶机动车过程中发生的一种更频繁、更强烈的愤怒,容易引发驾驶攻击。驾驶经验是产生驾驶愤怒的主要因素之一。本研究采用自编驾驶愤怒问卷,测查了628名不同类型驾驶员的驾驶愤怒。结果显示:驾驶愤怒各维度随着驾龄、驾驶公里数的变化而表现不同。驾驶愤怒与驾驶经验因素显著相关。驾龄、驾驶公里数可以预测驾驶攻击:驾龄较长、驾驶公里数少,驾驶攻击多。驾龄可以预测对不文明驾驶的驾驶愤怒:驾龄越短,驾驶员遇到不文明驾驶时越容易愤怒。驾驶公里数可以预测轻度厌恶:驾驶公里数越多,轻度厌恶越少。%Driving anger research originated from the research of road rage .Driving anger is a kind of more frequent and more intense anger while driving and often cause driving attack .Driving experience is one of the primary factors that influenced driving anger .T his study measured 628 different kinds of drivers’ driv‐ing anger by using self‐designed Driving Anger Questionnaire .The results show that driving anger differed from one to another with different driving years and miles .Driving anger correlated significantly with driv‐ing experience .Driving years and miles could predict driving attack ,The more driving years and the less driving miles ,more driving attack drivers had;Driving years could predict discourtesy driving .If their driving years are less ,drivers will be anger when they meet discourtesy driving .Driving miles could pre‐dict mild distaste ,if their driving miles are less ,their mild distaste is less too .

  13. Psycho-education's impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of emergency medical technical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinc Mersin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emergency medical students are first persons that encountered and make medical aids to patients or traumatized people. It is stated that having adequate facilities about the communication of each health workers to deal with emergency patient and wounded persons is as important as immediate treatment. This research was conducted as quasi-experimental in order to determine the education of emotion recognition and expression's impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of emergency medical technical students. Methods: The research was made with 7 students in first year of education in emergency department at a university in Turkey in 2013-2014 academic years. Total 12-session education of emotion recognition and expression was given to student within research for 2 hours in a week during 12 weeks. Information Form including socio-demographic characteristics, Communication Skills Inventory (CSI, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES and Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS were applied to students before and after psycho-education. Results: It was determined that CSI mean scores of students within research were high before and after psycho-education but there is no statistically difference between them. It was determined that also there is no significantly difference between students' RSES and STAS mean scores before and after psycho-education. Conclusion: It was determined in the research that education of emotion recognition and expression has no impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of students and students' communication skills levels were high before and after psycho-education. It has been concluded that especially empathy from communication skills is the mode of existence and therefore cannot be taught. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(6.000: 489-495

  14. Investigation of anger and aggresive behavior of Turkish football süper league derby match fans

    OpenAIRE

    Dal, Suzan; Odabaş, İlhan; Suna, Nalan; Bulgan, Çiğdem; Akkaya, Selda

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluation of the audiences’ anger and aggressive be­havior before, during and after the football derby matches in Turkish Super League.97 subject, 37 women, 60 men (Age mean 26 years ± 6,5, minimum 18 years, maximum 60 years) were participated as a volunteer. The Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) was used for data collection and it was applied to audiences who were watched the derby matches regularly. First part of the questionaire was consisted of demographi...

  15. Performance of a semiconductor SPECT system. Comparison with a conventional anger-type SPECT instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a new single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanner with a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detector (Discovery NM 530c; D530c) was evaluated and compared to a conventional Anger-type SPECT with a dual-detector camera (Infinia). Three different phantom studies were performed. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) was measured using line sources placed at different locations in a cylindrical phantom. Uniformity was measured using cylindrical phantoms with 3 different diameters (80, 120, and 160 mm). Spatial resolution was evaluated using hot-rod phantoms of various diameters (5, 9, 13, 16, and 20 mm). Three different myocardial phantom studies were also performed, acquiring projection data with and without defects, and evaluating the interference of liver and gallbladder radioactivity. In a clinical study, the D530c employed list-mode raw data acquisition with electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated acquisition over a 10-min period. From the 10-min projection data, 1-, 3-, 5-, 7- and 10-min SPECT images were reconstructed. The FWHM of the D503c was 1.73-3.48 mm (without water) and 3.88-6.64 mm (with water), whereas the FWHM of the Infinia was 8.17-12.63 mm (without water) and 15.48-16.28 mm (with water). Non-uniformity was larger for the D530c than for the Infinia. Truncation artifacts were also observed with the D530c in a Φ160 mm phantom. The contrast ratio, as defined by myocardial defect/non-defect ratio, was better for the D530c than for the Infinia, and the influence from liver and gallbladder radioactivities was less. Quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software demonstrated significant differences between data captured over a 10-min period, relative to those acquired over periods of <5 min; there was no difference between ejection fractions calculated using data capture for periods ≥5 min (p<0.05). The D530c is superior to the Infinia, with regard to both spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this study, these

  16. Childhood Abuse is Associated with Adiposity in Mid-life Women: Possible Pathways through Trait Anger and Reproductive Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midei, Aimee J.; Matthews, Karen A.; Bromberger, Joyce T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between childhood abuse/neglect and central adiposity and obesity in a sample of 311 women (106 Black, 205 White) from the Pittsburgh site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Methods SWAN included a baseline measurement of women in midlife (mean age = 45.7) and 8 follow-up visits during which waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire retrospectively assessed emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and emotional and physical neglect in childhood. Results ANCOVA analyses showed that women with a history of any abuse/neglect, and specifically physical and sexual abuse, had significantly higher WC and BMI at baseline than women with no abuse history. A significant interaction between abuse and BMI showed that among women with BMI < 30, any abuse/neglect and certain subtypes of abuse predicted greater increases in WC over time. Additional analyses showed that Trait Anger scores and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) attenuated cross-sectional relationships between abuse/neglect and WC and BMI. Conclusion This study suggests that abused/neglected women appear to have greater anger and lower levels of SHBG, which are associated with adiposity in mid-life. PMID:20064904

  17. Alcohol Abuse Mediates the Association between Baseline T/C Ratio and Anger Expression in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Romero-Martínez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The imbalance between testosterone (T and cortisol (C levels has been proposed as a possible marker of risk for intimate partner violence (IPV. Moreover, it could be related to a high probability of adopting risky behaviors such as alcohol abuse which, in turn, promotes the onset of IPV. This study tested the potential mediating effect of alcohol consumption on the relationship between baseline T/C ratio and anger expression in IPV perpetrators and non-violent controls. Alcohol consumption was higher in the former than controls. A high baseline T/C ratio was only associated with high anger expression in IPV perpetrators, and this association was mediated by high alcohol consumption. Thus, alcohol abuse may act as a catalytic factor in this relationship, high consumption promoting the onset of IPV. These findings contribute to the development of effective treatment and prevention programs, which could introduce the use of biological markers for preventing the onset, development and recidivism of IPV.

  18. Associations between Sexual Abuse and Family Conflict/Violence, Self-Injurious Behavior, and Substance Use: The Mediating Role of Depressed Mood and Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. Methods: A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of…

  19. Does Parental Attributional Retraining and Anger Management Enhance the Effects of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program with Parents at Risk of Child Maltreatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Pidgeon, Aileen M.; Gravestock, Fred; Connors, Mark D.; Brown, Samantha; Young, Ross W.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-eight parents experiencing significant difficulties in managing their own anger in their interactions with their preschool-aged children were randomly assigned either to an enhanced group-administered behavioral family intervention program based on the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program that incorporated attributional retraining and anger…

  20. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for 'Super ACAR'. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  1. The effects of anger and sadness on clinical pain reports and experimentally-induced pain thresholds in women with and without fibromyalgia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, H. van; Lumley, M.A.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Geenen, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Negative emotions are commonly experienced in fibromyalgia and may affect pain. This study examined the effects of anger and sadness on clinical pain reports and on pain threshold and tolerance in response to electrical stimulation in women with and without fibromyalgia. METHODS: In an ex

  2. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for `Super ACAR`. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.P. Jr. [Bell Labs. Murray Hill, NJ (United States); West, R.N.; Hyodo, Toshio

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  3. Date Rape and Sexual Aggression in College Males: Incidence and the Involvement of Impulsivity, Anger, Hostility, Psychopathology, Peer Influence and Pornography Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossman, Leslie L.

    This study investigated the relationship between sexual aggression and date rape and the character traits of anger, hostility, impulsivity, psychopathology, peer pressure, and pornography use. Male college students (N=480) completed a questionnaire that consisted of 10 instruments measuring character traits and sexual aggressive behavior. Areas…

  4. The Clinical Significance of Single Features of Borderline Personality Disorder: Anger, Affective Instability, Impulsivity, and Chronic Emptiness in Psychiatric Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, William D; Rosenstein, Lia; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although dimensional models of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are consistent with findings showing that minimal levels of pathology are associated with substantial increases in psychosocial impairment, it is still unclear whether different individual BPD criteria are each clinically significant on their own. The current study uses semistructured interview data from 1,870 adults presenting for outpatient psychiatric treatment to investigate whether the BPD criteria of impulsivity, affective instability, emptiness, and anger are each related to psychosocial morbidity when met in the absence of the other eight criteria. Analyses showed that each of these criteria was associated with dysfunction in comparison with a control group meeting zero BPD criteria, but only the emptiness criterion was a marker of impairment on all indices of psychosocial morbidity: suicidality, history of suicide attempts and psychiatric hospitalizations, social and work dysfunction, Axis I comorbidity, and global functioning. Implications for the study of borderline pathology are discussed. PMID:25893552

  5. Compassion meditators show less anger, less punishment, and more compensation of victims in response to fairness violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Cade; Steinbeis, Nikolaus; Ricard, Matthieu; Singer, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Fairness violations elicit powerful behavioral and affective responses. Indeed, people are willing to incur costs to sanction unfair behavior. Here we study the possible impact of long-term mental training in socio-affective capacities such as compassion on altruistic punishment and compensatory behavior in economic games. To this end we recruited a group of long-term meditation practitioners (LTPs) who had engaged in an average of 40 K h of mental training exercises including compassion-related meditation, along with a group of meditation-naïve controls. Participants played several adaptations of the dictator game in which they had the opportunity to punish the dictator both when they were the recipients of the dictator's offer and when they were third-party witnesses to the dictator's treatment of an anonymous second player. Compared to controls, LTPs were less likely to punish when they were the victims of fairness violations. However, both groups punished equivalently when they witnessed others receiving unfair treatment. In post-task questionnaires, controls reported significantly more anger in response to unfair offers than LTPs, although fairness judgments did not differ between groups. These data suggest that because the LTPs were less angered by unfair treatment of themselves, they punished that behavior less. However, when they witnessed the unfair treatment of others, they engaged in norm-reinforcing punishment. Finally, when participants played an additional game which included the opportunity to recompense victims, LTPs were more likely to do so. Together these data point to differential approaches to justice whereby LTPs engaged less in vengeful, retributive justice and focused more on norm reinforcement and the restoration of equity. These differences suggest that social preferences are plastic and that altruistic responses to unfairness may be shaped by the prolonged cultivation of prosocial motivation, altruism, and compassion. PMID:25538589

  6. Compassion Meditators Show Less Anger, Less Punishment and More Compensation of Victims in Response to Fairness Violations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cade eMcCall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fairness violations elicit powerful behavioral and affective responses. Indeed, people are willing to incur costs to sanction unfair behavior. Here we study the possible impact of long-term mental training in socio-affective capacities such as compassion on altruistic punishment and compensatory behavior in economic games. To this end we recruited a group of long-term meditation practitioners (LTPs who had engaged in an average of 40K hours of mental training exercises including compassion-related meditation, along with a group of meditation-naïve controls. Participants played several adaptations of the dictator game in which they had the opportunity to punish the dictator both when they were the recipients of the dictator’s offer and when they were third-party witnesses to the dictator’s treatment of an anonymous second player. Compared to controls, LTPs were less likely to punish when they were the victims of fairness violations. However, both groups punished equivalently when they witnessed others receiving unfair treatment. In post-task questionnaires, controls reported significantly more anger in response to unfair offers than LTPs, although fairness judgments did not differ between groups. These data suggest that because the LTPs were less angered by unfair treatment of themselves, they punished that behavior less. However, when they witnessed the unfair treatment of others, they engaged in norm-reinforcing punishment. Finally, when participants played an additional game which included the opportunity to recompense victims, LTPs were more likely to do so. Together these data point to differential approaches to justice whereby LTPs engaged less in vengeful, retributive justice and focused more on norm reinforcement and the restoration of equity. These differences suggest that social preferences are plastic and that altruistic responses to unfairness may be shaped by the prolonged cultivation of prosocial motivation, altruism and

  7. First-pass radionuclide ventriculography performed with the Anger camera at rest and during exercise. One thousand consecutive studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left and right ventricular global and segmental functions are currently assessed non-invasively by ejection fraction measurement and segmental wall motion analysis respectively. This information is gathered during the first-pass study in the preferred 300 right anterior oblique projection and cannot be acquired with the equilibrium-gated electrocardiogram (ECG). This view of the heart is complemented by a 300 left anterior oblique projection in biplane radionuclide studies. A report is given on 1000 consecutive first-pass radionuclide ventriculograms performed both at rest and during exercise using the Anger camera. These studies were performed after bolus injection of 15mCi 99Tcsup(m)-pertechnetate into an antecubital vein, and detected and processed as reported in Circulation 59 (1979) 60. Of the studies, 85 (8.5%) were considered unprocessable; these patients underwent gated ECG immediately thereafter. The reasons for unprocessability were as follows: 4.0% equipment failures; 2.5% failures of bolus injection technique; and 2.0% central haemodynamic impairment such as pulmonary hypertension, severe valvular regurgitation, or left to right shunt. Bolus quality control was achieved by measuring the mean transit time (MTT) of the superior vena cava: MTT longer than 4s coincided with an 82% probability of study unprocessability. Correlation of first-pass ventriculography performed in the catheterization laboratory with immediately subsequent contrast ventriculography in 16 patients yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.87 for left ventricular ejection fraction. For segmental wall motion, the correlation coefficient was 0.92 for the anterobasal segment, 0.72 for the anteroapical, 0.89 posteroapical, and 0.76 posterobasal segment. First-pass ventriculography with the Anger camera is an ideal means of gathering total and segmental regional functional information on the left ventricle at rest and during exercise. It is faster, simpler and more informative than the gated

  8. 中学生网络攻击行为与愤怒%Online aggression behaviors and anger in middle school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晔; 王利刚; 周文娇; 高文斌

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨中学生网络攻击行为与愤怒的关系.方法:选取12~ 19岁中学生349人,采用少年网络攻击行为评定量表、少年攻击性问卷和状态-特质愤怒表达量表修订版进行测评.结果:女生愤怒气质因子分高于男生[(2.0±0.7)vs.(1.9±0.7),P<0.05].高中生特质愤怒得分高于初中生[(2.1±0.6)vs.(1.9±0.6),P<0.01];愤怒外部表达因子分高于初中生[(2.3±0.5)vs.(2.2±0.6),P<0.01].攻击行为与特质愤怒、愤怒表达各因子均呈显著的正相关(r=0.14 ~0.57,P<0.05);现实攻击行为和网络工具性攻击行为与愤怒控制各因子呈显著的负相关(r=-0.19~-0.11,P<0.05),网络反应性攻击行为与愤怒控制各因子相关均无统计学意义.多元逐步回归分析显示,愤怒反应、愤怒表达因子得分与攻击行为得分呈正相关(β=0.13~0.37,P <0.05),控制外部表达因子与反应性攻击得分呈负相关(β=-0.01,P<0.05).对攻击行为的可解释变异率的范围为19.1% ~35.7%.结论:中学生网络攻击行为可能与特质愤怒、愤怒表达相关.%Objective: To explore the relationship between online aggression and anger in middle school students. Methods: Totally 349 middle school students aged 12 - 19 years were selected, including junior high school students and senior high school students. They were assessed with the Adolescent Online Aggressive Behavior Scale (AOABS), Adolescent Aggressive Behavior Questionnaire, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2). Results: Girls got significantly higher scores than boys on anger temper factor [ (2.0 ±0.7) vs. (1.9 ± 0.7), P < 0.05 ]. Senior high school students got significantly higher scores than junior high school students on trait anger subscale [(2.1 ±0.6) vs. (1.9 ±0.6),P <0.01] and anger expression-out factor [(2.3 ±0.5) vs. (2.2± 0. 6), P <0.01 ]. Aggressive behavior, no nutter online or offline, were positively correlated with trait anger and

  9. Factors affecting the myocardial activity acquired during exercise SPECT with a high-sensitivity cardiac CZT camera as compared with conventional Anger camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injected doses are difficult to optimize for exercise SPECT since they depend on the myocardial fraction of injected activity (MFI) that is detected by the camera. The aim of this study was to analyse the factors affecting MFI determined using a cardiac CZT camera as compared with those determined using conventional Anger cameras. Factors affecting MFI were determined and compared in patients who had consecutive exercise SPECT acquisitions with 201Tl (84 patients) or 99mTc-sestamibi (87 patients) with an Anger or a CZT camera. A predictive model was validated in a group of patients routinely referred for 201Tl (78 patients) or 99mTc-sestamibi (80 patients) exercise CZT SPECT. The predictive model involved: (1) camera type, adjusted mean MFI being ninefold higher for CZT than for Anger SPECT, (2) tracer type, adjusted mean MFI being twofold higher for 201Tl than for 99mTc-sestamibi, and (3) logarithm of body weight. The CZT SPECT model led to a +1 ± 26 % error in the prediction of the actual MFI from the validation group. The mean MFI values estimated for CZT SPECT were more than twofold higher in patients with a body weight of 60 kg than in patients with a body weight of 120 kg (15.9 and 6.8 ppm for 99mTc-sestamibi and 30.5 and 13.1ppm for 201Tl, respectively), and for a 14-min acquisition of up to one million myocardial counts, the corresponding injected activities were only 80 and 186 MBq for 99mTc-sestamibi and 39 and 91 MBq for 201Tl, respectively. Myocardial activities acquired during exercise CZT SPECT are strongly influenced by body weight and tracer type, and are dramatically higher than those obtained using an Anger camera, allowing very low-dose protocols to be planned, especially for 99mTc-sestamibi and in non-obese subjects. (orig.)

  10. Anger, Sadness and Fear in Response to Breaking Crime and Accident News Stories: How Emotions Influence Support for Alcohol-Control Public Policies via Concern about Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Solloway, Tyler; Slater, Michael D.; Chung, Adrienne; Goodall, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Prior research shows that discrete emotions, notably anger and fear, can explain effects of news articles on health and alcohol-control policy support. This study advances prior work by coding expressed emotional responses to messages (as opposed to directly manipulated emotions or forced responses), incorporating and controlling for central thoughts, including sadness (a particularly relevant response to tragic stories), and examining concern’s mediating role between emotion and policy suppo...

