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Sample records for angeles latino eye

  1. The impact of visual impairment on self-reported visual functioning in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globe, Denise R; Wu, Joanne; Azen, Stanley P; Varma, Rohit

    2004-06-01

    To assess the association between presenting binocular visual acuity (VA) and self-reported visual function as measured by the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25). A population-based, prevalence study of eye disease in Latinos 40 years and older residing in La Puente, California (Los Angeles Latino Eye Study [LALES]). Six thousand three hundred fifty-seven Latinos 40 years and older from 6 census tracts in La Puente. All participants completed a standardized interview, including the NEI-VFQ-25 to measure visual functioning, and a detailed eye examination. Two definitions of visual impairment were used: (1) presenting binocular distance VA of 20/40 or worse and (2) presenting binocular distance VA worse than 20/40. Analysis of variance was used to determine any systematic differences in mean NEI-VFQ-25 scores by visual impairment. Regression analyses were completed (1) to determine the association of age, gender, number of systemic comorbidities, depression, and VA with self-reported visual function and (2) to estimate a visual impairment-related difference for each subscale based on differences in VA. The NEI-VFQ-25 scores in persons with visual impairment. Of the 5287 LALES participants with complete NEI-VFQ-25 data, 6.3% (including 20/40) and 4.2% (excluding 20/40) were visually impaired. In the visually impaired participants, the NEI-VFQ-25 subscale scores ranged from 46.2 (General Health) to 93.8 (Color Vision). In the regression model, only VA, depression, and number of comorbidities were significantly associated with all subscale scores (R(2) ranged from 0.09 for Ocular Pain to 0.33 for the composite score). For 9 of 11 subscales, a 5-point change was equivalent to a 1- or 2-line difference in VA. Relationships were similar regardless of the definition of visual impairment. In this population-based study of Latinos, the NEI-VFQ-25 was sensitive to differences in VA. A 5-point difference on the NEI-VFQ-25 seems to be a

  2. The prevalence and risk indicators of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need in Latinos: the Los AngelesLatino Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Rohit; Wang, Michelle Y; Ying-Lai, Mei; Donofrio, Jill; Azen, Stanley P

    2008-12-01

    To determine the age- and sex-specific prevalence and risk indicators of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need among a population-based sample of Latino adults. Self-identified Latinos 40 years of age and older (n = 6129) from six census tracts in La Puente, California, underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, and a home-administered questionnaire provided self-reported data on potential risk indicators. Uncorrected refractive error was defined as a >or=2-line improvement with refraction in the better seeing eye. Unmet refractive need was defined as having or=20/40 after refraction (definition 1) or having or=2-line improvement with refraction (definition 2). Sex- and age-specific prevalence and significant risk indicators for uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need were calculated. The overall prevalence of uncorrected refractive error was 15.1% (n = 926). The overall prevalence of unmet refractive need was 8.9% (n = 213, definition 1) and 9.6% (n = 218, definition 2). The prevalence of uncorrected refractive error and either definition of unmet refractive need increased with age (P refractive error and unmet refractive need. The data suggest that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need is high in Latinos of primarily Mexican ancestry. Better education and access to care in older Latinos are likely to decrease the burden of uncorrected refractive error in Latinos.

  3. The research of the style of angel lobster eye x-ray optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, HuaQi; Liu, YuJiao; Zhang, ShaoWei; Hou, LinBao; Li, XingLong

    2018-01-01

    This paper has developed the theory research of wide field Angel lobster eye X-ray optical system based on the principle of entirely incidence. Combine the configuration characteristic of lobster eye, recommend the conclusion of beam of light focus on the half of radius whether point or parallel light. Designed the microchannel through the principle of real ray trace and got the relationship among different parameters about it using numerical value emulation. Got pixels and illumination pictures validated the wide field focus characteristic of Angel lobster eye by simulating the optical system.

  4. Integrated connection to neighborhood storytelling network, education, and chronic disease knowledge among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Moran, Meghan B; Wilkin, Holley A; Ball-Rokeach, Sandra J

    2011-04-01

    Combining key ideas from the knowledge-gap hypothesis and communication infrastructure theory, the present study aimed to explain the relations among individuals' education, access to community-based communication resources, and knowledge of chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, breast cancer, and prostate cancer) among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles. Rather than explore the effect of isolated communication resources, this study explored the effect of an integrated connection to community-based storytellers on chronic disease knowledge. The authors hypothesized that individuals' access to a community-based communication infrastructure for obtaining and sharing information functions as an intervening step in the process where social inequality factors such as education lead to chronic disease knowledge gaps in a local community context. With random samples of African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles, the authors found that access to community-based communication resources plays a mediating role in the case of breast cancer and diabetes knowledge, but not in hypertension and prostate cancer knowledge. The authors discussed these findings on the basis of communication infrastructure theory and knowledge-gap hypothesis.

  5. Eye Health Knowledge and Eye Health Information Exposure Among Hispanic/Latino Individuals: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Laura A; Tannenbaum, Stacey L; Zheng, D Diane; Joslin, Charlotte E; Perera, Marisa J; Gellman, Marc D; Arheart, Kristopher L; Lam, Byron L; Lee, David J

    2017-08-01

    Routine eye care is important to maintaining eye health and preventing visual impairment. However, poor knowledge of ocular risk factors and disease as well as minimal exposure to eye health information may compromise adherence to eye care recommendations. Studies have shown that Hispanic/Latino people have poor eye care utilization, but little is known about their knowledge of eye health and exposure to eye health information. To examine factors associated with more eye health knowledge and greater exposure to eye health information among Hispanic/Latino people. This was a cross-sectional ocular study of 1235 participants living in the Miami, Florida, site of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a multisite epidemiologic study of disease prevalence and development among Hispanic/Latino people. Data were collected from October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2013, and data analyses were conducted between May 28, 2014, and March 18, 2015. Descriptive and multivariable regression analyses were performed for 3 ocular health care outcomes. Regression models were built sequentially, with variables conceptually grouped according to Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations. Ability to identify 8 factors on a general eye health knowledge scale and number of eye health information sources seen or heard about in the past 12 months. Of the 1235 participants, 748 (73.4%) self-identified as being of Cuban descent and 407 (19.2%) self-identified as being from Central or South America, 478 (46.7%) were women and 757 (53.3%) were men, and the mean (SD) age was 53.6 (8.1) years. Participants with at least a high school degree or general educational development certificate had greater eye health knowledge (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.15 and IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.17, respectively) as did those with a higher mental health score on the Short Form 12-Item, version 2, Health Survey (IRR, 1

  6. Sex drugs, peer connections, and HIV: Use and risk among African American, Latino, and Multiracial young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in Los Angeles and New York

    OpenAIRE

    Mutchler, Matt G.; McKay, Tara; Candelario, Norman; Liu, Honghu; Stackhouse, Bill; Bingham, Trista; Ayala, George

    2011-01-01

    African American and Latino young men who have sex with men are at high risk for HIV infection. We administered brief intercept surveys (N=416) at 18 Black and Latino gay pride events in Los Angeles and New York in 2006 and 2007. Ordinal logistic regressions were used to model the effects of substance use during sex, peer connectedness, relationship status, and homelessness on condom use. Alcohol use, crystal use, homelessness, and having a primary relationship partner were negatively associa...

  7. A Qualitative Analysis of the Use of Financial Services and Saving Behavior Among Older African Americans and Latinos in the Los Angeles Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa R. Blanco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For this study, we conducted seven focus groups in the Los Angeles area with a total of 70 participants (42 Latinos and 28 African Americans recruited from three senior centers and a church. There was a wide variety of responses in relation to the usage of financial services among participants. We found that although some participants seem to participate more in the formal financial sector and show a higher level of sophistication when managing their finances, other participants’ use of formal financial institutions is minimal. Among African American participants, we found several instances in which individuals feel very comfortable using banks. Lower levels of participation in the formal financial sector were found among the lower income Latino participants. In relation to barriers to participate in the financial sector, supply was not an issue, but demand and behavioral factors seem more important. Overall, no participants saved very much on a regular basis. We also find that participants in general do not want to ask their children for money, and also do not want to save and accumulate wealth to leave to their children.

  8. A Latino Superintendent's Life History: A Re-Examination through Brown Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Alma Yvette

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates Latino males are under-represented in the educational pipeline and administrative ranks of public education. Further studies attribute the Latino culture as contributing to the obstacles encountered in Latino advancement. This qualitative study was a life history of a first generation U.S. born Latino raised in a Texas-Mexico…

  9. Conceptualisations of Masculinity and Self-Reported Medication Adherence among HIV-Positive Latino Men in Los Angeles, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Frank H.; Bogart, Laura M.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Klein, David J.; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-01-01

    HIV-positive Latino men have been found to have poorer medication adherence compared to Whites. This study sought to identify how cultural conceptualisations of masculinity are associated with self-reported medication adherence among Latino men. 208 HIV-positive men reported the number of doses of antiretroviral medication missed in the previous seven days (dichotomised at 100% adherence versus less). Conceptualisations of masculinity consisted of traditional machismo (e.g., power and aggressive attitudes, which are normally associated with negative stereotypes of machismo) and caballerismo (e.g., fairness, respect for elders and the importance of family). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with adherence. The mean adherence was 97% (SD 6.5%; range = 57%–100%). 100% adherence in the previous seven days was reported by 77% of the participants. Caballerismo was associated with a greater likelihood (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.08–2.92; p = 0.03) and machismo with a lower likelihood (OR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38–0.95; p = 0.03) of medication adherence. In addition, higher medication side effects were found to be associated with a lower likelihood (OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43–0.81; p = 0.001) of medication adherence. These findings reinforce the importance of identifying cultural factors which may affect medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men resident in the USA. PMID:24730591

  10. Conceptualisations of masculinity and self-reported medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men in Los Angeles, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Frank H; Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Klein, David J; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-06-01

    HIV-positive Latino men have been found to have poorer medication adherence compared to Whites. This study sought to identify how cultural conceptualisations of masculinity are associated with self-reported medication adherence among Latino men. A total of 208 HIV-positive men reported the number of doses of antiretroviral medication missed in the previous seven days (dichotomised at 100% adherence versus less). Conceptualisations of masculinity consisted of traditional machismo (e.g., power and aggressive attitudes, which are normally associated with negative stereotypes of machismo) and caballerismo (e.g., fairness, respect for elders and the importance of family). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with adherence. The mean adherence was 97% (SD = 6.5%; range = 57-100%). In all, 77% of the participants reported 100% adherence in the previous seven days. Caballerismo was associated with a greater likelihood (OR = 1.77; 95% CI: 1.08-2.92; p = 0.03) and machismo with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38-0.95; p = 0.03) of medication adherence. In addition, higher medication side-effects were found to be associated with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43-0.81; p = 0.001) of medication adherence. These findings reinforce the importance of identifying cultural factors that may affect medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men resident in the USA.

  11. Palace Revolt in Los Angeles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Antonio Villaraigosa, the mayor of Los Angeles, comes alive when recalling his start in local politics--as a labor organizer agitating for reform inside decrepit and overcrowded schools. In his quest to turn around the schools, the mayor has united working-class Latino parents, civil rights leaders, and big-money Democrats to challenge union…

  12. African Ancestry Is Associated with Higher Intraocular Pressure in Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannini, Drew; Torres, Mina; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Varma, Rohit; Gao, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor, as well as the only modifiable risk factor, for glaucoma. Racial differences have been observed in IOP measurements with individuals of African descent experiencing the highest IOP when compared with other ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic ancestry and IOP in Latinos. Population-based genetic association study. A total of 3541 participants recruited from the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study. Study participants were genotyped using the Illumina OmniExpress BeadChip (∼730K markers). We used STRUCTURE to estimate individual genetic ancestry. Simple and multiple linear regression, as well as quantile regression, analyses were performed to investigate the relationship between genetic ancestry and IOP. The relationship between genetic ancestry and IOP in Latinos. African ancestry was significantly associated with higher IOP in Latinos in our simple linear regression analysis (P = 0.002). After adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, central corneal thickness, and type 2 diabetes, this association remained significant (P = 0.0005). The main association was modified by a significant interaction between African ancestry and hypertension (P = 0.037), with hypertensive individuals experiencing a greater increase in IOP with increasing African ancestry. To our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time that African ancestry and its interaction with hypertension are associated with higher IOP in Latinos. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project: Model Program for Latino Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease-Affected People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Maria P.; Villa, Valentine M.; Trejo, Laura; Ramirez, Rosa; Ranney, Martha

    2003-01-01

    Describes the El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project--a dementia-specific outreach and services program targeting Latino caregivers in the Los Angeles area. Results of an evaluation of service utilization indicate a reduction in barriers to care and an increase in services utilization. Implications for social work practice are discussed. (Contains…

  14. Genotype Imputation for Latinos Using the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Project Reference Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi eGao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Genotype imputation is a vital tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS and meta-analyses of multiple GWAS results. Imputation enables researchers to increase genomic coverage and to pool data generated using different genotyping platforms. HapMap samples are often employed as the reference panel. More recently, the 1000 Genomes Project resource is becoming the primary source for reference panels. Multiple GWAS and meta-analyses are targeting Latinos, the most populous and fastest growing minority group in the US. However, genotype imputation resources for Latinos are rather limited compared to individuals of European ancestry at present, largely because of the lack of good reference data. One choice of reference panel for Latinos is one derived from the population of Mexican individuals in Los Angeles contained in the HapMap Phase 3 project and the 1000 Genomes Project. However, a detailed evaluation of the quality of the imputed genotypes derived from the public reference panels has not yet been reported. Using simulation studies, the Illumina OmniExpress GWAS data from the Los Angles Latino Eye Study and the MACH software package, we evaluated the accuracy of genotype imputation in Latinos. Our results show that the 1000 Genomes Project AMR+CEU+YRI reference panel provides the highest imputation accuracy for Latinos, and that also including Asian samples in the panel can reduce imputation accuracy. We also provide the imputation accuracy for each autosomal chromosome using the 1000 Genomes Project panel for Latinos. Our results serve as a guide to future imputation-based analysis in Latinos.

  15. Prevalence of amblyopia and strabismus in African American and Hispanic children ages 6 to 72 months the multi-ethnic pediatric eye disease study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    To determine the age- and ethnicity-specific prevalences of strabismus in African American and Hispanic/Latino children ages 6 to 72 months and of amblyopia in African American and Hispanic/Latino children 30 to 72 months. Cross-sectional study. The Multi-ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study is a population-based evaluation of the prevalence of vision disorders in children ages 6 to 72 months in Los Angeles County, California. A comprehensive eye examination was completed by 77% of eligible children. This report focuses on results from 3007 African American and 3007 Hispanic/Latino children. Eligible children in all enumerated households in 44 census tracts were identified. Participants underwent an in-home interview and were scheduled for a comprehensive eye examination and in-clinic interview. The examination included evaluation of ocular alignment, refractive error, and ocular structures, as well as determination of optotype visual acuity (VA) in children 30 months and older. The proportion of 6- to 72-month-olds with strabismus on ocular examination and proportion of 30- to 72-month-olds with optotype VA deficits and amblyopia risk factors consistent with predetermined definitions of amblyopia. Strabismus was detected in 2.4% of Hispanic/Latino children and 2.5% of African American children (P = 0.81), and was more prevalent in older children than in younger children. Amblyopia was detected in 2.6% of Hispanic/Latino children and 1.5% of African American children, a statistically significant difference (P = 0.02), and 78% of cases of amblyopia were attributable to refractive error. Amblyopia prevalence did not vary with age. Among Hispanic/Latino and African American children in Los Angeles County, strabismus prevalence increases with age, but amblyopia prevalence appears stable by 3 years of age. Amblyopia is usually caused by abnormal refractive error. These findings may help to optimize the timing and modality of preschool vision screening programs.

  16. Latino Parents and Teachers: Key Players Building Neighborhood Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elizabeth; Ulanoff, Sharon H.

    2013-01-01

    This narrative study examines how Latino parents and teachers in the Boyle Heights/East Los Angeles community create and appropriate social capital to increase student achievement. Specifically, the study explores how parents and teachers participate in two community organizations to extend resources that have the potential to positively impact…

  17. Cyber-angel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guglielmi, Michel; Serafin, Stefania

    2004-01-01

    ?It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive? Most of spiritual traditions trough the world are referring to some kind of souls acting as guardian and protector or divine messenger for humans (angels...

  18. Apocryphal Angels in Nun Convents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ávila Vivar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The preponderance of studies about viceregal angelic series, and the widespread belief that the representation of apocryphal angels is a specific peculiarity of viceregal angelology, have created such a close relation between it and the apocryphal angels, that they are even considered as synonymous. However, both the texts and the presence of this angels in the spanish convents of the XVII century, evidence that the apocryphal angels appeared and they were represented in Spain long before that in its american viceregal. Therefore, it is here where their origins and their meaning should be sought.

  19. The Los Angeles basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintoul, W.

    1991-01-01

    In the early 1890s, Edward L Doheny, a mining prospector down on his luck, observed residents of Los Angeles gathering brea from the area's tar pits for use as fuel in coal-scarce California. Realizing that this crude tar was petroleum that had congealed upon contact with the open air, Doheny explored the residential neighborhood near Westlake Park, pooled resources with Charles A Canfield, an old mining crony, and purchased a city lot for $400. This paper reports that drilling wells in the Los Angeles City field posed the problem of making oil production compatible with urban living. Residents had to deal with noise, dirt, traffic, odors, and waste disposal. At least one solution to the waste disposal problem proved unique. A homeowner with a rig in his backyard had no place for a sump in which to run waste water and mud. However, his house had a basement, and that's where the mud went

  20. A Qualitative Study of Latino Grandparents' Involvement in and Support for Grandchildren's Leisure Time Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Caldwell, Linda L; Loy, Steven; Robledo, Mayra

    2017-12-01

    Latino grandparents are often involved in rearing of grandchildren. However, their roles in promoting Latino children's leisure time physical activity (LTPA) have been largely overlooked by researchers. The purpose of this study is to examine Latino grandparents' involvement in and support for grandchildren's (age 2-12) LTPA as well as issues facing Latino grandparents. Participants included 53 Latino grandparents who lived with/cared for or used to live with/care for grandchildren of 2 to 12 years old in three low-income areas of Los Angeles County. Data were collected using 4 semistructured focus groups and 26 semistructured interviews. Transcribed data were systematically and iteratively coded and analyzed. Latino grandparents perceived various benefits of physical activity to their grandchildren's physical and mental health, and supported grandchildren's LTPA directly and indirectly. The direct support included doing physical activity with grandchildren, taking grandchildren to places for physical activities, verbally asking grandchildren to do physical activities, and rewarding grandchildren for doing physical activities. The indirect support was made through providing suggestions to parents. Mothers usually regulated Latino grandparents' involvement in or support for grandchildren's LTPA and tended to promote a maternal lineage. Some Latino grandparents reported barriers to supporting grandchildren's LTPA, including lack of information, access to affordable and safe LTPA facilities/programs, transportation, money, and time. Latino grandparents are advocates for grandchildren's LTPA and support grandchildren's LTPA directly and indirectly. It may be promising to develop interventions to increase Latino grandparents' competency in supporting grandchildren's LTPA.

  1. Latino Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NAMI About NAMI + x IN THIS SECTION La salud mental en la comunidad latina Share NAMI Share Home ... Support Diverse Communities Latinos IN THIS SECTION La salud mental en la comunidad latina Latino Mental Health Video ...

  2. Sexuality Information Needs of Latino and African American Ninth Graders: A Content Analysis of Anonymous Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Olaiz, Francisca; Goldfarb, Eva S.; Constantine, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    This study used qualitative content analysis to examine anonymous questions about sex and sexuality submitted by Latino and African American adolescents in Los Angeles, California, classrooms. The majority of questions asked about sexuality and sexual behavior, or anatomy and physiology, with fewer questions about pregnancy and pregnancy…

  3. Schools for Democracy: Labor Union Participation and Latino Immigrant Parents' School-Based Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriquez, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have long argued that civic organizations play a vital role in developing members' civic capacity. Yet few empirical studies examine how and the extent to which civic skills transfer across distinct and separate civic contexts. Focusing on Latino immigrant members of a Los Angeles janitors' labor union, this article fills a void by…

  4. House Poor in Los Angeles: Examining Patterns of Housing-Induced Poverty by Race, Nativity, and Legal Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Eileen Diaz

    2012-09-01

    Housing affordability in the United States is generally operationalized using the ratio approach, with those allocating more than thirty percent of income to shelter costs considered to have housing affordability challenges. Alternative standards have been developed that focus on residual income, whether income remaining after housing expenditures is sufficient to meet non-housing needs. This study employs Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey data to consider racial/ethnic, nativity and legal status differences in one residual income standard. Logistic regression analyses of housing-induced poverty focus on whether there are differences among five distinct groups: U.S.born Latinos, Non-Hispanic Whites, and African Americans, authorized Latino immigrants, and unauthorized Latino immigrants. Results suggest that: 1) Latino natives are significantly more likely to be in housing-induced poverty than African Americans and Latino immigrants, and 2) unauthorized Latino immigrants are not more likely to experience the outcome than other groups. The present work extends previous research. First, the results provide additional evidence of the value of operationalizing housing affordability using a residual income standard. Alternatives to the ratio approach deserve more empirical attention from a wider range of scholars and policymakers interested in housing affordability. Second, housing scholarship to date generally differentiates among Latinos by ethnicity, nativity, and citizenship. The present study contributes to emerging research investigating heterogeneity among Latinos by nativity and legal status.

  5. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Angels or demons? You decide!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The new film Angels & Demons starring Tom Hanks and directed by Ron Howard is being premiered worldwide on 15 May, but you could see it 10 days earlier at a special preview screening as the CERN Press Office has a limited number of tickets to give away. Preview of the new CERN website to be published on 5 May. Opinion is split among CERNois when talking about Dan Brown’s book Angels & Demons. Should he be praised for bringing particle physics into the spotlight or should he be demonised for the ‘creative liberties’ he took - for example, although it would be useful for the international collaborations, CERN doesn’t actually have its own private airport and supersonic jet. But love it or hate it, with the upcoming release of the multi-million dollar Hollywood film adaptation, Angels & Demons will introduce a huge new audience to CERN. "Guess what? – CERN really exists!" said...

  9. Geomorphological Hazards in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Richard F.

    This is a topical book that deals with the geomorphological and geological engineering problems associated with hillslope processes and sediment transport in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. There are few large cities in the United States where the problems of urban growth include such a distinctive physical environment, as well as the potential hazards of brush fires, earthquakes, and floods that occur in Los Angeles. The research and data used in the book are restricted to Los Angeles County and cover the period 1914-1978. The author has done a commendable job of synthesizing a large mass of data from diverse sources, including federal, state, and local agency reports, plus data from private groups such as professional technical societies and consultants.

  10. Immigrant incorporation in the garment industry of Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, I; Bernard, R B; Kim, R

    1999-01-01

    This study expands immigrant social network theory and examined employment patterns in the garment industry in Los Angeles, California, among Latino workers employed by Asian immigrant entrepreneurs. The study determined that a large percentage of immigrant employees found their jobs through the immigrant economy. Entrepreneurship increased the supply of local jobs and expanded the economy at destination at no expense to natives. Immigrant entrepreneurs bought firms from nonimmigrant owners or started new ones with an immigrant labor supply. Massey's index is flawed due to its exclusion of the role of entrepreneurs. Migration networks facilitate entrepreneurship, but some ethnic groups have fewer entrepreneurs, such as Mexicans and Central Americans. A 1993 Los Angeles survey identified 3642 garment factories in its county. Mean employment was 27.1 persons. The garment industry was the 4th largest industry in the area in 1996, with 98,700 employees. It represented 6% of all wage and salary employees in the City and 5.5% of the immigrant labor force in the County in 1990. 93% of garment workers in 1990 were immigrants. It is estimated that 51% of garment factory owners were Asians; most employees were Latinos. Census figures on sewing machine operators indicated 47.3% of owners were Whites and 42.45 were Asians. 53.3% of employees were other ethnic groups, 14.5% were Asians, and 32.2% were Whites. It is estimated that 47.2% of total employment was due to the immigration economy. 71.5% of the total employment in the garment industry was in the immigrant sector.

  11. Sexual Solicitation of Latino Male Day Laborers by Other Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Frank H.; Ortiz, Daniel J.; Martinez, Victor; Bing, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the likelihood of Latino day laborers being solicited for sex by other men. Material and Methods 450 Latino day laborers were recruited in Los Angeles, California, from July to September 2005. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which day laborers were more likely to be solicited and subsequently to have sex. Results Thirty-eight percent reported being solicited for sex by another man while seeking work. Those solicited were more likely to live longer in the U.S., be more educated and screen positive for drug dependence. Of those solicited, 9.4% had sex with their solicitors. Those screening positive for drug dependence were more likely to have sex. Most of the day laborers who had anal sex with their solicitors did not always use condoms. Conclusions HIV prevention efforts should target drug dependent day laborers, who may place themselves at risk for HIV through sex with male solicitors. PMID:19039432

  12. Hangar con alas, Los Angeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1961-04-01

    Full Text Available Formando parte de su programa, la TWA ha construido recientemente un hangar para servicio y reparaciones de su flota aérea de naves ordinarias y de aviones de reacción en el aeropuerto internacional de Los Angeles (Estados Unidos. El proyecto de esta obra se encargó a la empresa constructora Holmes & Narver, Inc.

  13. Tongues of Men and Angels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGraw, John J.

    2012-01-01

    to utter strings of syllables that some claim to be the ‘language of angels.’ Recent neuroimaging studies have highlighted differences in the brains of subjects performing glossolalia in comparison to those same subjects singing a Church hymn. An investigation of the neural correlates of glossolalia...

  14. Latino Students and Degree Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jacquelyn D.; Parks, Rodney

    2018-01-01

    Latinos are the largest growing population in America, and thus, have the potential to have the greatest impact on our nation's economy. However, Latinos also graduate college at a lower rate than their counterparts. This article focuses on the various cultural, social, and financial barriers Latino students face and provides recommendations for…

  15. Caring for Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  16. Latinos en Extasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, T; Chavez, J D

    1998-05-01

    The Mission Neighborhood Health Center (MNHC) in San Francisco offers a Latino youth program, Latinos en Extasis, focusing on HIV, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and pregnancy prevention. The youth-focused, peer intervention program works to increase risk prevention, improve self-esteem among Latino youth ages 13 to 18, and improve communication skills for negotiating birth control and condom use. Based on Diffusion of Innovation Theory (DIT), the program builds on the social influence of community leaders and peer educators. Peer educators, chosen based on their presentation skills and desire to be community activists, are trained on HIV/STDs and reproductive anatomy. The peer educators, who come from a variety of socioeconomic levels and backgrounds, recruit participants at community events, health centers, and high schools. Participants enjoy the role-playing and games that peer leaders use to encourage participation and facilitate education.

  17. Latino/a Youth Intentions to Smoke Cigarettes: Exploring the Roles of Culture and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Schwartz, Seth J; Unger, Jennifer B; Zamboanga, Byron L; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Huang, Shi; Villamar, Juan A; Soto, Daniel W; Pattarroyo, Monica; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2015-08-01

    Latino/a youth are at risk for cigarette smoking. This risk seems to increase as youth navigate the U.S. cultural context, especially for girls. To investigate how acculturation may influence Latino/a youths' intentions to use cigarettes, this study combines a bidimensional/multidomain model of acculturation and the Theory of Reasoned Action. Our sample consisted of 303 recent Latino/a immigrant youth who had resided in the United States for five years or less at baseline (141 girls, 160 boys; 153 from Miami, 150 from Los Angeles) who completed surveys at 3 time-points. Youth completed measures of acculturation (Latino/a practices, Latino/a identity, collectivistic values; U.S. cultural practices, U.S. identity, individualistic values), smoking related health risk attitudes, perceived subjective norms regarding smoking, and intentions to use cigarettes. Structural equation modeling indicated that collectivistic values were associated with more perceived disapproval of smoking, which in turn was negatively associated with intentions to smoke. Collectivistic values may help protect Latino/a immigrant youth from intending to smoke. Thus, educational smoking prevention efforts could promote collectivistic values and disseminate messages about the negative consequences of smoking on interpersonal relationships.

