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Sample records for anger regulation coping

  1. Peer victimization and subsequent disruptive behavior in school: The protective functions of anger regulation coping

    OpenAIRE

    Kaynak, Övgü; Lepore, Stephen J; Kliewer, Wendy; Jaggi, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Peer victimization is linked to adjustment problems in youth, including aggressive behavior, yet not all victimized youth are aggressive. The present study investigated whether youth’s anger regulation coping might attenuate the positive association between peer victimization and subsequent aggressive behavior. Longitudinal data from 485 7th-grade students (55% female, mean age = 12.84 years) and their teachers were collected in the fall and six months later. Teacher ratings of youth aggressi...

  2. Associations between Sadness and Anger Regulation Coping, Emotional Expression, and Physical and Relational Aggression among Urban Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Kliewer, Wendy; Goodman, Kimberly L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between self reports of sadness and anger regulation coping, reluctance to express emotion, and physical and relational aggression among two cohorts of predominantly African-American fifth (N = 191; 93 boys and 98 girls) and eighth (N = 167; 73 boys and 94 girls) graders. Multiple regression analyses indicated unique associations between relational aggression and expressive reluctance and sadness regulation coping. In contrast, physical aggression, but not rel...

  3. Associations between Sadness and Anger Regulation Coping, Emotional Expression, and Physical and Relational Aggression among Urban Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Kliewer, Wendy; Goodman, Kimberly L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between self-reports of sadness and anger regulation coping, reluctance to express emotion, and physical and relational aggression between two cohorts of predominantly African-American fifth (N = 191; 93 boys and 98 girls) and eighth (N = 167; 73 boys and 94 girls) graders. Multiple regression analyses indicated…

  4. The Ways of Religious Coping With Anger

    OpenAIRE

    YEĞİN, Hüseyin İbrahim

    2010-01-01

    Negative thoughts and behaviors accompanying the sense of anger adversely affect our psychological and social life. In this context, while psychology helps us in in dealing and coping with the feelings of anger to find solutions, religion shows us to tackle the same problem from a different angle. In this study, the psychological aspect of anger, which is one of basic human emotion, and the ways of dealing with it from a religious point of view are examined. It is to be noted that, in coping...

  5. Gender context of coping with anger in older adolescents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janošová, Pavlína

    Vilnius: Mykolas Romeris University, 2009. s. 125-125. [European conference on Developmental Psychology /14./. 18.08.2009-22.08.2009, Vilnius] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700250801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : late adolescence * coping with anger * gender Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  6. An Investigation of Anger and Anger Expression in Terms of Coping with Stress and Interpersonal Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Coskun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anger and anger expression styles with respect to coping with stress and interpersonal problem-solving. The participants were 468 (258 female and 210 male, between 17-30 years old) university students. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and multiple hierarchical regression analysis were…

  7. Anger Coping Method and Skill Training for Chinese Children with Physically Aggressive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Annis L. C.; Tsang, Sandra K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aggression hinders development in the child and creates numerous problems in the family, school and community. An indigenous Anger Coping Training program for Chinese children with aggressive behavior and their parents aimed to help reactively aggressive children in increasing anger coping methods and enhancing problem-solving abilities. This…

  8. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management style

    OpenAIRE

    Bülent Gündüz; Binali Tunç; Yusuf İnandı

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches i...

  9. Impact of anger expression on blood pressure levels in white-color workers with low-coping behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ohira, Tetsuya; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sankai, Tomoko; Imano, Hironori; Shimamoto, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    To examine the relationships between anger expression and blood pressure (BP) levels and their effect modification by stress coping behaviors, the authors analyzed data from a cross-sectional study of 790 Japanese male workers aged 20–60 years. We used the Spielberger anger expression scales to measure anger-out, anger-in, and anger-control. Relationships between anger expression scales and mean systolic and diastolic BP levels were examined in the total sample and in two subgroups of high an...

  10. Influence of music therapy on coping skills and anger management in forensic psychiatric patients : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, S.; Thaut, Michael H.; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavi

  11. Influence of music therapy on coping skills and anger management in forensic psychiatric patients: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, S.; Thaut, Michael H.; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavior of forensic psychiatric patients? To investigate this question, first a literature review is offered on music therapy and anger management in forensic psychiatry. Then, an explorative study is p...

  12. Bicultural adolescents' anger regulation: in between two cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novin, Sheida; Banerjee, Robin; Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the anger-regulation strategies of bicultural individuals who are brought up with two distinct cultures that might carry contradictory demands about how to regulate emotions. With a sample of 525 adolescents in the Netherlands and Morocco, we found that bicultural Moroccan-Dutch adolescents' anger regulation in response to hypothetical peer conflict were largely similar to those of their Dutch peers. In fact, both the Dutch and the Moroccan-Dutch adolescents' anger regulation differed in the same ways from the Moroccan group, with greater acting out and less calm verbalisation, reflection, and diversion in the former than in the latter. Additionally, our findings indicate that Moroccan-Dutch adolescents' identification with the Dutch as well as with the Moroccan culture is related to more anger verbalisation and less externalising anger regulation. These results are interpreted in light of the complex cultural position faced by bicultural adolescents. PMID:21824014

  13. Children's Self-Reports about Anger Regulation: Direct and Indirect Links to Social Preference and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearing, Karen F.; And Others

    2002-01-01

    Assessed direct relations between three aspects of self-reported anger regulation and peer-rated social preference and aggression as well as indirect relations between these constructs as mediated by observed anger expression. Interviewed 274 second-graders following anger-arousing games. Found that anger regulation was only indirectly related to…

  14. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Gündüz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches is significantly associated with and predicted the conflict management styles. Administrators’ anger control level is significant predictor of "integration" style, and emotion-focused stress management is significant predictors of “compromises", "domination" and "avoidance" styles. However, problem-focused (positive and emotion-focused (negative approaches are significant predictors of the "compromise" style. Administrators who uses integration style has low levels of anger and can control their anger. Administrators who tend to emotion-focused to stress cope uses compromise, avoidance, and domination styles. However, the administrators who tend to emotion-focused and problem-focused to stress cope use consensus style.

  15. Influence of Music Therapy on Coping Skills and Anger Management in Forensic Psychiatric Patients: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, Stefan; Thaut, Michael H; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-07-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavior of forensic psychiatric patients? To investigate this question, first a literature review is offered on music therapy and anger management in forensic psychiatry. Then, an explorative study is presented. In the study, a pre- and post-test design was used with a random assignment of patients to either treatment or control condition. Fourteen participants' complete datasets were collected. All participants received "treatment as usual." Nine of the participants received a standardized, music therapy anger management program; the five controls received, unplanned, an aggression management program. Results suggested that anger management skills improved for all participants. The improvement of positive coping skills and diminishing of avoidance as a coping skill were measured to show greater changes in music therapy participants. When controlling for the exact number of treatment hours, the outcomes suggested that music therapy might accelerate the process of behavioral changes. PMID:24379454

  16. Self-report of anger in repressors

    OpenAIRE

    HYNEK, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is focused on repressive coping style and self-reports of the anger. In the theoretical part are elaborated chapters concerning the definition of emotion, emotion regulation, coping and repressive coping style. The Repressors are characterized by unconscious denial of their own anxiety and self-image distortion within the low susceptibility to negative emotions. The research study focuses on the expression of anger by repressors and their comparison with other groups. Respondents (...

  17. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lara Rohlf

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6-10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92 participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection.

  18. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlf, Helena L; Krahé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6-10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92) participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection. PMID:25964767

  19. Analyse of the Medical Students, Coping Style Among anger - out Group and Anger - in Group%医学生愤怒、郁怒情绪与特质应对方式的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡凤; 陶海燕; 乔明琦; 张惠云

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To supply the theory support of the psychological mechanism of anger in TCM, we carryed out the research about coping style of people which were anger - in or anger - out. Methods: The students were differentiated by STAXI - 2,and were assessed by Trait Coping Style Questionnaire(TCSQ). The data was analysed by SPSS 13.0. Results: There were significant difference on negative coping style among anger - out group and normal group ( P < 0. 001 ), and as well as both negative coping stycle and positive coping style among anger - in group and normal group, and anger - in group and anger - out group ( P <0.001 ). Conclusion :The anger - in group has more tendency than anger - out group in the negative coping stycle ,and we also researched the correlations about disease of anger on the side of coping style.%目的:分析愤怒、郁怒人群特质应对方式的相关性研究,为探讨怒产生及诱发情志病证的心理机制提供理论支持.方法:以状态一特质怒表达量表(STAXI-2)作为筛选工具,区分出愤怒、郁怒人群,使用特质应对方式问卷(TCSQ)对学生人群进行调查分析,采用SPSS 13.0对数据进行统计分析.结果:愤怒组与正常组在消极应对方面存在显著性差异(P<0.001),郁怒组与愤怒组、正常组在消极应对、积极应对方面均存在显著性差异(P<0.001).结论:愤怒、郁怒人群均倾向于采取消极应对方式处理问题,且郁怒人群的倾向性更大,进一步揭示了怒致病与应对方式的相关性,为中医情志病因学研究增添新的手段和方法.

  20. Dynamic Changes in Anger, Externalizing and Internalizing Problems: Attention and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmeen; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low levels of dispositional anger and a good attention span are critical to healthy social emotional development, with attention control reflecting effective cognitive self-regulation of negative emotions such as anger. Using a longitudinal design, we examined attention span as a moderator of reciprocal links between changes in anger…

  1. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Ayano; Kim, Min-Sun; Oshio, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control), independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned). The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed. PMID:27303332

  2. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eAkutsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control, independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned. The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed.

  3. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Ayano; Kim, Min-Sun; Oshio, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control), independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned). The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed. PMID:27303332

  4. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management styleOkul yöneticilerinin öfke ve stresle başaçıkma yaklaşımları ile çatışma yönetimi stilleri arasındaki ilişki

    OpenAIRE

    Gündüz, Bülent; Binali TUNÇ; İnandı, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches i...

  5. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management style

    Okul yöneticilerinin öfke ve stresle başaçıkma yaklaşımları ile çatışma yönetimi stilleri arasındaki ilişki

    OpenAIRE

    Bülent Gündüz; Binali Tunç; Yusuf İnandı

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches i...

  6. Khat use and trait anger: effects on affect regulation during an acute stressful challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Stephan; al'Absi, Mustafa; Khalil, Najat Sayem; Al Habori, Molham

    2011-01-01

    Khat (Catha edulis) is a widely used stimulating drug often consumed in daily routine in Yemen and East African countries. Chewing khat acutely elicits states of euphoria and feelings of well-being which later shift into emotional instability and low mood. Little is known about emotional regulation in habitual khat chewers. In this study, we compared self-reports on trait anger as well as positive and negative affect responses to a mental arithmetic challenge. Participants included 135 men and women from Yemen who chew khat regularly, occasionally or not at all. Participants attended a laboratory session that involved resting periods and performing a math challenge. Analyses of variance and regression show that regular khat chewing is associated with higher trait anger, more pronounced negative responses during stress and less pronounced positive emotional states. These results suggest that regular khat chewing is associated with disturbances in emotion regulation processes. PMID:21860244

  7. Khat Use and Trait Anger: Effects on Affect Regulation during an Acute Stressful Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Bongard, Stephan; al'Absi, Mustafa; Khalil, Najat Sayem; Al Habori, Molham

    2011-01-01

    Khat (Catha edulis) is a widely used stimulating drug often consumed in daily routine in Yemen and East African countries. Chewing khat acutely elicits states of euphoria and feelings of well-being which later shift into emotional instability and low mood. Little is known about emotional regulation in habitual khat chewers. In this study, we compared self-reports on trait anger as well as positive and negative affect responses to a mental arithmetic challenge. Participants included 135 men an...

  8. Fear and Anger Reactivity Trajectories from 4 to 16 Months: The Roles of Temperament, Regulation, and Maternal Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L.; Karrass, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Two goals guided this study: (a) describe changes in infant fear and anger reactivity from 4 to 16 months and (b) examine the degree to which infant temperament, attentional regulation, and maternal sensitivity predict reactivity trajectories. Participants included 143 mothers and infants (57% male) who visited the laboratory at 4, 8, 12, and 16…

  9. Anger Management and Factors that Influence Anger in Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Koçer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are limited data regarding anger and its management with respect to physicians and many other professionals. Our objective was to evaluate anger expression and control in physicians. Material and Methods: The physicians of the Düzce School of Medicine were the participants in the study. Physicians were assigned to either an internal medicine or a surgery study group. Each group contained physicians from several specialties. The Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, and the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories were administered to all participants. The physicians (n=158 were evaluated and compared with controls (n=105 in terms of anger control and sociodemographic variables. Results: Anger-control scores were higher in physicians (p<0.01 and in those who willingly chose the medical profession (p<0.05. Age, number of years as a physician, and the specialty were negatively correlated with anger management in physicians working in the surgical disciplines (p<0.01. Only Beck anxiety and depression scores were positively correlated with anger-trait scores and anger-in scores for physicians working in the internal medicine disciplines (p<0.01.Conclusion: Physicians were relatively successful in coping with anger. A willingness to choose the medical profession was a factor influencing anger control. Age was the major factor affecting anger management in physicians.

  10. Adolescent RSA responses during an anger discussion task: Relations to emotion regulation and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lixian; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Harrist, Amanda W; Larzelere, Robert E; Criss, Michael M; Houltberg, Benjamin J

    2015-06-01

    The current study examined associations between adolescent respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during an angry event discussion task and adolescents' emotion regulation and adjustment. Data were collected from 206 adolescents (10-18 years of age, M age = 13.37). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration data were collected from adolescents, and RSA values and respiration rates were computed. Adolescents reported on their own emotion regulation, prosocial behavior, and aggressive behavior. Multilevel latent growth modeling was employed to capture RSA responses across time (i.e., linear and quadratic changes; time course approach), and adolescent emotion regulation and adjustment variables were included in the model to test their links to RSA responses. Results indicated that high RSA baseline was associated with more adolescent prosocial behavior. A pattern of initial RSA decreases (RSA suppression) in response to angry event recall and subsequent RSA increases (RSA rebound) were related to better anger and sadness regulation and more prosocial behavior. However, RSA was not significantly linked to adolescent aggressive behavior. We also compared the time course approach with the conventional linear approach and found that the time course approach provided more meaningful and rich information. The implications of adaptive RSA change patterns are discussed. PMID:25642723

  11. Coping with new regulations - Republic of Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we shall delineate the current regulatory set-up in Namibia, i.e. legal framework, administrative arrangements for the management of uranium exploration, mining, milling and waste management. Uranium, mining plays a big role on the economy of Namibia. With changing policy worldwide on supply of materials and its assurance, with consequences of worldwide on supply of materials and its assurance and with consequences of the concepts of sustainable development which coupled environmental and economic consideration, industry, people, communities, and governments will realign their future perception and concepts. Environmental considerations in Namibia require that for any major development, such as uranium exploration, environmental safety analysis reports are made which should incorporate community, industrial and government regulatory concerns. Namibia, being a developing country, knows that any new regulations that will consider environmental safety and regard for safe management of uranium wastes will add more pressure on present human resource needs (regulatory enhancement) and financial burden to the existing limited infrastructure. The new regulations should address; the environmental effect on mill tailings which are a result of processing the uranium ore in a mill; heap leaching residues which result from treatment of ore; tailing impoundment; tailing pile and tailing stabilization chemically or physically. From the radiation protection concepts, consideration will be made of the relationship of the new regulations and the current practice of the (ALI) recommended by the ICRP 60 of 1990 released in 1991, vis a vis SS-115 of IAEA for uranium intakes, considering the absence of either Nal or Germanium detector or scintillation/whole body counter in Namibia; implementation of the new regulations will require material and human resources if viable advise and training on regulatory implementation of statutory promulgation are to be enforced. (author)

  12. How the Study of Regulation Can Inform the Study of Coping

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Sulik, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    It is advantageous to study regulation and coping and their development at multiple levels of expression and origin simultaneously. We discuss several topics of current interest in the emotion-related regulation literature that are relevant to coping, including conceptual issues related to definitions and types of coping, types of physiological responses deemed to tap emotion regulation that could be pursued in work on coping, and findings on the socialization of self-regulation that have imp...

  13. How the Study of Regulation Can Inform the Study of Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Sulik, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    It is advantageous to study regulation and coping and their development at multiple levels of expression and origin simultaneously. We discuss several topics of current interest in the emotion-related regulation literature that are relevant to coping, including conceptual issues related to definitions and types of coping, types of physiological…

  14. Associations of Coping and Appraisal Styles with Emotion Regulation during Preadolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Maureen; Lengua, Liliana J.; Wilson, Anna C.; Trancik, Anika; Bazinet, Alissa

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of appraisal and coping styles with emotion regulation in a community sample of preadolescents (N = 196, 9-12 years of age), with appraisal, coping styles, and emotion regulation measured at a single time point. In a previous study, we identified five frustration and four anxiety emotion regulation profiles based…

  15. Associations of coping and appraisal styles with emotion regulation during preadolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Maureen; Lengua, Liliana J; Wilson, Anna C; Trancik, Anika; Bazinet, Alissa

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the associations of appraisal and coping styles with emotion regulation in a community sample of preadolescents (N=196, 9-12 years of age), with appraisal, coping styles, and emotion regulation measured at a single time point. In a previous study, we identified five frustration and four anxiety emotion regulation profiles based on children's physiological, behavioral, and self-reported reactions to emotion-eliciting tasks. In this study, preadolescents' self-reported appraisal and coping styles were associated with those emotion regulation profiles. Overall, findings revealed that children who were more effective at regulating their emotions during the emotion-eliciting tasks had higher levels of positive appraisal and active coping when dealing with their own problems. Conversely, children who regulated their emotions less effectively had higher levels of threat appraisal and avoidant coping. PMID:21507423

  16. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or ask your healthcare professionals about anger or stress management programs in your community. Tips Keep an ... Care of Yourself Introduction Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and Losing Weight Getting ...

  17. Associations of Coping and Appraisal Styles with Emotion Regulation During Preadolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zalewski, Maureen; Lengua, Liliana J.; LONG, ANNA C.; Trancik, Anika; Bazinet, Alissa

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of appraisal and coping styles with emotion regulation in a community sample of preadolescents (N = 196, 9–12 years), with appraisal, coping styles and emotion regulation measured at a single time point. In a previous study, we identified five frustration and four anxiety emotion regulation profiles based on children’s physiological, behavioral and self-reported reactions to emotion eliciting tasks. In this study, preadolescents’ self-reported appraisal and co...

  18. Effectiveness of Gross Model-Based Emotion Regulation Strategies Training on Anger Reduction in Drug-Dependent Individuals and its Sustainability in Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massah, Omid; Sohrabi, Faramarz; A’azami, Yousef; Doostian, Younes; Farhoudian, Ali; Daneshmand, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Emotion plays an important role in adapting to life changes and stressful events. Difficulty regulating emotions is one of the problems drug abusers often face, and teaching these individuals to express and manage their emotions can be effective on improving their difficult circumstances. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the Gross model-based emotion regulation strategies training on anger reduction in drug-dependent individuals. Patients and Methods The present study had a quasi-experimental design wherein pretest-posttest evaluations were applied using a control group. The population under study included addicts attending Marivan’s methadone maintenance therapy centers in 2012 - 2013. Convenience sampling was used to select 30 substance-dependent individuals undergoing maintenance treatment who were then randomly assigned to the experiment and control groups. The experiment group received its training in eight two-hour sessions. Data were analyzed using analysis of co-variance and paired t-test. Results There was significant reduction in anger symptoms of drug-dependent individuals after gross model based emotion regulation training (ERT) (P < 0.001). Moreover, the effectiveness of the training on anger was persistent in the follow-up period. Conclusions Symptoms of anger in drug-dependent individuals of this study were reduced by gross model-based emotion regulation strategies training. Based on the results of this study, we may conclude that the gross model based emotion regulation strategies training can be applied alongside other therapies to treat drug abusers undergoing rehabilitation. PMID:27162759

  19. Adolescent RSA Responses during an Anger Discussion Task: Relations to Emotion Regulation and Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Lixian; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Harrist, Amanda W.; Larzelere, Robert E; Criss, Michael M.; Houltberg, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined associations between adolescent respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during an angry event discussion task and adolescents’ emotion regulation and adjustment. Data were collected from 206 adolescents (10–18 years old, M age = 13.37). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration data were collected from adolescents, and RSA values and respiration rates were computed. Adolescents reported on their own emotion regulation, prosocial behavior, and aggressive behavior. Multi-lev...

  20. Control your anger! The neural basis of aggression regulation in response to negative social feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Michelle; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-05-01

    Negative social feedback often generates aggressive feelings and behavior. Prior studies have investigated the neural basis of negative social feedback, but the underlying neural mechanisms of aggression regulation following negative social feedback remain largely undiscovered. In the current study, participants viewed pictures of peers with feedback (positive, neutral or negative) to the participant's personal profile. Next, participants responded to the peer feedback by pressing a button, thereby producing a loud noise toward the peer, as an index of aggression. Behavioral analyses showed that negative feedback led to more aggression (longer noise blasts). Conjunction neuroimaging analyses revealed that both positive and negative feedback were associated with increased activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and bilateral insula. In addition, more activation in the right dorsal lateral PFC (dlPFC) during negative feedback vs neutral feedback was associated with shorter noise blasts in response to negative social feedback, suggesting a potential role of dlPFC in aggression regulation, or top-down control over affective impulsive actions. This study demonstrates a role of the dlPFC in the regulation of aggressive social behavior. PMID:26755768

  1. Attachment, emotion regulation and coping in Portuguese emerging adults: a test of a mediation hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Joana; de Matos, Paula; Soenens, Bart; Beyers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Although the quality of parent-adolescent emotional bonds has consistently been proposed as a major influence on young adult's psycho-emotional functioning, the precise means by which these bonds either facilitate or impede adaptive coping are not well-understood. In an effort to advance this inquiry, the present study examined interrelationships among measures of parental attachment, emotion regulation processes, and preferred coping strategies within a sample of 942 college freshmen. Struct...

  2. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  3. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Qu

    Full Text Available Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings.

  4. Considering anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, R J R

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to consider anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Five main claims are made: First, reactive aggression is the ultimate behavioral expression of anger and thus we can begin to understand anger by understanding reactive aggression. Second, neural systems implicated in reactive aggression (amygdala, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray; the basic threat system) are critically implicated in anger. Factors such as exposure to extreme threat that increase the responsiveness of these systems, should be (and are in the context of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), associated with increased anger. Third, regions of frontal cortex implicated in regulating the basic threat system, when dysfunctional (e.g., in the context of lesions) should be associated with increased anger. Fourth, frustration occurs when an individual continues to do an action in the expectation of a reward but does not actually receive that reward, and is associated with anger. Individuals who show impairment in the ability to alter behavioral responding when actions no longer receive their expected rewards should be (and are in the context of psychopathy) associated with increased anger. Fifth, someone not doing what another person wants them to do (particularly if this thwarts the person's goal) is frustrating and consequently anger inducing. The response to such a frustrating social event relies on the neural architecture implicated in changing behavioral responses in non-social frustrating situations. PMID:22267973

  5. Learn to manage your anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controlling Your Anger Before it Controls You. www.apa.org/topics/anger/control.aspx . Accessed September 18, ... Psychologist Can Help You Manage Your Anger. www.apa.org/topics/anger/help.aspx . Accessed April 28, ...

  6. Managing stress: the influence of gender, age and emotion regulation on coping among university students in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Nicole M.; Shyngle K. Balogun; Oratile, Kutlo N.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the influence of gender, age and emotion regulation on coping strategies among university students in Botswana. Sixty-four males and 64 females, ranging in age from 18 to 29 years completed the Difficulty in Emotion Regulation Scale and the Coping Strategy Inventory. Female students used wishful thinking and problem-focused disengagement more than male students; however, there were no other significant gender differences in coping strategies. Older students were more lik...

  7. Aggression, anger and violence in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Masango

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the roots of aggression, anger and violence in South Africa and the rest of the world. The paper is divided into four parts: Aggression, Anger, Catharsis and Violence. As a result of violence against other human beings, especially women and children, a profound respect for human dignity has been lost. People have become extremely aggressive. The last few decades have created a culture of violence because of the suppression or oppression of feelings. The article argues that frustration yields anger that leads to violent acts. The root cause of violence is frustration, which finally (if not attended to produces anger, anxiety, conflict and the eruption of violence. Suicide bombers in Palestine and other parts of the world demonstrate this type of aggression, anger and violence. Anger, on the one hand, is a good defense mechanism. It helps people cope with frustration. Violence, on the other hand, is used as a means of dominance, especially against women and children. In a political situation it is used as a means of changing social structures.

  8. Coping and Emotion Regulation from Childhood to Early Adulthood: Points of Convergence and Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compas, Bruce E; Jaser, Sarah S; Dunbar, Jennifer P; Watson, Kelly H; Bettis, Alexandra H; Gruhn, Meredith A; Williams, Ellen K

    2014-06-01

    Processes of coping with stress and the regulation of emotion reflect basic aspects of development and play an important role in models of risk for psychopathology and the development of preventive interventions and psychological treatments. However, research on these two constructs has been represented in two separate and disconnected bodies of work. We examine possible points of convergence and divergence between these constructs with regard to definitions and conceptualization, research methods and measurement, and interventions to prevent and treat psychopathology. There is clear evidence that coping and emotion regulation are distinct but closely related constructs in all of these areas. The field will benefit from greater integration of methods and findings in future research. PMID:24895462

  9. Self-regulation as a moderator of the relation between coping and symptomatology in children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengua, L J; Sandler, I N

    1996-12-01

    Investigated the effects of self-regulation as a moderator of the relations between coping efforts and psychological symptoms of children of divorce. The interactions of two dimensions of self-regulation (task orientation and approach-flexibility) and two dimensions of coping (active and avoidant) predicting children's postdivorce symptoms were tested using a sample of 199 divorced mothers and their children, ages 8 to 12. The approach-flexibility dimension moderated the relations of both active and avoidant coping with children's self-report of anxiety. At higher levels of approach-flexibility, active coping was negatively related to anxiety, while at lower levels of approach-flexibility, active coping was unrelated to anxiety. Avoidant coping was unrelated to anxiety at higher levels of approach-flexibility, whereas at lower levels of approach-flexibility, avoidant coping was positively related to anxiety. The task orientation dimension did not interact with coping, but had direct, independent effects on children's self-report of conduct problems, depression, and parent-report of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. The implications for understanding children's coping with divorce and future directions for research are discussed. PMID:8970904

  10. School Principals' Emotional Coping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirel, Emmanuel; Yvon, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the emotional coping of school principals in Quebec. Emotional coping was measured by stimulated recall; six principals were filmed during a working day and presented a week later with their video showing stressful encounters. The results show that school principals experience anger because of reproaches from staff…

  11. A Preliminary Examination of Thought Suppression, Emotion Regulation, and Coping in a Trauma Exposed Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Ananda B. Amstadter; Vernon, Laura L.

    2008-01-01

    Attempts to modulate negative emotional and cognitive symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be related to psychopathology. Trauma exposed undergraduates, 31 reporting severe PTSD symptoms (PTSD group) and 34 without PTSD symptoms (no-PTSD group), completed measures of PTSD, depression, anxiety, thought control, emotion regulation, and coping. The PTSD group had greater psychopathology and overall modulation strategy use than the no-PTSD group. Thought suppression, emotion suppr...

  12. Coping under pressure: employing emotion regulation strategies to enhance performance under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Yannick A; Adriaanse, Marieke A; de Ridder, Denise T D; Evers, Catharine

    2013-08-01

    Performing under high pressure is an emotional experience. Hence, the use of emotion regulation strategies may prove to be highly effective in preventing choking under pressure. Using a golf putting task, we investigated the role of arousal on declined sport performance under pressure (pilot study) and the effectiveness of emotion regulation strategies in alleviating choking under pressure (main study). The pilot study showed that pressure resulted in decreased performance and this effect was partially mediated by increased arousal. The main study, a field study, showed that whereas the choking effect was observed in the control condition, reappraisal and, particularly, distraction were effective emotion regulation strategies in helping people to cope instead of choke under pressure. These findings suggest that interventions that aim to prevent choking under pressure could benefit from including emotion regulation strategies. PMID:23966450

  13. The Mediating Role of Anger in the Relationship Between PTSD Symptoms and Impulsivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contractor, A. A.; Armour, C.; Wang, X.;

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger (Olatunji, Ciesielski, & Tolin, 2010; Orth & Wieland, 2006). Individuals may seek urgent coping to deal with the distress of anger, which is a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion (Novaco & Chem...

  14. The mediating role of anger in the relationship between PTSD symptoms and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Wang, Xin; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2015-03-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger (Olatunji, Ciesielski, & Tolin, 2010; Orth & Wieland, 2006). Individuals may seek urgent coping to deal with the distress of anger, which is a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion (Novaco & Chemtob, 2002); possibly in the form of impulsive actions consistent with impulsivity's association with anger (Milligan & Waller, 2001; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001). This could be 1 of the explanations for the relationship between PTSD and impulsivity (Kotler, Julian, Efront, & Amir, 2001; Ledgerwood & Petry, 2006). The present study assessed the mediating role of anger between PTSD (overall scores and subscales of arousal and negative alterations in mood/cognitions) and impulsivity, using gender as a covariate of impulsivity. The PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), Dimensions of Anger Reaction scale-5, and the UPPS Impulsivity Scale were administered to a sample of 244 undergraduate students with a trauma history. Results based on 1000 bootstrapped samples indicated significant direct effects of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on anger, of anger on impulsivity, and of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on impulsivity. Further, anger significantly mediated the relationship between PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) and impulsivity, consistent with the hypothesized models. Results suggest that impulsivity aims at coping with distressing anger, possibly explaining the presence of substance usage, and other impulsive behaviors in people with PTSD. Further, anger probably serves as a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion coupled with PTSD symptoms. PMID:25793689

  15. Exploring relationships among anger, perceived organizational support, and workplace outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Olivia A; Vandenberg, Robert J; Dejoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G

    2009-07-01

    The present study examines anger within a perceived organizational support (POS) theory framework. Using structural equation modeling, the authors explored relationships among POS, anger, and workplace outcomes in a sample of 1,136 employees in 21 stores of a U.S. retail organization. At both individual and store levels, low POS was directly associated with greater anger. At the individual level, anger partially mediated relationships among low POS and turnover intentions, absences, and accidents on the job. Anger had direct and indirect effects on alcohol consumption and health-related risk taking. At the store level, anger had direct negative effects on inventory loss and turnover. The authors interpret these findings in light of social exchange theory and emotion regulation theory. PMID:19586225

  16. If you can regulate sadness, you can probably regulate shame: Associations between trait emotional intelligence, emotion regulation and coping efficiency across discrete emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Mikolajczak, Moïra; Nelis, Delphine; Hansenne, Michel; Quoidbach, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    The construct of trait emotional intelligence [trait El] encompasses individual dispositions related to the perception, processing, regulation, and utilization of emotional information. These emotion-related dispositions are located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. Prior studies found that trait El promoted the utilization of adaptive coping strategies to regulate stress. The present study examined (1) whether this effect would extend to other emotions and (2) whether the copin...

  17. COMT but not serotonin-related genes modulates the influence of childhood abuse on anger traits.

    OpenAIRE

    Perroud, Nader; Jaussent, Isabelle; Guillaume, Sébastien; Bellivier, Frank; Baud, Patrick; Jollant, Fabrice; Leboyer, Marion; Lewis, Cathryn,; Malafosse, Alain; Courtet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    International audience Anger-related traits are regulated by genes as well as early environmental factors. Both childhood maltreatment and genes underlie vulnerability to suicidal behaviors, possibly by affecting the constitution of intermediate phenotypes such as anger traits. The aim of this study was to test the interaction between nine candidate genes and childhood maltreatment in modulating anger-related traits in 875 adult suicide attempters. The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventor...

  18. Coping, emotion regulation, and self-blame as mediators of sexual abuse and psychological symptoms in adult sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E; Peter-Hagene, Liana C; Relyea, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether coping, emotion regulation, and self-blame mediate relationships of trauma histories with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in adult sexual assault victims (N = 1863). A path analysis showed that theorized mediators partially mediated associations between trauma history variables and psychological symptoms. Specifically, child sexual abuse severity was related to greater post-traumatic stress disorder and depression indirectly through maladaptive coping and decreased emotion regulation but not self-blame. Other traumas had direct relationships with symptoms and partially mediated effects through maladaptive coping and emotion regulation. Child sexual abuse was unrelated to self-blame, but other traumas were related to greater self-blame. Results differed according to whether women had counseling post-assault. Implications are drawn for future research and clinical treatment of adult sexual assault victims. PMID:24393091

  19. Learn to manage your anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Anger can put a strain on your relationships or cause problems at school or work. Anger management can help ... Find ways to relax . Learning to relax your body and mind can help you calm down. There are many ...

  20. Coping Strategies Form Systems that Regulate PTSD Symptoms in Children and Adolescents: Exploring the Regulatory Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal, Franklin

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the potential regulatory effects of various coping strategies on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It first divided PTSD symptoms and selected coping strategies into cognitive, social/motivational, and emotional types. The study then conceptualized each of the preceding types of coping strategies as being controlled stress responses and the PTSD symptoms as being semiautomatic stress responses. It lastly proposed that coping strategies be further divided into activ...

  1. Guilt, Anger, and Retribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    those who do not. I shall argue that (a) is false on empirical grounds; and that there are no particularly good reasons to believe (b). Finally, I will consider and reject the claim that anger, as opposed to guilt, can afford the type of epistemic justification needed by positive retributivism...

  2. The relationship between the school administrators’ anger control and stress coping methods and their conflict management styleOkul yöneticilerinin öfke ve stresle başaçıkma yaklaşımları ile çatışma yönetimi stilleri arasındaki ilişki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Gündüz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the school administrators’ approaches of stress coping and anger control that what extent predicted their conflict-management styles. For this purpose, three different scales those are “Organizational Conflict Management Scale”, “The State-Trait Anger Scale” and “Stress Coping Style Scale” were applied to the 279 school administrators who work in the province of Mersin. The results show that administrators’ anger control and stress coping approaches is significantly associated with and predicted the conflict management styles. Administrators’ anger control level is significant predictor of "integration" style, and emotion-focused stress management is significant predictors of “compromises", "domination" and "avoidance" styles. However, problem-focused (positive and emotion-focused (negative approaches are significant predictors of the "compromise" style.  Administrators who uses integration style has low levels of anger and can control their anger. Administrators who tend to emotion-focused to stress cope uses compromise, avoidance, and domination styles. However, the administrators who tend to emotion-focused and problem-focused to stress cope use consensus style. ÖzetBu çalışmanın amacı, okul yöneticilerinin öfke düzeyleri ve stresle başaçıkmada kullandıkları yöntemlerin, çatışmaları çözme stillerini ne düzeyde yordadığını belirlemektir. Bu amaçla Mersin ilinde görev yapan 279 okul yöneticisine, “Örgütsel Çatışma Yönetimi Ölçeği”, “Durumluk-Sürekli Öfke Ölçeği” ve “Stresle Başaçıkma Tarzları Ölçeği” olmak üzere üç ayrı ölçek uygulanmıştır. Araştırma sonuçları, yöneticilerin stresle başa çıkma ve öfke kontrolü yaklaşımlarının, çatışmaları yönetme stilleriyle ilişkili olduğunu ve bu stilleri anlamlı düzeyde yordadığını göstermektedir. Yöneticilerin öfke kontrolü,

  3. ANGER MANAGEMENT AMONG STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUDARSHAN DEVIDAS KHAPARDE

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The health of mind and body are unquestionably interrelated as both positive and negative emotions have a tremendous ability to affect the quality of our life emotions are powerful forces influencing our everyday affairs. From the time we join the nursery class, our educational system focuses on making us intellectuals and shaping us good products for the job markets. In fact, no emphasis is laid in our curriculum on teaching children to manage their anxiety, anger, inner conflicts and emotions, learning to manage emotions can ensure achievement of mental and physical serenity. In anger child may refuse to go school, to eat to play and to talk. He may complain of different problems, may fight with others, may be unable to sleep and become a problem child. If not managed properly these students may become slaves to anger, crying and aggression. On the other hand, students who know how to manage their emotions will be successful. High intelligence will be of no use to those who lack this skill and who may and up with less self respect and poor self awareness. Cognitive ability is not the sole critical determinant of our life. One also needs good communication and interpersonal skills which one can acquire only through anger management. We parents, teachers and social workers, can play a vital role in helping students handle their anger and develop emotional security with fair and consistent limits and responsibilities. There are several ways through which we can effectively help students to understand their emotions, recognize the feeling of others, differentiate between feelings and actions, act in more acceptable ways and most importantly be good role models for our little ones. Each one teach one is a good policy.

  4. Regulating the interpersonal self: strategic self-regulation for coping with rejection sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayduk, O; Mendoza-Denton, R; Mischel, W; Downey, G; Peake, P K; Rodriguez, M

    2000-11-01

    People high in rejection sensitivity (RS) anxiously expect rejection and are at risk for interpersonal and personal distress. Two studies examined the role of self-regulation through strategic attention deployment in moderating the link between RS and maladaptive outcomes. Self-regulation was assessed by the delay of gratification (DG) paradigm in childhood. In Study 1, preschoolers from the Stanford University community who participated in the DG paradigm were assessed 20 years later. Study 2 assessed low-income, minority middle school children on comparable measures. DG ability buffered high-RS people from interpersonal difficulties (aggression, peer rejection) and diminished well-being (e.g., low self-worth, higher drug use). The protective effect of DG ability on high-RS children's self-worth is explained by reduced interpersonal problems. Attentional mechanisms underlying the interaction between RS and strategic self-regulation are discussed. PMID:11079241

  5. Topiramate for anger control: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese Bindu; Rajeev A; Norrish Mark; Al Khusaiby Saleh

    2010-01-01

    Background : Uncontrolled anger while being most commonly associated with personality disorders could also be part of many other conditions such as chronic low back ache and post-traumatic stress disorder. The intensity of anger as an emotional state at a particular time is known as "State Anger," whereas how often angry feelings are experienced over time is known as "Trait Anger." Anger could also manifest as expression of anger toward other persons or objects in the environment (Anger-Out),...