  11. The ‘Staying Calm’ programme : an evaluation of the impact of group work on children’s emotional resiliency, behaviour, anger control and social problem solving skills

    OpenAIRE

    Whyard, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Staying Calm’ is a small group programme designed to promote emotional skills, anger control and social problem solving skills in children. This study outlines an evaluation of the programme completed with 48 Year 5 and 6 children in two schools within a large shire county in the Midlands. The study begins by examining previous research and literature relevant to children’s emotional and social skills. A range of concepts and interventions that influence children’s emotional literacy, regu...

  12. Effectiveness of Gross Model-Based Emotion Regulation Strategies Training on Anger Reduction in Drug-Dependent Individuals and its Sustainability in Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massah, Omid; Sohrabi, Faramarz; A’azami, Yousef; Doostian, Younes; Farhoudian, Ali; Daneshmand, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Emotion plays an important role in adapting to life changes and stressful events. Difficulty regulating emotions is one of the problems drug abusers often face, and teaching these individuals to express and manage their emotions can be effective on improving their difficult circumstances. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the Gross model-based emotion regulation strategies training on anger reduction in drug-dependent individuals. Patients and Methods The present study had a quasi-experimental design wherein pretest-posttest evaluations were applied using a control group. The population under study included addicts attending Marivan’s methadone maintenance therapy centers in 2012 - 2013. Convenience sampling was used to select 30 substance-dependent individuals undergoing maintenance treatment who were then randomly assigned to the experiment and control groups. The experiment group received its training in eight two-hour sessions. Data were analyzed using analysis of co-variance and paired t-test. Results There was significant reduction in anger symptoms of drug-dependent individuals after gross model based emotion regulation training (ERT) (P < 0.001). Moreover, the effectiveness of the training on anger was persistent in the follow-up period. Conclusions Symptoms of anger in drug-dependent individuals of this study were reduced by gross model-based emotion regulation strategies training. Based on the results of this study, we may conclude that the gross model based emotion regulation strategies training can be applied alongside other therapies to treat drug abusers undergoing rehabilitation. PMID:27162759

  13. A Community - Based Modification Intervention To Reduce Anger Among Secondary School Students Living In The Five Local Government Areas Of Oyo State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates behaviour modification intervention programme in the reduction of anger among secondary school students from five local government areas of Oyo State. Intensity of Angry Feeling Scale (IAFS) developed by the researcher was the measuring instrument used to collect the data. The participants of the study comprised of 600 final year students randomly drawn from 10 secondary schools located in 5 Local Government Area of Oyo State. Two hypotheses were tested for significanc...

  14. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Driving Anger Scale (DAS: long form and short form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessye Almeida Cantini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Driving anger has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years because it may induce individuals to drive aggressively or adopt risk behaviors. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS was designed to evaluate the propensity of drivers to become angry or aggressive while driving. This study describes the cross-cultural adaptation of a Brazilian version of the short form and the long form of the DAS.Methods: Translation and adaptation were made in four steps: two translations and two back-translations carried out by independent evaluators; the development of a brief version by four bilingual experts in mental health and driving behaviors; a subsequent experimental application; and, finally, an investigation of operational equivalence.Results: Final Brazilian versions of the short form and of the long form of the DAS were made and are presented. Conclusions: This important instrument, which assesses driving anger and aggressive behaviors, is now available to evaluate the driving behaviors of the Brazilian population, which facilitates research in this field.

  15. Interrelations of Justice, Rejection, Provocation, and Moral Disgust Sensitivity and Their Links with the Hostile Attribution Bias, Trait Anger, and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondü, Rebecca; Richter, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Several personality dispositions with common features capturing sensitivities to negative social cues have recently been introduced into psychological research. To date, however, little is known about their interrelations, their conjoint effects on behavior, or their interplay with other risk factors. We asked N = 349 adults from Germany to rate their justice, rejection, moral disgust, and provocation sensitivity, hostile attribution bias, trait anger, and forms and functions of aggression. The sensitivity measures were mostly positively correlated; particularly those with an egoistic focus, such as victim justice, rejection, and provocation sensitivity, hostile attributions and trait anger as well as those with an altruistic focus, such as observer justice, perpetrator justice, and moral disgust sensitivity. The sensitivity measures had independent and differential effects on forms and functions of aggression when considered simultaneously and when controlling for hostile attributions and anger. They could not be integrated into a single factor of interpersonal sensitivity or reduced to other well-known risk factors for aggression. The sensitivity measures, therefore, require consideration in predicting and preventing aggression.

  16. Preliminary evidence that different mechanisms underlie the anger superiority effect in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko eIsomura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that angry faces capture humans’ attention more rapidly than emotionally positive faces. This phenomenon is referred to as the anger superiority effect (ASE. Despite atypical emotional processing, adults and children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have been reported to show ASE as well as typically developed (TD individuals. So far, however, few studies have clarified whether or not the mechanisms underlying ASE are the same for both TD and ASD individuals. Here, we tested how TD and ASD children process schematic emotional faces during detection by employing a recognition task in combination with a face-in-the-crowd task. Results of the face-in-the-crowd task revealed the prevalence of ASE both in TD and ASD children. However, the results of the recognition task revealed group differences: In TD children, detection of angry faces required more configural face processing and disrupted the processing of local features. In ASD children, on the other hand, it required more feature-based processing rather than configural processing. Despite the small sample sizes, these findings provide preliminary evidence that children with ASD, in contrast to TD children, show quick detection of angry faces by extracting local features in faces.

  17. 愤怒情志表达方式及特质对自主神经的影响%Effect of expression and trait of anger emotion on autonomic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹向红; 刘胜利; 江虹; 乔明琦; 张惠云; 潘芳; 杨雪; 徐玮玮

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of expression and trait of anger emotion on autonomic nerve. Methods:The subjects enrolled were screened from the health college students. The changes of autonomic nerve were researched in an experimental paradigm processed dynamically by emotion induction (by watching movie clips) and emotion regulation (by phraseology clewing and regulating body reaction to anger). Results: The increased extent of heart rate, finger pulse volume, heart rate variability, galvanic skin reflex in the anger-ont groups was higher than that in the anger-in groups(P=0.025, 0.028, 0.014,0.047). The skin temperature of the subjects increased when the anger expression of them in the high-trait anger group were suppressed (P=0.032). Conclusion: ①The extent of sympathetic nerve of the subjects activated by anger-out was more obvious than that by anger-in. ②There was the interaction between trait anger and anger expression.%目的:探讨愤怒情志表达方式和特质对自主神经的影响.方法:以健康在校大学生48人为被试,采用情绪诱发(观看电影片段)和情绪调节(按语词提示调节对愤怒刺激的反应)动态加工的实验范式,研究自主神经的变化.结果:发怒时心率(HR)、手脂脉搏血容(FPV)、心率变异性(HRV)、皮肤电(GSR)增幅大于郁怒(P=0.025,0.028,0.014,0.047);高特质怒在抑制情绪表达时皮肤温度升高(P=0.032).结论:①发怒时对交感神经的激活程度高于郁怒;②特质怒与愤怒表达方式间存在交互作用.

  18. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management styleOkul yöneticilerinin öfke ve stresle başaçıkma yaklaşımları ile çatışma yönetimi stilleri arasındaki ilişki

    OpenAIRE

    Gündüz, Bülent; Binali TUNÇ; İnandı, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches i...

  19. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management style

    Okul yöneticilerinin öfke ve stresle başaçıkma yaklaşımları ile çatışma yönetimi stilleri arasındaki ilişki

    OpenAIRE

    Bülent Gündüz; Binali Tunç; Yusuf İnandı

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches i...

  20. Anxiety and Anger Symptoms in Hwabyung Patients Improved More following 4 Weeks of the Emotional Freedom Technique Program Compared to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Suh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT is a meridian-based psychological therapy. The present clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of EFT as a new treatment option for Hwabyung (HB patients experiencing anger and compares the efficacy to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR, the conventional meditation technique. Methods. The EFT and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR methods were performed on 27 HB patients, and their capacities to alleviate anxiety, anger, and emotional status were compared. After a 4-week program, a survey was conducted; patients then completed a self-training program for 4 weeks, followed by a second survey. Results. During the initial 4 weeks, the EFT group experienced a significant decrease in the HB symptom scale, anger state, and paranoia ideation (p<0.05. Over the entire 9-week interval, there were significant decreases in the HB symptom scale, anxiety state, anger state, anger trait, somatization, anxiety, hostility, and so on in EFT group (p<0.05. Conclusion. The EFT group showed improved psychological symptoms and physical symptoms greater than those observed in the PMR group. EFT more effectively alleviated HB symptoms compared to PMR. EFT group showed better maintenance during self-training, suggesting good model of self-control treatment in HB patients.

  1. Tentativa de crianças em lidar com as emoções de raiva e tristeza Children trying to deal with emotions of anger and sadness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Bompastor Borges Dias

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo focaliza respostas de crianças sobre como parar o sentimento de tristeza e raiva, o que implica explorar estratégias de alterações de humor, i.e., pensamentos sobre como regular as emoções. Foi perguntado a crianças brasileiras e norueguesas de 5, 7 e 9 anos de idade como a tristeza e a raiva podiam cessar em 4 diferentes contextos para cada emoção. Os resultados mostram que as estratégias de regulação das emoções (RE variavam em função do contexto e da idade; que as crianças brasileiras usaram mais a interação social e as crianças norueguesas recorreram mais às estratégias cognitivas para raiva, mas não para tristeza. Não foi observada uma diferença clara na estratégia de RE para tristeza e raiva.The present study focus on children's cognitions of how to stop feeling sad and angry, which implies an exploration of their meta mood strategies, i.e. thoughts about how to regulate emotions. It was asking 5, 7, and 9-year-old Brazilian and Norwegian children how sadness and anger could be stopped in 4 different contexts for each emotion. The results showed that ER strategies varied with context and age, that Brazilian children used more social interaction and Norwegian children more cognitive strategies for anger, but not for sadness, and that even three year old children could state different strategies in different emotion contexts. There was not observed a clear difference in ER strategy for sadness and anger.

  2. Dating methods combined to building archaeology: the contribution of thermoluminescence to the case of the bell tower of St Martin’s church, Angers (France)

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Sophie; Guibert, Pierre; Prigent, Daniel; Lanos, Philippe; Oberlin, Christine; Sapin, Christian; Bouvier, Armel; Dufresne, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    St Martin’s church, Angers, is emblematic of the problems raised in pre-12th century history of architecture. In view of the importance of this building, it was necessary to attempt to define its dating and this study particularly focuses on its bell-tower. In addition to the conclusion resulting from the interpretation of written sources and typological criteria positioning the construction of the site at the beginning of the 11th century, not only a significant number of 14C dates were c...

  3. Factors affecting the myocardial activity acquired during exercise SPECT with a high-sensitivity cardiac CZT camera as compared with conventional Anger camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947 and Universite de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep experimental imaging platform, Nancy (France); Imbert, Laetitia [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep experimental imaging platform, Nancy (France); Centre Alexis Vautrin, Department of Radiotherapy, Vandoeuvre (France); Yagdigul, Yalcine; Roch, Veronique [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep experimental imaging platform, Nancy (France); Fay, Renaud [INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique CIC-P 9501, Nancy (France); Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947 and Universite de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique [AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); INSERM U 773 and Denis Diderot University, Paris (France); Fourquet, Nicolas [Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Poussier, Sylvain [INSERM U947 and Universite de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep experimental imaging platform, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep experimental imaging platform, Nancy (France); INSERM U1116 and Universite de Lorraine, Nancy (France); CHU-Nancy, Allee du Morvan, Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2014-03-15

    Injected doses are difficult to optimize for exercise SPECT since they depend on the myocardial fraction of injected activity (MFI) that is detected by the camera. The aim of this study was to analyse the factors affecting MFI determined using a cardiac CZT camera as compared with those determined using conventional Anger cameras. Factors affecting MFI were determined and compared in patients who had consecutive exercise SPECT acquisitions with {sup 201}Tl (84 patients) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (87 patients) with an Anger or a CZT camera. A predictive model was validated in a group of patients routinely referred for {sup 201}Tl (78 patients) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (80 patients) exercise CZT SPECT. The predictive model involved: (1) camera type, adjusted mean MFI being ninefold higher for CZT than for Anger SPECT, (2) tracer type, adjusted mean MFI being twofold higher for {sup 201}Tl than for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, and (3) logarithm of body weight. The CZT SPECT model led to a +1 ± 26 % error in the prediction of the actual MFI from the validation group. The mean MFI values estimated for CZT SPECT were more than twofold higher in patients with a body weight of 60 kg than in patients with a body weight of 120 kg (15.9 and 6.8 ppm for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi and 30.5 and 13.1ppm for {sup 201}Tl, respectively), and for a 14-min acquisition of up to one million myocardial counts, the corresponding injected activities were only 80 and 186 MBq for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi and 39 and 91 MBq for {sup 201}Tl, respectively. Myocardial activities acquired during exercise CZT SPECT are strongly influenced by body weight and tracer type, and are dramatically higher than those obtained using an Anger camera, allowing very low-dose protocols to be planned, especially for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi and in non-obese subjects. (orig.)

  4. Anxiety and Anger Symptoms in Hwabyung Patients Improved More following 4 Weeks of the Emotional Freedom Technique Program Compared to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jin Woo; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Sang Young; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, Jong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is a meridian-based psychological therapy. The present clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of EFT as a new treatment option for Hwabyung (HB) patients experiencing anger and compares the efficacy to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR), the conventional meditation technique. Methods. The EFT and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) methods were performed on 27 HB patients, and their capacities to alleviate anxiety, anger, and emotional status were compared. After a 4-week program, a survey was conducted; patients then completed a self-training program for 4 weeks, followed by a second survey. Results. During the initial 4 weeks, the EFT group experienced a significant decrease in the HB symptom scale, anger state, and paranoia ideation (p self-training, suggesting good model of self-control treatment in HB patients. PMID:26539218

  5. Trénink hněvu: Smrtelný hřích v temperamentní profesi Coaching anger: A deadly sin in a lively profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Fry

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Podle křesťanské tradice je hněv jedním ze "sedmi smrtelných hříchů". Ve východním náboženském myšlení je hněv považován za jedovatý a návykový. Tyto pohledy poukazují na problémovou povahu hněvu. Jiní se však domnívají, že hněv může nabývat vhodného výrazu a pozitivní funkce. Vzhledem k tomu, že hněv se ve sportu projevuje často, je důležité vyhodnotit význam hněvu také v této oblasti lidského života. Zvláště často projevují hněv trenéři. S ohledem na tuto skutečnost se v tomto příspěvku zaměřuji na povahu hněvu a jeho roli v profesi trenéra. Je na roli, kterou trenér zastává, něco, co by trenérům poskytovalo zvláštní svobodu ve vyjadřování hněvu? "Trénink hněvu" se nezabývá výhradně projevy hněvu trenérů, ale také praktickými kroky vedoucími k účinnému a přiměřenému ovládání této složité emoce. According to Christian tradition, anger comprises one of the "seven deadly sins". In Eastern religious thought anger is held to be poisonous and addictive. These views point to the problematic nature of anger. Some hold, however, that anger can have an appropriate expression and a positive function. Since anger is often vented in sport, it is important to assess the significance of anger in this area of life. Coaches, in particular, frequently display anger. Given this fact, in this paper I focus on the nature of anger and its role in the coaching profession. Is there something distinctive about the role of the coach such that coaches should be granted special leeway in the expression of anger? "Coaching anger" refers not merely to the manifestation of coaches’ anger, but also to practical steps towards effective and appropriate dealing with this complex emotion.

  6. The Body as a Tool for Anger Awareness--Differential Effects of Angry Facial and Bodily Expressions on Suppression from Awareness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minye Zhan

    Full Text Available Emotional signals are perceived whether or not we are aware of it. The evidence so far mostly came from studies with facial expressions. Here, we investigated whether the pattern of non-conscious face expression perception is found for whole body expressions. Continuous flash suppression (CFS was used to measure the time for neutral, fearful, and angry facial or bodily expressions to break from suppression. We observed different suppression time patterns for emotions depending on whether the stimuli were faces or bodies. The suppression time for anger was shortest for bodily expressions, but longest for the facial expressions. This pattern indicates different processing and detection mechanisms for faces and bodies outside awareness, and suggests that awareness mechanisms associated with dorsal structures might play a role in becoming conscious of angry bodily expressions.

  7. EXPRESSIONS OF ANGER IN DIWAN LUGAT AT-TURK DİVANÜ LUGATİ’T-TÜRK’TE KIZGINLIK İFADE EDEN KELİMELER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar TOKAY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diwan Lugat at-Turk is one of the basic sources of Turcology and this book has significant information on any issues related to the culture of Turks. One of these issues which unreviewed, is expressions of anger, in the other words cursing words. Expressions of anger, no doubt, the lifes of communities, lifestyles and trends showing us that must be addressed as a seperate issue. In this article, cursing words, indicating some etymological ideas about language materials will be provided, as recorded by Mahmud Kashgari. Divanü Lugati’t-Türk, Türklük biliminin en temel kaynaklarından biridir ve Türk kültürüyle ilgili birçok konuda önemli bilgiler içermektedir. İşte bu eserin bizlere sunduğu malzemelerden biri de bugüne kadar pek ele alınmayan kızgınlık ifadeleri, başka bir deyişle sövgülerdir. Şüphesiz kızgınlık ifadeleri, toplumların hayatlarını, yaşam tarzlarını ve eğilimlerini göstermesi bakımından ayrı bir mesele olarak ele alınmalıdır. Bu yazıda, Kâşgarlı Mahmud’un sövgü bildiren sözcükler olarak kaydettiği dil malzemeleri üzerinde durulacak ve bu kelimeler hakkında bazı etimolojik düş��ncelere yer verilecektir.