  18. Latino/a Youth Intentions to Smoke Cigarettes: Exploring the Roles of Culture and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Huang, Shi; Villamar, Juan A.; Soto, Daniel W.; Pattarroyo, Monica; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Latino/a youth are at risk for cigarette smoking. This risk seems to increase as youth navigate the U.S. cultural context, especially for girls. To investigate how acculturation may influence Latino/a youths’ intentions to use cigarettes, this study combines a bidimensional/multidomain model of acculturation and the Theory of Reasoned Action. Our sample consisted of 303 recent Latino/a immigrant youth who had resided in the United States for five years or less at baseline (141 girls, 160 boys; 153 from Miami, 150 from Los Angeles) who completed surveys at 3 time-points. Youth completed measures of acculturation (Latino/a practices, Latino/a identity, collectivistic values; U.S. cultural practices, U.S. identity, individualistic values), smoking related health risk attitudes, perceived subjective norms regarding smoking, and intentions to use cigarettes. Structural equation modeling indicated that collectivistic values were associated with more perceived disapproval of smoking, which in turn was negatively associated with intentions to smoke. Collectivistic values may help protect Latino/a immigrant youth from intending to smoke. Thus, educational smoking prevention efforts could promote collectivistic values and disseminate messages about the negative consequences of smoking on interpersonal relationships. PMID:28042523

  19. Eye Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Allergies Sections What Are Eye Allergies? Eye Allergy Symptoms ... allergy diagnosis Eye allergy treatment What Are Eye Allergies? Leer en Español: ¿Qué son las alergias de ...

  20. Eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Z K

    1991-01-01

    Eye cosmetics are useful to highlight and emphasize the eyes. Currently available eye cosmetics include eye shadows, eye shadow setting creams, under-eye concealers, eye-liners, mascaras, artificial eyelashes, and eyebrow pencils. Special care must be taken when patients with sensitive skin or contact lens wearers select eye cosmetics. Eye cosmetics may also be the cause of either irritant or allergic contact dermatitis, which are two causes of the upper-eyelid dermatitis syndrome.

  1. Eye Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Symptoms This symptoms list is for general reference ... Y Z A-Z A B Blood in Eye Bloodshot Eye Blurriness Burning Eyes C Crusty Eyelid ...

  2. Eye pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  3. Delayed presentation for care during acute myocardial infarction in a Hispanic population of Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sean O; Magana, Renee N; Korn, Carrie S; Genna, Tammy; Bretsky, Philip M

    2002-01-01

    Delay in seeking care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been well described in some populations, but little research has been conducted on delay by minority groups, such as Latinos and Asians. This study sought to determine the degree of delay and mode of access of patients with AMI presenting to an inner-city hospital serving an ethnically diverse population. This study was a retrospective case series of Latino, Asian, African-American and Caucasian patients diagnosed in the emergency department (ED) with chest pain (CP) and AMI, during a 2-year period. Three hundred thirty seven cases were studied, with the average delay in presentation for care being 44.3 hours, with a median of 8.8 hours. Before seeking care for symptoms of AMI, Latinos delayed an average of 41.5 hours (median 9.2 hours); African Americans delayed an average of 30.8 hours (median 3.5 hours); Asians delayed an average of 92 hours (median 12 hours); and Caucasians delayed an average of 31.6 hours (median 3.2 hours). The mode of transportation used by the different groups to travel to the ED was also significantly different, with Latinos and Asians utilizing private transportation the majority of the time (70% and 83%, respectively). There is a significant delay in presentation for care in patients experiencing AMI in Los Angeles County, greatest among the Asian and Latino populations. Once the decision to seek assistance is made, an under-utilization of EMS compounds the problem. Socioeconomic status, language, and cultural practices pose unique barriers to recognizing and addressing symptoms of AMI in this population.

  4. Connecting eye to eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne; Rask, Anders Bindslev

    2017-01-01

    Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) is used a frame for supporting online and blended learning in educations. The online communication and collaboration are afforded by the social collaboration. However, the social collaboration is based on the establishment of direct eye contact...... (Khalid, Deska & Hugenberg, 2016), but direct eye contact is challenged by the position of the digital devices and thus CSCL. Lack of eye contact is the chief contributor to the negative effects of online disinhibition (Lapidot-Lefler & Barak, 2012) and the problem is the location of the web camera...... at the computer. Eye contact is challenged by the displacement between the senders´ and receivers´ focus on the screen picture and the camera's location at the top or bottom of screens on all digital devices. The aim of this paper is accordingly to investigate the influence of the displacement in eye contact...

  5. Son los latinos estadounidenses?

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    En el año 2050 la población blanca no latina de Estados Unidos sumará el 46% del total de los ciudadanos de ese país. Para entonces, la población latina, negra y asiática combinada representará el 54%. En ese horizonte que predicen los cálculos oficiales, los latinos habrán crecido en un 15%, pasando de los 47 millones que viven ahora EEUU a 133 millones. Mientras que los latinos y los asiáticos (de 16 millones a 41 millones para entonces) no pararán de crecer, las poblaciones blanca y negra ...

  6. Examining the Perils and Promises of an Informal Niche in a Global City: A Case Study of Mexican Immigrant Gardeners in Los Angeles

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The domestic household service sector of contract gardening dominated by Mexican immigrants in Los Angeles constitutes an important and under-examined component of the city's informal economy. Mexican immigrant gardeners, like Latina domestic workers and Latino day laborers, represent an important and undervalued labor source in this global city and other U.S. cities and suburbs. While domestic help has historically been a privilege of the affluent, the middle-class, since the World War II er...

  7. "Sobresalir": Latino Parent Perspectives on New Latino Diaspora Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Sarah; Wortham, Stanton

    2012-01-01

    Although many have documented the high value Latino families place on education, prevalent discourses nonetheless characterize Latino immigrant parents as not caring about their children's education. This paper describes the practice-based components of a participatory action research project in which we created a collaborative film, intended for…

  8. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Gender and Power: Reconstructing Latino Ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavella, Patricia; Takash, Paule Cruz

    1993-01-01

    Introduces selected papers delivered at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Papers explore gender as experienced by Latinas and Latinos, examine gendered relationships between Latino men and women, and discern how Latino gender norms in Latin America are perpetrated and negotiated by Latinos within the U.S.…

  14. Alcohol use among recent immigrant Latino/a youth: acculturation, gender, and the Theory of Reasoned Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Schwartz, Seth J; Unger, Jennifer B; Zamboanga, Byron L; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Huang, Shi; Villamar, Juan A; Soto, Daniel; Pattarroyo, Monica

    2016-12-01

    Latino/a youth are at risk for alcohol use. This risk seems to rise with increasing US cultural orientation and decreasing Latino cultural orientation, especially among girls. To ascertain how acculturation may influence Latino/a youth alcohol use, we integrated an expanded multi-domain model of acculturation with the Theory of Reasoned Action. Participants were 302 recent Latino/a immigrant youth (141 girls, 160 boys; 152 from Miami, 150 from Los Angeles) who completed surveys at 4 time points. Youth completed measures of acculturation, attitudes toward drinking, perceived subjective norms regarding alcohol use, intention to drink, and alcohol use. Structural equation modeling indicated that collectivistic values predicted more perceived disapproval of drinking, which negatively predicted intention to drink. Intention to drink predicted elevated alcohol use. Although the association between collectivistic values and social disapproval of drinking was relatively small (β = .19, p < .05), findings suggest that collectivistic values may help protect Latino/a immigrant youth from alcohol use by influencing their perceived social disapproval of drinking, leading to lower intention to drink. Educational preventive interventions aimed at reducing or preventing alcohol use in recent Latino/a immigrant youth could promote collectivistic values and disseminate messages about the negative consequences of drinking.

  15. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  16. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  17. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  18. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  19. National Latino AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-10-08

    This podcast highlights National Latino AIDS Awareness Day, to increase awareness of the disproportionate impact of HIV on the Hispanic or Latino population in the United States and dependent territories. The podcast reminds Hispanics or Latinos that they have the power to take control of their health and protect themselves against HIV.  Created: 10/8/2014 by Office of Health Equity, Office of the Director, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 10/14/2014.

  20. Perinatal grief in Latino parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based on research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture.

  1. Evaluation of a Community Health Worker Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Stigma and Increase HIV Testing Among Underserved Latinos in the Southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Becker, Davida; Espinoza, Lilia; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena; Diaz, Gaby; Carricchi, Ana; Galvez, Gino; Garcia, Melawhy

    2015-01-01

    Latinos are at an elevated risk for HIV infection. Continued HIV/AIDS stigma presents barriers to HIV testing and affects the quality of life of HIV-positive individuals, yet few interventions addressing HIV/AIDS stigma have been developed for Latinos. An intervention led by community health workers (promotores de salud, or promotores) targeting underserved Latinos in three southwestern U.S. communities was developed to decrease HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV knowledge and perception of risk. The intervention was led by HIV-positive and HIV-affected (i.e., those who have, or have had, a close family member or friend with HIV/AIDS) promotores, who delivered interactive group-based educational sessions to groups of Latinos in Spanish and English. To decrease stigma and motivate behavioral and attitudinal change, the educational sessions emphasized positive Latino cultural values and community assets. The participant pool comprised 579 Latino adults recruited in El Paso, Texas (n=204); San Ysidro, California (n=175); and Los Angeles, California (n=200). From pretest to posttest, HIV/AIDS stigma scores decreased significantly (pstigma scores when compared with their male counterparts, which may have been related to a greater increase in HIV/AIDS knowledge scores (p=0.016 and p=0.007, respectively). Promotores interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV-related knowledge, perception of risk, and willingness to discuss sexual risk with partners show promise in reaching underserved Latino communities.

  2. Uncorrected Refractive Error in a Latino Population: Proyecto VER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Jorge A.; Swenor, Bonnielin K.; Muñoz, Beatriz E.; West, Sheila K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of refractive error (RE), and the proportion of those with uncorrected refractive error and factors associated with uncorrected RE in Latino adults. Design Population-based, cross-sectional study. Participants A random sample of 4,509 Latinos ≥40 years from Tucson and Nogales, Arizona with both ophthalmic evaluation and questionnaire were included in these analyses. Methods A case of RE was defined as subject wearing prescription glasses for distance vision whose presenting visual acuity (PVA) was 20/25 or better, or subject with PVA worse than 20/25 in at least one eye who improved ≥2 lines after subjective refraction and whose refractive correction met these cutoffs: sphere 1.0D or cylinder ≥+1.0D. Among those with RE, those who on refraction achieved ≥2 line improvement in at least one eye (definition 1) or in both eyes (definition 2) were classified as uncorrected RE. A questionnaire on access to care, acculturation, perceived barriers, income, and education was asked. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence of RE and proportion of uncorrected RE Results The overall prevalence of RE in at least one eye was 64%, and in both eyes was 51%. Of participants with RE in at least one eye, 35% have uncorrected RE. Of those with RE in both eyes, 19% have uncorrected RE. As compared to those with corrected RE, those with uncorrected RE in at least one eye were more likely to have lower levels of acculturation (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.2; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.1–1.4 per unit decrease) and education (OR=1.6 for ≤6 years vs. >12 years; 95% CI: 1.2–2.2). Uncorrected RE was also significantly associated with not having insurance (OR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.6), a low family income (OR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.7 1 year vs. <6 months). Conclusions In our sample of Latinos the overall proportion of uncorrected RE is high, and suggests that one third of those with RE may benefit from a new pair of glasses. Indices of marginalization are

  3. Correlates of adiposity among Latino preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood obesity is at record high levels in the US and disproportionately affects Latino children; however, studies examining Latino preschool children's obesity-related risk factors are sparse. This study determined correlates of Latino preschoolers' (ages 3-5 years) adiposity to inform future ob...

  4. Eye Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  5. THE NEGRO IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Relations Educational Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    BASIC PROBLEMS OF POPULATION GROWTH, HOUSING SEGREGATION, SUBSTANDARD HOUSING, DWELLING UNIT POPULATION DENSITY, EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE ATTITUDE OF THE NEGRO ARE PRESENTED. THE INCREASE IN NONWHITE POPULATION IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY BETWEEN 1950 AND 1960 WAS 113.7 PERCENT. MOST NONWHITES, 93.7 PERCENT, LIVE IN THE CENTRAL DISTRICT, THEY LIVE…

  6. Latina Adolescent Childbearing in East Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Pamela I.

    This book is about teenage pregnancy among Latina teenagers in East Los Angeles (California). It focuses on teenage pregnancy and motherhood among economically disadvantaged Latinas aged 17 and under. The young mothers in this study were participants in a series of intervention efforts to prevent repeat pregnancy at a family planning clinic. This…

  7. Black/immigrant competition re-assessed: new evidence from Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldinger, R

    1997-01-01

    Findings are presented from a survey of employers conducted to assess the impact of immigration and employer practices upon the chances of Blacks finding employment in Los Angeles. The highest ranking person involved in the hiring process at each of 44 restaurants, 46 printers, 41 hotels, and 39 furniture manufacturers was interviewed. The hiring of new employees drawn from the network of current employees seems to have the dual function of bringing immigrant communities into the workplace, while detaching vacancies from the open market, thereby reducing the number of employment opportunities for Blacks. Employers also perceived immigrants to be far more desirable employees than Blacks, partly because they believe that immigrants will work more productively. Immigrants are also seen as the more tractable laborers. Any managerial propensity to favor immigrants over Blacks will probably be reinforced by the attitudes of the mainly Latino work force, for placing a Black worker in a mainly Latino work crew may frustrate productivity given the animosity between the two ethnic groups. Blacks also appear to opt out of the low-level labor market in response to rising expectations, on the one hand, and the anticipation of encountering employment difficulties on the other.

  8. The association between self-rated eating habits and dietary behavior in two Latino neighborhoods: Findings from Proyecto MercadoFRESCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Mienah Z; Rizzo, Shemra; Marino, Enrique; Belin, Thomas R; Glik, Deborah C; Kuo, Alice A; Ortega, Alexander N; Prelip, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Latinos are the largest racial and ethnic minority group in the United States and bear a disproportionate burden of obesity related chronic disease. Despite national efforts to improve dietary habits and prevent obesity among Latinos, obesity rates remain high. The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between self-rated dietary quality and dietary behavior among Latinos and how this may vary by socio-demographics to help inform future public health efforts aiming to improve eating habits and obesity rates. Cross-sectional study using a series of chi-square tests, the non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression to explore self-rated eating habits. Two urban, low-income, predominantly Latino neighborhoods in Los Angeles County. 1000 adults who self-identified as their household's primary food purchaser and preparer were interviewed from 2012 to 2013. Households were randomly selected based on their proximity to corner stores participating in a project to improve the food environment. Most respondents (59%) report "good" eating habits. Significant associations between "good" eating habits and overall health, fruit and vegetable consumption were observed (p habits are associated with fruit and vegetable consumption among Latinos in two urban neighborhoods. However, there is a need for more targeted health promotion and nutrition education efforts on the risks associated with soda and energy-dense food consumption to help improve dietary habits and obesity levels in low-income Latino communities.

  9. Adapting a 1% or less milk campaign for a Hispanic/Latino population: the Adelante Con Leche Semi-descremada 1% experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Arnell J; Mistry, Ritesh; McCarthy, William J; Yancey, Antronette K

    2008-01-01

    Describe and evaluate a media campaign to encourage 1% or nonfat milk consumption. Uncontrolled pre/post test. One largely rural (Santa Paula) and one urban (East Los Angeles) California community. Community residents and milk vendors in primarily low-income Latino/Hispanic communities. The "1% or Less" milk campaign, which promotes substitution of 2% fat or whole milk with 1% or less fat milk was adapted and implemented. Comparison of post-campaign milk sales with pre-campaign sales. Chi-square tests of independence used to compare precampaign and postcampaign sales. There were decreases in the proportion of whole milk sold and increases in the proportion of reduced-fat, low-fat, and nonfat milk sold in the weeks following each campaign (Santa Paula: p = .0165; East Los Angeles: p < .0001). However, follow-up data from East Los Angeles suggest that these changes were not sustained. The proportions of the different units of milk sold also changed in the weeks following each campaign (p < .0001). Sales of whole milk gallon units decreased from 36.3% to 28.4% in Santa Paula, and from 43.5% to 10.2% in East Los Angeles. Highly focused campaigns to promote substitution of high-fat milk with low-fat or nonfat milk can show dramatic initial changes in sales patterns. However, whether such campaigns can have a sustained impact in largely Latino/Hispanic communities is not evident.

  10. Latino Resources at the Smithsonian = Recursos Latinos en el Smithsonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

    This bilingual directory (English and Spanish) describes Smithsonian museums and offices and focuses on the Hispanic, Latino, Latin American, Spanish, and Portuguese facets of their collections, exhibits, research, public programs, fellowship and internship opportunities, publications, and services. The Smithsonian Institution is composed of 16…

  11. Latino Literature Mediating Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Roldan, Carmen M.; Heineke, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    This interpretive study draws on data from a larger inquiry into teacher learning in a graduate-level course on Latino literature at a large southwestern university. The article focuses on a small diverse group of educators taking part in a literature discussion of the novel "Before We Were Free" by J. Alvarez (2002). Using a…

  12. Suicidal Behavior among Latino Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canino, Glorisa; Roberts, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the scientific literature related to suicidal behavior among Latino youth. Discusses the conceptualizations of culture, and how culture may influence behavior and psychopathology, in particular, suicidal behavior. Reviews the literature that discusses rates of suicidal behavior, risk, and protective factors associated with this behavior…

  13. Latinos' Perceptions of Interethnic Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Amber L.; Riggio, Heidi R.; Palavinelu, Subha; Culpepper, Lane Locher

    2012-01-01

    Numerous survey findings indicate that the majority of White Americans are accepting of interracial romantic relationships. However, relatively few studies have looked at how different American ethnic minority groups view such relationships. The current research examined Latinos' evaluations of intraethnic and interethnic couples. Latino…

  14. Dante o anjeloch (Dante on Angels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Žilinek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Dante’s eternal Love was Bice Portinari who died in 1290. Dante saw her in Florence in 1274. She was his muse and her death was the reason to write Divine Comedy. We meet her in part of Divine Comedy calledParadise as a guide into Celestial Empire. I have ever been interested in structure of Celestial Empire and mesmerised by Dante. That was the reason to write this paper. I try to re-construct and complete Dante’s interpretation of the hierarchy of Celestial Empire with focusing on angels. Angels are also called Intellects or forms of the Heaven or substances between the Earth and Heaven or blissful Beings. I also try to find out the answer what happened to souls of people who died, especially to souls of innocent children. In memory of Michalka Režnáková (1984-1995.

  15. Tohoku Women's Hurdling Project: Science Angels (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuki, Kotoe; Watanabe, Mayuko

    2009-04-01

    Tohoku University was the first National University to admit three women students in Japan in 1913. To support the university's traditional ``open-door'' policy, various projects have been promoted throughout the university since its foundation. A government plan, the Third-Stage Basic Plan for Science and Technology, aims to increase the women scientist ratio up to 25% nationwide. In order to achieve this goal, the Tohoku Women's Hurdling Project, funded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), was adopted in 2006. This project is threefold: support for child/family, improvement of facilities, and support for the next generation, which includes our Science Angels program. ``Science Angels'' are women PhD students appointed by the university president, with the mission to form a strong support system among each other and to become role-models to inspire younger students who want to become researchers. Currently, 50 women graduate students of the natural sciences are Science Angels and are encouraged to design and deliver lectures in their areas of specialty at their alma maters. Up to now, 12 lectures have been delivered and science events for children in our community have been held-all with great success.

  16. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  17. Grit: A Potential Protective Factor Against Substance Use and Other Risk Behaviors Among Latino Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Lourdes R; Dudovitz, Rebecca; Chung, Paul J; Dosanjh, Kulwant K; Wong, Mitchell D

    2016-04-01

    Grit, defined as "working strenuously toward challenges, maintaining effort and interest over years despite failure, adversity, and plateaus in progress," is strongly associated with academic achievement and life success and may also be associated with health outcomes and behaviors. We examined predictors of grit, and the association between grit and health behaviors among at-risk Latino adolescents. We analyzed baseline survey data collected in 2013-2014 from a sample of 1270 9th graders in low-income neighborhoods of Los Angeles. We examined factors associated with grit and whether grit is associated with substance use and delinquent behaviors, controlling for adolescent and parent sociodemographic factors. In a sample of mostly Latino adolescents (89.5%), compared to those with low grit, those with high grit had significantly lower odds of alcohol use in the last 30 days (odds ratio 0.30, P authoritative parenting style, parental employment, and high self-efficacy scores. Grit may be an important candidate protective factor against substance use and other risk behaviors among Latino adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Grieving and death rituals of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munet-Vilaró, F

    1998-01-01

    To describe the grieving behaviors and selected death beliefs and rituals for two Latino groups: island Puerto Ricans and Mexican immigrants. Published articles, book chapters, books, government documents, and clinical experience. Limited scientific research exists on the grieving process and beliefs about death of Latinos. Death is seen as an extension of life in some Latino cultures, a belief that seems to assist positively in the grieving process. Rituals and ceremonies to honor the dead still are practiced in many Latino cultures and are rooted partly in their cultural heritage. Nurses caring for Latinos with cancer can provide better care with an understanding of grieving behaviors observed early in the disease process and at the time of imminent death. Culturally competent care can be given when beliefs and values about death are understood. Allowing Latino clients to grieve and honor the dead in a culturally appropriate way will enhance the nurse/client/family relationship.

  19. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... 66. CME FEBRUARY 2011 Vol.29 No.2. Eye trauma. To a clinician without experience, a person with an eye injury presents a dilemma. This article should reassure you that methodical assessment and treatment of most injuries is simple and within the ambit of every doctor. JONatHaN PONs, MB ChB, Dip ...

  20. Neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes in Latino childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunita K; Lo, Tracy T Y; Dennis, Jessica M; Bhatia, Smita

    2013-10-01

    Children with brain tumors and leukemia are at risk for neurocognitive and behavioral late effects due to central nervous system-directed therapies. Few studies have examined these outcomes in ethnic minority samples, despite speculation that socio-demographic factors may increase vulnerability for adverse neurobehavioral outcomes. We evaluated the neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes and their impact on the health-related quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer drawn from Latino families in the Los Angeles region. Using culturally-relevant recruitment strategies, 73 predominantly Spanish-speaking parents of pediatric brain tumor or leukemia survivors completed standardized questionnaires, including the Conners parent-report and the Bidimensional Acculturation Scales. Clinical and socio-demographic factors influencing the development of neurocognitive and behavioral dysfunction were examined. Approximately 50% of the children placed at or above the "elevated" level for difficulties with attention, school-based learning, and peer relations. Younger age at diagnosis significantly predicted dysfunction in inattention, learning problems, and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Children whose parents were less adherent to the non-Hispanic white culture were more likely to have problems with peer relations and executive functioning. HRQL was significantly lower in survivors with neurocognitive and behavioral dysfunction relative to those with normal range scores on the Conners scale. In addition to the child's age at diagnosis, acculturation appears to predict select neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes in this socio-demographically homogeneous sample of Latino families. Further research is needed to understand the interaction of ethnic and cultural factors with therapeutic exposures in determining the adverse neurobehavioral outcomes, so as to optimally design interventions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bringing Culture Into Parent Training With Latinos

    OpenAIRE

    Calzada, Esther J.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional frameworks of parenting have failed to capture the distinctive nature of parenting in Latino families. Cultural values likely influence parenting practices. The study of cultural values may allow us to identify aspects of parenting that are unique to Latinos and which complement traditional frameworks of parenting. This paper presents qualitative work on two Latino cultural values, familismo and respeto, and examines ways in which these values may inform the provision of standard ...

  2. The Role and Place of Governing Angels in Bible

    OpenAIRE

    Sayyed hesam aldin Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Angels have allocated a considerable part of Bible's discussions to themselves and since one of the dogmatic principles of the revealed religions is the belief in angels, depiction of the place and attributes of angels can be the indicator of the quality of attitude and worldview and the strength of dogmatic principles of Bible's followers and justify their thought and ideas; For this subject is related with the issues such as: transcendent unity of divine acts and essence and attribu...

  3. Business Angels - A Subspecies of the homo oeconomicus ludens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsler, Laurenz; Platzer, Erich M

    2014-12-01

    Business Angels invest in start-up companies in their early stage. This type of investor usually has a good knowledge of the start-up's industry sector, and in addition to the funds he invests, his management experience and his network can be useful for start-ups. Business Angel involvement has shown to improve the success rate and the profitability of start-ups. The article depicts the relationship between entrepreneurs and Business Angels in four case examples.

  4. Identidades Nacionais e identidade Latino-Americana

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Clodoaldo Gomes de

    2012-01-01

    Metadados do Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso: Identidades Nacionais e identidade Latino-Americana, pela discente: Clodoaldo Gomes de Carvalho, sob Orientação de Clara Agustina Suárez Cruz do curso de Especialização em Literatura Latino-Americana (2011-2012) da Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana (UNILA), no Repositório Institucional da UNILA (RI-UNILA). Identidades Nacionais e identidade Latino-Americana

  5. Protective factors against suicidal behavior in Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Maria A; Dragatsi, Dianna; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Dervic, Kanita; Currier, Dianne; Burke, Ainsley Keller; Grunebaum, Michael F; Mann, J John

    2005-07-01

    Latinos appear to be relatively protected against suicidal behavior, but the factors that mediate this effect are not known. Some protective factors may be related to cultural constructs that provide a buffer against suicidal behavior in the face of psychiatric illness. We sought to determine whether the Reasons for Living Inventory (RFLI) might capture protective factors against suicidal behavior in Latinos and non-Latinos. Patients with major depression, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia were interviewed regarding their depressive symptomatology and lifetime history of suicidal behavior. The RFLI, which measures protective factors against suicidal acts, was also administered. Multivariate analyses were used to assess the relationship between suicide measures, ethnicity, and selected clinical and demographic variables. Although Latinos and non-Latinos did not differ significantly in attempter status (attempter/nonattempter), number of attempts, or suicide intent, Latinos reported significantly less suicidal ideation and made less lethal attempts. On the RFLI, Latinos scored significantly higher on subscales regarding survival and coping beliefs, responsibility to family, and moral objections to suicide, possibly reflective of cultural norms endorsed by Latino groups. Multivariate analyses suggested that although being Latino was independently associated with less suicidal ideation, other suicidal behaviors held a stronger relationship to moral objections to suicide and survival and coping skills than to ethnicity. Self-identification as Latino may be associated with espousing cultural constructs that mediate protective effects against suicidal behavior. Constructs identified in the RFLI may protect Latinos from acting on suicidal thoughts, affecting moral objections to suicide and survival and coping beliefs. Further studies to elucidate the impact of these factors on suicidal behavior and their relationship to specific cultural constructs would be of interest.

  6. Angel De la Calle, Tina Modotti

    OpenAIRE

    Genevée, Frédérick

    2014-01-01

    La bande dessinée au service de l’histoire. Certains parleront plus volontiers de roman graphique. Angel de la Calle livre une œuvre originale et complexe sur la vie de Tina Modotti (1896-1942). Femme amoureuse, photographe, militante communiste kominternienne, Tina Modotti ne cesse de fasciner notre imaginaire. Italie, États-Unis, Mexique, URSS, Espagne…, elle fut de tous les pays et du monde. Elle croisa Diego Rivera, Vladimir Maïakovski, John Dos Passos, Frida Kahlo, Pablo Neruda… Comment ...

  7. Black Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2018 Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery * Required * First Name: * Last Name: ...

  8. Eye Twitching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affecting all aspects of life. Hemifacial spasm involves twitches of muscles on one side of the face, ... few weeks Your eyelid completely closes with each twitch or you have difficulty opening the eye Twitching ...

  9. Eyes - bulging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lamp examination may be done. Blood testing for thyroid disease may be done. Treatments depend on the cause. ... team. Eye Diseases Read more Hyperthyroidism Read more Thyroid Diseases Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  10. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This is often referred to as "pink eye." Corneal ulcers : sores on the cornea most often caused by a serious bacterial or viral infection. Uveitis : inflammation of the ... Corneal scratches: injuries caused by sand, dust, or overuse ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es el ojo seco? ...