  6. Anger Management and Factors that Influence Anger in Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Koçer; Abdulkadir Koçer; Fatih Canan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There are limited data regarding anger and its management with respect to physicians and many other professionals. Our objective was to evaluate anger expression and control in physicians. Material and Methods: The physicians of the Düzce School of Medicine were the participants in the study. Physicians were assigned to either an internal medicine or a surgery study group. Each group contained physicians from several specialties. The Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Invento...

  7. Anger Management and Factors that Influence Anger in Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Koçer, Emel; Koçer, Abdulkadir; Canan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There are limited data regarding anger and its management with respect to physicians and many other professionals. Our objective was to evaluate anger expression and control in physicians. Material and Methods: The physicians of the Düzce School of Medicine were the participants in the study. Physicians were assigned to either an internal medicine or a surgery study group. Each group contained physicians from several specialties. The Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expressi...

  8. Understanding Anger: Managing This Constant Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the psychology of anger as a basis for dealing with anger-related problems that arise at camp. Camp staff may have problems with anger that are not identified by staff screening. The camp staff manual should contain a written policy regarding overt displays of anger. Guidelines suggest the use of anger during conflict resolution. (CDS)

  9. Regulating Worry, Promoting Hope: How Do Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Cope with Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Learning about global problems, such as climate change, is not only a cognitive endeavor, but also involves emotions evoked by the seriousness and complexity of these problems. Few studies, however, have explored how young people cope with emotions related to climate change. Since coping strategies could be as important as the emotions themselves…

  10. Pathways to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients: mediation of coping, spiritual struggle and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Amy Lee; Pargament, Kenneth; Kronfol, Ziad; Tice, Terrence N; Appel, Hoa

    2010-03-01

    Using structural equation modeling, we estimated major pathways from preoperative distress, indicated by anxiety and other factors, to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients. Sequential interviews were conducted before and after surgery. Standardized medical and surgical indices were selected from a national database. Results showed that preoperative spiritual struggle mediated indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on Interleukin-6 (IL-6) immediately before surgery. The link between spiritual struggle and IL-6 further mediated the indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on postoperative hostility. Anger coping mediated the harmful influence of anxiety and counteracted the protection of positive religious coping on adjustment. PMID:20207662

  11. Is the European Medical Products Authorisation Regulation Equipped to Cope with the Challenges of Nanomedicines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorbeck-Jung, Bärbel; Chowdhury, Nupur

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the emerging European regulatory activities in relation to nanopharmaceuticals. The central question is whether the regulatory responses are appropriate to cope with the regulatory problems nanomedicinal development is posing. The article explores whether the medical product re

  12. Endogenous opioids regulate glucocorticoid-dependent stress-coping strategies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklarczyk, Klaudia; Korostynski, Michal; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Ficek, Joanna; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2016-08-25

    Coping skills are essential in determining the outcomes of aversive life events. Our research was aimed to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of different coping styles in two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J and SWR/J. We compared the influence of a preceding stressor (0.5h of restraint) on behavioral and gene expression profiles between these two strains. The C57BL/6J strain exhibited increased conditioned fear and high immobility (passive coping). Oppositely, the SWR/J mice demonstrated low freezing and immobility, low post-restraint anxiety and considerable struggling during the forced swim test (active coping). Gene profiling in the amygdala revealed transcriptional patterns that were related to the differential stress reactivity, such as the activation of glucocorticoid-dependent genes specifically in the C57BL/6J mice. Post-restraint blood sampling for corticosterone levels confirmed the association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activation with a passive coping style. Pharmacological tools were used to modulate the stress-coping strategies. The blockade of opioid receptors (ORs) before the aversive event caused transcriptional and neuroendocrine changes in the SWR/J mice that were characteristic of the passive coping strategy. We found that treatment with a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist (dexamethasone (DEX), 4mg/kg) impaired the consolidation of fear memory in the C57BL/6J mice and that this effect was reversed by OR blockade (naltrexone (NTX), 2mg/kg). In parallel, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (mifepristone (MIF), 20mg/kg) reversed the effect of morphine (20mg/kg) on conditioned fear in the C57BL/6J mice. Our results suggest that in mice, stress-coping strategies are determined by opioid-dependent mechanisms that modulate activity of the HPA axis. PMID:27235740

  13. Rain with chances of a thunderstorm: on the role of anger in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoeven, Floortje Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Since heterogeneity in depressed patients makes treatment decisions difficult and treatment often unsuccessful, we seek to identify certain subtypes of depression. 30 to 40% of depressed patients have anger regulation problems; from irritability to anger attacks. What is the significance of anger in depression? Does it signify a subtype of depression? In the NESDA cohort, we compared a large sample of currently depressed patients with irritability to currently depressed patients without irrit...

  14. The Metacognitive Anger Processing (MAP) Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum

    2015-01-01

    preliminary studies was to apply a metacognitive framework to anger and put forward a new anger self-report scale, the Metacognitive Anger Processing (MAP) scale, intended as a supplement to existing measures of anger disposition and to enhance anger treatment targets. METHOD: The new measure was tested in a...... nonclinical and a clinical sample together with measures of anger and metacognition to establish factor structure, reliability, concurrent, and convergent validity. RESULTS: The MAP showed a reliable factor structure with three factors - Positive Beliefs about anger, Negative Beliefs about anger, and...... Rumination; good internal reliability, and test-retest reliability. The subscales showed positive correlations with anger and the pattern of correlation with the general metacognitive measure supported the idea that the MAP represents dimensions of metacognition as it relates to anger. CONCLUSIONS: The...

  15. Emotionality and self-regulation, threat appraisal, and coping in children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengua, L J; Sandler, I N; West, S G; Wolchik, S A; Curran, P J

    1999-01-01

    A model of the effects of children's temperament (negative and positive emotionality, impulsivity and attention focusing) on post-divorce threat appraisals, coping (active and avoidant), and psychological symptoms (depression and conduct problems) was investigated. The study utilized a sample of 223 mothers and children (ages 9 to 12 years) who had experienced divorce within the last two years. Evidence was found of direct effects of child-report negative emotionality on children's threat perceptions and of child-report positive emotionality and impulsivity on children's coping. Indirect effects of negative emotionality on active and avoidant coping through threat appraisal were found. Direct effects of the temperament variables on symptoms were also found. Cross group analyses indicated that the models were robust to age differences, but gender differences were found in the relation between negative emotionality and depression. The results of this study indicate that temperament and threat appraisals are important predictors of children's post-divorce symptoms, and that temperament is a predictor of children's appraisal and coping process. PMID:10208354

  16. Children's dynamic RSA change during anger and its relations with parenting, temperament, and control of aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G; Chocol, Caroline; Nuselovici, Jacob N; Utendale, William T; Simard, Melissa; Hastings, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of child temperament on the association between maternal socialization and 4-6-year-old children's dynamic respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) change in response to anger-themed emotional materials (N=180). We used latent growth curve modeling to explore adaptive patterns of dynamic RSA change in response to anger. Greater change in RSA during anger-induction, characterized by more initial RSA suppression and a subsequent return to baseline, was related to children's better regulation of aggression. For anger-themed materials, low levels of authoritarian parenting predicted more RSA suppression and recovery for more anger-prone children, whereas more authoritative parenting predicted more RSA suppression and recovery for less anger-prone children. These findings suggest that children's adaptive patterns of dynamic RSA change can be characterized by latent growth curve modeling, and that these patterns may be differentially shaped by parent socialization experiences as a function of child temperament. PMID:23274169

  17. Anger and health risk behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Staicu, ML; Cuţov, M

    2010-01-01

    The present paper makes a research about negative effects of anger and hostile conduct on peoples' health status. We have studied scientific articles published between 2000 and 2010, that did not contradict our initial assumption. The literature demonstrates that anger, wheatear suppressed or expressed, can determine various diseases, it can influence the conduct of people suffering from bulimia nervosa or it can be the cause of the growing number of car accidents. In order to avoid these ris...

  18. Anger profiles in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versella, Mark V; Piccirillo, Marilyn L; Potter, Carrie M; Olino, Thomas M; Heimberg, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) exhibit elevated levels of anger and anger suppression, which are both associated with increased depression, diminished quality of life, and poorer treatment outcomes. However, little is known about how anger experiences differ among individuals with SAD and whether any heterogeneity might relate to negative outcomes. This investigation sought to empirically define anger profiles among 136 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD and to assess their association with distress and impairment. A latent class analysis was conducted utilizing the trait subscales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 as indicators of class membership. Analysis revealed four distinct anger profiles, with greatest distress and impairment generally demonstrated by individuals with elevated trait anger, a greater tendency to suppress the expression of anger, and diminished ability to adaptively control their anger expression. These results have implications for tailoring more effective interventions for socially anxious individuals. PMID:26590429

  19. Emotion regulation in patients with rheumatic diseases: validity and responsiveness of the Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mowinckel Petter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic rheumatic diseases are painful conditions which are not entirely controllable and can place high emotional demands on individuals. Increasing evidence has shown that emotion regulation in terms of actively processing and expressing disease-related emotions are likely to promote positive adjustment in patients with chronic diseases. The Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC measures active attempts to acknowledge, understand, and express emotions. Although tested in other clinical samples, the EAC has not been validated for patients with rheumatic diseases. This study evaluated the data quality, internal consistency reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version of the EAC for this group of patients. Methods 220 patients with different rheumatic diseases were included in a cross-sectional study in which data quality and internal consistency were assessed. Construct validity was assessed through comparisons with the Brief Approach/Avoidance Coping Questionnaire (BACQ and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20. Responsiveness was tested in a longitudinal pretest-posttest study of two different coping interventions, the Vitality Training Program (VTP and a Self-Management Program (SMP. Results The EAC had low levels of missing data. Results from principal component analysis supported two subscales, Emotional Expression and Emotional Processing, which had high Cronbach's alphas of 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. The EAC had correlations with approach-oriented items in the BACQ in the range 0.17-0.50. The EAC Expression scale had a significant negative correlation with the GHQ-20 of -0.13. As hypothesized, participation in the VTP significantly improved EAC scores, indicating responsiveness to change. Conclusion The EAC is an acceptable and valid instrument for measuring emotional processing and expression in patients with rheumatic diseases. The EAC scales were responsive to change in an intervention

  20. The Effectiveness of Group Training of Procedural Emotion Regulation Strategies in Cognitive Coping of Individuals Suffering Substance Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali ghaedniay jahromi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group training of procedural emotion regulation strategies in cognitive coping of individuals suffering substance abuse. Method: A quasi-experimental design along with pretest-posttest and control group was used for this study. Then, 16 patients suffering substance abuse were selected through convenience sampling and were randomly assigned to two control and experimental groups. The experimental group received 10 sessions of group training of procedural emotion regulation strategies while the control group received no treatment. Both groups before and after the treatment completed the Persian version of cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire (Hasani, 2011. Results: The results showed that group training of e procedural motion regulation strategies leads to a reduction in maladaptive strategies such as self-blame, rumination, catastrophizing, and other-blame and an increase in adaptive strategies such as refocus on planning, positive reappraisal, and perspective development. Conclusion: Training of procedural emotion regulation strategies via the reduction of maladaptive and increase of adaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies can provide the opportunity for the improvement and non-return to substance abuse.

  1. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorys eCastelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP in the facial region.Methods: 45 MP patients (mean (SD age: 38.9 (11.6 and 45 female healthy controls (mean (SD age: 37.8 (13.7 were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (Beck Depression Inventory – short form, anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y, emotional distress (Distress Thermometer, anger (State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory - 2 and alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale.Results: the MP patients showed significantly higher scores in the depression, anxiety and emotional distress inventories. With regard to anger, only the Anger Expression-In scale showed a significant difference between the groups, with higher scores for the MP patients. In addition, the MP patients showed significantly higher alexithymic scores, in particular in the Difficulty in identifying feelings (F1 subscale of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20. Alexithymia was positively correlated with the Anger Expression-In scale. Both anger and alexithymia showed significant positive correlations with anxiety scores, but only anger was positively correlated with depression. Conclusion: A higher prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms associated with a higher prevalence of alexithymia and expression-in modality to cope with anger was found in the MP patients. Because the presence of such psychological aspects could contribute to generate or exacerbate the suffering of these patients, our results highlight the need to include accurate investigation of psychological aspects in MP patients in normal clinical practice in order to allow clinicians to carry out more efficacious management and treatment strategies.

  2. Trait Anger, Anger Expression, and Suicide Attempts among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Stephanie S.; Goldston, David B.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Franklin, Joseph C.; Mayfield, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the relationship between anger, anger expression, and suicidal behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed findings. In a prospective, naturalistic study, we examined how trait anger and anger expression influenced the likelihood of suicide attempts among 180 adolescents followed for up to 13.3 years after…

  3. Considering anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective

    OpenAIRE

    R.J.R. Blair

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to consider anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Five main claims are made: First, reactive aggression is the ultimate behavioral expression of anger and thus we can begin to understand anger by understanding reactive aggression. Second, neural systems implicated in reactive aggression (amygdala, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray; the basic threat system) are critically implicated in anger. Factors such as exposure to extreme threat that increase the r...

  4. Amygdala-Orbitofrontal Resting State Functional Connectivity is Associated with Trait Anger

    OpenAIRE

    Fulwiler, Carl E.; King, Jean A; Zhang, Nanyin

    2012-01-01

    An important distinction in research on the neural mechanisms of emotion regulation involves the relatively limited duration of emotional states vs. emotional traits which are defined as the stable tendency to experience particular emotions in daily life. Neuroimaging investigations of the regulation of anger states point to involvement of reciprocal changes in prefrontal cortex and amygdala activity, but the neural substrate of trait anger has received less attention. We used resting-state f...

  5. Self- and Co-Regulation of Anger and Fear in Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Role of Maternal Parenting Style and Temperament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschler-Guttenberg, Yael; Feldman, Ruth; Ostfeld-Etzion, Sharon; Laor, Nathaniel; Golan, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) difficulties are a major concern in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Maternal temperament and parenting style have significant effects on children's ER. However, these effects have not been studied in children with ASD. Forty preschoolers with ASD and their mothers and forty matched controls engaged in fear and…

  6. How do ADHD children perceive their cognitive, affective, and behavioral aspects of anger expression in school setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghighi Habib

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anger is an ignored research area in children and young adolescents with Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in the school setting. This study compares school anger dimensions in children and young adolescents with ADHD and a control group. Methods The subjects were a clinical sample of 67 children and young adolescents with ADHD and their parents, with a sample of 91 children from the community of similar age and gender as control group. Anger was measured by the Farsi version of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory (MSAI. Results The scores of the two components of "Hostile Outlook" and "Positive Coping" were different between the groups. The mean scores for the Anger components did not statistically differ between the children with ADHD and ODD and ADHD without ODD, boys and girls, or different types of ADHD. Conclusion Children with ADHD do not report higher rates of experience of anger and they do not apply destructive strategies more than the control group. However, children with ADHD appear to have a more hostile outlook toward school and their coping strategy is weaker than that of the control group.

  7. The Impact of Anger on Sexual Satisfaction in Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Claude; Laughrea, Kathleen; Lafontaine, Marie-France

    2001-01-01

    Explored the effect of different forms of anger (state anger, trait anger, and anger expression) on sexual satisfaction in marriage, noting differences between the genders. Data on 192 French-Canadian heterosexual couples recruited from clinical and non-clinical populations highlighted several links between anger and sexual satisfaction as well as…

  8. Social support, social comparison, and anger

    OpenAIRE

    Murat İskender; Taşkın Tanrıkulu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of social support, social comparison, anger and anger expression. Participants were 258 high school students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Multidimensional Scale for Social Support, the Social Comparison Scale, and the State-Trait Anger Scale. The hypothesis model was tested correlational analysis. According to results social support was related positively to social comparison. Also social comparison was rel...

  9. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Anita Dingle

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency has yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18 to 34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 minutes of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 minutes of silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive a...

  10. Anger attacks in obsessive compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh Prakash Painuly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research on anger attacks has been mostly limited to depression, and only a few studies have focused on anger attacks in obsessive compulsive disorder. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study all new obsessive compulsive disorder patients aged 20-60 years attending an outpatient clinic were assessed using the anger attack questionnaire, irritability, depression and anxiety scale (for the direction of the aggressive behavior and quality of life (QOL. Results: The sample consisted of 42 consecutive subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder, out of which 21 (50% had anger attacks. The obsessive compulsive disorder subjects with and without anger attacks did not show significant differences in terms of sociodemographic variables, duration of illness, treatment, and family history. However, subjects with anger attacks had significantly higher prevalence of panic attacks and comorbid depression. Significantly more subjects with anger attacks exhibited aggressive acts toward spouse, parents, children, and other relatives in the form of yelling and threatening to hurt, trying to hurt, and threatening to leave. However, the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of QOL, except for the psychological domain being worse in the subjects with anger attacks. Conclusion: Anger attacks are present in half of the patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, and they correlate with the presence of comorbid depression.

  11. Topiramate for anger control: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Bindu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Uncontrolled anger while being most commonly associated with personality disorders could also be part of many other conditions such as chronic low back ache and post-traumatic stress disorder. The intensity of anger as an emotional state at a particular time is known as "State Anger," whereas how often angry feelings are experienced over time is known as "Trait Anger." Anger could also manifest as expression of anger toward other persons or objects in the environment (Anger-Out, holding in or suppressing angry feelings (Anger-In and controlling angry feelings by preventing the expression of anger toward other persons or objects in the environment or controlling suppressed angry feelings by calming down or cooling off (Anger Control. Objective : To prove the effectiveness of topiramate in the control of anger as compared to placebo and to disprove that its use leads to psychiatric adverse events by systematically reviewing the available randomized controlled trials. Materials and Methods : The basic search was performed in MEDLINE (1966 through November 2008 combined with the optimal search strategy for randomized controlled trials described in the Cochrane Reviewers′ Handbook. To update this search, we regularly screened citations from PubMed till November 2008 for eligible studies or reviews that might include eligible studies. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL was searched using the terms "topiramate" and "anger or aggression." In addition, we screened bibliographies of reviews and identified articles. Randomized clinical trials wherein study participants were aggressive adults were included. Results : We could arrive at a weighted mean difference of -3.16 (-3.64 to -2.68 in State Anger. The reduction in the score was highest in borderline personality disorder (BPD patients as compared to those with low back ache. Trait Anger dropped by -2.93 (-3.49 to -2.37, especially in female BPD patients. Anger In

  12. Self-mutilative behaviors in male substance-dependent inpatients and relationship with anger and aggression: mediator effect of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cuneyt; Cınar, Ozgul; Evren, Bilge; Celik, Selime

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of self-mutilation (SM) with anger and aggression in male substance-dependent inpatients. Also, we wanted to evaluate the mediator effect of childhood trauma on these relationships while controlling variables such as age, substance of dependence (alcohol/drug), and negative effect. Participants were consecutively admitted 200 male substance-dependent inpatients. Patients were investigated with the Self-mutilative Behaviour Questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Reports, the Buss-Perry's Aggression Questionnaire, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Rate of being married, current age, and age onset of regular substance use were lower, whereas being unemployed and history of childhood trauma (HCT) were higher in group with SM (n = 124, or 62.0%). Higher mean scale scores were found in SM group. Predictors of SM were being younger, impaired anger control, and physical aggression in logistic regression model. Being younger and the outward expression of anger (anger-out) predicted SM in the subgroup of patients without HCT, whereas being younger, severity of anger, and the inward expression of anger (anger-in) predicted SM in the subgroup of patients with HCT. Thus, to reduce self-mutilative behavior among substance-dependent patients, clinicians must improve anger control, particularly in younger patients. Type of strategy for coping with anger, which must be worked on, may differ in different subgroup patients, that is, focusing anger toward self among those with HCT, whereas anger toward others among those without. PMID:21632037

  13. High Anger Expression is Associated with Reduced Cortisol Awakening Response and Health Complaints in Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The extant evidence suggests a robust positive association between expression (anger expression-out) and suppression (anger expression-in) of anger and compromised health. Nevertheless, the underlying psychobiological mechanisms which explain these relationships are not well understood. This study examined whether anger expression would predict general health, cortisol awakening response (CAR) and evening cortisol levels in a community sample of 156 healthy young adults of both genders. Participants were distributed into two groups according to their anger expression scores: high and low anger expression (HAE and LAE, respectively). Findings indicated that those with HAE had worse self-reported health (p = .02) and higher CAR than the LAE group (p = .04). Moreover, high levels of anger expression-out (p self-reported health in both groups. On the other hand, high anger expression-out was associated with flattened CAR but only in the HAE group (p < .01). This study reinforces the need to develop effective strategies to provide mechanisms to regulate anger expression by promoting personal growth and positive skills that enhance individuals' well-being and quality of life and, in turn, their own health. PMID:27125918

  14. Coping with dehydration: sympathetic activation and regulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hypothalamic PVN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardgett, Megan E; Chen, Qing-Hui; Guo, Qing; Calderon, Alfredo S; Andrade, Mary Ann; Toney, Glenn M

    2014-06-01

    Autonomic and endocrine profiles of chronic hypertension and heart failure resemble those of acute dehydration. Importantly, all of these conditions are associated with exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) driven by glutamatergic activation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Here, studies sought to gain insight into mechanisms of disease by determining the role of PVN ionotropic glutamate receptors in supporting SNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during dehydration and by elucidating mechanisms regulating receptor activity. Blockade of PVN N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors reduced (P chloralose-anesthetized dehydrated (DH) (48 h water deprivation) rats, but had no effect in euhydrated (EH) controls. Blockade of PVN α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors had no effect in either group. NMDA in PVN caused dose-dependent increases of renal SNA and MAP in both groups, but the maximum agonist evoked response (Emax) of the renal SNA response was greater (P < 0.05) in DH rats. The latter was not explained by increased PVN expression of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit protein, increased PVN neuronal excitability, or decreased brain water content. Interestingly, PVN injection of the pan-specific excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) inhibitor DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid produced smaller sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses in DH rats, which was associated with reduced glial expression of EAAT2 in PVN. Like chronic hypertension and heart failure, dehydration increases excitatory NMDA receptor tone in PVN. Reduced glial-mediated glutamate uptake was identified as a key contributing factor. Defective glutamate uptake in PVN could therefore be an important, but as yet unexplored, mechanism driving sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671240

  15. Do episodes of anger trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, J; Hallqvist, J; Diderichsen, Finn;

    1999-01-01

    Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility.......Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility....

  16. Transdiagnostic cognitive processes in high trait anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John M

    2011-03-01

    Trait anger is a personality construct that refers to stable individual differences in the propensity to experience anger as an emotional state. The objective of this paper is to review relevant empirical studies in order to determine whether the transdiagnostic cognitive processes that have been identified across the DSM-IV Axis I disorders (specifically, selective attention, memory biases, reasoning biases and recurrent negative thinking) are also an underlying characteristic of high trait anger. On the basis of the review it is concluded that, whilst the research base is limited, there is good evidence that high trait anger is associated with selective attention to hostile social cues, the tendency to interpret the behaviour of others as indicating potential hostility and the tendency to ruminate over past anger-provoking experiences. The range of cognitive processes identified in high trait anger is consistent with those identified in the Axis I disorders. It is concluded that these findings provide support for (i) the broad applicability of the transdiagnostic approach as a theoretical framework for understanding a range of psychological conditions, not limited to the Axis I disorders, and (ii) the validity of conceptualising high trait anger as an aspect of personality functioning that is maintained, at least in part, by cognitive processes. Cognitive and motivational factors (specifically, beliefs and goals) that may underlie the hostile information-processing biases and recurrent negative thinking associated with high trait anger are discussed, and consideration is given to the clinical relevance of the findings of the review. PMID:21094569

  17. Mindful Coping

    OpenAIRE

    Tharaldsen, Kjersti Balle

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the relation between mindfulness and coping. Building on a definition of mindfulness as a way of being in the present moment, appraisal theory was linked to coping with distress. The reason was to inquire whether mindfulness may be related to a coping process that entails appraising and to suggest how it is associated. “Mindful coping” is presented as a way to link these two traditions. This aim was developed based on year...

  18. Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  19. The expression of proteins involved in digestion and detoxification are regulated in Helicoverpa armigera to cope up with chlorpyrifos insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkar, Vishal V; Chikate, Yojana R; More, Tushar H; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is a key pest in many vital crops, which is mainly controlled by chemical strategies. To manage this pest is becoming challenging due to its ability and evolution of resistance against insecticides. Further, its subsequent spread on nonhost plant is remarkable in recent times. Hence, decoding resistance mechanism against phytochemicals and synthetic insecticides is a major challenge. The present work describes that the digestion, defense and immunity related enzymes are associated with chlorpyrifos resistance in H. armigera. Proteomic analysis of H. armigera gut tissue upon feeding on chlorpyrifos containing diet (CH) and artificial diet (AD) using nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified upregulated 23-proteins in CH fed larvae. Database searches combined with gene ontology analysis revealed that the identified gut proteins engrossed in digestion, proteins crucial for immunity, adaptive responses to stress, and detoxification. Biochemical and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of candidate proteins indicated that insects were struggling to get nutrients and energy in presence of CH, while at the same time endeavoring to metabolize chlorpyrifos. Moreover, we proposed a potential processing pathway of chlorpyrifos in H. armigera gut by examining the metabolites using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. H. armigera exhibit a range of intriguing behavioral, morphological adaptations and resistance to insecticides by regulating expression of proteins involved in digestion and detoxification mechanisms to cope up with chlorpyrifos. In these contexts, as gut is a rich repository of biological information; profound analysis of gut tissues can give clues of detoxification and resistance mechanism in insects. PMID:25284010

  20. Genome-wide association study of proneness to anger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Mick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. METHODS: With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Scale in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study (n = 8,747. RESULTS: Subjects were, on average, 54 (range 45-64 years old at baseline enrollment, 47% (n = 4,117 were male, and all were of European descent by self-report. The mean Angry Temperament and Angry Reaction scores were 5.8 ± 1.8 and 7.6 ± 2.2. We observed a nominally significant finding (p = 2.9E-08, λ = 1.027 - corrected pgc = 2.2E-07, λ = 1.0015 on chromosome 6q21 in the gene coding for the non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, Fyn. CONCLUSIONS: Fyn interacts with NDMA receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3-gated channels to regulate calcium influx and intracellular release in the post-synaptic density. These results suggest that signaling pathways regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, which are relevant to memory, learning, and neuronal survival, may in part underlie the expression of Angry Temperament.

  1. RORSCHACH SPACE RESPONSES AND ANGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Anna Maria; Chiorri, Carlo; Denevi, Simona

    2015-08-01

    In this study, three different subtypes of Space responses to the Rorschach test were hypothesized: S-fusion, S-reversal, and S-integration. The relationship between these subtypes and feelings of anger and aggression was investigated. The Rorschach test, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were administered to 50 university students. Scores on the STAXI-2 were positively associated with S-fusion and negatively associated with S-integration. No significant associations of S subtypes with aggression were found. The findings support the hypothesis that different figure-ground relationships, shown in the subtypes of S responses, indicate different psychological processes. PMID:26107109

  2. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ask your healthcare professionals about anger or stress management programs in your community. Tips Keep an anger ... your condition can give you hope for improved health. Track your heart health online with Heart360 . Sharing ...

  3. Anger in School Managers: Continuity, Direction, Control and Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Mustafa; Iskender, Murat; Cardak, Mehmet; Dusunceli, Betul

    2012-01-01

    School managers undertake an important duty in structuring of education institutions. In the study carried out in this context; anger conditions, continuity, and direction of anger, anger control levels and anger styles of school managers who are the decision makers in schools were examined according to the ages, working periods, duty types, ways…

  4. Spirituality, Religion, and Substance Coping as Regulators of Emotions and Meaning Making: Different Effects on Pain and Joy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarrocchi, Joseph W.; Brelsford, Gina M.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses whether aspects of spirituality and religion predict psychological and emotional well-being in a general population over and above personality and coping through the use of drugs or alcohol. Results are consistent with self-control theory and positive psychology approaches. (Contains 3 tables.)

  5. An explanatory model of adjustment to type I diabetes based on attachment, coping, and self-regulation theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzazian, S; Besharat, M A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test a model of adjustment to type I diabetes. Three hundred young adults (172 females and 128 males) with type I diabetes were asked to complete the Adult Attachment Inventory (AAI), the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (Brief IPQ), Task-oriented subscale of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), D-39, and well-being subscale of the Mental Health Inventory (MHI). HbA1c was obtained from laboratory examination. Results from structural equation analysis partly supported the hypothesized model. Secure and avoidant attachment styles were found to have effects on illness perception, ambivalent attachment style did not have significant effect on illness perception. Three attachment styles had significant effect on task-oriented coping strategy. Avoidant attachment had negative direct effect on adjustment too. Regression effects of illness perception and task-oriented coping strategy on adjustment were positive. Therefore, positive illness perception and more usage of task-oriented coping strategy predict better adjustment to diabetes. So, the results confirmed the theoretical bases and empirical evidence of effectiveness of attachment styles in adjustment to chronic disease and can be helpful in devising preventive policies, determining high-risk maladjusted patients, and planning special psychological treatment. PMID:21678193

  6. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheshin Arik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n=38 were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n=80 & n=144. Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff’s fear level. Staff’s responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients’ requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff’s response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  7. Analysis of anger expression style--continuous anger and personality types of professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Sahan, Hasan; Tekin, Murat; Ulukan, Mehmet; Mehtap, Bekir

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the anger expression styles, the continuous anger and personality types of players who play football in the professional league. The research group consisted of 133 soccer players who are playing in sports teams in the Turkish Super League: Ankara Sport Club, Gençlerbirliği Sports Club and Hacettepe Sports Club in the first league, Turk Telekom sports in the second league, and Keçiören Gücü Sports and Ankarademir Sports playing in the third league in the 2008-2009 football season. The Eysenck personality inventory was modified to Turkish by Bayar in 1983, having been developed by Eysenck and Eysenck in 1975 and the continuous anger-anger style scale (SOTO) was modified to Turkish by Ozer in 1994. The state trait anger scale (STAS) was originally developed by Spielberger in 1983. All these were used on soccer players participating in the study to determine the continuous anger and anger styles in this study. In the interpretation of data, a meaningfulness of p extrovert, neurotic, false). In addition, a significant relationship was found between psychoticism, extrovert, neurotic, and lie sub-dimensions and the personality type sub-dimensions of professional players' constant anger-anger expression styles. PMID:22397242

  8. How Can I Deal with My Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... angry. Tools to Tame a Temper: Self-Awareness & Self-Control Because anger can be powerful, managing it is ... challenging. It takes plenty of self-awareness and self-control to manage angry feelings. And these skills take ...

  9. Customer Anger and Incentives for Quality Provision

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Heyes; Sandeep Kapur

    2012-01-01

    Emotions are a significant determinant of consumer behaviour. A customer may get angry if he feels that he is being treated unfairly by his supplier and that anger may make him more likely to switch to an alternative provider. We model the strategic interaction between firms that choose quality levels and anger-prone customers who pick their supplier based on their expectations of suppliers' quality. Strategic interaction can allow for multiple equilibria including some in which no firm inves...

  10. Aggression, anger and violence in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    M.J. Masango

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the roots of aggression, anger and violence in South Africa and the rest of the world. The paper is divided into four parts: Aggression, Anger, Catharsis and Violence. As a result of violence against other human beings, especially women and children, a profound respect for human dignity has been lost. People have become extremely aggressive. The last few decades have created a culture of violence because of the suppression or oppression of feelings. The article argues that...

  11. Extreme metal music and anger processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Anita Dingle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency has yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18 to 34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 minutes of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 minutes of silence (control. Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS. Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier rather it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners.

  12. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Leah; Dingle, Genevieve A

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger, and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency have yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18-34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 min of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 min silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased) in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier; rather, it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners. PMID:26052277

  13. Anger perceptually and conceptually narrows cognitive scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2015-07-01

    For the last 50 years, research investigating the effect of emotions on scope of cognitive processing was based on models proposing that affective valence determined cognitive scope. More recently, our motivational intensity model suggests that this past work had confounded valence with motivational intensity. Research derived from this model supports the idea that motivational intensity, rather than affective valence, explains much of the variance emotions have on cognitive scope. However, the motivational intensity model is limited in that the empirical work has examined only positive affects high in approach and negative affects high in avoidance motivation. Thus, perhaps only approach-positive and avoidance-negative states narrow cognitive scope. The present research was designed to clarify these conceptual issues by examining the effect of anger, a negatively valenced approach-motivated state, on cognitive scope. Results revealed that anger narrowed attentional scope relative to a neutral state and that attentional narrowing to anger was similar to the attentional narrowing caused by high approach-motivated positive affects (Study 1). This narrowing of attention was related to trait approach motivation (Studies 2 and Study 3). Anger also narrowed conceptual cognitive categorization (Study 4). Narrowing of categorization related to participants' approach motivation toward anger stimuli. Together, these results suggest that anger, an approach-motivated negative affect, narrows perceptual and conceptual cognitive scope. More broadly, these results support the conceptual model that motivational intensity per se, rather than approach-positive and avoidance-negative states, causes a narrowing of cognitive scope. PMID:26011662

  14. Psychological Counselors’ Coping Strategies with Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadır BOZOĞLAN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to present how often the scholl counselorsexperience the emotions of anger, sadness, fear and hatred and what they do to cope with these emotions. In the study, the qualitative research method was used. From the 49 provinces of Turkey, 140 people comprising of women and 81 men participated and the feedback from 101 of these participants were taken. An open-ended semi- structured question form which was developed by the researchers to collect the data was used. The Nvivo9 package software programme has been used for the process of entering, studying and analysing the data by tabulating it. To cope with manage negative emotions, the participants were in general seen to use some coping strategies with their emotions such as ‘trying to forget and avoid, turning into introvert and share, turning into extrovert and face off and trying to be calm’.

  15. Experience and expression of anger among Australian prisoners and the relationship between anger and reintegration variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkfield, Alison J; Graffam, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    We examined the experience and expression of anger among a group of Australian prisoners prior to and following prison release, as well as the relationship between anger and several reintegration variables. Participants were 79 adult prisoners (54 male, 25 female) who completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI-2) 1 month prior to release and again at 1 to 4 weeks and 3 to 4 months post-release. A postrelease questionnaire was also administered at the two postrelease points focusing on the quality of life conditions experienced following release. Mean state and trait anger scores were significantly higher at pre-release than post-release. As well, higher levels of anger expression and anger control were reported at pre-release compared with post-release. Higher age was related to lower state anger at post-release, whereas several variables were related to trait anger at post-release. Theoretical implications for reintegration theory are discussed, together with practical applications. PMID:23267242

  16. Coping changes the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Nechvatal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished subsequent indications of anxiety. Most of these studies focused on functional changes in the amygdala and anterior corticolimbic brain circuits that control cognitive, motivational, and emotional aspects of physiology and behavior. Corresponding structural brain changes and the timing, frequency, and duration of stress exposure required to modify brain functions remain to be elucidated in future research. These studies will advance our understanding of coping as a learning process and provide mechanistic insights for the development of new interventions that promote stress coping skills.

  17. Examining Player Anger in World of Warcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jane; Coulson, Mark; Foreman, Nigel

    This questionnaire study of the sources of anger in World of Warcraft applies classical quantitative measurement scale construction to a new problem, generating a host of questionnaire items that could find use in future studies, and identifying four major categories of events that cause negative effect among players. First, 33 players provided examples of in-game scenarios that had made them angry, and their responses were culled to create a 93-item battery rated by hundreds of player respondents in terms of anger intensity and anger frequency. An iterative process of factor analysis and scale reliability assessment led to a 28-item instrument measuring four anger-provoking factors: Raids/Instances, Griefers, Perceived Time Wasting, and Anti-social Players. These anger-causing scenarios were then illustrated by concrete examples from player and researcher experiences in World of Warcraft. One striking finding is that players become angry at other players' negative behavior, regardless of whether that behavior was intended to harm.

  18. Is cyberbullying related to trait or state anger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigro, Antonia; Schneider, Barry H; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto; Pallini, Susanna; Brunner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Anger is a powerful emotion shared by victims and bullies in both physical and electronic forms of bullying. However, little is known about the specific roles of trait anger and state anger in involvement in bullying episodes. The purpose of this study was to verify which component of anger, trait or state, is more strongly related to physical and cyberbullying and victimization. Students between the ages 11-19 (N = 716, 392 female, 324 male) completed the state trait anger expression inventory-2 child and adolescent and a measure of victimization and bullying. Results for cyberbullying suggested a major vulnerability among bullies and victims to experience anger as a personality trait as well some links between state anger, cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Moreover, the outward, explosive expression of anger appears to be common among cyber and physical bullies. Implications for intervention programs are discussed. PMID:25081097

  19. Coping with loneliness: what do older adults suggest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, E.; van Tilburg, T.; Fokkema, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A limited amount of information is available on how older adults cope with loneliness. Two ways of coping are distinguished here, i.e., active coping by improving relationships and regulative coping by lowering expectations about relationships. We explore how often older adults suggest t

  20. Coping with loneliness: What do older adults suggest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, E.C.; Tilburg, van T.G.; Fokkema, T.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A limited amount of information is available on how older adults cope with loneliness. Two ways of coping are distinguished here, i.e. active coping by improving relationships and regulative coping by lowering expectations about relationships. We explore how often older adults suggest th

  1. The impact of music on affect during anger inducing drives

    OpenAIRE

    Zwaag, M. van der; Fairclough, S.; Spiridon, E.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Driver anger could be potentially harmful for road safety and long-term health. Because of its mood inducing properties, music is assumed to be a potential medium that could prevent anger induction duringdriving. In the current study the influence of music on anger, mood, skin conductance, and systolic blood pressure was investigated during anger inducing scenarios in a driving simulator. 100 participants were split into five groups: four listened to different types of music (high/ low energy...