  8. Analysis and modelling of the performance of a new solid-state detector in nuclear medicine: from Anger- to Semiconductor-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Developed in the 1980's with rotating Anger gamma cameras, this technique could be dramatically enhanced by new imaging systems working with semiconductor detectors and which performances are clearly enhanced. Two semiconductor cameras, dedicated to nuclear cardiology and equipped with Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors, have been recently commercialized: the Discovery NM- 530c (General Electric) and the DSPECT (Spectrum Dynamics). The performances of these CZT cameras were compared: 1) by a comprehensive analysis of phantom and human SPECT images considered as normal and 2) with the parameters commonly recommended for SPECT recording and reconstruction. The results show the superiority of the CZT cameras in terms of detection sensitivity, spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio, compared to conventional Anger cameras. These properties might lead to dramatically reduce acquisition times and/or the injected activities. However, the limits of these new CZT cameras, as well as the mechanism of certain artefacts, remain poorly known. This knowledge could be enhanced by a numerical modeling of the DSPECT camera, and this might also help to optimize acquisition and reconstruction parameters. We developed a simulator where the geometry of the detectors of the DSPECT camera and their energy response were modeled in the GATE platform. In order to validate this simulator, actually recorded data were compared with simulated data through three performance parameters: detection sensitivity, spatial resolution and energy resolution. Results were in agreement between simulated and actually recorded data. This observation validates the DSPECT simulator and opens the door to further studies planed to optimize the recorded and reconstruction processes, especially for complex protocols such as simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisition

  9. Neuroendocrine mechanisms of left ventricular dysfunction stimulated by anger stress in rats with atherosclerosis-a putative role of natriuretic peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Chen; Xian-Zhi He; Qi-Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of natriuretic peptide in the process of left ventricular dysfunction caused by emotional stress. Methods: Adult male SD rats (n=30) and Wistar rats (n=60) were selected in this study. Atherosclerosis models were induced with high-fat diet and excess VD3 injection (eight consecutive weeks), and anger stress models were prepared by resident-intruder stress experiment (two consecutive weeks). Furthermore, left ventricular functions were examined by high-resolution echocardiograph, after which left ventricular myocardium and coronary arteries were prepared for pathological section and observed with electron microscope. At the same time, the hypothalamus, medulla oblongata and left ventricular myocardium were also prepared for pathological sections to detect the localization and expression of ANP, BNP and NPR-A with immunofluorescence and western blot. Results: We found that left ventricular functions of atherosclerosis or emotional stress modeled rats were both inferior to the healthy ones and superior to the combined (atherosclerosis and emotional stress) modeled ones (P<0.05). We also found that atherosclerosis and emotional stress could both cause morphological changes of left ventricular cells and capillary which contribute to apoptosis and hyperblastosis. Further more, there was NPR-A distributed in hypothalamus, medulla oblongata, as well as left ventricular tissues with the same express trend between groups, with atherosclerosis modeled rats the highest and the healthy rats the lowest. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that anger stress could cause an excess consumption of ANP, BNP and NPR-A in nervous and cardiovascular system which inhibit the compensatory self-repair function of atherosclerosis rats, leading to a promotion of fibrosis and lipid peroxidation, offering insight into the neuroendocrine mechanisms of left heart function obstacle.

  10. 愤怒应激对衰老大鼠认知功能的影响及机制分析%Effect of Anger Stress on the Learning Behaviour and Mechanism Investigation in Aging Model Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵君玫; 詹向红; 张娜; 杨雪; 李伟

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects and mechanism of anger stress on behavior and memory in the D-gal induced brain aging model rats. Method: Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, anger model group, D-gal group, anger + D-gal group, and attack rats. The D-galgroup and anger + D-gal group were administered ip 1% D-gal physiological salinesolution ( PSS) 10 mL ·kg-1·d . The control group and anger model group were ip given the same volume of PSS for 6 weeks. From the third weeks, the anger model group and anger + D-gal group accepted the anger stimulation test for 4 weeks. Each rat in anger model group was placed into one cage and accepted the attack from the invade rat, the tail of invade rat was clamped by using haemostat packed with bandage, two rats bite each other 20 min per day. Morris water maze test was carried out in the 37 days. Six days later all rats were executed and the brain tissue was collected for measurement of superoxide disnvutase (SOD), malondialdehyde ( MDA ) , lipofuscin ( LPF) , meanwhile, pathological changes were observed on cerebral cortex and seahorse. Result: Compared with control group, the behavior and memory significantly decreased (P<0.05, P<0.01) , the brain tissue SOD activity wassignifieantly reduced (P <0.01) and MDA,LPF content were obviously increased (P <0. 01 ) in the anger model group, D-gal group and anger + D-gal group. Furthermore, pathological study showed that the cerebral cortex and seahorsein in the anger model group, D-gal group and anger + D-gal group appeared pathological changes compared with control group, the pathological changes in anger + D-gal group were most obvious. Conclusion: The anger stress has the negatively effects on behavior and memory in the D-gal induced brain aging model rats.%目的:研究愤怒应激对D-半乳糖(D-gal)诱导的脑老化模型大鼠认知功能的影响及机制.方法:将Wistar大鼠随机分成正常对照组、愤怒模型组、D-gal模型组愤怒+D-gal

  11. Sensitivity degradation of an anger camera operated in SPECT-like mode under the influence of a strong external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally determine the degradation in sensitivity of an Anger camera rotated in SPECT-like orbits around the transverse and sagittal planes of the magnetic field produced by a conventional, dual coil, 1 T electromagnet. A 74 photomultiplier Siemens Basicam Anger camera with a 29 cm radius crystal and an Isotrak 35 cm diameter, 46 MBq (1.25 mCi), Co-57 disk source attached to a low energy general purpose collimator, were used for all measurements. A custom made, air-cooled, dual coil, 1 T electromagnet was used to produce the external magnetic field. A map of the magnetic field was obtained by taking intensity measurements around the sagittal and transverse planes of the magnet. Camera sensitivity – defined as the measured count rate for a given activity of a radionuclide in a defined geometry – was first measured around the transverse plane at angles of 0°, 90°, and 270°, with, and without, the magnetic field present. At each angle, three 30 min measurements were made and the average count rate was calculated. A similar protocol was used for measurements upon rotation in the sagittal plane: counts per 30 min interval were measured for 20 angles, with a 15° increment between measurements. Camera sensitivity as a function of field strength was also determined by collecting counts over 30 min intervals at a fixed angle (90°) with magnet currents of 0.00 A, 2.65 A, and 5.30 A. In the transverse plane, at 0° under a field intensity of 21 mT, the loss in sensitivity was 18.14%, at 90° (B=37 mT) the loss was 30.5%, and at 270° (B=38 mT) the loss was 34.9%. Thus for rotation in the transverse plane, the sensitivity is monotonically reduced with an increase in field intensity. On rotation in the sagittal plane, sensitivity degradation ranged between 50.3% at a 22° angle, and 59.1% at 315°. Broad sensitivity peaks were observed at 105° and 195°, with minima at 60°, 135°, and 260°, consistent with our theoretical

  12. Sensitivity degradation of an anger camera operated in SPECT-like mode under the influence of a strong external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiano, Eduardo, E-mail: egalianoriveros@laurentian.ca; Aldarwish, Huda

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally determine the degradation in sensitivity of an Anger camera rotated in SPECT-like orbits around the transverse and sagittal planes of the magnetic field produced by a conventional, dual coil, 1 T electromagnet. A 74 photomultiplier Siemens Basicam Anger camera with a 29 cm radius crystal and an Isotrak 35 cm diameter, 46 MBq (1.25 mCi), Co-57 disk source attached to a low energy general purpose collimator, were used for all measurements. A custom made, air-cooled, dual coil, 1 T electromagnet was used to produce the external magnetic field. A map of the magnetic field was obtained by taking intensity measurements around the sagittal and transverse planes of the magnet. Camera sensitivity – defined as the measured count rate for a given activity of a radionuclide in a defined geometry – was first measured around the transverse plane at angles of 0°, 90°, and 270°, with, and without, the magnetic field present. At each angle, three 30 min measurements were made and the average count rate was calculated. A similar protocol was used for measurements upon rotation in the sagittal plane: counts per 30 min interval were measured for 20 angles, with a 15° increment between measurements. Camera sensitivity as a function of field strength was also determined by collecting counts over 30 min intervals at a fixed angle (90°) with magnet currents of 0.00 A, 2.65 A, and 5.30 A. In the transverse plane, at 0° under a field intensity of 21 mT, the loss in sensitivity was 18.14%, at 90° (B=37 mT) the loss was 30.5%, and at 270° (B=38 mT) the loss was 34.9%. Thus for rotation in the transverse plane, the sensitivity is monotonically reduced with an increase in field intensity. On rotation in the sagittal plane, sensitivity degradation ranged between 50.3% at a 22° angle, and 59.1% at 315°. Broad sensitivity peaks were observed at 105° and 195°, with minima at 60°, 135°, and 260°, consistent with our theoretical

  13. 考虑驾驶愤怒的元胞自动机交通流模型%Cellular Automaton Model for Urban Traffic Flow Considering Driving Anger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑华荣; 吴超仲; 马晓凤

    2013-01-01

    Driving behaviors of the angry drivers are quite different from those of the normal drivers.Because of these behavioral differences,driving speed,driving track etc.can be influenced,resulting in a different state of the road traffic flow.This paper re-defined the typical cellular automaton updating rules in mainly three aspects,i.e.,speed,lane change conditions as well as the safe distance and established the periodic boundary two-lane cellular automata traffic flow model considering the characteristics of angry driving behaviors based on NaSch cellular automaton traffic flow model.Both the model constructed and the classical NaSch traffic flow model were simulated in MATLAB and the comparison show that the variance in speed caused by driving anger had the most significant impact on traffic flow.The research can provide as the guidance on establishing models for cellular automaton traffic flow with consideration of driving anger and studying the influence of it to the urban traffic flow; the influence on traffic flow of other driver concerned factors,e.g.,driving fatigue,driving distraction need further research following this method.%驾驶员在愤怒时的驾驶行为表现与正常驾驶时存在较大的差异,这些行为差异会影响车辆的运行速度、运行轨迹等,进而对道路交通流产生影响.文中在NaSch元胞自动机交通流模型的基础上,考虑愤怒驾驶行为的特点,从运行速度、换道条件和安全距离3个方面重新确定元胞更新规则,构建考虑驾驶愤怒情绪的周期边界条件下双车道元胞自动机交通流模型.在MATLAB环境下,对所建模型与普通NaSch交通流模型进行对比仿真分析.结果表明,驾驶愤怒所引起的行驶速度变化对交通流影响明显.

  14. Entre ville et campagne, la villégiature à Angers (Maine-et-Loire au XIXe siècle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Letellier-d'Espinose

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Quelles formes prend au XIXe siècle la villégiature dans les proches abords d’une ville de taille moyenne comme Angers ? Le sujet est particulièrement riche durant cette période de forte urbanisation où s’interpénètrent une campagne de proximité avec son héritage patrimonial et les quartiers suburbains, nouveaux espaces « résidentiels ». La frontière mouvante entre espace rural et urbain, comme la notion floue et évolutive de temporalité qui met à mal la distinction entre résidences permanentes et temporaires, rejoint les désirs de nature du citadin ou de confort moderne du châtelain bien analysés par le théoricien Daly. Ce phénomène sociétal se traduit par des expressions architecturales souvent ambivalentes, que différencie surtout la relation au lieu. Du front urbain au chemin rural, du jardin paysager miniature au parc domanial, le paramètre contextuel est évidemment déterminant dans l’appréhension d’une villégiature de bord de ville.What are the forms of countryside retreat during the nineteenth century in the immediate vicinity of a medium-sized town such as Angers? The subject is a remarkably stimulating one during this period which saw the expansion of the town into the surrounding countryside where an existing heritage of country houses was now joined by new ‘residential’ spaces of suburban neighbourhoods. The fluctuating frontier between urban and rural space, along with evolving notions of the occupation of time, making the distinction between a permanent and a holiday residence uncertain, find an echo in the theories of Daly about the town-based desires for modern comfort shared by the class of country house owners. The societal phenomenon finds expression in architectural terms which is often ambivalent, producing differences in relation to specific places. From the urban street front to the rural lane, from the miniature landscaped garden to the estate park, contextual parameters are

  15. “怒观”、“治怒”与两种“不动心”*--儒学与斯多亚学派修身学的一个比较研究%Views of Anger Anger Control and Two Kinds of the Undisturbed Mind---A Comparative Study on Self-cultivation between Confucianism and Stoicism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立胜

    2014-01-01

    儒家区别义理之怒与血气之怒,前者需要培育,后者需要对治;斯多亚学派则视“怒”为“激情”,一切忿怒(包括义愤)均应克治。无论儒家抑或斯多亚学派之治怒均富有多重精神旨趣:既追求心灵宁静与“不动心”之境界,亦注重治怒之政治哲学之意味,而“关注当下”更是两者治怒背后的共同的“时间意识”。但儒家之不动心乃是一“热”的“不动心”,热情、平和、敏感是这种不动心的基本特征;斯多亚学派之不动心乃是一“冷”的“不动心”,冷静、理性、果断是这种不动心的基本特征。两种不动心背后折射出两种不同的真己、自我观。%Confucians make differences between the public anger and private one of which the former should be developed and the latter should be controlled whereas the Stoics looks all kinds of anger as passion which should be eliminated at all.There are multi-dimensional significances in the control/elimination of anger both in Confucianism and Stoicism such as pur-suing peace of mind and tranquility focusing on its meaning for political philosophy and achieving spiritual vigilance etc..But Confucian undis-turbed mind ( bu dong xin) is tender-minded whereas Stoic apathy is tough-minded which reflects the different views of the self.

  16. Evidence for interplay between genes and parenting on infant temperament in the first year of life: monoamine oxidase A polymorphism moderates effects of maternal sensitivity on infant anger proneness

    OpenAIRE

    Pickles, A.; Hill, Jonathan; Breen, G.; Quinn, J.; Abbott, K.; Jones, H.; Sharp, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The low expression polymorphism of the MAOA gene in interaction with adverse environments (G × E) is associated with antisocial behaviour disorders. These have their origins in early life, but it is not known whether MAOA G × E occurs in infants. We therefore examined whether MAOA G × E predicts infant anger proneness, a temperamental dimension associated with later antisocial behaviour disorders. In contrast to previous studies, we examined MAOA G × E prospectively using an obs...

  17. Survivors of war in northern Kosovo (III): The role of anger and hatred in pain and PTSD and their interactive effects on career outcome, quality of sleep and suicide ideation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Shr-Jie; Rushiti Feride; Sejdiu Xhevdet; Pacolli Sebahate; Gashi Besart; Salihu Florentina; Modvig Jens

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The management of chronic debilitating health conditions after trauma remains a challenge in post-conflict settings. The study aimed to expand current understanding of the diagnostic overlap of pain and PTSD and explore their independent and interactive effect on career change, sleep disorder and suicide ideation. The role of anger and hatred as contributing factors to the persistence of pain and PTSD were also examined. Methods 125 victims of torture and massive violence ...

  18. The Prayers and Tears of Foucault: Panopticism and the Politics of Dissent in An Enemy of the People and Look Back in Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Jeihouni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the thought of Foucault, this article argues that the anarchistic protagonists of Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People (1882 and John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger (1956 are engaged in a hegemonic battle which puts their identities at stake and ultimately exiles them to isolation. It points out that the very success of both in renouncing authority’s sovereignty is what actually hastens their failure in the end. The identification of this failure with panopticism, which for Foucault characterizes the modern economy of power, is the primary concern of this article. It is argued that through the subtle process of normalizing subjects the panopticon establishes a disciplinary society where citizens are stripped of their subjective voices. The central characters of both plays are thus easily exposed to panoptic surveillance when they decide to take on the strategies of power. Further, using Foucault’s concept of exclusion, the article proceeds to illustrate how in filtering out these delinquent individuals the hands of power urge them to refine their ways and how, upon failure, they exert the policy of exclusion.Keywords: Foucault, Panopticon, Exclusion, Dr. Stockmann, Jimmy Porter

  19. Sharing and Unsharing Memories. Life Stories of Jews from Muslim-Arab Countries: Fear, Anger and Discontent within a Silenced Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cohen Fournier

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As a massive exodus drained the Jewish communities from Muslim-Arab countries, starting just after World War II a large number of them migrated in cosmopolitan Montréal. This paper offers a new perspective on their displacement, inquiring on individual narratives of their reconstruction of shared and unshared memories. In this post-Shoah and post-colonial migration, how have these departures been represented within individual memory? What are the elements that have been shared and others hidden? And what are the consequences of uprooting within the individual realm?Using an oral history methodology, the life stories of Sephardic Jews reveal a paradigm present in certain individuals of an ever-present fear and emotional burden, as well as an ability to maintain their agency over their own trajectory. Through the sharing of memories enabled by the project Life stories of Montrealers displaced by war, genocide and human rights violation, I will look at four narratives from four individuals that demonstrate these lingering emotions of fear, anger and discontent. By engaging with usually unshared memories, information is revealed on the personal significance of massive displacement and hopeful for future reconciliation with a fragmented past.