  12. An Examination of Latino Students' Homework Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Homework appears to be positively associated with better student outcomes. Although some researchers have explored the connection between time spent on homework and minority student achievement, few have examined the homework routines of Latino youth. Interviews with Latino high school students show that they have some difficulty completing daily…

  13. Bringing Culture into Parent Training with Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther J.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional frameworks of parenting have failed to capture the distinctive nature of parenting in Latino families. Cultural values likely influence parenting practices. The study of cultural values may allow us to identify aspects of parenting that are unique to Latinos and which complement traditional frameworks of parenting. This paper presents…

  14. Latinos Improve Food Habits through Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lucia L.; Sutherlin, Jeanette M.; Yoshida, Sallie C.; Murphy, Suzanne P.; Bresnick, Stuart D.

    1998-01-01

    The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, a federally funded nutrition education program in California, is undertaking to assess the needs of Latino clients and develop culturally appropriate tools to evaluate changes in food-related behaviors. Latino participants in Fresno County reported improvements in reducing fat intake, using fruits…

  15. Latino Youth Gangs and Schools. Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Michelle; And Others

    This bibliography was written for those interested in learning about the sociological and psychological research literature on Hispanic/Latino youth gangs. The focus is on the sociological and psychological issues of gang life that could be used to inform a school's response to gangs of Hispanic and Latino youth. Gangs and educators have…

  16. Facts About Pink Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conjunctivitis) >> Facts About Pink Eye Listen Facts About Pink Eye Pink eye is one of the most ... treatment depends on the underlying cause. What is pink eye? Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, involves ...

  17. Snapshot of Teleretinal Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy at the West Los Angeles Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Irena; Havunjian, Margaret A; Davis, John A; Giaconi, JoAnn A

    2016-10-01

    The West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center is a large urban facility with a robust teleretinal screening program in primary care clinic, established in 2006. The purpose of this article is to provide a snapshot of teleretinal screening at this site. Diabetic patients from 2012 were analyzed with a prospective cohort study. Demographic information, results of teleretinal screening, referral to eye clinic, and loss to follow-up (defined as no eye care within 2 years) were collected. Of 516 patients with diabetes screened with teleretinal imaging, 120 patient charts were reviewed for data analysis. Teleretinal imaging diagnosed 15% (18/120) of patients with varying stages of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR). Of patients screened, 55.8% (67/120) of the patients were referred to an eye clinic for further ophthalmic evaluation. Nondiabetic retinopathy reasons for eye clinic referral included glaucoma suspect (13.3%, 16/120) and age-related macular degeneration (10.0%, 12/120). Of all patients screened, 37.5% (45/120) of them were lost to follow-up, defined as no teleretinal screening or eye clinic appointment within 2 years. Patients who lived farther away from clinic had a higher risk of loss to follow-up (p = 0.04). We found, although only 15% of patients were diagnosed with DR from teleretinal screening, more than 50% of patients were referred to eye clinic. In addition, of all screened patients, there was a high rate of not returning to the Veterans Affairs (VA) for eye care.

  18. "Quebrando Fronteras": Trends among Latino and Latina Undergraduate Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Michelle Madsen; Lord, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Engineering, a field that has shaped the world's industrial and technological base, is ripe for an influx of Latino undergraduate students. Given U.S. Latino population increases, what is the trajectory of Latino participation in engineering education? Using an interdisciplinary lens, we critically examine Latino trends in undergraduate…

  19. "La Influencia De La Familia": Latino Retention in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort Daniels, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Although the Latino population is currently the largest minority ethnicity in the U.S. (U.S. Census, 2008), Latino students enroll in college and graduate in proportionately the smallest numbers (Latino, 2002). This dissertation examined the effect of Latino students' families on their decision to remain in school and finish a bachelor's…

  20. Angels as arguments? The rhetorical function of references to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The issue investigated in this article is the rhetorical function fulfilled by the references to angels in the Main Letters of Paul. For this purpose all the references to angels in Galatians, 1 and 2 Corinthians and Romans are investigated systematically and thoroughly. This study shows that Paul never uses any of the references ...

  1. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  2. Battle in Los Angeles: Conflict Escalates as Charter Schools Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the 1990s and well into the new millennium, the massive Los Angeles Unified School District barely noticed the many charter schools that were springing up around the metropolis. But Los Angeles parents certainly took notice, and started enrolling their children. In 2008, five charter-management organizations announced plans to…

  3. "Angels & Demons" - Distinguishing truth from fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Dan Brown's best-selling novel "Angels & Demons" was published in French on 2 March. A web page on CERN's public site is dedicated to separating truth from fiction in this novel. After the extraordinary success of Dan Brown's "Da Vinci Code", one of his earlier novels "Angels & Demons", published in 2000, has now become a best seller and has generated a flood of questions about CERN. This detective story is about a secret society, the Illuminati, who wish to destroy the Vatican with an antimatter bomb stolen from - wait for it - CERN! Inevitably, CERN has been bombarded with calls about the technologies described in the novel that are supposed to be under development in the Laboratory. The Press Office has always explained that, even if the novel appears to be very informative, it is in fact a mixture of fact and fiction. For instance, according to the novel CERN is supposed to own a plane that can cover the distance between Massachusetts in the United States and Switzerland in just over an hour! ...

  4. A Framework for Latino Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarruel, Antonia M

    2017-10-01

    There is an urgent need for Latino leaders in nursing, yet little has been written about Latino leaders and leadership. Leadership comes with challenges and opportunities in particular for Latino nurses who contend with specific cultural imperatives and obstacles. In this article, I review the current healthcare environment and propose a framework for Latino nursing leadership within the context of current challenges and opportunities and my personal experience in nursing. This framework is meant to serve as a guide for the development of Latino nurses who will improve the health and well-being of those in the most vulnerable communities by utilizing their cultural strengths and professional skills to deliver quality and compassionate care.

  5. Spirituality and Cultural Identification Among Latino and Non-Latino College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campesino, Maureen; Belyea, Michael; Schwartz, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine (a) differences in spiritual perspectives and practices of Latino and non-Latino young adults and (b) the cultural relevance of the Latino Spiritual Perspective Scale (LSPS). Studies indicate that spiritual perspectives are embedded within cultural group norms and vary significantly across ethnic groups. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a convenience sample of 223 Latino and non-Latino university students in the Southwestern United States. The Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), the LSPS, the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were used. Latinos scored significantly higher than non-Latinos in both measures of spiritual perspectives. Self-reported behavioral measures, such as frequency of personal prayer, were also higher among the Latino group. Latino cultural identification was the only significant predictor of LSPS scores. Findings from this study indicate that spirituality among Latinos has meanings specific to the cultural group context. These findings have implications for nursing research involving the conceptualization and measurement of spirituality among multiethnic groups.Los propósitos de este estudio eran examinar: (a) diferencias en perspectivas espirituales y prácticas de jóvenes Latinos y no Latinos; y (b) la relevancia cultural de la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina. Estudios indican que perspectivas espirituales están incrustadas entre normas culturales del grupo y varían considerablemente entre grupos étnicos. Un diseño transversal y de encuesta fue utilizado con una muestra de conveniencia de 233 estudiantes universitarios Latinos y no Latinos en el Suroeste de los Estados Unidos. La Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual (EPE), la Escala de la Perspectiva Espiritual Latina (EPEL), la Escala Ortogonal de Identificación Cultural, y un cuestionario demográfico fueron utilizados. Los Latinos calificaron considerablemente más alto que los no

  6. Homophobia and racism experienced by Latino men who have sex with men in the United States: correlates of exposure and associations with HIV risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuko; Borkowf, Craig; Millett, Gregorio A; Bingham, Trista; Ayala, George; Stueve, Ann

    2012-04-01

    Using cross-sectional data collected from 1081 Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited with respondent-driven sampling (RDS) techniques from Los Angeles and New York, we examined the extent to which Latino MSM reported exposure to social discrimination (i.e., experienced both homophobia and racism, homophobia only, racism only, or neither homophobia nor racism). More than 40% of respondents experienced both homophobia and racism in the past 12 months. Los Angeles participants, those with lower income, and those who reported being HIV-positive were more likely to report experiencing both types of social discrimination. Adjusting for potential confounders, men exposed to both homophobia and racism were more likely than men exposed to neither form of discrimination to report unprotected receptive anal intercourse with a casual sex partner (AOR = 1.92, 95% CI, 1.18-3.24) and binge drinking (AOR = 1.42, 95% CI, 1.02-1.98). Our findings suggest the presence of a syndemic of adverse social experiences and call for more intervention research to address both homophobia and racism experienced among Latino MSM in the United States.

  7. Should government support business angel networks? The tale of Danish business angels network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Lindgaard

    2011-01-01

    . This article discusses the possible rationale for governments to support BANs and what criteria to apply when evaluating such networks. The article is based on an in-depth observation study of the whole life cycle of a national BAN – the Danish Business Angel Network (DBAN) – and a comparison with a similar......Policies promoting informal venture capital generally and business angel networks (BANs) in particular have gained increased attention in recent years. As a consequence, BANs are now widespread across Europe. However, there continues to be a debate whether BANs should be supported with public money...... whether to provide continuing support to BANs they should evaluate not only their immediate effectiveness but also whether BANs should be considered a part of the general small business support infrastructure....

  8. The Role and Place of Governing Angels in Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed hesam aldin Hosseini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Angels have allocated a considerable part of Bible's discussions to themselves and since one of the dogmatic principles of the revealed religions is the belief in angels, depiction of the place and attributes of angels can be the indicator of the quality of attitude and worldview and the strength of dogmatic principles of Bible's followers and justify their thought and ideas; For this subject is related with the issues such as: transcendent unity of divine acts and essence and attributes and even unity in obedience, how to record the actions and investigate them in Purgatory and Resurrection and believe in the unseen world and how to connect to that world and how to manage the world by God and the definition of the Kingdom of Heaven and how to divide people's sustenance and their reward and punishment which is the indicator and representative of the position of each religion as compared to other religions. Like Muslims, the followers of Bible regard the existence of angels as one of the articles of faith and among the most important elements of the world of being. And whereas the Old Testament has described the revelation of One God using figures who appear in the Eastern mythological stories, it can be seen that in many cases the Kingdom of Heaven has been depicted by metaphors which match the similes used in Quran like angel's march before God (Fajr, 22 as if God is one of the kings from East. The angels are mentioned a lot in the Bible. In Hebrews it has been said that the numbers of angels is countless and in fact, they cannot be enumerated. Angels also do many things including: the report of the Birth of John… the most important task which is assigned to the angels is worshipping God. (1 Enoch, 40 The other significant task undertaken by angels is mediating between God and man. Intercession is another role assigned to angels. (1 Enoch, 2: 4, 4:9 Sometimes man asks the angels beseechingly to convey his/her request to Divinity. The angels

  9. The Role and Place of Governing Angels in Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed hesam aldin Hosseini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Angels have allocated a considerable part of Bible's discussions to themselves and since one of the dogmatic principles of the revealed religions is the belief in angels, depiction of the place and attributes of angels can be the indicator of the quality of attitude and worldview and the strength of dogmatic principles of Bible's followers and justify their thought and ideas; For this subject is related with the issues such as: transcendent unity of divine acts and essence and attributes and even unity in obedience, how to record the actions and investigate them in Purgatory and Resurrection and believe in the unseen world and how to connect to that world and how to manage the world by God and the definition of the Kingdom of Heaven and how to divide people's sustenance and their reward and punishment which is the indicator and representative of the position of each religion as compared to other religions. Like Muslims, the followers of Bible regard the existence of angels as one of the articles of faith and among the most important elements of the world of being. And whereas the Old Testament has described the revelation of One God using figures who appear in the Eastern mythological stories, it can be seen that in many cases the Kingdom of Heaven has been depicted by metaphors which match the similes used in Quran like angel's march before God (Fajr, 22 as if God is one of the kings from East. The angels are mentioned a lot in the Bible. In Hebrews it has been said that the numbers of angels is countless and in fact, they cannot be enumerated. Angels also do many things including: the report of the Birth of John… the most important task which is assigned to the angels is worshipping God. (1 Enoch, 40 The other significant task undertaken by angels is mediating between God and man. Intercession is another role assigned to angels. (1 Enoch, 2: 4, 4:9 Sometimes man asks the angels beseechingly to convey his/her request to Divinity. The angels

  10. The Use of Female Commercial Sex Workers’ Services by Latino Day Laborers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Frank H.; Ortiz, Daniel J.; Martinez, Victor; Bing, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the characteristics of Latino day laborers who have sex with female commercial sex workers (CSWs). A sample of 450 day laborers in Los Angeles was utilized. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association of independent variables with the likelihood of having sex with a CSW. Overall, 26% of the 450 day laborers reported having had sex with a CSW in the previous 12 months. A lower likelihood of having sex with a CSW was found for those with more than six years of education and for those who were married and living with their spouses. A higher likelihood of having sex with a CSW was found for those who met the criteria for harmful drinking or drug dependence. Commercial sex work has been associated with sexually transmitted infections and other problems among clients of CSWs and warrants further attention by providers working with day laborers. PMID:20354572

  11. Tuberculosis; Eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Through an internet search and review of current literature on tuberculosis and its ocular complications, the information relevant to the objectives was obtained. ' Conclusions: TB can affect any structure in the eye and adnexae. Ocular TB is not easy to diagnose because most times there is no concurrent active ...

  12. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... things up close or far away. Most older people you know — like your grandparents — probably wear glasses. To the Brain! Think of the optic nerve as the great messenger in the back of your eye. The rods and cones of the retina change the colors and shapes you see into millions of nerve ...

  13. Eye Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is very important to read the product safety materials before using any new chemicals. The appropriate personal protective equipment for eye protection will be listed. This is particularly important for applying and handling pesticides, working with caustics such as lime fertilizer, ...

  14. Effects of air pollution exposure on glucose metabolism in Los Angeles minority children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Corral, C M; Alderete, T L; Habre, R; Berhane, K; Lurmann, F W; Weigensberg, M J; Goran, M I; Gilliland, F D

    2018-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that ambient (AAP: NO 2 , PM 2.5 and O 3 ) and traffic-related air pollutants (TRAP) contribute to metabolic disease risk in adults; however, few studies have examined these relationships in children. Metabolic profiling was performed in 429 overweight and obese African-American and Latino youth living in urban Los Angeles, California. This cross-sectional study estimated individual residential air pollution exposure and used linear regression to examine relationships between air pollution and metabolic outcomes. AAP and TRAP exposure were associated with adverse effects on glucose metabolism independent of body fat percent. PM 2.5 was associated with 25.0% higher fasting insulin (p air pollution exposure was associated with a metabolic profile that is characteristic of increased risk for type 2 diabetes. These results indicate that increased prior year exposure to air pollution may adversely affect type 2 diabetes-related pathophysiology in overweight and obese minority children. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  15. Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit: a community health worker program to prevent vision loss and blindness among people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammary-Risch, Neyal J; Aguilar, Marcela; Goodman, Laura Saunders; Quiroz, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic eye disease is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States and disproportionately affects Hispanics/Latinos. This article provides an overview of the Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit, a culturally and linguistically appropriate resource designed for community health workers to educate people with diabetes about eye health complications. The toolkit provides science-based, easy-to-understand information that can be used to conduct interactive, educational sessions about diabetes and eye health, the importance of comprehensive dilated eye examinations at least once a year for people with diabetes, and other ways to prevent vision loss and blindness.

  16. Eye Involvement in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Eyes Campbell (1905) first described the eye involvement in ... some form of eye involvement. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may involve the eyelids of ...

  17. Conjunctivitis or pink eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation - conjunctiva; Pink eye; Chemical conjunctivitis, Pinkeye; Pink-eye ... Tears most often protect the eyes by washing away the germs and irritants. Tears contain proteins and antibodies that kill germs. Pink eye is most often caused ...

  18. Why Do Eyes Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth / For Kids / Why Do Eyes Water? What's ... coming out of your nose. Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  19. Eye Injuries at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recreation Eye Injuries at Work Fireworks Eye Safety Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Five ... Edited By: Shirley Dang Feb. 22, 2016 The personal and economic toll of eye injuries at work is alarming. ...

  20. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Kids >> About the Eye Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  1. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a dilated eye exam once a year Photo courtesy of the National Eye Institute, NIH. Your eyes ... vessels can lead to serious vision problems. Photo courtesy of the National Eye Institute, NIH. Normal vision ...

  2. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can put on your web pages. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) One-Page Overview Pink, itchy eyes? Conjunctivitis – ... protect yourself from getting and spreading pink eye . Pink Eye: What To Do Discusses causes and treatment, ...

  3. Engaging Latino audiences in informal science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, Susan B.

    Environment for the Americas (EFTA), a non-profit organization, developed a four-year research project to establish a baseline for Latino participation and to identify practical tools that would enable educators to overcome barriers to Latino participation in informal science education (ISE). Its national scope and broad suite of governmental and non-governmental, Latino and non-Latino partners ensured that surveys and interviews conducted in Latino communities reflected the cosmopolitan nature of the factors that influence participation in ISE programs. Information about economic and education levels, country of origin, language, length of residence in the US, and perceptions of natural areas combined with existing demographic information at six study sites and one control site provided a broader understanding of Latino communities. The project team's ability to work effectively in these communities was strengthened by the involvement of native, Spanish-speaking Latino interns in the National Park Service's Park Flight Migratory Bird Program. The project also went beyond data gathering by identifying key measures to improve participation in ISE and implementing these measures at established informal science education programs, such as International Migratory Bird Day, to determine effectiveness. The goals of Engaging Latino Audiences in Informal Science Education (ISE) were to 1) identify and reduce the barriers to Latino participation in informal science education; 2) provide effective tools to assist educators in connecting Latino families with science education, and 3) broadly disseminate these tools to agencies and organizations challenged to engage this audience in informal science education (ISE). The results answer questions and provide solutions to a challenge experienced by parks, refuges, nature centers, and other informal science education sites across the US. Key findings from this research documented low participation rates in ISE by Latinos, and that

  4. Port Angeles, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Port Angeles, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  5. 75 FR 3981 - National Angel Island Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    .... Some expressed themselves by carving poetry and inscriptions into the walls in their native language--from Chinese, Japanese, and Korean to Russian, German, and Urdu. These etchings remain on Angel Island...

  6. Photo Gallery from the Los Angeles River Watershed (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photo gallery of the Los Angeles River Watershed area of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  7. Conceptions of warlike angels in literature of the late Second Temple period

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Aleksander Roman

    2011-01-01

    The work begins with a chapter that presents the various traditions concerning "angelic" warriors in the Hebrew Bible. In this context, we have investigated the two main biblical traditions: the council of gods and the Angel of Yahweh. It can be demonstrated that both these traditions were connected with martiality, which might have influenced later speculations about warlike angels. The second chapter deals with the various Second Temple beliefs concerning the principal angels, angelic hiera...

  8. Salud Tiene Sabor: a model for healthier restaurants in a Latino community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Carmen R; Lafleur, Mariah S; Schwarte, Liz U; Rodin, Beth; de Silva, Pri; Samuels, Sarah E

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has risen nationally in recent decades, and is exceptionally high in low-income communities of color such as South Los Angeles CA. Independently owned restaurants participating in the Salud Tiene Sabor program at ethnic foods marketplace Mercado La Paloma in South Los Angeles are responding to the childhood obesity crisis by posting calories for menu items and providing nutrition information to patrons. To evaluate whether menu labeling and nutrition information at point of purchase have an influence on availability of healthy food options, patron awareness of calorie information, and restaurant owners' support of the program. A case-study design using mixed methods included restaurant owner and stakeholder interviews, patron surveys, and environmental assessments. Data were collected using originally designed tools, and analyzed in 2009-2011. Healthy eating options were available at the Mercado La Paloma; restaurant owners and the larger community supported the Salud Tiene Sabor program; 33% of patrons reported calorie information-influenced purchase decisions. Owners of independent restaurants have an important role in improving access to healthy foods in low-income, Latino communities. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons?

  10. Assessing urban forest effects and values, Los Angeles' urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Robert E. III Hoehn; Daniel E. Crane; Lorraine Weller; Antonio. Davila

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of trees in Los Angeles, CA, reveals that this area has about 6 million trees with tree and shrub canopies that cover 24.9 percent of the city. The most common tree species are Italian cypress, scrub oak, laurel sumac, Mexican fan palm, and Indian laurel, Trees in Los Angeles currently store about 1.3 million tons of carbon (4.7 million tons CO2...

  11. Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Amblyopia Sections Amblyopia: What Is Lazy Eye? Amblyopia: What ... Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Diagnosis Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Treatment Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Treatment Leer en Español: Ambliopía: Tratamiento ...

  12. Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Amblyopia Sections Amblyopia: What Is Lazy Eye? Amblyopia: What ... Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Diagnosis Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Treatment Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Diagnosis Leer en Español: Ambliopía: Diagnóstico ...

  13. Edificio de archivos en Los Angeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neutra & Alexander, Arquitectos

    1963-07-01

    Full Text Available The 80th birthday of Richard Neutra coincides with the completion of this building, a special feature of which is that it has 13 half-floor levels, thus saving space and making it easier to reach the documents. Besides housing the Territorial Archives Office, it accommodates the Territorial Testing Dept., Regional Planning Committee and Territorial Library. 40 ms high rotary sun shields are fitted, made of aluminium. They are controlled automatically by electronic devices, motivated by the solar action, and are thus correctly orientated at any time to provide protection against sun glare. They close altogether when the wind speed is such that they might be damaged. On the main facade looking towards Temple Street, the plastic arts organisation has contributed a large mosaic by Joseph Young, showing a map of the district. This archives building in Los Angeles is a fine exponent of what technology can do for man, and it is a characteristic example of contemporary organic architecture at its best.El principio de la octava década de Neutra coincide con la terminación del edificio, cuya sección nos ofrece trece medias plantas, para economizar espacio y facilitar el alcance de los documentos. Aloja, además de la Oficina Territorial de Archivos, otras varias: Departamento Territorial de Pruebas, Comisión de Planificación Regional y Biblioteca Territorial. Unos «brise-soleils» giratorios, de aluminio, de 40 m de altura, que funcionan automáticamente —controlados por un cerebro electrónico— bajo la acción solar, proporcionan la orientación «adecuada» en cada momento y protegen del brillo lateral, cerrándose cuando el viento sopla con una velocidad que puede serles perjudicial. Como aportación de las Artes Plásticas aparece en la fachada principal, que da a la calle Temple, un gran mosaico, de Joseph Young, del mapa del territorio. Este edificio de archivos en Los Angeles constituye un claro exponente en el que la, técnica est

  14. Acculturation, nutrition, and health disparities in Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States and will represent 25% of the US population by 2050. Latinos experience a disproportionate burden of poverty and poor health outcomes. We critically examined the evidence for a link between acculturation and health disparities in Latinos with a focus on type 2 diabetes (T2D) and nutrition-related risk factors and illustrated how acculturation principles can help design a culturally appropriate T2D self-management intervention in Latinos. Evidence presented in this article was drawn from 1) systematic reviews identified through PubMed searches, 2) backward searches that were based on articles cited, 3) experts in the field, and 4) the author's personal files. The preponderance of the evidence supported an association of acculturation with poor dietary quality and obesity. These associations appeared to be modified by several socioeconomic and demographic factors and were not always linear. The association between acculturation and T2D is unclear. Longitudinal studies and more sophisticated analytic approaches are needed to better understand if and how acculturation affects health-disparity outcomes in Latinos. Tailoring interventions to the acculturation level of individuals is likely to help reduce health disparities in Latinos.

  15. Os estudos latinos no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Tuffani

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se da importância do ensino do Latim no periodo colonial, enfatizando o papel da Companhia de Jesus. É discutido o longo processo da reorganização do ensino secundário e da implantação dos estudos superiores. Apresenta-se a época que vai do fim do secundário de tradição literária à fundação dos primeiros cursos de Letras e Filosofia. Faz-se um balanco dos estudos latinos de 1940 a 1970, período de sua maior vitalidade no Brasil, tratando da Lei Capanema de 1942 e da antiga Lei de Diretrizes e Bases da Educação Nacional. É fechado o panorama com o relato das atividades ate 1996, considerando o quadro por ocasião da nova LDB.

  16. Sociocultural influences on mental health service use by Latino older adults for emotional distress: exploring the mediating and moderating role of informal social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marissa C; Aranda, María P

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the determinants of mental health services for emotional distress by low-income older Latinos living in Los Angeles County (United States). The functional effects of informal support on service use were tested while accounting for dimensions of support and sociocultural factors. Using data from a cross-sectional survey of older Latinos (n = 235), we preformed a secondary data analysis using path analysis with Poisson regression to assess mediation and moderation models by type of perceived support, emotional and instrumental. Data was originally collected between 1998 and 2005. Results indicated that no mediation effects were present however significant moderation effects emerged. Respondents with low levels of linguistic acculturation and informal support used fewer services. Variations by type of informal support emerged, with emotional support presenting the best model fit compared to instrumental support in the moderation model analysis. The direct effects of linguistic acculturation and age remained significant after controlling for need. Findings reveal limited informal support is a risk factor for the underutilization of mental health services by older Latinos with low levels of linguistic acculturation as they age. Integrating support resources that assist in navigating service systems and address language barriers can enhance service use by older Latino adults. Implications for service delivery and program development are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  18. The SAFER Latinos Project: Addressing a Community Ecology Underlying Latino Youth Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D.; Collins, Elizabeth; Klevens, Joanne; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Ivonne; del Cid, Alex Taylor; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the intervention model, early implementation experience, and challenges for the "Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos" (SAFER) Latinos project. The SAFER Latinos project is an attempt to build the evidence for a multilevel participatory youth violence prevention model tailored to the specific circumstances of…

  19. Sexual solicitation of Latino male day laborers by other men Solicitación sexual de hombres jornaleros latinos por otros hombres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank H Galvan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the likelihood of Latino day laborers being solicited for sex by other men. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 450 Latino day laborers were recruited in Los Angeles, California, from July to September 2005. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which day laborers were more likely to be solicited and subsequently to have sex. RESULTS: Thirty-eight percent reported being solicited for sex by another man while seeking work. Those solicited were more likely to live longer in the US, be more educated and screen positive for drug dependence. Of those solicited, 9.4% had sex with their solicitors. Those screening positive for drug dependence were more likely to have sex. Most of the day laborers who had anal sex with their solicitors did not always use condoms. CONCLUSIONS: HIV prevention efforts should target drug dependent day laborers, who may place themselves at risk for HIV through sex with male solicitors.OBJETIVO: Examinar hasta qué punto los jornaleros latinos son solicitados por otros hombres para tener relaciones sexuales. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Cuatrocientos cincuenta jornaleros latinos fueron reclutados en Los Ángeles, California, de julio a septiembre de 2005. Un análisis de regresión logística fue utilizado para determinar cuáles jornaleros tenían más probabilidades de que fueran solicitados y, subsecuentemente, de que tuvieran sexo. RESULTADOS: Treinta y ocho por ciento reportaron que fueron solicitados para sexo por otros hombres mientras buscaban trabajo. Estos hombres que fueron solicitados tenían más probabilidades de haber vivido más tiempo en los Estados Unidos, tener más educación formal y dar resultados positivos en dependencia de drogas. De los solicitados, 9.4% tuvieron sexo con los solicitadores. Aquellos que dieron resultados positivos para dependencia de drogas tenían más probabilidades de tener sexo. La mayoría de los jornaleros que tuvieron sexo anal con los solicitadores no siempre

  20. Los Angeles Area Permit Holder Estimated Trash Load Reduction, Los Angeles CA, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Los Angeles River has been designated as an impaired waterbody due to the large volume of trash it receives from the watershed. To address this problem a Total...

  1. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wade

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Icons are eye-cons: they provide a distillation of a complex object or idea into a simple pictorial shape. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimension of distance or depth is missing from the icon, and this alone introduces all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as an exploration of the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons are more honest—they are tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is presented. They are visual allusions rather than visual illusions, although they can display illusory effects. At its broadest, icon can be equated with image. The concept of image has thrived on its vagueness, and so attempts have been made to refine it. An icon corresponds to an optical image: it shares some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional rather than spatialised and projective. Words and images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte (1898-1967 in a series of pipe paintings, and he also played on the theme of the arbitrariness of the verbal labels assigned to objects. What is surprising is that Magritte did not apply his painterly skills to transforming the word shapes he used. A similar reluctance to transform the typefaces pervades visual poetry. My interests are in the visual rather than the poetic dimension, and I will present a range of my own eye contricks which play with letter and word shapes in a variety of ways.