  2. Cognitive-Behavioral Conceptualization and Treatment of Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Anger is conceptualized within a broad cognitive-behavioral (CBT) framework emphasizing triggering events; the person's pre-anger state, including temporary conditions and more enduring cognitive and familial/cultural processes; primary and secondary appraisal processes; the anger experience/response (cognitive, emotional, and physiological…

  3. The impact of music on affect during anger inducing drives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaag, M. van der; Fairclough, S.; Spiridon, E.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Driver anger could be potentially harmful for road safety and long-term health. Because of its mood inducing properties, music is assumed to be a potential medium that could prevent anger induction duringdriving. In the current study the influence of music on anger, mood, skin conductance, and systo

  4. Psychological Counselors’ Coping Strategies with Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadır BOZOĞLAN; İbrahim ÇANKAYA

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present how often the scholl counselorsexperience the emotions of anger, sadness, fear and hatred and what they do to cope with these emotions. In the study, the qualitative research method was used. From the 49 provinces of Turkey, 140 people comprising of women and 81 men participated and the feedback from 101 of these participants were taken. An open-ended semi- structured question form which was developed by the researchers to collect the data was used. The Nviv...

  5. Driving anger and its expressions: further evidence of validity and reliability for the driving anger expression inventory french adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    VILLIEUX, A; Delhomme, P.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide further evidence of validity and reliability for the Driving Anger Expression Inventory (DAX) French adaptation (Villieux & Delhomme, 2008, Le Travail Humain, 71(4), 359-384) and to investigate the relationships between driving anger, how people express their anger while driving, and traffic violations among young drivers in France. Method: The French adaptations of the DAX, of the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), and of the Extended Violations Scale were admi...

  6. The art of anger: reward context turns avoidance responses to anger-related objects into approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Henk; Ruys, Kirsten I; Veling, Harm; Renes, Robert A; de Groot, Jasper H B; van Nunen, Anna M; Geertjes, Sarit

    2010-10-01

    Anger has a special status among the emotions in that it can elicit avoidance as well as approach motivation. This study tested the ignored role of reward context in potentiating approach rather than avoidance responses toward objects associated with anger. In Experiment 1, angry and neutral facial expressions were parafoveally paired with common objects, and responses to the objects were assessed by subjective reports of motivation to obtain them. In Experiment 2, objects were again paired with angry or neutral faces outside of participants' awareness, and responses toward the objects were indexed by physical effort expended in attempting to win them. Results showed that approach motivation toward anger-related objects can be observed when responding is framed in terms of rewards that one can obtain, whereas avoidance motivation occurs in the absence of such a reward context. These findings point to the importance of a reward context in modulating people's responses to anger. PMID:20855898

  7. Coping changes the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M. Nechvatal; Lyons, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished subsequen...

  8. Coping changes the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M. Nechvatal; Lyons, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished su...

  9. Anger Management in Parent-Adolescent Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an outcome investigation of the role of anger management in parent-adolescent conflict. Eighteen parent-adolescent dyads were randomly assigned either to a conflict resolution group treatment or combined conflict management and conflict resolution group treatment. Findings suggest that the combination treatment group parents and teens…

  10. Application of Trait Anger and Anger Expression Styles Scale New Modelling on University Students from Various Social and Cultural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in anger traits of university students and teacher candidates studying in various social and cultural regions, of Batman and Denizli, Turkey. Modelling anger and anger expression style scale according to some variables such as age, gender, education level, number of siblings, parents'…

  11. The Comparison of Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy Based on Coping Skills and Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Improvement of Emotional Regulation Strategies and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghorbany

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy based on coping skills (CBT and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT in improvement of emotional regulation strategies and prevention of relapse. Method: The method of the present study was semi-experimental research design (pre-test-post-test with witness group. For sampling 45 substance abuse people who had referred to addiction treatment centers were selected and assigned to three groups of cognitive behavior therapy, methadone maintenance treatment and witness group randomly. The participants in all three groups completed the emotional intelligence questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by covariance method. Results: The results showed that cognitive-behavior therapy in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and witness group led to significant improvement of emotional regulation in substance abusers, but there was no significant difference between the methadone maintenance treatment group and control group. Also, the rate of relapse in individuals who assigned to cognitive-behavior therapy group in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and the witness group was significantly lower, but there was no significant difference between methadone therapy and witness. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavior therapy was an effective treatment that can change the cognitive and behavioral variables related to substance abuse, such as emotional regulation strategies. Thus, results suggested that drug abuse treatment programs must target these mediator variables.

  12. Examining the Coping Response to Peer Relational Aggression Victimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Methods. Grounded theory techniques were used to gain an understanding of the victimization experience and the coping responses used. Findings. A theory of coping after experiencing peer relational aggression victimization was generated. Girls voiced feelings of hurt and anger after the experience and expressed the following ways of coping as a result: distancing from others, retaliation against the aggressor, discussing their feelings with friends and family, writing their feelings down, and/or confronting the aggressor. Clinical Implications. Nurses should be aware of the phenomenon and asses, for incidences of relational aggression victimization so that they may provide strategies to assist the adolescent and her family with positive coping mechanisms in order to prevent maladaptive responses.

  13. Perceived Racism and Coping: Joint Predictors of Blood Pressure in Black Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Gwendolyn James; Robertson, Jermaine; Robinson, Jackie Collins; Austin, Candice; Edochie, Valencia

    2008-01-01

    Black Americans suffer disproportionate incidences of severe complications associated with hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial factors and subsequent coping responses have been implicated in the etiology of disease. Perceived racism has been identified as a source of stress for Blacks and is related to anger, hostility, paranoia,…

  14. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel S. Karp, principal investigator

    2004-12-14

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  15. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  16. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Todd E [Institute of Imaging Science, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Department of Physics, and Program in Chemical and Physical Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Furenlid, Lars R, E-mail: todd.e.peterson@vanderbilt.edu [Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging, Department of Radiology, and College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-09-07

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. (topical review)

  17. Anger in psychological disorders: Prevalence, presentation, etiology and prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ephrem; Johnson, Sheri L

    2016-06-01

    Anger is present as a key criterion in five diagnoses within DSM-5: Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder. This review amasses scientific literature demonstrating that within each of these disorders, anger is a central clinical feature that is highly prevalent and predictive of important outcomes. For each disorder, we also discuss the phenomenology and etiology of anger. Although models of anger have been quite distinct across these disorders, few empirical studies have truly tested whether anger stems from different etiological factors across these different conditions. We end with a discussion of transdiagnostic research that draws from cognitive psychology, affective science, and the neuroscience of anger, and that also fits with integrative approaches to treatment. PMID:27188635

  18. Analysis of Anger Expression Style – Continuous Anger and Personality Types of Professional Soccer Players

    OpenAIRE

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Hasan ŞAHAN; Tekin, Murat; Ulukan, Mehmet; MEHTAP, Bekir

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the anger expression styles, the continuous anger and personality types of players who play football in the professional league. The research group consisted of 133 soccer players who are playing in sports teams in the Turkish Super League: Ankara Sport Club, Gençlerbirliði Sports Club and Hacettepe Sports Club in the first league, Turk Telekom sports in the second league, and Keçiören Gücü Sports and Ankarademir Sports playing in the third...

  19. ANGER CORRELATED WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL VARIABLES IN RURAL YOUTH

    OpenAIRE

    Puskar, Kathryn; Ren, Dianxu; Bernardo, Lisa Marie; Haley, Tammy; Hetager Stark, Kirsti

    2008-01-01

    Uncontrolled anger is a contributing force in the three leading causes of adolescent death: homicide, suicide, and injuries. Anger may be one of the early warning signs which could lead to violent behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between anger experience and expression with the potential correlates of life events, perceived social support, self-esteem, optimism, drug use, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in rural adolescents. The participants (n=193) were ag...

  20. From Chaos to Calm understanding Anger in Urban Adolescent Males

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, June M.

    2010-01-01

    From Chaos to Calm Understanding Anger in Urban Adolescent Males by June Mardell Montgomery (ABSTRACT) This work is based on the premise that uncontrolled anger contributes to the violence committed by adolescent boys 13-17 years of age. In fact, in all countries, young males are both the principal perpetrators and victims of homicide (World Health Organization, 2002). Identifying the underlying reasons for the anger is instrumental in controlling this emotion and in develop...

  1. Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Claire A. J. Bloxsom; Christopher Marsh,; Clive R. Hollin

    2011-01-01

    The association between anger and criminal, particularly violent, behaviour is firmly established in the literature. However, most of the extant research has been conducted with clinical and legally sanctioned forensic populations. The present study sought to examine anger in a non forensic population using a self-report measure of delinquency. The Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI; Novaco, 2003) and the Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire (Elliot & Ageton, 1980) were com...

  2. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cause your blood pressure and heart rate to rise, and make your heart work harder. Sometimes anger ... Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate 10 What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National ...

  3. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... extreme anger can cause your blood pressure and heart rate to rise, and make your heart work harder. ... Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Target Heart Rates 3 What are the Symptoms of High Blood ...

  4. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart rate to rise, and make your heart work harder. Sometimes anger also causes angina (chest pain) ... your way in daily situations, such as at work, in traffic or waiting in line. Feel that ...

  5. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs in your community. Tips Keep an anger journal. Write down the people and situations that make ... Blood Pressure Tracker BMI (Body Mass Index) Calculator Medical Contact List Medication Chart Survival Skills Checklist Related ...

  6. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cause your blood pressure and heart rate to rise, and make your heart work harder. Sometimes anger ... Good vs. Bad Cholesterol 10 What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National ...

  7. STRES DITINJAU DARI ACTIVE COPING, AVOIDANCE COPING DAN NEGATIVE COPING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantoro Safaria

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakStres  merupakan bagian dari kehidupan dan  kehidupan tidak lepas dari stres. Stresbisa dialami siapa saja, dari kanak-kanak hingga  lanjut usia.  Stres bisa bersifat akut danbisa pula bersifat  kronis.  Banyak penelitian empiris yang membuktikan bahwa stres berdampaksecara negatif bagi kesehatan tubuh  dan  kesejahteraan psikologis. Namun banyak faktoryang berpengaruh terhadap stres. Diantara faktor  faktor tersebut adalah strategi  coping yangdigunakan individu.Penelitian ini menguji hubungan antara  tiga strategi coping yaitu active coping,avoidance coping  dan  negative coping  dengan  stres  pada mahasiswa. Subyekpenelitian berjumlah  41 orang yang merupakan mahasiswa psikologi Universitas AhmadDahlan Yogyakarta.Berdasarkan hasil  analisis regresi menunjukkan tidak ada hubungan  yang signifikanantara   active coping, negative coping dan  avoidance coping  secara bersama-sama dengan  stres R = 0.045 F = 1.631 p = 0.199. Hasil uji korelasi  product momentpearson antara  active coping  dengan stres menunjukkan adanya hubungan negatif yangtidak signifikan r = - 0.034 p =  0.417. Korelasi antara avoidance coping  dengan stresmenunjukkan adanya hubungan positif yang tidak signifikan r = 0.113 p = 0.241.  Korelasiantara  negative coping  dengan stres menunjukkan hubungan positif yang signifikan  r =0.340 p = 0.015. Negative  coping  menyumbang  9.3 %  terhadap  stres. Ini menunjukkanmasih terdapat  90.7 % pengaruh variabel lain yang terhadap stres.

  8. The Role Of Socialization Process In The Creation Of Gender Differences In Anger

    OpenAIRE

    ÜNAL, Halime

    2004-01-01

    There is a general belief that women do not express their anger as men do. Contrary to this general belief, this paper argues that women express their anger but they express it differently. Previous research has indicated that there are important gender differences in expression of anger and anger provoking situations. For example, women generally have expressed their anger through indirect ways (e.g. verbal aggression) while men have expressed their anger through physical aggression. After d...

  9. Anger and assaultiveness of male forensic patients with developmental disabilities : links to volatile parents

    OpenAIRE

    Novaco, Raymond; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    This study with 107 male forensic patients with developmental disabilities investigated whether exposure to parental anger and aggression was related to anger and assaultiveness in a hospital, controlling for background variables. Patient anger and aggression were assessed by self-report, staff-ratings, and archival records. Exposure to parental anger/aggression, assessed by a clinical interview, was significantly related to patient self-reported anger, staff-rated anger and aggression, and p...

  10. Anger Suppression, Interdependent Self-Construal, and Depression among Asian American and European American College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Rebecca Y. M.; Park, Irene J. K.

    2010-01-01

    The present study tested a theoretical model of emotion regulation (Yap, Sheeber, & Allen, 2007) in a sample of Asian American and European American college students (N = 365). Specifically, the mediating role of anger suppression in the effect of temperament and family processes on depressive symptoms was tested across race and levels of interdependent self-construal (a culturally based self orientation emphasizing connectedness with others). Next, the moderation of the suppression—depressio...

  11. Dalbybogen / The Dalby Book. Angersfragmentet / The Angers Fragment. Hamburgbibelen / The Hamburg Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Dalbybogen / The Dalby Book; Angersfragmentet / The Angers Fragment; Hamburgbibelen / The Hamburg Bible......Dalbybogen / The Dalby Book; Angersfragmentet / The Angers Fragment; Hamburgbibelen / The Hamburg Bible...

  12. The interpersonal effects of anger and happines in negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. van Kleef; C.K.W. de Dreu

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the interpersonal effects of anger and happiness in negotiations. In the course of a computer-mediated negotiation, participants received information about the emotional state (anger, happiness, or none) of their opponent. Consistent with a strategic-choice perspective

  13. Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. J. Bloxsom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between anger and criminal, particularly violent, behaviour is firmly established in the literature. However, most of the extant research has been conducted with clinical and legally sanctioned forensic populations. The present study sought to examine anger in a non forensic population using a self-report measure of delinquency. The Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI; Novaco, 2003 and the Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire (Elliot & Ageton, 1980 were completed by male and female university students. The total anger score was associated with overall delinquency and specifically with crimes against the person and against property. Males reported higher levels of anger and a greater involvement in criminal acts. The practical implications of the findings within a legal context are discussed.

  14. Anger and effortful control moderate aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Sanna; Hodges, Ernest V E; Peets, Kätlin; Salmivalli, Christina

    2016-08-01

    The effects of anger and effortful control on aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations were investigated among a total of 311 Finnish fifth and sixth graders (mean age = 11.9 years). Self-reported aggressive cognitions (i.e., normative- and self-efficacy beliefs about aggression) were expected to be associated with higher peer-reported aggressive behaviour. Teacher reported anger and effortful control were hypothesised, and found, to moderate the effects of aggressive cognitions on aggression, such that the effects were strongest for children who were high in anger and low in effortful control, as compared to other conditions. Furthermore, under the conditions of high anger and high effortful control, self-efficacy was negatively related to aggression. Thus, aggression is a result of a complex, hierarchically organised motivational system, being jointly influenced by aggressive cognitions, anger and effortful control. The findings support the importance of examining cognitive and emotional structures jointly when predicting children's aggressive behaviour. PMID:26042460

  15. Anger as a Train and State, Anger Management Methods, and People\\\\\\'s Tendency towards Collective Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Nikdel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   Ethnic disputes and collective aggressions are observable in each period of history and are more evident in traditional and nomadic communities. This issue has had many life and property damages in the past and present times and it has also prevented social development to flourish. Based on the damages of collective aggression, the researchers attempt to study the fundamental causes of this problem. It is assumed that state-trait anger and anger control methods are effective variables on people's tendency toward collective aggression. Therefore, determining the effective factors on collective aggression is of great importance from social, family and individual aspects. The theoretical framework of the present study is the combination of psychological and social- psychological theories regarding collective aggression. According the theories regarding collective aggression and relevant researches, collective aggression stems from different factors and reasons as a multi-dimensional social phenomenon. In a general classification, these factors are divided into individual and social factors. Based on various researches regarding social reasons of tendency to collective aggression, only the individual and psychological causes have been investigated. Indeed, this study evaluated state-trait anger and anger control method variables as individual and psychological factors related to tendency to collective aggression.     Materials & Methods   The study method is non-experimental -anger ationneral BB Asianasurest time and it also and it is a survey in terms of type and cross section in terms of time. The study population is all citizens of the Kohgiluye and Buyerahmad province whose age is between 14 and 50 years old. Based on the latest census, they include 325204 individuals. The sample size is 400 based on Cochran’s formula. The sampling method is stratified random. Two questionnaires were used to measure the variables: a

  16. Depression and Anger as Risk Factors Underlying the Relationship between Maternal Substance Involvement and Child Abuse Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Denise; Cohen, Lisa R.; Caldeira, Nathilee A.; Flom, Peter; Wasserman, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how emotion regulation deficits in the area of anger arousal and reactivity are associated with child abuse potential in mothers with substance use and depressive disorders in order to identify targeted areas for prevention and treatment. Methods: A sample of 152 urban mothers was interviewed on measures of substance…

  17. The Role of Youth Anger in Explaining Links between Parenting and Early Adolescent Prosocial and Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Sheffield Morris, Amanda; Cui, Lixian; Henry, Carolyn S.; Criss, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the role of youth anger regulation and reactivity in the link between parenting and social adjustment among a sample of 84 youth residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods in a mid-southwestern city. Using path analysis, findings indicate that parents' responsive and discipline-related behaviors…

  18. Successful coping in urban, community-dwelling older adults with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrezia, Mary G; Scrandis, Debra

    2015-01-01

    By 2015, 50% of HIV-infected individuals in the United States will be 50 years of age and older. Examining successful coping in older adults with HIV could expand existing coping toolkits, enhance disease management, and improve overall outcomes. We explored how urban, community-dwelling older adults (N = 40) coped with HIV infection, comorbidities, and related stressors. Participants completed an individual or focus group interview session using open-ended questions formulated from extended participant observation. Data were analyzed for theme development using interpretive hermeneutics and qualitative content analysis. Stressors included HIV, comorbidities, fear, anger, stigma, and finances. Three themes for successful coping were identified: accessing support, helping selves and helping others, and tapping into spirituality. Participants engaged in active, meaning-based strategies to successfully cope with HIV and related stressors. These strategies can be adapted for other older adults with HIV, leading to holistic care and improved outcomes. PMID:25665886

  19. Anger suppression, interdependent self-construal, and depression among Asian American and European American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Rebecca Y M; Park, Irene J K

    2010-10-01

    The present study tested a theoretical model of emotion regulation (Yap, Sheeber, & Allen, 2007) in a sample of Asian American and European American college students (N = 365). Specifically, the mediating role of anger suppression in the effect of temperament and family processes on depressive symptoms was tested across race and levels of interdependent self-construal (a culturally based self orientation emphasizing connectedness with others). Next, the moderation of the suppression-depression relation was tested by race and interdependent self-construal. Results indicated that the hypothesized model fit well across Asian American and European American students, as well as those with high versus low levels of interdependent self-construal. Anger suppression was a significant mediator of the hypothesized indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Moreover, race and interdependent self-construal moderated the suppression-depression link, such that Asian American status and a stronger interdependent self-construal attenuated the relation between anger suppression and depressive symptoms. Understanding both universal and culture-specific aspects of emotion regulation in the development of depressive symptoms will be essential for sound theory, future research, and effective prevention and intervention efforts across diverse populations. PMID:21058815

  20. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... get help if you need it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions John Hammarley talks about coping with emotions Learn more ...

  1. Coping with Cold Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  2. The Effects of Cognitive--Behavioral Therapy on Trait Anger and Paranoid Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio; Jozefowicz-Simbeni, Debra M. Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates a cognitive-behavioral anger treatment approach to reduce anger and paranoid ideation on men (n = 32) in treatment for anger problems and compares levels of paranoid ideation with a sample of men ( n = 27) who sought mental health treatment for non-anger issues. Method: A pre- and posttest design is used to evaluate…

  3. The Investigation of Drug Addiction Potential among Medical Students: Role of Subjective Components of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agha Yusefi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Given that drug addiction is not merely related to a specific individual or group, and few studies have investigated the role of anger in the development of drug addiction, this study was done to investigate the role of the components of anger in predicting addiction potential. Method: A descriptive-correlation research design was used for the conduct of this study. The number of 309 medical students in Kermanshah city was selected using stratified cluster sampling and completed Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Scale (STAS and Zargar’s addiction potential questionnaire. Results: The results showed that ate anger, trait anger, anger expression-out (AXO, anger expression-in (AXI, the overall index for the expression of anger were significantly associated with addiction potential. Similarly, anger control-out (ACO, anger control-in (ACI were correlated with addiction potential. In addition, the regression analysis results indicated that the components of state anger and anger expression-in (AXI together can predict 35% of changes related to addiction potential. Conclusion: State anger and anger expression-in (AXI as subjective components of anger have a significant role in predicting addiction potential among medical students. Anger management programs for medical students, as the most important segment of the society in the field of public health, are recommended to assign more credit to these two components.

  4. The effects of music on anger and psychological symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Fahri

    2011-01-01

    In this study, individuals who prefer to listen to music in everyday life tried to determine whether the effects on anger and psychological states. The sample group consisted of total 288 individuals who 188 girl and 100 men. The data used in this study obtained from The State Trait Anger Scale and Anger Expression Scale and Brief Symptoms Inventory. Analysis of the data, mean and standard deviation values, and one-way analysis of variance (One Way ANOVA) were used. As a result of the finding...

  5. Depression is more than just sadness: A case of excessive anger and its management in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Sahu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available People with depressive illness often have symptoms of overt or suppressed anger. Those with anger traits face exaggerated problem during symptomatic period of depression. Pharmacological management helps in control of depressive and anxiety symptoms, but rarely address anger symptoms. Non-pharmacological management like cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT is effective in depression as well as in anger management, but is not used frequently in anger associated or exacerbated by depression. We present the case of a 27-year-old male suffering from moderate depressive episode with associated anger outburst. He underwent CBT, which resulted in a significant decrease in anger symptoms as well as in severity of depression.

  6. Theoretical Approaches to Coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dealing with stress requires conscious effort, it cannot be perceived as equal to individual's spontaneous reactions. The intentional management of stress must not be confused withdefense mechanisms. Coping differs from adjustment in that the latter is more general, has a broader meaning and includes diverse ways of facing a difficulty.Aim: An exploration of the definition of the term "coping", the function of the coping process as well as its differentiation from other similar meanings through a literature review.Methodology: Three theoretical approaches of coping are introduced; the psychoanalytic approach; approaching by characteristics; and the Lazarus and Folkman interactive model.Results: The strategic methods of the coping approaches are described and the article ends with a review of the approaches including the functioning of the stress-coping process , the classificationtypes of coping strategies in stress-inducing situations and with a criticism of coping approaches.Conclusions: The comparison of coping in different situations is difficult, if not impossible. The coping process is a slow process, so an individual may select one method of coping under one set ofcircumstances and a different strategy at some other time. Such selection of strategies takes place as the situation changes.

  7. Rumination on anger and sadness in adolescence: Fueling of fury and deepening of despair

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, M.; Moretti, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined anger rumination and sadness rumination in clinic-referred adolescents (N=121). Factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger and sadness rumination measures loaded onto 2 factors tapping anger rumination and sadness rumination, respectively. Structural equation modeling confirmed unique relations between each form of rumination and specific emotional or behavioral problems. Anger and anger rumination were independent predictors of aggression, suggesting that both the ...

  8. Moderators and mediators of the stress-aggression relationship: executive function and state anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Jenessa; Verona, Edelyn; Kalkhoff, Will; Kilmer, Ashley

    2011-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of executive function (i.e., EF) and anger/hostility on the relationship between stress (across individual stress domains, as well as at the aggregate level) and aggression. Two independent groups of participants-a college sample and a low-income community sample-were administered a battery of self-report measures concerning the subjective experience of stress, aggressive behaviors, and feelings of state anger and hostility in the last month, along with a battery of well-validated neuropsychological tests of EF. Across both samples, the stress domains that demonstrated the strongest associations with aggression were those involving chronic strains of daily living (e.g., job, financial, health) versus interpersonal stressors (e.g., family, romantic). In the community sample, analyses also revealed a significant interaction between perceived stress (aggregated across domains) and EF in predicting aggressive behavior. Specifically, participants with relatively low EF abilities, across different EF processes, showed a stronger relationship between different domains of stress and aggression in the last month. Similar effects were demonstrated in the college sample, although the interaction was not significant. In both samples, experiences of anger and hostility in the last month mediated the relationship between perceived stress (aggregate) and aggressive behavior among those low, but not high, in EF. These findings highlight the importance of higher-order cognitive processes in regulating appropriate affective and behavioral responses across different types of individuals, particularly among those experiencing high levels of stress. PMID:21401226

  9. The effects of music on anger and psychological symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahri Sezer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, individuals who prefer to listen to music in everyday life tried to determine whether the effects on anger and psychological states. The sample group consisted of total 288 individuals who 188 girl and 100 men. The data used in this study obtained from The State Trait Anger Scale and Anger Expression Scale and Brief Symptoms Inventory. Analysis of the data, mean and standard deviation values, and one-way analysis of variance (One Way ANOVA were used. As a result of the findings of this study, individuals who prefer to listen to music in everyday life situations of anger and psychological symptoms revealed that over a significant effect.

  10. Interpersonal Conflict: Effects of Variations in Manner of Expressing Anger and Justification for Anger upon Perceptions of Appropriateness, Competence, and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, Kenneth K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how an expression of anger affects the receiver's perceptions of anger in a close interpersonal relationship. Reports that findings contradicted conventional wisdom and research findings on assertive communication. (MM)

  11. Nicotine-induced brain metabolism associated with anger provocation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamner Larry D; Whalen Carol K; Loughlin Sandra E; Leslie Frances M; Potkin Steven G; Gehricke Jean-G; Mbogori James; Fallon James H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cortico-limbic brain activity associated with anger may be susceptible to nicotine and, thus, may contribute to smoking initiation and nicotine addiction. The purpose of the study was to identify the brain regions that are most reactive to nicotine and show the greatest association with anger task performance. Twenty adult nonsmokers (9 women, 11 men) participated in two laboratory sessions to assess brain metabolism with fluoro deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Topography (FDG-PET) in...

  12. Nicotine-induced brain metabolism associated with anger provocation

    OpenAIRE

    Gehricke, Jean-G; Potkin, Steven G; Leslie, Frances M.; Loughlin, Sandra E.; Whalen, Carol K; Jamner, Larry D; Mbogori, James; Fallon, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Cortico-limbic brain activity associated with anger may be susceptible to nicotine and, thus, may contribute to smoking initiation and nicotine addiction. The purpose of the study was to identify the brain regions that are most reactive to nicotine and show the greatest association with anger task performance. Twenty adult nonsmokers (9 women, 11 men) participated in two laboratory sessions to assess brain metabolism with fluoro deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Topography (FDG-PET) in response...

  13. PRIMARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS' CONFLICT APPROACHES AND THEIR ANGER EXPRESSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Argon, Türkan; AÇIKGÖZ, Abdurrahman

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study to determine the school administrators' conflict approaches and their levels of anger expressions and to examine if there is a meaningful relationship between these two levels or not. In the study, relational survey model was used. While administrators believed they use classical conflict management at "completely agree level", use modern conflict approach at "unsure level"; use anger control approach at "moderate level&qu...

  14. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni; Gramaglia Carla; Marzola Enrica; Amianto Federico; Zuccolin Maria; Fassino Secondo

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive sy...

  15. The Symbolic Meditation of Luck and Anger in Lucky Jim

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秋婷

    2016-01-01

    Lucky Jim is set around 1950s. The novel is under the influence of"Angry Young Men" movement which has encouraged many authors to produce angry novels that criticize the outdated social and political values and condemn the distinctive class differentiation. This essay analyzes the luck and anger of Jim Dixon from the perspective of"Political Unconscious". And the deeper reasons that are dug out behind luck and anger reflect readers' symbolic meditation towards a whole generation of people.

  16. The influence of working memory on the anger superiority effect

    OpenAIRE

    Moriya, J.; Koster, Ernst; De Raedt, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    The anger superiority effect shows that an angry face is detected more efficiently than a happy face. However, it is still controversial whether attentional allocation to angry faces is a bottom-up process or not. We investigated whether the anger superiority effect is influenced by top-down control, especially working memory (WM). Participants remembered a colour and then searched for differently coloured facial expressions. Just holding the colour information in WM did not modulate the ange...

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of Proneness to Anger

    OpenAIRE

    Mick, Eric; Mcgough, James,; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Jean A. Frazier; Kennedy, David; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. Methods With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger S...

  18. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... programs in your community. Tips Keep an anger journal. Write down the people and situations that make ...

  19. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Don't try to reduce your anxiety with harmful habits, such as drinking alcohol or taking sleeping ... can help you with home care, transportation and social needs. Think about why you feel ... take time to develop. Anger Many heart patients ...

  20. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... heart rate to rise, and make your heart work harder. Sometimes anger also causes angina (chest pain) ...

  1. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... neighbors, co-workers and healthcare professionals. Learn about community and social service resources that can help you with home care, transportation and social needs. Think about why you feel lonely or ... in your community. Tips Keep an anger journal. Write down the ...

  2. Coping with a Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with PD: It is common for many people to experience a wide range of emotions upon diagnosis from shock, to anger and even to sometimes a sense relief at being able to name symptoms (perhaps a small ... yours. Hear from People with Parkinson's on this Video for the Newly ...

  3. Theoretical Approaches to Coping

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Zyga; Evmorfia Koukia; Antonios Travlos; Stavroula Mitrousi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Dealing with stress requires conscious effort, it cannot be perceived as equal to individual's spontaneous reactions. The intentional management of stress must not be confused withdefense mechanisms. Coping differs from adjustment in that the latter is more general, has a broader meaning and includes diverse ways of facing a difficulty.Aim: An exploration of the definition of the term "coping", the function of the coping process as well as its differentiation from other similar ...

  4. Process of Coping with Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jean E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated ability of self-regulation and emotional-drive theories to explain effects of informational intervention entailing objective descriptions of experience on outcomes of coping with radiation therapy among 84 men with prostate cancer. Consistent with self-regulation theory, similarity between expectations and experience and degree of…

  5. Anger, anxiety and depression in females with diffuse alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçil Aldemir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Present study aims to compare control group patients and patients with diffuse alopecia in order to understand the nature of the relationship between symptoms and level of anger and to see whether patient group has higher number of symptoms than control group. Methods: 43 female patients who were diagnosed diffuse alopecia in dermatology clinic and 52 age-and-gender-matched control participants were included in the study. 20% of patients (n=19 with androgenetic alopecia, 10.5% of patients (n=10 with diffuse alopecia areata and 14.7% of patients (n=14 with telogen effluvium participated in study. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and The Trait Anger and Anger Expression Scale (TAAES were filled by the participants. Also patients were followed up by a standard hospital form recording alopecia. Results: It was found that patients with alopecia revealed significantly more depression (p<0,001 and anxiety (p<0,001 scores than control group. Also trait anger (β = 0,216, Wald Z = 3,697, Exp(B= 1,241, p<0,05 and anxiety (β = -0.466, Wald Z = 5,008, Exp(B= 0.628, p<0,05 scores significantly predicted alopecia group. Additionally total time period for alopecia significantly and positively correlated with depression (r= 0,402, p<0.01 and anxiety (r=0,393, p<0,01 scores. Comparing patient groups with each other, trait anger and expressed anger were significantly different across groups. Conclusion: Patient group reported more anxiety and depressive symptoms than control group. In treatment of patients with alopecia, bidirectional relationship between alopecia and psychological symptoms should be in consideration. Collaboration with psychiatry is suggested in order to improve treatment efficacy and patients’ life satisfaction. In addition anger management seems essential in treatment of patients with diffuse alopecia.

  6. Binge eating & childhood emotional abuse: The mediating role of anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinson, Marjorie C; Hornik-Lurie, Tzipi

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies reveal that childhood emotional abuse (CEA) is the trauma most clearly associated with adult eating pathology. Yet, relatively little is understood about psychological mechanisms linking these distal experiences. Anger's mediational role in the relationship between CEA and adult binge eating (BE) is explored in a community-based sample of 498 adult women (mean age 44). Detailed telephone interviews assess BE (7 items), CEA (single item), and unresolved anger (single item) along with self-criticism (modified Rosenberg self-esteem scale), depression and anxiety symptoms (BSI sub-scales). Statistical analyses include Pearson correlations, Baron and Kenny's steps for mediation, and Preacher and Hayes bootstrapping method to test proposed multiple mediators simultaneously. Findings reveal significantly more respondents (n = 476 with complete data) with serious BE behaviors report a history of CEA compared to women with considerable and/or minimal BE (53% vs 37%, p = 0.002 respectively). Significant correlations are found among all study variables. Mediation analyses focus on anger together with self-criticism, depression and anxiety. Findings reveal anger and self-criticism fully mediate the CEA-BE relationship. In contrast, depression and anxiety symptoms are not significant mediators in a model that includes anger and self-criticism. Although additional research is warranted to more fully understand complex causal processes, in the interim, treatment interventions should be broadened to include assessments of anger among adult women with BE behaviors, especially those with histories of childhood abuse. Additionally, prevention strategies that incorporate learning how to express anger directly and positively may be particularly effective in reducing various disordered eating behaviors among women and girls. PMID:27208594

  7. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneezy, Uri; Imas, Alex

    2014-01-28

    We propose that individuals use anger strategically in interactions. We first show that in some environments angering people makes them more effective in competitions, whereas in others, anger makes them less effective. We then show that individuals anticipate these effects and strategically use the option to anger their opponents. In particular, they are more likely to anger their opponents when anger negatively affects the opponents' performances. This finding suggests people understand the effects of emotions on behavior and exploit them to their advantage. PMID:24474756

  8. Hostility, Anger and Risk of Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Masoudnia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The previous researches about the etiology of coronary artery atherosclerosis have accentuated on clinical and medical risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, positive family background, myocardial ischemia history in family, atherogenic diet, increase of A lipoprotein, inflammatory factors such as increase of cross-reactive protein and so on. Although factors in behavioral medicine are recognized as an independent risk factor in coronary artery atherosclerosis, few researches have been done on hostility and anger. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between normal people(Control group and people with coronary artery atherosclerosis(Case group with regards to hostility and anger. Methods: This study was performed as a case-control design. Data was collected from seventy-seven patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis who had referred to Afshar Hospital Professional Heart Clinic in Yazd city and seventy-eight normal people were used as control. Two groups completed the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire(BPAQ to measure their hostility and anger. Results: The results of the analysis showed that there was a statistically significant difference regarding hostility(p<.05 and anger(p<.001 between the two groups. Hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the sociodemographic and clinical variables(step 1 explained 35.5 % to 47.4%, while hostility and anger(step 2 explained 6.7% to 9% of the variance in incidence of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are strong risk factors for coronary artery atherosclerosis or CAD in Iran. Therefore, in order to decrease the incidence rate of coronary artery atherosclerosis in Iran, alongside medical interventions, attention should also be paid towards behavioral interventions in order to modify hostile and angrily behavior.

  9. A Prospective Study of Trait Anger and PTSD Symptoms in Police

    OpenAIRE

    Meffert, Susan M.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Henn-Haase, Clare; McCaslin, Shannon; Inslicht, Sabra; Chemtob, Claude; Neylan, Thomas; Marmar, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    It is unknown whether anger is a risk factor for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, arises as a consequence of PTSD, or both. Two hypotheses were tested in 180 police recruits: Greater trait anger during training will predict greater PTSD symptoms at one year; greater PTSD symptoms at one year will predict greater state anger at one year. Both hypotheses were confirmed, suggesting that trait anger is a risk factor for PTSD symptoms, but that PTSD symptoms are al...

  10. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gneezy, Uri; Imas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Emotions play a critical role in social interactions and decision-making. We present evidence that individuals understand the behavioral effects of emotions, particularly anger, and use them strategically in interactions. In our study, individuals competed on a task, and one of them was given the opportunity to anger the other. The first task was strength-based, where we expected anger to improve performance. Other participants competed on a mental task in which we expected anger to impair pe...

  11. Positive and Negative Religious Coping and Well-Being in Women with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Scheier, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although religions is important to many people with cancer, few studies have explored the relationship between religious coping and well-being in a prospective manner, using validated measures, while controlling for important covariates. Methods One hundred ninety-eight women with stage I or II and 86 women with stage IV stage breast cancer were recruited. Standardized assessment instruments and structured questions were used to collect data at study entry and 8 to 12 months later. Religious coping was measured with validated measures of positive and negative religious coping. Linear regression models were used to explore the relationships between positive and negative religious coping and overall physical and mental well-being, depression, and life satisfaction. Results The percentage of women who used positive religious coping (i.e., partnering with God or looking to God for strength, support, or guidance) “a moderate amount” or “a lot” was 76%. Negative religious coping (i.e., feeling abandoned by or anger at God) was much less prevalent; 15% of women reported feeling abandoned by or angry at God at least “a little.” Positive religious coping was not associated with any measures of well-being. Negative religious coping predicted worse overall mental health, depressive symptoms, and lower life satisfaction after controlling for sociodemographics and other covariates. In addition, changes in negative religious coping from study entry to follow-up predicted changes in these well-being measures over the same time period. Cancer stage did not moderate the relationships between religious coping and well-being. Conclusions Negative religious coping methods predict worse mental heath and life satisfaction in women with breast cancer. PMID:19508140

  12. Interrelatedness of Proactive Coping, Reactive Coping, and Learned Resourcefulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, John; Fuhrman, Robert; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A.