  20. Survivors of war in northern Kosovo (III: The role of anger and hatred in pain and PTSD and their interactive effects on career outcome, quality of sleep and suicide ideation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shr-Jie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of chronic debilitating health conditions after trauma remains a challenge in post-conflict settings. The study aimed to expand current understanding of the diagnostic overlap of pain and PTSD and explore their independent and interactive effect on career change, sleep disorder and suicide ideation. The role of anger and hatred as contributing factors to the persistence of pain and PTSD were also examined. Methods 125 victims of torture and massive violence identified in a household survey took part in the in-depth assessment. Socio-demographic data and information on trauma, emotional disturbance, injuries and medication history were collected. PTSD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Pain was assessed using the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Margolis Pain Diagram. Results Nearly 95% participants experienced pain during the last 2 weeks, 47% were diagnosed with PTSD, 50% were taking medication against depression and anxiety. There is substantial overlap of pain, PTSD and emotional disturbance. Injury history, PTSD and negative emotions were related to the pain score and the number of pain locations. Anger, hatred or an inferiority complex particularly amplified pain experience. Headache was constant and especially prevalent in those with recent experience of anger, aggressiveness and hatred. The risk of having chest and abdominal pain within 2 weeks was very high in those who had chest injury and had recently been crying. An increased risk of changing jobs or stopping work or schooling due to depression or injury was observed for those with a higher pain score, and for pain in neck, shoulder and upper limbs. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 80%, that of suicide ideation 70%, and these were found to be associated with greater pain and anger. PTSD was also related to suicide ideation. Conclusions The findings provide an overview of pain characteristics in individuals with PTSD and injury and

  1. Anger management for people with mild to moderate learning disabilities: Study protocol for a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a manualized intervention delivered by day-service staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttall Jacqueline

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is the treatment of choice for common mental health problems, but this approach has only recently been adapted for people with learning disabilities, and there is a limited evidence base for the use of CBT with this client group. Anger treatment is the one area where there exists a reasonable number of small controlled trials. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a manualized 12-week CBT intervention for anger. The intervention will be delivered by staff working in the day services that the participants attend, following training to act as 'lay therapists' by a Clinical Psychologist, who will also provide supervision. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a group intervention versus a 'support as usual' waiting-list control group, with randomization at the level of the group. Outcomes will be assessed at the end of the intervention and again 6-months later. After completion of the 6-month follow-up assessments, the intervention will also be delivered to the waiting-list groups. The study will include a range of anger/aggression and mental health measures, some of which will be completed by service users and also by their day service key-workers and by home carers. Qualitative data will be collected to assess the impact of the intervention on participants, lay therapists, and services, and the study will also include a service-utilization cost and consequences analysis. Discussion This will be the first trial to investigate formally how effectively staff working in services providing day activities for people with learning disabilities are able to use a therapy manual to deliver a CBT based anger management intervention, following brief training by a Clinical Psychologist. The demonstration that service staff can successfully deliver anger management to people with learning disabilities, by widening the pool of potential therapists, would have

  2. Comparison of Dyadic Adjustment, Problem-Solving Skills, Submissive Acts and Anger Attitudes in Terms of Gender Between Married Couples Who Sought Counseling and in Those Ordered to Undergo Counseling

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    Hülya AKAR ÖZMEN

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Marital conflicts and problems are among the issues needing psychology professionals' attention. Rising divorce rates caused the professionals who are dealing with such issues to realize the need to understand the dynamics involved in marriage and family relations. The purpose of this study was to compare three groups, namely the couples who applied for professional counseling for the first time, those who have not applied for counseling, and those who were about to get divorced, in terms of dyadic adjustment levels, problem solving skills, characteristics of submissive behavior, and anger attitude; the comparison was made in relation to gender. Methods: The study included 150 couples: those who applied to the Marriage Counseling Unit (MCU to get psychiatric help (MCU group, those who were forwarded to the unit by a court to determine if they needed counseling and who have not received any psychological help (court group, and those who have not received any psychological help and who had no marriage related problems (control group. Problem solving inventory, submissive behaviors scale, state trait anger scale, state dyadic adjustment scale, and demographic data form were administered to all couples. Results: The mean age of the female participants was 33.6±1.1 for the MCU group, 33.9±1.2 for the court group, and 36.4±1.4 for the control group, while the mean age of the male participants was 38.7±1.7, 37.2±1.1, 39.1±1.1, respectively. In the MCU group, female participants showed significantly more submissive behaviors compared to the male participants; in the court group, no difference was observed between sexes in terms of problem-solving skills, submissive behaviors, and state trait anger; in the control group, female participants showed significantly more submissive behaviors compared to the male participants. When male participants of the 3 groups were compared with each other, significant differences were observed in terms

  3. Lan-Ji Piao Jin-Ryung Kang A Study on Anger Expression Behavior of Korean-Chinese Middle School Students%中国朝鲜族中学生愤怒表达行为的影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴兰姬; 姜镇灵

    2013-01-01

    离婚家庭的父母对子女采用漠不关心的养育态度,直接导致了青少年的不合理信念以及愤怒行为的爆发,因此要加强对离婚家庭父母和青少年的教育,使父母意识到父母养育的重要性,让青少年学会以合理的思维方式代替不合理的思维方式。%Objective To investigated the relations among parenting styles, Irrational Belief and Anger Expression behaviors. Methods Totally 510 participants were investigated with EMBU, CASI, anger expression behavior questionnaires. Result ① there were significant differences on parenting styles and anger in on family structure. ② there were significant correlation among parenting styles, irrational belief and anger expression.③there was significant moderating effect of irrational belief between parenting styles and anger out. Conclusion strengthen education for parents and youth.

  4. A Study of Driving Anger Expression Scale Based on Driving Behavior%基于驾驶行为的驾驶愤怒表现量表研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷虎; 吴超仲; 张晖

    2012-01-01

    对456名驾驶人的调查数据进行了因子分析,得到一份有21个项目的驾驶愤怒表现量表(Cronbach α=0.861),量表包括操作强度、操作频率、言语攻击、对车发泄、自我调节5个可靠的分量表,子量表的信度系数(Cronbach α)在0.667~0.894之间.除自我调节子量表外,其余各子量表彼此显著正相关.并通过比较月收入不同的驾驶人驾驶愤怒表现得分平均数对量表的结构效度进行了检验.研究结果表明,本量表具有较高的信度和效度,符合心理测量学标准.%A factor analysis of responses from 456 drivers yielded a 21-item driving anger expression scale (alpha reliability = 0. 861) with five reliable subscales involving operational fiery, operational frequency, verbal aggression, venting by vehicle and self-regulation. The subscale of reliability coefficients ranged between =0. 667 and =0. 894. In addition to self-regulation subscale, the other sub-scales correlated positively and significantly with each other. The scale of construct validity was tested by comparing the driving anger performance average score of drivers with different monthly income. The results show that the scale has high reliability and validity, meets the psychometric standards,and is a valid instrument to study the driver of driving anger performance.

  5. About the Little Red Riding Hood, Durex and anger: production, meaning and reception of one fairy tale and one commercial ad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By applying the semiological analysis, this paper considers planned and unplanned readings of a provocative domestic commercial, which, in order to convey its message, transposed the Little Red Riding Hood’s character in accordance with the advertised product – Durex condoms. This commercial caused furious reactions of parents who took legal action for breaching the Law on public advertising and, especially, "harming children’s sensibility and integrity". Provocative billboards also caused numerous comments in the daily newspapers, in the Internet chat rooms, with some considering the commercial vulgar and offensive and others having no problem with it, adding that the ones who took offence belonged to those puritan and conservative layers of the society. In order to discover the reasons to this kind of reactions, I started with researching how the commercial was made and what kind of message it offered. Next, I reconsidered the meaning of the very fairy tale "The Red Riding Hood". Its original version, which contains open sexual allusions, is quite different to the changed versions offered by Charles Perrault and the Grimm brothers. Their versions can be seen as fakelore, since they outrageously intervened on the plot and the meaning of the original fairy tale. However, since the Grimm brothers’ version is the most popular, it is a fact that our public reacted with such anger led by the meaning of their version, which accentuates overeating and cannibalism, and not sexual development of girls, which is the basic message of the original version. This is where the "communicational noise" that led to those negative reactions came from. By discovering the true meaning of the tale, the answer is given to the question whether the advertising agency made a slip up, or it had actually found the right way to communicate the hidden message of the tale, and at the same time ruin the advertising campaign for which it was used. In the end, range and

  6. Anger Management in the Workplace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    连晓君

    2005-01-01

    人类有七种消极情绪:恐惧、仇恨、愤怒、贪婪、嫉妒、报复、迷信。七种积极情绪:爱、性、希望、信心、同情、乐观、忠诚。在生活、工作中,有许多事都受到感情的影响。我们的感情可为我们带来伟大的成就,也可能使我们失败。敌意和愤怒是致命的心态,发怒是典型的慢性自杀。如果你的心绪欠宽容,那么学会抑制愤怒应视为当务之急。

  7. El enojo en madres y padres de hijas adolescentes: propuesta de orientación desde la TREC y la inteligencia emocional / The anger in parents of teenage daughters: propose of guidance since the TREC and emotional intelligence

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    Murillo Aguilar, Osvaldo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este artículo, basado en la tesis de grado denominada “Expresión del Enojo en Madres y Padres de Hijas Adolescentes: Propuesta de Orientación desde el Enfoque de la TREC”, realizada por Jessie Arroyo Zúñiga y Osvaldo Murillo Aguilar, para optar por el grado de licenciatura en Orientación en el año 2008, ofrece desde esta disciplina, una integración entre la teoría de la Inteligencia Emocional y el enfoque de la Terapia Racional Emotivo – Conductual (TREC, para comprender y abordar la expresión del enojo en estas madres y padres de hijas adolescentes. Por ello, como recomendación, se presenta una propuesta de Orientación que pretende fortalecer los vínculos de las madres y padres con sus hijas adolescentes, por medio de un proceso que propicie formas de expresión emocionalmente saludables del enojo, basado en la integración de la teoría de la inteligencia emocional y el enfoque de la TREC. Para la elaboración del presente trabajo se establecieron los siguientes objetivos: 1. Analizar las formas en las que expresan el enojo las madres y los padres de familia del Liceo María Auxiliadora.2. Elaborar estrategias de Orientación dirigidas a madres y padres de hijas adolescentes que promuevan una expresión saludable del enojo. La metodología se estableció bajo la perspectiva cualitativa, que permitió la comprensión de las experiencias de las madres y los padres, sus emociones, pensamientos y conductas. La principal técnica de recolección de información fueron los grupos focales, y se analizó a partir de la organización y codificación de datos, por medio de categorías de análisis.Abstract: This article, based on the thesis entitled "Expression of Anger in Mothers and Fathers of Daughters Teens: proposed of Guidance since the TREC" performed by Jessie Arroyo Zúñiga and Osvaldo Murillo Aguilar, to graduate in Guidance in the 2008; offers from this discipline, an integration between the theory of Emotional

  8. Aggressive Behavior Test as a Method for Evaluating Test - retest Reliability in Anger Emotion Rats%攻击行为测试:大鼠怒情绪评价方法的复测信度检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薄纯光; 魏盛; 高兴笑; 张惠云

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the test - retest reliability of aggressive behavior test parameters, as a method for evaluating ethology in anger emotion rats. Methods With resident intruder and social isolation stress, typical anger emotion in 40 male Wister rats was produled. The following parameters were evaluated: latent time, number of attacks, attack durations, number of bites, on - top durations and scores of composite aggression. The intractass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the agreement index ( Kappa) were calculated for each of these parameters to explore the test - retest reliability of the above parameters of aggressive behavior. Results Both ICC and Kappa for composite aggression ( Kappa =0.662,P <0.001; ICC =0.910,P <0.001) showed a good reliability between the test parameters. Attack durations ( Kappa =0.533 ,P<0.001; ICC =0. 898,P <0.001) showed a fair reliability between the test parameters. Only ICC for number of attack (ICC =0. 834,P <0.001)and latent lime(ICC =0.671 ,P <0.001)showed a good reliability between the test parameters. Neither ICC nor Kappa displayed a significant reliability between the rest parameters. Conclusion The score of composite aggression , which had a good lest - retest reliability, was found to be a stable parameter in aggressive behavior of anger emotion rats. The aggressive behavior test of rats with anger emotion was also affected by both environmental factors and the isoforms of anger emotion.%目的 探讨攻击行为测试参数作为怒情绪大鼠行为学评价方法的复测信度.方法 40只雄性Wistar大鼠,应用居住入侵配合社会隔离慢性应激造成大鼠出现典型“怒”情绪改变.通过组内相关系数(ICC)和一致性系数(Kappa)对实验进行复测信度检验,参数如下:潜伏期( latent time)、攻击次数(number of attacks)、攻击持续时间(attack durations)、撕咬次数(numberof bites)、攀压持续时间(on - top durations)、混和攻击行为得分(composite aggression

  9. Analyse et modélisation des performances d'un nouveau type de détecteur en médecine nucléaire : du détecteur Anger au détecteur Semi-conducteur

    OpenAIRE

    Imbert, Laetitia

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Developed in the 1980s with rotating Anger gammacameras, this technique could be dramatically enhanced by new imaging systems working with semiconductor detectors and which performances are clearly enhanced. Two semiconductor cameras, dedicated to nuclear cardiology and equipped with Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors, have been recently commercialized: ...

  10. Evaluation of a program to prevent political violence in the Basque conflict: effects on the capacity of empathy, anger management and the definition of peace Evaluación de un programa para la prevención de la violencia política en el conflicto vasco: efectos en la capacidad de empatía, el control de la ira y la definición de paz

    OpenAIRE

    Maite Garaigordobil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of a program for the prevention of political violence on empathy, expression of feelings of anger, and the capacity to define peace-violence. Method: This study used a quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest repeated measures and a control group. The sample comprised 276 adolescents aged between 15 and 17 years (191 in the experimental group, 85 in the control group; 127 boys and 149 girls). A battery of three assessment instruments was administered be...

  11. Mahetoidu-kogemusi Inglismaalt / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2005-01-01

    Interreg IIIC projekti "Kohaliku ja mahetoidu väiketöötlemise, turustamise ja tarbimise edendamine" raames käisid Saare- ja Hiiumaa projekti eestvedajad kogemusi mahetoidu turustamisest saamas Suurbritannias Dorseti maakonnas

  12. Salme vallateater noppis teatrifestivali peaauhinna / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2008-01-01

    Salme Vallateatrist, kes Jõgevamaal Tabiveres VIII külateatrite festivalil võitis Andrus Kivirähki "Kalevipoja" lavastusega peapreemia. Esmakordselt välja pandud Mari Möldre nimelise näitlejapreemia pälvis Salme vallavanem Kalmer Poopuu, kes mängis Tuuslarit

  13. Cepov's sharp tongue sparks anger, again

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Venemaa suursaadik Leedus Boriss Tsepov nimetas ajaleheartiklis leedulasi skandaalitsejateks, kes süüdistavad probleemides alati Moskvat. Leedu presidendi nõuniku sõnul ületas saadik oma käitumisega diplomaatilise etiketi piirid

  14. AMATÖR VE PAF LİGİNDE OYNAYAN FUTBOLCULARIN KİŞİLİK TİPLERİ VE SÜREKLİ ÖFKE-ÖFKE İFADE TARZLARININ İNCELENMESİ / THE INVESTIGATION OF PERSONALITY TYPE AND TRAITH ANGER - TYPES OF EXPRESSIONS OF SOCCER PLAYERS WHO PLAY IN AMATEUR AND YOUTH SOCCER LEAGUES

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Bu çalışmanın amacı, amatör ve paf liginde oynayan futbolcuların kişilik tipleri ile sürekliöfke-öfke ifade tarzlarının ilişkilerinin incelemesidir.Çalışmaya, 2007-2008 futbol sezonunda Ankara, İstanbul, Trabzon, Erzurum, Muğla veKonya şehirlerinde amatör ( Xyaş 21.7686 + 4.0410) ve paf, liginde oynayan( Xyaş 18.3478 + 1.7666)167 futbolcu katılmıştır.Sporcuların sürekli öfke-öfke ifade tarzları The State-Trait Anger Scale ölçeğ...

  15. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management styleOkul yöneticilerinin öfke ve stresle başaçıkma yaklaşımları ile çatışma yönetimi stilleri arasındaki ilişki

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    Bülent Gündüz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches is significantly associated with and predicted the conflict management styles. Administrators’ anger control level is significant predictor of "integration" style, and emotion-focused stress management is significant predictors of “compromises", "domination" and "avoidance" styles. However, problem-focused (positive and emotion-focused (negative approaches are significant predictors of the "compromise" style.  Administrators who uses integration style has low levels of anger and can control their anger. Administrators who tend to emotion-focused to stress cope uses compromise, avoidance, and domination styles. However, the administrators who tend to emotion-focused and problem-focused to stress cope use consensus style. ÖzetBu çalışmanın amacı, okul yöneticilerinin öfke düzeyleri ve stresle başaçıkmada kullandıkları yöntemlerin, çatışmaları çözme stillerini ne düzeyde yordadığını belirlemektir. Bu amaçla Mersin ilinde görev yapan 279 okul yöneticisine, “Örgütsel Çatışma Yönetimi Ölçeği”, “Durumluk-Sürekli Öfke Ölçeği” ve “Stresle Başaçıkma Tarzları Ölçeği” olmak üzere üç ayrı ölçek uygulanmıştır. Araştırma sonuçları, yöneticilerin stresle başa çıkma ve öfke kontrolü yaklaşımlarının, çatışmaları yönetme stilleriyle ilişkili olduğunu ve bu stilleri anlamlı düzeyde yordadığını göstermektedir. Yöneticilerin öfke kontrolü,

  16. An investigation of the relationship between childhood trauma experince of adolescents and the anger expression styles, self -esteem, life satisfactionErgenlerde çocukluk örselenme yaşantıları ve öfke ifade tarzları ile benlik saygısı ve yaşam doyumu arasındaki ilişkilerin incelenmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Rezan Çeçen Eroğul

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study is to investigate the relationship between childhood traumatic experience of adolescents and the anger expression styles, self-esteem and life satisfaction. The study conducted on 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grade students, the age range 14-18. The sample consisted of 210 female (46%, 240 male (53% total 450 adolescents. To collect data “Childhood Trauma Questionnaire”, “State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory”, “Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale”  “Satisfaction of Life Scale” have been applied to the students. The analysis data One Way ANOVA and Pearson Product Momentum Coefficient have been calculated. The results of the study revealed that according to gender there is significant differentiation on emotional and sexual abuse but not physical abuse. In addition the results of the study have been shown that the students who have experienced physical, emotional and sexual abuse significantly differentiated on trait anger and anger expression scales (anger in, anger out, anger control, self esteem and satisfaction of life scales scores. All variables correlations coefficiants were significantly correlated at p<.001 significant level as expected direction. ÖzetBu araştırmanın amacı ergenlerde çocukluk örselenme yaşantıları ve öfke ifade biçimleri ile benlik saygısı ve yaşam doyumu arasındaki ilişkilerin incelenmesidir. Araştırma 9, 10,11 ve 12. sınıfa devam eden 14-18 yaş aralığındaki 210 kız (%46,  240 erkek (%53 toplam 450 ergen üzerinde yürütülmüştür. Verilerin toplanmasında “Çocukluk Örselenme Yaşantıları Ölçeği Ergen Formu”, “Sürekli Öfke ve Öfke İfade Tarzları Ölçeği”, “Rosenberg Benlik Saygısı Ölçeği” ile “Yaşam Doyumu” ölçme araçları kullanılmıştır. Verilerin analizinde “Tek Yönlü Varyans Analizi” ve “Pearson Korelasyon Katsayısı” istatistik teknikleri kullanılmıştır. Araştırma sonuçları fiziksel istismar

  17. 忧伤与愤怒:教育社会学的情感动力--以涂尔干、麦克拉伦为例%Sadness and Anger:Emotional Driving Forces of Educational Sociology---Taking Emile Derkheim and P. Mcralen for Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勇

    2014-01-01

    反思教育社会学时,不应仅从理论角度展开,还应关注其中的情感动力。以涂尔干的古典教育社会学为例,其中便有一种古典主义者特有的忧伤情感在起支撑作用。而在麦克拉伦的教育社会学实践中,则可以清楚看到马克思主义者对于“资本主义”及“帝国主义”体制的强烈愤怒。麦克拉伦之后的教育社会学以及当代中国教育社会学能有什么样的发展,同样也要厘清其中可能存在的情感动力。%The Emotional driving forces are subject to be ignored in the theoretical oriented reflection of educational sociology. Taking the educational sociology invented by Emile Derkheim as an example, one can see that this kind of educational sociology was shaped by the typical emotion of sadness that a classical scholar might have. In the works of Peter Mcralen ’s educational sociology, there has been a strong Marxism anger towards the capitalism and imperialism word. The emotional driving forces must also be taken into consideration when examining the development of Chinese contemporary educational sociology.