  2. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of ... Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer ...

  3. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision ...

  4. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships ... carry visual messages from the retina to the brain. Retina (REH-tin-uh) is the light-sensitive ...

  5. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Accomplishments Budget and Congress About the NEI Director History of the NEI NEI 50th Anniversary NEI Women ... Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer Intern ...

  6. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program ... To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home » NEI for ...

  7. Latino/a Student Misbehavior and School Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.; Shekarkhar, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Although Latino/as are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. student population, Latino/a youth face a number of educational hurdles, such as disproportionate school punishment. This topic is particularly relevant today in the midst of the current social, political, and economic debate over the influence of Latino/a immigration in the US school…

  8. Positive Reading Attitudes of Low-Income Bilingual Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussert-webb, Kathy M.; Zhang, Zhidong

    2018-01-01

    Many assume low-income, emergent bilingual Latinos have poor reading attitudes. To investigate this issue, we surveyed 1,503 Texas public high school students through stratified cluster sampling to determine their reading attitudes. Most represented Latinos and mixed-race Latinos/Whites who heard Spanish at home and whose mother tongue was…

  9. Anti-Black Latino Racism in an Era of Trumpismo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Jasmine M.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the Latino population that voted for the current president and overview reasons as to why they voted for the current president. I purposefully center the anti-Black racism within the Latino community and focus specifically on recent political and nationwide events that are connected to anti-Black Latino racism. Additionally,…

  10. Availability of commonly consumed and culturally specific fruits and vegetables in African-american and Latino neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S; Zenk, Shannon N; Odoms-Young, Angela; Ruggiero, Laurie; Moise, Imelda

    2010-05-01

    Although the importance of culture in shaping individual dietary behaviors is well-documented, cultural food preferences have received limited attention in research on the neighborhood food environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the availability of commonly consumed and culturally specific fruits and vegetables in retail food stores located in majority African-American and Latino neighborhoods in southwest Chicago, IL. A cross-sectional survey of 115 stores (15% grocery stores, 85% convenience/corner stores) in African-American neighborhoods and 110 stores (45% grocery stores, 55% convenience/corner stores) in Latino neighborhoods was conducted between May and August of 2006. chi(2) tests were used to assess differences in the availability (presence/absence) of commonly consumed (n=25) and culturally specific fruits and vegetables for African Americans (n=16 varieties) and Latinos (n=18 varieties). Stores located in neighborhoods in which the majority of residents were African American or Latino were more likely to carry fresh fruits and vegetables that were culturally relevant to the dominant group. For example, grocery stores located in Latino neighborhoods were more likely to carry chayote (82.0% vs 17.6%, P<0.05), whereas grocery stores located in African-American neighborhoods were more likely to carry black-eyed peas (52.9% vs 20%, P<0.05). Most stores, however, carried fewer than 50% of commonly consumed or culturally specific fruits and vegetables. Findings from this study highlight that limited availability of culturally specific as well as commonly consumed fruits and vegetables in the neighborhood may be a barrier to fruit and vegetable consumption among African Americans and Latinos. Copyright 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Preventing Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Leer en Español: Lesiones de los ojos ...

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ... Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  13. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es el ojo seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  15. Bags Under Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bags under eyes Overview Bags under eyes — mild swelling or puffiness under the eyes — are common as you age. With aging, the tissues around your ... space below your eyes, adding to the swelling. Bags under eyes are usually a cosmetic concern and ...

  16. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  17. Black Eye: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Black eye Black eye: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A black eye is caused by bleeding under the skin around the eye. Most injuries that cause a ... 13, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-black-eye/basics/ART-20056675 . Mayo ...

  18. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pagan-Duran MD Sep. 01, 2017 Our eyes need tears to stay healthy and comfortable. If your eyes do not produce enough tears, it is called dry eye. Dry eye is also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film . How do tears ...

  19. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  20. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Eye Injuries KidsHealth / For Parents / Eye Injuries What's in ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  1. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  2. About the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  3. EyeGENE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The eyeGENE® Biorepository and corresponding Database contain family history and clinical eye exam data from subjects enrolled in eyeGENE® Program coupled to...

  4. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Your eyes are made up of many different parts that work together to help you see. ... to the brain. Watch now! Learn how the different parts of your eye work together so you ...

  5. Fluorescein eye stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test that uses orange dye (fluorescein) and a blue light to detect foreign bodies in the eye. This ... eye. The health care provider then shines a blue light at your eye. Any problems on the surface ...

  6. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  7. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  8. The informal investment context: specific issues concerned with business angels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Hoyos Iruarrizaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Informal investors play a key role to meet the financing needs of business projects in early stages. However, this is a group in which there are different kinds and ways of dealing with investment. One of these profiles is associated with the figure known as business angel, whose main distinguishing feature is its ability to add smart capital in the form of knowledge, experience and contacts. The aim of this paper is to determine to what extent the specific profile of business angels differ from the rest of informal investors. With a sample of over 800 informal investors in Spain, the empirical results of this study show that the higher income, skills and entrepreneurial training and the less family ties to the entrepreneur, the greater the probability of belonging to business angel investment group.

  9. Professional Identity at Los Angeles College of Chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Melissa Nagare; Russell, Robb; Scaringe, John

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this article is to describe chiropractic professional identity as espoused by the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic. Professional identity is a construct that begins formation prior to career selection, can be considered the backbone of health care education, and has been linked to career success. Los Angeles College of Chiropractic's professional identity is shaped by a philosophy of health care that is focused on vitalism, holism, naturalism, therapeutic conservatism, critical rationalism, phenomenology, humanism, and interprofessionalism. Other distinguishing aspects include portal-of-entry professionals with broad diagnostic skills; a focus on spine care; promotion of public-health; and delivery of manual treatments. The chiropractic professional identity at the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic focuses on serving the needs of the people who entrust their health to its graduates and will continue to evolve on the basis of many factors, such as politics, social perceptions, and economic conditions.

  10. Church, place, and crime: Latinos and homicide in new destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Edward S; Winters, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Latinos are moving beyond traditional areas and settling in new, potentially disorganized destinations. Without an established immigrant community, new destinations appear to rely more on the local religious ecology to regulate community life and to keep crime low. We examine the link between religious ecology and Latino homicide victimization for traditional and new destination counties. We observe four findings. (1) A Catholic presence has no effect on Latino violence in the old and well-organized traditional settlement areas. But in new Latino settlement areas, a Catholic presence substantially lowers violence against Latinos. In contrast, mainline Protestantism is linked to high levels of violence against Latinos in new destinations. (2) Previous claims that Latino communities are safe do not apply to new destinations, where Latinos are murdered at a high rate. (3) Previous claims that areas with high Latino immigration are safe for Latinos are not true for new destinations. (4) New Latino destinations offer little insulation from the effects of economic deprivation on violence. We discuss the implications of the findings.

  11. Latino Retail Entrepreneurship in Minnesota: Implications for Extension Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Young Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Minnesota has become a “new destination” state for Latino migrants in the United States. What has made Latinos in Minnesota successful? In a narrower sense, what has provided them with a route out of poverty and an alternative to unemployment or discrimination in the labor market? Our purpose was to (a compile characteristics associated with the Latino community and successful Latino-owned retail businesses in Minnesota, (b identify unique problems encountered by Latino retail entrepreneurs, and (c develop recommendations to overcome obstacles encountered. To meet our objectives, we employed two methods: a Delphi study with Latino community leaders and a case study with Latino retail entrepreneurs. Implications for Extension educators are discussed.

  12. Genomewide Clonal Analysis of Lethal Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Eye: Comparison of the X Chromosome and Autosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Call, Gerald B.; Olson, John M.; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T.; Yabroff, Allison M.; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K.; Chhabra, Akanksha

    2007-01-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved ...

  13. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  14. Too Latino and Not Latino Enough: The Role of Ethnicity-Related Stressors on Latino College Students' Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lizette; Navarro, Rachel L.; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Arbona, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between demographics (generation status, age, gender, education level) and ethnicity-related stressors, namely, perceived discrimination, stereotype confirmation concern, and own-group conformity pressure, and the life satisfaction of 115 Latino college students was examined. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated…

  15. Consejos para los adolescentes latinos que adoptan ambas culturas (Tips for Latino teens)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-19

    Podcast para los adolescentes latinos: Este podcast ofrece consejos útiles a los adolescentes latinos sobre cómo encontrar un equilibrio entre su cultura de origen y la cultura estadounidense, con el fin de disfrutar de una vida más feliz y saludable.  Created: 8/19/2009 by Centro Coordinador de Salud Ambiental y Prevención de Lesiones (CCEHIP).   Date Released: 8/19/2009.

  16. Predictors of change in sports participation in Latino and non-Latino children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Kirsten; Crespo, Noe C; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Sallis, James F; Shadron, Lisa M; Moody, Jamie S; Elder, John P

    2012-07-01

    Few prospective studies have examined predictors of change in specific physical activity (PA) behaviours in different ethnic groups. To assess predictors of change in sports participation in Latino and non-Latino 5-8 year-old children in San Diego, California. Average sports participation frequency (days/week) was assessed by validated parent-report at baseline (Nov 2006-May 2008) and 1 year later in 541 children (45.0% male, 41.1% Latino; mean ± SD age: 6.6 ± 0.7 years) taking part in an obesity prevention study (Project MOVE). Biological (sex, age, Body Mass Index z-score), socio-cultural (ethnicity, income, care giver education), parental (PA rules, PA encouragement) and environmental factors (home PA equipment, PA location) were assessed at baseline. Associations between change in sports participation and potential predictors were studied using multilevel linear regression stratified by Latino ethnicity, adjusted for sex, baseline sport participation, study condition and recruitment area. Sports participation increased over 1 year (mean change: +0.5 days; pchildren showed a greater increase (p=0.03). The number of locations used for PA (p=0.024) and the total frequency of PA location use (p=0.018) were positively associated with increased sports participation among Latinos. No predictors were identified for non-Latino children. Only factors relating to PA location were identified as predictors of change in sports participation for Latino children. Interventions targeting specific PA behaviours such as sports participation may need to consider PA locations for Latino children and be tailored for specific ethnic groups.

  17. LA Sprouts Randomized Controlled Nutrition, Cooking and Gardening Program Reduces Obesity and Metabolic Risk in Latino Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of a 12-week gardening, nutrition, and cooking intervention (“LA Sprouts”) on dietary intake, obesity parameters and metabolic disease risk among low-income, primarily Hispanic/Latino youth in Los Angeles. Methods Randomized control trial involving four elementary schools [2 schools randomized to intervention (172, 3rd–5th grade students); 2 schools randomized to control (147, 3rd–5th grade students)]. Classes were taught in 90-minute sessions once a week to each grade level for 12 weeks. Data collected at pre- and post-intervention included dietary intake via food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), anthropometric measures [BMI, waist circumference (WC)], body fat, and fasting blood samples. Results LA Sprouts participants had significantly greater reductions in BMI z-scores (0.1 versus 0.04 point decrease, respectively; p=0.01) and WC (−1.2 cm vs. no change; pobesity and metabolic risk. PMID:25960146

  18. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region consists of the following territorial area (including the territorial... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality...

  19. The Latino Experience in Central Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

  20. Changing Political Landscapes for Latinos in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, Jason P.; Ibarra, Joanne D.

    2012-01-01

    The increased demographic presence of Latino individuals has gradually resulted in growing political influence and representation. This growing presence and influence has altered the American political landscape, drawing sudden attention among scholars, the media, and political pundits. This article investigates four aspects of the growing…

  1. Reflections of a Latino Associate Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2018-01-01

    The following reflection essay is about my experiences as a Latino Associate Professor who focuses on criminology, youth violence, juvenile justice, and the associated disparities with race, ethnicity, and immigration. I reflect about the "race and justice" job market, pursuing and establishing a Latina/o Criminology working group, often…

  2. Delicious Heart-Healthy Latino Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free milk, small amounts of vegetable oil, lean cuts of meat, poultry without the skin, fish, beans, fruits, vegetables, ... popular low-sodium sauce adds great flavor to meats and vegetables. 48 Side Dishes Delicious and Heart Healthy Latino ... n ½ cucharadita de chile (ají) picante seco 1 cucharada de orégano seco ...

  3. Celebratory Socialization: Welcoming Latino Students to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Berta Vigil

    This paper describes the Puente Project, a program developed to provide support services to Latino students attending California community colleges. A discussion of the organizational response to students of color and of organizational socialization practices is followed by a description of the development of the Puente Project. The project's…

  4. Brotherhood and College Latinos: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Fernando; Mejia, Araceli; Hufana, Alyssa Mae

    2017-01-01

    An understudied topic is the social experiences of college Latinos. In this study, six men shared their experience of brotherhood or "hermandad". Individual interviews yielded qualitative data that were subjected to inductive coding resulting in seven descriptive themes conveying the essence of brotherhood. The findings and implications…

  5. Training Materials Developed for Latino Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreo, Christina; Miller, Wayne; Farmer, Frank; Moon, Zola; McCullough, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the materials and training program that Extension created to assist current and potential Latino immigrant entrepreneurs in starting businesses in Arkansas. The content-based educational materials describe the process for starting a new business, government regulatory requirements, start-up costs and considerations, and how…

  6. Measles Vaccination Coverage among Latino Children Aged 12 to 59 Months in Los Angeles County: A Household Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Donnell P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the results of a household survey of measles vaccination coverage among Hispanic American children aged 12 to 59 months. Between 81 percent and 91 percent of the children have been vaccinated, a percentage insufficient to stop the high rate of measles transmission within this population. Recommends that public health efforts be focused on…

  7. How does entrepreneurial activity affect the supply of business angels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, A.; Hartog, C.; van Stel, A.; Suddle, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the prevalence and the determinants of informal entrepreneurial investment activity (i.e. the 3 FFFs -friends, fools and family- and business angels), using a data set of more than 175,000 individuals - including some 4000 informal investors - in a large number of highly

  8. Predicting Los Angeles abrasion loss of rock aggregates from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    resistance generally tested using the Los Angeles testing machine. The abrasion resistance of aggregates is measured by the LA abrasion test originally developed to provide a quantitative method for evaluating the quality of aggre- gates for use in highway construction. The wear due to attrition between rock particles and ...

  9. Working Smart: The Los Angeles Workplace Literacy Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    The Working Smart workplace literacy project was sponsored by a public school district and several profit and nonprofit companies and conducted for the hotel and food industry in the Los Angeles area. Literacy instruction was merged with job requirements of the customer service job classifications. Videodisc courseware was developed, as were…

  10. Los Angeles School Board Race Shatters Spending Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2013-01-01

    The price tag to win a seat in this week's primary election for the Los Angeles school board climbed to unprecedented levels, as a massive influx of outside cash has turned a local campaign into a national showdown pitting the long-standing influence of teachers' unions against the expanding imprint of deep-pocketed education activists. The high…

  11. Rikaste klubi hindab Eesti reformikogemust / Angel Gurria ; interv. Sirje Rank

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gurria, Angel, 1950-

    2008-01-01

    Majandusliku Koostöö ja Arengu Organisatsiooni (OECD) peasekretär Angel Gurria ütleb intervjuus Äripäevale, et Eesti on oodatud rikaste riikide klubisse eelkõige oma reformikogemuse tõttu, ette heitis ta aga Eesti tööturu jäikust. Kommenteerib välisminister Urmas Paet. Lisa: Taust

  12. Los Angeles 1-Million tree canopy cover assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory E. McPherson; James R. Simpson; Qingfu Xiao; Wu Chunxia

    2008-01-01

    The Million Trees LA initiative intends to chart a course for sustainable growth through planting and stewardship of trees. The purpose of this study was to measure Los Angeles's existing tree canopy cover (TCC), determine if space exists for 1 million additional trees, and estimate future benefits from the planting. High resolution QuickBird remote sensing data,...

  13. Advancing the Latino Physician Workforce-Population Trends, Persistent Challenges, and New Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Poll-Hunter, Norma I; Acosta, David

    2015-07-01

    From 1980 to 2010, the shortage of Latino physicians worsened despite the unique benefits that Latino physicians provide, especially in caring for the rapidly growing Latino patient population. The authors describe the expanding Latino population in the United States, discuss some health care issues specific to the Latino population, and briefly evaluate historical and ongoing issues to increase the Latino physician workforce. Developing the Latino physician workforce will require a multifaceted approach including, but not limited to, building the next generation of Latino medical school applicants and matriculants, cultivating more Latino residents, prioritizing Latino inclusion in the academic medicine workforce, expanding curricula and training on Latino health in both undergraduate and graduate medical education, rebuilding and reframing federally sponsored diversity initiatives, and fostering collaboration between Latino professional organizations and academic health centers.

  14. A comparative analysis of homosexual behaviors, sex role preferences, and anal sex proclivities in Latino and non-Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, William L

    2009-10-01

    Machismo prescribes that homosexual encounters among Latino men are conducted along highly gendered lines: men tend to be anally insertive or receptive over the lifecourse, but not both. Some have argued that Latino men have more lifecourse homosexual behaviors in comparison to other racial/ethnic groups. This is often due to the perception that Latin America has quasi-institutionalized homosexuality, which sharply contrasts it with the United States. Although scholars suggest that sex role preferences and greater likelihoods for homosexual behaviors exist among Latino men in the United States, limited empirical data validate these claims. Latino/non-Latino differences in male homosexual behaviors and sex role preferences were analyzed by using the 2002 cycle of the National Survey of Family Growth, a nationally representative, probability sample of 4,928 men. Findings revealed that non-Mexican Latino, but not Mexican, men had increased likelihoods of ever having anal sex than non-Latino Whites and oral sex than non-Latino Blacks. These relationships remained after controlling for age, education, and foreign birth. Latino men preferred insertive or receptive sex in comparison to non-Latino Blacks and Whites, but this difference disappeared after education was controlled. In full and reduced models, Mexican men tended to be orifice-specific (oral or anal), while non-Mexican Latinos were more oriented to both oral and anal sex. Controlling for other factors, all Latinos were more likely than non-Latino Blacks and Whites to refuse to answer male homosexual behavior questions. The implications of race/ethnicity are discussed for homosexual behavior patterns among U.S. men.

  15. "Latino Spaces Have Always Been the Most Violent": Afro-Latino Collegians' Perceptions of Colorism and Latino Intragroup Marginalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Jasmine M.

    2017-01-01

    This study centers on the racialized experiences of Afro-Latino undergraduates at historically White institutions. Of particular interest, I examine how six Afro-Latino collegains experience intragroup marginalization due to colorism. The research design is undergirded by critical race theory and a critical race methodology. Participants'…

  16. Angel Investors” in Entrepreneurship: An Assessment on Turkey Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayet Tiftik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the subject of angel investors is a new concept for the researches of our country there is little if any in Turkey regarding of scientific research. As well as any quantitative research not exist on the field, the searches carried out are discussed as qualitative and literature study. The concept is ranked among the titles such as business angels, angel capital, angel investment, angel financing in the international literature. The search involves the entrepreneurship concept, the study results hereof in our country, the literature about angel investment and the studies carried out in other countries regarding of the subject matter. In consequences of the searches, the subject discussed from a different point of view and headed by the literature offers a number of suggestions and advices to entrepreneurships, the whole parts mod eled by angel investment and researches.

  17. Hispanic/Latino Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Influence of Family Structure, Perceived Peer Norms, and Family Members' Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Wura; Barry, Adam E; Xu, Lei; Valente, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Family structure and value system among Hispanic/Latino population are changing. However, very few studies are examining the combination of the influence of family structure, parental and sibling alcohol use, perceived peer norms about drinking, and alcohol use among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. This study examined the associations among family structure parental and sibling substance use, perceived peer norm toward drinking and alcohol use among a sample of adolescents in the US. We assessed cross-sectional data from a 2010 study of 1,523 high school students from a school district in Los Angeles. Logistic regression analyses were conducted using SPSS 23. Our results indicate that family structure was not significantly associated with adolescents' alcohol use. Having family members' who consumed alcohol, perception of close friends' attitudes toward drinking, and perceived drinking prevalence among peers increased the likelihood of drinking. Findings suggest that alcohol use behaviors of members of the family unit, perception of drinking prevalence among peers, and perception of friends attitude to drinking (not their actual drinking behavior) increased the likelihood of drinking. We call Health Education Specialists develop awareness programs targeted at correcting adolescents' normative perceptions towards alcohol use prevalence among their peers.

  18. Overcoming Barriers: Tailoring Climate Education for Latino and non-Latino Citizen to Impact Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, M.; Boudrias, M. A.; Silva-Send, N. J.; Gershunov, A.; Anders, S.

    2013-12-01

    Culture has been shown to be an important determinant of Latino/Hispanic American environmental attitudes (Schultz, Unipan, & Gamba, 2000), which might help to explain the underrepresentation of Latinos in the U.S. 'environmental' movement. With shifting U.S. demographics, however, there is increased urgency to understand how Latinos integrate into the community that is concerned and literate about climate change. As part of the Climate Education Partners (CEP) work in San Diego, we investigated how to address this ethnic group disparity. In this paper, we describe a study of how climate change science knowledge relates to Latino and Non-Latino citizen (a) engagement in conservation behaviors and (b) more informed decision-making. Drawing upon previous work on the Tripartite Integration Model of Social Influence (TIMSI) (Estrada et al., 2011), we hypothesized that climate change knowledge that promotes efficacy (i.e., a sense that one can do something) would relate to greater engagement in conservation behaviors and more informed decision-making (both common of community members concerned about climate change). To test this model, 1001 San Diego residence participated in a telephone survey in which the attitudes towards climate change were assessed using '6 Americas' segmentation (Leiserowitz et al., 2011), in addition to climate change science knowledge, efficacy, values, and engagement in weekly and yearly climate change friendly behaviors (e.g., conservation, transportation, community engagement behaviors). Results showed that there were significant differences in the 6 America segmentation distributions, knowledge, efficacy and behavioral engagement with Latinos significantly more concerned than Non-Latinos, and reporting greater knowledge, efficacy and engagement in behaviors. However, data from both groups showed support for the TIMSI theoretical framework, such that efficacy mediated the relationship between climate change knowledge and behavior. Thus, for

  19. Cultural factors in preventive care: Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Victor Alejandro

    2002-09-01

    For many, the term "Hispanic" places undue emphasis on the European influence of Spanish colonialism and may even have negative connotations for some. "Latino" is a more encompassing term that gives recognition to the influences of the indigenous and African cultures on modern day Latin Americans. Nevertheless, recognition of typical Latino attitudes and beliefs may assist health care providers. Poverty, unemployment, and low level of education usually account for adverse health in this population. Anti-immigrant sentiment and discrimination in health care and education add adversity to the immigrant's experience. Lack of health insurance and access to quality health care typically plague the adult immigrant. For many, the nearest emergency department is their only source of medical care.

  20. SAFER Latinos: a community partnership to address contributing factors for Latino youth violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D; Andrade, Elizabeth; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Maria Ivonne; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a multilevel youth violence prevention effort called SAFER Latinos (Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos), a collaboration between The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (GWU) and two key Latino community organizations. To implement and evaluate an intervention addressing factors within the social ecology of an immigrant Latino community. The intervention includes (1) Social promotores for family outreach and problem resolution; (2) Youth peer advocates at the high school level; (3) a drop-in center with support services for families and youth; and (4) community events, capacity building, and messages. Evaluation includes a baseline and follow-up surveys (N = 1,400) and focus groups. (1) Community circumstances change, requiring regular program adaptation. (2) Community interventions with research face potential contradictions in purpose impacting management of the collaboration and model fidelity. (3) Etiological models tied to interventions may have to be revisited owing to changes in the character and dynamics of the immigrant community.

  1. Origins of the New Latino Underclass

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Douglas S.; Pren, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the Latino population of the United States was transformed from a small, ethnically segmented population of Mexicans in the southwest, Puerto Ricans in New York, and Cubans in Miami into a large national population dominated by Mexicans, Central Americans, and South Americans. This transformation occurred through mass immigration, much of it undocumented, to the point where large fractions of non-Caribbean Hispanics lack legal protections and rights in the United S...

  2. Latino residential segregation and self-rated health among Latinos: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascak, Jesse J.; Molina, Yamile; Wu-Georges, Samantha; Idris, Ayah; Thompson, Beti

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between Latino residential segregation and self-rated health (SRH) is unclear, but might be partially affected by social capital. We investigated the association between Latino residential segregation and SRH while also examining the roles of various social capital measures. Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2012–2014) and U.S. Census data were linked by zip code and zip code tabulation area. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate odds of good or better SRH by Latino residential segregation, measured by the Gini coefficient, and controlling for sociodemographic, acculturation and social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control. The Latino residential segregation – SRH relationship was convex, or ‘U’-shaped, such that increases in segregation among Latinos residing in lower segregation areas was associated with lower SRH while increases in segregation among Latinos residing in higher segregation areas was associated with higher SRH. The social capital measures were independently associated with SRH but had little effect on the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. A convex relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH could explain mixed findings of previous studies. Although important for SRH, social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control might not account for the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. PMID:27173739

  3. Modeling smog along the Los Angeles-Palm Springs trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of smog concentrations and wind patterns during the summer of 1973 in Los Angeles, Pomona, Riverside, Banning, and Palm Springs, California are presented which show that high oxidant concentrations at Banning and Palm Springs are often due to advection of smog from source regions in the more densely populated western part of the Los Angeles basin. At Pomona and Riverside, advection from upwind source regions combines with the effects of local emissions to cause long durations of high oxidant concentrations with peak times in the mid afternoon. An empirical model for the diurnal oxidant variation is suggested which satisfactorily simulates observed concentrations. More complex models which include chemical kinetics systems do not perform very satisfactorily at the rural stations of Banning and Palm Springs, especially at night when observed oxidant concentrations remain high

  4. Angelic and Crepuscular in Alexandru Sever’s Drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena IANCU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The illustration of a world, apparently drifting, the (demystification of the transcendent and of the act of creation, as idea and textual strategy, seem to Alexandru Sever (1921-2010 a means for another beginning. The impossibility of action in Înger bătrîn/ The Old Angel (1977 and the pact-making in Îngerul slut/ The Miscreated Angel (1982, imply metamorphosis in essence, supported by the dialogue with the great texts of the world, by intertextuality (the biblical text, Shakespeare's texts -Hamlet -Yorick, texts written by Göethe, Beckett, Marlowe, Dostoevsky, J. P. Sartre, Mikhail Bulgakov and others. The projection of Auschwitz, as a Siberia of the spirit, and that of Faustianism, result in a detailed analysis of the human, both as individuality and as community, in an attempt to illustrate the (inintelligible inaction, death involving catharsis in the mundane and the theatre alike.

  5. Bottled, filtered, and tap water use in Latino and non-Latino children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Wendy L; Knochel, Miguel L; Byington, Carrie L; Young, Paul C; Hoff, Charles J; Buchi, Karen F

    2007-05-01

    To describe bottled, filtered, and tap water consumption and fluoride use among pediatric patients; to analyze differences between ethnic and socioeconomic groups; and to describe the frequency of physician-parent discussions regarding water consumption. Convenience sample survey. An urban public health clinic. Parents attending a public health clinic. The primary outcome measure was the prevalence of tap, filtered, and bottled water use. The secondary outcome measures were supplemental fluoride use and the percentage of patients reporting discussions of water consumption with their physician. A total of 216 parents (80.5% Latino and 19.5% non-Latino) completed the survey. Of the parents, 30.1% never drank tap water and 41.2% never gave it to their children. Latino parents were less likely than non-Latino parents to drink tap water (odds ratio, 0.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.67) and less likely to give tap water to their children (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.70). More Latinos believed that tap water would make them sick (odds ratio, 5.63; 95% confidence interval, 2.17-14.54). Approximately 40% of children who never drank tap water were not receiving fluoride supplements. Of the lowest-income families (water to their children. Of the parents surveyed, 82.5% reported that their child's physician had never discussed the type of water they should use. Many Latino families avoid drinking tap water because they fear it causes illness. Unnecessary use of bottled and filtered water is costly and may result in adverse dental health outcomes. Physicians should provide guidance to families regarding the safety, low cost, and dental health benefits of drinking tap water.