    2011-01-01

    Research has identified that coping strategies used by individuals depend on temporal locations of stressors. Dispositional attributes are also identified as predictors of coping. The current study identified commonalities of proactive coping, reactive coping, and learned resourcefulness measures. The analysis yielded three factors reflective of…

  13. Rumination on Anger and Sadness in Adolescence: Fueling of Fury and Deepening of Despair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Maya; Moretti, Marlene M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined anger rumination and sadness rumination in clinic-referred adolescents (N = 121). Factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger and sadness rumination measures loaded onto 2 factors tapping anger rumination and sadness rumination, respectively. Structural equation modeling confirmed unique relations between each form of…

  14. Design and evaluation of a virtual environment for the treatment of anger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.P.; Hattangadi, N.; Meziane, Z.; Pul, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy is often used for anger treatment. An important element of this therapy is exposure to anger evoking stimuli. In this paper virtual reality is put forward as a technology that can effectively create these stimuli by exposing patients to social scenes that include anger

  15. Profiles of Observed Infant Anger Predict Preschool Behavior Problems: Moderation by Life Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of…

  16. Anger-Control Group Counseling for Women Recovering from Alcohol or Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Two experimental conditions, a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger-control treatment incorporating empowerment strategies and a relapse-prevention treatment without the anger-control component, were compared to assess their impact on levels of trait anger and attributional styles of women recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Participants…

  17. The Effects of Anger Management Groups in a Day School for Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Millicent H.; Bry, Brenna H.

    1999-01-01

    Reports the results of an anger management program for emotionally disturbed adolescents (N=7) who scored in the clinical range on the Conduct subscale of the Conners Teacher Rating Scale. The program included psychoeducation, anger discrimination training, and training on prosocial responses to anger. Results indicate evidence of positive…

  18. Expression of Anger in Depressed Adolescents: The Role of the Family Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    The expression of anger is considered to be abnormal in depression, yet its role is only poorly understood. In the present study we sought to clarify this role by examining the moderating influence of the family environment on overall levels of anger expression and anger reactivity in depressed and non-depressed adolescents during conflictual…

  19. Genetic selection for coping style predicts stressor susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenema, AH; Meijer, OC; de Kloet, ER; Koolhaas, JM

    2003-01-01

    Genetically selected aggressive (SAL) and nonaggressive (LAL) male wild house-mice which show distinctly different coping styles, also display a differential regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after exposure to an acute stressor. To test the hypothesis that coping style predicts s

  20. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Introduction Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and ... Stories from Survivors Survivors of heart disease and stroke are not alone. Read their stories ...

  1. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... positive. These feelings are very common — most heart patients have them. They may go away as you ... reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions John Hammarley talks about ...

  2. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Introduction Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and Losing Weight Getting Physically Active - Introduction - ... of High Blood Pressure? 5 How to Eat Healthy 6 Low Blood Pressure 7 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  3. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Coping with Feelings Updated:Apr 20,2016 ... Stories from Survivors Survivors of heart disease and stroke are not alone. Read their stories of hope . ...

  4. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... about coping with emotions Learn more about these emotions: Fear After any illness, it's normal to feel ... off, then take action. Hope Many of the emotions you may feel after a heart disease diagnosis ...

  5. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... and healthcare professionals. Learn about community and social service resources that can help you with home care, ... Your Heart Condition • Communicating with Professionals • Managing Your Medicines • Taking Care of Yourself Introduction Coping with Feelings ...

  6. Coping with Rosacea: Tripwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form Search You are here Home Coping With Rosacea Tripwires - Weather Sun exposure, hot weather, humidity, cold ... you select rosacea-friendly meals: Monitor how your rosacea reacts to alcoholic beverages . Alcoholic beverages often induce ...

  7. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talks about coping with emotions Learn more about these emotions: Fear After any illness, it's normal to ... disease, it's normal to feel sad or low. These feelings may get better as you learn more ...

  8. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... you need it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions ... and information that can make you feel better. Anxiety Do you often feel restless and worried? This ...

  9. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and manage it, but sometimes feelings such as depression may stay with you and require you to ... it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions John Hammarley ...

  10. Coping with College Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160792.html Coping With College Stress Parents can help make the transition easier for ... 5, 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and anxiety are common among new college students, ...

  11. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professionals • Managing Your Medicines • Taking Care of Yourself Introduction Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and Losing Weight Getting Physically Active - Introduction - Physical Activity & Health - What Type of Activity is ...

  12. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... a health professional. back to top What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  13. Caregivers--Who Copes How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L.; Dujela, Carren

    2009-01-01

    Within gerontological caregiving research, there is a major emphasis on stresses and burdens of this role. Yet there has been little attention directed toward the coping strategies that caregivers engage in to cope with this role and the factors that influence their adoption of different coping strategies. This article examines coping strategies…

  14. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger-aggression relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J L G; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts to the insulting participant. Individuals who received tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity behaved more aggressively when they were angry. No relation between anger and aggression was observed in the increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham condition. These results concur with the motivational direction model of frontal asymmetry, in which left frontal activity is associated with anger. We propose that anger with approach motivational tendencies is more likely to result in aggression. PMID:21421731

  15. Anger after Childbirth: An Overlooked Reaction to Postpartum Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Lobel, Marci; DeLuca, Robyn Stein

    2002-01-01

    Other than postpartum depression, little is known about women's emotional responses to childbirth and subsequent stressors. Anger was explored on the basis of theory and evidence that it is a likely emotional response in this context. During their third trimester of pregnancy and approximately six weeks after delivery, 163 participants completed…

  16. Hypertensive Patients and Normotensive Individuals: Differences in Anger Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sahraian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: : Hypertension (HTN is a common condition with increasing prevalence rate. Hypertensive patients have a high prevalence of mental disorders, including anger.. Objectives: : The present study aimed to investigate the score of anger in hypertensive patients in comparison to the individuals with normal blood pressure in Shiraz.. Patients and Methods: : This case-control study was conducted on 100 patients with HTN and 107 normal controls with the mean age of 52.48 and 53.78 years, respectively. These patients had referred to Shiraz HTN clinic in 2013. All the patients completed the Multidimensional Anger Inventory (MAI and the results were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software, 2010.. Results: : The participants were matched regarding age and other demographic factors which might have influenced HTN. Distributions of these factors were partly similar and the differences were not significant. The HTN group obtained higher scores in all dimensions. Besides, the differences were significant in all subscales, except for anger.. Conclusions: : In line with the previous researches, the present study indicated that high level of aggression was correlated to high blood pressure. Therefore, it is necessary to have psychological interventions along with other interventions for hypertensive patients. Overall, this research confirmed biopsycho approach to psychosomatic diseases..

  17. New Attacks on Animal Researchers Provoke Anger and Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on firebomb attacks at the homes of two animal researchers which have provoked anger and unease. The firebomb attacks, which set the home of a neuroscientist at the University of California at Santa Cruz aflame and destroyed a car parked in the driveway of another university researcher's home, have left researchers and…

  18. Children's Self-Regulation and School Achievement in Cultural Contexts: The Role of Maternal Restrictive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Mirjam; Trommsdorff, Gisela; Muñoz, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation can be developed through parent-child interactions and has been related to developmental outcomes, e.g., such as educational achievement. This study examined cross-cultural differences and similarities in maternal restrictive control, self-regulation (i.e., behavior and emotion regulation) and school achievement and relations among these variables in Germany and Chile. Seventy-six German and 167 Chilean fourth graders, their mothers, and their teachers participated. Mothers and teachers rated children's behavior regulation with a subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Children reported their use of emotion regulation strategies on the Questionnaire for the Measurement of Stress and Coping. Mothers rated maternal restrictive control by answering the Parenting Practice Questionnaire. School achievement was assessed by grades for language and mathematics. Results showed higher behavior regulation of German children in comparison to Chilean children and a higher preference of restrictive parental control in Chilean mothers than in German mothers. Regression analyses revealed positive relations between children's behavior regulation and school achievement in Germany and in Chile. Further, in both cultural contexts, maternal restrictive control was related negatively to behavior regulation and positively to anger-oriented emotion regulation. In sum, the study showed the central function of behavior regulation for school achievement underlining negative relations of maternal restrictive control with children's self-regulation and school achievement in diverse cultural contexts. Culturally adapted interventions related to parenting practices to promote children's behavior regulation may assist in also promoting children's school achievement. PMID:27303318

  19. Children's Self-Regulation and School Achievement in Cultural Contexts: The Role of Maternal Restrictive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Mirjam; Trommsdorff, Gisela; Muñoz, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation can be developed through parent-child interactions and has been related to developmental outcomes, e.g., such as educational achievement. This study examined cross-cultural differences and similarities in maternal restrictive control, self-regulation (i.e., behavior and emotion regulation) and school achievement and relations among these variables in Germany and Chile. Seventy-six German and 167 Chilean fourth graders, their mothers, and their teachers participated. Mothers and teachers rated children's behavior regulation with a subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Children reported their use of emotion regulation strategies on the Questionnaire for the Measurement of Stress and Coping. Mothers rated maternal restrictive control by answering the Parenting Practice Questionnaire. School achievement was assessed by grades for language and mathematics. Results showed higher behavior regulation of German children in comparison to Chilean children and a higher preference of restrictive parental control in Chilean mothers than in German mothers. Regression analyses revealed positive relations between children's behavior regulation and school achievement in Germany and in Chile. Further, in both cultural contexts, maternal restrictive control was related negatively to behavior regulation and positively to anger-oriented emotion regulation. In sum, the study showed the central function of behavior regulation for school achievement underlining negative relations of maternal restrictive control with children's self-regulation and school achievement in diverse cultural contexts. Culturally adapted interventions related to parenting practices to promote children's behavior regulation may assist in also promoting children's school achievement. PMID:27303318

  20. Subjective Illness theory and coping

    OpenAIRE

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a view of a problem of subjective illness theory in context of coping behavior. The article compiles the results of the latest studies of coping; discloses the way subjective illness theory affects the illness coping and patient's health; presents the study of differences in coping behaviour of patients at risk of heart attack and oncology. The article is recommended for specialists, concerned with psychological reasons of pathogenic processes and coping strategies of pat...

  1. Subjective Illness theory and coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a view of a problem of subjective illness theory in context of coping behavior. The article compiles the results of the latest studies of coping; discloses the way subjective illness theory affects the illness coping and patient's health; presents the study of differences in coping behaviour of patients at risk of heart attack and oncology. The article is recommended for specialists, concerned with psychological reasons of pathogenic processes and coping strategies of patients.

  2. Mastering moral misery: Emotional and coping responses to intragroup morality (vs. competence) evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Romy; Ellemers, Naomi; Scheepers, Daan

    2016-01-01

    In social groups, individuals are often confronted with evaluations of their behaviour by other group members and are motivated to adapt their own behaviour accordingly. In two studies we examine emotional responses towards, and perceived coping abilities with, morality vs. competence evaluations individuals receive from other in-group members. In Study 1, we show that evaluations of one's immoral behaviour primarily induce guilt, whereas evaluations of incompetent behaviour raise anger. In Study 2, we elaborate on the psychological process associated with these emotional responses, and demonstrate that evaluations of immorality, compared to incompetence, diminish group members' perceived coping abilities, which in turn intensifies feelings of guilt. However, when anticipating an opportunity to restore one's self-image as a moral group member, perceived coping abilities are increased and the experience of guilt is alleviated. Together these studies demonstrate how group members can overcome their moral misery when restoring their self-image. PMID:26192008

  3. [Coping psychologically with amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M

    2009-02-01

    An amputation is a "tragic event" in someone's biography which causes a dramatic change in the outer appearance, the loss of mobility, independence and self esteem. The following article is about how people learn to cope with this difficult situation; with the practical problems of everyday life as well as their emotional problems. It is important for the amputees to go through the different stages of mourning: The first stage is the rejection of the situation. Repression and denial of the loss protects the patient from emotional overstrain. Confrontation is the next step: emotionally as well as mentally. "How could it happen?", (understanding the reasons why ...) "What will my future be like?", "How will I cope?" (ability of coping) "Why did it happen to me?" (sense) The last stage of coping with the amputation is to accept and deal with the new situation and to build up new self-confidence. A successful process of coping leads to a new identity. If a person fails to adapt to the new situation, he will develop an inferiority complex and fall into a depression. He might also try to look for culprit and blame the situation on someone else. About two thirds of all amputees don't cope with their amputation and become depressive. 15% develop symptoms of anxiety. Therefore it is important to offer help. The patients should get together in self helping groups and talk about their experiences and problems. If they need more intensive and individual help, they should have the opportunity to contact a psychologist. During the process of coping with their amputation the patients often alternate between optimistic and pessimistic moods. Sometimes they fall back into a negative and resigned state of mind. This is natural and part of the process as long as they find their own way to a positive attitude and view of life. PMID:19259934

  4. Examining the Links between Strain, Situational and Dispositional Anger, and Crime: Further Specifying and Testing General Strain Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Paul; Piquero, Alex R.; Capowich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Explored whether relationships between strain, anger, and deviant outcomes varied when using trait- or situational-based measures of anger, noting whether people with higher trait anger had increased likelihood of experiencing strain, becoming angry from strain, and responding deviantly. Relying on trait-based static indicators of anger was…

  5. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison Among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Mansournia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents’ behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70, karateka (n=66, swimmers (n=59, and non athletes (n=96. One stage cluster sampling method was used to select judoka, karateka, and swimmers from sport clubs in Tehran. Students of governmental schools at the same area were chosen as the non-athletes group. The “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” questionnaire was utilized to assess the anger rate.Findings: The mean age of participants was 12.90(±2.06 years. The total anger rates were 45.40 (±5.61 in judoka, 41.53(±5.63 in karateka, 41.19(±5.33 in swimmers, and 45.44 (±8.58 in non athletes. In total anger scale karateka and swimmers had a significantly lower score compared to judoka and non athletes. In instrumental anger subscale the difference was significant just between karateka and non athletes. In reactive anger subscale judoka showed higher scores than swimmers. In anger control subscale the difference was significant between judoka and swimmers and also judoka and karateka. The difference of anger control between karateka and non athletes was significant.Conclusion: The findings of this study propose a difference in the anger rate between judoka and karateka. In contrary to the results of previous studies, judo training may have no influence on anger control, while karate training could be beneficial.

  6. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  7. Attentional Bias to Negative Emotion as a Function of Approach and Withdrawal Anger Styles: An ERP Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; Silton, Rebecca Levin; Sass, Sarah M.; Fisher, Joscelyn E.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Although models of emotion have focused on the relationship between anger and approach motivation associated with aggression, anger is also related to withdrawal motivation. Anger-out and anger-in styles are associated with psychopathology and may disrupt the control of attention within the context of negatively valenced information. The present study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine whether anger styles uniquely predict attentional bias to negative stimuli during an emot...

  8. Coping with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2008-01-01

    -living with a spouse. The analysis revealed that the basic social psychological problem faced by patients with mild AD was their awareness of decline in personal dignity and value. Coping strategies used to meet these problems were adaptations to the altered situation in order to maintain a feeling of well......Abstract The aim of this study was to analyse how patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cope with the changes they face concerning everyday life and social relations. This study used a grounded theory approach in the analysis of interview data from 11 persons with mild AD, home......-being. The spouse appeared to be the most important social relation. The most significant worries of the patients were about communication in relation to their spouse, and about the reaction of the spouse to the consequences of the disease. Keywords coping; dementia; everyday life; patients’ perspective; social...

  9. Coping with climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuan; Byg, Anja

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents rural households' perceptions of and responses to hailstorms and drought, which have been increasingly common in southwest China. This is important as the current coping behaviour serves as a starting point for future adaptations. Primary data were collected from 162 households...... found across villages regarding the degree of perceived sensitivity and responses despite similar exposure to climate extremes. These differences are partly related to the nature of events and varied socio-economic characteristics of households, which influence their vulnerability and ability to cope...

  10. Indisciplina, stress e coping

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Maria Helena dos Santos Marques de

    2011-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Psicologia (Secção de Psicologia da Educação e da Orientação), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Psicologia, 2011 O presente estudo foi realizado com o propósito de analisar as relações entre as vivências de indisciplina, o stress e o coping em crianças e jovens no contexto escolar, de forma a compreender em que medida a indisciplina reflecte o uso inadequado de estratégias de coping. Pretendeu-se simultaneamente aceder às representações dos alunos sobre a indisciplina...

  11. Population heterogeneity of trait anger and differential associations of trait anger facets with borderline personality features, neuroticism, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and alcohol problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubke, Gitta H; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; de Moor, Marleen H M; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-12-15

    Anger is an emotion consisting of feelings of variable intensity ranging from mild irritation to intense fury. High levels of trait anger are associated with a range of psychiatric, interpersonal, and health problems. The objectives of this study were to explore heterogeneity of anger as measured by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS), and to assess the association of the different anger facets with a selection of psychiatric disorders covering externalizing and internalizing problems, personality disorders, and substance use. Factor mixture models differentiated between a high and low scoring class (28% vs. 72%), and between three factors (anger-temperament, anger-reaction, and immediacy of an anger response). Whereas all psychiatric scales correlated significantly with the STAS total score, regressing the three STAS factors on psychiatric behaviors model showed a more detailed pattern. Only borderline affect instability and depression were significantly associated with all three factors in both classes whereas other problem behaviors were associated only with 1 or 2 of the factors. Alcohol problems were associated with immediacy only in the high scoring class, indicating a non-linear relation in the total sample. Taking into account these more specific associations is likely to be beneficial when investigating differential treatment strategies. PMID:26454404

  12. A study on trait angeranger expression and friendship commitment levels of primary school 2nd stage students who play – do not play sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Kırımoğlu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the state of trait anger-anger expression and friendship commitment levels depending on the fact whether 2nd-stage-students in primary schools played sports or not.Personal Information Form, Trait Anger-Anger Expression Scales and Inventory of Peer Attachment were used in order to collect the data.The population of the research was consisted of the students who studied in 2nd stage of 40 primary state schools that belonged to National Education Directorate of Hatay Province between 2009-2010 academic year. Sample group was made up by 853 students of 21 primary schools who were selected from the population (262 boy students and 149 girl students who played sports as registered players; 233 boy students and 209 girl students who did not play sports..To sum up; the comparison of the scores of trait anger and external anger of the participant students who played sports yielded a statistically significant difference in terms of sex variable (p< 0.05. As for the sedentary group, boys had higher scores of internal anger and external anger than girls. In the comparison of the scores of friendship commitment in sedentary students in terms of sex variable, it was found out that there was a statistically significant difference between girls and boys, which was in favour of boys (p<0.05.

  13. Cross-cultural assessment of emotions: The expression of anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolete S. Moscoso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to focus on unique issues that are encountered in the crosscultural adaptation of measures of emotions. We take into consideration the cross-cultural equivalence of the concept of emotion, and how cultural differences influence the meaning of words that are utilized to describe these concepts. The critical need to take the state-trait distinction into account in adapting measures of emotional states and personality traits is then discussed. The effects of language and culture in adapting measures of the experience, expression, and control of anger in Latin-America are also reviewed. The construction of the Latin American Multicultural State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory is described.

  14. Anger Recognition in Speech Using Acoustic and Linguistic Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Polzehl, Tim; Alexander SCHMITT; Metze, Florian; Wagner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present study elaborates on the exploitation of both linguistic and acoustic feature modeling for anger classification. In terms of acoustic modeling we generate statistics from acoustic audio descriptors, e.g. pitch, loudness, spectral characteristics. Ranking our features we see that loudness and MFCC seems most promising for all databases. For the English database also pitch features are important. In terms of linguistic modeling we apply probabilistic and entropy-b...

  15. Anger superiority effect: The importance of dynamic emotional facial expressions

    OpenAIRE

    F.Ceccarini; C.Caudek

    2013-01-01

    A rapid response to a threatening face in a crowd is important to successfully interact in social environments. Visual search tasks have been employed to determine whether there is a processing advantage for detecting an angry face in a crowd, compared to a happy face. The empirical findings supporting the anger superiority effect (ASE), however, have been criticized on the basis of possible low-level visual confounds and because of the limited ecological validity of the stimuli. Moreover, a ...

  16. Secure Base Priming Diminishes Conflict-Based Anger and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Donald G; Lane, René A; Koren, Tamara; Bartholomew, Kim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a visual representation of a secure base (i.e. a secure base prime) on attenuating experimentally produced anger and anxiety. Specifically, we examined the assuaging of negative emotions through exposure to an image of a mother-infant embrace or a heterosexual couple embracing. Subjects seated at a computer terminal rated their affect (Pre Affect) using the Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) then listened to two sets of intense two person conflicts. After the first conflict exposure they rated affect again (Post 1 AAC). Following the second exposure they saw a blank screen (control condition), pictures of everyday objects (distraction condition) or a photo of two people embracing (Secure Base Prime condition). They then reported emotions using the Post 2 AAC. Compared to either control or distraction subjects, Secure Base Prime (SBP) subjects reported significantly less anger and anxiety. These results were then replicated using an internet sample with control, SBP and two new controls: Smiling Man (to control for expression of positive affect) and Cold Mother (an unsmiling mother with infant). The SBP amelioration of anger and anxiety was replicated with the internet sample. No control groups produced this effect, which was generated only by a combination of positive affect in a physically embracing dyad. The results are discussed in terms of attachment theory and research on spreading activation. PMID:27606897

  17. 愤怒情志表达方式及特质对自主神经的影响%Effect of expression and trait of anger emotion on autonomic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹向红; 刘胜利; 江虹; 乔明琦; 张惠云; 潘芳; 杨雪; 徐玮玮

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of expression and trait of anger emotion on autonomic nerve. Methods:The subjects enrolled were screened from the health college students. The changes of autonomic nerve were researched in an experimental paradigm processed dynamically by emotion induction (by watching movie clips) and emotion regulation (by phraseology clewing and regulating body reaction to anger). Results: The increased extent of heart rate, finger pulse volume, heart rate variability, galvanic skin reflex in the anger-ont groups was higher than that in the anger-in groups(P=0.025, 0.028, 0.014,0.047). The skin temperature of the subjects increased when the anger expression of them in the high-trait anger group were suppressed (P=0.032). Conclusion: ①The extent of sympathetic nerve of the subjects activated by anger-out was more obvious than that by anger-in. ②There was the interaction between trait anger and anger expression.%目的:探讨愤怒情志表达方式和特质对自主神经的影响.方法:以健康在校大学生48人为被试,采用情绪诱发(观看电影片段)和情绪调节(按语词提示调节对愤怒刺激的反应)动态加工的实验范式,研究自主神经的变化.结果:发怒时心率(HR)、手脂脉搏血容(FPV)、心率变异性(HRV)、皮肤电(GSR)增幅大于郁怒(P=0.025,0.028,0.014,0.047);高特质怒在抑制情绪表达时皮肤温度升高(P=0.032).结论:①发怒时对交感神经的激活程度高于郁怒;②特质怒与愤怒表达方式间存在交互作用.

  18. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survival Skills Checklist Related Sites My Life Check Nutrition Center Caregivers Heart360® Cardiac Rehabilitation • Home • What is ... Introduction Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and Losing ... 5 How to Eat Healthy 6 Heart Attack Symptoms in Women 7 Tachycardia | ...

  19. Coping with Computing Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Richard D.

    Elements of computing success of Iona College, the challenges it currently faces, and the strategies conceived to cope with future computing needs are discussed. The college has mandated computer literacy for students and offers nine degrees in the computerized information system/management information system areas. Since planning is needed in…

  20. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and Losing Weight Getting Physically Active - Introduction - Physical Activity & Health - What Type of Activity is Best? - Develop a Physical Activity Plan - Be Safe While Being Active - Stretching & Flexibility Exercises - Strength & ...

  1. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... celebrate your achievements. Knowing that you're actively managing your condition can give you hope for improved ... Rehab? • Understanding Your Heart Condition • Communicating with Professionals • Managing Your Medicines • Taking Care of Yourself Introduction Coping ...

  2. Coping with Glaucoma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I could have coped with that, and yet it's something that almost happened. Announcer: It almost did happen to Ben Ewing because not long ago and without knowing it, Ben was going blind. Ben: I didn't ...

  3. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Condition • Communicating with Professionals • Managing Your Medicines • Taking Care of Yourself Introduction Coping with Feelings Reducing Stress Quitting Smoking Eating Well and Losing Weight Getting Physically Active - Introduction - Physical Activity & Health - What Type of Activity is Best? - Develop a ...

  4. What is Skilled Coping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høffding, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The paper uses a phenomenological analysis of interviews with a professional string quartet to critique the notion of ‘skilled coping’ as used by Hubert Dreyfus. According to Dreyfus, skilled coping is a way of being and acting in which one is immersed in one’s actions such that one is not thinking...

  5. Coping and sickness absence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhenen, W. van; Schaufeli, W.B.; Dijk, F.J.H. van; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the role of coping styles in sickness absence. In line with findings that contrast the reactive-passive focused strategies, problem-solving strategies are generally associated with positive results in terms of well-being and overall health outcomes; ou

  6. Self-Reported Psychopathology, Trauma Symptoms, and Emotion Coping Among Child Suicide Attempters and Ideators: An Exploratory Study of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzy, Mary E; Barreto, Steven J; Swenson, Lance P; Liguori, Gina; Costea, Geanina

    2016-01-01

    This study examined self-reported psychopathology, trauma symptoms, and emotion coping in 7 to 12 year old children with suicidal ideation and attempts. This study compared 70 psychiatric inpatient children with current suicidal ideation to 59 psychiatric inpatient children with recent suicide attempts on measures of depression, anxiety, anger, emotional intelligence, and family/contextual factors. Results revealed greater self-reported anger as well as psychological distress associated with traumatic experiences (dissociation, anger, depression), among children who attempted suicide, in addition to increased reports of special education utilization, when compared to ideators only. These relationships were not affected by age or gender. Overall, the findings suggest self-reports of younger children who attempt suicide share similarities with older children and adolescent attempters, when compared with ideators who do not attempt. Implications for assessment and treatment are discussed. PMID:25751265

  7. The impact of incidental fear and anger on in- and outgroup attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukowski Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the impact of two specific negative emotions of anger and fear on intergroup attitudes. In Study 1 we measured emotions of anger and fear and in Study 2 we evoked these emotions incidentally, that is independently of any intergroup context. In both studies we measured attitudes towards the ingroup (Polish and the outgroup (Gypsies.We expected that fear would lead to more positive ingroup attitudes and anger to more negative outgroup attitudes. The results of the correlational study (Study 1 confirmed the predictions regarding anger and decreased outgroup evaluations, and the experimental study (Study 2 revealed that fear enhanced positivity towards the ingroup, but anger increased negativity towards the outgroup. The impact of fear and anger on social attitudes in the specific context of a negatively self-stereotyped ingroup is discussed.

  8. Breastfeeding experience differentially impacts recognition of happiness and anger in mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Kathleen M; Kamboj, Sunjeev K; Curran, H Valerie; Grossmann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Breastfeeding is a dynamic biological and social process based on hormonal regulation involving oxytocin. While there is much work on the role of breastfeeding in infant development and on the role of oxytocin in socio-emotional functioning in adults, little is known about how breastfeeding impacts emotion perception during motherhood. We therefore examined whether breastfeeding influences emotion recognition in mothers. Using a dynamic emotion recognition task, we found that longer durations of exclusive breastfeeding were associated with faster recognition of happiness, providing evidence for a facilitation of processing positive facial expressions. In addition, we found that greater amounts of breastfed meals per day were associated with slower recognition of anger. Our findings are in line with current views of oxytocin function and support accounts that view maternal behaviour as tuned to prosocial responsiveness, by showing that vital elements of maternal care can facilitate the rapid responding to affiliative stimuli by reducing importance of threatening stimuli. PMID:25387686

  9. Ruminations on rumination: anger and sadness rumination in a normative and clinical sample

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, Maya

    2006-01-01

    Anger rumination and sadness rumination were examined concurrently in a normative sample of adults (Study 1) and a clinical adolescent sample (Study 2). The purpose of this research was to assess if rumination on anger and sadness have distinct emotional and behavioural associations, and whether it is warranted to conceptualize them as separate constructs. In both studies, factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger rumination and sadness rumination measures loaded onto two fact...

  10. The role of personality and blame attribution in prisoners' experience of anger.

    OpenAIRE

    Jane L Wood; Newton, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The emotion of anger has gained researchers' interest in recent years [Novaco (1994) In: J. Monahan & M. J. Steadman (Eds.), Violence and mental disorder.- developments in risk assessment. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press; (1997) Legal and Criminological Psychology, 2, 77]. However, it is still unclear what influences the expression of anger. The current study investigated the relationship between anger, personality and blame attribution in Icelandic prisoners. Sixty-nine male offende...

  11. The clinic of anger : from psychopathology to the adequacy of punishment

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe, Paule; Scholl, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Not every fit of anger is good. But some are not to be avoided either. And fits of anger have not all the same aetiology. The authors try to understand the various psychopathological and\\or neuropsychological mechanisms that could explain anger whether in babies, children, teenagers or adults. Anger can arise from the feeling of being overwhelmed – coming by an overflow of the possibilities of management of the ego – (¬¬as a consequence of excessive intake of sensory or emotional information...

  12. An 18-month Follow-up of Anger in Female Karate Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ziaee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of anger scores in female karate athletes during 18 months, and to compare anger scores in adolescents who continue or stop training karate.Method:The sample consisted of 18 female elite karate athletes, practicing modern style of karate. To measure anger and its subscales, participants were asked to complete “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” (AARS questionnaire in both stages of the study. Athletes were divided in to two groups of “stayer” (n=12 and “quitter” (n=6 if they continued practicing karate or stopped it, respectively. In order to study the changes of anger score with time, paired T test was used.Results:In analysis of changes in anger scores with time, there was a statistically significant increase in instrumental anger (p=0.001 and non-significant increase in other anger scores among 14-year-old girls who continued practicing karate.Conclusion :Increased instrumental anger in female karate athletes could be due to the impact of participation in a combative sport. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously due to limitations of the study.

  13. Coping with Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Poul Thøis

    explicitly refers to the actually existing economy or comments upon or relates to the question of theorizing versus reality. By analyzing (or generalizing) this empirical material it is demonstrated that Keynes copes with reality by generalizing from experience, giving priority to the most important parts of...... economic reality and by making empirically based assumptions rather than assumptions consistent to a theoretical model. If economic textbooks were to apply the same stringent principles not much would be left…...

  14. Coping with an Alcoholic Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all seem like too much. There are many reasons why a parent's drinking can contribute to feelings of anger, frustration, ... drinking problems. Alateen can also help teens whose parents may already be in ... call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at (800) 799-SAFE. And don't ...

  15. An Evaluation of Personality Traits and Negative Life Events in Explaining Negative Coping Strategies among Drug Dependent People: The Mediating Role of Negative Affects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A beigi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to examine the relationship of personality traits and negative life events with coping styles with the mediating role of negative affects in drug dependent people. Method: This was a correlational study wherein the number of 152 participants (drug users completed Cloninger temperament and character inventory, Paykel life events inventory, positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS, and Endler & Parker’s coping inventory for stressful situations. Results: Novelty seeking had an indirect effect on emotional coping styles. Although anger had a mediating role in this relationship, it did not play such a role in the relationship of low self-directedness and negative life events with emotional coping styles. Harm avoidance had a direct effect on avoidant coping styles. Fear and sadness played a mediating role in the structural relationship of harm avoidance and negative events with avoidant coping styles. Reward dependence had an indirect effect on avoidant coping styles. Sadness had a mediating role in the structural relationship between reward dependence and avoidant coping styles. Conclusion: People with traumatic personality traits show negative affects by experiencing stressful negative events which leads to traumatic coping style, including addiction.

  16. Longitudinal spiritual coping with trauma in people with HIV: implications for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Ironson, Gail

    2014-03-01

    This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (pbarriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts. PMID:24601735

  17. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz

    2016-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders. PMID:27231675

  18. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders. PMID:27231675

  19. The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Predictive Association between Social Information Processing and Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the moderating role of emotion regulation in the relationship between some components of social information processing (hostile interpretation and anger) and aggressive behavior. The secondary aim was to assess whether emotion regulation, hostile interpretation, and anger account for gender differences…

  20. Language choice in expressing anger among Arab-English Londoners

    OpenAIRE

    Dewaele, Jean Marc; Qaddourah, I.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to partially replicate the study in Dewaele (2013). We want to determine whether the independent variables linked to the preference of the first (L1) or second language (L2) for the communication of anger among a large heterogeneous group of long-time multilinguals from all over the world (Dewaele 2013) have similar effects in one relatively homogeneous linguistic and cultural group, namely 110 English-speaking Arabs living in London (UK). The analysis of quan...

  1. Seeing Enemies? A systematic review of anger bias in the perception of facial expressions among anger-prone and aggressive populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellentin, Angelina Isabella; Dervisevic, Ajla; Stenager, Elsebeth;

    2015-01-01

    that mediates aggression in individuals susceptible to externalizing behavior. This paper therefore aims to clarify whether anger-prone and aggressive populations are emotionally biased towards perceiving others as angry and hostile when processing facial expressions in neuropsychological paradigms. A...

  2. Let Me Go: The Influences of Crawling Experience and Temperament on the Development of Anger Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton Roben, Caroline K.; Bass, Anneliese J.; Moore, Ginger A.; Murray-Kolb, Laura; Tan, Patricia Z.; Gilmore, Rick O.; Buss, Kristin A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Teti, Laureen O.

    2012-01-01

    Infants' emerging ability to move independently by crawling is associated with changes in multiple domains, including an increase in expressions of anger in situations that block infants' goals, but it is unknown whether increased anger is specifically because of experience with being able to move autonomously or simply related to age. To examine…

  3. Empathy and Observed Anger and Aggression in Five-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Janet; Roberts, William

    2004-01-01

    In Roberts and Strayer (1996), we reported that emotional expressiveness and anger were important predictors of empathy for school-age children, and that empathy strongly predicted prosocial behaviors aggregated across methods and sources. In this paper, we report how empathy was associated with direct observations of anger and aggression in peer…

  4. The Predictors of Indonesian Senior High School Students' Anger at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernawati, Lucia; Rahayu, Esti; Soejowinoto, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the correlation between senior high school students' anger at school and the quality relationship of parents-adolescents, peer pressure, narcissistic personality, and school climate. The instruments used were student anger at school inventory, scale of adolescent and family attachment, peer pressure inventory,…

  5. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  6. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  7. Emotions in context : Anger causes ethnic bias but not gender bias in men but not women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Toon; Pollet, Thomas V.; Teixeira, Catia P.; Demoulin, Stephanie; Roberts, S. Craig; Little, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Emotions influence information processing because they are assumed to carry valuable information. We predict that induced anger will increase ethnic but not gender intergroup bias because anger is related to conflicts for resources, and ethnic groups typically compete for resources, whereas gender g

  8. Can expressions of anger enhance creativity? A test of the emotions as social information (EASI) model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, Gerben A.; Anastasopoulou, Christina; Nijstad, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether expressions of anger can enhance creative performance. Building on the emotions as social information (EASI) model (Van Kleef, 2009), we predicted that the interpersonal effects of anger expressions on creativity depend on the target's epistemic motivation (EM) the desire to

  9. Sex Differences in the Relationship of Anger and Depression: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jody L.; Gray, Elizabeth A.; Fuqua, Dale R.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory scales revealed that women scored significantly higher than men on depression, whereas there were no significant differences on any of the six anger scales. These findings support further research on functional affective differences between men…

  10. Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Anger Experience and Expression among Partner Assaultive Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    The author investigated the acute effects of alcohol intoxication on anger experience and expression among 46 maritally violent (MV) and 56 maritally nonviolent (NV) men randomly assigned to receive alcohol, placebo, or no alcohol. Participants completed an anger-arousing articulated thoughts in simulated situations (ATSS) paradigm and imagined…

  11. Reduction of assaultive behavior following anger treatment of forensic hospital patients with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaco, Raymond W; Taylor, John L

    2015-02-01

    Anger is related to violence prior to hospitalization, during hospitalization, and after discharge. Meta-analyses have established treatment efficacy in reducing anger, but few studies have addressed whether reduced anger leads to lowered aggressive behavior. This study concerns individually-delivered anger treatment, specialized for offenders with intellectual disabilities, delivered twice weekly for 18 sessions to 50 forensic hospital patients. Assessments involved patient self-report of anger, staff ratings of anger and aggression, and case records of assaultive incidents. Physical assault data were obtained from records 12 months pre-treatment and 12 months post-treatment. Significant reductions in assaults following treatment were found by GEE analyses, controlling for age, gender, length of stay, IQ, and pre-hospital violence. Following treatment, physical attacks reduced by more than half, dropping from approximately 3.5 attacks per patient 6 months prior to treatment, versus approximately 1 attack per patient in the 6-12 month interval post-treatment. In hierarchical regressions, controlling for IQ, reduction in physical assaults was associated with pre-to post-treatment change in anger level. These findings buttress the efficacy of anger treatment for patients having histories of violence and have significance for patient mental health, hospital staff well-being, therapeutic milieu, hospital management, and service delivery costs. PMID:25569340

  12. Anger, Violence, and Academic Performance: A Study of Troubled Minority Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jacqueline; Barner, Celious III; Hudson, Betsy; Rosignon-Carmouche, Lee A.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the relationship between anger, violence, and academic performance among troubled adolescents participating in a risk reduction intervention that stressed emotional confrontation and behavior change support. Surveys indicated that anger management was unrelated to violence or academic performance. Loss of control over time, concentration,…

  13. Effects of Pessimism and Explanatory Style on Development of Anger in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Peter; Smith, Douglas C.; Curtis, David

    2003-01-01

    Assesses high school students' levels of dispositional optimism and pessimism, explanatory style and anger in relation to the school setting. Results suggest that anger management programs focusing on cognitive restructuring and related strategies can be a powerful means for reducing aggressive behaviors at school. (Contains 38 references.) (GCP)

  14. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive symptomatology: patients with Anorexia Binge-Purging and Bulimia Nervosa were more likely to be diagnosed with MD. Irritable mood was found in the 73% of patients with MD. High Harm Avoidance (HA and low Self-Directedness (SD predicted MD independently of severity of the ED symptomatology, several clinical variables, and ED diagnosis. Assessing both personality and depressive symptoms could be useful to provide effective treatments. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the pathogenetic role of HA and SD for ED and MD.