  18. Application of the Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory in clinical patients Aplicação do inventário de expressão de raiva estado-traço de Spielberger em pacientes clínicos

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    Flávia Barros de Azevedo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the factor structure of the Portuguese version of State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI in clinical patients. METHOD: 400 subjects from an internal medicine outpatient unit and 200 from a medical ward were recruited. Patients answered questions about clinical data, the STAXI, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Raw score of the STAXI was submitted to reliability assessment and factor analysis. RESULTS: Internal consistency using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was of 0.84. The STAXI significantly correlated with BDI at r=0.352 (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar o construto e as propriedades psicométricas da versão em português do Inventário de Expressão de Raiva Estado-Traço (STAXI em pacientes clínicos. MÉTODO: 400 indivíduos de uma unidade ambulatorial e 200 de uma enfermaria de clínica médica foram recrutados. Foram coletadas informações sobre aspectos clínicos, o STAXI e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI. Os escores brutos do STAXI foram submetidos à análise de confiabilidade e análise fatorial. RESULTADOS: A consistência interna pelo coeficiente alfa de Cronbach foi de 0,84. O STAXI se correlacionou significativamente com BDI (r=0,352; p<0,01. A análise de Componentes Principais identificou cinco fatores significativos: Raiva-traço, Raiva-estado, Controle-de-raiva, Raiva-para-fora e Raiva-para-dentro. Esse modelo estrutural é similar ao apresentado originalmente por Spielberger. CONCLUSÃO: A versão em português do STAXI apresenta uma estrutura fatorial adequada que permite a avaliação das dimensões da raiva em pacientes clínicos.

  19. 白香丹胶囊对愤怒情绪模型大鼠海马GABABR和KIR表达的影响%Effect of Baixiangdan Capsule on Expression of GABABR and KIR in Hippocampus of Anger-out Rat Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许莉莉; 蔡洪信; 高杰; 薄蔷; 张惠云

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression of two subunits of gamma arainobutyric acid B receptor, GABABR1 andGABABR2, as well as inwardly rectifying K+ channel (KIR) in hippocampus of anger-out rat models, and to explore the intervention mechanism of Baixiangdan Capsule in teating the syndrome of adverse flow of liver-Qi. Methods The Wistar rats were divided into normal group, modle group, Baixiangdan Capsule group(ig 0.2 g·kg-1, qd, for 7 d) and baclofen group (ig 0.008 g·kg-1, qd, for 7 d). The anger-out emotion rat models were established with social isolation plus resident intruder stress. The model was evaluated by sucrose intake test, open field test and elevated plus-maze test. The expression of GABABR 1, GABABR2 and KIR in hippocampus was detected by immunofloures-cence assay. Results Compared with the normal group, the modle group had lower sucrose intake, higher total score of open field test, lower open arm entry percent(OE %) and open arm time percent(OT %) of elevated plus-maze test, and lower expression of GABABR1, GABABR2 and KIR in hippocampus(P < 0.05). Compared with the model group, Baixiangdan capsule and baclofen decreased the total score of open field test, increased OE % and OT % of elevated plus-maze test, and promoted expression of GABABR1, GABABR2 and KIR in hippocampus(P < 0.05). Conclusion The lower expression of GABABR1, GABABR2 and KIR in hippocampus may have close relationship with anger-out emotion. Increasing the expression of GABABR and the function of G protein-coupled KIR in hippocampus maybe one of the mechanism of Baixiangdan capsule in soothing liver and regulating Qi flow.%目的 检测愤怒情绪模型大鼠海马γ-氨基丁酸B受体两个亚基GABABR1、GABABR2和内向整流型钾通道( KIR)表达的变化,初步探讨白香丹胶囊对肝气逆证的中枢干预机制.方法 大鼠随机分为正常对照组、模型组、白香丹胶囊组(0.2 g·kg-1)、巴氯芬组(0.008 g·kg-1),采用“社会隔离结合居住入侵

  20. Evaluation of a program to prevent political violence in the Basque conflict: effects on the capacity of empathy, anger management and the definition of peace Evaluación de un programa para la prevención de la violencia política en el conflicto vasco: efectos en la capacidad de empatía, el control de la ira y la definición de paz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Garaigordobil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effects of a program for the prevention of political violence on empathy, expression of feelings of anger, and the capacity to define peace-violence. Method: This study used a quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest repeated measures and a control group. The sample comprised 276 adolescents aged between 15 and 17 years (191 in the experimental group, 85 in the control group; 127 boys and 149 girls. A battery of three assessment instruments was administered before and after the intervention. The aim of the program was to increase sensitivity to the victims of political violence, promote respect for human rights, and prevent violence. The intervention consisted of 10 sessions over 3 months. Results: MANOVA analyses revealed that the program increased participants' capacity of empathy (perspective-taking, anger control in annoying situations, and capacity to define peace-violence. Conclusions: This study has practical educational implications and provides an intervention tool that enhances the development of personality during adolescence and may have a preventive effect on violent behavior.Objetivo: Evaluar los efectos de un programa para prevenir la violencia política en la capacidad de empatía, la expresión de sentimientos de ira y la definición de paz-violencia. Método: El estudio utilizó un diseño cuasiexperimental de medidas repetidas pretest-intervención-postest con grupo de control. La muestra está configurada con 276 adolescentes de 15 a 17 años de edad; de ellos, 191 son experimentales y 85 controles, 127 hombres y 149 mujeres. Se administró una batería de tres instrumentos de evaluación antes y después de aplicar el programa de intervención. El objetivo del programa fue incrementar la sensibilidad hacia las víctimas de la violencia política, promover el respeto por los derechos humanos y prevenir la violencia. La intervención consistió en 10 sesiones realizadas durante 3 meses

  1. Iterative reconstruction of detector response of an Anger gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A; Solovov, V; Alves, F; Domingos, V; Martins, R; Neves, F; Chepel, V

    2015-05-21

    Statistical event reconstruction techniques can give better results for gamma cameras than the traditional centroid method. However, implementation of such techniques requires detailed knowledge of the photomultiplier tube light-response functions. Here we describe an iterative method which allows one to obtain the response functions from flood irradiation data without imposing strict requirements on the spatial uniformity of the event distribution. A successful application of the method for medical gamma cameras is demonstrated using both simulated and experimental data. An implementation of the iterative reconstruction technique capable of operating in real time is presented. We show that this technique can also be used for monitoring photomultiplier gain variations. PMID:25951792

  2. Red clothing increases perceived dominance, aggression and anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Diana; Burt, D Michael; Hill, Russell A; Barton, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The presence and intensity of red coloration correlate with male dominance and testosterone in a variety of animal species, and even artificial red stimuli can influence dominance interactions. In humans, red stimuli are perceived as more threatening and dominant than other colours, and wearing red increases the probability of winning sporting contests. We investigated whether red clothing biases the perception of aggression and dominance outside of competitive settings, and whether red influences decoding of emotional expressions. Participants rated digitally manipulated images of men for aggression and dominance and categorized the emotional state of these stimuli. Men were rated as more aggressive and more dominant when presented in red than when presented in either blue or grey. The effect on perceived aggression was found for male and female raters, but only male raters were sensitive to red as a signal of dominance. In a categorization test, images were significantly more often categorized as 'angry' when presented in the red condition, demonstrating that colour stimuli affect perceptions of emotions. This suggests that the colour red may be a cue used to predict propensity for dominance and aggression in human males. PMID:25972401

  3. Anger and Globalization among Young People in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchday, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges faced by youth in developing countries. Using India as an example of a fast-globalizing country, this article highlights the experience and challenges faced by adolescents and emerging adults as they search for their interpersonal and professional identities. The difficulties of defining identity in the…

  4. Suspended Subjects: The Politics of Anger in Asian American Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Examining a diverse set of Asian American literary texts, this project explores the ways in which discourses of race, gender, class, sexuality and citizenship shape the articulation of emotions in Asian American Literature. While figures of the angry black man, the Latino gangster, and the Native American warrior abound in dominant American cultural narratives, Asian Americans have been constructed as the polar opposite: subdued, submissive, and accommodating. The figure of the angry Asian ...

  5. How Often is Employee Anger an Insider Risk I?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric David Shaw

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This research introduced two new scales for the identification and measurement of negative sentiment and insider risk in communications in order to examine the unexplored relationship between these two constructs.The inter-rater reliability and criterion validity of the Scale of Negativity in Texts (SNIT and the Scale of Insider Risk in Digital Communications (SIRDC were established with a random sample of email from the Enron archive and criterion measures from established insiders, disgruntled employees, suicidal, depressed, angry, anxious and other sampled groups.In addition, the sensitivity of the scales to changes over time as the risk of digital attack increased and transitioned to a physical attack was also examined in an actual case study.Inter-rater reliability for the SNIT was extremely high across groups while the SIRDC produced lower, but acceptable levels of agreement. Both measures also significantly distinguished the criterion groups from the overall Enron sample. The scales were then used to measure the frequency of negative sentiment and insider risk indicators in the random Enron sample and the relationship between the two constructs.While low levels of negative sentiment were found in 20% of the sample, moderate and high levels of negative sentiment were extremely rare, occurring in less than 1% of communications. Less than 4% of the sampled emails displayed indicators of insider risk on the SIRDC.Emails containing high levels of insider risk comprised less than one percent or the sample.Of the emails containing negative sentiment in the sample, only 16.3%, also displayed indicators of insider risk.The odds of a communication containing insider risk increased with the level of negative sentiment and only low levels of insider risk were found at low levels of negative sentiment.All of the emails found to contain insider risk indicators on the SIRDC also displayed some level of negative sentiment.The implications of these findings for insider risk detection were then examined.

  6. Overbevisning og anger over utdannings- og yrkesvalg blant nyutdannede sykepleiere

    OpenAIRE

    Førland, Oddvar

    2005-01-01

    ENGLISH SUMMARY Conviction and regret related to the choice of education and profession among new graduated registered nurses (RNs) in Norway. This paper focuses on the attitudes of new graduate RNs in Norway towards their choice of education and profession. It is a part of an ongoing prospective cohort study with the title “Working career and career values among new graduate RNs”, financed by Western Norway Regional Health Authority and Bergen Deaconess University College. The pro...

  7. Leisi grafitiga bussipaviljon tekitab vastakaid arvamusi / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2005-01-01

    Leisi keskkooli kunstiringis korraldati grafitikursused, mida juhendasid Anton Koovit ja Ants Sarv. Oma oskusi rakendasid õpilased täissoditud seintega bussipaviljoni grafitiga kaunistamiseks. Kommenteerib Elo Liiv

  8. Maalammas - tunnistatud, kuid tunnustamata lambatõug Eestis / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2006-01-01

    Eestimaa Looduse Fondi ja Eesti Maalamba Ühingu poolt ellukutsutud ning UNESCO poolt rahastatud projektist "Maalamba kui põlisväärtuse säilitamine Eestis". 17. novembril Põllumajandusministeeriumis toimunud arutelust

  9. Toetusmeetmed peavad tagama kogu maaelu arengu / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2006-01-01

    Maaelu arengukava 2007-2013 toetusmeetmetest. Lisad: Toetused põllumajandusele 1999 kuni 2005; Toetused Saare maakonna põllumajandusele 1999 kuni 2003; Saare maakonna põllumajandusteotused 2004. aastal

  10. FACIAL EMOTION RECOGNITION USING GABOR (HAPPY, SAD, ANGER, NEUTRAL MOOD)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Shamsh Alam

    2015-01-01

    The best way to communicate the emotions and intentions is facial expressions. This is powerful because as per the psychological research 55% of the total communicated message is the human facial expression. Therefore deriving an effective facial representation from the original face image is a vital step and very tough task in the field of computer science for successful facial expression recognition. Human facial recognition usually uses image processing, gesture signal ...

  11. Psychotic Symptoms, Anger, and Anxiety as Determinants of Agrresive Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Nederlof (Angela F.)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAs an introduction on the topic of this dissertation, it might be interesting to look at some other cases of psychiatric patients that displayed clear-cut aggressive behavior towards other persons: Case 1. Twenty-nine-year-old man, who stabbed his mother’s fiancé in the chest with the in

  12. Bassilaulja Ain Anger lummas Viini publiku / Talvi Nurgamaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nurgamaa, Talvi

    2008-01-01

    1. aprillil Musikvereini klaassaalis Viinis toimunud laulja soolokontserdist sarjast "Lied. Bühne", klaveril Jendrik Springer. Samal ajal kudses saalis toimunud Tonkünstler Orchester kontserdist, dirigent Kristjan Järvi

  13. Discipline without Anger: A New Style of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the first schools opened their doors, teachers have struggled to find ways to successfully deal with misbehaving students. Many have found nothing but stress and frustration in their attempts to bring order to their classrooms. Unfortunately, this problem is not going away. As times and students change, teachers are finding that old…

  14. Between anger and resignation; Zwischen Rage und Resignation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roepcke, I.

    2008-07-21

    Wind power in Bavaria and Baden-Wuerttemberg is overshadowed by hydroelectric power, biomass, and solar energy. Regional development plans are obstacles to the construction of new wind power systems. (orig.)

  15. Foreign Minister angers conservatives over compensation / Laima Vaiga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaiga, Laima

    2008-01-01

    Energiaressursside tagamise huvides ei soovita Leedu välisminister Petras Vaitiekunas valitsusel aktiivselt nõuda Venemaalt okupatsioonikahjude hüvitamist. Kahjude hüvitamist nõuavad Leedu konservatiivid

  16. Iterative reconstruction of detector response of an Anger gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Alves, F.; Domingos, V.; Martins, R.; Neves, F.; Chepel, V.

    2015-05-01

    Statistical event reconstruction techniques can give better results for gamma cameras than the traditional centroid method. However, implementation of such techniques requires detailed knowledge of the photomultiplier tube light-response functions. Here we describe an iterative method which allows one to obtain the response functions from flood irradiation data without imposing strict requirements on the spatial uniformity of the event distribution. A successful application of the method for medical gamma cameras is demonstrated using both simulated and experimental data. An implementation of the iterative reconstruction technique capable of operating in real time is presented. We show that this technique can also be used for monitoring photomultiplier gain variations.

  17. Anger Between Intimates: An Experimental Study of Aggression Reduction Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Don; And Others

    The effects of counter-aggression strategies on married couples resulting from use of the Taylor interactive paradigm were investigated. Married persons (N=52) competed in a complex reaction time task and set durations of 100 decibel punitive noise for either their spouse or an opposite-sex stranger. During pretrials (aggression escalation), males…

  18. Cosmic Anger Abdus Salam - The First Muslim Nobel Scientist

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Gordon Murray

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a biography of Abdus Salam, the first Muslim to win a Nobel Prize for Science (Physics 1979), who was nevertheless excommunicated and branded as a heretic in his own country. His achievements are often overlooked, even besmirched. Realizing that the whole world had to be his stage, he pioneered the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, a vital focus of Third World science which remains as his monument. A staunch Muslim, he was ashamed of thedecline of science in the heritage of Islam, and struggled doggedly to restore it to its former glory. Undermined by

  19. Seeing enemies? A systematic review and treatment proposal for anger bias in the perception of facial expressions among anger-prone and aggressive populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellentin, Angelina Isabella; Dervisevic, Ajla; Stenager, Elsebeth;

    2014-01-01

    externalizing and potential aggressive behavior are characterized by attentional bias towards perceiving others as angry and hostile, when processing facial expressions in neuropsychological paradigms. Based on this review the second objective was to recommend potential treatment for antisocial pathology...... review specific treatment recommendations for potential attentional bias and recognition impairments both based on the Attentional Bias Modification (ABM) are outlined. It is suggested, that a simple modification of ABM could convert the method into a candidate treatment of recognition impairments......; Attentional Recognition Impairment Modification (ARIM). Applying this treatment, ARIM, supraminally and subliminally presented stimuli could target more automatic processes mediating fear and anxiety and lead them to focus on the neglected ocular or facial expressions. The neuropsychological treatment...

  20. Determinants of Anger in Young Infants: The Effect of Loss of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Margaret W.; Lewis, Michael

    This study examined the effect of different types of loss of control on the quality and quantity of the frustration response in 4- to 6-month-old infants. To establish an expectancy, all infants received 4 minutes of contingency training in which infants were presented with slides and music after they performed a pulling response with their right…

  1. Longitudinal Relations among Language Skills, Anger Expression, and Regulatory Strategies in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roben, Caroline K. P.; Cole, Pamela M.; Armstrong, Laura Marie

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that as children's language skill develops in early childhood, it comes to help children regulate their emotions (Cole, Armstrong, & Pemberton, 2010; Kopp, 1989), but the pathways by which this occurs have not been studied empirically. In a longitudinal study of 120 children from 18 to 48 months of age, associations…

  2. Tuning in to teens: Improving parental responses to anger and reducing youth externalizing behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Sophie S; Kehoe, Christiane E; Harley, Ann E

    2015-07-01

    Parent emotion socialization plays an important role in shaping emotional and behavioral development during adolescence. The Tuning in to Teens (TINT) program aims to improve parents' responses to young people's emotions with a focus on teaching emotion coaching. This study examined the efficacy of the TINT program in improving emotion socialization practices in parents and whether this reduced family conflict and youth externalizing difficulties. Schools were randomized into intervention and control conditions and 225 primary caregiving parents and 224 youth took part in the study. Self-report data was collected from parents and youth during the young person's final year of elementary school and again in their first year of secondary school. Multilevel analyses showed significant improvements in parent's impulse control difficulties and emotion socialization, as well as significant reductions in family conflict and youth externalizing difficulties. This study provides support for the TINT program in reducing youth externalizing behavior problems. PMID:26005933

  3. The Relationship between Personality, Anger Expression, and Perceived Family Control among Incarcerated Male Juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Charlton J.; Greene, Anthony F.; Braithwaite, Harold O.