  6. Genomewide clonal analysis of lethal mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster eye: comparison of the X chromosome and autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Gerald B; Olson, John M; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T; Yabroff, Allison M; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K; Chhabra, Akanksha; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Do, Minh-Tu; Fang, Q Angela; Folick, Andrew; Goodstein, Gelsey L; Huang, Cheng R; Hung, Tony; Kim, Eunha; Kim, William; Kim, Yulee; Kohan, Emil; Kuoy, Edward; Kwak, Robert; Lee, Eric; Lee, JiEun; Lin, Henry; Liu, H-C Angela; Moroz, Tatiana; Prasad, Tharani; Prashad, Sacha L; Patananan, Alexander N; Rangel, Alma; Rosselli, Desiree; Sidhu, Sohrab; Sitz, Daniel; Taber, Chelsea E; Tan, Jingwen; Topp, Kasey; Tran, PhuongThao; Tran, Quynh-Minh; Unkovic, Mary; Wells, Maggie; Wickland, Jessica; Yackle, Kevin; Yavari, Amir; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Allen, Christopher M; Alli, Latifat; An, Ju; Anwar, Abbas; Arevalo, Sonia; Ayoub, Danny; Badal, Shawn S; Baghdanian, Armonde; Baghdanian, Arthur H; Baumann, Sara A; Becerra, Vivian N; Chan, Hei J; Chang, Aileen E; Cheng, Xibin A; Chin, Mabel; Chong, Fleurette; Crisostomo, Carlyn; Datta, Sanjit; Delosreyes, Angela; Diep, Francie; Ekanayake, Preethika; Engeln, Mark; Evers, Elizabeth; Farshidi, Farzin; Fischer, Katrina; Formanes, Arlene J; Gong, Jun; Gupta, Riju; Haas, Blake E; Hahm, Vicky; Hsieh, Michael; Hui, James Z; Iao, Mei L; Jin, Sophia D; Kim, Angela Y; Kim, Lydia S-H; King, Megan; Knudsen-Robbins, Chloe; Kohanchi, David; Kovshilovskaya, Bogdana; Ku, Amy; Kung, Raymond W; Landig, Mark E L; Latterman, Stephanie S; Lauw, Stephanie S; Lee, Daniel S; Lee, Joann S; Lei, Kai C; Leung, Lesley L; Lerner, Renata; Lin, Jian-ya; Lin, Kathleen; Lim, Bryon C; Lui, Crystal P Y; Liu, Tiffany Q; Luong, Vincent; Makshanoff, Jacob; Mei, An-Chi; Meza, Miguel; Mikhaeil, Yara A; Moarefi, Majid; Nguyen, Long H; Pai, Shekhar S; Pandya, Manish; Patel, Aadit R; Picard, Paul D; Safaee, Michael M; Salame, Carol; Sanchez, Christian; Sanchez, Nina; Seifert, Christina C; Shah, Abhishek; Shilgevorkyan, Oganes H; Singh, Inderroop; Soma, Vanessa; Song, Junia J; Srivastava, Neetika; StaAna, Jennifer L; Sun, Christie; Tan, Diane; Teruya, Alison S; Tikia, Robyn; Tran, Trinh; Travis, Emily G; Trinh, Jennifer D; Vo, Diane; Walsh, Thomas; Wong, Regan S; Wu, Katherine; Wu, Ya-Whey; Yang, Nkau X V; Yeranosian, Michael; Yu, James S; Zhou, Jennifer J; Zhu, Ran X; Abrams, Anna; Abramson, Amanda; Amado, Latiffe; Anderson, Jenny; Bashour, Keenan; Beyer, Elsa; Bookatz, Allen; Brewer, Sarah; Buu, Natalie; Calvillo, Stephanie; Cao, Joseph; Chan, Amy; Chan, Jenny; Chang, Aileen; Chang, Daniel; Chang, Yuli; Chen, YiBing; Choi, Joo; Chou, Jeyling; Dang, Peter; Datta, Sumit; Davarifar, Ardy; Deravanesian, Artemis; Desai, Poonam; Fabrikant, Jordan; Farnad, Shahbaz; Fu, Katherine; Garcia, Eddie; Garrone, Nick; Gasparyan, Srpouhi; Gayda, Phyllis; Go, Sherrylene; Goffstein, Chad; Gonzalez, Courtney; Guirguis, Mariam; Hassid, Ryan; Hermogeno, Brenda; Hong, Julie; Hong, Aria; Hovestreydt, Lindsay; Hu, Charles; Huff, Devon; Jamshidian, Farid; Jen, James; Kahen, Katrin; Kao, Linda; Kelley, Melissa; Kho, Thomas; Kim, Yein; Kim, Sarah; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Langenbacher, Adam; Laxamana, Santino; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chris; Lee, So-Youn; Lee, ToHang S; Lee, Toni; Lewis, Gemma; Lezcano, Sheila; Lin, Peter; Luu, Thanh; Luu, Julie; Marrs, Will; Marsh, Erin; Marshall, Jamie; Min, Sarah; Minasian, Tanya; Minye, Helena; Misra, Amit; Morimoto, Miles; Moshfegh, Yasaman; Murray, Jessica; Nguyen, Kha; Nguyen, Cynthia; Nodado, Ernesto; O'Donahue, Amanda; Onugha, Ndidi; Orjiakor, Nneka; Padhiar, Bhavin; Paul, Eric; Pavel-Dinu, Mara; Pavlenko, Alex; Paz, Edwin; Phaklides, Sarah; Pham, Lephong; Poulose, Preethi; Powell, Russell; Pusic, Aya; Ramola, Divi; Regalia, Kirsten; Ribbens, Meghann; Rifai, Bassel; Saakyan, Manyak; Saarikoski, Pamela; Segura, Miriam; Shadpour, Farnaz; Shemmassian, Aram; Singh, Ramnik; Singh, Vivek; Skinner, Emily; Solomin, Daniel; Soneji, Kosha; Spivey, Kristin; Stageberg, Erika; Stavchanskiy, Marina; Tekchandani, Leena; Thai, Leo; Thiyanaratnam, Jayantha; Tong, Maurine; Toor, Aneet; Tovar, Steve; Trangsrud, Kelly; Tsang, Wah-Yung; Uemura, Marc; Vollmer, Emily; Weiss, Emily; Wood, Damien; Wu, Joy; Wu, Sophia; Wu, Winston; Xu, Qing; Yamauchi, Yuki; Yarosh, Will; Yee, Laura; Yen, George; Banerjee, Utpal

    2007-10-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved in eye development as that found on the autosomes.

  7. Maximizing Intelligence Sharing Within the Los Angeles Police Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    member of JIS was to target for violent attack “any enemies of Islam or infidels , including the United States Government, Jewish and non-Jewish...Team, Sexual Assault Team, Burglary Team and so on. The detectives that are assigned to a specific team handled that specific crime. In addition...the same types of crimes Los Angeles does, murders, kidnaps, sexual assaults, prostitution, drugs, gangs, etc. One difference between Israel and Los

  8. Implementing municipal tree planting: Los Angeles million tree initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Pincetl

    2010-01-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic—living—infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests...

  9. Los Angeles Summer Midday Particulate Carbon: Primary and Secondary Aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Turpin, Barbara J.; Huntzicker, James J.; Larson, Susan M.; Cass, Glen R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerosol sampling during photochemically active times across the Los Angeles Basin has provided evidence of secondary formation of organic aerosol from gas-phase precursors at midday. Ambient organic carbon/elemental carbon ratios exceeded the estimated ratio of organic carbon/elemental carbon in primary source emissions on most sampling days at all sites. The concentration of secondary organic aerosol was calculated by using ambient data and estimates of the organic ca...

  10. The spatial distribution of underage tobacco sales in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Robert; Banerjee, Aniruddha; Levy, David; Manzanilla, Nora; Cochrane, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Underage tobacco sales is considered a serious public health problem in Los Angeles. Anecdotally, rates have been thought to be quite high. In this paper, using spatial statistical techniques, we describe underage tobacco sales, identifying areas with high levels of sales and hot spots controlling for sociodemographic measures. Six hundred eighty-nine tobacco outlets were investigated throughout the city of Los Angeles in 2001. We consider the factors that explain vendor location of illegal sales of tobacco to underage youth and focus on those areas with especially high rates of illegal sales when controlling for other independent measures. Using data from the census, the LA City Attorney's Office, and public records on school locations in Los Angeles, we employ general least-squares (GLS) estimators in order to avoid biased estimates. vendor location of underage tobacco compliance checks, violators, and nonviolators. Underage tobacco sales in Los Angeles were very high (33.5%) for the entire city in 2001. In many zip codes this rate is considerably higher (60%-100%). When conducting spatial modeling, lower income and ethnicity were strongly associated with increases in underage tobacco sales. Hotspot areas of underage tobacco sales also had much lower mean family income and a much higher percentage of foreign born and greater population density. Spatial techniques were used to better identify areas where vendors sell tobacco to underage youth. Lower income areas were much more likely to both have higher rates of underage tobacco sales and to be a hot spot for such sales. Population density is also significantly associated with underage tobacco sales. The study's limitations are noted.

  11. The Spatial Politics of Street Vending in Los Angeles

    OpenAIRE

    Sarmiento, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    This brief focuses on the politics of street vending in Los Angeles. The topic is especially salient now as the city expands its investments in design and planning interventions to activate public space, streets and sidewalks, for local economic development, and to encourage public transit and transportation alternatives to the automobile. Driven by the “smart growth” imperatives of increasing density in the urban core and transit-oriented development, “complete streets” initiatives, the Los ...

  12. Insurance Stock Prices Following the 1994 Los Angeles Earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas A. Aiuppa; Thomas M. Krueger

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the changes in insurance firm value following the 1994 Los Angeles earthquake. While prior studies found that the 1989 San Francisco earthquake was associated with an increase in earthquake insurers’ firm value, the findings of this study indicate that earthquake firms sustained their value following the 1994 earthquake. These results and their implications provide insight for investors, regulators, and other policymakers as regards future earthquakes.

  13. Toxoplasmosis (and the Eye)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of known infected babies. What happens to the eyes of babies born with congenital toxoplasmosis? The infection ... to further reduce the inflammation. Updated 10/2016 Eye Terms & Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia ...

  14. Standard eye exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the eye (eyelids, cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, and iris) Check for increased pressure in the eye ( glaucoma ) using a method called tonometry Color blindness is tested using cards with colored dots ...

  15. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program ... the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety ...

  16. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about ...

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film . How do tears ... tested whether I close my eyes when I sleep? Feb 10, 2016 Can light sensitivity from Parkinson’s ...

  18. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  19. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH), the National Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of ...

  20. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you see. Check out the diagrams below to learn about each part of your eye and what ... the optic nerve to the brain. Watch now! Learn how the different parts of your eye work ...

  1. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Leer en Español: Lesiones de los ojos en ... chore is being done. Preventing Eye Injuries at Home Wearing protective eyewear will prevent 90 percent of ...

  2. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home >> NEI for Kids >> About the Eye Listen All ... much as it does on your eyes. NEI Home Contact Us A-Z Site Map NEI on ...

  3. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services ... 2015 Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Follow The Academy ...

  4. Eye Injuries in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health ... Splints Home Prevention and Wellness Exercise and Fitness Sports Safety Eye Injuries in Sports Eye Injuries in ...

  5. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... National Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, ...

  6. Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or child care if you're not able to take time off — just stay consistent in practicing good hygiene. Preventing pink eye in newborns Newborns' eyes are susceptible to bacteria normally present in the mother's birth canal. ...

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology ...

  8. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the retina, or in other parts of the eye (such as melanoma ) Damaged tissue or injuries in the bony socket (orbit) that surrounds and protects the eye Foreign bodies Pulling away of the retina from ...

  9. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program ... About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  10. National Eye Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The NEI Audacious Goals Initiative is supporting next-generation imaging tools to view the eye. See some of the stunning imagery. ... Health from A-Z Information in español NEI FAQs Eye Health Resources ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology ...

  12. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks ... NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website can be addressed ...

  13. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid ... Your eyes are made up of many different parts that work together to help you see. Check out the ...

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... right type of tears or tear film . How do tears work? When you blink, a film of ... layer cleans the eye, washing away particles that do not belong in the eye. This layer comes ...

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and ...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis dangerous? Mar 06, 2017 Why are my eyes bloodshot when ... When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Follow The Academy Professionals: Education Guidelines ...

  17. Disconjugate eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Dominik

    2007-01-01

    To foveate targets in different depths, the movements of the two eyes must be disconjugate. Fine measurements of eye rotations about the three principal axes have demonstrated that disconjugate eye movements may appear not only in the horizontal, but also in the vertical and torsional directions. In the presence of visual targets, disconjugate eye movements are driven by the vergence system, but they may also appear during vestibular stimulation. Disconjugate eye movements are highly adaptable by visual disparities, but under normal condition the effects of adaptation only persist when one eye is covered. Finally, disorders of the brainstem and cerebellum may lead to abnormal disconjugate eye movements that are often specific for the topography of the lesion. This chapter reviews the literature on the phenomenology of disconjugate eye movements over the last 15 years.

  18. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the ...

  19. The informal investment context: specific issues concerned with business angels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Hoyos Iruarrizaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Los inversores informales desempeñan un papel fundamental para cubrir las necesidades de financiación de los proyectos de negocio en fase emprendedora. Sin embargo, se trata de un segmento en el que cohabitan distintas tipologías y maneras de afrontar la inversión. Uno de estos perfiles se asocia a la figura conocida como inversor ángel o business angel, cuyo principal rasgo diferenciador reside en su capacidad para aportar un capital inteligente en forma de conocimiento, experiencia y contactos. El objetivo de este trabajo persigue conocer en qué medida el perfil específico de los business angels difiere del resto de inversores informales. Con una muestra de más de 800 inversores informales en España, los resultados empíricos de este trabajo ponen de manifiesto que a mayor nivel de renta, mayores habilidades y formación específica para emprender y menor vínculo familiar con el emprendedor, siendo mayor la probabilidad de pertenecer al segmento business angel de inversión informal.

  20. Tecidos, linhas e agulhas: uma narrativa para Zuzu Angel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Guilherme Simili

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Na década de 1960, enquanto a moda brasileira seguia os padrões europeus, Zuzu Angel proclamava, entre chitas e rendas, “eu sou a moda brasileira”. O conteúdo do texto versa sobre a identificação das contribuições da produção estética de Zuzu Angel na criação de representações para a moda brasileira e também sobre a apropriação de tecidos pouco nobres, de panos usados para a decoração do lar e de trabalhos manuais de linha e agulha na construção de roupas feitas para a elite, o que se constitui em exemplo de reaproveitamento na moda. A metodologia utiliza as roupas como textos-documentos para a narrativa de sua trajetória. Associados à história da moda, das mulheres e aos conteúdos do filme “Zuzu Angel”, desvendamos aspectos da cultura feminina em suas relações com as domesticidades, a vida pública e política nos conturbados anos 1960 e 1970.  Com tecidos, linha e agulha, Zuzu escreveu uma história na moda e na luta contra a ditadura civil-militar.   Palavras-chave: ANGEL, Zuzu, 1976; Roupas; Moda - Brasil; Política.

  1. Mercury Concentrations in Pacific Angel Sharks (Squatina californica) and Prey Fishes from Southern Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Sánchez, O; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Moreno-Sánchez, X G; Romo-Piñera, A K; Frías-Espericueta, M G

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of mercury (Hg) were quantified in muscle tissues of the Pacific angel shark, Squatina californica sampled from Southern Gulf of California, Mexico, considering total length, sex, diet and the dietary risk assessment. High Hg levels are typically associated with carnivorous fishes, however S. californica showed low Hg concentrations ( 0.05). Hg concentrations were highest in the darkedge mishipman: Porichthys analis (0.14 ± 0.08 µg g(-1)) and red-eye round herring Etrumeus teres (0.13 ± 0.05 µg g(-1)) relative to other prey species, which could suggest that Hg concentrations in S. californica were influenced by these species. Given the relatively low concentration of Hg across age-classes and sex, consumption of S. californica's muscle tissue poses limited risk to humans.

  2. Harmonizing the classification of age-related macular degeneration in the three-continent AMD consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Meuer, Stacy M; Myers, Chelsea E; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Rochtchina, Elena; Choudhury, Farzana; de Jong, Paulus T V M; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Iyengar, Sudha K; Gao, Xiaoyi; Lee, Kristine E; Vingerling, Johannes R; Mitchell, Paul; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wang, Jie Jin; Klein, Barbara E K

    PURPOSE: To describe methods to harmonize the classification of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) phenotypes across four population-based cohort studies: the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), the Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES), the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES), and the Rotterdam Study (RS).

  3. Eye Tracking for Everyone

    OpenAIRE

    Kellnhofer, Petr; Bhandarkar, Suchendra; Khosla, Aditya; Kannan, Harini D.; Matusik, Wojciech; Torralba, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    From scientific research to commercial applications, eye tracking is an important tool across many domains. Despite its range of applications, eye tracking has yet to become a pervasive technology. We believe that we can put the power of eye tracking in everyone's palm by building eye tracking software that works on commodity hardware such as mobile phones and tablets, without the need for additional sensors or devices. We tackle this problem by introducing GazeCapture, the first large-scale ...

  4. HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of primarily African-American and Latino men who have sex with men social media users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Chiu, Jason; Young, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in social media use allows these technologies to rapidly reach communities with higher HIV prevalence, such as African-American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). However, no studies have looked at HIV/AIDS stigma among social media users from African-American and Latino MSM communities, or the association between stigma and social media use among these groups. This study sought to assess the level of HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of social media-using African-American and Latino MSM from Los Angeles. A total of 112 (primarily African-American and Latino, n = 98, 88%) MSM Facebook users completed a survey on demographics, online social network use, and HIV/AIDS stigma. A composite stigma score was created by taking the cumulative score from a 15-item stigma questionnaire. Cumulative logistic models were used to assess the association between HIV/AIDS stigma and online social network use. In general, participants reported a low level of HIV/AIDS stigma (mean = 22.2/75, SD = 5.74). HIV/AIDS stigma composite score was significantly associated with increased time spent on online social networks each day (Adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 1.07, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.15). Among this diverse sample of MSM online social network users, findings suggest that HIV/AIDS stigma is associated with usage of social media. We discuss the implications of this work for future HIV prevention.

  5. Are Parental Relationships Always Protective? A Social Network Analysis of Black, Latino, and White Homeless Youth and Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Jaih B; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey

    2016-11-01

    Black and Latino homeless youth are at high risk of HIV, and yet no HIV prevention interventions have been specifically designed for these groups. Given the success of parent-child intervention programs for housed Black and Latino youth, this study examined parental relationships that could be leveraged for future HIV prevention efforts targeting minority homeless youth, specifically the associations among presence of parents in social networks, parental influence, and parental support. A convenience sample of Black, Latino, and White homeless youth (N = 754) was recruited from three drop-in centers in Los Angeles. Participants completed a computerized, self-administered questionnaire and an interviewer-led personal social network interview. Multivariate logistic regression models assessed the association between parental relationships and sexual risk behaviors. Forty-five percent (n = 338) of youth identified a parent in their network. Having at least one parent in their network was significantly associated with decreased odds of using a condom for Black and White youth. Black youth were almost four times more likely to report being tested for HIV if they spoke to their parents about sex, whereas Latino youth were 91 % less likely to report being tested for HIV if they talked with their parents about sex. Black youth who identified a parent as a positive influence (i.e., promoting condom use or discouraging multiple partners) were almost four times more likely to have used a condom during their last sexual encounter. Parent-child HIV prevention interventions targeting homeless youth would benefit from culturally tailored adaptations.

  6. Psychosocial Correlates of Unprotected Sex Without Disclosure of HIV-Positivity among African-American, Latino, and White Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Matt G.; Bogart, Laura M.; Elliott, Marc N.; McKay, Tara; Suttorp, Marika J.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    African-American, Latino, and White men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) may be a bridge of HIV transmission from men to women. Very little research has directly compared culturally specific correlates of the likelihood of unprotected sex among MSMW. The present study examined psychosocial correlates of unprotected sex without disclosure of HIV status with male and female partners among 50 African American, 50 Latino, and 50 White HIV-positive MSMW recruited from AIDS service organizations in Los Angeles County. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to examine relationships of race/ethnicity and psychosocial variables (e.g., condom attitudes, self-efficacy for HIV disclosure, sexual identification) to unprotected sex without disclosure of HIV status, for male and female partners separately. For female partners, different effects emerged by race/ethnicity. Among African-Americans, less exclusively homosexual identification and low self-efficacy for disclosure of HIV status to female partners were associated with unprotected sex without disclosure; among Latinos, less exclusively homosexual identification and negative attitudes about condoms were significant. Participants who were more exclusively homosexually identified, who held less positive condom attitudes, and who had low self-efficacy for disclosure to female partners were more likely to have unprotected sex without disclosure of HIV status to male partners. Culturally tailored community-level interventions may help to raise awareness about HIV and bisexuality, and decrease HIV and sexual orientation stigma, thereby increasing African-American and Latino MSMW's comfort in communicating with their female partners about sexuality, HIV and condoms. Addressing norms for condom use and disclosure between male partners is recommended, especially for homosexually identified MSMW. PMID:18506613

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eye is also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film . How do tears work? When you blink, a film of tears spreads over the eye. This keeps the eye’s surface smooth and clear. The tear film is important for good vision. The tear film is made of three ...

  8. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MSC 9300 Bethesda, MD 20892-9300 (Courier services use: Rockville, MD 20852) 301-451-2020 Research at ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First ... About the Eye Your eyes ...

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es ... the tear film. It makes up most of what we see as tears. This layer cleans the ...

  10. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  11. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  12. Eye and orbital cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfilova, G.V.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatomy of eyes and orbit is described. Diseases of the orbit (developmental anomalies, inflammatory diseases, lacrimal apparatus deseases, toxoplasmosis, tumors and cysts et al.), methods of foreign body localization in the eye are considered. Roentgenograms of the orbit and calculation table for foreign body localization in spherical eyes of dissimilar diameter are presented

  13. Fish eye optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.; Michalova, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on small student (high—school) project of the Czech Academy of Sciences dealing with animal (fish) eyes and possible application in science and technology. Albeit most fishes have refractive eyes, the recent discoveries confirm that some fishes have reflective eyes with strange arrangements as well.

  14. The all seeing eye?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    The All Seeing Eye? Did you know that you are probably a believer in the All Seeing Eye? The odds are that I’m right—why? Well, the bulk of mainstream vision literature blindly relies on the All Seeing Eye. It is written all over papers, albeit between the lines. Understandably so, for scientists

  15. Pensamento, Teoria e Estudos Latino-americanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques de Novion

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O presente trabalho configura como artigo inicial do Dossiê Especial – Pensamento, Teoria e Estudos Latino-americanos, organizado conjuntamente por nós, a pedido da Revista de Estudos e Pesquisas sobre as Américas (CEPPAC, do Instituto de Ciências Sociais (ICS, da Universidade de Brasília (UnB. De forma breve, este artigo apresenta a importância alcançada pelo Pensamento, pela Teoria, e, sobre tudo, pelos Estudos Latino-americanos nas últimas décadas. Em seguida, o artigo apresenta os quatorze trabalhos e uma resenha que compõem este Dossiê, resultado da contribuição de diferentes pesquisadores de distintas localidades da região, organizados em três blocos: Ciências Sociais Latino-americanas, Pensamento e Estudos. PALAVRAS CHAVE: Ciências Sociais Latino-americanas; Pensamento Latino-americanos; Teoria Latino-americana; Estudos Latino-americanos. --- RESUMEN El presente trabajo configura como articulo inicial del Dossier Especial – Pensamiento Teoría y Estudios Latinoamericanos, organizado conjuntamente por nosotros, a pedido de la Revista de Estudos e Pesquisas sobre as Américas (CEPPAC, del Instituto de Ciências Sociais (ICS, de la Universidade de Brasília (UnB. De forma breve, este articulo presenta la importancia alcanzada por el Pensamiento, por la Teoría, y, sobre todo, por los Estudios Latinoamericanos en las últimas décadas. En seguida, el articulo presenta los catorce trabajos e una reseña que componen este Dossier, resultado de la contribución de diferentes investigadores de distintas localidades de la región, organizados en tres bloques: Ciencias Sociales Latinoamericanas, Pensamiento y Estudios. PALABRAS CLAVE: Ciencias Sociales Latinoamericanas; Pensamiento Latinoamericano; Teoría Latinoamericana; Estudios Latinoamericanos. --- ABSTRACT This paper is set up as the initial article of this Special Dossier - Thought, Theory and Latin American Studies, which we organized collectively, at the request

  16. Latino Associate Degree Completion: Effects of Financial Aid over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jacob P. K.; Zerquera, Desiree; Inge, Brittany; Berry, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Lack of financial resources to pay for postsecondary education--perceived and actual--has been cited as a barrier to student access and persistence, particularly for Latino students. This study investigates the following question: "To what extent does financial aid affect the educational attainment of Latinos enrolled in Associate's degree…

  17. Social Security: Strengthening a Vital Safety Net for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Since 1935, Social Security has provided a vital safety net for millions of Americans who cannot work because of age or disability. This safety net has been especially critical for Americans of Latino decent, who number more than 50 million or nearly one out of every six Americans. Social Security is critical to Latinos because it is much more…

  18. College Knowledge: How Immigrant Latino Parents Access Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Ana F.

    2013-01-01

    Among ethnic groups in California, Latinos continue to have the lowest high school graduation rates and the lowest college completion rates. This study focused on understanding the role parents can play and ways schools and educators can support immigrant Latino parents to improve these rates. Framed with a "funds of knowledge" approach…

  19. "Salud America!" Developing a National Latino Childhood Obesity Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J.; Green, Lawrence W.; Ottoson, Judith

    2011-01-01

    U.S. childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, with one third of children overweight or obese. Latino children have some of the highest obesity rates, a concern because they are part of the youngest and fastest-growing U.S. minority group. Unfortunately, scarce research data on Latinos hinders the development and implementation of…

  20. Latino parents' perspectives on barriers to autism diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Katharine E; Sinche, Brianna; Mejia, Angie; Cobian, Martiza; Becker, Thomas; Nicolaidis, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Latino children are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) at older ages and at the point of more severe symptoms. We sought to qualitatively describe community, family, and health care system barriers to ASD diagnosis in Latino children. Five focus groups and 4 qualitative interviews were conducted with 33 parents of Latino children previously diagnosed with an ASD. Participants described Latino community perceptions of autism and barriers they experienced during the diagnostic process. Sessions were audiorecorded and transcribed. Transcripts were coded by 2 researchers, and data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Parents reported low levels of ASD information and high levels of mental health and disability stigma in the Latino community. Parents had poor access to care as a result of poverty, limited English proficiency, and lack of empowerment to take advantage of services. Providers sometimes dismissed parents' concerns. The ASD diagnostic process itself was slow, inconvenient, confusing, and uncomfortable for the child. These factors led many parents to normalize their child's early behaviors, deny that a problem existed, and lose trust in the medical system. Additional educational outreach to Latino families, destigmatization of ASD, streamlining the ASD diagnostic process, and providing additional support to Latino parents of at-risk children may decrease delays in ASD diagnosis among Latino children. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Athletics and Academic Achievement in Latino Youth: A Cautionary Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Harklau, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities has been associated with enhanced academic achievement in Latino youth. Based on a longitudinal case study of one immigrant adolescent, this article finds that athletic participation is in itself neither a wholly positive or negative influence on Latino school achievement. Rather, effects of…

  2. Passing for English Fluent: Latino Immigrant Children Masking Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzo, Lilia D.; Rueda, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This article describes passing for English fluent among Latino immigrant children. A two-year ethnography of eight Latino immigrant families was conducted in which fifth-grade children were followed in home, school, and community contexts. This article presents passing as a consequence of U.S. race relations. Their reasons for presenting…

  3. Food and Beverage Marketing to Latinos: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeigbe, Rebecca T.; Baldwin, Shannon; Gallion, Kip; Grier, Sonya; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity rates among U.S. adults and children have increased over the past two decades and, although signs of stabilization and decline among certain age groups and geographies are being reported, the prevalence of obesity among Latino adults and children remain high. The Latino population is growing in parallel to these obesity rates and marketers…

  4. Latino Solo Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Health Risks and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Deborah M; Fuller-Thomson, Esme

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this descriptive report is to provide the first representative information on the sociodemographic profile and the prevalence of mental and physical health conditions of two "at-risk" groups of Latino caregivers: solo grandparent caregivers and single parents. The 2012 Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System was used to compare five dimensions of health on a sample of Latino solo grandparents and Latino single parents, raising their grandchildren/children alone. Bivariate and logistic regression comparative analyses were conducted on study measures. Latino solo grandparents have a high prevalence of chronic health conditions, including arthritis (51%), depression (40%), diabetes (34%), and asthma (34%). Latino single parents have lower but troubling health risks, including depression (22%), diabetes (14%), and asthma (14%). Differences between the two groups were largely due to the grandparents older age. Latino solo grandparents have a high prevalence of several chronic medical conditions. The prevalence of disorders is much lower for Latino single parents, although they too have disturbing health risks. Latino solo grandparents perform their parenting role under intense physical and emotional strain. Health professionals can be instrumental in facilitating interventions that affect the well-being of this expanding family group.