  15. STRESS COPING SKILLS IN ADDICTS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ebrahimi; SG MOOSAVI; R SAMOOEIE; A ,HASAN ZADEH

    2002-01-01

    Introduction. Stress coping skills is one of the most important factors in prediction of addictive behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine this pattern and to compare them with those of non-addicts. Methods. One hundred subjects with substance dependency and 100 non-addict subjects were selected. Both groups were matched on the basis of their socioeconomic state. Stress coping skills of study participants were examined using CS-R scale. Results. Stress coping skills in ...

  16. Coping with power dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    how the actors involved cope with the new configurations. In this introduction, we discuss the conceptualization of power dispersion and highlight the ways in which the contributions add to this research agenda. We then outline some general conclusions and end by indicating future avenues of research....... Taken together, the collection contributes some answers to the challenge of defining and measuring – in a comparative way – the control and co-ordination mechanisms which power dispersion generates. It also explores the tension between political actors' quest for autonomy and the acknowledgement of...

  17. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  18. Validation of the Novaco Anger Scale-Provocation Inventory (Danish) With Nonclinical, Clinical, and Offender Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum; Novaco, Raymond; Heinola-Nielsen, Vivian;

    2015-01-01

    Anger has high prevalence in clinical and forensic settings, and it is associated with aggressive behavior and ward atmosphere on psychiatric units. Dysregulated anger is a clinical problem in Danish mental health care systems, but no anger assessment instruments have been validated in Danish...... aggressive behavior in hospital. Regression analyses showed that higher scores on NAS increase the risk of having acted aggressively in the past and of acting aggressively in the future....... investigated with samples of 477 nonclinical, 250 clinical, 167 male prisoner, and 64 male forensic participants. Anger prevalence and its relationship with other anger measures, anxiety/depression, and aggression were examined. NAS-PI was found to have high reliability, concurrent validity, and discriminant...

  19. STRESS COPING SKILLS IN ADDICTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A EBRAHIMI

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stress coping skills is one of the most important factors in prediction of addictive behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine this pattern and to compare them with those of non-addicts. Methods. One hundred subjects with substance dependency and 100 non-addict subjects were selected. Both groups were matched on the basis of their socioeconomic state. Stress coping skills of study participants were examined using CS-R scale. Results. Stress coping skills in addicts were different from those of non-addicts in most of the coping procedures. Nonaddicts reported that they used problem-focused coping and some of the emotional-focused coping strategies. In contrast, addicts shown that they used unuseful and noneffective stress coping strategies. Discussion. These data indicate that using ineffective stress coping skills is one of-the predisposing and precipitating factors in addictive behavior. It seems that stress coping skills training is necessary in prevention of addiction.

  20. The Relationship of Spiritual Beliefs and Involvement with the Experience of Anger and Stress in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterowd, Carrie; Harrist, Steve; Thomason, Nancy; Worth, Sheri; Carlozzi, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of spiritual beliefs and involvement with anger and stress in college students. The spirituality scales were positively related to perceived stress and most of the anger subscales. When stress was controlled, the spirituality subscales still contributed significantly to anger.

  1. Anger Emotional Stress Influences VEGF/VEGFR2 and Its Induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiao, Mingqi; Wu, Jibiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We discuss the influence of anger emotional stress upon VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Methods. We created a rat model of induced anger (anger-out and anger-in) emotional response using social isolation and resident-intruder paradigms and assessed changes in hippocampus' VEGF content, neuroplasticity, and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Results. The resident-intruder method successfully generated anger-out and anger-in models that differed significantly in composite aggression score, aggression incubation, open field behavior, sucrose preference, and weight gain. Anger emotional stress decreased synaptic connections and VEGFR2 expression. Anger emotional stress led to abnormal expression of VEGF/VEGFR2 mRNA and protein and disorderly expression of key factors in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Fluoxetine administration ameliorated behavioral abnormalities and damage to hippocampal neurons caused by anger emotional stress, as well as abnormal expression of some proteins in VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Conclusion. This research provides a detailed classification of anger emotion and verifies its influence upon VEGF and the VEGF-induced signaling pathway, thus providing circumstantial evidence of mechanisms by which anger emotion damages neurogenesis. As VEGFR2 can promote neurogenesis and vasculogenesis in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, these results suggest that anger emotional stress can result in decreased neurogenesis. PMID:27057362

  2. The effect of anger management levels and communication skills of Emergency Department staff on being exposed to violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GozdeYildiz Das

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the effect of anger management levels and communication skills of emergency department staff on their frequency of being exposed to violence. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey between 11 April and 15 October 2013 by using a questionnaire including descriptive features, anger management scale, and communication skills scale applied to 283 health personnel working in children and adult emergency department clinics. Results Statistically significant differences were found between the health workers’ ages and their anger control levels, marital status and anger-in and anger control levels, working position and anger-in levels, and between anger-in, anger-out and anger control levels based on their level of education. Statistically significant differences were also found between age and communication levels based on the personnel’s working position. Statistically significant difference between the anger-in subscale of health personnel based on their state of being exposed to violence was found (78.4% of the health workers had been exposed to violence. Conclusion In the in-service programs of institutions, there should be trainings conducted about anger management and effective communication techniques so that the health personnel can be aware of their own feelings and express anger in a suitable way.

  3. Coping with Traumatic Stress Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with VA PTSD Care or ... Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military ...

  4. Predicting coping style in adolescence following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask

    Decades of research have established the importance of coping with stressful events. Individuals generally use the same overall coping styles across situations, and correlational studies have demonstrated a relationship between single individual characteristics and coping. However, there is a lac...

  5. Peer Victimization and Forms of Aggression During Middle Childhood: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, John L; Fite, Paula J

    2016-04-01

    The current short-term longitudinal study evaluated whether anger and sadness regulation moderated the associations between peer victimization and physical and relational forms of aggression over a 6-month period. Participants included 278 predominantly Caucasian children (51.8% female) between 8 and 12 years of age (M = 9.33, SD = 0.99). Peer victimization was assessed at Time 1 using child- and teacher-reports, and teachers provided ratings of children's aggressive behavior at Time 1 and Time 2. Children also completed self-report measures of anger and sadness regulation at Time 1. Results from multilevel models provided support for the notion that children's ability to effectively regulate their feelings of anger and sadness influences the relations among peer victimization and forms of aggression over time. As anticipated, high levels of anger regulation attenuated the link between child-reported peer victimization and physical aggression. Further, when levels of anger regulation were high, teacher-reported peer victimization predicted subsequent decreases in physical aggression. Contrary to expectations, however, high levels of anger and sadness regulation exacerbated the association between child-reported peer victimization and relational aggression, and teacher-reported peer victimization predicted decreases in relational aggression over time when levels of anger regulation were low. Directions for future research and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:26168955

  6. Coping, social relations, and communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael; Jensen-Johansen, Mikael Birkelund; Gubba, Lotte;

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study of families where a parent has cancer was to explore ways of informing the child of the parent's illness, how the child perceives the parent's emotional state, how the child copes with the parent's illness, and how this coping relates to the parent's coping and...... concerns for the child. Twenty-one children from 15 families and their parents were interviewed. In 13 families the mother was ill, in two the father. Children were aware of the facts of the illness, but there was limited emotional communication between the generations. The children were very observant of...... examples of parentification were found. Communication patterns and parental coping seemed to be highly related to the child's coping repertoire. Even though most children seemed to manage rather well, all children were strongly affected by the illness. The `healthiest' adaptation related to factors within...

  7. Anger is more influential than joy: sentiment correlation in weibo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Fan

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed the tremendous growth of the online social media. In China, Weibo, a Twitter-like service, has attracted more than 500 million users in less than five years. Connected by online social ties, different users might share similar affective states. We find that the correlation of anger among users is significantly higher than that of joy. While the correlation of sadness is surprisingly low. Moreover, there is a stronger sentiment correlation between a pair of users if they share more interactions. And users with larger number of friends possess more significant sentiment correlation with their neighborhoods. Our findings could provide insights for modeling sentiment influence and propagation in online social networks.

  8. SPECIFIC EFFECTS OF ANGER RUMINATION ON PARTICULAR EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinfang; Yang, Yin; Qian, Mingyi; Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene

    2015-12-01

    The effects of two types of rumination on different kinds of executive functions were investigated. Fifty-nine participants (M age = 22.8 yr., SD = 2.5) were assigned to one of three conditions and instructed either to: (1) ruminate in a self-distanced way, (2) ruminate in a self-immersed way, or (3) think about the layout of their campus following anger induction. Afterward, the participants were directed to finish tasks designed to assess three kinds of executive functions: shifting, inhibition, and updating. Results showed that self-immersed rumination impaired shifting ability the most, while participants engaged in self-distanced rumination showed the worst performance on the inhibition task. No significant difference was found in the updating task. These results suggest that rumination influenced particular executive functions in different ways. PMID:26595287

  9. Suicidal behavior among alcohol dependents: Relationship with anger and personality dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol dependents have high percentage of nonfatal suicidal behaviors. There is no substantial data on anger and personality correlates of suicidal behaviors among alcohol users. The present work explored the relationship of anger and personality with suicidal behaviors among alcohol-dependent individuals. Materials and Methods: Sociodemographic data sheet, State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI, and Neo Five-Factor Inventory (NFFI were administered on 30 subjects who had lifetime history of suicidal attempt. Results: A total of 80% attempted suicide in the intoxicated states, 56.7% were high on trait anger, and 60% were high on anger expression outward. A significant negative correlation was found between expressing feelings (verbally/physically openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness. A significant positive correlation was found between anger expression inward and neuroticism. Conclusions: It helped in understanding the psychological variables associated with suicidal behavior among alcohol-dependent individuals and has implications for addressing neuroticism openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness for bringing change in anger expression.

  10. Modeling anger and aggressive driving behavior in a dynamic choice-latent variable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaf, Mazen; Abou-Zeid, Maya; Kaysi, Isam

    2015-02-01

    This paper develops a hybrid choice-latent variable model combined with a Hidden Markov model in order to analyze the causes of aggressive driving and forecast its manifestations accordingly. The model is grounded in the state-trait anger theory; it treats trait driving anger as a latent variable that is expressed as a function of individual characteristics, or as an agent effect, and state anger as a dynamic latent variable that evolves over time and affects driving behavior, and that is expressed as a function of trait anger, frustrating events, and contextual variables (e.g., geometric roadway features, flow conditions, etc.). This model may be used in order to test measures aimed at reducing aggressive driving behavior and improving road safety, and can be incorporated into micro-simulation packages to represent aggressive driving. The paper also presents an application of this model to data obtained from a driving simulator experiment performed at the American University of Beirut. The results derived from this application indicate that state anger at a specific time period is significantly affected by the occurrence of frustrating events, trait anger, and the anger experienced at the previous time period. The proposed model exhibited a better goodness of fit compared to a similar simple joint model where driving behavior and decisions are expressed as a function of the experienced events explicitly and not the dynamic latent variable. PMID:25460097

  11. Coping with Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques

    is to provide insights into the ecological role of soil microbes living in a community and its capabilities to cope with short- and long-term stresses. In the introduction, the problem of using RNA based approaches in soil ecology is presented in parallel with the importance of soil microbes for the ecosystem...... research directions is presented. This PhD-thesis resulted in four draft-manuscripts where RNA sequencing techniques were used to answer different research questions related to the response of soil microorganisms to different types of stress: MANUSCRIPT 1 explores the effect of soil sieving...... towards microwaving-heat were detected and corresponded to traits conserved at high taxonomical level. Moreover, using the detected tolerance ranges, it was possible to point nitrification as “at risk” in systems exposed to rapid heat stress, even though some functional redundancy may have occurred...

  12. Anger as a predictor of suicidal ideation in middle-school students in Korea: gender difference in threshold point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongeun; Choi, Heeseung; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi; Shin, Dong-soo

    2009-01-01

    Studies on gender differences in suicidal ideation and anger are limited. Furthermore, these studies focused on linear relationships, which limits the full understanding of the complex relationships and hampers identification of high-risk groups for suicidal tendencies. Hence, this study aims to assess the gender differences in: (1) the level of suicidal ideation and anger; (2) predictors for suicidal ideation; and (3) the varying association between suicidal ideation and anger. The target population for this cross-sectional, correlational study was adolescents aged 13 to 15 years living in South Korea. A total of 258 adolescents (160 boys and 98 girls) completed the Multidimensional Anger Inventory and Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, multiple linear, and spline regression analysis. Girls reported significantly higher scores in both anger and suicidal ideation. While anger was a significant predictor for suicidal ideation only in boys, both school life satisfaction and anger were significant predictors of suicidal ideation in girls. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, the spline regression revealed a significant threshold point in the relationship between anger and suicidal ideation, particularly among girls. At the threshold anger point of 117.67, 12.5% of girls belonged to the high-risk group. The gender-specific patterns of the relationship between suicidal ideation and anger and the existence of threshold points confirmed the need for targeted suicidal preventive programs focusing on controlling anger. PMID:19764277

  13. Navigating in murky waters: How multiracial Black individuals cope with racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Cyndy R

    2016-01-01

    Multiracial people are often lauded as evidence of the waning significance of race and racism in the United States. In reality, the experiences of multiracial people illuminate the ways that racism still exists and efforts to classify people based on assumed racial characteristics for the purposes of inclusion and exclusion are alive and well. Multiracial individuals experience racism from multiple sources and in various forms, which has the potential to negatively impact their development and well-being. Thus, scholars and practitioners must better understand how the growing population of multiracial individuals learns to cope with such racism. The central aim of this qualitative interview study was to shed light on the ways in which multiracial individuals of African descent in the United States cope with and respond to racism. Findings are organized around 5 broad conceptual themes for coping with and addressing racism: avoidance and internalization, anger and violence, education and advocacy, seeking culture and community, and chameleon identities. Findings of this study speak to the dynamic nature of strategies used to cope with racism and hold implications for practices and programs designed to support positive racial identity development among multiracial individuals of African descent. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26845045

  14. Web-based coping skills training for women whose partner has a drinking problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychtarik, Robert G; McGillicuddy, Neil B; Barrick, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Spouses whose partner has an alcohol use disorder can experience considerable psychological distress. Yet, because of social, financial, relationship, and psychological barriers they often remain hidden and underserved. To partially reduce treatment barriers for this population, this study evaluated the short-term efficacy of a self-paced, web-delivered coping skills training program for women experiencing distress as a result of living with a partner with an alcohol use disorder. Participants (N = 89) were randomly assigned to either 8 weeks of an Internet-administered coping skills training program (iCST), or an 8-week delayed treatment control (DTC). Participation in, and satisfaction with iCST was high. At the end of the 8-week access/delay period, iCST participants exhibited a significantly higher level of coping skills relative to DTC, d = 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI; .64, 1.51], and reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms, d = -.65, 95% CI [-1.21, -.35], and situational anger, d = -.70, 95% CI [-1.62, -.64]. Moreover, iCST appeared to prevent an increase in symptoms among those with low baseline symptom levels; DTC did not. Skill acquisition appeared to partially mediate changes observed. Online coping skills training may be an effective way of reaching and helping a large number of this frequently underserved population. PMID:25347016

  15. Stress reactions and coping strategies among Bedouin Arab adolescents exposed to demolition of houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra; Al Said, Haled

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine emotional reactions and coping strategies of Bedouin adolescents against the backdrop of house demolitions in the unrecognized Bedouin villages in the Negev, Israel. We compared two groups of adolescents living in unrecognized Bedouin villages, teenagers whose houses had been destroyed (acute + chronic group) and their counterparts whose houses had not been destroyed (chronic group). Data were gathered during October to December 2010 from 465 Bedouin adolescents aged 13-18 years. Adolescents filled out self-report questionnaires, which included demographics, objective and subjective exposure to house demolition, state anxiety, state anger, psychological distress and Adolescent Coping Scale. Results show differences between the two groups in stress reactions as well as in objective exposure to house demolition with the acute + chronic group reporting more stress and more exposure. In addition, different variables explained stress reactions in the different groups. Whereas in the acute + chronic group, objective and subjective exposure were the most significant variables, in the chronic group, the coping strategies explained stress with more variance. Results are discussed in terms of differentiating between types of stress, chronic versus acute + chronic and in relation to the interactionist model of coping with stress. PMID:23955875

  16. Comparison of Drivers' Aggression Frequency on and off the Road According to the Propensity to Experience Anger While driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herrero-Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An important question in the study of driving anger is whether drivers express anger the same way on and off the road. With the aim of analyzing the between-group and within-group differences in a heterogeneous sample of 157 drivers divided in high, moderate and low-driving anger, four ways of expressing anger were assessed (verbally, physically, displacedly and adaptatively, both in general and behind the wheel. The between-group results showed that high anger drivers scored higher than low angered in all types of desadaptative expression on the road (η2 = .08 - .16 as well as in the physical (η2 = .06 and displaced (η2= .10 ways off the road. The within-group comparisons evidenced high equivalence in each of the three groups about the preference of anger expressions on and off the road, concluding the apparent equivalence of the behavior in all the contexts. Clinical and road safety implications are discussed.

  17. Myths And Reality About Anger In The Workplace: What Do Managers Need To Know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley J. Bennington

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing categorization of workplace data ignores an opportunity to provide more distinct and relevant information on workplace incidents. This article describes current reporting of violence in the workplace and what issues must be addressed to be of better service to organizations. In addition to knowing statistical realities, managers must become very self-aware of their reactions to anger as a part of the overall anger management strategy of the organization. Emotional Intelligence research provides valuable tools for managers and supervisors to improve their responses to anger in the workplace.

  18. Pediatric oncologists' coping strategies for dealing with patient death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Leeat; Barrera, Maru; Scheinemann, Katrin; Bartels, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This research examined pediatric oncologists coping strategies when their patients died of cancer. Twenty-one pediatric oncologists at 2 Canadian pediatric academic hospitals were interviewed about their coping strategies when patients died or were in the process of dying. The grounded theory method of data collection and data analysis were used. Line-by-line coding was used to establish codes and themes and constant comparison was used to establish relations among emerging codes and themes. Pediatric oncologists used engagement coping strategies with primary and secondary responses including emotional regulation (social support and religion), problem solving (supporting families at end of life), cognitive restructuring (making a difference and research), and distraction (breaks, physical activity, hobbies and entertainment, spending time with own children). They also used disengagement coping strategies that included voluntary avoidance (compartmentalization and withdrawing from families at end of life). Given the chronic nature of patient death in pediatric oncology and the emotionally difficult nature of this work, medical institutions such as hospitals have a responsibility to assist pediatric oncologists in coping with this challenging aspect of their work. Future research is needed to evaluate how best to implement these changes on the institutional level to help oncologists cope with patient death and the effect of using these strategies on their quality of life. PMID:26865337

  19. Retirement Transition in Ballet Dancers: "Coping Within and Coping Without"

    OpenAIRE

    Roncaglia, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Retirement transitions in ballet dancers have been under researched. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of career transition in ballet dancers, from a life course perspective. Drawing upon existing transition models (SCHLOSSBERG, 1981) and sport literature (TAYLOR & OGILVIE, 1994), the paper investigates how ballet dancers cope (or not) with the transition and explores the different factors influencing the coping process. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interv...

  20. Cognitive Coping Strategies and Stress in Parents of Children with Down Syndrome: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-sectional and prospective relationships between cognitive coping strategies and parental stress in parents of children with Down syndrome. A total of 621 participants filled out questionnaires, including the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire to measure cognitive coping and the Nijmeegse…

  1. Visual search for emotional expressions: Effect of stimulus set on anger and happiness superiority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Ruth A; Becker, Stefanie I; Lipp, Ottmar V

    2016-06-01

    Prior reports of preferential detection of emotional expressions in visual search have yielded inconsistent results, even for face stimuli that avoid obvious expression-related perceptual confounds. The current study investigated inconsistent reports of anger and happiness superiority effects using face stimuli drawn from the same database. Experiment 1 excluded procedural differences as a potential factor, replicating a happiness superiority effect in a procedure that previously yielded an anger superiority effect. Experiments 2a and 2b confirmed that image colour or poser gender did not account for prior inconsistent findings. Experiments 3a and 3b identified stimulus set as the critical variable, revealing happiness or anger superiority effects for two partially overlapping sets of face stimuli. The current results highlight the critical role of stimulus selection for the observation of happiness or anger superiority effects in visual search even for face stimuli that avoid obvious expression related perceptual confounds and are drawn from a single database. PMID:25861807

  2. Anger: A Neglected Group Treatment Issue with Cardiac Transplantation Recipients and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstam, Varda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the group process, specifically as it evolved with respect to anger in cardiac transplantation recipients and their families. Discusses the implications of these findings for professionals working in group settings with recipients and their families. (JBJ)

  3. The impact of relaxing music on prisoners' levels of anxiety and anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensimon, Moshe; Einat, Tomer; Gilboa, Avi

    2015-04-01

    Listening to relaxing music was found to reduce state anxiety and state anger among various populations. Nonetheless, the impact of relaxing music in prisons has not yet been studied. The current study examines the impact of relaxing music on levels of state anxiety and state anger among a random sample of 48 criminal prisoners. Main findings are as follows: (a) level of state anxiety decreased among the treatment group compared with the comparison group and (b) level of state anger decreased among the treatment group compared with the comparison group. Findings are discussed in light of other studies that have shown positive effects of exposure to relaxing music on levels of anxiety and anger among other populations. The final part of the study provides practical recommendations for prison administrators regarding implementation of programs of relaxing music in various prison facilities. PMID:24265309

  4. The Relationship between Students Problematic Internet Usage and Their Anger Expression Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvan Emine Ata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The research was carried out analytically to examine the relationship between students problematic internet usage and their anger expression manners. METHOD : The population sample of the research consists of 360 students, selected among 1592 students with stratified sampling, that are studying in Educational Faculty, Vocational School and Health School of Agri Ibrahim Cecen University in 2008�2009 academic year. A determined number of students, selected from each school according to basic random sampling method, is included in the research. In the research, �Personal Information Form�, �Problematic Internet Usage Scale� (PIUS and �Trait Anger and Anger Expression Scale� are used. The data are analyzed by means of frequency distribution and correlation analysis. FINDINGS: %74,5 of students were 18�22 age range, %55 of them men, %69,7 had nuclear family, %71,1 has well economic conditions and %49,4 were living with their families during education. The average PIUS of students is 60.6119.50, and when the subgroup point averages are considered, the internet negative consequences point average is calculated as 26.4510.37, social benefit/ social welfare point average as 18.837.31 and excessive usage point average is calculated as 15.35.20. Trait anger point average of students is determines as 22.336.43, anger control point averages as 21.104.83, interior anger point averages as 16.634.04 and exterior anger point average is determined as 15.814.35. A positive relationship is detected between students` problematic internet usage scale total point and trait anger (r=0.27, p=0.00, interior anger (r= 0.18, p=0.00, exterior anger (r= 014, p= 0.00 point averages. RESULT: A meaningful lower relationship is found proportionately between students� problematic internet usage and their anger expression manner. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 473-480

  5. Hurricane! Coping With Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    A new AGU book, Hurricane! Coping With Disaster, analyzes the progress made in hurricane science and recounts how advances in the field have affected the public's and the scientific community's understanding of these storms. The book explores the evolution of hurricane study, from the catastrophic strike in Galveston, Texas in 1900—still the worst natural disaster in United States history—to today's satellite and aircraft observations that track a storm's progress and monitor its strength. In this issue, Eos talks with Robert Simpson, the books' senior editor.Simpson has studied severe storms for more than 60 years, including conducting one of the first research flights through a hurricane in 1945. He was the founding director of the (U.S.) National Hurricane Research Project and has served as director of the National Hurricane Center. In collaboration with Herbert Saffir, Simpson helped design and implement the Saffir/Simpson damage potential scale that is widely used to identify potential damage from hurricanes.

  6. Coping with Distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærenholdt, Jørgen Ole

    tilblivelse af de nordisk atlantiske samfund tilbage fra vikingetiden over kolonitiden og de nationale projekter og med særlig vægt på den nyere historie. Der gives et rids af de lange linier i Nord-Norges, Færøernes, Islands og Grønlands historie, men det diskuteres også hvordan formidling af historien...... fiskeriet og i kap. 6 om turismen. Fiskerisamfund er mobile samfund med en lang historie, og fiskeriet udgør samtidig et meget væsentligt og omdiskuteret hovederhverv i Nord-Norge, Færøerne, Island og Grønland. Turismen har endnu ikke helt vundet den samme anerkendelse og anses endda under tiden som en...... trussel mod samfundsbygningen. Men kap. 6 viser de mange måder hvori gennem turismen bidrager til samfundsbygningen, og det er en historie som indledes med en grundig diskussion af opdagelsesrejsernes grundlæggende betydning, også kulturelt. Begge disse kapitler tilføjer coping tilgangen flere analytiske...

  7. Identity style and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzonsky, M D

    1992-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between identity style and strategies used to cope with stressors that potentially threaten one's sense of identity. Identity style refers to differences in the way individuals construct and revise or maintain their sense of identity. An informational style involves actively seeking out, evaluating, and utilizing self-relevant information. A normative style highlights the expectations and standards of significant others. A diffuse/avoidant style is characterized by procrastination and situation-specific reactions. Late-adolescent college subjects were administered measures of identity style, ways of coping with academic stressors, and test anxiety. Within this self-as-student context, subjects with diffuse and normative identity styles employed avoidant-oriented coping strategies (wishful thinking, distancing, and tension reduction). An informational style was associated with deliberate, problem-focused coping. Findings are discussed in terms of a process model of identity development. PMID:1469598

  8. Coping with Agitation and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Coping with Agitation and Aggression People with Alzheimer’s disease may become agitated or aggressive as the disease gets worse. Agitation means that a person is restless or worried. ...

  9. Nursing and Coping With Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Laal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress could be defined simply as the rate of wear and tear on the body systems caused by life. Stress at work is a big problem. Working in the profession of nursing is a demanding and often stressful occupation. Thus, nurses’ health could be affected by stress dangerous consequences. Coping strategies are key elements of nurses' stress reactions. Coping strategy as a stabilizing factor may be as important as the stressful event itself. Purpose: To determine how and how much nursing staff cope with the stressful events and to find out the relationships between job coping and health outcomes in the study population. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study included one hundred nursing staff working in two hospitals (Tohid and Besat of Sanandaj City (Kurdistan, Iran. They completed the questionnaires containing coping strategies based on the Adolescent Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences (A-COPE, in the year of 2006. We examined the relationships between age, gender, position, tenure state, marriage state, job experience, work shift and place (environment to application of coping methods. Analysis was done using SPSS 18. Statistical significance was set at P ≤0.05.Results: Out of one hundred nurses of all grades included in this study, fifty-seven were female (57%, 60(% were between 30-39 years old and 50(% were single. There was no significant difference between junior and senior staff in applying positive methods (p=0.666 or negative responses to cope with stress (p=0.195.The majority of nurses 55(% had job experience of 5-10 years, 40(% worked in the evening and night shift and 54(% were in Tohid hospital. Generally in our study, the rate of application positive methods of coping was good 19%, medium 51% and weak 30%. Negative responses to stress were high 49%, medium 29% and low 22%. There were significant associations between: age, tenure state, work place and job experience with positive coping as follow; (p

  10. Ruminating on rumination: Are rumination on anger and sadness differentially related to aggression and depressed mood?

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, M.; Moretti, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor for aggression and depression, yet few studies have incorporated both aggression and depression in a unitary model that reflects how rumination predicts these distinct conditions. The current study examined rumination on anger and sadness to assess their unique relations with aggression and depressed mood, respectively. Analogous anger rumination and sadness rumination questionnaires were used to minimize measurement variance, and were completed by 226 undergraduat...

  11. Personality predictors of speeding in young drivers: Anger vs. sensation seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Delhomme, Patricia; CHAURAND, Nadine; PARAN, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Among personality factors, sensation seeking and anger are the main predictors of voluntary risky behaviors. The studies that compare the impact of these factors show that anger is a greater predictor of voluntary risky driving behaviors than sensation seeking. However, these studies usually average data from several risky behaviors, and it is possible that analyzing data from individual risky behaviors would yield different results. Speeding in particular corresponds more closely to the defi...

  12. Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members

    OpenAIRE

    Worthen, M; Rathod, SD; Cohen, G.; Sampson, L; Ursano, R; Gifford, R; Fullerton, C; Galea, S.; Ahern, J.

    2014-01-01

    Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n=1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PT...

  13. Beware the angry leader: Trait anger and trait anxiety as predictors of petty tyranny

    OpenAIRE

    Kant, Leo; SKOGSTAD, Anders; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Einarsen, Ståle

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the general aggression model and theories of victimization and temperamental goodness-of-fit, we investigated trait anger and trait anxiety as antecedents of petty tyranny: employing a multilevel design with data from 84 sea captains and 177 crew members. Leader trait anger predicted subordinate-reported petty tyranny. Subordinate trait anxiety was associated with subordinate-reported petty tyranny. Theassociation between leader traitanger and subordinate-reported pe...

  14. Positive correlation between serum interleukin-1β and state anger in rugby athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Mirko; Speranza, Lorenza; Franceschelli, Sara; Ialenti, Valentina; Iezzi, Irene; Patruno, Antonia; Rizzuto, Alessia; Robazza, Claudio; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Felaco, Mario; Grilli, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several studies reported a relationship between immune system activation and anger expression. Consequently, the aim of this study was to explore immunitary molecular mechanisms that potentially underlie anger expression. To this end, we applied the Frustration-Aggression Theory in a contact sport model, utilizing the nearing of sporting events to trigger anger feelings. In parallel, we evaluated the activation of immune system at mRNA levels. We enrolled 20 amateur rugby players (age ± SD, 27.2 ± 4.5) who underwent psychological assessment to evaluate anger, with the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), before rugby matches; at the same time blood samples were taken to analyze the variations of gene expression by microarray. During the 2 hr before each game, a significant increase was verified in the Rage State (RS) score compared to the score ascertained 72 hr before. At the same time, we found modulation in expression profile, in particular increased expression of gene that encodes interleukin l-β (IL-1β). In a regression analysis, RS score was related to IL-1β, and the potential risk factors age, body mass index, smoking, and drinking. The levels of cytokine were positively and independently related to RS score. Our results suggest that the nearing of sporting event can trigger anger state feelings and activate immune system in rugby players. We propose the IL-1β as a potential biological marker of anger. However, further research is necessary to clarify the correlation between cytokine and anger. PMID:23208827

  15. Effects of mental workloads on depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Azzem Ozkan; Mahmut Ozdevecioglu; Yasemin Kaya; Filiz Özşahin Koç

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals. A model was created in keeping with the main objective of the study, and regression analysis was carried out on the questionnaire responses from 168 accounting professionals employed in Kayseri. The results revealed the significant positive impacts of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sens...

  16. Effects of mental workloads on depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzem Ozkan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals. A model was created in keeping with the main objective of the study, and regression analysis was carried out on the questionnaire responses from 168 accounting professionals employed in Kayseri. The results revealed the significant positive impacts of mental workloads on the depression–anger symptoms and interpersonal sensitivities of accounting professionals.

  17. Coping styles of music teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Staniçi, Jelena; Stankovi, Ivana; Bogunovi, Blanka

    2009-01-01

         The previous findings have shown that musicians as well as music teachers differ in personality characteristics from the general population. There are strong indications that musicians are exposed to numerous stressful situations during their education and professional life. We aimed to: identify preferred coping styles of music teachers and their possible difference in comparison to non-music teachers* coping styles, as well as to depict their relationship taking into consideration c...

  18. Spiritual Coping with Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Intro The object of this study was to investigate the relationship between an individual’s spiritual beliefs and how that affected their pain in those with arthritis. It focused mainly on the coping strategies they chose and how their personality influenced this. Method 113 people with various forms of arthritis completed a questionnaire which included scales measuring spiritual perspective (SPS), pain levels and pain interference (BPI), personality factors (Big 5 Domain), coping st...

  19. Anger, Cognition, Ideology: What Crash Can Show Us About Emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue J. Kim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract (E: Sue J. Kim’s essay “Anger, Cognition, Ideology: What Crash Can Show Us About Emotion” argues for the relevance and importance of cognitive studies to ethnic and postcolonial literary studies, and vice versa. After surveying recent developments in the field of cognitive studies, the essay combines cultural and cognitive approaches in order to examine anger in and around the 2005 Paul Haggis film Crash.

     

    Abstract (F: Dans cet article, l’auteur fait un plaidoyer pour l’application des études cognitives aux études ethniques et postcoloniales et inversement. L’essai présente d’abord un survol des récents développements dans le domaine des études cognitives, puis combine les approches culturelles et cognitives dans une lecture détaillée du thème de la colère dans le film Crash de Paul Haggis (2005.

     

  20. Computer copings for partial coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissen, H; van der Zel, J; Reisig, J; Vlaar, S; de Ruiter, W; van Waas, R

    1999-04-01

    Partial coverage posterior tooth preparations are very complex surfaces for computer surface digitization, computer design, and manufacture of ceramic copings. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether the Computer Integrated Crown Reconstruction (Cicero) system was compatible with a proposed partial coverage preparation design and capable of producing ceramic copings. Posterior teeth were prepared for partial coverage copings with deep gingival chamfers in the proximal boxes and around the functional cusps (buccal of mandibular and lingual of maxillary posterior teeth). The nonfunctional cusps (lingual of mandibular and buccal of maxillary posterior teeth) were prepared with broad bevels following the inclined occlusal plane pattern. Optical impressions were taken of stone dies by means of a fast laser-line scanning method that measured the three-dimensional geometry of the partial coverage preparation. Computers digitized the images, and designed and produced the ceramic copings. The Cicero system digitized the partial coverage preparation surfaces precisely with a minor coefficient of variance of 0.2%. The accuracy of the surface digitization, the design, and the computer aided milling showed that the system was capable of producing partial coverage copings with a mean marginal gap of 74 microns. This value was obtained before optimizing the marginal fit by means of porcelain veneering. In summary, Cicero computer technology, i.e., surface digitization, coping design, and manufacture, was compatible with the described partial coverage preparations for posterior teeth. PMID:11351490

  1. Chronic anger as a precursor to adult antisocial personality features: The moderating influence of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Samuel W; Perlman, Susan B; Byrd, Amy L; Raine, Adrian; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin A

    2016-01-01

    Anger is among the earliest occurring symptoms of mental health, yet we know little about its developmental course. Further, no studies have examined whether youth with persistent anger are at an increased risk of exhibiting antisocial personality features in adulthood, or how cognitive control abilities may protect these individuals from developing such maladaptive outcomes. Trajectories of anger were delineated among 503 boys using annual assessments from childhood to middle adolescence (ages ∼7-14). Associations between these trajectories and features of antisocial personality in young adulthood (age ∼28) were examined, including whether cognitive control moderates this association. Five trajectories of anger were identified (i.e., childhood-onset, childhood-limited, adolescent-onset, moderate, and low). Boys in the childhood-onset group exhibited the highest adulthood antisocial personality features (e.g., psychopathy, aggression, criminal charges). However, boys in this group were buffered from these problems if they had higher levels of cognitive control during adolescence. Findings were consistent across measures from multiple informants, replicated across distinct time periods, and remained when controlling for general intelligence and prior antisocial behavior. This is the first study to document the considerable heterogeneity in the developmental course of anger from childhood to adolescence. As hypothesized, good cognitive control abilities protected youth with persistent anger problems from developing antisocial personality features in adulthood. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:26618654

  2. The relationship between adult health and childhood maltreatment, as moderated by anger and ethnic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoza, Kimberly A; Wilson, Denise T; Widmann, Wendy A; Riley, Michelle A; Robertson, Thomas W; Maiello, Elizabeth; Villot, Nikisha; Manzella, Dana J; Ortiz-Garcia, Alberto L

    2014-03-01

    Childhood maltreatment, anger, and racial/ethnic background were examined in relation to physical health, psychological well-being, and blood pressure outcomes. This study used data from a diverse sample of African American, Latino, and Caucasian participants (N=198). Results from a series of multiple regressions indicated anger and total childhood maltreatment were robust predictors of poorer health. Although correlational analyses found maltreatment from the mother and father were associated with poorer health outcomes, when considered as part of the regression models, only a relationship between maltreatment from the mother and physical health was found. Greater anger scores were linked with lower blood pressure, particularly systolic blood pressure. Generally, more psychological and physical symptom reporting was found with greater anger scores, and higher levels of total maltreatment also predicted physical symptoms. The pattern of interactions indicated anger was more detrimental for African American participant's (and marginally so for Latino participant's) physical health. Interestingly, interactions also indicated total childhood maltreatment was related to fewer symptoms for Latino participants. Although child maltreatment may be viewed as a moral and/or human rights issue, this study provides evidence that it can also be viewed as a public health issue. Our study demonstrated that known health risk factors such as anger and maltreatment may operate in a different pattern dependent on ethnic/cultural background. The findings suggest health and health disparities research would benefit from greater exploration of the differential impact of certain moderating variables based on racial/ethnic background. PMID:24582658

  3. Cognitive coping and defense styles in patients with personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Wijk-Herbrink; H. Andrea; R. Verheul

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the associations between cognitive coping (as measured with the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire; CERQ), defense mechanisms (as measured with the Defense Style Questionnaire-60; DSQ-60) and personality disorders (PDs; as measured with the SIDP-IV interview) in a lar

  4. Cognitive coping and defense styles in patients with personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Wijk-Herbrink (Marjolein); H. Andrea (Helene); R. Verheul (Roel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigates the associations between cognitive coping (as measured with the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire; CERQ), defense mechanisms (as measured with the Defense Style Questionnaire- 60; DSQ-60) and personality disorders (PDs; as measured with the SIDP-IV interv

  5. COPING: IMPORTANCE OF CONTEXTUAL FACTORS AND MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    Coping skills cover an important area in rehabilitation counseling field. Bipolarity of coping skills as being adaptive or not adaptive has been prevalent throughout the literature. On the other hand, influence of contextual factors on coping skills has been underemphasized.  Recent researches indicate that contextual factors play major role in coping skills. This paper examines importance of contextual factors on coping skills particularly in relation to assessment issues in rehabilitation c...