    2002-01-01

    Examines three factors that may place adolescents at risk for aggression and violence: personality, affect, and family. Using a sample of male adolescents at risk for violence, a cluster analysis was conducted to categorize these adolescents in terms of personality characteristics. Concludes that, among male delinquents, elevated psychopathology…

  4. More in sorrow than in anger: the British nurses' strike of 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, S; Fee, E

    1992-01-01

    In early 1988 the nurses of Britain's National Health Service reached a peak of frustration. They took unprecedented industrial action to bring the state of nursing, and problems within the Health Service, to the attention of the nation. Throughout the crisis there was acrimonious debate between the Royal College of Nursing, which acts as both a professional association and a negotiating unit and opposed the strike, and the trade unions, which organized it. Their conflict undermined the nurses' solidarity and highlighted deep and complex tensions within the profession. On the day of action, labor withdrawal was widespread but inconsistent. In the end, the nurses made some gains, but most of their concerns were ignored. The government promoted the divisions between nursing unions; the media were critical of the nurses' actions; however, the labor movement supported them, and the British Medical Journal voiced the merits of the nurses' case. The struggle of the British nurses exemplifies issues and dilemmas facing nurses throughout the world. The increasing militancy of nurses in many countries reflects their dissatisfaction with pay, working conditions, and career opportunities. Many nurses are torn between the ideals of professionalism and the realities of their workplace and are ambivalent about the principles of collective bargaining. This article addresses these ambivalences and stresses the need to find creative solutions to match nurses' unique place in the political economy of health care. PMID:1644505

  5. Enhanced sensitivity and response bias for male anger in women with borderline personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Veague, Heather Barnett; Hooley, Jill Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal difficulties, which are characteristic of Borderline personality disorder (BPD), may be related to problems with social cognition. We explored facial emotion recognition in 44 women (15 with BPD, 15 healthy controls, and 14 with a history of childhood trauma but no BPD) examining the role of BPD and abuse history in the ability to detect fearful, angry and happy cues in emotional faces. In Task 1, participants viewed pictures of morphed faces containing different percentages of ...

  6. Caregiver Mental Health and Potentially Harmful Caregiving Behavior: The Central Role of Caregiver Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Gordon; Kosberg, Jordan I.; Durkin, Daniel W.; Dooley, W. Keith; DeCoster, Jamie; Williamson, Gail M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Caregivers feeling stress and experiencing mental health problems can be at risk for engaging in abusive acts against elderly care recipients. Potentially harmful behavior (PHB) was used as a measure of caregivers' engagement in, or fear of engagement in, behavior that places dependent care recipients at risk of physical and/or…

  7. Anger Management Leadership Groups: A Creative Intervention for Increasing Relational and Social Competencies with Aggressive Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Isaac; Patel, Samir H.; Lewis, Sally V.

    2012-01-01

    School counselors (SCs) have a wide range of responsibilities in schools, such as administrative, disciplinary, and counseling duties (Dahir & Stone, 2009). Due to the large number of responsibilities, SCs sometime struggle with developing programs to meet relational needs of at-risk students. The purpose of this article was to provide SCs with a…

  8. Anger Mediates the Relation between Violence Exposure and Violence Perpetration in Incarcerated Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimonis, Eva R.; Ray, James V.; Branch, Jessica R.; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Youth who are exposed to violence are more likely to perpetrate violence. Incarcerated youth are a special population that is at a significantly greater risk for violent offending because of their relatively greater rates of violence exposure. Two important outcomes of violence exposure that may help explain its link with violence perpetration are…

  9. Distinctive effects of fear and sadness induction on anger and aggressive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Jun; Ren, Jun; Fan, Jin; Luo, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has reported that the successful implementation of cognitive regulation of emotion depends on higher-level cognitive functions, such as top-down control, which may be impaired in stressful situations. This calls for “cognition free” self-regulatory strategies that do not require top-down control. In contrast to the cognitive regulation of emotion that emphasizes the role of cognition, traditional Chinese philosophy and medicine views the relationship among different types of em...

  10. Distinctive mood induction effects of fear or sadness on anger and aggressive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Jun eZhan; Jun eRen; Jin eFan; Jing eLuo

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has reported that the successful implementation of cognitive regulation of emotion depends on higher-level cognitive functions, such as top-down control, which may be impaired in stressful situations. This calls for a need of cognition free self-regulatory strategies that do not require top-down control. In contrast to the cognitive regulation of emotion that emphasizes the role of cognition, traditional Chinese philosophy and medicine views the relationship among different typ...

  11. Children's Anger, Emotional Expressiveness, and Empathy: Relations with Parents' Empathy, Emotional Expressiveness, and Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Janet; Roberts, William

    2004-01-01

    In Roberts and Strayer (1996) we described how emotional factors were strongly related to children's empathy, which in turn strongly predicted prosocial behavior. This paper focuses on how these child emotional factors, assessed across methods and sources, related to parental factors (empathy, emotional expressiveness, encouragement of children's…

  12. Associations among Negative Parenting, Attention Bias to Anger, and Social Anxiety among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Lauren D.; Oppenheimer, Caroline W.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Theories of affective learning suggest that early experiences contribute to emotional disorders by influencing the development of processing biases for negative emotional stimuli. Although studies have shown that physically abused children preferentially attend to angry faces, it is unclear whether youth exposed to more typical aspects of negative…

  13. Gender difference of school anger dimensions and its prediction for suicidal behavior in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este estudio instrumental fue examinar las diferencias de género en los componentes de ira escolar y su predicción para el comportamiento suicida en los adolescentes de educación secundaria en Shiraz, una cultura no-occidental. Los sujetos de este estudio fueron 1418 estudiantes de Educación Secundaria seleccionados mediante muestreo aleatorio estratificado en Shiraz. Se utilizó un autoinforme de Inventario Multidimensional de Ira Escolar para medir la ira dentro del contexto escolar. Los sujetos informaron sobre su comportamiento suicida, incluyendo el deseo de morir, consideración del suicidio, intentos suicidios y comportamiento de autolesionarse en los seis meses anteriores. Las mujeres experimentaban más ira que los varones y, por el contrario, la hostilidad fue más alta en ellos. Sin embargo, no había diferencias entre los géneros en cuanto a la expresión positiva y destructiva de afrontamiento. Las puntuaciones en la actitud hostil y expresión destructiva de ira fueron positivamente relacionadas con todos los tipos de comportamiento suicida. Sin embargo, la puntuación en afrontamiento positivo no fue asociada con consideración del suicidio, intentos suicidas y comportamiento de autolesionarse. La puntuación en estrategia positiva de afrontamiento de ira no era predictora del comportamiento suicida. Parece que el componente cognitivo de ira no se relaciona con su expresión más sana. Los adolescentes sin intentos suicidas no han informado sobre mayores estrategias positivas de afrontamiento como medio para controlar y expresar sentimientos de ira en comparación con los que sí han intentado suicidarse. Adicionalmente, eso indica que cogniciones negativas más hostilidad hacia compañeros de escuela se relaciona con menores niveles de ajuste. Enseñar las estrategias positivas de afrontamiento para controlar la ira puede no ser suficiente para prevenir el comportamiento suicida.

  14. The effects of negative emotions on sensory perception: Fear but not anger decreases tactile sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas J Kelley; Schmeichel, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions and sensory perceptions are closely intertwined. Of the five senses sight has been by far the most extensively studied sense in emotion research. Relatively less is known about how emotions influence the other four senses. Touch is essential for nonverbal communication in both humans and other animals. The current investigation tested competing hypotheses about the effect of fear on tactile perception. One hypothesis based on evolutionary considerations predicts that fear enhances se...

  15. The effects of negative emotions on sensory perception: fear but not anger decreases tactile sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas J Kelley; Schmeichel, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions and sensory perceptions are closely intertwined. Of the five senses, sight has been by far the most extensively studied sense in emotion research. Relatively less is known about how emotions influence the other four senses. Touch is essential for nonverbal communication in both humans and other animals. The current investigation tested competing hypotheses about the effect of fear on tactile perception. One hypothesis based on evolutionary considerations predicts that fear enhances s...

  16. Fear and Anger have Opposite Effects on Risk Seeking in the Gain Frame

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne eHabib; Mathieu eCassotti; Sylvain eMoutier; Olivier eHoudé; Gregoire eBorst

    2015-01-01

    Emotions strongly influence our decisions, particularly those made under risk. A classic example of the effect of emotion on decision making under risk is the framing effect, which involves predictable shifts in preferences when the same problem is formulated in different ways. According to dual process theories, this bias could stem from an affective heuristic belonging to an intuitive type of reasoning. In this study, we examined whether specific incidental negative emotions (i.e., fear and...

  17. Fear and anger have opposite effects on risk seeking in the gain frame

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, Marianne; Cassotti, Mathieu; Moutier, Sylvain; Houdé, Olivier; Borst, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    Emotions strongly influence our decisions, particularly those made under risk. A classic example of the effect of emotion on decision making under risk is the “framing effect,” which involves predictable shifts in preferences when the same problem is formulated in different ways. According to dual process theories, this bias could stem from an affective heuristic belonging to an intuitive type of reasoning. In this study, we examined whether specific incidental negative emotions (i.e., fear a...

  18. Adolescent RSA Responses during an Anger Discussion Task: Relations to Emotion Regulation and Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Lixian; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Harrist, Amanda W.; Larzelere, Robert E; Criss, Michael M.; Houltberg, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined associations between adolescent respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during an angry event discussion task and adolescents’ emotion regulation and adjustment. Data were collected from 206 adolescents (10–18 years old, M age = 13.37). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration data were collected from adolescents, and RSA values and respiration rates were computed. Adolescents reported on their own emotion regulation, prosocial behavior, and aggressive behavior. Multi-lev...

  19. Albert Memmi and Audre Lorde: Gender, Race, and the Rhetorical Uses of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Guadalupe Davidson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Feminists, like members of other oppressed groups, are likely to embrace many aspects of Albert Memmi’s profound analysis of domination and oppression. Even though feminists can find common cause with Memmi in many respects, nevertheless they are likely to find themselves at odds with what Memmi says and does not say about women.  

  20. Lambad ei jõua lihatööstusse / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2005-01-01

    Kuigi Saaremaa lihatööstusel on ainukesena Eestis olemas lammaste töötlemise liin, ei ole seda võimalik tulusalt rakendada, kuna lammaste üldarvu kasvule vaatamata tööstusele toodavate loomade hulk hoopis väheneb

  1. Maavalitsuses ja taluliidus arutati pindalapõhiste toetustega seotud probleeme / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2007-01-01

    Paljud Saaremaa põllumehed ja karjakasvatajad on jäänud ilma 2006. aasta ühtsest pindala- ja põllukultuuride toetusest ning otsivad abi kohalikelt võimuorganitelt. Vt. samas: Vilma Rauniste. Toetusaluseid pindasid vähendati ebaseaduslikult

  2. Saaremaa kümnes provintsiteatripäev Salmel / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2007-01-01

    Esinesid kolm näitetruppi - Salme vallateatrilt Albert Uustulndi "Naistele mehed, meestele meri", Lümanda näiteringilt Andrus Kivirähki "Vapper keefir", Kuressaare kultuurikooli Didasko noortelt "Sõnum" ja Ellen Teemuse "Naised"

  3. Marie-Luise Angerer, Christiane König (Hg.: Gender Goes Life. Bielefeld: transcript Verlag 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Kalender

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Der vorliegende Band vereinigt Beiträge von hochkarätigen Gendertheoretiker/-innen zu den Lebenswissenschaften, die je für sich lesenswert und innovativ sind. Die deutschsprachige Gender-Debatte zu den Lebenswissenschaften, bislang eher von kulturhistorischen und sozialwissenschaftlichen Ansätzen geprägt, wird durch den Einbezug von beispielsweise film- oder medientheorethischen Zugängen erweitert. Das angekündigte Anliegen des Buches, Geschlecht als Wissenskategorie im Hinblick auf die Lebenswissenschaften systematisch zu reflektieren, wird jedoch nicht eingelöst. Ebenso führt der Band eine Schwäche der Genderansätze zu den Lebenswissenschaften fort. Sie besteht darin, die Kategorie Behinderung konstant auszublenden.The volume at hand unifies contributions from highly respected gender theorists in the life sciences, each of which is an innovative and worthwhile read. The German-language gender debate in the life sciences, till now mostly formed by cultural-historical and social-scientific approaches, is expanded through other approaches such as film and media. However, the expressed intention of the book, to systematically reflect gender as a category of knowledge with respect to the life sciences, is not followed through. The volume also perpetuates the flaw of many gender approaches in the life sciences: it ignores the category of disability.

  4. Control your anger! The neural basis of aggression regulation in response to negative social feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Michelle; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-05-01

    Negative social feedback often generates aggressive feelings and behavior. Prior studies have investigated the neural basis of negative social feedback, but the underlying neural mechanisms of aggression regulation following negative social feedback remain largely undiscovered. In the current study, participants viewed pictures of peers with feedback (positive, neutral or negative) to the participant's personal profile. Next, participants responded to the peer feedback by pressing a button, thereby producing a loud noise toward the peer, as an index of aggression. Behavioral analyses showed that negative feedback led to more aggression (longer noise blasts). Conjunction neuroimaging analyses revealed that both positive and negative feedback were associated with increased activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and bilateral insula. In addition, more activation in the right dorsal lateral PFC (dlPFC) during negative feedback vs neutral feedback was associated with shorter noise blasts in response to negative social feedback, suggesting a potential role of dlPFC in aggression regulation, or top-down control over affective impulsive actions. This study demonstrates a role of the dlPFC in the regulation of aggressive social behavior. PMID:26755768

  5. Anger camera dead time and its computer correction in dynamic radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods used for the measurement of the camera's dead time are described. Two program variants were dra wn up to create histograms of the course of radioactivity in the selected zones of interest during dynamic studies with computer correction of dead time; these variants are that part of the system of computer and control programs which were written for the Clincom device. The first variant performs the correction on the basis of recorded count rate in the whole display, while the second variant uses an additional reference source positioned in a suitable place of the cameras field of vision. (author)

  6. Anger Control Bibliotherapy with a Convicted Murderer under Life Sentence: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Used personalized bibliotherapy intervention approach to prevent build up of aggression in inmate with low tolerance to perceived provocation. Follow-up data over six-month period revealed dramatic decrease in discipline reports following therapy. Interview and questionnaire feedback from client indicated reduced incidence of feelings of…

  7. Karja kiriku taasavatud pastoraadihoone seinale paigaldati mälestustahvel Fr. W. Willmannile / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2001-01-01

    Karja kihelkonna päevade raames avati äsjaremonditud Karja kiriku pastoraadihoones näitus kodukandi kultuuriloost ja hoone seinale paigaldati mälestustahvel esimesel siinkandis tegutsenud kirjamehele Fr. W. Willmannile (1746-1819)

  8. Opening the black box the role of personality and anger in executives' decision making and leadership

    CERN Document Server

    Sputtek, Rebekka

    2012-01-01

    Rebekka Sputtek sheds light upon the question of how the personality and emotional traits of executives influence their decision making and leadership behavior. While recent strategic management research has started to recognize the relevance of an executive''s personality traits as antecedents of organizational outcomes, this stream has called for a more fine-grained clarification of the psychological processes underlying executive decision making. In order to contribute to the understanding of these processes, a holistic model integrating the role of an expedient set of personality variables

  9. Gender difference of school anger dimensions and its prediction for suicidal behavior in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2008-01-01

    El propósito de este estudio instrumental fue examinar las diferencias de género en los componentes de ira escolar y su predicción para el comportamiento suicida en los adolescentes de educación secundaria en Shiraz, una cultura no-occidental. Los sujetos de este estudio fueron 1418 estudiantes de Educación Secundaria seleccionados mediante muestreo aleatorio estratificado en Shiraz. Se utilizó un autoinforme de Inventario Multidimensional de Ira Escolar para medir la ira dentro del contexto ...

  10. Publishers' PR Tactic Angers University Presses and Open-Access Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on reactions to the Association of American Publishers' new public-relations campaign, which has upset many university presses and research librarians, as well as open-access advocates. The effort, known as the "Partnership for Research Integrity in Science & Medicine," or Prism, is the latest tactic in a continuing…

  11. Anger and optimal performance in karate : an application of the IZOF model

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Cerezo, Montse

    2004-01-01

    Montse Ruiz Cerezo tutki väitöskirjatyössään emotionaalisten kokemusten ja liikuntasuorituksen välistä suhdetta. Hän tarkasteli espanjalaisten karatekojen suorituksiin liittyvää vihaa ja muita tunnetiloja ja havaitsi, että urheilijat kokivat vihan parantavan suoritusta, koska se tuotti ylimääräistä energiaa. Huonosti menneissä kilpailuissa viha kuitenkin heijasti energian puutetta tai urheilijan kykenemättömyyttä ottaa käyttöön tai hyödyntää omia resurssejaan.

  12. The catecholamine neurotransmitter precursor tyrosine increases anger during exposure to severe psychological stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lieberman, Harris R; Thompson, Lauren A.; Caruso, Christina M.; Niro, Philip J.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; McClung, James P.; Caron, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Acute stress produces behavioral and physiological changes modulated by central catecholamines (CA). Stress increases CA activity, and depletion of CA stores reduces responses to stress. Increasing CA activity by administration of the dietary amino acid CA precursor tyrosine may increase responsiveness to stress. This study determined whether tyrosine enhances the ability of humans to respond to severe stress. Methods Severe psychological stress was generated during training at Surv...

  13. Monuments for stillborn children : Coming to terms with the sorrow, regrets and anger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faro, L.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, until the years mid eighty of the previous century, health care professionals like doctors, midwives and nurses determined routines around birth. As a consequence and according to the protocols at the time, stillborn children were immediately taken away after birth. Parents most

  14. Physician anger: Leggo dem managed care blues--leadership beyond the era of managed cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirz, H L

    1999-01-01

    While managed care has caused great disruption, it has also provided physician executives with a natural leadership raison d'être. Managed care, with all its pros and cons, is largely a response to certain unrelenting trends. The core functions of leaders comprise the stewardship of organizations and colleagues in response to these trends. Four trends are explored: (1) The demise of open-ended funding of American health care; (2) continued competition for health care resources; (3) thriving pluralism; and (4) patients continually adjusting to assure themselves of appropriate health care access, quality, and service. In the 21st century, the industry will need a new brand of leader, one capable of balancing the needs of the professionals with the business and accountability requirements of a permanently competitive and resource-constrained service industry. The keys to successful leadership in the future include: (1) Clear service differentiation and a compelling vision to match it; (2) recruiting and retaining top clinical talent, including the required return to physician self-direction and governance; (3) successful partnerships with others outside your organization; and (4) a steady focus on performance in all its dimensions. PMID:10351726

  15. Breastfeeding experience differentially impacts recognition of happiness and anger in mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Krol, Kathleen M.; Kamboj, Sunjeev K.; Curran, H. Valerie; Grossmann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Breastfeeding is a dynamic biological and social process based on hormonal regulation involving oxytocin. While there is much work on the role of breastfeeding in infant development and on the role of oxytocin in socio-emotional functioning in adults, little is known about how breastfeeding impacts emotion perception during motherhood. We therefore examined whether breastfeeding influences emotion recognition in mothers. Using a dynamic emotion recognition task, we found that longer durations...