  5. Recognising the Latino Immigrant's Space in the American ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zeleza

    companies all over the world want to tap into the skyrocketing US-based Latino population's purchasing power because ... On the administrative level, the US justice system has been seeking ways of engaging. Hispanics in public .... It is within the present study's limits to find out how well Latino immigrants' presence in the ...

  6. What Would They Do? Latino Church Leaders and Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Andrew O.; Ames, Natalie; Hancock, Tina U.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding what Latino church leaders believe about domestic violence, and what they do when they confront it, is a key step in developing programs to help them engage in domestic violence prevention and intervention activities in their congregations. This article presents the findings from an exploratory study of 28 Latino church leaders. The…

  7. Predictive Variables of Success for Latino Enrollment in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jafeth E.; Usinger, Janet; Thornton, Bill W.

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to better understand the unique variables that serve as predictors of Latino students' postsecondary enrollment and success. Impacts of various variables were examined among 850 Latino and Caucasian students (76% and 24% of the sample, respectively). Gender, ethnicity, perceived affordability, high school grade point average, and…

  8. Degrees of Separation: Latino Students' Transitions to a Texas HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Taryn Ozuna; Stone, Ashley N.

    2016-01-01

    A successful transition to college is the foundation for future academic success, and this process is particularly important for a quickly growing Latino population. This qualitative study explored the transitional experiences of eight Latino students who enrolled in a historically Black university in Texas. Focusing specifically on their…

  9. Supporting the Development of Latino Bilingual Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michelle L.; Sawyer, Cheryl B.; Guzmán, Michele R.; Graziani, Cate

    2014-01-01

    Latino individuals who prefer to communicate in Spanish lack linguistically and culturally proficient mental health professionals with whom they can communicate effectively. This study illustrates the components necessary to facilitate the overall success of Latino, Spanish-speaking students in attaining advanced degrees in mental health services…

  10. Adult Latino College Students: Experiencias y la Educacion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Ana Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the learning experiences of adult Latino college students, as described directly in their own voices. The study was guided by two research questions: RQ1: "How do adult Latinos describe their undergraduate college learning experiences?" and RQ2: "How do culture, gender, and ethnic…

  11. Barriers to Participation for Latino People at Dodge Nature Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Angie; Anderson, Dorothy H.

    2006-01-01

    The authors sought to identify barriers to participation for Latino people at Dodge Nature Center (DNC) in West St. Paul, MN. The authors used a multi-method approach, which included collecting demographic information, surveying the DNC staff, and interviewing Latino community leaders and parents. Results showed that unfamiliarity with DNC,…

  12. Applying Common Latino Magazine Cover Line Themes to Health Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Colleen L.; Barrios, Pamela; Lozada, Carolina; Soto-Balbuena, Kenlly; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe strategies used in magazine cover lines to capture the attention of Latino consumers. A content analysis of cover lines (n = 581) from six top-selling Latino women's and parenting magazines (n = 217 issues) sold in the United States identified 12 common themes: great/inspiring, beauty/health, bad/negative,…

  13. Educating Latino Students: A Guide to Successful Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maria Luisa, Ed.; Huerta-Macias, Ana, Ed.; Tinajero, Josefina Villamil, Ed.

    This book attempts to assist readers in expanding their knowledge base in the area of quality practices for Latino students. The chapters contain many practices that can be implemented in educational settings from preschool to secondary school. The following chapters are included: (1) "Successfully Educating Latinos: The Pivotal Role of the…

  14. Patterns of Sexual Experience Among Urban Latino and African American Ninth Grade Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatello, Robin A; De Rosa, Christine J; Moulton, Bret D; Chung, Emily Q; Viola, Rachel; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Afifi, Abdelmonem A

    This analysis assessed patterns of sexual experience, the order in which behaviors were initiated, and associated factors, among Latino and African American ninth grade students (average age 15.2) who self-administered audio-computer-assisted surveys on netbooks in classes at 10 Los Angeles-area public high schools. Lifetime experiences with vaginal and oral sex were most common (19% and 16%, respectively); fewer reported anal sex (6%). Of the 23% reporting any sex, 91% fell into four categories: 36% reporting both oral and vaginal sex; 23% vaginal only; 18% all three; and 13% oral only. Most sexually experienced students (88%) initiated with vaginal or oral sex (46% vaginal, 33% oral, 9% both same day). No dominant pathway of sexual onset emerged for those reporting all three types of sex. We found no evidence that oral or anal sex substituted for or delayed vaginal sex. Males, those with a current partner, and those reporting multiple partners were more likely than others to report all three sexual behaviors versus vaginal only (odds ratios [ORs] 2.0, 1.5, 3.0; p = .02, .06, < .01, respectively). Although vaginal intercourse dominated their early sexual behavior, one-fifth of sexually experienced students reported anal intercourse, highlighting the need for specific prevention messages surrounding this higher-risk behavior.

  15. Paired-eye comparison of medical therapies for glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred M Solish

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alfred M Solish1,2, Friedericke James1, John G Walt3, Tina H Chiang31Southern California Glaucoma Consultants, Pasadena CA, USA; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 3Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA Objective: To evaluate efficacy and patient preference retrospectively among intraocular pressure (IOP-lowering prostamide and prostaglandin medications in a real-world clinical setting.Methods: Chart review of patients with uncontrolled glaucoma or ocular hypertension seen at a private practice clinic (n = 55 who received bimatoprost 0.03% once daily in one eye and either travoprost 0.004% or latanoprost 0.005% once daily in the fellow eye. IOP was evaluated at the initial visit and at a follow-up visit scheduled 4–6 weeks later. At the follow-up visit, each patient discussed the clinical results with their physician, chose which medication they preferred to continue using, and were queried regarding the reason for their choice. This paired-eye comparison method is used routinely in clinical practice to assess clinical response and involve patients in decisions regarding treatment. Change in mean IOP from baseline and patient medication choice were the outcome measures.Results: Bimatoprost-treated eyes (n = 52 had a mean IOP reduction of 2.7 mmHg and travoprost-treated eyes (n = 47 had an average decrease of 1.7 mmHg (P = 0.230. Bimatoprost significantly reduced mean IOP (from 19.8 mmHg at baseline to 17.1 mmHg at follow-up, P < 0.0001, as did travoprost (from 19.4 mmHg at baseline to 17.7 mmHg at follow-up, P = 0.009. Latanoprost-treated eyes were excluded from the efficacy analysis due to small sample size (n = 5. For continued therapy, patients chose bimatoprost over travoprost by a factor of 2.4 to 1. Of the 15 patients who gave a reason for their choice, 80% said their decision was based primarily on IOP change.Conclusions: Bimatoprost and travoprost were efficacious in reducing IOP among patients with

  16. Latino Employment and Black Violence: The Unintended Consequence of U.S. Immigration Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Edward S.; Barranco, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. immigration policies after 1965 fueled a rise in the Latino population and, thus, increased the competition for low-skill jobs. We examine whether Latino immigration and Latino dominance of low-skill industries increases black urban violence. Using city-level data for the year 2000, we find that (1. Latino immigration is positively linked to…

  17. (Re)visioning U.S. Latino Literatures in High School English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Mary Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    The term "Latino" in this paper adopts a U.S. definition to refer to those persons born/living in the United States who are of Latin American ancestry. U.S. Latino literature is defined as literature that is originally composed mostly in English, but not exclusively, by authors of U.S. Latino background. Selections of Latino literature…

  18. Understanding Latino Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Through a Bioecological Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Angela Nancy; Fruhauf, Christine A; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly; Weil, Joyce

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of the published research addressing the challenges and strengths of Latino grandparents raising grandchildren in the United States. Using the bioecological framework as a guide to organize and understand the published literature addressing Latino grandparent caregivers, we examined refereed articles published over the past 19 years. This framework provides a lens for understanding and situating research on Latino grandparents raising grandchildren to discover Latino grandparents' strengths and challenges. The areas of foci include financial challenges, intergenerational relationships, reasons for caregiving, health status, language barriers, and culture. This article concludes with future research opportunities and a call to action for more research on Latino grandparents raising grandchildren.

  19. Race and Skin Color in Latino Health: An Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo; Williams, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We examined 22 articles to compare Black Latinos/as’ with White Latinos/as’ health and highlight findings and limitations in the literature. We searched 1153 abstracts, from the earliest on record to those available in 2016. We organized the articles into domains grounded on a framework that incorporates the effects of race on Latinos/as’ health and well-being: health and well-being, immigration, psychosocial factors, and contextual factors. Most studies in this area are limited by self-reported measures of health status, inconsistent use of race and skin color measures, and omission of a wider range of immigration-related and contextual factors. We give recommendations for future research to explain the complexity in the Latino/a population regarding race, and we provide insight into Black Latinos/as experiences. PMID:27736206

  20. Latino Educational Leadership across the Pipeline: For Latino Communities and Latina/o Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Cristóbal; Martinez, Melissa A.; Valle, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Educational leaders have challenges providing rich and equitable education for the Latino community, the fastest growing underserved demographic in the United States. Although the field of educational leadership draws connections to serve diverse populations, this work uses existing research and theory to establish the concept of Latino…

  1. Educating Latino Immigrant Students: The Phenomenon of Teaching Latino Immigrant Elementary Students in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorzano, Sara Georgina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore one Indiana elementary teacher's perceptions of her Latino immigrant students as they become English-language proficient by providing an in-depth analysis of a 4th and 5th grade teacher at a local school. Findings are based on interviews with the focus teacher and with the personnel she works with such as…

  2. Water Control Manual: Sepulveda Dam and Reservoir, Los Angeles River, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Generally the quality of urban base flow has been so poor that these facilities are 4-7 rarely used. A downstream reach with cobblestone invert near...by the Los Angeles County Drainage Area Review (see table 1-01; Draft: Los Angeles County Drainage Area Review: Part I, Hydrology Report). b. Rubber ...Dam. The City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power construct a rubber dam approximately 10 miles below Sepulveda Dam for diversion of water into

  3. The Acute Red Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen Osborn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This modified team-based learning (mTBL exercise is appropriate for junior or senior emergency medicine learners. Introduction: The acute red eye is a common chief complaint in the emergency department. It is essential that the emergency physician be knowledgeable about the differential diagnosis for the acute red eye and be able to distinguish between benign and sinister causes of the acute red eye. Objectives: By the end of this educational session, the learner will: 1 list 10 major causes for an acute red eye; 2 describe historical features that help distinguish between benign and serious causes of the acute red eye; 3 describe physical examination features that help distinguish between benign and serious causes of the acute red eye; and 4 use historical and physical examination features to distinguish between the 10 different causes of the acute red eye. Method: This is an mTBL session.

  4. EYE GAZE TRACKING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of performing eye gaze tracking of at least one eye of a user, by determining the position of the center of the eye, said method comprising the steps of: detecting the position of at least three reflections on said eye, transforming said positions to spanning...... a normalized coordinate system spanning a frame of reference, wherein said transformation is performed based on a bilinear transformation or a non linear transformation e.g. a möbius transformation or a homographic transformation, detecting the position of said center of the eye relative to the position...... of said reflections and transforming this position to said normalized coordinate system, tracking the eye gaze by tracking the movement of said eye in said normalized coordinate system. Thereby calibration of a camera, such as knowledge of the exact position and zoom level of the camera, is avoided...

  5. Knowing and "Unknowing" Transnational Latino Lives in Teacher Education: At the Intersection of Educational Research and the Latino Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villenas, Sofia A.

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative and ethnographic research in immigrant/Diaspora education has contributed significantly to prospective and practicing teachers' "unknowing" of Latino families as culturally deficient. Engagement with this scholarship in teacher education has opened the possibilities for a more complex knowing of Latino families' and youth's lives. With…

  6. Creating Meanings and Supportive Networks on the Spiritual Internet Forum "The Nest of Angels"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Uibu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the ethnographic study of Estonian spiritual Internet forum The Nest of Angels, the article observes the process of sharing virtual social support and creating-confirming spiritual meanings. The forum, explicitly opposing the consumeristic side of new spirituality, has become popular and demonstrates the nature and various roles of contemporary spiritual angels. The study identifies two main modes in which the Nest and the presence of angels might be useful for users. Firstly, emotional support is shared, either by fellow users directly or by confirmations that angels will definitely help. Secondly, the Nest allows people to acquire knowledge both on spiritual and practical issues. As the Nest is dialogical, users can pose questions and find confirmations for their otherwise deviant experiences. Discussions in the Nest encourage everybody to interpret some situations and objects (like feathers as signs from angels. This interpreting process might change people’s perceptions of the world by adding a layer of positive emotions. The study demonstrates how the angelic presence (or at least endeavour towards the presence helps to establish and keep the tonality of benevolence which functions as the cornerstone of this virtual space. The Nest supports a specific epistemological stance manifested in the angelic, traditional ‘feminine’ values of empathy, softness, and caring. Angels and the idea of angelic presence is the main factor helping to keep the ‘high-vibrational’ and benevolent atmosphere of the forum and empowering the users inside the traditional understanding of ‘feminine softness’.

  7. Employer, use of personal protective equipment, and work safety climate: Latino poultry processing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Anderson, Andrea M; Mora, Dana C; Carrillo, Lourdes; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-02-01

    This analysis describes the work safety climate of Latino poultry processing workers and notes differences by worker personal characteristics and employer; describes the use of common personal protective equipment (PPE) among workers; and examines the associations of work safety climate with use of common PPE. Data are from a cross-sectional study of 403 Latino poultry processing workers in western North Carolina. Work safety climate differed little by personal characteristics, but it did differ consistently by employer. Provision of PPE varied; for example, 27.2% of participants were provide with eye protection at no cost, 57.0% were provided with hand protection at no cost, and 84.7% were provided with protective clothing at no cost. PPE use varied by type. Provision of PPE at no cost was associated with lower work safety climate; this result was counter-intuitive. Consistent use of PPE was associated with higher work safety climate. Work safety climate is important for improving workplace safety for immigrant workers. Research among immigrant workers should document work safety climate for different employers and industries, and delineate how work safety climate affects safety behavior and injuries. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Organization of eye bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    Comeal transplantation is the only method of combating the blindness due to corneal opacity caused by infections, malnutrition, trauma and hereditary diseases. Comeal blindness is more prevalent in the developing countries. The availability of the donor cornea, trained ophthalmic surgeons and microsurgery facilities are the key factors in restoring vision in-patients with comeal blindness. The eye bank organization is somewhat similar to that of blood bank. The eye bank should be located in a hospital or a medical centre in which a laboratory may be established for the evaluation and storage of donor tissue. The medical director (Ophthalmologist), technician, secretary and public relation officer are the persons who play an important role in the successful organization of eye bank. The function of the eye bank are procurement, assessment, processing, distribution of donor eyes/corneas, training of technicians/doctors, and conducting research related to storage of donor tissue and corneal transplantation. The necessary infrastructure required for the organization of an eye bank include separate accommodation area for the personnel and the laboratory, telephone, computer, refrigerator, laminar air flow hood. Slitlamp, specular microscope, storage media and equipment, instrument for enucleation of donor eyes, and a motor vehicle. The details of responsibilities of the staff of eye bank, source of donor eyes, suitability of donor material, procurement of the donor cornea, tissue assessment, storage and preservation, distribution of donor tissue, and limitation of eye bank will be discussed at the time of presentation

  9. Interseismic Strain Accumulation Across Metropolitan Los Angeles: Puente Hills Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D.; Liu, Z.; Heflin, M. B.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Lundgren, P.; Drake, V. G.; Rodriguez, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    Twelve years of observation of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) are tightly constraining the distribution of shortening across metropolitan Los Angeles, providing information on strain accumulation across blind thrust faults. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and water well records are allowing the effects of water and oil management to be distinguished. The Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault is at a 25° angle to Pacific-North America plate motion. GPS shows that NNE-SSW shortening due to this big restraining bend is fastest not immediately south of the San Andreas fault across the San Gabriel mountains, but rather 50 km south of the fault in northern metropolitan Los Angeles. The GPS results we quote next are for a NNE profile through downtown Los Angeles. Just 2 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up across the San Gabriel mountains, 40 km wide (0.05 micro strain/yr); 4 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up between the Sierra Madre fault, at the southern front of the San Gabriel mountains, and South Central Los Angeles, also 40 km wide (0.10 micro strain/yr). We find shortening to be more evenly distributed across metropolitan Los Angeles than we found before [Argus et al. 2005], though within the 95% confidence limits. An elastic models of interseismic strain accumulation is fit to the GPS observations using the Back Slip model of Savage [1983]. Rheology differences between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin rocks are incorporated using the EDGRN/EDCMP algorithm of Wang et al. [2003]. We attempt to place the Back Slip model into the context of the Elastic Subducting Plate Model of Kanda and Simons [2010]. We find, along the NNE profile through downtown, that: (1) The deep Sierra Madre Thrust cannot be slipping faster than 2 mm/yr, and (2) The Puente Hills Thrust and nearby thrust faults (such as the upper Elysian Park Thrust) are slipping at 9 ±2 mm/yr beneath a locking depth of 12 ±5 km (95% confidence limits

  10. A TEOLOGIA LATINO-AMERICANA NA ENCRUZILHADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Codina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As mudanças ocorridas no mundo, no fim dos anos 80, não podem deixar de afetar a Teologia latino-americana e, muito concretamente, a Teologia da Libertação (TdL, teologia que nasceu na América Latina na década de 701. A TdL encontra-se hoje numa encruzilhada: retroceder e dar marcha a ré? Continuar repetindo o que até agora foi dito, como se nada tivesse acontecido?

  11. Angels and Demons: The Science Behind the Scenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Does antimatter really exist? How and why do scientists produce and use it? Does CERN exist and is there an underground complex deep beneath the Swiss/French border? Is truth stranger than fiction? Find out at the coming public lecture. On Tuesday, May 12, SLAC physicist Norman Graf will discuss the real science behind Angels and Demons, Dan Brown's blockbuster novel and the basis of an upcoming Tom Hanks movie. Graf's' talk is one in a series of public lectures across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to share the science of antimatter and the Large Hadron Collider, and the excitement of particle physics research.

  12. Giordano da Pisa and the language of angels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Francone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the issues about the angels considered by the Dominican preacher Giordano da Pisa, this essay studies the problem of their language. The question of the locutio angelica had become quite relevant in the scholastic thought from the XIIIth century and had been widely discussed by Thomas Aquinas and Giles of Rome; the study of this argument in Giordano da Pisa’s sermons shows the transition in the homiletic texts of a highly speculative theme and we can see how the preacher, who combines rather freely the positions of Thomas and Giles, filters the question for his lay public, simplifying the more difficult passages.

  13. Food and Beverage Marketing to Latinos: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeigbe, Rebecca T; Baldwin, Shannon; Gallion, Kip; Grier, Sonya; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2015-10-01

    Obesity rates among U.S. adults and children have increased over the past two decades and, although signs of stabilization and decline among certain age groups and geographies are being reported, the prevalence of obesity among Latino adults and children remain high. The Latino population is growing in parallel to these obesity rates and marketers realize they cannot ignore this growing, high-spending, media-consuming segment. Studies examining food and beverage marketing strategies tend to discuss minority groups in general but do not account for racial and ethnic differences, reducing our ability to explain existing inequities. This article aimed to identify the food and beverage marketing strategies used to influence food environments for Latinos versus non-Latinos. A systematic literature review and analysis, guided by an established marketing conceptual framework, determined that the food and beverage marketing environment for Latinos is less likely to promote healthy eating and more likely to encourage consumption of low-nutrient, calorie-dense foods and beverages. This analysis also determined that Latinos' food environment and the placement of food retail stores appears to influence their body mass index; however, placement of these stores cannot be generalized, as geographical differences exist. While food and beverage marketing is only one of many sources of influence on food and beverage consumption, these findings reinforce the notion that Latinos are at a disadvantage when it comes to exposure of healthy lifestyle messaging and health-promoting food environments. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Teamwork for eye care

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, M Babar

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) – the development of the people who deliver health care – has been identified as one of the key pillars of eye health delivery. HRD is one of the essential building blocks of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan: ‘Towards universal eye health’. The importance of HRD is also recognised beyond eye care, as can be seen in the WHO Health Systems approach.

  15. Improvements in packages comprising eye baths and eye lotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A new packaged assembly comprising an eye bath and eye lotion is described. The eye bath is shaped for application to the eye; it has a rim portion formed so as to provide a smooth skin-contacting surface and is sealed to a lid at a position removed from the skin-contacting area. The eye bath is formed in a sterile condition and aseptically filled to an appropriate level with eye lotion by a blow moulding process. The eye bath and its contents are sterilised after sealing by radioactive sterilsation. This packaged assembly is an improvement over previous eye bath assemblies in that it allows the eye bath to be used in a sterile form. It is also more comfortable and convenient to use than other sterile forms of eye treatment such as eye drops or jets of eye wash. Furthermore, bathing the eye provides a more prolonged treatment. (U.K.)

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists ...

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye ...

  18. Prevention of Eye Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Pashby, Tom

    1981-01-01

    In Canada 30,000 people are registered as blind; in one third of these, blindness might have been avoided. Prevention is the key to reducing the number of eye injuries and blind eyes. The role of the family physician in early identification of treatable conditions and in the education of patients is discussed, but responsibility for prevention belongs to all physicians. The success of prevention is seen in the great reduction in eye injuries in industry and sports since eye protectors have be...

  19. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & ...

  2. Perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino and non-Latino male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Semple, Shirley J.; Wagner, Karla D.; Chavarin, Claudia V.; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    HIV prevention efforts must be comprehensive in their understanding of the factors involved in HIV risk. Male clients, who have received less research attention than female sex workers (FSWs), may experience stigma as a function of purchasing sex. Perceived stigma may be related to poor psychological outcomes, risky psychosexual characteristics, and higher drug and sexual risk behavior among male clients of FSWs. However, perceived stigma of purchasing sex may differ between clients of different ethnic groups. In the present study, we examine the correlates of perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino vs. non-Latino male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, Mexico. Using time-location sampling, we recruited 375 male clients (323 Latino, 52 non-Latino) in Tijuana who completed a computerized survey on various measures. We measured perceived stigma of purchasing sex using three items we developed for this study. Using linear regression analyses we found that perceived stigma was associated with greater guilt, a greater feeling of escape from everyday life, and more negative condom attitudes among Latino clients. This was not found among non-Latino clients. Features of Latino culture, like machismo, and how they may relate to stigma of purchasing sex are discussed. PMID:23979714

  3. Perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino and non-Latino male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Semple, Shirley J; Wagner, Karla D; Chavarin, Claudia V; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Patterson, Thomas L

    2015-02-01

    HIV prevention efforts must be comprehensive in their understanding of the factors involved in HIV risk. Male clients, who have received less research attention than female sex workers (FSWs), may experience stigma as a function of purchasing sex. Perceived stigma may be related to poor psychological outcomes, risky psychosexual characteristics, and higher drug and sexual risk behavior among male clients of FSWs. However, perceived stigma of purchasing sex may differ between clients of different ethnic groups. In the present study, we examine the correlates of perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino versus non-Latino male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, Mexico. Using time-location sampling, we recruited 375 male clients (323 Latino, 52 non-Latino) in Tijuana who completed a computerized survey on various measures. We measured perceived stigma of purchasing sex using three items we developed for this study. Using linear regression analyses we found that perceived stigma was associated with greater guilt, a greater feeling of escape from everyday life, and more negative condom attitudes among Latino clients. This was not found among non-Latino clients. Features of Latino culture, like machismo, and how they may relate to stigma of purchasing sex are discussed.

  4. Zorotypus weiweii (Zoraptera: Zorotypidae), a new species of angel insects, from Sabah, East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyun; Li, Hu; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-09-12

    A new species of the insect order Zoraptera, Zorotypus weiweii, is described and figured from Sabah, East Malaysia. The new species represents the second angel insect from Borneo. Z. caudelli Karny was also collected near the type locality of Z. weiweii. Methods of specimen collection and a brief note of angel insects in Malaysia were provided based on new materials and biological observations.

  5. 33 CFR 100.1307 - Special Local Regulations, Strait Thunder Performance, Port Angeles, WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Thunder Performance, Port Angeles, WA. 100.1307 Section 100.1307 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1307 Special Local Regulations, Strait Thunder Performance, Port Angeles, WA. (a) Regulated Areas... speed may be reduced at the discretion of the Patrol Commander. (3) A succession of sharp, short signals...

  6. "USA Today": Comparative Analysis with Two National and Two Los Angeles Daily Newspapers. Research Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Steve; And Others

    Sections of the newspaper "USA Today" were compared with corresponding sections of four major newspapers--the "New York Times," the "Wall Street Journal," the "Los Angeles Herald Examiner," and the "Los Angeles Times"--to determine what editorial components made "USA Today" different and…

  7. Turning Sunshine into Noir and Fantasy into Reality: Los Angeles in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Alvina E.

    1998-01-01

    At the University of Delaware, an interdisciplinary college course called "LA.: City of the Angels" incorporated history, political theory, film studies, and literature. The course aimed to deepen student awareness of diversity by deconstructing Hollywood images of Los Angeles and examining the interconnections between regional…

  8. Beyond "Little Taipei": The Development of Taiwanese Immigrant Businesses in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yen-Fen

    1995-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative techniques, including a telephone survey of 310 Taiwanese business owners, were used to study the unique features of Taiwanese immigrant businesses in Los Angeles (California). When provided with entrepreneurial capital, Taiwanese enterprises grow rapidly in the context of Los Angeles's economic restructuring. (SLD)

  9. Letting Los Angeles Go: Lessons from Feral Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Woodward

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Los Angeles is home to numerous feral landscapes: designed gardens no longer receiving intentional care. These are cultivated gardens, usually composed of plants from myriad global climate types, which have been abandoned or neglected and have adapted to native rainfall or unintentional water sources such as broken irrigation systems. They are found in canyons and ridges swept by fire, along rights-of-way where properties were condemned for freeways, in once-glorious neighbourhoods fallen on hard times, and in places where speculation places properties on hold. They are found in all regions and are particularly vivid in Los Angeles, proclaimed as "Lurch City" by Cuff (2000, where disruptive urban convulsions are frequent. These sites are rich with information pertinent to conceivable futures in which supplemental resources and care may not be reliable. This article portrays selected feral landscapes, briefly describes their responses to pervasive urban forces over time, and extracts design attributes to consider when creating future resilient landscapes. Scrutiny of these landscapes' decline and tenacity reveals a telling view of a region's volatility and global context and reminds us to take into account probable neglect when shaping future landscapes.