  6. The role of patients' illness representations in coping and functioning with Addison's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between illness representations, coping behaviour and adaptive outcome in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Design: Cross-sectional. Following Leventhal's self-regulation model (Leventhal, Meyer & Nerenz, 1980), it was hypothesized that illness representati

  7. Review of the Book “Defense Mechanisms. Coping Strategies. Self-Regulation”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoil Mavrodiev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This book deals with coping strategies and defense mechanisms as two kinds of self-regulation of human behaviour. The defense mechanisms are described with some examples of fiction books.

  8. Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Military Population: Differences by Trauma Context and Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Worthen, M; Rathod, SD; Cohen, G.; Sampson, L; Ursano, R; Gifford, R; Fullerton, C; Galea, S.; Ahern, J.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. Studies have found a stronger association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in military populations than in nonmilitary populations. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain this difference: Military populations are more prone to anger than nonmilitary populations, and traumas experienced on deployment create more anger than nondeployment traumas. To examine these hypotheses, we evaluated the associat...

  9. Neural substrates involved in anger induced by audio-visual film clips among patients with alcohol dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mi-Sook; Lee, Bae Hwan; Sohn, Jin-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the neural circuitry underlying anger processing among alcoholics. The purpose of this study was to examine the altered brain activity of alcoholic individuals during transient anger emotion. Methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 18 male patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence in an inpatient alcohol treatment facility and 16 social drinkers with similar demographics were scanned during the viewing of anger-provoking film clips. R...

  10. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Helps with Anger Issues in the Severe and Persistently Mentally Ill (SPMI) Population

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Ann Edins

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study conducted which used Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) to help with anger issues in people who have been previously diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI). Fifty-six participants were studied and questioned in depth for an understanding of their anger issues; as they relate to their diagnosis. Some of the questions that were considered were as follows: Is anger a direct result of their diagnosis? Is the medication they take somehow responsible? ...

  11. The relationship of anger and cognitive distortions with violence in violent offenders’ population: A meta-analytic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Pintea; Simona V. Chereji; Daniel David

    2012-01-01

    In the present meta-analysis, the magnitude of the relationship between cognitive distortions and anger and violent behaviour of incarcerated offenders, based on selected data for the relationship between anger and violence, and cognitive distortions and violence was empirically assessed. Out of nineteen studies included for analysis nine of them contain statistical indicators regarding the relationship between anger and violence, and fourteen studies regarding cognitive distortions and viole...

  12. Determination of the Relation between Metabolic Syndrome and Anger in Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2015-09-01

    Material and Methods: The study included 78 obese women presenting to the diet outpatient clinic of Kahramanmaras Onikisubat Public Health Center between 1 June and 30 August 2014. Results: The mean age of the participants was 38.1+/-11.1 years (min=18, max=62. Forty-two participants (53.8% were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome, but 36 (46.2% did not fulfill the criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Forty-six participants (59.0% had obesity, 16 (20.5% had severe obesity and 16 (20.5% had morbid obesity. The participants diagnosed as metabolic syndrome had 21.1+/-5.4 and those without metabolic syndrome had 22.7+/-6.4 for the subscale of continuous anger. The participants with metabolic syndrome got significantly higher scores for continuous anger (p=0.011. The participants with metabolic syndrome and those without metabolic syndrome had similar scores for the subscale anger-in (p=0.058 and the subscale anger control (p=0.196. The participants with metabolic syndrome got significantly lower scores for the subscale anger-out (p=0.004. Conclusion: The study revealed that obese women diagnosed as metabolic syndrome had lower scores for Continuous Anger-Anger Manner Scale. Offering social and psychological support for people treated for obesity is important for mental health of these people. Follow-up of the patients offered treatment for obesity by a team including a psychiatrist can increase these patients' compliance with their diet and help to prevent comorbid psychopathologies. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 525-533

  13. Study Finds Chronic Anger In U.S.Workplace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆小鹿

    1999-01-01

    据调查,美国近1/4的工人在工作场所长期感到“愤怒”。 其后果是严重的:Angry employees tend to have less energy snd interest inthe job. 怒从何来?下句中的5个由by引导的介词短语道出了全部真情: Employees are most likely to be angered ba a boss or supervisor(主管),by afellow employee or by others in the workplace not being productive,by tightdeadlines(催逼甚紧的最后期限)or by heavy workloads(工作量). 其中第2、3个介词短语(by a fellow employee or by others in the workplacenot being productive)不可忽视,分词短语折射出了工人的精神状态:anger的原由之一竟是伙伴的not being productive! 本文对这种现象有一“高屋建瓴”的分析: A turbulent(喧闹的)economic environment that has produced,on the onehand,productivity and growth and. on the other,wrenching(带来痛苦的)change and uncertainty,has buffeted(冲击)the workplace. 问题的两个方面通过上句的 on the one hand和 on the other讲得一清二楚。 这种anger也会演变,演变成本文所说的 workplace aggression,其最高形式是 resort to(诉诸)violence. 本文的末段出现了一个大家已经很熟悉的词汇:rampages(疯狂?

  14. Children’s Self-Regulation and School Achievement in Cultural Contexts: The Role of Maternal Restrictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam eWeis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulation can be developed through parent-child interactions and has been related to developmental outcomes, e.g. such as educational achievement. This study examined cross-cultural differences and similarities in maternal restrictive control, self-regulation (i.e., behavior and emotion regulation and school achievement and relations among these variables in Germany and Chile. Seventy-six German and 167 Chilean fourth graders, their mothers, and their teachers participated. Mothers and teachers rated children’s behavior regulation with a subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Children reported their use of emotion regulation strategies on the Questionnaire for the Measurement of Stress and Coping. Mothers rated maternal restrictive control by answering the Parenting Practice Questionnaire. School achievement was assessed by grades for language and mathematics. Results showed higher behavior regulation of German children in comparison to Chilean children and a higher preference of restrictive parental control in Chilean mothers than in German mothers. Regression analyses revealed positive relations between children’s behavior regulation and school achievement in Germany and in Chile. Further, in both cultural contexts, maternal restrictive control was related negatively to behavior regulation and positively to anger-oriented emotion regulation. In sum, the study showed the central function of behavior regulation for school achievement underlining negative relations of maternal restrictive control with children’s self-regulation and school achievement in diverse cultural contexts. Culturally adapted interventions related to parenting practices to promote children’s behavior regulation may assist in also promoting children’s school achievement.

  15. The Effects of an Online Mind-Body Training Program on Stress, Coping Strategies, Emotional Intelligence, Resilience and Psychological State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Ha; Ha, Tae Min; Oh, Chang Young; Lee, UI Soon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Jungwon; Park, Jae-Oh; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of an online mind-body training (MBT) program on participants’ stress, anger, coping strategies, emotional intelligence, resilience, and positive and negative affect. Forty-two healthy women participated in an online MBT program for approximately 8–10 minutes a day for 8 weeks; a control group of 45 healthy women did not participate in the program. Self-report psychological questionnaires were administered before the beginning of the program and at 4 and 8 weeks following its onset. Data from the MBT group and the control group were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and Student’s t-tests. Significant time x group interaction effects were found with respect to stress, coping strategies, anger, emotional intelligence, negative affect and resilience. These results demonstrate beneficial effects of the online MBT program and significant improvements in the psychological capabilities of participants compared with the control group. The effects of online MBT program were similar with those of the previous offline MBT in psychological aspects, suggesting further studies for neuroscientific evidence related stress and emotion of online MBT effects. PMID:27479499

  16. The Effects of an Online Mind-Body Training Program on Stress, Coping Strategies, Emotional Intelligence, Resilience and Psychological State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Ha; Ha, Tae Min; Oh, Chang Young; Lee, Ui Soon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Jungwon; Park, Jae-Oh; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of an online mind-body training (MBT) program on participants' stress, anger, coping strategies, emotional intelligence, resilience, and positive and negative affect. Forty-two healthy women participated in an online MBT program for approximately 8-10 minutes a day for 8 weeks; a control group of 45 healthy women did not participate in the program. Self-report psychological questionnaires were administered before the beginning of the program and at 4 and 8 weeks following its onset. Data from the MBT group and the control group were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and Student's t-tests. Significant time x group interaction effects were found with respect to stress, coping strategies, anger, emotional intelligence, negative affect and resilience. These results demonstrate beneficial effects of the online MBT program and significant improvements in the psychological capabilities of participants compared with the control group. The effects of online MBT program were similar with those of the previous offline MBT in psychological aspects, suggesting further studies for neuroscientific evidence related stress and emotion of online MBT effects. PMID:27479499

  17. Learning to cope with stress modulates anterior cingulate cortex stargazin expression in monkeys and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex G; Capanzana, Roxanne; Brockhurst, Jacqueline; Cheng, Michelle Y; Buckmaster, Christine L; Absher, Devin; Schatzberg, Alan F; Lyons, David M

    2016-05-01

    Intermittent mildly stressful situations provide opportunities to learn, practice, and improve coping with gains in subsequent emotion regulation. Here we investigate the effects of learning to cope with stress on anterior cingulate cortex gene expression in monkeys and mice. Anterior cingulate cortex is involved in learning, memory, cognitive control, and emotion regulation. Monkeys and mice were randomized to either stress coping or no-stress treatment conditions. Profiles of gene expression were acquired with HumanHT-12v4.0 Expression BeadChip arrays adapted for monkeys. Three genes identified in monkeys by arrays were then assessed in mice by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of a key gene (PEMT) involved in acetylcholine biosynthesis was increased in monkeys by coping but this result was not verified in mice. Another gene (SPRY2) that encodes a negative regulator of neurotrophic factor signaling was decreased in monkeys by coping but this result was only partly verified in mice. The CACNG2 gene that encodes stargazin (also called TARP gamma-2) was increased by coping in monkeys as well as mice randomized to coping with or without subsequent behavioral tests of emotionality. As evidence of coping effects distinct from repeated stress exposures per se, increased stargazin expression induced by coping correlated with diminished emotionality in mice. Stargazin modulates glutamate receptor signaling and plays a role in synaptic plasticity. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity that mediate learning and memory in the context of coping with stress may provide novel targets for new treatments of disorders in human mental health. PMID:27003116

  18. Female murderers: Examination of the relationship between childhood traumatic experiences and anger expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrem Akduman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Adverse childhood period and abuse experiences may lead to some problems later in life. One of these problems is aggressive behavior, which is thought to be a reflection of the child’s increasing anger (Page, 2004; Olive, 2007.  Based on the fact that negative childhood experiences can lead to aggressive emotions, investigating the relationship between traumatic childhood experiences and female convicts’ aggression expression styles was considered important. Sample of the research consists of 77 females who are homicide convicts selected from correctional institutes in three different cities. Data gathered from the participants were examined by using the Turkish versions of The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and The State-Trait Anger Scale. A positive and meaningful relationship between childhood trauma experiences and trait anger levels of participants was observed. In addition, there was a significant relationship between childhood trauma experiences and domestic violence as well as perceived problematic relationship with family members during childhood. Trait anger and internal anger were also found to be significantly related to perceived problematic relationship with family members during childhood.   Results of the analyses were discussed in detail.

  19. Efektivitas Anger Management Training Untuk Menurunkan Agresivitas Pada Remaja Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrizulhaidi Nasrizulhaidi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui efektivitas anger management training untuk menurunkan agresivitas pada remaja disruptive behavior disorders. Subjek penelitian dipilih melalui screening dengan skala CPRS (Conduct Problem Risk Screen dan pengukuran agresivitas dengan skala Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BAQ. AMT (Anger Management Training berupa psikoedukasi, yang mempelajari tentang pemahaman dasar marah, ekspresi marah dan akibatnya, mengidentifikasi diri saat marah, mengontrol pikiran marah dan menentukan tingkat kemarahan. Selanjutnya memahami anger management melalui film, relaksasi otot dan pernapasan, cara menyelesaikan konflik, cara mengontrol marah dan perencanaan dalam mengontrol marah. Adapun metode intervensi yang digunakan terdiri dari diskusi kasus, latihan individual, presentasi dan modelling perilaku. Penempatan subjek dengan random assignment dibagi menjadi dua kelompok. Kelompok eksperimen berjumlah 10 orang, mendapat AMT selama 3 kali pertemuan dan setiap pertemuan memerlukan waktu 120 menit. Sementara subjek di kelompok kontrol juga berjumlah 10 orang, namun tidak mendapatkan perlakuan. Dapat disimpulkan anger management efektif untuk menurunkan agresivitas. Dalam hal ini subjek di kelompok eksperimen mengalami penurunan agresivitas setelah mendapat AMT dan subjek di kelompok kontrol mengalami peningkatan agresivitas karena tidak mendapatkan AMT. Selain itu AMT dapat pula diberikan pada individu yang memiliki kemampuan di bawah rata-rata, dengan memodifikasi program yang lebih berbentuk operasional konkrit. Kata kunci: anger management training, agresivitas, disruptive behavior disorders

  20. Emotion-relevant impulsivity predicts sustained anger and aggression after remission in bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anger and aggression are of concern even during remission for persons with bipolar I disorder, although there is substantial variability in the degree of anger and aggression across individuals. Little research is available to examine psychological models of anger and aggression for those with remitted bipolar disorder, and that was the goal of this study. Participants were 58 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, who were followed with monthly symptom severity interviews until they achieved remission, and then assessed using the Aggression-Short Form. We examined traditional predictors of clinical parameters and trauma exposure, and then considered three trait domains that have been shown to be elevated in bipolar disorder and have also been linked to aggression outside of bipolar disorder: emotion-relevant impulsivity, approach motivation, and dominance-related constructs. Emotion-relevant impulsivity was related to anger, hostility, verbal aggression, and physical aggression, even after controlling for clinical variables. Findings extend the importance of emotion-relevant impulsivity to another important clinical outcome and suggest the promise of using psychological models to understand the factors driving aggression and anger problems that persist into remission among persons with bipolar disorder. PMID:26437231

  1. On the Relationship between Work Pressure and Job Burnout among Front-line Employees of Star-rated Hotels in Scenic Spots---Regulation Effect of Trait Coping Style%旅游景区星级酒店一线服务人员工作压力与职业倦怠的关系--特质应对方式的调节作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付洪利; 罗利

    2014-01-01

    The Work Stress Questionnaire,Trait Coping Style Questionnaire(TCSQ)and Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey(MBI-GS)were used to investigate 98 front-line employees of star-rated hotels in Leshan.The purpose is to find out about the relationship among work stress,coping style and job burnout,and to test the regulation effect of coping style on work stress and job burnout.The results are shown as follows:①The front-line employees’work stress in the star-rated hotels was at the middle level,and they were more likely to use positive coping style;②Job burnout was positively related to work stress and negative coping style(r=0.72,r=0.66),but negatively related to the positive coping style (r=-0.33);Work stress was negatively related to positive coping style (r=-0.33),but positively related to negative coping style(r=0.50);③Hierar-chical linear regression analysis showed that job burnout was positively predicted by work stress,and two coping styles were found to have a significant regulating effect between work stress and job burnout.Conclusion:For frontline hotel employees more positive coping strategies rather than negative coping ones should be used to ease the job burnout resulted from work stress.%采用工作压力问卷、特质应对方式问卷和职业倦怠问卷对乐山市旅游景区星级酒店的98名一线服务人员进行调查研究,以考查三者的关系,以及特质应对方式在工作压力和职业倦怠间的调节作用.研究表明:(1)酒店一线服务人员的工作压力处于中等水平;习惯采用积极应对的方式;(2)职业倦怠与工作压力、消极应对呈正相关(r分别为0.72、0.66),与积极应对呈负相关(r=-0.33);工作压力与积极应对呈负相关(r=-0.33),与消极应对呈正相关(r=0.50);(3)分层线性回归分析表明工作压力对职业倦怠有正向预测作用,两种应对方式在工作压力与职业倦怠间的调节作用显著.结论:对于旅游酒店一线

  2. Genetic association of the transcription of neuroplasticity-related genes and variation in stress-coping style

    OpenAIRE

    Aizawa, Saeko; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Masuda, Koji; Inoue, Ayako; Oshita, Harumi; Hirakawa, Hirofumi; Ninomiya, Taiga; Maruyama, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Kana; Kawashima, Chiwa; Nakanishi, Mari; Higuma, Haruka; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Akiyoshi, Jotaro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stress coping has been defined as the cognitive and behavioral efforts made to conquer, endure, or decrease external and internal demands and the conflicts between them. It has two main elements: the control or modification of the person–environment relationship causing the stress (i.e., problem-focused coping) and/or regulation of stressful feelings (i.e., emotion-focused coping). Research suggests that the expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophic...

  3. Coping When You're Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Siblings Cope Parents Weigh in on Sibling Issues Co-Parenting a Child with PH You and Your Partner: ... Siblings Cope Parents Weigh in on Sibling Issues Co-Parenting a Child with PH You and Your Partner: ...

  4. Coping with PH over the Long Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Siblings Cope Parents Weigh in on Sibling Issues Co-Parenting a Child with PH You and Your Partner: ... Siblings Cope Parents Weigh in on Sibling Issues Co-Parenting a Child with PH You and Your Partner: ...

  5. Stress and the Athlete: Coping with Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Athletes, including recreational athletes, must cope with stress, both from within and from others. The causes of stress, identifying the distressed athlete, and coping with stress are dealt with. (MT)

  6. ストレス課題における心臓血管系反応に対する怒り表出性の検討 : anger expression-inの効果

    OpenAIRE

    石原, 俊一

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that anger expressions such as anger-in, anger-out, and anger-control contribute to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). In the 1980s, an increased number of studies indicated that anger and hostility were directly related to CHD. Dembroski et al. reported the relationship between angiographically documented coronary arteriosclerosis and anger and hostility. Williams et al. found a relationship between the scale of hostility in the Minnesota Multiph...

  7. The adaptive problems of female teenage refugees and their behavioral adjustment methods for coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaidat, Fatin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the levels of adaptive problems among teenage female refugees in the government schools and explored the behavioral methods that were used to cope with the problems. The sample was composed of 220 Syrian female students (seventh to first secondary grades) enrolled at government schools within the Zarqa Directorate and who came to Jordan due to the war conditions in their home country. The study used the scale of adaptive problems that consists of four dimensions (depression, anger and hostility, low self-esteem, and feeling insecure) and a questionnaire of the behavioral adjustment methods for dealing with the problem of asylum. The results indicated that the Syrian teenage female refugees suffer a moderate degree of adaptation problems, and the positive adjustment methods they have used are more than the negatives. PMID:27175098

  8. Stressed Out: How Stress Develops and How to Cope with it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortillaro Marcello

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our experience of stress depends on how we evaluate the circumstances impacting our individual well-being. In principle, any event can be a stressor. Certain events can produce complex emotional states, such as a mixture of anger and worry. If such states are prolonged, they can lead to stress. Stress can be identified by means of such expressive components as facial expression and signs of stress in the voice. Indeed, the voice is particularly sensitive to stress and is frequently used to measure stress levels. Coping strategies differ from person to person and are not mutually exclusive. Often, people use multiple strategies at the same time. Not all of these strategies are good for individual well-being or favor a cooperation-based work culture. To avoid employee burnout, companies should keep an eye on the stress load of their employees and develop trainings to increase emotional competences and improve constructive stress management.

  9. Eating Disorders as Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Amy M.; Much, Kari

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the complex nature of eating disorders, specifically highlighting their use as coping mechanisms for underlying emotional and psychological concerns. Case examples of college counseling center clients are discussed in order to illustrate common ways in which eating disorders are utilized by clients with varying…

  10. Grief: Helping Young Children Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Frances B.

    2008-01-01

    In their role as caregivers supporting the children they teach, it is important for teachers to understand the grieving process and recognize symptoms of grief. The author explains Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's five stages of grief and offers 10 classroom strategies to help young children cope with their feelings.

  11. Appraisal, Personality, And Coping Choice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Janušová, P.

    Lanškroun: GOSC Group, s.r.o., 2001. s. 442. [The Tenth European Congress on Work and Organizational Psychology . 16.05.2001-19.05.2001, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : coping * appraisal * personality Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  12. CONSUMER COPING STRATEGIES OF EATING LOCAL

    OpenAIRE

    Bingen, Jim; Sage, Julie; Sirieix, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an exploratory investigation of the coping strategies of a small group of local food consumer “activists” –those committed to, and those who promote “eating locally” in Michigan. Following a brief review of discussions surrounding different definitions of local food and the concept of coping strategy, this paper presents the methods for collecting preliminary information about local food coping strategies in Michigan and then discusses the coping strategies o...

  13. Validation of the mindful coping scale

    OpenAIRE

    Kjersti B. Tharaldsen; Bru, Edvin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to develop and validate a self-report measure of mindfulness and coping, the mindful coping scale (MCS). Dimensions of mindful coping were theoretically deduced from mindfulness theory and coping theory. The MCS was empirically evaluated by use of factor analyses, reliability testing and nomological network validation. The study’s participants were high school students from two high schools, covering all streams. Further validation was obtained by co...

  14. Coping strategies in anxious surgical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aust, Hansjoerg; Rüsch, Dirk; Schuster, Maike; Sturm, Theresa; Brehm, Felix; Nestoriuc, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaesthesia and surgery provoke preoperative anxiety and stress. Patients try to regain control of their emotions by using coping efforts. Coping may be more effective if supported by specific strategies or external utilities. This study is the first to analyse coping strategies in a large population of patients with high preoperative anxiety. Methods We assessed preoperative anxiety and coping preferences in a consecutive sample of 3087 surgical patients using validated scales (Am...

  15. Dispositional optimism and coping with pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bargiel-Matusiewicz K; Krzyszkowska A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this article is to analyze the relation between dispositional optimism and coping with chronic pain. The study seeks to define the relation between life orientation (optimism vs. pessimism) and coping with pain (believes about pain control and the choice of coping strategy). Material and methods The following questionnaires were used: LOT-R - Life Orientation Test, BPCQ - The Beliefs about Pain Control Questionnaire and CSQ - The Pain Coping Strategies Questionna...

  16. Involuntary coping mechanisms: a psychodynamic perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vaillant, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Coping responses to stress can be divided into three broad categories. The first coping category involves voluntarily mobilizing social supports. The second category involves voluntary coping strategies like rehearsing responses to danger. The third coping category, like fever and leukocytosis, is involuntary. It entails deploying unconscious homeostatic mechanisms that reduce the disorganizing effects of sudden stress, DSM-5 offers a tentative hierarchy of defenses, from psychotic to immatur...

  17. COPING STRATEGIES AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanovic, S.; Perunicic, I.; Todorovic, D.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the use of coping strategies in children. The sample consisted of 240 children of primary school. They were administrated Children's Coping Strategies Checklist (CCSC, Ayers, Sandler, West, & Roos, 1996). By factor analysis we extracted 4 factors of coping strategies: Active Coping, Avoidance Strategies, Support Seeking Strategies and Distraction Strategies. Using Canonical Discriminatory Function we have found that girls gene...

  18. Predicting coping styles in adolescence following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research have established the importance of coping when dealing with a stressful or traumatic event. Individuals tend to use the same overall coping styles across situations, and correlational studies have demonstrated a relationship between individual characteristics and coping. Howev...

  19. With a little coping from my friends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Tanja; Waldstrøm, Christian; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the distributed nature of coping and thereby expand the understanding of coping as more than a transaction between the individual and a specific stressful situation. We argue that coping is not just an individual process, but is embedded in the organizational and thereby...

  20. Coping with the Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Per

    2002-01-01

    The implementation of environmental management practices in industrial companies has grown exponentially in recent years. In Denmark, more than 700 companies have been awarded an ISO 14001 certificate or are EMAS registered. It is often stressed that these companies, compared with the average...... company, are proactive and work more intensively with cleaner production and consider their production from a life cycle perspective. In a survey of the first 116 companies in Denmark, which had implemented environmental management practices by the beginning of 1998, we examined how the initial...... environmental review was carried out and what different environmental solutions resulted. The conclusion is that the environmentally certified companies deal with more environmental relations than environmental regulation normally envisages. This more frequently results in the implementation of cleaner...

  1. Lesson Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum within an Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Emily L.; Carlson, John S.; Guthrie, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Four fourth-grade boys participated in an anger management group using "Seeing Red: An Anger Management and Peacemaking Curriculum for Kids" facilitated by a school psychology intern and her supervisor (J. Simmonds, 2003). The group met for 30 min weekly for a total of 14 sessions. Lessons consisted of practicing skills and strategies related to…

  2. Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This commentary responds to "Lessons Learned From Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School," E. L. Sportsman, J. S. Carlson, and K. M. Guthrie's (2010/this issue) account of an anger control intervention's implementation and effectiveness in an elementary school setting. The accompanying article…

  3. The Relationship between the Recognition of Facial Expressions and Self-Reported Anger in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Kate A.; Rose, John

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study aims to examine the relationship between how individuals with intellectual disabilities report their own levels of anger, and the ability of those individuals to recognize emotions. It was hypothesized that increased expression of anger would be linked to lower ability to recognize facial emotional expressions and increased…

  4. The Relation of Brain Behavioral Systems, D Personality Type, Anger and Hostility in People with Gum Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Akbari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gum disease is a chronic bacterial infection that affects the gum structures. Given the importance of psychological factors and their impact on physical condition such as gum disease, the aim of this study was to investigate D personality type, brain behavioral systems and anger and hostility in people with gum disease. Materials and Methods: In this causal-comparative study, 50 women with and 50 women without gum disease (age range from 14 to 37 were selected using purposive sampling method and completed the questionnaires of multidimensional anger (Sigel, 1986, D personality type scale, Behavioral inhibition/activation system. MANOVA was used for data analysis. Results: Data analysis showed that groups had significant differences in behavioral inhibition system, behavioral activation system and its components (response to drives, fun seeking, reward responsiveness, D personality type and its components (negative affectivity, social inhibition, anger-arousal, hostile attitude and anger-in (p<0.05, but there were no differences in anger arousing situations and anger-out between them. Conclusion: People with gum disease score higher in BIS, and lower in BAS than normal people, and score higher in D personality type and its components, anger-arousal, hostile outlook, and anger-in. This suggests that psychological factors play a significant role in developing and continuing gum disease and possibly other psychosomatic disorders. So this study focuses on the decisive role of psychological treatments in prevention and promotion of physical and psychological health of people.

  5. Effects of anger and sadness on attentional patterns in decision making: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Cai

    2014-02-01

    Past research examining the effect of anger and sadness on decision making has associated anger with a relatively more heuristic decision-making approach. However, it is unclear whether angry and sad individuals differ while attending to decision-relevant information. An eye-tracking experiment (N=87) was conducted to examine the role of attention in links between emotion and decision making. Angry individuals looked more and earlier toward heuristic cues while making decisions, whereas sad individuals did not show such bias. Implications for designing persuasive messages and studying motivated visual processing were discussed. PMID:24765709

  6. Coping with a community stressor: a proposed hazardous waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    This study examined a number of factors believed to influence community involvement. Residents of a rural community near Phoenix, Arizona, where a hazardous waste facility had been proposed to built, were interviewed at home in August 1982. Most residents were chosen at random (n = 70) while a smaller number (n = 29) were selected because of known involvement in activities regarding the hazardous waste facility. Residents who perceived the facility as a threat to their health, safety, and general well-being employed a number of coping strategies. Strategies to change or alter the source of stress, problem-focused coping, were associated with greater community involvement. Strategies to regulate one's emotional response to stress, emotion-focused coping, were associated with less community involvement. Increased self-efficacy and sense of community led to increased community involvement. Both measures indirectly influenced community involvement through different modes of coping. Self-efficacy was negatively related to emotion-focused coping while sense of community was positively related to problem-focused coping. Increased demoralization was associated with decreased self-efficacy, increased emotion-focused coping, and decreased community involvement. The results suggest that the psychologically most fragile residents are underrepresented in community activities, and that the use of high levels of emotion-focused coping may have been maladaptive.

  7. The Role of Anger Rumination and Autism Spectrum Disorder-Linked Perseveration in the Experience of Aggression in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Fritz, Matthew S.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    This study (a) examined the role of anger rumination as a mediator of the relation between social anxiety and the experience of anger, hostility, and aggression, in the general population, and (b) evaluated the degree to which the presence of autism spectrum disorder characteristics moderates the indirect influence of anger rumination. We then…

  8. The consequences of coping with stalking-results from the first qualitative study on stalking in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Katrine Bindesbøl Holm; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    -regulation as a coping strategy has social and psychological consequences for the victims, leading to various degrees of social isolation and apprehension. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that it is necessary to consider how professionals advise victims to cope with their situation as how legal measures should focus...

  9. Caritas, spirituality and religiosity in nurses' coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedahl, M A; Wengström, Y

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate registered nurses' coping processes when working with terminally ill and dying cancer patients, with special focus on religious aspects of coping resources. What religious components can be identified as coping resources in oncology nurses' orienting system and what function has religiosity in the nurse's work? The theoretical reference is care philosophy and the psychology of religion and coping. The material consists of interviews with 15 Swedish registered oncology nurses. The results highlight different dynamic aspects of the nurses' life orientation such as caritas, religiosity, spirituality and atheism and demonstrate that religiosity can have a protective function that facilitates coping, as the nurse has something to turn to. Religious coping dominated by basic trust where prayer is used as a coping strategy may support the nurse. PMID:20030696

  10. The social epidemiology of coping with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, B E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the cross-sectional association between coping responses with infertility and occupational social class. Infertility is evenly distributed across social classes in Denmark, and there is free access to high-quality assisted reproduction technology. METHODS: Data were based on...... measure was developed in four categories: active-avoidance coping; active-confronting coping; passive-avoidance coping; meaning-based coping. These subscales were later confirmed by factor analysis. Occupational social class was measured in a standardized way. RESULTS: Contrary to expectations, the...... logistic regression analyses showed that women from lower social classes V + VI and men from social classes III + IV used significantly more active-confronting coping. Women from lower social classes V + VI used significantly more meaning-based coping. Both men and women from social classes III - VI used...

  11. Clinical nurses' characterizations of patient coping problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becket, N

    1991-01-01

    The author reports the findings from a qualitative study of diagnostic data obtained and interpreted by hospital nurses on the coping of adult patients and their families. Clinical data taken from taped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory and analytic induction techniques. The data were then compared with diagnoses accepted for testing by NANDA. The phenomena described by the research did not match the NANDA constructs for individual and family coping problems. Nurses' assessments of coping response, however, fit within transactional theory. The use of the term "ineffective" to qualify coping was generally avoided. Ineffective coping, suggesting an outcome or product of coping, was not often considered applicable to the coping responses nurses found appropriate at specific times in specific situations. PMID:1873103

  12. Tentativa de crianças em lidar com as emoções de raiva e tristeza Children trying to deal with emotions of anger and sadness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Bompastor Borges Dias

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo focaliza respostas de crianças sobre como parar o sentimento de tristeza e raiva, o que implica explorar estratégias de alterações de humor, i.e., pensamentos sobre como regular as emoções. Foi perguntado a crianças brasileiras e norueguesas de 5, 7 e 9 anos de idade como a tristeza e a raiva podiam cessar em 4 diferentes contextos para cada emoção. Os resultados mostram que as estratégias de regulação das emoções (RE variavam em função do contexto e da idade; que as crianças brasileiras usaram mais a interação social e as crianças norueguesas recorreram mais às estratégias cognitivas para raiva, mas não para tristeza. Não foi observada uma diferença clara na estratégia de RE para tristeza e raiva.The present study focus on children's cognitions of how to stop feeling sad and angry, which implies an exploration of their meta mood strategies, i.e. thoughts about how to regulate emotions. It was asking 5, 7, and 9-year-old Brazilian and Norwegian children how sadness and anger could be stopped in 4 different contexts for each emotion. The results showed that ER strategies varied with context and age, that Brazilian children used more social interaction and Norwegian children more cognitive strategies for anger, but not for sadness, and that even three year old children could state different strategies in different emotion contexts. There was not observed a clear difference in ER strategy for sadness and anger.

  13. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction for African-American Men through Health Empowerment and Anger Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Torrance; Braithwaite, Harold; Johnson, Larry; Harris, Catrell; Katkowsky, Steven; Troutman, Adewale

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine impact of CVD risk reduction intervention for African-American men in the Atlanta Empowerment Zone (AEZ) designed to target anger management. Design: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test was employed as a non-parametric alternative to the t-test for independent samples. This test was employed because the data used in this analysis…

  14. He drove forward with a yell: anger in medicine and Homer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, A; Marshall, R; Levine, D

    2014-06-01

    We use Homer and Sun Tzu as a background to better understand and reformulate confrontation, anger and violence in medicine, contrasting an unproductive 'love of war' with a productive 'art of war' or 'art of strategy'. At first glance, it is a paradox that the healing art is not pacific, but riddled with militaristic language and practices. On closer inspection, we find good reasons for this cultural paradox yet regret its presence. Drawing on insights from Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey, we argue for better understanding of confrontation, anger, bullying, intimidation and violence in medicine in order to change the culture. For example, equating medicine with war is not a given condition of medicine but a convenient metaphor with historical origins and a historical trajectory. Other, non-martial metaphors, such as medicine as collaboration, may be more appropriate in an age of team-based care. Taking lessons from Homer, we suggest three key ways in which cold-hearted confrontation and anger in medicine can be transformed into productive, warm-hearted engagement: the transformation of angry impulse into (1) reflection, (2) moral courage and (3) empathy. Thinking with Homer can offer an aesthetically and morally charged alternative to the current body of literature on topics, such as anger in doctors, and how this may be 'managed', without recourse to an instrumental economy where emotions are viewed as commodities, and emotional responses can be 'trained' through communication skills courses. PMID:24194554

  15. The Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (1994 Version) in Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI, 1994 version) in Dutch violent forensic psychiatric patients and secondary vocational students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the subscale structure of the NAS was carried out, reliability was investigated, and relations were calculated between…

  16. Factor Structure of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5: Relationships Among Symptom Clusters, Anger, and Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Contractor, Ateka; Shea, Tracie; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    Scarce data are available regarding the dimensional structure of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and how factors relate to external constructs. We evaluated six competing models of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, including Anhedonia, Externalizing Behaviors, and Hybrid models, using confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 412 trauma-exposed college students. We then examined whether PTSD symptom clusters were differentially related to measures of anger and impulsivity using Wald chi-square tests. The seven-factor Hybrid model was deemed optimal compared with the alternatives. All symptom clusters were associated with anger; the strongest association was between externalizing behaviors and anger (r = 0.54). All symptom clusters, except reexperiencing and avoidance, were associated with impulsivity, with the strongest association between externalizing behaviors and impulsivity (r = 0.49). A seven-factor Hybrid model provides superior fit to DSM-5 PTSD symptom data, with the externalizing behaviors factor being most strongly related to anger and impulsivity. PMID:26669984

  17. State narcissism and aggression: The mediating roles of anger and hostile attributional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caina; Sun, Ying; Ho, Man Yee; You, Jin; Shaver, Phillip R; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-07-01

    Prior research has documented a relationship between narcissism and aggression but has focused only on dispositional narcissism without considering situational factors that may increase narcissism temporarily. This study explored the possibility that an increase in state narcissism would foster aggressive responding by increasing anger and hostile attributional bias following unexpected provocation among 162 college students from China. We created a guided-imagination manipulation to heighten narcissism and investigated its effects on anger, aroused hostile attribution bias, and aggressive responses following a provocation with a 2 (narcissism/neutral manipulation) × 2 (unexpected provocation/positive evaluation condition) between-subjects design. We found that the manipulation did increase self-reported state narcissism. The increase in state narcissism in turn heightened aggression, and this relation was mediated by increased anger. Regardless of the level of state narcissism, individuals were more aggressive after being provoked and this effect of provocation was mediated by hostile attributional bias. The findings indicate that narcissism can be temporarily heightened in a nonclinical sample of individuals, and that the effect of state narcissism on aggression is mediated by anger. Differences between state and trait narcissism and possible influences of culture are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:333-345, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27283271

  18. Pre-Service Classroom Teachers' Emotional Intelligence and Anger Expression Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin Baltaci, Hulya; Demir, Kamile

    2012-01-01

    In this study in which the pre-service classroom teachers' emotional intelligence and the ways of their anger expression styles were examined, correlational survey model was used. In total 342 students, 189 of whom were females and 153 of whom were males, constituted the participants of the research. The students are the first year and the senior…

  19. Enhanced sensitivity and response bias for male anger in women with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veague, Heather Barnett; Hooley, Jill M

    2014-03-30

    Interpersonal difficulties, which are characteristic of Borderline personality disorder (BPD), may be related to problems with social cognition. We explored facial emotion recognition in 44 women (15 with BPD, 15 healthy controls, and 14 with a history of childhood trauma but no BPD) examining the role of BPD and abuse history in the ability to detect fearful, angry and happy cues in emotional faces. In Task 1, participants viewed pictures of morphed faces containing different percentages of specific emotions and reported the emotion they saw. In Task 2, participants were asked to increase the intensity of a specific emotion on an initially neutral face until they could detect that emotion in the face. Across both tasks, BPD predicted the earlier detection of anger in male faces. BPD symptoms also predicted the misidentification of anger in male faces containing no anger cues. Although participants with BPD were slower to recognize happiness in male faces, their overall ability to recognize happiness was unimpaired. Abuse history did predict problems with happiness recognition. Finally, recognition of fear was unrelated to abuse history and BPD. Findings suggest that BPD is associated with a bias toward seeing anger in males and that this is independent of abuse history. PMID:24485062

  20. Communicating anger and contempt in intergroup conflict : Exploring their relational functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bartholomeus

    2015-01-01

    Although the experience of anger in intergroup conflict is typically viewed as a destructive force that is best kept under wraps, the current dissertation suggests that its communication can help de-escalate intergroup conflict because of its relational function. Specifically, this entails that the

  1. Anger and attitudinal reactions to negative feedback: The effects of emotional instability and power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemann, Jana; Wisse, Barbara; Rus, Diana; Van Yperen, Nico W.; Sassenberg, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Feedback is a basic tool that is used to stimulate learning and performance at all organizational levels. However, negative feedback can sometimes evoke defensive responses such as feelings of anger or the repudiation of the feedback. In two experiments we explored whether people’s negating response

  2. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  3. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants' anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  4. Analyzing the traditional and anti-traditional features in Look Back in Anger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 张宪

    2009-01-01

    The thesis takes John Osborne' s play Look Back in Anger as an example to analyze the new features in British dramas after the World War II. The thesis sums up the revolution of postwar drama by comparing with the traditional features of British dramas in the aspects of its writing style, language and the two sexual relationships.