  16. Cultural Variations in the Socialization of Young Children's Anger and Shame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Pamela M.; Tamang, Babu Lal; Shrestha, Srijana

    2006-01-01

    Tamang and Brahman Nepali children have culturally specific emotion scripts that may reflect different emotion socialization experiences. To study emotion socialization, the child-adult interactions of 119 children (3-5 years old) were observed and 14 village elders were interviewed about child competence in Tamang and Brahman villages. Tamang…

  17. Agir pour communiquer : le cas de la BU d'Angers (BUA)

    OpenAIRE

    CLOT, Nathalie,; Tacheau, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    On ne peut pas ne pas communiquer ! Cette formule attribuée à Paul Watzlawick, qui évoquait les relations entre individus, interroge aujourd'hui les organisations publiques et les institutions culturelles confrontées à de forts enjeux de sens et d'image. Deux questions sont ouvertes : que peut et doit dire d'elle une bibliothèque ? Que dit-elle d'elle-même en creux lorsqu'elle ne fait ou ne dit rien ? Par extension : comment et pourquoi faut-il la dissocier de la représentation commune d'un l...

  18. ANGER IS A GIFT: propaganda, performance e documentário nos Rage Against The Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Nogueira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available About 20 years ago, and during the 1990s, Rage Against the Machinedid not change the world, but endeavored to cause small aesthetic (at the level of musicmakingand ethical quakes (at the level of civic intervention. The visual production that accompanied their music had become equally bold and unusual: videoclips based on foundfootage and live performances, concert films that sought to capture the visceral energy of live performance and a strong propaganda permeating both music and the images that accompany, seem to us aspects of note and worthy of reflection. This article is concernedwith the intersection between documentary and music never seen before in the entertainment industry and culture in contemporary music.

  19. Associations among Negative Parenting, Attention Bias to Anger, and Social Anxiety among Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Gulley, Lauren; Oppenheimer, Caroline; Hankin, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Theories of affective learning suggest that early experiences contribute to emotional disorders by influencing the development of processing biases for negative emotional stimuli. Although studies show that physically abused children preferentially attend to angry faces, it is unclear whether youth exposed to more typical aspects of negative parenting would exhibit the same type of bias. The current studies extend previous research by linking observed negative parenting styles (e.g. authorita...

  20. Administrators' Use of Metaphors to Deal with Anger in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Tareef, Atif Omer

    2014-01-01

    School violence emerged as a topic of interest for the education system during the past decade. School violence covers an array of intentional or reckless behaviors that include physical harm, psychological harm, and property damage. These include behaviors that vary in severity and frequency such as murder (Dwyer, Osher, & Warger, 1998). Tay,…

  1. Anger, Stress Proliferation, and Depressed Mood among Parents of Children with ASD: A Longitudinal Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Paul R.; Karlof, Kristie L.

    2009-01-01

    "Stress proliferation" (the tendency for stressors to create additional stressors) has been suggested as an important contributor to depression among caregivers. The present study utilized longitudinal data from 90 parents of children with ASD to replicate and extend a prior cross-sectional study on stress proliferation by Benson (J Autism Develop…

  2. HOW I DID IT....THE CEO OF ATHENAHEALTH on ON THE ROLE OF ANGER IN STARTING NEW BUSINESSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    As a boy, Bush watched Emergency! on television and was captivated by the romance and seeming magic of saving lives. As an adult, he found the reality of medicine to be very different: There wasn't much humanity in the way health care was actually delivered. Believing that he'd be daunted by the course work required for a medical degree, he decided to take an entrepreneurial route to improving the system. His first sense of the opportunity came while he was driving an ambulance in New Orleans one summer during college. Some patients with chronic disease who couldn't afford their medicines would repeatedly call the ambulance to take them to a hospital where they could be stabilized. What if the ambulance itself were outfitted with treatments for the five most common chronic diseases and carried EMTs who were trained to use them? Those patients could be treated in place, at a radically lower cost than what the hospital would charge. That idea didn't work out, and Bush moved on to think about a network of maternity clinics. He and Todd Park drew up a business plan at Harvard Business School--one that was "unbelievably complicated to execute and very risky." But in the process of pursuing it, they created websites for the paperwork with rules that prevented mistakes. That was the seed for athenahealth, which today supports electronic medical records and a suite of practice management and care coordination services, leaving doctors free to spend more time with their patients. PMID:26875377

  3. Risk of Revictimization of Intimate Partner Violence: The Role of Attachment, Anger and Violent Behavior of the Victim

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijpers, Karlijn F.; van der Knaap, Leontien M.; Winkel, Frans Willem

    2011-01-01

    Victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) are known to be at high risk for revictimization. Yet, to date, the mechanisms explaining the link between victimization and revictimization of IPV have not been extensively studied. In the present prospective study involving 74 female help-seeking victims of IPV, we investigated victim-related psychological mechanisms that may underlie this link. With this study, we aim to contribute to the development of theory addressing these psychological mechan...

  4. When Clients' Morbid Avoidance and Chronic Anger Impede Their Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Cory F.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the fact that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for major depressive disorder is an empirically supported treatment, some clients do not respond optimally or readily. The literature has provided a number of hypotheses regarding the factors that may play a role in these clients' difficulties in responding to CBT, with the current paper…

  5. Put your money where your mouth is! : Explaining collective action tendencies through group-based anger and group efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, M; Spears, R; Fischer, AH; Leach, CW

    2004-01-01

    Insights from appraisal theories of emotion are used to integrate elements of theories on collective action. Three experiments with disadvantaged groups systematically manipulated procedural fairness (Study 1), emotional social support (Study 2), and instrumental social support (Study 3) to examine

  6. Epigenetic modification of the oxytocin receptor gene influences the perception of anger and fear in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puglia, Meghan H.; Lillard, Travis S.; Morris, James P.; Connelly, Jessica J.

    2015-01-01

    Although understanding the precise nature of oxytocin’s influence on complex human social behavior has proven difficult, increasing evidence points to an anxiolytic effect. We use an imaging epigenetic approach to further parse oxytocin’s effects by examining a biological marker within the oxytocin system, DNA methylation of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR). Importantly, this epigenetic modification directly impacts the expression of oxytocin’s receptor, which is critical for the actions of ...

  7. The Effects of Mother Education Programs on the Functionality, Anger Management and Conflict Solution Levels of Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal, Zekavet

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Studies carried out in recent years both in Turkey and abroad indicate that child and teenage violence has increased and become widespread. Annually, 91.1% of deaths due to violence in the world occur in low and middle-income countries. Family life is an important element in understanding violent behavior as it relates to family…

  8. Supportive Parenting Moderates the Effect of Discrimination upon Anger, Hostile View of Relationships, and Violence among African American Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Ronald L.; Simons, Leslie Gordon; Burt, Callie Harbin; Drummund, Holli; Stewart, Eric; Brody, Gene H.; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that exposure to discrimination increases the probability that African American adolescents will engage in delinquent behavior, especially acts of violence. The present study extended this research by examining the extent to which supportive parenting buffers a youth from these deleterious consequences of discrimination.…

  9. Lümanda vald tähistas oma sünnipäeva arengukonverentsiga / Tõnu Anger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Anger, Tõnu, 1950-

    2008-01-01

    Seoses Lümanda valla 15. aastapäevaga taasiseseisvunud Eestis korraldati valla arengupäev, mille motoks oli "Vald mere ääres - metsa sees". Kohale oli kutsutud ka regionaalminister Siim-Valmar Kiisler, kes esines pikema sõnavõtuga teemal "Omavalitsus riigi struktuuris"

  10. Hostility, Physical Aggression and Trait Anger as Predictors for Suicidal Behavior in Chinese Adolescents: A School-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ping; Roberts, Robert E.; Liu, Zhuoya; Meng, Xian; Tang, Jie; Sun, Lin; Yu, Yizhen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study explored the extent to which trait aggression is associated with suicidal behavior in a nationwide school-based sample of adolescents. Methods A nationwide sample of 14,537 high school students in urban areas of China was recruited. Information concerning suicide ideation, plans, attempts, trait aggression and other risk factors was collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Multivariate regression analyses were employed to predict suicidal behavior. Results Approximately ...

  11. Bodily-Moral Disgust: What It Is, How It Is Different from Anger and Why It Is an Unreasoned Emotion.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Pascale S.; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2013-01-01

    With the recent upswing in research interest on the moral implications of disgust, there has been uncertainty about what kind of situations elicit moral disgust and whether disgust is a rational or irrational player in moral decision making. We first outline the benefits of distinguishing between bodily violations (e.g., sexual taboos, such as pedophilia and incest) and nonbodily violations (e.g., deception or betrayal) when examining moral disgust. We review findings from our lab and others'...

  12. Brief cognitive behavioural therapy with male adolescent offenders in open custody or on probation: an evaluation of management of anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, P M; Jensen, B; Raven-Brook, L

    1995-06-01

    A 6-wk. cognitive behavioural program administered to 24 adolescent male offenders assigned to open custody and 5 to probation showed no mean differences on the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, and the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory. Significant correlations were found for the personality measures with pretreatment and posttreatment scores on the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory. PMID:7568580

  13. Rejected by Peers--Attracted to Antisocial Media Content: Rejection-Based Anger Impairs Moral Judgment among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Xanthe S.; Konijn, Elly A.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage during which both peers and the media have a strong influence. Both peer rejection and the use of morally adverse media are associated with negative developmental outcomes. This study examines processes by which peer rejection might drive adolescents to select antisocial media content by tying…

  14. Compassion Meditators Show Less Anger, Less Punishment and More Compensation of Victims in Response to Fairness Violations

    OpenAIRE

    Cade McCall; Matthieu Ricard

    2014-01-01

    Fairness violations elicit powerful behavioral and affective responses. Indeed, people are willing to incur costs to sanction unfair behavior. Here we study the possible impact of long-term mental training in socio-affective capacities such as compassion on altruistic punishment and compensatory behavior in economic games. To this end we recruited a group of long-term meditation practitioners (LTPs) who had engaged in an average of 40K hours of mental training exercises including compassion-r...

  15. Video Games and Aggression: the effects of violent game play on self-reported and peer-observed anger

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew R

    2009-01-01

    The continued upsurge in the popularity of video games has lead to persistent debate over the effects of play, particularly the use of violent video games. The present experimental study aimed to replicate the results of numerous research groups who found that playing violent video games lead to an increase in aggression and to examine peer-observer perceptions of violent game play. Two experiments were carried out; the first used 24 participants in a within-subjects design being filmed while...

  16. Discrepancies in Military Middle-School Adolescents' and Parents' Perceptions of Family Functioning, Social Support, Anger Frequency, and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Janet R.; Seybold, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that adolescents' and parents' perceptions of family functioning are typically quite disparate and that perceptual discrepancies increase when a family is under stress. During the years of deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan adolescents in military families have faced uniquely stressful circumstances which may…

  17. Bodily Moral Disgust: What It Is, How It Is Different from Anger, and Why It Is an Unreasoned Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Pascale Sophie; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2013-01-01

    With the recent upswing in research interest on the moral implications of disgust, there has been uncertainty about what kind of situations elicit moral disgust and whether disgust is a rational or irrational player in moral decision making. We first outline the benefits of distinguishing between bodily violations (e.g., sexual taboos, such as…

  18. Don't look at me in anger! Enhanced processing of angry faces in anticipation of public speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Matthias J; Pauli, Paul; Reicherts, Philipp; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Anxiety is supposed to enhance the processing of threatening information. Here, we investigated the cortical processing of angry faces during anticipated public speaking. To elicit anxiety, a group of participants was told that they would have to perform a public speech. As a control condition, another group was told that they would have to write a short essay. During anticipation of these tasks, participants saw facial expressions (angry, happy, and neutral) while electroencephalogram was recorded. Event-related potential analysis revealed larger N170 amplitudes for angry compared to happy and neutral faces in the anxiety group. The early posterior negativity as an index of motivated attention was also enhanced for angry compared to happy and neutral faces in participants anticipating public speaking. These results indicate that fear of public speaking influences early perceptual processing of faces such that especially the processing of angry faces is facilitated. PMID:20030758

  19. Parent-Child Discussions of Anger and Sadness: The Importance of Parent and Child Gender during Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Janice; Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Cassano, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides conceptual background and empirical evidence that parental emotion socialization continues well into middle childhood and is influenced by the social context. Data are presented to illustrate the influence of parent and child gender on parental socialization of emotion in 113 Caucasian, middle-class children. Mothers and…

  20. Epigenetic modification of the oxytocin receptor gene influences the perception of anger and fear in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglia, Meghan H; Lillard, Travis S; Morris, James P; Connelly, Jessica J

    2015-03-17

    In humans, the neuropeptide oxytocin plays a critical role in social and emotional behavior. The actions of this molecule are dependent on a protein that acts as its receptor, which is encoded by the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR). DNA methylation of OXTR, an epigenetic modification, directly influences gene transcription and is variable in humans. However, the impact of this variability on specific social behaviors is unknown. We hypothesized that variability in OXTR methylation impacts social perceptual processes often linked with oxytocin, such as perception of facial emotions. Using an imaging epigenetic approach, we established a relationship between OXTR methylation and neural activity in response to emotional face processing. Specifically, high levels of OXTR methylation were associated with greater amounts of activity in regions associated with face and emotion processing including amygdala, fusiform, and insula. Importantly, we found that these higher levels of OXTR methylation were also associated with decreased functional coupling of amygdala with regions involved in affect appraisal and emotion regulation. These data indicate that the human endogenous oxytocin system is involved in attenuation of the fear response, corroborating research implicating intranasal oxytocin in the same processes. Our findings highlight the importance of including epigenetic mechanisms in the description of the endogenous oxytocin system and further support a central role for oxytocin in social cognition. This approach linking epigenetic variability with neural endophenotypes may broadly explain individual differences in phenotype including susceptibility or resilience to disease. PMID:25675509

  1. Anger and happiness in virtual teams: emotional influences of text and behavior on others' affect in the absence of non-verbal cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cheshin; A. Rafaeli; N. Bos

    2011-01-01

    Emotions carry social influence, as evident by emotion contagion - an unconscious process attributed to mimicking of non-verbal cues. We investigate whether emotion contagion can occur in virtual teams; specifically, the emotional influence of text-based and behavior-based cues on participants’ emot

  2. With a modern P.T. Barnum act, Donald Trump is tapping Americans’ anger to sell tickets to his own political circus

    OpenAIRE

    Pruessen, Ron

    2016-01-01

    If the US election campaign currently has the air of a circus, Donald Trump can easily be seen as its P.T. Barnum. While the historical analogy is worth consideration, though, Ron Pruessen argues that Trump goes beyond (and beneath) the earlier Big Top impresario – and that the audience he is attracting is more than a gaggle of rubes and suckers.

  3. Self- and Co-Regulation of Anger and Fear in Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Role of Maternal Parenting Style and Temperament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschler-Guttenberg, Yael; Feldman, Ruth; Ostfeld-Etzion, Sharon; Laor, Nathaniel; Golan, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) difficulties are a major concern in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Maternal temperament and parenting style have significant effects on children's ER. However, these effects have not been studied in children with ASD. Forty preschoolers with ASD and their mothers and forty matched controls engaged in fear and…

  4. Visual Search for Basic Emotional Expressions in Autism; Impaired Processing of Anger, Fear and Sadness, but a Typical Happy Face Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K.; Branson, Amanda; King, Ben J.

    2011-01-01

    Facial expression recognition was investigated in 20 males with high functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger syndrome (AS), compared to typically developing individuals matched for chronological age (TD CA group) and verbal and non-verbal ability (TD V/NV group). This was the first study to employ a visual search, "face in the crowd" paradigm with a…

  5. The Association between Impulsivity, Trait Anger, and the Perpetration of Intimate Partner and General Violence among Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Brasfield, Hope; Febres, Jeniimarie; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of domestic violence is widespread, with research indicating men and women both perpetrate a substantial amount of aggression. However, aggression perpetrated by women is a relatively understudied area compared to aggression perpetrated by men. Additionally, research is needed to determine the correlates of aggression perpetration…

  6. Does Exercise Reduce Aggressive Feelings? An Experiment Examining the Influence of Movement Type and Social Task Conditions on Testiness and Anger Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pels, Fabian; Kleinert, Jens

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, it was assumed that a decrease in aggressive feelings is stronger with movements that are unlike aggressive actions compared with those that are similar to aggressive actions. Furthermore, cooperative exercise tasks were expected to lead to lower aggressive feelings compared with competitive tasks. After undergoing an induction of aggressive feelings, 60 participants were randomly assigned to one of six experimental treatment groups, each differing in "movement type" (rowing and combat exercise) and "social task condition" (cooperation, competition, and individualization). A significant reduction of aggressive feelings was only found for participants exercising individually in the rowing condition compared with the individual combat exercise condition. There were no sole effects of "movement type" and "social task condition." PMID:27184261

  7. Looking Back on Anger: Explaining the Social Origins of Left-Wing and Nationalist-Separatist Terrorism in Western Europe, 1970-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Brockhoff, Sarah; Krieger, Tim; Meierrieks, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A unique dataset is used to separately analyze the social origins of left-wing and nationalist-separatist terrorism in 17 Western European countries between 1970 and 2007. We argue that the differences in the historic roots, ultimate goals as well as their negotiability, levels of domestic and international support, and politico-military strategies of these types of ideologically or ethnically motivated terrorism make it plausible that they respond differently to specific social conditions an...

  8. Cerebellum and processing of negative facial emotions: cerebellar transcranial DC stimulation specifically enhances the emotional recognition of facial anger and sadness

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Giannicola, Gaia; Rosa, Manuela; Fumagalli, Manuela; Boggio, Paulo Sergio; Hallett, Mark; Zago, Stefano; Priori, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that the cerebellum participates in the complex network processing emotional facial expression. To evaluate the role of the cerebellum in recognizing facial expressions we delivered transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex. A facial emotion recognition task was administered to 21 healthy subjects before and after cerebellar tDCS; we also tested subjects with a visual attention task and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for mood.

  9. Renal blood flow investigations with 133xenon and the anger scintillation camera in the hyperacute xenograft rejection of the rabbit kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the advantage and validity of 133Xe-washout externally monitored by the scintillation camera. Until now there were no reports on quantitative blood flow studies in hyperacute rejection of transplanted kidneys using a scintillation camera. Within 35 minutes after e-vivo hemoperfusion of rabbit kidneys by cats we found a simultaneous progressive decrease of renal blood flow, renal cortical blood flow as well as of the intrarenal distribution of renal cortical blood flow in all cases. The hyperacute rejection of xenografts could be verified in every case histologically. Using the scintillation camera we were able to detect regional perfusion defects caused by artifical air embolism as well as by preexisting cortical infarction. (orig.)

  10. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ask your healthcare professionals about anger or stress management programs in your community. Tips Keep an anger ... your condition can give you hope for improved health. Track your heart health online with Heart360 . Sharing ...