  10. Latino Teen Theater: A Theater Intervention to Promote Latino Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, Joanne; Castillo, Nancy; Allen, Tiffany L; Esqueda, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Latina teen pregnancy rates continue to be a health disparity in the United States. This study evaluated a parenting intervention using interactive theater to facilitate Latino parent-adolescent communication about sexuality and pregnancy prevention. The intervention, conducted in Spanish and with teen actors, consisted of scenes involving the audience. Fifty-nine parents participated in this 3-month prospective study. Spanish measures of comfort with communication, general communication, and parent-child sexual communication were employed comparing paired t tests for each scale. Acceptability of the intervention was assessed and demonstrated. Eighty-six percent of parents used information from the performance to talk to their child. Improvements in general communication (p < .02), sexual communication (p < .001), and comfort (p < .001) occurred. Interactive theater is an innovative approach to facilitate Latino parent communication about sexuality and pregnancy prevention.

  11. Carotenoids of Sea Angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the Perspective of the Food Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoka, Takashi; Kuwahara, Takashi; Narita, Masanao

    2014-01-01

    Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction. PMID:24633249

  12. Carotenoids of Sea Angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the Perspective of the Food Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction.

  13. Photorefraction of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Photorefraction is a method to easily estimate the refractive state of the eye. The principle of photorefraction involves projecting light into the eye during flash photography and then examining the paths of light that emerge from the pupil after scattering on the back portion of the interior of the eyeball (fundus). We will explain the optical…

  14. Perception of eye positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van; Lankheet, M.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    In a two-alternative forced-choice psychophysical test human subjects were tested for their ability to perceive their own viewing direction. A small red flash was presented at different horizontal positions left or right from the subjects' eye position on the screen. Eye positions were recorded with

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tested whether I close my eyes when I sleep? Feb 10, 2016 Can light sensitivity from Parkinson’s be treated? Jan 28, ... of Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  16. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home >> NEI for Kids >> About the Eye Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your ...

  17. Eye Injuries in Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strong shield). OSHA says your employer must provide eye or face protection for flying particles, molten metal, chemicals, and welding ... must be a flameproof screen to shield against UV rays around a welder to protect other ... flash (burns) in your eyes. Do not look at the welding arc — or ...

  18. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society ... Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society ...

  19. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery Subspecialties Cataract/Anterior Segment Comprehensive ... Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery Subspecialties Cataract/Anterior Segment Comprehensive ...

  20. Sports and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Sports and Your Eyes Gear up! If you play sports, you know they can be a lot of ... the right safety gear. Think about your favorite sport. Do you wear anything to protect your eyes, ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services EyeCare America Help IRIS Registry Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and ... Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services EyeCare America Help IRIS Registry Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and ...

  2. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH), the National Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and ...

  3. Eye-Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GROSSECK

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye-tracking: one of the newest and most efficient methods of improving on-line marketing communication is called eye-tracking. Marketers have borrowed this technique, usually used in psychological and medical research, in order to study web users with the help of a video camera incorporated in the monitor.

  4. Diabetic Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first. Symptoms can include Blurry or double vision Rings, flashing lights, or blank spots Dark or floating spots Pain or pressure in one or both of your eyes Trouble seeing things out of the corners of your eyes Treatment often includes laser treatment or surgery, with follow-up care. Two ...

  5. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film . How do tears work? When you blink, a film of tears spreads over the eye. This keeps the eye’s surface smooth and clear. The tear film is important ...

  6. Chemotherapy in eye cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemotherapy in eye cancer. Chemotherapy is one of several treatment strategies used to halt the uncontrolled division, proliferation and unpredictable growth patterns of malignant cells. R Dolland, BSc, MB BCh, FC Ophth (SA). Consultant, St John Eye Hospital, Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Neurosciences, ...

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... IRIS Registry Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki ... IRIS Registry Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki ...

  8. Eye tracking social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Ting; Potters, Jan; Funaki, Yukihiko

    We hypothesize that if people are motivated by a particular social preference, then choosing in accordance with this preference will lead to an identifiable pattern of eye movements. We track eye movements while subjects make choices in simple three-person distribution experiments. We characterize

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive ... Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive ...

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services EyeCare America ... Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services EyeCare America ...

  11. Smoking and Eye Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Sections Smoking and Eye Disease Leer en Español: El cigarrillo ... By: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Apr. 27, 2017 Smoking contributes to a number of major health problems, ...

  12. Understanding pink eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink eye (PE) is a physiological tuber disorder that can result in serious processing complications and storage losses. The earliest external symptoms consist of an ephemeral pinkish discoloration around tuber eyes, predominately at the bud end of the tuber. These pinkish areas can then develop into...

  13. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorio, Rosa; Forehand, Mark; Aguirre, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a) describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b) describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c) describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c) determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay. PMID:24864201

  14. Poniendo tu granito de arena: Latinos and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, E

    1999-01-01

    Because the Latino community often lacks the money and power of large, white-run agencies in HIV prevention efforts, Latino HIV-service providers often turn to bootstrap efforts that are well-grounded in cultural realities. The community response to HIV prevention efforts is examined in terms of the cultural sensitivity needed to reach this ethnic group more effectively. Reasons why grassroots efforts are more effective in a Latino community than traditional agencies, and some examples of successful programs are outlined. The discrepancies seen in HIV services due to lack of resources and connections to needed funding are also discussed. Discussions on the Latino understanding of fatalism, homophobia, family values, and machismo that all affect the spread of HIV are highlighted.

  15. Deporting the American Dream: Immigration Enforcement and Latino Foreclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob S. Rugh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, Latinos have been buffeted by two major forces: a record number of immigrant deportations and the housing foreclosure crisis. Yet, prior work has not assessed the link between the two. We hypothesize that deportations exacerbate rates of foreclosure among Latinos by removing income earners from owner-occupied households. We employ a quasi-experimental approach that leverages variation in county applications for 287(g immigration enforcement agreements with Immigration and Customs Enforcement and data on foreclosure filings from 2005–2012. These models uncover a substantial association of enforcement with Hispanic foreclosure rates. The association is stronger in counties with more immigrant detentions and a larger share of undocumented persons in owner-occupied homes. The results imply that local immigration enforcement plays an important role in understanding why Latinos experienced foreclosures most often. The reduced home ownership and wealth that result illustrate how legal status and deportation perpetuate the racial stratification of Latinos.

  16. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Solorio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay.

  17. The Political Consequences of Latino Prejudice against Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupnikov, Yanna; Piston, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    A good deal of scholarship examines the effects of prejudice against blacks on public opinion and vote choice in the United States. Despite producing valuable insights, this research largely ignores the attitudes of Latinos—a critical omission, since Latinos constitute a rapidly growing share of the population. Using two nationally representative survey data sets, we find that the level of racial prejudice is comparable for Latinos and non-Hispanic whites. Equally comparable are associations between prejudice and political preferences: policy opinion and support for Obama in the 2008 presidential election. Our findings suggest that despite demographic changes, efforts to enact policies intended to assist blacks and elect black candidates will continue to be undermined by prejudice. That said, Latinos are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to support policies intended to assist blacks, because Latinos are more Democratic than non-Hispanic whites, more egalitarian, and less committed to the value of limited government. PMID:27274574

  18. MTF of compound eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Hamid Reza; Karimzadeh, Ayatollah

    2010-06-07

    Compound eye is a new field of research about miniaturizing imaging systems. We for the first time introduce a dual compound eye that contains three micro lens arrays with aspheric surfaces. The designed dual compound eye in one state is a superposition system in which each channel images all of field of view of the system. With adding a field stop we have decreased the stray light. MTF of ideal superposition compound eye calculated. Also with changing field stop the system is converted to an apposition compound eye in which each channel images only a part of total field of view and so the field of view is larger than that of superposition type.

  19. Psicologia Latino-Americana: desafios e possibilidades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Veras Pessoa da Silva

    Full Text Available A comemoração dos 50 anos da regulamentação da profissão da Psicologia no Brasil sinaliza o recente e o contínuo esforço das profissionais psicólogas e psicólogos em contextualizar o saber psicológico com a realidade e as condições de vida da população latino-americana. Atualmente, a Psicologia passa por um processo de reformulação crítica que considera as peculiaridades históricas, culturais, políticas, econômicas e sociais na constituição subjetiva dos sujeitos. Dessa forma, propõe o alinhamento epistemológico desse saber com os demais países da América Latina devido às vivências similares de colonização ibérico-católica, de modernização tardia e de exploração dos recursos naturais e humanos do continente. Contudo, a construção de uma psicologia latino-americana enfrenta desafios, a exemplo das diferenças entre os países, da multiplicidade cultural e dos interesses geopolíticos das nações. O objetivo do presente estudo foi compreender o processo de formação e de construção epistemológica da Psicologia histórico-cultural buscando, na literatura analisada, as principais possibilidades e desafios da integração da Psicologia com os demais países latino-americanos. De qualquer forma, observa-se que, ao se dedicar ao atendimento das demandas populacionais e à implicação no processo de transformação social, são oferecidas à Psicologia diversas possibilidades de atuação.

  20. Barriers to health care access for Latino children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, G; Vega, L R

    1998-03-01

    More than 9 million Latino children currently live in the United States. Latinos will soon be the largest minority group in the country, but little is known about access barriers to health care faced by Latino children. We reviewed the literature to define specific barriers to care for Latino children, identify methodologic problems, and highlight the clinical and research implications of the identified barriers. We did a MEDLINE search, using combinations of the key words Hispanic, children, and access. Study exclusion criteria included "not an original research article," "enrolled only adult subjects," "no separate data analysis for children," and "dental care focus." The search yielded 497 citations, of which 27 met the inclusion criteria. Of the 32 potential barriers identified, 21 had good supportive evidence. Lack of health insurance was a consistent barrier; recent data revealed that 26% of Latino children are uninsured, compared with 10% of white children and 14% of African-American children. Latino children also are at greater risk for episodic insurance coverage, low rates of private insurance, and loss of employee-based coverage. Parent beliefs about the etiology and treatment of their child's illness, use of home remedies, choice of sources of advice, and folk medicine practices may also influence how health care is obtained. Few data are available on differences in access among major Latino subpopulations, and no studies focused primarily on barriers as perceived by Latino parents. Evidence is equivocal or lacking that the following are barriers for Latino children: immigration status, duration of parent residency in the United States, and acculturation. Several barriers were identified that originate with practices and behaviors of health care providers, including reduced screening, missed vaccination opportunities, decreased likelihood of receiving prescriptions, and poor communication. Lack of health insurance and lack of a regular source of care

  1. Justice and Immigrant Latino Recreation Geography in Cache Valley, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Jodie; Radel, Claudia; Endter-Wada, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Latinos are the largest U.S. non-mainstreamed ethnic group, and social and environmental justice considerations dictate recreation professionals and researchers meet their recreation needs. This study reconceptualizes this diverse group’s recreation patterns, looking at where immigrant Latino individuals in Cache Valley, Utah do recreate rather than where they do not. Through qualitative interviews and interactive mapping, thirty participants discussed what recreation means to them and explai...

  2. Social Work Practice with Latinos: Key Issues for Social Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, Rich; Negi, Nalini Junko; Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Rowan, Diana; Shukraft, Allison; Gragg, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The Latino population is the fastest growing group in the United States; thus, it is imperative that social workers and other mental health practitioners be knowledgeable about the current literature on how to effectively serve this population. This article elucidates key issues and knowledge, such as immigration and migration concerns; discusses how to assess for levels of acculturation; examines cultural values; and highlights salient work issues and health disparities that Latinos experien...

  3. Experiences of discrimination and their impact on the mental health among African American, Asian and Pacific Islander, and Latino men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Paul, Jay; Ayala, George; Boylan, Ross; Gregorich, Steven E

    2013-05-01

    We examined the associations between specific types and sources of discrimination and mental health outcomes among US racial/ethnic minority men who have sex with men (MSM) and how these associations varied by race/ethnicity. A chain-referral sample of 403 African American, 393 Asian and Pacific Islander (API), and 400 Latino MSM recruited in Los Angeles County, California completed a standardized questionnaire. Data were obtained from the Ethnic Minority Men's Health Study from May 2008 to October 2009. Past-year experiences of racism within the general community and perceived homophobia among heterosexual friends were positively associated with depression and anxiety. Past-year homophobia experienced within the general community was also positively associated with anxiety. These statistically significant associations did not vary across racial/ethnic groups. The positive association of perceived racism within the gay community with anxiety differed by race/ethnicity, and was statistically significant only for APIs. Perceived homophobia within the family was not associated with either depression or anxiety. Higher levels of experiences of discrimination were associated with psychological distress among MSM of color. However, specific types and sources of discrimination were differentially linked to negative mental health outcomes among African American, API, and Latino MSM.

  4. Acculturation, nutrition, and health disparities in Latinos1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background: Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States and will represent 25% of the US population by 2050. Latinos experience a disproportionate burden of poverty and poor health outcomes. Objectives: We critically examined the evidence for a link between acculturation and health disparities in Latinos with a focus on type 2 diabetes (T2D) and nutrition-related risk factors and illustrated how acculturation principles can help design a culturally appropriate T2D self-management intervention in Latinos. Design: Evidence presented in this article was drawn from 1) systematic reviews identified through PubMed searches, 2) backward searches that were based on articles cited, 3) experts in the field, and 4) the author's personal files. Results: The preponderance of the evidence supported an association of acculturation with poor dietary quality and obesity. These associations appeared to be modified by several socioeconomic and demographic factors and were not always linear. The association between acculturation and T2D is unclear. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies and more sophisticated analytic approaches are needed to better understand if and how acculturation affects health-disparity outcomes in Latinos. Tailoring interventions to the acculturation level of individuals is likely to help reduce health disparities in Latinos. PMID:21367946

  5. Participatory assessment of the health of Latino immigrant men in a community with a growing Latino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documėt, Patricia I; Kamouyerou, Andrea; Pesantes, Amalia; Macia, Laura; Maldonado, Hernan; Fox, Andrea; Bachurski, Leslie; Morgenstern, Dawn; Gonzalez, Miguel; Boyzo, Roberto; Guadamuz, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Latino immigrant men are an understudied population in the US, especially in areas with small yet growing Latino populations. For this community-based participatory health assessment we conducted four focus groups and 66 structured surveys with Latino immigrant men, and 10 openended interviews with service providers. We analyzed transcripts using content analysis and survey data using Pearson Chi-square tests. Overall, 53% of participating men had not completed high school. Our findings suggest that their social circumstances precluded men from behaving in a way they believe would protect their health. Loneliness, fear and lack of connections prompted stress among men, who had difficulty locating healthcare services. Newly immigrated men were significantly more likely to experience depression symptoms. Latino immigrant men face social isolation resulting in negative health consequences, which are amplified by the new growth community context. Men can benefit from interventions aimed at building their social connections.

  6. Attributes associated with eye care use in the United States: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Laura Danielle; Rein, David B

    2013-07-01

    To model the factors that are associated with the use of eye care services among the US population with and without diabetes, stratifying by age group. Meta-analysis. We analyzed data from 3 datasets: the Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System combined years 2006-2009, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey combined years 2005-2008, and the National Health Interview Survey year 2008. For all 3 datasets, we analyzed data from all survey participants aged 40 years or older who participated in vision-related survey modules. We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess associations between any eye care use within the previous year and 14 indicators of patient demographics and health. We estimated separate regressions for persons with and without diabetes stratified by age group. We combined estimates across datasets using a random effects model estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms. Use of eye care in the previous year and personal factors associated with eye care use. Annual eye care use rates ranged from 46% to 51% in participants without diabetes and 64% to 72% in participants with diabetes. For people with and without diabetes, health insurance, an eye disease diagnosis, and higher income were associated with higher odds of eye care use. Being male was associated with lower odds of eye care use in some diabetes status and age group categories. Other variables, such as more education, being married, black race, Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, health status, heavy drinking, and limited ability to read small print, were associated with eye care use in only some diabetes status and age group categories. Our findings indicate that economic and ocular health factors are associated with the greatest odds of annual eye care use. Access to health insurance and income levels greater than $35 000 US dollars (value at the time of interview) are associated with eye care use independently of other demographic factors. Copyright

  7. Advocacy for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  8. Problem Behavior Theory: An Examination of the Behavior Structure System in Latino and non-Latino College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Byron L. Zamboanga; Gustavo Carlo; Marcela Raffaelli

    2004-01-01

    Escolares han propuesto que diversos comportamientos problematicos y convencionales reflejan solo un factor subyacente: sin embargo, otros sugieren que la fuerza y el modelo de interrelaciones entre comportamientos problematicos y convencionales no sean constantes a través de diversos grupos culturales. El estudio presente investigó la estrucutra factorial de comportamientos problematicos y convencionales en Cubano, no-Cubano Latino, y no- Latino estudiantes de universidad. Doscie...

  9. Angels and Demons: The Science Behind the Scenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Norman

    2009-05-12

    Does antimatter really exist? How and why do scientists produce and use it? Does CERN exist and is there an underground complex deep beneath the Swiss/French border? Is truth stranger than fiction? Find out at the coming public lecture. On Tuesday, May 12, SLAC physicist Norman Graf will discuss the real science behind Angels & Demons, Dan Brown's blockbuster novel and the basis of an upcoming Tom Hanks movie. Graf's' talk is one in a series of public lectures across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to share the science of antimatter and the Large Hadron Collider, and the excitement of particle physics research.

  10. LA Sprouts: a garden-based nutrition intervention pilot program influences motivation and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M; Ventura, Emily E; Cook, Lauren T; Gyllenhammer, Lauren E; Davis, Jaimie N

    2012-06-01

    Garden-based approaches to nutrition education may be effective for improving nutrition habits in adolescents. A quasi-experimental, garden-based intervention for Latino youth (LA Sprouts) was piloted and assessed for its influence on behavior associated with dietary intake and psychosocial factors. Study participants were 104 predominately Latino fourth and fifth grade students in Los Angeles (mean age, 9.8±0.7 years; n=70 control subjects, n=34 LA Sprouts participants); more than half (n=61, 59.8%) were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥85th percentile). LA Sprouts participants received an intervention of weekly 90-minute culturally tailored, interactive classes for 12 consecutive weeks at a community garden during the spring of 2010; control participants received an abbreviated delayed intervention. Questionnaire data were obtained before and after the intervention. Compared with control subjects, LA Sprouts participants had an increased preference for vegetables overall, increased preferences for three target fruits and vegetables, as well as improved perceptions that "vegetables from the garden taste better than vegetables from the store." In the overweight/obese subgroup (n=61), LA Sprouts participants had a 16% greater increase in their preference for vegetables compared with control subjects (P=0.009). Results from this pilot study suggest that a cooking, nutrition, and gardening after-school program in a garden-based setting can improve attitudes and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth, which may lead to improved nutritional habits and dietary intake and reduced health disparities. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aquaporins in the Eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Hamann, Steffen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    The major part of the eye consists of water . Continuous movement of water and ions between the ocular compartments and to the systemic circulation is pivotal for many physiological functions in the eye. The movement of water facilitates removal of the many metabolic products of corneal-, ciliary...... pressure. In the retina, water is transported into the vitreous body and across the retinal pigment epithelium to regulate the extracellular environment and the hydration of the retina. Aquaporins (AQPs ) take part in the water transport throughout the eye....

  12. The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise: African Americans "yel Mundo Latino."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widener, Danny

    1998-01-01

    Traces the long and varied history of interaction and collective action by African Americans and Latinos, focusing on common culture and political cooperation. Outlines issues related to the continued cooperation of African Americans and Latinos, and common political projects. (SLD)

  13. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations ...

  14. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  15. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations ...

  16. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, ... and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI Division ...

  17. Applied eye tracking research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka

    2011-01-01

    Jarodzka, H. (2010, 12 November). Applied eye tracking research. Presentation and Labtour for Vereniging Gewone Leden in oprichting (VGL i.o.), Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  18. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables ... Optic nerve (OP-tic nurv) is the bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages from the retina to ...

  19. Using Eye Makeup

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a moving vehicle. Do not separate your mascara-clumped lashes with sharp items. If you tend ... all eye makeup at night before sleeping, especially mascara that can stick to the lashes. Brush a ...

  20. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Units Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications eyeGENE Research Directors Office Office of the Scientific Director Sheldon S. Miller, Ph.D., Scientific Director David ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treated? Jan 28, 2016 Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced Search Ask an Ophthalmologist Browse Answers Free Newsletter Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ...

  2. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related Please Don’t Shave the Inside of ... Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology ...

  3. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... the Inside of Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul ... Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2018 ...

  4. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related Please Don’t Shave the Inside ... the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media ...

  5. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... are made up of many different parts that work together to help you see. Check out the ... Learn how the different parts of your eye work together so you can see and make sense ...

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    Full Text Available ... Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs ... Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and ...

  7. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Accomplishments Budget and Congress About the NEI Director History of the NEI NEI 50th Anniversary NEI Women ... Emily Y. Chew, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic ...

  8. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about ...

  9. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... different parts that work together to help you see. Check out the diagrams below to learn about ... of your eye work together so you can see and make sense of the world around you. ...

  10. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Office of the Clinical Director Laboratories, Sections and Units Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications eyeGENE Research ... iris adjusts the size of the pupil and controls the amount of light that can enter the ...

  11. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding ... job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home >> NEI for Kids >> About the Eye Listen All About Vision About ...

  12. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... luh) is the small, sensitive area of the retina needed for central vision. It contains the fovea. ... iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to focus on both ...

  13. Eye Cosmetic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hot cars, for example, are more susceptible to deterioration of the preservative. When applying or removing eye ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  14. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... part of your eye and what it does. Macula (MACK-yoo-luh) is the small, sensitive area ... FOH-vee-uh) is the center of the macula, where your vision is sharpest. Optic nerve (OP- ...

  15. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” News & ... Emily Y. Chew, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic ...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Sep. 01, 2017 Our eyes need tears to stay ... tear duct to insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May ...

  17. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ...

  18. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians ...

  19. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to ... Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - ...

  20. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Units Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications eyeGENE Research Directors Office Office of the Scientific Director Sheldon S. ... Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for ...

  1. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety ... NEI Website Manager . Department of Health and Human Services | The National Institutes of Health | USA.gov NIH… ...

  2. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians ...

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    Full Text Available ... History of the NEI NEI 50th Anniversary NEI Women Scientists Advisory Committee (WSAC) Board of Scientific Counselors ... Emily Y. Chew, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic ...

  4. LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your eye. Overcorrections may be more difficult to fix than undercorrections. Astigmatism. Astigmatism can be caused by ... back into place. The flap usually heals without stitches. During the surgery, you'll be asked to ...

  5. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... the NEI Website search NEI on Social Media | Search A-Z | en español | Text size S M L ... (WSAC) Board of Scientific Counselors National Advisory Eye Council (NAEC) Donating to ...

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Each layer of the tear film serves a purpose. The oily layer is the outside of the ... tested whether I close my eyes when I sleep? Feb 10, 2016 Can light sensitivity from Parkinson’s ...

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced ...

  9. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Office of the Scientific Director Office of the Clinical Director Laboratories, Sections and Units Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications eyeGENE Research Directors Office Office of the ...

  10. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... of the NEI NEI 50th Anniversary NEI Women Scientists Advisory Committee (WSAC) Board of Scientific Counselors National ... All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ ...

  11. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations ...

  12. Diabetes - eye care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 26696680 . Read More Diabetes and eye disease High blood pressure Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - keeping active Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care Diabetes - preventing heart attack and ...

  13. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Learn how the different parts of your eye work together so you can see and make sense of the world around you. Did You Know? Vision depends on your brain as much as it does on your eyes. NEI Home Contact Us A-Z Site Map NEI on Social Media Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, ...

  14. Fish eye optics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René; Michalová, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2017), s. 94-99 ISSN 1335-1842. [INTEGRAL/BART Workshop /14./. Karlovy Vary, 03.04.2017-07.04.2017] Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-33324S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : fish eye optics * lobster eye optics * X-ray monitoring Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 0.336, year: 2016

  15. Proyecto MercadoFRESCO: a multi-level, community-engaged corner store intervention in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Alexander N; Albert, Stephanie L; Sharif, Mienah Z; Langellier, Brent A; Garcia, Rosa Elena; Glik, Deborah C; Brookmeyer, Ron; Chan-Golston, Alec M; Friedlander, Scott; Prelip, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Urban food swamps are typically situated in low-income, minority communities and contribute to overweight and obesity. Changing the food landscape in low income and underserved communities is one strategy to combat the negative health consequences associated with the lack of access to healthy food resources and an abundance of unhealthy food venues. In this paper, we describe Proyecto MercadoFRESCO (Fresh Market Project), a corner store intervention project in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights in California that used a multi-level approach with a broad range of community, business, and academic partners. These are two neighboring, predominantly Latino communities that have high rates of overweight and obesity. Located in these two communities are approximately 150 corner stores. The project used a community-engaged approach to select, recruit, and convert four corner stores, so that they could become healthy community assets in order to improve residents' access to and awareness of fresh and affordable fruits and vegetables in their immediate neighborhoods. We describe the study framework for the multi-level intervention, which includes having multiple stakeholders, expertise in corner store operations, community and youth engagement strategies, and social marketing campaigns. We also describe the evaluation and survey methodology to determine community and patron impact of the intervention. This paper provides a framework useful to a variety of public health stakeholders for implementing a community-engaged corner store conversion, particularly in an urban food swamp.

  16. The prevalence of harmful content on outdoor advertising in Los Angeles: land use, community characteristics, and the spatial inequality of a public health nuisance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Bryce C; Sloane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Our study sought to examine associations between the content of outdoor advertising and neighborhood ethnic/racial and socioeconomic composition to see whether particular communities disproportionately host harmful content. We constructed a spatial database of photographs taken from June 2012 until December 2012 in 7 identically zoned communities in Los Angeles, California, to compare outdoor advertising area and content. We selected communities to contrast by ethnicity/race, income, education, and youth population. At-risk communities and communities of color hosted more outdoor advertising depicting harmful content than other communities. Among included neighborhoods, harmful content and the proportion of outdoor advertising overall were most prevalent in communities of Asian Americans and Latino Americans. In all communities, harmful content represented at least 24% of outdoor advertising space. This study provides evidence of the potential for land-use decisions to result in spatially inequitable health impacts. Although dictating the placement of outdoor advertising through zoning may seem sensible, such a decision might have the unintended consequence of disadvantaging the well-being of local communities. Neighborhood factors require more contextually nuanced public health and land-use policy.

  17. A corner store intervention to improve access to fruits and vegetables in two Latino communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Stephanie L; Langellier, Brent A; Sharif, Mienah Z; Chan-Golston, Alec M; Prelip, Michael L; Elena Garcia, Rosa; Glik, Deborah C; Belin, Thomas R; Brookmeyer, Ron; Ortega, Alexander N

    2017-08-01

    Investments have been made to alter the food environment of neighbourhoods that have a disproportionate number of unhealthy food venues. Corner store conversions are one strategy to increase access to fruits and vegetables (F&V). Although the literature shows modest success, the effectiveness of these interventions remains equivocal. The present paper reports on the evaluation of Proyecto MercadoFRESCO, a corner store conversion intervention in two Latino communities. A repeated cross-sectional design was employed. Data were stratified by intervention arm and bivariate tests assessed changes over time. Logistic and multiple regression models with intervention arm, time and the interaction of intervention and time were conducted. Supplementary analyses account for clustering of patrons within stores and staggering of store conversions. Three stores were converted and five stores served as comparisons in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, California, USA. Store patrons were interviewed before (n550) and after (n407) the intervention. Relative to patrons of comparison stores, patrons of intervention stores demonstrated more favourable perceptions of corner stores and increased purchasing of F&V during that store visit. Changes were not detected in store patronage, percentage of weekly dollars spent on food for F&V or daily consumption of F&V. Consistent with some extant food environment literature, findings demonstrate limited effects. Investments should be made in multilevel, comprehensive interventions that target a variety retail food outlets rather than focusing on corner stores exclusively. Complementary policies limiting the availability, affordability and marketing of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods should also be pursued.