  5. Posttraumatic Anger, Recalled Peritraumatic Emotions, and PTSD in Victims of Violent Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, M. J. J.; Winkel, F. W.; Bogaerts, S.

    2011-01-01

    A mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design was employed to explore the association between posttraumatic anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; symptoms) in victims of civilian violence. It was speculated that this relationship is mainly due to concurrent recalled peritraumatic emotions. Such emotions may be interpreted to result from…

  6. The Colors of Anger, Envy, Fear, and Jealously: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupka, Ralph B.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studies to what extent emotion words--anger, envy, fear, and jealousy--reminded samples of Americans, Germans, Mexicans, Poles and Russians, of 12 terms of color. Responses from 661 undergraduates suggest that cross-modal associations originate in universal human experiences and in culture-specific variables, such as language, mythology, and…

  7. Frontal cortical asymmetry may partially mediate the influence of social power on anger expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong eLi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies.

  8. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  9. Respect-Based Control and Anger as Determinants of Children's Socio-Emotional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awong, Tsasha; Grusec, Joan E.; Sorenson, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Shortly after the birth of their infants, teenage working-class mothers were assessed on attitudes toward the need for deference to family authority (respect-based control) and anger. Their children's internalizing and externalizing problems and self-esteem were assessed approximately 12 years later. High respect-based control was linked to higher…

  10. The Role of Depressed Mood and Anger in the Relationship between Family Conflict and Delinquent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigfusdottir, Inga-Dora; Farkas, George; Silver, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on R. Agnew's (Foundation for a general strain theory of crime and delinquency. Criminology 30: 47-87, 1992) general strain theory, this paper examines whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of family conflict on delinquency. We examine data on 7,758 students, 14-16 years old, attending the compulsory 9th and 10th grades of…

  11. Maternal Socialization of Children's Anger, Sadness, and Physical Pain in Two Communities in Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Vaishali Vidhatri; Martini, Tanya Susan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recognition of cultural influences in child socialization, little is known about socialization of emotion in children from different cultures. This study examined (a) Gujarati Indian mothers' reports concerning their beliefs, affective and behavioral responses to their children's displays of anger, sadness, and physical pain, and (b)…

  12. Anger Expression Styles of Hearing Impaired Individuals Doing Sport and Those Not Doing Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the anger expression styles between the sportive hearing impaired individuals and the sedentary hearing impaired individuals. In the sportive hearing impaired group, there were 170 participants: 62 females and 108 males doing basketball, volleyball and football teams as licensed sportsmen in various clubs…

  13. Group process as a mechanism of change in the group treatment of anger and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James; Holman, Krista; Seymour, Bailey; Dinges, Brandy; Ronan, George F

    2015-04-01

    Angry reactions can present unique challenges to the process of conducting group therapy, especially when providing group treatment to participants who have histories of angry or aggressive behavior. This article briefly reviews relevant literature and describes a group-based violence reduction training program (VRTP). The VRTP conceptualizes anger and aggression from a frustration-aggression framework and employs treatment derived from research in the area of social problem-solving. An emphasis is placed on how fostering group experiences consistent with Irving Yalom's classic work on the theory and practice of group therapy can reinforce skill acquisition and general treatment responsiveness. Management of the group process is a plausible mechanism of change in group treatment of anger. We highlight the challenges and benefits of dealing with anger-infused communication while ensuring the integrity of the overall group process. Case examples are provided for illustration of VRTP. Future research can answer important questions about group process and mechanisms of change in group-based treatments for anger and aggression. PMID:25760784

  14. Anger among Allies: Audre Lorde's 1981 Keynote Admonishing the National Women's Studies Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lester C.

    2011-01-01

    This essay argues that Audre Lorde's 1981 keynote speech, "The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism," has much to contribute to communication scholars' understanding of human biases and rhetorical artistry. The significance of Lorde's subject is one reason for devoting critical attention to her speech, because, in contemporary public life in…

  15. Frequently Used Coping Scales: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tsukasa

    2015-10-01

    This article reports the frequency of the use of coping scales in academic journals published from 1998 to 2010. Two thousand empirical journal articles were selected from the EBSCO database. The COPE, Ways of Coping Questionnaire, Coping Strategies Questionnaire, Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, Religious-COPE and Coping Response Inventory were frequently mentioned. In particular, the COPE (20.2%) and Ways of Coping Questionnaire (13.6%) were used the most frequently. In this literature reviewed, coping scales were most often used to assess coping with health issues (e.g. illness, pain and medical diagnoses) over other types of stressors, and patients were the most frequent participants. Further, alpha coefficients were estimated for the COPE subscales, and correlations between the COPE subscales and coping outcomes were calculated, including depressive symptoms, anxiety, negative affect, psychological distress, physical symptoms and well-being. PMID:24338955

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RELIGIOUS COPING AND COPING WITH STRESS METHODS: AN ANALYSIS FROM VARIOUS OF VARIABLE

    OpenAIRE

    KARAKAŞ, Ahmet Canan; KOÇ, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Stress is one of the main causes of many mental and physical illnesses. However, there are various ways of coping with stress. 'Religious coping' one of the ways of coping with stress, arises from the need to take refuge into self-superior beings. In this study, it is investigated whether there exist a relationship between religious coping and coping with stress in general with respect to various variables. This investigation was carried out by using stress inventory and religious coping scal...

  17. Anger expression, violent behavior, and symptoms of depression among male college students in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane Yemane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is an important global public health problem. Given the scarcity of studies involving African youths, this study was conducted to evaluate the associations of anger expression and violent behavior with symptoms of depression among male college students. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics and violent behavior among 1,176 college students in Awassa, Ethiopia in June, 2006. The questionnaire incorporated the Spielberger Anger-Out Expression (SAOE scale and symptoms of depression were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Multivariable logistic regression procedures were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. Results Symptoms of depression were evident in 23.6% of participants. Some 54.3% of students reported committing at least one act of violence in the current academic year; and 29.3% of students reported high (SAOE score ≥ 15 levels of anger-expression. In multivariate analysis, moderate (OR = 1.97; 95%CI 1.33–2.93 and high (OR = 3.23; 95%CI 2.14–4.88 outward anger were statistically significantly associated with increased risks of depressive symptoms. Violent behavior was noted to be associated with depressive symptoms (OR = 1.82; 95%CI 1.37–2.40. Conclusion Further research should be conducted to better characterize community and individual level determinants of anger-expression, violent behavior and depression among youths.

  18. THE ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANGER EXPRESSION AND EMPATHIC DISPOSITIONS OF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anger level and emphatic concern of young wrestlers and determine the relationship between anger expression and empathic dispositions of Turkish young national wrestling team players. The study was conducted in 46 wrestlers from Turkish young national wrestling team whose ages differed from 17 to 20 (19.0 ± 0.82. The Interpersonal Reactivity Index: IRI which was developed by Davis (1980 and translated into Turkish by Engeler (2005 and the Anger Expression Inventory which was developed by Spielberger (1988 and translated into Turkish by Özer (1994 have been used for collecting data. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk tests were employed to test whether or not scores obtained from the inventory followed a normal distribution before the statistical analyses of the data were initiated and it was found out that observation values did not follow a normal distribution. Since there is not a normal distribution of the data non-parametric correlation test Spearman Correlation was performed. Statistical analyses of the data obtained were performed using Portable IBM SPSS Statistics v19 program. Minimum and maximum values of the mean scores obtained from the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and Anger Expression Inventory subscales were presented in tables. The analysis showed that there is a significant relationship (p<0.05 between anger expression and empathic dispositions of Turkish young national wrestling team players. This situation was observed frequently athletes who are dealing with combat sports. This result is consistent with the literature.

  19. Examining the Relationships among General Coping, Alcohol-Specific Coping and Alcohol Use in a College Student Population

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, N. Robrina

    2007-01-01

    The coping and alcohol literature indicates certain styles of coping are more protective against alcohol use than others. The purpose of the current study was to explore the associations among general coping styles, alcohol-specific coping skills, drinking to cope motives, and alcohol use in an effort to further examine their theoretical relationships. It was hypothesized that: (1) The relationship between problem-focused coping and alcohol use would be mediated by alcohol-specific coping, (...

  20. Attachment styles of helping volunteers and their coping with stress in the field of psychosocial help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonida Kobal Možina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years I have been observing young adults who worked as volunteers in the field of psychosocial help. I have studied their functioning during summer psychotherapeutic camps, where they spent about 20 days with children and adolescents with heavier emotional and behaviour problems. Therapeutic camps based on the concept of milieu therapy often presented a stress factor for the volunteers, consisting mostly of students with no therapeutic education. I presumed they would differ in prevailing attachment styles, in their ways of coping with stress, and in constructive shifts when coping with stress. The sample consisted of 21 volunteers. Data were collected with The Attachment Style Questionnaire and with two semi-structured interviews and interpreted with the qualitative analysis. Volunteers with a preoccupied attachment style, for example, had difficulties with distancing themselves from inner experiencing in stressful situations and often went through intense emotional crises, helplessness, suffering; they were looking for constant support and held on to idealized individuals; they needed frequent feedback information about themselves and their work; self-image and self-evaluation depended on external factors. Volunteers with an avoidant attachment style, for example, avoided conflicts and emotional engagements by occupying themselves with work, activity; holding back emotions was often followed by intense anger outbursts; their reactions were inflexible and connected with their expectations and goals, thus exercising constant control in the relationship with their self-sufficient attitude.

  1. What basic emotions are experienced in bipolar disorder and how are they are regulated

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There remains a lack of theoretical models which can adequately account for the key features of bipolar disorders (Power, 2005). Objectives: Firstly, to test the predictions made by the SPAARS model that mania is predominantly characterised by the coupling of happiness with anger, while depression (unipolar and bipolar) primarily comprises of a coupling between sadness and disgust. Secondly, to investigate and compare the coping strategies ...

  2. Pain coping strategies in pediatric dental care

    OpenAIRE

    Lucie Sikorová; Lucie Rajmová

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine pain coping strategies used by children during dental treatment. Design: A single cross-sectional survey with a questionnaire carried out in 199 children aged 10-17 years. Methods: The Waldron/Varni Pediatric Pain Coping Inventory was used. Interpretation of the results was preceded by exploratory factor analysis and Varimax orthogonal rotation. Statistical analysis of results concerning coping strategies was performed with descriptive statistics methods: the mean, standard ...

  3. Coping Strategies in People Attempting Suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Bazrafshan, Mohammad-Rafi; Jahangir, Fereidun; Mansouri, Amir; Kashfi, Seyyed Hannan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Having a set of effective coping skills can prevent suicidal behavior by increasing self-control and self-direction. This study examines coping styles used by suicidal patients. Objectives: The researchers in this study try to identify coping strategies used by suicide attempters admitted to Shiraz Shahid Faghihi Hospital emergency room. Materials and Methods: This is a analytical cross-sectional study. Participants consisted of 50 suicide-attempted people admitted to Shiraz Faghi...

  4. Personality and Coping in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Françoise V. Contreras-Torres; Juan Carlos Espinosa-Méndez; Gustavo A. Esguerra-Pérez

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe the personality traits and the copingstyles used by 99 college students, and observe if this variable are related.The NEO Five Factor Inventory [NEO-FFI], and the Coping StrategiesQuestionnaire [CAE] was used. The results confirm that Neuroticism isrelated with passive and emotion focused coping strategies (maladaptivecopings) whereas, Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness arerelated with rational and active focused coping. Openness to Experie...

  5. Insight, distress and coping styles in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Michael; Peters, Emmanuelle; Fannon, Dominic; Anilkumar, Anantha P.P.; Aasen, Ingrid; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2007-01-01

    Background The stigma and negative societal views attached to schizophrenia can make the diagnosis distressing. There is evidence that poor insight into symptoms of the disorder and need for treatment may reflect the use of denial as a coping style. However, the relationships between insight and other coping styles have seldom been investigated. Method We examined the associations between insight, distress and a number of coping styles in 65 outpatients with schizophrenia (final n = 57) in a ...

  6. The effect of coping on job performance

    OpenAIRE

    Tummers, Lars

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Frontline workers, such as teachers and social workers, often experience stress, for instance because of high workloads. To deal with this, they use coping strategies. However, it is still unclear how coping strategies influence performance at work. The first goal of this article is therefore to theoretically and empirically study whether one important coping strategy (prioritizing motivated clients) influences job performance. The secondary goal is to go beyond t...

  7. Pain and Coping in Rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt

    by biological, psychological, social and cultural factors, which indicates that a bottom-up and a top-down approach in the study of pain and religion should interact instead of co-exist. This paper presents the initial framework of an interdisciplinary study of pain and coping in the religious mind......Both pain and religious rituals are complex phenomena. On the one hand pain is often understood as an object for natural science, but on the other hand pain is always defined as a psychological and subjective experience, leaving room for psychology and the humanities. Rituals, like pain, are framed...

  8. Stress and Coping with Stress in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Dolenc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the many developmental changes in adolescence, young people are exposed to greater likelihood of experiencing stress. On the other hand, this period is critical for developing effective and constructive coping strategies. In the contribution, we summarize part of what is known about stress, stress responses and coping. Throughout, we focus on common stressful events among adolescents and emphasize the importance of dealing successfully with stressors in their daily lives. Finally, we highlight the most frequently used instruments to measure coping behaviour in youth and present an overview of the research findings on differences in coping among adolescents according to age and gender.

  9. Preschoolers' Emotion Regulation Strategy Understanding: Relations with Emotion Socialization and Child Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Pamela M.; Dennis, Tracy A.; Smith-Simon, Kristen E.; Cohen, Laura H.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool-age children's ability to verbally generate strategies for regulating anger and sadness, and to recognize purported effective strategies for these emotions, were examined in relation to child factors (child age, temperament, and language ability) and maternal emotion socialization (supportiveness and structuring in response to child…

  10. The Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire on Coping with Cyberbullying: The Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Niels C.L. Jacobs; Trijntje Völlink; Francine Dehue; Lilian Lechner

    2015-01-01

    The negative effects and the continuation of cyberbullying seem to depend on the coping strategies the victims use. To assess their coping strategies, self-report questionnaires (SRQs) are used. However, these SRQs are often subject to several shortcomings: the (single and topological) categorizations used in SRQs do not always adequately differentiate among various coping responses, in addition the strategies of general SRQs fail to accurately measure coping with cyberbullying. This study is...

  11. Coping with stress, coping with violence: Links to mental health outcomes among at-risk youth

    OpenAIRE

    Boxer, Paul; Sloan-Power, Elizabeth; Schappell, Ignacio Mercado and Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Coping reactions to stressful events are important links between difficult experiences and the emergence of psychopathology. In this study we compared youths' negative coping with stress in general to their negative coping with violence in particular, and utilized a person-centered analytic approach to examine how patterns of coping relate to various mental health outcomes. We utilized survey interview measures to collect data from a sample of 131 youth (ages 11–14, 100% ethnic minority) resi...

  12. How Dyslexic Teenagers Cope: An Investigation of Self-Esteem, Coping and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Passe, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Research into how dyslexics cope and the effects of their coping has received little attention in the 100 years since dyslexia has been recognized. Why is this? Well it is not an easy area to investigate, partly as most qualitative studies have looked only at coping strategies of specific dyslexics. These are individuals and are unsuitable for…

  13. A Systematic Review of Studies Using the Brief COPE: Religious Coping in Factor Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian U. Krägeloh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Religion is generally recognized as a major resource for dealing with stressful events, but its relationship with secular coping strategies continues to be debated. The present article provides a systematic review of the way in which analyses of the sub-scale turning to religion of the widely used Brief COPE [1] instrument are presented in peer-reviewed research articles, in order to investigate how the wealth of data published using this instrument can inform how religious coping relates to other coping strategies. Of the 212 identified articles that included turning to religion in their analyses, 80 combined sub-scale scores to form higher-order coping factors, 38 of which based on exploratory factor analyses of their own datasets. When factor analyses had used individual items as indicators, religious coping was more likely to load together with maladaptive coping strategies, and more likely with adaptive coping strategies when analyses were conducted at sub-scale level. To a large extent, the variation in the results from exploratory factor analyses appears to be due to the diverse and often inappropriate factor analytic techniques used to determine the factor structure of the Brief COPE instrument. Reports from factor analyses of the Brief COPE therefore have very little value when trying to make general conclusions about the role of religious coping in relation to secular coping methods.

  14. The effectiveness of coping strategies used by entrepreneurs and their impact on personal well-being and venture performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Wincent

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes effectiveness of coping strategies that entrepreneurs use to daily manage work related stress. Coping is the process of expending efforts to solve personal and interpersonal problems and reducing stress induced by unpleasant and stressful situations. Two broad strategies of coping are identified; problem-based coping refers to a cognitively-based response behavior that includes efforts to alleviate stressful circumstances while emotion-based coping involves behavioural responses to regulate the affective consequences of stressful events. The purpose of this research is to analyze relationships among the coping strategies used by entrepreneurs and a set of antecedents influencing the selection of coping strategies. The methodology used is based on structural equation modeling and empirical data of 469 entrepreneurs from two European countries. Our results show that problem based coping facilitates well-being and venture performance. In addition, our findings also support interaction effects of founder centrality and contextual conditions of venturing on the extent entrepreneurs engage in coping. We believe that our insights can help in training entrepreneurs in the development of effective coping strategies that are context dependent. In specific, our results suggest entrepreneurs to engage in problem-focused strategies when they want to effectively address the economic aspects of their lives whereas when they engage in emotion based strategies they seem to increase the self-knowledge they need to start subsequent ventures and facilitate learning from failure. Future studies on coping strategies could study the interplay of coping strategies used to resolve challenging social situations that various stakeholders of practicing entrepreneurs impose.

  15. Post-traumatic stress disorder and coping strategies in psychotraumatized refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čavić Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In extreme life events basic assumptions are frequently reassessed and changed. Therefore, trauma requires re-education. Effective coping strategies enable individual to tolerate, minimize, accept or ignore what one cannot manage and to moder­ate the consequences of stressful, traumatic events. Materials and Methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate coping strategies in refugees with post-traumatic stress disorder prior and after group cognitive-behavioural therapy. The sample included 70 refu­gees who experienced multiple stressors such as organized violence, ethnic conflicts, bombing, expelling from their homes and life in exile. Impact Event Scales-Revised, Ways of Coping-Revised, Scale of Cognitive Self-regulation and Scale of Coping Strategies were administered before and after six months of group cognitive-behavioural therapy. Results. Post-traumatic stress disorder in refugees after therapy significantly decreased. Cognitive self-regulation was improved by moving locus of control from external to internal resources. Coping was qualitatively different, with a wider repertoire of adaptive strategies. Discussion. Cognitive group work facilitates processes of grieving, working-through of traumatic material, increasing emotional awareness and developing creativity in coping. Conclusion. Our findings highlight the positive impact of cognitive-behavioural treatment on post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic adjustment. .

  16. Effects of expression ways and traits of anger emotion on autonomic nerve in the emotion recovery stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹向红

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of expression ways and traits of anger emotion on autonomic nerve in the emotion recovery stage.Methods The 48 healthy undergraduate students were recruited as subjects,who were

  17. Medical Students’ Regulatory Emotional Self - efficacy,Social Supports and Coping Styles%医学生情绪调节自我效能感与社会支持、应对方式的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林影; 江琴

    2016-01-01

    Objective :To analyze relationship between medical students’ regulatory emotional self - efficacy ,social support and coping style .Methods :319 medical students were investigated by Regulatory Emotional Self - efficacy Scale ,Coping Styles and Perceived Social Support Scale .Results :The total regulatory emotional self - efficacy of med‐ical students were above the average .Perceived self - efficacy in regulating despondency /distress (DES ) ,and per‐ceived self - efficacy in regulating anger /irritation(ANG) :Female students’ scores in perceived self - efficacy in feel‐ing positive affect(POS)were significantly higher than male students’(t = 2 .83 ,P < 0 .01) ,while female’s scores in DES and ANG were significantly lower than male students (t = 4 .78 ,2 .19 ;P < 0 .01) .The total regulatory emotional self - efficacy and its dimensions were all negatively related to negative coping styles ,and positively related to social supports .POS and perceived social supports had a certain prediction upon coping styles .Conclusion :Medical universi‐ties should pay enough attention to take various effective ways to strengthen medical students ’ the psychological health education ,improve their regulatory emotional self - efficacy and the ability of understanding social supports , change their cognition ,so as to enhance their ability to cope with stress better .%目的:探讨医学生情绪调节自我效能感、社会支持、应对方式三者间的关系,为医学生的心理咨询和心理健康教育提供科学依据,从而提高医学生的心理健康水平。方法:通过情绪调节自我效能感量表、领悟社会支持量表、应对方式问卷对某医科大学的319名医学生进行调查。结果:医学生的总体情绪调节自我效能感总体上处于中等偏上水平,但在结构上有所失衡:医学生感受和调节正性情绪的效能感比较高,而调节沮丧/痛苦情绪效能感和调节生气/愤怒

  18. Filipino Mothers’ Self-Efficacy in Managing Anger and in Parenting, and Parental Rejection as Predictors of Child Delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Daganzo, Mary Angeline A.; Peña Alampay, Liane; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The authors tested a model in which Filipino mothers’ self-efficacy in managing anger/irritation influenced child delinquency via two parenting variables: parental self-efficacy and parental rejection. Structured interviews were conducted with 99 mothers twice with an interval of one year with efficacy beliefs and rejection measured in the first year and child delinquency data collected in the following year. Path analyses showed that self-efficacy in managing anger/irritation negatively pred...

  19. Emotion Control Values and Responding to an Anger Provocation inAsian-American and European-American Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Mauss, Iris B.; Butler, Emily A.; Nicole A Roberts; Chu, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined whether Asian-American (AA) versus European-American (EA) women differed in experiential, expressive, or autonomic physiological responding to a laboratory anger provocation and assessed the mediating role of values about emotional control. Results indicate that AA participants reported and behaviorally displayed less anger than EA participants, while there were no group differences in physiological responses. Observed differences in emotional responses were part...

  20. Longitudinal Pathways from Marital Hostility to Child Anger During Toddlerhood: Genetic Susceptibility and Indirect Effects via Harsh Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Kimberly A.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David

    2011-01-01

    We examined direct and indirect pathways from marital hostility to toddler anger/frustration via harsh parenting and parental depressive symptoms, with an additional focus on the moderating role of genetic influences as inferred from birth parent anger/frustration. Participants were 361 linked triads of birth mothers, adoptive parents, and adopted children who were 9 (T1) and 18 (T2) months old across the study period. Results indicated an indirect effect from T1 marital hostility to T2 toddl...

  1. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving 201Tl (n = 120) or 99mTc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress (99mTc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress (99mTc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, 201Tl 92 %, 99mTc-Low 86 %, 99mTc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p 201Tl or 99mTc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 ± 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 ± 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  2. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Fourquet, Nicolas [Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique [AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); INSERM U 773 Inserm and Denis Diderot University, Paris (France); Koehl, Gregoire; Roch, Veronique [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Imbert, Laetitia [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Centre Alexis Vautrin, Department of Radiotherapy, Vandoeuvre (France); Poussier, Sylvain [INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Fay, Renaud [INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique CIC-P 9501, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM U961, Nancy (France); Hopital de Brabois, CHU-Nancy, Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-03-15

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving {sup 201}Tl (n = 120) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, {sup 201}Tl 92 %, {sup 99m}Tc-Low 86 %, {sup 99m}Tc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p < 0.001). This larger extent was mainly observed in 50 obese patients who were in the {sup 201}Tl or {sup 99m}Tc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 {+-} 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 {+-} 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  3. Sibling bullying perpetration: associations with gender, grade, peer perpetration, trait anger, and moral disengagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, Ibrahim; Campbell, Marilyn A

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated bullying among siblings in both traditional and cyber forms, and the associations of gender, grade, peer bullying perpetration, trait anger, and moral disengagement. The participants were 455 children in Grades 5 to 12 (262 girls and 177 boys with 16 unknown gender) who had a sibling. As the number of siblings who only bullied by technology was low, these associations were not able to be calculated. However, the findings showed that the percentage of sibling traditional bullying perpetration (31.6%) was higher than peer bullying perpetration (9.8%). Sibling bullies reported engaging in complex behaviors of perpetration and victimization in both the physical and in cyber settings, although the number was small. Gender, trait anger, moral disengagement, and bullying peers at school (but not grade) were all significantly associated with sibling traditional bullying perpetration. The implications of the findings are discussed for bullying intervention and prevention programs to understand childhood bullying in diverse contexts. PMID:25038224

  4. The characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Mohammadifar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was conducted to compare the characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideation. Method: This research was and the causal-comparative research method which is categorized in descriptive one. Sample in this study was included 300 addicts referred to the addiction treatment clinic in Semnan province. By convenience sampling with considering of entry criteria 300 addicts selected and based on the suicidal ideation scores were categorized to two groups with and without suicide ideation. Suicide ideation, buss and Perry’s aggression and borderline personality questionnaires administered among selected sample. Findings: Borderline personality traits, anger, hostility and aggression were higher in suicidal addicts in comparison of non-suicidal. Conclusion: Seems essential screening and identifying addicts which features high aggression and borderline personality for prevention of suicide.

  5. [The effects of media violence on aggression: focus on the role of anger evoked by provocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, S; Endo, K; Yoshida, F

    2001-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of anger evoked by earlier provocation on cognition, emotion, and aggressive behavior after being exposed to media violence. Sixty male undergraduates participated in the experiment. Before viewing one of three videos (either highly violent, violent with high entertainment, or nonviolent), half of the subjects were provoked by a confederate posing as another subject. Subjects' heart rates and eyeblink rates were recorded while viewing the video. After viewing the video, subjects described their thoughts that occurred while watching the video and rated their affective reactions toward the video. Finally, subjects' aggressive behavior toward the confederate was measured. Results of covariance structure analysis suggested that (a) anger evoked by provocation and high level of violence in videos additively elicited negative cognition and affect, which further facilitated aggressive behavior, and (b) high level of entertainment in videos elicited positive cognition and affect, which alleviated negative cognition and affect. PMID:11494654

  6. Group-based Compunction and Anger: Their Antecedents and Consequences in Relation to Colonial Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Figueiredo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Group-based emotions can be experienced by group members for the past misdeeds of their ingroup towards an outgroup.. The present study examines distinct antecedents and consequences of group-based compunction and anger in two countries with a history of colonization (Portugal, N = 280 and the Netherlands, N = 184. While previous research has focused mainly on ingroup-focused antecedents of group-based emotions, such as ingroup identification and perceptions of responsibility, our research also analyzed outgroup-focused variables, such as outgroup identification and meta-perceptions. Multiple group structural equation modeling showed that group-based compunction and group-based anger have similar antecedents (exonerating cognitions, collectivism, outgroup identification and meta-perceptions. Furthermore, the results showed that the two emotions have distinct but related consequences for the improvement of intergroup relations (compensation, subjective importance of discussing the past and forgiveness assignment.

  7. Easier contagion and weaker ties make anger spread faster than joy in social media

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Rui; Zhao, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Similar to face-to-face communication in daily life, more and more evidence suggests that human emotion also spread in online social media through virtual interactions. However, the mechanism underlying the emotion contagion, like whether different feelings diffuse unlikely or how the spread is coupled with the social network, is rarely investigated. Indeed, because of the costly expense and spatio-temporal limitations, it is challenging for conventional questionnaires or controlled experiments. While given the instinct of collecting natural affective responses of massive connected individuals, online social media offer us an ideal proxy to tackle this issue from the perspective of computational social science. In this paper, based on the analysis of millions of tweets in Weibo, a Twitter-like service in China, we surprisingly find that anger is more contagious than joy, indicating that it can sparkle more angry follow-up tweets and anger prefers weaker ties than joy for the dissemination in social network, i...

  8. The Relationship Between Exposure to Violence and Anger in Thai Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtongkam, Nualnong; Ward, Paul R; Day, Andrew; Winefield, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    Youth violence is a serious public health problem in Thailand, and yet is poorly understood and is thought to vary considerably between metropolitan and rural areas. This article reports the findings of a cross-sectional study involving 1,170 technical college students who completed self-report questionnaires assessing the frequency of violent acts, antisocial behavior, and angry emotion. There were no differences in self-reported violent activities between metropolitan and rural participants, but those attending colleges in the metropolitan areas reported more acts involving weapons. Scores on the measure of anger expression predicted physical and verbal assault, specifically punching and name calling, suggesting that the implementation of interventions which help students to improve control over anger may be a useful violence prevention approach. PMID:25814506

  9. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, R.A., E-mail: riedelra@ornl.gov; Donahue, C.; Visscher, T.; Montcalm, C.

    2015-09-11

    We describe the design and performance of a 157 mm×157 mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of <1.2 mm with distortion <0.5 mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1 mm{sup 3}) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low values of the refinement parameter R{sub w}(F)

  10. Effectiveness of Problem-Focused Coping Strategies on the Burden on Caregivers of Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Golnar; Ashghali Farahani, Mansoureh; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that family caregivers of hemodialysis patients experience high levels of burden. However, these caregivers are often neglected, and no studies are available on the effectiveness of coping strategies on the burden of care among these caregivers. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of problem-focused coping strategies (communication skills, anger management, and deep breathing) on the burden on caregivers of hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 76 family caregivers of hemodialysis patients referred to Shahid Hasheminejad hemodialysis center in Tehran, Iran. The subjects were equally allocated into two groups of 38. Through a coin-tossing method, caregivers of patients who referred on even or odd days of the week were randomly assigned into the intervention group or the control group, respectively. The intervention group received four training sessions on problem-focused coping strategies, but the control group did not receive any intervention. Both groups answered the caregiver’s burnout inventory at the start and six weeks after the last educational session. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, Fisher’s exact test, independent-samples t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyze the data. Results The majority of caregivers (54%) were in the age range of 35 - 55 years, female (68.4%), and married (70%). No significant difference was found between the baseline mean caregivers’ burden scores of the intervention and control groups (88.56 ± 11.74 vs. 84.97 ± 15.13, P = 0.308). However, the mean caregivers’ burden in the intervention group decreased, and the two groups were significantly different at the end of the study (58.77 ± 6.64 vs. 87.84 ± 11.74, P educational programs, such as the program implemented in the current study, into the country’s healthcare system. PMID:27556058

  11. Career Choice Anxiety, Coping, and Perceived Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Faye M.; Healy, Charles C.; Ender, Philip B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a study exploring whether perceived control moderates the relation between coping with career indecision and choice anxiety among women in low-level jobs. Results revealed that perceived control interacted with problem-focused coping to increase accountable variance in choice anxiety. Discusses implications for interventions with women in…

  12. Coping Strategies of Caribbean "Problem Students"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Donna-Maria B.; Welch, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    The coping strategies of middle adolescents (14-16 years) generate interest amongst educators, parents, school psychologists and school counsellors. This study, using a phenomenological approach, examined the coping strategies of "problem" adolescents in the Caribbean in regard to their interactions with peers and teachers. Data were collected…

  13. Mindfulness, Stress, and Coping among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Angele; Rodger, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 135 first-year university students living in residence completed questionnaires that measured individual differences in mindfulness, coping styles, and perceived stress. Findings revealed significant positive relationships between mindfulness and rational coping, and significant negative relationships with emotional and avoidant coping…

  14. Coping styles of older adults with ostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Sheila Normand; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

    2002-05-01

    Various clinical studies throughout the years have shown that individuals with ostomies are a unique group facing adjustment demands. One of the most important challenges for an individual with an ostomy is coping with the physiological and psychological changes. The purpose of this study was to describe coping styles of older adults after undergoing ostomy surgery and to explore its helpfulness in dealing with the stressors related to having an ostomy. Lazarus and Folkman's theory on stress and coping was used as the framework to guide this study. A sample of 27 participants ranging from age 50 to 84 years was obtained from an ostomy association in southeastern Louisiana. Participants were asked to complete a demographic data form and the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale. This revised scale measured eight coping styles related to Use and Effectiveness. Findings revealed significant differences existed among the means of the eight measures for both Use and Effectiveness at p gender or ostomy type. Also, aging did not appear to be a factor when considering coping styles of older adults with ostomies. The nursing role should include assessment of the individual preoperatively to identify fears, concerns, and stressors related to having an ostomy. Also, nurses can provide education on disease management, assist with identification of ineffective coping mechanisms, and promote effective coping skills and stress management techniques. PMID:12035824

  15. Can the Internet cope with stress?

    CERN Document Server

    Lisewski, Andreas Martin

    2007-01-01

    When will the Internet become aware of itself? In this note the problem is approached by asking an alternative question: Can the Internet cope with stress? By extrapolating the psychological difference between coping and defense mechanisms a distributed software experiment is outlined which could reject the hypothesis that the Internet is not a conscious entity.

  16. Predictors of Coping in Divorced Single Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propst, L. Rebecca; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the effects of demographic variables, variables specific to marriage and divorce, and coping resources (internal and external) on the adjustment of single mothers. Results indicate that four classes of variables have an effect on the mother's adjustment: phase of divorce and/or separation; numbers and ages of children; style of coping;…

  17. Religion and Spirituality in Coping with Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stephanie; Furr, Susan; Flowers, Claudia; Burke, Mary Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Relations among and between religion, spirituality, and the ability to cope with stress were examined using a sample of 115 graduate students in counseling. Religion and spirituality positively correlated with coping with stress. The results have implications for preparing counseling students to work with clients with religious/spiritual issues.…

  18. Coping with Relationship Stressors: A Decade Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2011-01-01

    This review identifies key issues in research on adolescent coping with stress with parents, friends, and romantic partners during the past decade. An analysis of 78 studies revealed findings on relationship stressors and the potential links between the use of different coping styles for different relationship types. Research has confirmed…

  19. Adolescents' Attachment and Coping with Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle S.; Medway, Frederic J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined how high school students cope with stress as a function of their attachment style. Data were gathered from 75 adolescent-parent pairs in Texas and included measures of attachment, coping style, life stress, and whom the respondent would turn to in times of stress. Adolescents' attachment security was positively related to…

  20. Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Military Population: Differences by Trauma Context and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Studies have found a stronger association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in military populations than in nonmilitary populations. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain this difference: Military populations are more prone to anger than nonmilitary populations, and traumas experienced on deployment create more anger than nondeployment traumas. To examine these hypotheses, we evaluated the association between anger and PTSD severity among never-deployed military service members with nondeployment traumas (n = 226) and deployed service members with deployment traumas (n = 594) using linear regression. We further examined these associations stratified by gender. Bivariate associations between anger and PTSD severity were similar for nondeployment and deployment events; however, gender modified this association. For men, the association for deployment events was stronger than for nondeployment events (β = .18, r = .53 vs. β = .16, r = .37, respectively), whereas the reverse was true for women (deployment: β = .20, r = .42 vs. nondeployment: β = .25, r = .65). Among men, findings supported the hypothesis that deployment traumas produce stronger associations between PTSD and anger and are inconsistent with hypothesized population differences. In women, however, there was not a clear fit with either hypothesis. PMID:26580844

  1. Female murderers: Examination of the relationship between childhood traumatic experiences and anger expression

    OpenAIRE

    İrem Akduman; Dilek Çelik; Nurhan Tiftik

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood period and abuse experiences may lead to some problems later in life. One of these problems is aggressive behavior, which is thought to be a reflection of the child’s increasing anger (Page, 2004; Olive, 2007).  Based on the fact that negative childhood experiences can lead to aggressive emotions, investigating the relationship between traumatic childhood experiences and female convicts’ aggression expression styles was considered important. Sample of the research consis...