  11. Kişilerarası Tarz, Öfke ve Benlik Algısı: Psikopatolojilerde Ortak Ögeler (Interpersonal Style, Anger and Self- Perception: Common Factors of Psychopathology)

    OpenAIRE

    DURAK BATIGÜN, Ayşegül; HİSLİ ŞAHİN Nesrin,

    2009-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, depresyon, anksiyete bozukluğu, psikosomatik bozukluklar ve cinsel işlev bozukluğu yaşayanlar ile, bu tür sorunları olmayan kişiler; kişilerarası ilişki tarzları, öfke, benlik algısı ve genel semptom düzeyi açısından karşılaştırılmışlardır. Böylece, bu bozuklukların gelişmesi ve sürdürülmesinde, bu faktörlerin nasıl bir etkisinin olduğu saptanmaya çalışılmıştır.Araştırmanın depresyon örneklemini, bu tanıyı almış 64 hasta ile, depresyon tanısı almamış 71 normal birey oluşturmakta...

  12. 谨防干部问责成为平息民愤的"应急作秀"%Prevention to Make a Show of Leadres' Responsibility Investigation to Calm down People's Anger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玉清

    2009-01-01

    @@ 目前,一些地方出现了责任追究"避重就轻"、干部"带病复出"的现象,干部问责制在执行过程中不同程度地存在"跑偏走样"等问题.这种被称为高调问责、低调复出的"应急作秀",不仅削弱了干部问责的约束力和威慑力,更损害了党和政府的公信力.因此,必须从以下几个方面对干部问责进行规范,谨防干部问责成为平息民愤的"应急作秀".

  13. Understanding the Human Volcano: What Teens Can Do about Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Earl

    Anger and violence among children has moved from the streets to the schools, with tragic, and well-documented, results. This book addresses anger and violence among children and is, in essence, an anger-management course for teens, written at about an eighth-grade level. Part 1, "The Problems of Violence in Our World," explores human violence. It…

  14. Senekos dramų herojų jausmų raiška ir poveikis žiūrovams. Expression of the feelings of the characters and impact on the spectators in Seneca’s dramas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovita Dikmonienė

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the works by Taplin, Nussbaum, and Schiesar, the article explores the feelings of the protagonists of Seneca’s tragedies, Thyestes and Medea, which are the factors that develop the plot and the dynamics of the tragedies. The article also reviews the emotions these tragedies may set up in the spectators and readers. A comparison is draw between these tragedies and three philosophical dialogues of Seneca On Anger. The article investigates why and how the hatred and fury of the protagonists grows and develops. Anger is shown as pain by Seneca. Such words as ira and dolor are used as synonyms in the tragedies. The protagonists’ emotions of anger and rage cause the spectators’ fear.In Thyestes and Medea, very much like in his philosophical piece On Anger, Seneca discloses the feeling of anger of the main characters in three stages. In the first stage, the poet depicts involuntary anger of Medea with Jason who has broken the vows of love. In Thyestes, Atreus is angry with Thyestes who has insulted his glory. In stages one and three the characters talk to their spirit and the feeling of anger as if with an ostensible, imaginable interlocutor. In stage two, Seneca discloses extensive pride of the protagonists, the feeling of anger that is managed and controlled, their accusations to the offenders, and their wilful determination to revenge. In stage three, the poet depicts wild and uncontrollable anger and fury when Medea and Atreus kill children not because of any need, but because the passion of anger blinds the wisdom. The first and third stages of anger are shown by Seneca as uncontrollable and unconscious, whereas the second stage of anger – a conscious when the protagonists can control their passions, yet they succumb to them.In the tragedies, like in the essay On Anger, Seneca focuses on the depiction of the consequences of anger and the damage that the failure to control anger in due time brings to a man and the people

  15. Contempt: Derogating Others While Keeping Calm

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Agneta H.; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2015-01-01

    While philosophers have discussed the emotion of contempt from antiquity to the present day, contempt has received less attention in psychological research. We review the defining features of contempt, both as a short-term emotion and as a more long lasting sentiment. Contempt is similar to anger in that it may occur after (repeated) social or moral transgressions, but it differs from anger in its appraisals, actions and emotivational goals. Unlike anger, contempt arises when a person’s or gr...

  16. ISPA - a high accuracy X-ray and gamma camera Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    ISPA offers ... Ten times better resolution than Anger cameras High efficiency single gamma counting Noise reduction by sensitivity to gamma energy ...for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

  17. Unusual 45S-5S units dominate ribosomal RNA loci in the sunflower family (Asteraceae): the case of Artemisia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Garcia, S.; Lim, K.Y.; Chester, M.; Garnatje, T.; Pellicer, J.; Valles, J.; Leitch, A.R.; Kovařík, Aleš

    Angers, 2008. s. 3-4. [Cytogénétique et Polyploidie, DGAP INRA - Technopole. 02.04.2008-04.04.2008, Angers] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : compositae * concerted evolution * FISH Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  18. Accounting for Untoward Managerial Actions: The Mediating Influence of Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Jasmine

    1996-01-01

    Tests empirically a model of the relationships between social accounts, appraisal of actions (perceptions of fairness and attributions of responsibility) and two reactions to untoward actions (anger and approval). Suggests that the influence of social accounts on employees' anger and disapproval is mediated by perceived fairness and…

  19. The Role of Stress and Negative Emotions in an Occupational Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutri, Merja; Lindeman, Marjaana

    2002-01-01

    Measures of occupational crisis, anger, anxiety, and depression were completed by 277 Finnish workers (53% women). Occupational crises resulted from overload, interpersonal problems, organizational changes, or threatened job loss, accompanied by trait anxiety, suppressed anger, and depressive symptoms. Female employees who experienced…

  20. Correlates of Authoritarian Parenting in Individualist and Collectivist Cultures and Implications for Understanding the Transmission of Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Duane; Grusec, Joan E.

    2001-01-01

    Administered measures of authoritarianism, collectivism, warmth, anger, attributions for children's misbehavior, and parental feelings of control over failure to Egyptian- and Anglo-Canadians. Egyptians were higher on authoritarianism, collectivism, and anger. Men were higher on perceived control over failure. The best predictors of authoritarian…

  1. Exposure to Pornography and Aggression Toward Women: The Case of the Angry Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Susan H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research since 1970 on the effects of pornography on men's treatment of, and underlying attitudes toward, women. Holds that anger is a greater social problem than pornography, particularly in men who are unable to resolve that anger and to distinguish it from sexual arousal and control over women. (Author/GC)

  2. Emotional Skills-Building Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickover, Sheri

    2010-01-01

    Current anger management programs use a cognitive behavior perspective; however, research also links anger control to developmental deficits such as attachment insecurity and emotional regulation. This article previews the Emotional Skills-Building Curriculum (ESBC), a 13-week treatment program designed to treat individuals who are referred for…

  3. Dosimetrie du personnel navigant des compagnies aeriennes tcheques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spurný, František; Malušek, Alexandr; Turek, Karel

    Angers: SFRP, 1999. s. 100-101. [SFRP 99 - Congrés National de Radioprotection. 02.06.1999-04.06.1999, Angers] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0151 Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine

  4. Sound Morality: Irritating and Icky Noises Amplify Judgments in Divergent Moral Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Angelika; Prinz, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical models and correlational research suggest that anger and disgust play different roles in moral judgment. Anger is theorized to underlie reactions to crimes against persons, such as battery and unfairness, and disgust is theorized to underlie reactions to crimes against nature, such as sexual transgressions and cannibalism. To date,…

  5. Socio-emotional factors in alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyashini Lahiri Tikka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol-dependent patients are traditionally believed to have insecure attachment styles, higher anger expression, and lower self-esteem. There is a need to study them together. Aim: To understand the relationships amongst various of the socio-emotional factors. Materials and Methods: Forty male patients with Alcohol dependence syndrome and 40 matched healthy controls (General Health Questionnaire-12 score <3 were compared on attachment styles (on Relationship Scale Questionnaire, anger domains (on State Trait Anger Expression Inventory, and self-esteem (on Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Statistics and Analysis: Comparison using independent samples t test and chi square test; correlation using Pearson′s correlation coefficient. Results: Patients had significantly higher anger expression, ′anger in′ and ′anger out,′ and lower self-esteem than healthy controls. Severity of alcohol dependence had significant correlation with ′anger out,′ and self-esteem had significant negative correlation with anger expression. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the socio-emotional factors studied are developmentally linked to each other.

  6. On angry leaders and agreeable followers: How leader emotion and follower personality shape motivation and team performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. van Kleef; A.C. Homan; B. Beersma; D. van Knippenberg

    2010-01-01

    Do followers perform better when their leader expresses anger or when their leader expresses happiness? We propose that this depends on the follower’s level of agreeableness. Anger is associated with hostility and conflict—states that are at odds with agreeable individuals’ goals. Happiness facilita

  7. Impression Management Messages and Reactions to Organizational Reward Allocations: The Mediating Influence of Fairness and Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Jasmine; Rhodes, Susan R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationships among impression-management messages, evaluations of reward allocations (fairness and responsibility), and reaction to rewards (anger, approval of manager, and overall job satisfaction). Finds that impression-management messages directly influence fairness and responsibility, and indirectly influence anger and approval. (SR)

  8. The gene copy number and DNA methylation influence expression of ribosomal RNA loci in recently and recurrently formed Tragopogon allotetraploids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovařík, Aleš; Šrubařová, Hana; Lim, K.Y.; Leitch, A.R.; Soltis, D.E.; Soltis, P.S.; Matyášek, Roman

    Angers, 2008. s. 2. [Cytogénétique et Polyploidie, DGAP INRA - Technopole. 02.04.2008-04.04.2008, Angers] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : epigenetic silencing * rDNA * Tragopogon allotetraploids Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. Creative production by angry people peaks early on, decreases over time, and is relatively unstructured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Matthijs; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotes and introspective reports from eminent scientists and artists aside, a systematic test of the putative creativity-enhancing effect of anger is missing. This article fills this void with three experiments examining creativity as a function of anger (vs. sad or a mood-neutral control state).

  10. The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Predictive Association between Social Information Processing and Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the moderating role of emotion regulation in the relationship between some components of social information processing (hostile interpretation and anger) and aggressive behavior. The secondary aim was to assess whether emotion regulation, hostile interpretation, and anger account for gender differences…

  11. Psychomotor therapy and aggression regulation in eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerhout, Cees; van Busschbach, Jooske; Wiersma, Durk; Hoek, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorder behaviours can be seen as self-destructive behaviours to a great extent related to inhibited anger expression. However, a treatment protocol targeted at anger and aggression in these disorders is lacking. This paper describes a psychomotor therapy (PMT) model as a body-oriented metho

  12. Transposon-based genomic restructurations in natural/synthetic Nicotiana allotetraploids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mhiri, C.; Petit, M.; Denis, E.; Parisod, Ch.; Kovařík, Aleš; Lim, K.Y.; Leitch, A.R.; Grandbastien, M.-A.

    Angers, 2008. s. 22. [Cytogénétique et Polyploidie, DGAP INRA - Technopole. 02.04.2008-04.04.2008, Angers] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : Nicotiana * allopolyploidy * transposable elements Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine

  13. The isolation of de novo polyploids from their diploid parents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leitch, A.R.; Ainouche, M.; LeComber, S.; Soltis, P.S.; Soltis, D.E.; Matyášek, Roman; Lim, K.Y.; Šrubařová, Hana; Kovařík, Aleš

    Angers, 2008. s. 10. [Cytogénétique et Polyploidie, DGAP INRA - Technopole. 02.04.2008-04.04.2008, Angers] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : polyploidie * chromosomes * evolution Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Empathy and Aggressive Behavior of Middle School Students: The Mediating Effect of the Anger-Hostility Action%中学生移情与攻击行为:攻击情绪与认知的中介作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应贤慧; 戴春林

    2008-01-01

    采用问卷法调查了305名中学生,并通过结构方程模型技术考察了移情与攻击行为的关系及攻击情绪与认知的中介作用.结果表明:(1)中学生的主要攻击方式为言语攻击,性别和年级对攻击性存在影响;(2)攻击情绪与认知是移情影响攻击行为的中介变量;(3)"他人移情"完全经由中介变量抑制攻击行为,"自我敏感"则部分经由中介变量正向影响攻击行为.部分直接抑制攻击行为.

  15. Valoración de Situaciones-Estímulo Que Generan Enojo en Diferentes Relaciones Interpersonales / Appreciation of Stimulus Situations That Generate Anger in Different Interpersonal Relations / Valoração de Situações-Estímulo Que Geram Ira em Diferentes Relações Interpessoais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Martínez Pérez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Se exploró si los motivos de enojo varían según el tipo de relación con el agente causal. Adultos jóvenes de la Ciudad de México (N=282 describieron un evento de enojo, las causas y con quién se enojaron. A partir de un análisis de frecuencias se encontró que hay cinco valoraciones que generan enojo (injusticia, ofensa/agresión, faltas de respeto, frustración y desacuerdos a través de cinco tipos de relaciones interpersonales (familiares, desconocidos, pareja, compañeros y amigos. Específicamente, se encontró que las valoraciones de injusticia y ofensa/agresión generan enojo con todos los agentes causales. Por tanto, las intervenciones encaminadas a la regulación emocional deberían considerar que la valoración de estímulos emocionales es distinta en cada relación interpersonal.

  16. "The pale trees shook, although no wind blew, and it seemed to Tristran that they shook in anger": “blind space” and ecofeminism in a post-colonial reading of Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess’s graphic novel Stardust (1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Curry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article calls on two branches of third-wave feminist theory – ecofeminism and post-colonial feminism – to investigate human and nonhuman interrelations in Neil Gaiman’s young adult graphic novel, Stardust, illustrated by Charles Vess. Stardust follows Tristran Thorn on his journey into the land of Faerie in his attempt to capture and bring back a fallen star. Faerie is both a natural and exotic space and Tristran’s journey “to the East” transposes an Orientalist aesthetic onto its wild geography. Tristran, as would-be coloniser, views Faerie as a place of potentially inexhaustible natural resources. The star – as the imperialistic goal – is in fact a woman, which endows the wild space with further Oriental tropes, rendering it sensual, feminine and embodied. Tristran’s imperialistic impulse is thus associated with both a cultural impulse towards the domination of nature and a patriarchal impulse towards the oppression of women. Tristran’s increasing recognition of the star’s right to a fully realised selfhood sits uncomfortably with his initial imperialistic ambitions. As the novel progresses, the East becomes not, as it has been, a natural world ripe for colonial exploration and exploitation, but a place of positive intersubjective relations between humans and non-human nature. Initially both a real and illusory textual space resembling Edward Said’s “imaginative geography,” Faerie ultimately becomes a space to call “home,” in an overt critique of the nineteenth century boy’s adventure story with its implicit glorification of empire. Thus, it is argued, Stardust’s ecofeminist counter-discourse

  17. Social Exclusion and Integration: Sociological Reflection on the Anger-venting Type Crime of Personal Extreme Violence%社会排斥与社会融合:泄愤型个人极端暴力犯罪的社会学思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏猛

    2012-01-01

    近年来,泄愤型个人极端暴力犯罪成为当前和今后一个时期影响我国治安秩序和社会稳定最突出的问题之一,学术界对泄愤型个人极端暴力犯罪的研究多是从心理学和犯罪学等微观角度来进行,较少考察社会因素对犯罪主体的重要影响,鉴于这一情况,应着重探讨泄愤型个人极端暴力犯罪的宏观社会背景,从社会排斥理论出发,分析泄愤型个人极端暴力犯罪的发生机理,进而从社会融合理论的角度提出化解泄愤型个人极端暴力犯罪的路径,实现对受社会排斥的社会群体的融合,确保社会长治久安.

  18. Suicidal ideation in adolescents: an explanatory model using LISREL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Joo; Ryu, Hosihn; Han, Kuemsun; Kwon, Jung Hye; Kim, Han Kyeom; Kang, Hyun Cheol; Yoon, Ji-Won; Cheon, Suk-Hee; Shin, Hyunjeong

    2010-03-01

    Suicidal ideation has been reported to be a major factor in attempted and completed suicides. The purpose of this study is to test a structural model to explain adolescent suicidal ideation. Specifically tested is the relationship between the predictor variables of trait anger, anger suppression, entrapment, psychosomatic symptoms, depression, and resilience and the dependent variable of suicidal ideation. Data are collected from a convenience sample of 11,393 students from 36 middle schools and 23 high schools in Korea. Trait anger, entrapment, psychosomatic symptoms, depression, and resilience have a direct effect on suicidal ideation whereas anger suppression shows a significant indirect effect on adolescent suicidal ideation. The predictor variables account for 39% of the variance in suicidal ideation. The study findings suggest that future programs for prevention or alleviation of adolescents' suicidal ideation need to use interventions that facilitate their resilience and reduce their anger, entrapment feeling, psychosomatic symptoms, and depression. PMID:20040734

  19. Peer Victimization and Forms of Aggression During Middle Childhood: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, John L; Fite, Paula J

    2016-04-01

    The current short-term longitudinal study evaluated whether anger and sadness regulation moderated the associations between peer victimization and physical and relational forms of aggression over a 6-month period. Participants included 278 predominantly Caucasian children (51.8% female) between 8 and 12 years of age (M = 9.33, SD = 0.99). Peer victimization was assessed at Time 1 using child- and teacher-reports, and teachers provided ratings of children's aggressive behavior at Time 1 and Time 2. Children also completed self-report measures of anger and sadness regulation at Time 1. Results from multilevel models provided support for the notion that children's ability to effectively regulate their feelings of anger and sadness influences the relations among peer victimization and forms of aggression over time. As anticipated, high levels of anger regulation attenuated the link between child-reported peer victimization and physical aggression. Further, when levels of anger regulation were high, teacher-reported peer victimization predicted subsequent decreases in physical aggression. Contrary to expectations, however, high levels of anger and sadness regulation exacerbated the association between child-reported peer victimization and relational aggression, and teacher-reported peer victimization predicted decreases in relational aggression over time when levels of anger regulation were low. Directions for future research and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:26168955

  20. Pathways to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients: mediation of coping, spiritual struggle and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Amy Lee; Pargament, Kenneth; Kronfol, Ziad; Tice, Terrence N; Appel, Hoa

    2010-03-01

    Using structural equation modeling, we estimated major pathways from preoperative distress, indicated by anxiety and other factors, to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients. Sequential interviews were conducted before and after surgery. Standardized medical and surgical indices were selected from a national database. Results showed that preoperative spiritual struggle mediated indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on Interleukin-6 (IL-6) immediately before surgery. The link between spiritual struggle and IL-6 further mediated the indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on postoperative hostility. Anger coping mediated the harmful influence of anxiety and counteracted the protection of positive religious coping on adjustment. PMID:20207662