  2. Group-based Compunction and Anger: Their Antecedents and Consequences in Relation to Colonial Conflicts

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Figueiredo; Bertjan Doosje; Joaquim Pires Valentim

    2016-01-01

    Group-based emotions can be experienced by group members for the past misdeeds of their ingroup towards an outgroup.. The present study examines distinct antecedents and consequences of group-based compunction and anger in two countries with a history of colonization (Portugal, N = 280 and the Netherlands, N = 184). While previous research has focused mainly on ingroup-focused antecedents of group-based emotions, such as ingroup identification and perceptions of responsibility, our research a...

  3. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors. Progress Report (1999-2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  4. SPORT’S EFFECT ON ANGER LEVEL FOR PEOPLE WITH MENTAL DISABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    MUSTAFA YILDIZ; AYSEN SONUC

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study is to research sport’s effect on anger level for the young with mental disability. 25 educable, mentally disabled individuals who receive special education in rehabilitation center, are between ages 10-19, have no physical disability preventing functional abilities that necessary for the study, have never took place in any sports organizations. “Exercise Program” was applied to experimental group 8 weeks long twice a week. Sessions elapsed nearly 60 minutes. Before and after...

  5. The characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideas

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Mohammadifar; Elahe Zareie, M.K; Mahmood Najafi; Mahmood Manteqi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to compare the characteristics of borderline personality, anger, hostility and aggression in addicts with and without suicide ideation. Method: This research was and the causal-comparative research method which is categorized in descriptive one. Sample in this study was included 300 addicts referred to the addiction treatment clinic in Semnan province. By convenience sampling with considering of entry criteria 300 addicts selected and based on the su...

  6. ANTS2 package: simulation and experimental data processing for Anger camera type detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Morozov, A; Solovov, V.; Martins, R.; Neves, F.; Domingos, V.; Chepel, V.

    2016-01-01

    ANTS2 is a simulation and data processing package developed for position sensitive detectors with Anger camera type readout. The simulation module of ANTS2 is based on ROOT package from CERN, which is used to store the detector geometry and to perform 3D navigation. The module is capable of simulating particle sources, performing particle tracking, generating photons of primary and secondary scintillation, tracing optical photons and generating photosensor signals. The reconstruction module f...

  7. Anger and emotional distress in patients with migraine and tension–type headache

    OpenAIRE

    Perozzo, P; Savi, L; L. Castelli; Valfrè, W.; Lo Giudice, R.; Gentile, S.; I. Rainero; Pinessi, L.

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of anger and emotional distress in migraine and tension– type headache patients. Two hundred and one headache patients attending the Headache Center of the University of Turin were selected for the study and divided into 5 groups: (1) migraine, (2) episodic tension–type headache, (3) chronic tension–type headache, (4) migraine associated with episodic tension–type headache and (5) migraine associated with chronic tension–typ...

  8. The Impact of Anger Control Training on Resiliency in Adolescents with Addiction Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Rasouli

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Aggression and acting out behaviors can lead to drug use and acceptance in deviated groups. This project had planned to determine the impact of anger control training on resiliency enhancement in high school boys. Method: design of this research was pre experimental with pre-test post-test kind by control group. Sample includes of 30 high school students (15 experiment group, 15 in control group) selected by cluster sampling method. The students were randomly assigned in two experi...

  9. Anger expression, violent behavior, and symptoms of depression among male college students in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Berhane Yemane; Gelaye Bizu; Terasaki Dale J; Williams Michelle A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is an important global public health problem. Given the scarcity of studies involving African youths, this study was conducted to evaluate the associations of anger expression and violent behavior with symptoms of depression among male college students. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics and violent behavior among 1,176 college students in Awassa, Ethiopia in June, 2006. Th...

  10. Performance of a semiconductor SPECT system: comparison with a conventional Anger-type SPECT instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; MIYAGAWA, MASAO; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Ishimura, Hayato; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2012-01-01

    Objective The performance of a new single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanner with a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detector (Discovery NM 530c; D530c) was evaluated and compared to a conventional Anger-type SPECT with a dual-detector camera (Infinia). Methods Three different phantom studies were performed. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) was measured using line sources placed at different locations in a cylindrical phantom. Uniformity was measured us...

  11. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Lorys; De Santis, Federica; Giorgi, Ilaria; Deregibus, Andrea; Tesio, Valentina; Leombruni, Paolo; Granieri, Antonella; Debernardi, Cesare; Torta, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP) in the facial region. Methods: 45 MP patients [mean (SD) age: 38.9 (11.6)] and 45 female healthy controls [mean (SD) age: 37.8 (13.7)] were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (B...

  12. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorys eCastelli; Federica eDe Santis; Ilaria eDe Giorgi; Andrea eDeregibus; Valentina eTesio; Paolo eLeombruni; Antonella eGranieri; Cesare eDebernardi; Riccardo eTorta

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP) in the facial region.Methods: 45 MP patients (mean (SD) age: 38.9 (11.6)) and 45 female healthy controls (mean (SD) age: 37.8 (13.7)) were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (Beck ...

  13. Review of Coping in Children Exposed to Mass Trauma: Measurement Tools, Coping Styles, and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Nitiéma, Pascal; Jacobs, Anne K; Noffsinger, Mary A; Wind, Leslie H; Allen, Sandra F

    2016-04-01

    Evidence-based practice requires the use of data grounded in theory with clear conceptualization and reliable and valid measurement. Unfortunately, developing a knowledge base regarding children's coping in the context of disasters, terrorism, and war has been hampered by a lack of theoretical consensus and a virtual absence of rigorous test construction, implementation, and evaluation. This report presents a comprehensive review of measurement tools assessing child and adolescent coping in the aftermath of mass trauma, with a particular emphasis on coping dimensions identified through factor analytic procedures. Coping measurement and issues related to the assessment of coping are reviewed. Concepts important in instrument development and psychometric features of coping measures used in disasters, terrorism, and war are presented. The relationships between coping dimensions and both youth characteristics and clinical outcomes also are presented. A discussion of the reviewed findings highlights the difficulty clinicians may experience when trying to integrate the inconsistencies in coping dimensions across studies. Incorporating the need for multiple informants and the difference between general and context-specific coping measures suggests the importance of a multilevel, theoretical conceptualization of coping and thus, the use of more advanced statistical measures. Attention also is given to issues deemed important for further exploration in child disaster coping research. PMID:26887259

  14. The Impact of Coping Flexibility on the Risk of Depressive Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukasa Kato

    2015-01-01

    Objective According to the dual-process theory, coping flexibility is defined as the ability to produce and implement a new coping strategy in place of an ineffective coping strategy. Specifically, coping flexibility includes two processes: evaluation coping and adaptive coping. Evaluation coping refers to sensitivity to feedback about the efficacy of a coping strategy, and adaptive coping involves the willingness to implement alternative coping strategies. The coping flexibility hypothesis (...

  15. Coping with breathlessness among people with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup; Lomborg, Kirsten; Dahl, Ronald;

    2014-01-01

    Identifying indicators on predominant types of coping with breathlessness may facilitate the possibility for qualified individualised advice on how to live with breathing difficulties. This paper reports the statistical findings on several parameters constituting possible coping-type-specific ind......Identifying indicators on predominant types of coping with breathlessness may facilitate the possibility for qualified individualised advice on how to live with breathing difficulties. This paper reports the statistical findings on several parameters constituting possible coping......) Bedside forced expiratory volume in 1 s of predicted; (b) scores on the Modified Borg Scale; (c) respiratory rate; (d) peripheral oxygen saturation and (e) use of breaks from activity and break time duration. We found that the following parameters were able to discriminate between the four coping types......: COPD severity, intensity of breathlessness, respiratory rate, level of oxygen saturation and the patients’ use of breaks. These findings should be further tested....

  16. When anger dominates the mind: Increased motor corticospinal excitability in the face of threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; de Gelder, Beatrice; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-09-01

    Threat demands fast and adaptive reactions that are manifested at the physiological, behavioral, and phenomenological level and are responsive to the direction of threat and its severity for the individual. Here, we investigated the effects of threat directed toward or away from the observer on motor corticospinal excitability and explicit recognition. Sixteen healthy right-handed volunteers completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) task and a separate three-alternative forced-choice emotion recognition task. Single-pulse TMS to the left primary motor cortex was applied to measure motor evoked potentials from the right abductor pollicis brevis in response to dynamic angry, fearful, and neutral bodily expressions with blurred faces directed toward or away from the observer. Results showed that motor corticospinal excitability increased independent of direction of anger compared with fear and neutral. In contrast, anger was better recognized when directed toward the observer compared with when directed away from the observer, while the opposite pattern was found for fear. The present results provide evidence for the differential effects of threat direction on explicit recognition and motor corticospinal excitability. In the face of threat, motor corticospinal excitability increases independently of the direction of anger, indicative of the importance of more automatic reactions to threat. PMID:27325519

  17. Anger and Gender Effects in Observed Supervisor-Subordinate Dyadic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb; Hulin

    1997-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of a supervisor's anger and supervisor's and subordinate's gender on evaluations made by observers of interacting supervisor-subordinate dyads. In a laboratory experiment, 370 undergraduates viewed one of eight video-tapes representing the conditions of the 2 (gender of supervisor) x 2 (gender of subordinate) x 2 (presence or absence of anger) design and then completed evaluations of the supervisor and the subordinate. A field study using 265 employees from three organizations replicated the laboratory results. In spite of constant dialogue in the interactions across all eight conditions, supervisors expressing anger were rated lower and female supervisors were rated higher by observers. Subordinates were rated higher when interacting with an angry supervisor and when interacting with a male supervisor. Main effects of supervisor's gender may reflect over-evaluation of unexpected, albeit average, performance. The joint supervisor and subordinate effects are interpreted as reflecting a dyadic rating effect in which high ratings assigned to one member of the dyad are accompanied by lower ratings assigned to the other member. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. PMID:9606168

  18. The motivation behind serial sexual homicide: is it sex, power, and control, or anger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Wade C; Husted, David S; Safarik, Mark E; O'Toole, Mary Ellen

    2006-07-01

    Controversy exists in the literature and society regarding what motivates serial sexual killers to commit their crimes. Hypotheses range from the seeking of sexual gratification to the achievement of power and control to the expression of anger. The authors provide theoretical, empirical, evolutionary, and physiological support for the argument that serial sexual murderers above all commit their crimes in pursuit of sadistic pleasure. The seeking of power and control over victims is believed to serve the two secondary purposes of heightening sexual arousal and ensuring victim presence for the crime. Anger is not considered a key component of these offenders' motivation due to its inhibitory physiological effect on sexual functioning. On the contrary, criminal investigations into serial sexual killings consistently reveal erotically charged crimes, with sexual motivation expressed either overtly or symbolically. Although anger may be correlated with serial sexual homicide offenders, as it is with criminal offenders in general, it is not causative. The authors further believe serial sexual murderers should be considered sex offenders. A significant proportion of them appear to have paraphilic disorders within the spectrum of sexual sadism. "sexual sadism, homicidal type" is proposed as a diagnostic subtype of sexual sadism applicable to many of these offenders, and a suggested modification of DSM criteria is presented. PMID:16882237

  19. Fear and Anger have Opposite Effects on Risk Seeking in the Gain Frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne eHabib

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotions strongly influence our decisions, particularly those made under risk. A classic example of the effect of emotion on decision making under risk is the framing effect, which involves predictable shifts in preferences when the same problem is formulated in different ways. According to dual process theories, this bias could stem from an affective heuristic belonging to an intuitive type of reasoning. In this study, we examined whether specific incidental negative emotions (i.e., fear and anger influence framing susceptibility and risk-taking identically. In each trial, participants received an initial amount of money, and pictures of angry or fearful faces were presented to them. Finally, participants chose between a sure option and a gamble option of equally expected value in a gain or loss frame. Risk-taking was modulated by emotional context: fear and anger influenced risk-taking specifically in the gain frame and had opposite effects. Fear increased risk-averse choices, whereas anger decreased risk-averse choices, leading to a suppression of the framing effect. These results confirm that emotions play a key role in framing susceptibility.

  20. Exploring factors related to the anger superiority effect in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, T; Cornish, K; Rinehart, N J

    2016-07-01

    Despite face and emotion recognition deficits, individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) appear to experience the anger superiority effect, where an angry face in a crowd is detected faster than a neutral face. This study extended past research to examine the impacts of ecologically valid photographic stimuli, gender and anxiety symptoms on the anger superiority effect in children with and without ASD. Participants were 81, 7-12year old children, 42 with ASD matched on age, gender and perceptual IQ to 39 typically developing (TYP) children. The photographic stimuli did not impact on task performance in ASD with both groups exhibiting the anger superiority effect. There were no gender differences and no associations with anxiety. Age was associated with the effect in the TYP but not ASD group. These findings confirm a robust effect of speeded detection of threat in ASD which does not appear to be confounded by gender or anxiety, but may have different underlying age-associated mechanisms. PMID:27258410

  1. Imagine no religion: Heretical disgust, anger and the symbolic purity of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Ryan S; Preston, Jesse L; Salomon, Erika; Relihan-Johnson, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Immoral actions, including physical/sexual (e.g., incest) and social (e.g., unfairness) taboos, are often described as disgusting. But what about immoral thoughts, more specifically, thoughts that violate religious beliefs? Do heretical thoughts taint the purity of mind? The present research examined heretical disgust using self-report measures and facial electromyography. Religious thought violations consistently elicited both self-reported disgust and anger. Feelings of disgust also predicted harsh moral judgement, independent of anger, and were mediated by feelings of "contamination". However, religious thought violations were not associated with a disgust facial expression (i.e., levator labii muscle activity) that was elicited by physically disgusting stimuli. We conclude that people (especially more religious people) do feel disgust in response to heretical thoughts that is meaningfully distinct from anger as a moral emotion. However, heretical disgust is not embodied in a physical disgust response. Rather, disgust has a symbolic moral value that marks heretical thoughts as harmful and aversive. PMID:25899719

  2. Defining and quantifying coping strategies after stroke: a review

    OpenAIRE

    DONNELLAN, CLAIRE; Hevey, David; Hickey, Anne; O'Neill, Desmond

    2006-01-01

    The coping strategies that people use after a stroke may influence recovery. Coping measures are generally used to assess the mediating behaviour between a stressor (ie, disease or condition) and the physical or psychological outcome of an individual. This review evaluates measures that quantified coping strategies in studies on psychological adaptation to stroke. The main aspects of the coping measures reviewed were (a) conceptual basis; (b) coping domains assessed; (c) coping strategies use...

  3. The Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire on Coping with Cyberbullying: The Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels C.L. Jacobs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The negative effects and the continuation of cyberbullying seem to depend on the coping strategies the victims use. To assess their coping strategies, self-report questionnaires (SRQs are used. However, these SRQs are often subject to several shortcomings: the (single and topological categorizations used in SRQs do not always adequately differentiate among various coping responses, in addition the strategies of general SRQs fail to accurately measure coping with cyberbullying. This study is therefore aimed to develop a SRQ that specifically measures coping with cyberbullying (i.e., Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire; CCQ and to discover whether other, not single and topological, categorizations of coping strategies can be found. Based on previous SRQs used in the (cyberbullying (i.e., traditional and cyberbullying literature (i.e., 49 studies were found with three different SRQs measuring coping with traditional bullying, cyberbullying or (cyberbullying items and categorizations were selected, compared and merged into a new questionnaire. In compliance with recommendations from the classical test-theory, a principal component analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis were done, and a final model was constructed. Seventeen items loaded onto four different coping categorizations: mental-, passive-, social-, and confrontational-coping. The CCQ appeared to have good internal consistency, acceptable test-retest reliability, good discriminant validity and the development of the CCQ fulfilled many of the recommendations from classical test-theory. The CCQ omits working in single and topological categorizations and measures cognitive, behavioral, approach and avoidance strategies.

  4. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger–aggression relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts ...

  5. Relationship of Maternal Negative Moods to Child Emotion Regulation during Family Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Dagne, Getachew A.; Snyder, James

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of maternal hostile and depressive moods to children’s down-regulation of unprovoked anger and sadness/fear was assessed in a community sample of 267 five year old boys and girls. The speed of children’s down-regulation of unprovoked anger and sadness/fear was based on real-time observations during mother-child interaction. The association of down-regulation with maternal mood was estimated using Bayesian event history analysis. As mothers reported higher depressive mood, bot...

  6. Repressive coping and alexithymia in ideopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously...... and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI.......) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated...

  7. A Systematic Review of Studies Using the Brief COPE: Religious Coping in Factor Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Krägeloh, Christian U

    2011-01-01

    Religion is generally recognized as a major resource for dealing with stressful events, but its relationship with secular coping strategies continues to be debated. The present article provides a systematic review of the way in which analyses of the sub-scale turning to religion of the widely used Brief COPE [1] instrument are presented in peer-reviewed research articles, in order to investigate how the wealth of data published using this instrument can inform how religious coping relates to ...

  8. Coping with Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coping with the most common cosmetic side effects. Hair Loss Hair thinning or hair loss is often ... a mild soap or shampoo. Avoid those with dyes, perfumes, or alcohol. Especially avoid acne soaps and ...

  9. Coping with Cancer in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles » My ACS » Coping With Cancer in Everyday Life Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) Nearly 14. ... cancer For spouses, families, and friends Finding support Life after cancer treatment Finding hope To learn more ...

  10. Self-Compassion, Stress, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashley Batts; Leary, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    People who are high in self-compassion treat themselves with kindness and concern when they experience negative events. The present article examines the construct of self-compassion from the standpoint of research on coping in an effort to understand the ways in which people who are high in self-compassion cope with stressful events. Self-compassionate people tend to rely heavily on positive cognitive restructuring but do not appear to differ from less self-compassionate people in the degree to which they cope through problem-solving and distraction. Existing evidence does not show clear differences in the degree to which people who are low vs. high in self-compassion seek support as a coping strategy, but more research is needed. PMID:20686629

  11. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview ... a resource to help caregivers of cancer patients. Bereavement and Grief Key Points Bereavement is the period ...

  12. Coping with Cancer after a Natural Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Coping With Cancer After a Natural Disaster: Frequently Asked Questions for People With Cancer and ... has been changed due to a recent natural disaster, you may have trouble getting the cancer care ...

  13. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Muscular Dystrophy: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... in this section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents many challenges in many ...

  14. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life. PMID:26922751

  15. Coping with Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team to talk about these issues. {{ Your child’s style of coping. Not all children are the same, ... your child through these changes. {{ Keep lines of communication open between your child’s school, the hospital and ...

  16. Personality and Coping among Caregivers of Spouses with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Karen; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined personality factors and coping strategies among 50 spouse caregivers of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. Results showed that personality traits explained 60% of variance in emotion-focused coping, 30% of variance in problem-focused coping, and 15% of variance associated with social support coping.…

  17. Relationship of Maternal Negative Moods to Child Emotion Regulation during Family Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Getachew A.; Snyder, James

    2016-01-01

    The relationship of maternal hostile and depressive moods to children’s down-regulation of unprovoked anger and sadness/fear was assessed in a community sample of 267 five year old boys and girls. The speed of children’s down-regulation of unprovoked anger and sadness/fear was based on real-time observations during mother-child interaction. The association of down-regulation with maternal mood was estimated using Bayesian event history analysis. As mothers reported higher depressive mood, both boys and girls were faster to down regulate anger displays as those displays accumulated during mother child interaction. The speed of boys’ down regulation of anger and of sadness/fear was not associated with maternal hostile mood. As mothers reported more hostile mood, girls were faster to down regulate displays of sadness/fear, but the speed of this down regulation slowed as those displays accumulated during ongoing mother-child interaction. These associations of child down regulation and maternal mood were observed after controlling for child adjustment. The data suggest frequent exposure to different negative maternal moods affect children’s expression and regulation of emotions in relatively specific ways, conditional on the type of maternal mood, the type of child emotion, and child gender. PMID:21262049

  18. Repressive coping style: relationships with depression, pain, and pain coping strategies in lung lancer outpatient

    OpenAIRE

    Prasertsri, Nusara; Holden, Janean; Keefe, Francis J.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have shown that coping style is related to pain and adjustment in people with chronic illness. This study was the first to examine how coping style related to pain, pain coping strategies, and depression in lung cancer outpatients. We conducted a comparative, secondary data analysis of 107 lung cancer patients (73% male, mean age 61.4 ± 10.43 years, 88% Caucasian). As in prior studies, we classified patients into four coping style groups based on Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability...

  19. The relationship of anger and cognitive distortions with violence in violent offenders’ population: A meta-analytic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pintea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present meta-analysis, the magnitude of the relationship between cognitive distortions and anger and violent behaviour of incarcerated offenders, based on selected data for the relationship between anger and violence, and cognitive distortions and violence was empirically assessed. Out of nineteen studies included for analysis nine of them contain statistical indicators regarding the relationship between anger and violence, and fourteen studies regarding cognitive distortions and violence. The results indicated a strong relationship both between anger and violence, and between cognitive distortions and violent behaviour. Furthermore, the moderating effect of the type of instruments (self-reported vs. observational behavioural measurements used for violence assessment was tested. The results indicated that the type of instruments had no significant influence on the cognition-violence relationship, QB(1 = 0.12, p > .05, while in case of the anger-violence relationship, a significant moderating effect was identified, QB(1 = 14.26, p < .01, which supports a higher effect size when violence was measured by a self-reported than when was measured by behavioural observation.

  20. Examining the Direct and Indirect Effects of Fear and Anger on Criminal Decision Making Among Known Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Jeff A

    2015-12-01

    Deterrence represents the central theoretical core of the American criminal justice system, yet relatively little attention has been paid to how emotions like fear and anger may relate to deterrence. Psychological research has debated whether negative emotions each have similar impacts on decision making (valence approaches) or if distinct emotions have unique impacts (appraisal tendency approaches). This study explores the direct and indirect influences of fear and anger on hypothetical drunk driving likelihood, including their impact on cost perceptions. Surveys were administered to 1,013 male and female incarcerated felony offenders in the Southwestern United States. Using a multivariate path model and controlling for a number of other individual factors, current fear related to increased cost perceptions and anger to decreased costs. Anger also maintained a direct influence on drunk driving, whereas fear did not. Despite their shared negative valence, fear and anger appear to have dissimilar influences on cost perceptions and criminal decision making. A better understanding of these processes may lead to improved crime prevention approaches. PMID:24927741

  1. Hostility, physical aggression and trait anger as predictors for suicidal behavior in Chinese adolescents: a school-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study explored the extent to which trait aggression is associated with suicidal behavior in a nationwide school-based sample of adolescents. METHODS: A nationwide sample of 14,537 high school students in urban areas of China was recruited. Information concerning suicide ideation, plans, attempts, trait aggression and other risk factors was collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Multivariate regression analyses were employed to predict suicidal behavior. RESULTS: Approximately 18.5% of students reported suicide ideation, 8.7% reported suicide plans, and 4.1% reported attempts during the past one year. Hostility and trait anger had a significant positive association with suicidal ideation. Hostility and physical aggression were positively related to suicide plans. Hostility had a positive correlation with suicide attempts, while trait anger was inversely associated with suicide attempts. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that hostility, physical aggression and trait anger may be able to be used to predict suicidal behavior among adolescents. Suicide prevention programs should target at attenuating the severity of hostility, anger and physical aggression. But teachers and parents should also give close attention to students with low trait anger.

  2. The Effects of Subjective Loss of Control on Risk-taking Behavior: The Mediating Role of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit M. Beisswingert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger. An experimental paradigm for inducing externally caused and consequently externally attributed loss of control which should lead to experiences of anger was developed and pretested in a Pilot Study. The relationship between loss of control experiences, anger and risk-taking behavior was investigated using two separate student samples from Germany (N = 84, 54% female and China (N = 125; 64% female. In line with our hypotheses, results showed that anger mediated the link between subjective loss of control experiences and increasing risk-taking behavior. Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results’ cross-cultural generalizability. These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

  3. The association between driving anger and driving outcomes: A meta-analysis of evidence from the past twenty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingru; Chan, Alan H S

    2016-05-01

    Through the use of meta-analysis, this study investigated the relationships between driving anger and five types of driving outcomes (aggressive driving, risky driving, driving errors, near misses and accidents). The moderating effects of three variables (age, study publication year, and participants' country of origin) on these relationships were also examined. A total of 51 studies published over the past two decades met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The results showed that driving anger significantly predicted all three types of aberrant driving, with zero-order correlations of 0.312, 0.243, and 0.179 with aggressive driving, risky driving and driving errors, respectively. The correlations between driving anger and accident-related conditions, though at relatively weaker levels, were still statistically significant. Tests for effects of the moderating variables suggested that driving anger was a stronger predictor of risky driving among young drivers than among old drivers. Also, the anger-aggression association was found to decrease over time and vary across countries. The implications of the results and the directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26918282

  4. Culture, Coping and Resilience to Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Aldwin, Carolyn M.

    2004-01-01

    Sudden economic change can have devastating effects on the wellbeing of a country, as witnessed by the dramatic increases in suicide rates in the former Soviet Socialist Republics. However, it is possible to use economic development to promote happiness, if one understands the relationship between culture, coping, and resilience to stress. Cultures shape both normative stressors and individuals’ responses to them; individual coping strategies and cultural institutions must change to accommoda...

  5. Impact factor stories: Anxiety, Stress, & Coping

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety, Stress, & Coping provides a forum for scientific, theoretically important, and clinically significant research reports and conceptual contributions. It deals with experimental and field studies on anxiety dimensions and stress and coping processes, but also with related topics such as the antecedents and consequences of stress and emotion. Welcome are papers contributing to the understanding of the relationship between psychological and physiological processes, specific for stress an...

  6. Development of Coping Processes Against“ Listening Stress”

    OpenAIRE

    野呂, 徳治

    2011-01-01

     The present study reexamines the model of the cognitive appraisal process and circular mechanisms of“listening stress” conceptualized and designed by the present author. It has been pointed out that the model did not adequately organize the coping component, causing logical incoherence. The role of listening commitments in reappraisal has been also questioned. By reviewingpsychological stress theories, this study reorganizes the coping component of the appraisal model and reformulates listen...

  7. Stress and Coping with Stress in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Dolenc

    2015-01-01

    Because of the many developmental changes in adolescence, young people are exposed to greater likelihood of experiencing stress. On the other hand, this period is critical for developing effective and constructive coping strategies. In the contribution, we summarize part of what is known about stress, stress responses and coping. Throughout, we focus on common stressful events among adolescents and emphasize the importance of dealing successfully with stressors in their daily lives. Finally, ...

  8. Stress, coping and satisfaction in nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Chris; Dempster, Martin; Moutray, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Aim. This article is a report of a study conducted to explore the relationship between sources of stress and psychological well-being and to consider how different sources of stress and coping resources might function as moderators and mediators on well-being.Background. In most research exploring sources of stress and coping in nursing students, stress has been construed as psychological distress. Sources of stress likely to enhance well-being and, by implication, learning have not been cons...

  9. Stress and Coping - An Economic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wälde, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Stress is ubiquitous in society. In our model, stressors translate into subjective stress via an appraisal process. Stress reduces instantaneous utility of an individual directly and via a cognitive load argument. Coping can be functional and under the control of the individual or more automatic with dysfunctional features. We predict the occurrence and frequency of uncontrolled coping - emotional outbursts - as a function of an individual´s personality and environment. Outbursts cannot alway...

  10. Religious Coping and Psychological Distress in Military Veteran Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Elizabeth; Schuster, Jennifer; Richardson, Peter; Moye, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Research on the relationship between religious coping and psychological well-being in cancer survivors is limited. Forty-eight veteran cancer survivors completed measures of psychological distress, posttraumatic growth, and positive and negative religious coping. Negative religious coping was associated with greater distress and growth. Positive religious coping was associated with greater growth. Gender, race, and religious affiliation were significant predictors of positive and negative religious coping. Veteran cancer survivors who utilize negative religious coping may benefit from referral to clergy or a mental health professional. Assessment of religious coping may be particularly important for female, non-White, and Christian cancer survivors. PMID:21822744

  11. Pain coping strategies in pediatric dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Sikorová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine pain coping strategies used by children during dental treatment. Design: A single cross-sectional survey with a questionnaire carried out in 199 children aged 10-17 years. Methods: The Waldron/Varni Pediatric Pain Coping Inventory was used. Interpretation of the results was preceded by exploratory factor analysis and Varimax orthogonal rotation. Statistical analysis of results concerning coping strategies was performed with descriptive statistics methods: the mean, standard deviation and median. Quantitative parameters were compared with the two-sample t-test, Mann-Whitney and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. All the tests were performed at a level of significance of α = 0.05. Results: The results were interpreted based on analysis of 25 items structured into five factors of the modified questionnaire, revealing strategies used by children to cope with pain and perceived as effective by them. The most frequently reported strategies were cognitive self-instructions. Younger children preferred the use of social support; passive relaxation and cognitive self-instructions were preferred by girls and boys, respectively. Hospitalized children needed social support more often than outpatients, and so did children undergoing dental treatment with parental accompaniment. Conclusion: Differences in the use of coping strategies were noted, particularly with regard to children's age category, gender, hospitalization and parents being present during treatment. Routine recommendations of how to effectively cope with pain during dental treatment without considering the child’s individuality and particular situation are not advisable.

  12. Coping with the Trauma of Professional Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovzhik L. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation considers sports injuries as a psychological phenomenon, reveals the personality traits of athletes in terms of their vulnerability and resource to overcome injuries. Authors suggest the specificity of athletes’ coping strategies composition, as well as differences in their emotional state depending on the psychological well-being level. We consider gender-specific study links. In the survey, 124 participants were interviewed (M age = 22.1, SD age = 4; 80 male, 44 female. Authors has found significant differences in the ways of overcoming ordinary and sports stress among athletes having high or low level of well-being, gender-specific coping with the situation of injury have been shown. In the male group, athletes with high level of well-being use Problem-solving strategies, as well as Sport coping skills significantly more often. In the female group, in addition to coping peculiar to men, there is an appeal to Goal Setting and Mental Preparation, besides that they use Coach ability coping strategy. The study also identified coping strategies that contributed to the experience of well-being. Authors propose the practical aspects and perspectives of research.

  13. New perspectives on coping in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Grassi-Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a prevalent and highly disabling psychiatric condition. Despite the widely acknowledged importance of psychosocial interventions that involve a complex cognitive, behavioral, and biological process to help patients cope better with their illness, few studies have systematically evaluated coping in BD. Therefore, our objective was to examine recent developments in current research on coping in BD. Several studies have documented a strong association between BD and numerous neuroanatomical and neuropsychological abnormalities, particularly multiple episodes and longer durations of the disorder. The most marked effects of BD encompass brain areas involved in executive function, which may affect the mechanisms underlying an adequate selection of coping strategies. Thus, the ability of individuals to reduce their own stress burden is impaired, increasing vulnerability to stressful life events and negatively affecting the course of BD. Psychosocial interventions that focus on BD should be evaluated for their ability to improve coping abilities, and research on BD should consider neuropsychological impairment and cognitive-behavioral strategies for coping with stress.

  14. LIFE EVENTS AND NEGATIVE RELIGIOUS COPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sema eryücel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Recently, insufficiency of secular coping methods has drawn the attention of researchers towards religious coping methods. While the parts about theory and model cover an important place in the literature, experimental studies are rapidly going on. Although religious coping was initially interpreted as positive, experimental studies reveal that it also has negative forms. The purpose of this study, in which qualitative research methods were used, is to define the components of religious coping. Semi structured interview was used among 42 participants, 9 war veterans from Association of Turkish Disabled War Veterans, Martyrs, their Widows and Orphans Ankara Branch, and 9 relatives of martyrs from the Association of Martyrs’ Families Ankara Branch, totaling 60 volunteer participants between the ages 25 and 65 with snowball sampling method. It was discovered that 29 of the participants used negative religious coping and the participants who only used negative religious coping were studied in this research. Upon recording the interviews with the aid of a recorder, the researched typed the script of the interviews. The qualitative analysis of the collected data was done in MAXODA 11 computer program.

  15. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  16. Cooperative Group Performance in Graduate Research Methodology Courses: The Role of Study Coping and Examination-Taking Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the extent to which cooperative group members' levels of coping strategies (study and examination-taking coping strategies) and the degree that heterogeneity (variability of study coping strategies and examination-taking coping strategies) predict cooperative groups' levels of achievement in research…

  17. Coping strategies of HIV-affected households in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Laar, Amos; Manu, Abubakar; Laar, Matilda; El-Adas, Angela; Amenyah, Richard; Atuahene, Kyeremeh; Quarshie, Dave; Adjei, Andrew Anthony; Quakyi, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and negative coping mechanisms have a cyclical relationship. HIV infections may lead to the adoption of coping strategies, which may have undesired, negative consequences. We present data on the various coping mechanisms that HIV-affected households in Ghana resort to. Methods We collected data on coping strategies, livelihood activities, food consumption, and asset wealth from a nationally representative sample of 1,745 Ghanaian HIV-affected households. We computed coping stra...

  18. Personality and coping traits: A joint factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn

    2001-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this paper is to explore the structural similarities between Eysenck's model of personality and the dimensions of the dispositional COPE. Costa et al. {Costa P., Somerfield, M., & McCrae, R. (1996). Personality and coping: A reconceptualisation. In (pp. 44-61) Handbook of coping: Theory, research and applications. New York: Wiley} suggest that personality and coping behaviour are part of a continuum based on adaptation. If this is the case, there should be structural similarities between measures of personality and coping behaviour. This is tested using a joint factor analysis of personality and coping measures. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. METHODS: The EPQ-R and the dispositional COPE were administered to 154 participants, and the data were analysed using joint factor analysis and bivariate associations. RESULTS: The joint factor analysis indicated that these data were best explained by a four-factor model. One factor was primarily unrelated to personality. There was a COPE-neurotic-introvert factor (NI-COPE) containing coping behaviours such as denial, a COPE-extroversion (E-COPE) factor containing behaviours such as seeking social support and a COPE-psychoticism factor (P-COPE) containing behaviours such as alcohol use. This factor pattern, especially for NI- and E-COPE, was interpreted in terms of Gray's model of personality {Gray, J. A. (1987) The psychology of fear and stress. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press}. NI-, E-, and P-COPE were shown to be related, in a theoretically consistent manner, to perceived coping success and perceived coping functions. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that there are indeed conceptual links between models of personality and coping. It is argued that future research should focus on identifying coping 'trait complexes'. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:12614507

  19. Adolescents', mothers', and fathers' gendered coping strategies during conflict: Youth and parent influences on conflict resolution and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Schreiber, Jane E; Hastings, Paul; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2015-11-01

    We observed gendered coping strategies and conflict resolution outcomes used by adolescents and parents during a conflict discussion task to evaluate associations with current and later adolescent psychopathology. We studied 137 middle- to upper-middle-class, predominantly Caucasian families of adolescents (aged 11-16 years, 65 males) who represented a range of psychological functioning, including normative, subclinical, and clinical levels of problems. Adolescent coping strategies played key roles both in the extent to which parent-adolescent dyads resolved conflict and in the trajectory of psychopathology symptom severity over a 2-year period. Gender-prototypic adaptive coping strategies were observed in parents but not youth, (i.e., more problem solving by fathers than mothers and more regulated emotion-focused coping by mothers than fathers). Youth-mother dyads more often achieved full resolution of conflict than youth-father dyads. There were generally not bidirectional effects among youth and parents' coping across the discussion except boys' initial use of angry/hostile coping predicted fathers' angry/hostile coping. The child was more influential than the parent on conflict resolution. This extended to exacerbation/alleviation of psychopathology over 2 years: higher conflict resolution mediated the association of adolescents' use of problem-focused coping with decreases in symptom severity over time. Lower conflict resolution mediated the association of adolescents' use of angry/hostile emotion coping with increases in symptom severity over time. Implications of findings are considered within a broadened context of the nature of coping and conflict resolution in youth-parent interactions, as well as on how these processes impact youth well-being and dysfunction over time. PMID:26439060

  20. A Study of Driving Anger Expression Scale Based on Driving Behavior%基于驾驶行为的驾驶愤怒表现量表研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷虎; 吴超仲; 张晖

    2012-01-01

    对456名驾驶人的调查数据进行了因子分析,得到一份有21个项目的驾驶愤怒表现量表(Cronbach α=0.861),量表包括操作强度、操作频率、言语攻击、对车发泄、自我调节5个可靠的分量表,子量表的信度系数(Cronbach α)在0.667~0.894之间.除自我调节子量表外,其余各子量表彼此显著正相关.并通过比较月收入不同的驾驶人驾驶愤怒表现得分平均数对量表的结构效度进行了检验.研究结果表明,本量表具有较高的信度和效度,符合心理测量学标准.%A factor analysis of responses from 456 drivers yielded a 21-item driving anger expression scale (alpha reliability = 0. 861) with five reliable subscales involving operational fiery, operational frequency, verbal aggression, venting by vehicle and self-regulation. The subscale of reliability coefficients ranged between =0. 667 and =0. 894. In addition to self-regulation subscale, the other sub-scales correlated positively and significantly with each other. The scale of construct validity was tested by comparing the driving anger performance average score of drivers with different monthly income. The results show that the scale has high reliability and validity, meets the psychometric standards,and is a valid instrument to study the driver of driving anger performance.