  18. The Draize eye test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, K R

    2001-01-01

    Hundreds of substances are used daily that can damage eyesight. People's eyes are open to accidental or intentional exposure during the production, transportation, use, and disposal of chemical preparations. Ensuring the safety of consumer products was born during the mid twentieth century in the aftermath of chemical warfare research, and was motivated by the hazards of unsafe cosmetics. Justified by an exigency for public protection, the Draize eye test became a governmentally endorsed method to evaluate the safety of materials meant for use in or around the eyes. The test involves a standardized protocol for instilling agents onto the cornea and conjunctiva of laboratory animals. A sum of ordinal-scale items of the outer eye gives an index of ocular morbidity. Advances in ocular toxicology are challenging the validity, precision, relevance, and need of the Draize eye test. Preclinical product-safety tests with rabbits and other mammals also raise ethical concerns of animal wellbeing. Some use the Draize test as a rallying point for how animals are treated in science and industry. A battery of cellular systems and computer models aim to reduce and ultimately to replace whole-animal testing. Molecular measures of ocular toxicity may eventually allow comprehensive screening in humans. The Draize eye test was created and refined for humanitarian reasons and has assuredly prevented harm. Its destiny is to be progressively supplanted as in vitro and clinical alternatives emerge for assessing irritancy of the ocular surface.

  19. Danish Rural Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Tracy Beth; Ellervik, Christina; Buch, Helena

    2016-01-01

    , Danish Rural Eye Study (DRES). All DRES participants received a comprehensive general health examination preceding their eye examination, including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) for each eye, bilateral 45° retinal fundus photographs and further ophthalmological examination where...... indicated.Results: Overall, 3826 of 3843 participants (99.6%) had bilateral visual acuity measurements. The overall frequency of VI (BCVA eye) was 0.4% (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.2-0.7%; n = 15) among all DRES participants, 0.6% (95% CI 0.3-1.0%; n = 15) among participants...... >50 years and 3.7% (95% CI 2.1-6.5%; n = 11) in participants >80 years. The primary causes of VI in the better-seeing eye were age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in 46.7% (7/15) and cataract in 26.7% (4/15). A total of 43.3% (n = 115) of participants >80 years were pseudophakic in one or both eyes...

  20. Incidence and risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in Texas Latinos: implications for prevention research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie G Ramirez

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is increasing in the U.S. despite a decline in cancer overall. Latinos have higher rates of HCC than the general population according to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER Program. Not included in SEER, Texas Latinos make up one-fifth of the U.S. Latino population. To determine whether HCC incidence differs among U.S. and Texas Latinos, this descriptive study compares HCC incidence from 1995 through 2006 among three Latino populations: U.S. SEER, Texas overall and a South Texas subset. To identify lines of prevention research, we compare prevalence of known HCC risk factors among these Latino groups.Data were collected from the U.S. SEER Program, Texas Cancer Registry and Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS. Annual age-specific and age-adjusted HCC incidence rates, annual percent changes (APCs and 95% confidence intervals were calculated as well as prevalence of obesity, diabetes, heavy alcohol use and cigarette smoking.Of the three Latino groups compared, South Texas Latinos had the highest age-adjusted HCC incidence rates and SEER Latinos had the lowest (10.6/100,000 (10.1-11.1 and 7.5/100,000 (7.2-7.7, respectively. HCC incidence significantly increased over time (APCs>0 among Latinos in all three geographic groups. Between 1995 and 2006, there was an increase in obesity among all three populations, and obesity was highest among South Texas Latinos. Diabetes increased among U.S. Latinos, and Latino women in South Texas had significantly higher diabetes prevalence than U.S. Latino women. Cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol use were similar among groups.The incidence of HCC among Latinos in South Texas is higher than elsewhere in the United States. Higher rates of HCC among Texas and South Texas Latinos may be associated with greater prevalence of obesity and diabetes, risk factors for HCC that are amenable to intervention.

  1. Eye Safety. Mississippi Industrial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    This manual is designed to help industrial arts teachers eliminate student eye injuries within industrial arts programs. Presented first is Mississippi eye safety law. Following a discussion of eye protection equipment, illustrations of eye protection devices are provided. Guidelines are set forth for selecting shade numbers for welding filters.…

  2. The Impact of Health Care and Immigration Reform on Latino Support for President Obama and Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Gabriel R.; Medeiros, Jillian; Sanchez-Youngman, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    At the start of their term, the Obama administration pledged to reform two failing policy systems in the United States: immigration and health care. The Latino populations' attitudes toward these two critical policy areas are particularly relevant due to the large foreign born population in the Latino community and the large number of Latinos who…

  3. Variations in Latino Parenting Practices and Their Effects on Child Cognitive Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Von Figueroa-Moseley, Colmar; Ramey, Craig T.; Keltner, Bette; Lanzi, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    This research examines variations in parenting and its effects on child cognitive outcomes across Latino subgroups from a national sampling that utilized a subset of 995 former Head Start Latino parents and children. Comparisons of the Parenting Dimension Inventory scaled scores revealed Latino subgroup differences on nurturance and consistency.…

  4. Strengthening rural Latinos' civic engagement for health: The Voceros de Salud project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cevallos, Daniel; Dierwechter, Tatiana; Volkmann, Kelly; Patton-López, Megan

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the Latino Health Ambassadors Network (Voceros de Salud ) project created to support and mobilize Latino community leaders to address health inequalities in a rural Oregon county. Voceros de Salud is discussed as a model that other rural communities may implement towards strengthening Latino civic engagement for health.

  5. Get Ready, Get in, Get through: Factors That Influence Latino College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joel P.; Murphy, Shirley A.

    2018-01-01

    "Get ready, get in, and get through." Latino adolescents and young adults are enrolling in the nation's colleges and universities at record numbers. However, completion rates of Latinos range from 8% to 25%. We examined individual rather than organizational factors shown to influence Latino student post-secondary levels of success.…

  6. Latino Access to Higher Education: Ethnic Realities and New Directions for the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Martin Guevara; Wright, Claudia Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    While the black and white racial experience has been delineated over the years, the ethnic realities of Latinos have received minimal attention. Therefore, with Latinos projected as the upcoming U.S. population majority, the central goal of this book is to document the Latino experience in the world of academia, focusing primarily, but not…

  7. Religious Literacy in the New Latino Diaspora: Combating the "Othering" of Muslim Refugee Students in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierk, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Many communities across the United States have been undergoing recent demographic changes. Since the 1980s, low-skilled labor (e.g. meatpacking) has attracted Latino families to settle in communities that historically have been home to few, if any, Latinos (i.e. the New Latino Diaspora). In more recent years, these same job opportunities have also…

  8. Latino Youth and the School-to-Prison Pipeline: Addressing Issued and Achieving Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroczynski, Alesha D.; Jobst, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Latinos are one of the fastest growing sectors in the American population, and Latinos figure prominently in many political, economic, and educational social systems. Unfortunately, the juvenile justice system is no exception. At least 18,000 Latino youth are incarcerated annually, and they are 2 to 3 times more likely to be incarcerated than…

  9. Undocumented Latino Parents' Access to Services for Their Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Lopez, Marie

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 13 percent of children in the U.S. ages 3-21 have special needs. The Latino population is the largest minority group in the United States, and in this group there is an increasing number of Latino parents with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The problem is that the combined negative effects of Latinos occupying three…

  10. Beer Advertising to Latino Youth: The Effects of Spanish vs. English Language Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie M.; And Others

    Although Latino youth have slightly lower rates of alcohol use than Anglo youth, evidence suggests that as Latinos acculturate their rates of use increase to match those of the Anglo adolescent population. In light of these cultural patterns, a study examined the reactions of young adult males of Latino origin to television beer and non-beer…

  11. The Professional Educator: Why Supporting Latino Children and Families Is Union Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortino, Catalina R.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the creation and promise of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) resolution "¡Si Se Puede!: Improving Outcomes for Latino Children and Youth and Addressing the Needs of the Latino Community." The resolution affirms the AFT's commitment to elevating the importance of Latino issues. As a union committed to…

  12. A Place for Us? Latino Parent and Student Satisfaction in a Cyber School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Dennis; Maranto, Robert; Tuchman, Sivan

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates that traditional public schools are less effective in serving Latino students. Yet Latino students, but not their parents, exhibit greater school satisfaction than do their counterparts. The purpose of this study was to examine Latino student and parent satisfaction with their cyber school and prior traditional public school…

  13. Los Angeles and Its Influence on Professional and Popular Astronomy - A Hollywood Love Story, by Lewis Chilton, Past President, Optical Shop Director and Historian, Los Angeles Astronomical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Lew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show through visualizations how the Los Angeles, California milieu of the early 20th century benefited the advancement of astronomy and captured the public consciousness through popular press accounts of these advancements and of the scientists who made them. The thesis of this presentation purports that a symbiosis developed between astronomers of Los Angeles-area scientific and educational institutions and a local community of interested laypersons, and was the catalyst that sparked future generations to enter the fields of astronomy, the allied sciences, education and technology. This presentation attempts to highlight the importance of continued public outreach by the professional astronomical community, for the ultimate benefit to itself, in Los Angeles and beyond.

  14. Los Angeles congestion reduction demonstration (Metro ExpressLanes) program. National evaluation : content analysis test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This report presents the Content Analysis Test Plan for the national evaluation of the Los Angeles County Congestion Reduction Demonstration (CRD) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) Progr...

  15. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W.; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  16. Socio-economic effect of seismic retrofit implemented on bridges in the Los Angeles highway network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This research studied socio-economic effect of the seismic retrofit implemented on bridges in Los Angeles Area : Freeway Network. Firstly, advanced FE (Finite Element) modeling and nonlinear time history analysis are carried out to : evaluate the sei...

  17. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority climate change adaptation pilot project report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Report details the project background of the recently-completed Los Angeles County : Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) Transit Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project as well as the various wor...

  18. Prokofiev: The Fiery Angel.Gösta Ohlin Vocal Ensemble / David J. Fanning

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fanning, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Prokofiev: The Fiery Angel.Gösta Ohlin Vocal Ensemble, Gothenburg Pro Musica Chamber Choir and Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi" DG CD 431 669-2 GH2 (two discs, nas:118 minutes:DDD)

  19. Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship for Los Angeles Unified School District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, A.; Beattie, D.; Thomas, K.; Davis, K.; Sim, M.; Jhaveri, A.

    2007-11-01

    This Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship states goals, measures progress toward goals and how actions are monitored to achieve continuous improvement for the Los Angeles Unified School District.

  20. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Radio communications for port entities governing anchorages are as follows: Los Angeles-Long Beach... Defense charter, and vessels requiring use of the explosives anchorage. c. Bunkering and lightering are...

  1. Teaching case studies on earthquake preparedness efforts in the transportation sector, Los Angeles metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Through the development of a Harvard Kennedy School case study (intended for : use as curriculum in graduate-level and executive education programs), this project : examines earthquake preparedness and planning processes in the Los Angeles : metropol...

  2. NASA's "Eyes" Focus on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, K.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's "Eyes on…" suite of products continues to grow in capability and popularity. The "Eyes on the Earth", "Eyes on the Solar System" and "Eyes on Exoplanets" real-time, 3D interactive visualization products have proven themselves as highly effective demonstration and communication tools for NASA's Earth and Space Science missions. This presentation will give a quick look at the latest updates to the "Eyes" suite plus what is being done to make them tools for STEM Education.

  3. The couple as context: Latino gay male couples and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beougher, Sean C; Gomez, Walter; Hoff, Colleen C

    2011-03-01

    HIV-prevention efforts with gay men in relationships frequently omit primary partners. When they are considered, examinations of race/ethnicity are often overlooked despite higher infection rates among gay men of colour. Acknowledging both the need to contextualise the behaviours that may affect HIV risk for gay men of colour and the disproportionate impact of HIV on Latino gay men, the present study utilised semi-structured, qualitative interviews to explore relationship dynamics, sexual agreements and behaviours, safer sex choices and HIV risk among nine Latino gay male couples. All participants were HIV-negative and in concordant negative relationships. Additionally, nearly all reported closed agreements. Analysis revealed participants engaging in four behaviours that may actively reduce their HIV risk: approaching sexual agreements from a practical standpoint, maintaining a high literacy around HIV, having exposure to social support groups for Latino gay men and finding support in their relationship with another Latino gay man. Additional issues are raised where long-term HIV prevention is concerned. Intimate relationships are an important context for understanding both HIV risk and prevention among Latino gay men. Likewise, race/ethnicity provides an indispensable perspective on all research with gay couples. Future prevention efforts with gay men must strive to include both.

  4. Ethnoracial inequality and insurance coverage among Latino young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriquez, Veronica; Joseph, Tiffany D

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that Latino young adults are uninsured at higher rates relative to other ethnoracial groups. Recent implementation of the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) has increased access to health insurance for young adults, in part by maintaining health coverage through their parents until age 26. This paper examines patterns of Latino young adults' insurance coverage during early ACA implementation by addressing three questions: 1) To what extent do Latino young adults remain uninsured relative to their peers of other ethnoracial groups? 2) How do young adults' family socioeconomic background, immigrant characteristics, college enrollment, and employment status mediate their coverage? And, 3) do patterns of insurance coverage differ for employer-provided coverage versus other sources of coverage (including parents' health insurance)? Using a 2011 representative sample of U.S.-born and 1.5-generation immigrant young adults in California, we find that Latinos are more likely than other ethnoracial groups to remain uninsured. While they are as likely as similar peers to obtain employer-provided health insurance, they are less likely to possess insurance through other sources (including their parents). This study contributes to our understanding of the limits of the ACA in reducing disparities in insurance coverage for Latinos by highlighting the importance of family socioeconomic background, immigrant characteristics, college enrollment, and employment in shaping coverage among this age group. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Strategies to Build Trust and Recruit African American and Latino Community Residents for Health Research: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaré, Ibrahima C; Bross, Rachelle; Brown, Arleen F; Del Pino, Homero E; Jones, Loretta F; Morris, D'Ann M; Porter, Courtney; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Vargas, Roberto; Forge, Nell; Norris, Keith C; Kahn, Katherine L

    2015-10-01

    This study used Community Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR) to address low participation of racial and ethnic minorities in medical research and the lack of trust between underrepresented communities and researchers. Using a community and academic partnership in July 2012, residents of a South Los Angeles neighborhood were exposed to research recruitment strategies: referral by word-of-mouth, community agencies, direct marketing, and extant study participants. Among 258 community members exposed to recruitment strategies, 79.8% completed the study. Exposed individuals identified their most important method for learning about the study as referral by study participants (39.8%), community agencies (30.6%), word-of-mouth (17.5%), or direct marketing promotion (12.1%). Study completion rates varied by recruitment method: referral by community agencies (88.7%), referral by participants (80.4%), direct marketing promotion (86.2%), word of mouth (64.3%). Although African American and Latino communities are often described as difficult to engage in research, we found high levels of research participation and completion when recruitment strategies emerged from the community itself. This suggests recruitment strategies based on CPPR principles represent an important opportunity for addressing health disparities and our high rates of research completion should provide optimism and a road map for next steps. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cross-border ties and self-rated health status for young Latino adults in Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jacqueline M

    2013-03-01

    At the same time that health researchers have mostly ignored the cross-border nature of immigrant social networks, scholars of immigrant "transnationalism" have left health largely unexamined. This paper addresses this gap by analyzing the relationship between cross-border ties and self-rated health status for young Latino adults living in the greater Los Angeles area (n = 1268). Findings based on an ordered logistic regression analysis suggest that cross-border relationships may have both protective and adverse effects on overall health status. Specifically, those reporting a period of extended parental cross-border separation during childhood have lower odds of reporting better categories of self-rated health, all else equal. Conversely, a significant positive association was found between having a close relative living abroad and self-rated health status for foreign-born respondents when interacted with immigrant generation (foreign versus U.S.-born). Given the findings of significant negative and positive relationships between cross-border ties and self-rated general health status, I discuss the implications for future research on the social determinants of immigrant health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. LA Sprouts Randomized Controlled Nutrition, Cooking and Gardening Program Reduces Obesity and Metabolic Risk in Hispanic/Latino Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Explore the effects of a novel 12-week gardening, nutrition, and cooking intervention (“LA Sprouts”) on dietary intake, obesity parameters and metabolic disease risk among low-income, primarily Hispanic/Latino youth in Los Angeles. Methods Randomized control trial involving four elementary schools [2 randomized to intervention (172, 3rd–5th grade students); 2 randomized to control (147, 3rd–5th grade students)]. Classes were taught in 90-minute sessions once/week for 12 weeks. Data collected at pre- and post-intervention included dietary intake via food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), anthropometric measures [BMI, waist circumference (WC)], body fat, and fasting blood samples. Results LA Sprouts participants compared to controls had significantly greater reductions in BMI z-scores (−0.1 vs. −0.04, respectively; p=0.01) and WC (−1.2 vs. 0.1cm; pobesity and metabolic risk, however, additional larger and longer term studies are warranted. PMID:26909882

  8. LA sprouts randomized controlled nutrition, cooking and gardening programme reduces obesity and metabolic risk in Hispanic/Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, N M; Martinez, L C; Spruijt-Metz, D; Davis, J N

    2017-02-01

    Many programmes for children that involve gardening and nutrition components exist; however, none include experimental designs allowing more rigorous evaluation of their impact on obesity. The objective of this study is to explore the effects of a novel 12-week gardening, nutrition and cooking intervention {'LA Sprouts'} on dietary intake, obesity parameters and metabolic disease risk among low-income, primarily Hispanic/Latino youth in Los Angeles.. This study used a randomized control trial involving four elementary schools [two randomized to intervention {172, 3rd-5th grade students}; two randomized to control {147, 3rd-5th grade students}]. Classes were taught in 90-min sessions once per week for 12 weeks. Data collected at pre-intervention and post-intervention included dietary intake via food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measures {body mass index, waist circumference}, body fat, and fasting blood samples. LA Sprouts participants compared with controls had significantly greater reductions in body mass index z-scores {-0.1 vs. -0.04, respectively; p = 0.01} and waist circumference {-1.2 vs. 0.1 cm; p obesity and metabolic risk; however, additional larger and longer-term studies are warranted. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  9. Shortening and Thickening of Metropolitan Los Angeles Measured and Inferred Using Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D.; Heflin, M.; Donnellan, A.; Webb, F.; Dong, D.; Hurst, K.; Jefferson, D.; Lyzenga, G.; Watkins, M.; Zumberge, J.

    1999-01-01

    Geodetic measurements using the Global Positioning System and other techniques show north-south shortening near Los Angeles to be fastest across the northern part of the metropolitan area, where an ESE-striking, 5- to 40-km-wide belt lying to the south of San Gabriel Mountains and to the north of downtown and West Los Angeles is shortening at 5 mm/yr.

  10. Angelic music in Marian Iconography. A visual discourse about the hope of salvation

    OpenAIRE

    Perpinyà, Candela

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to provide an in-depth study of the meaning of angelic music in Marian iconography. In what are called apocryphal gospels, the canticles of the angels are associated for the first time in the history of Christ and his mother, Mary, appearing thus in the key moments of the history of human salvation. The first representations alluding to this question arise in the ecclesiastical intellectual elite, but in the early Middle Ages, with the diffusion of hagiographic literature an...

  11. Electromagnetic Transient Response Analysis of DFIG under Cascading Grid Faults Considering Phase Angel Jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Wu, Qiuwei

    2014-01-01

    This paper analysis the electromagnetic transient response characteristics of DFIG under symmetrical and asymmetrical cascading grid fault conditions considering phaseangel jump of grid. On deriving the dynamic equations of the DFIG with considering multiple constraints on balanced and unbalanced...... conditions, phase angel jumps, interval of cascading fault, electromagnetic transient characteristics, the principle of the DFIG response under cascading voltage fault can be extract. The influence of grid angel jump on the transient characteristic of DFIG is analyzed and electromagnetic response...

  12. An historical experiment: Los Angeles smog evolution observed by blimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidy, G M

    2018-02-12

    Observations of smog over the Los Angeles Basin (LAB) links high oxidant mixing ratios with poor visibility, sometimes smog by blimp in a Lagrangian-like format. The experiment on September 6, 1973, demonstrated that a blimp could travel with the wind across the LAB, observing ozone (O 3 ) and precursors, and particles of different size ranges. These included condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations dominated by particles of ≤ 0.1 µm diameter and light scattering coefficient (b sc ) representing mainly particles of 0.1-2.0 µm diameter. The results indicated a pollutant variation similar to that measured at a fixed site. Ozone was produced in an air mass, reaching a maximum of ~400 ppb in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), then declined. Although the photochemistry was developing, b sc grew with O 3 mixing ratio to a quasi-steady state at ~9-10 × 10 -4  m -1 , decreasing in value much later with decease in O 3 . The light scattering coefficient was found to be positively associated with the O 3 mixing ratio, whereas CN concentrations were negatively proportional to O 3 mixing ratio. The blimp experiment was supported with aircraft vertical profiles and ground-level observations from a mobile laboratory. The blimp flight obtained combined gas and particle changes aloft that could not be obtained by ground or fixed-wing aircraft measurements alone. The experiment was partially successful in achieving a true Lagrangian characterization of smog chemistry in a constrained or defined "open" air mass. The Los Angeles experiment demonstrated the use of a blimp as a platform for measurement of air pollution traveling with an air mass across an urban area. The method added unique data showing the relationship between photochemical smog chemistry and aerosol dynamics in smog. The method offers an alternative to reliance on smog chamber and modeling observations to designing air quality management strategies for reactive

  13. Parenting Practices, Interpretive Biases, and Anxiety in Latino Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, R. Enrique; Niditch, Laura A.; Hensley-Maloney, Lauren; Moore, Kathryn W.; Creveling, C. Christiane

    2013-01-01

    A number of factors are believed to confer risk for anxiety development in children; however, cultural variation of purported risk factors remains unclear. We examined relations between controlling and rejecting parenting styles, parental modeling of anxious behaviors, child interpretive biases, and child anxiety in a mixed clinically anxious (n = 27) and non-clinical (n = 20) sample of Latino children and at least one of their parents. Families completed discussion-based tasks and questionnaires in a lab setting. Results indicated that child anxiety was: linked with parental control and child interpretative biases; associated with parental modeling of anxious behaviors at a trend level; and not associated with low parental acceptance. Findings that controlling parenting and child interpretive biases were associated with anxiety extend current theories of anxiety development to the Latino population. We speculate that strong family ties may buffer Latino children from detrimental effects of perceived low parental acceptance. PMID:23434545

  14. Mental health correlates of past homelessness in Latinos and Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hans Y; DeVylder, Jordan E

    2014-11-01

    Mental illness and addiction are strongly associated with homelessness, yet few studies have shown how these relationships vary across ethnic categories that are underrepresented in the homeless population. This study draws from the National Latino and Asian American Survey to examine mental health and substance abuse correlates of homelessness amongst Latinos and Asians living in the United States. Clinical and institutional factors associated with homelessness varied by ethnicity. Among Latinos, alcohol abuse or dependence, conduct disorder and intermittent explosive disorder were risk factors for homelessness, while attending a religious service more than once a week was a protective factor. Among Asians, mood disorder was a risk factor as were health problems and receiving welfare in the past. Understanding ethnicity-specific correlates of homelessness may guide culturally nuanced mental health prevention and intervention efforts.

  15. Language barriers surrounding medication use among older Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Jan E; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo; Coppin, Antonia; Gottlieb, Alison

    2007-03-01

    Limited English language proficiency forms a significant challenge for many Latinos in clinical settings. Although medications are commonly used by older individuals as a means of maintaining good health and managing health problems, the extent to which English proficiency is related to medication use among older Latinos is not known. Focus groups were conducted with Latino, community-residing individuals aged 50 and over in eastern Massachusetts. Qualitative evaluation of the group interviews suggests that language is a barrier in dealing with medication for these individuals. Limited English proficiency appears to be related to feelings of being discriminated against in clinical and pharmacy settings. As well, communicating directly with health professionals in a common language is associated with level of trust and confidence in medical settings. Use of formal and informal interpreters, as well as seeking Spanish-speaking physicians and pharmacies with Spanish-speaking staff, are identified as strategies for overcoming health-related obstacles surrounding language.

  16. Gift and sacrifice: parental involvement in Latino adolescents' education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballo, Rosario; Maurizi, Laura K; Suarez, Gloria A; Aretakis, Maria T

    2014-01-01

    Although myriad studies document the benefits of parental involvement in education on various indicators of children's academic performance, less research examines parental involvement among adolescents in low-income Latino families. Incorporating a multidimensional conceptualization of parental involvement, this study examined the relation between parental involvement and academic outcomes in a sample of 223 low-income, Latino adolescents. Results indicated that three types of parental involvement (gift/sacrifice, future discussions/academic socialization, and school involvement) had significant, positive associations with academic outcomes. Moreover, our results suggest that parents' stories about struggles with poverty and immigration are an important component of parental involvement, contributing to adolescents' desire to succeed academically and "give back" to parents. Additionally, our findings indicated that the positive relations between parental involvement and academic outcomes were stronger for immigrant youth and for those with higher endorsements of the Latino cultural value of respeto (respect).

  17. The relationship between fatalism, dissociation, and trauma symptoms in Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, Ashley N; Cosden, Merith

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented an overrepresentation of posttraumatic stress disorder in the Latino population. However, the contributing factors to trauma symptomatology among Latinos are not fully understood. The present study examined 112 low-income, Latino outpatients in a mental health clinic to identify culturally relevant variables that predict trauma symptomatology. Fatalism, peritraumatic dissociation, acculturation, and demographic variables were analyzed. Peritraumatic dissociation was found to account for a significant percentage of the variance in trauma symptoms (21%) as measured by the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire-Modified and the Trauma Symptom Inventory. Fatalism measured by the Multiphasic Assessment of Cultural Constructs was not found to be significantly associated with symptom severity. Also, acculturation variables did not predict peritraumatic dissociation. Implications of the findings for trauma research and practice are discussed.

  18. The myth of sameness among Latino men and their machismo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, José B; Solberg, V Scott H; Carlstrom, Aaron H

    2002-04-01

    This study examined the construct of machismo in relationship to measures of machismo, masculinity, and gender role identity. One hundred forty-eight Latino men with an average age of 36, primarily Mexican American and Puerto Rican, participated. Results indicate that machismo can be characterized as a multidimensional construct, and cluster analyses found that traditional definitions of machismo as authoritarian, emotionally restrictive, and controlling represented only about 10% of the classified Latinos. Most of the sample identified with more emotionally responsive, collaborative, and flexible masculinity styles. Five identity dimensions identified were Contemporary Masculinity, Machismo, Traditional Machismo, Conflicted/Compassionate Machismo, and Contemporary Machismo. Implications include the need to change stereotypes of machismo to be more congruent with the variation in Latino male identity.

  19. Parenting practices, interpretive biases, and anxiety in Latino children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, R Enrique; Niditch, Laura A; Hensley-Maloney, Lauren; Moore, Kathryn W; Creveling, C Christiane

    2013-03-01

    A number of factors are believed to confer risk for anxiety development in children; however, cultural variation of purported risk factors remains unclear. We examined relations between controlling and rejecting parenting styles, parental modeling of anxious behaviors, child interpretive biases, and child anxiety in a mixed clinically anxious (n=27) and non-clinical (n=20) sample of Latino children and at least one of their parents. Families completed discussion-based tasks and questionnaires in a lab setting. Results indicated that child anxiety was: linked with parental control and child interpretative biases, associated with parental modeling of anxious behaviors at a trend level, and not associated with low parental acceptance. Findings that controlling parenting and child interpretive biases were associated with anxiety extend current theories of anxiety development to the Latino population. We speculate that strong family ties may buffer Latino children from detrimental effects of perceived low parental acceptance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Let us in: Latino underrepresentation in Gifted and Talented Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Emily

    2010-01-01

    This paper articulates the necessity of improving identification protocols for inclusion of low-socioeconomic gifted Latino students in Gifted and Talented Programs in all levels of education ranging from elementary and continuing on to the college level. Non-verbal tests, observation instruments, grade-to-grade portfolios, performance projects, and extensive interviewing are suggested in lieu of biased standardized tests as identification variables. In addition, teacher professional development opportunities as well as the inclusion of multicultural curriculum will promote an appreciation of Latino culture as well as encourage and include intellectually gifted Hispanic students. Reference to collectivistic societal constructs impacting on positive Latino student engagement is discussed. This article will appeal specifically to those individuals entrusted with recruitment for elementary and secondary Gifted and Talented Programs as well as College Honors Programs. In addition, the notion that the identification of giftedness is culture dependent is of importance to the general public in our endeavor to become a multicultural globalist society.

  1. FROM EXCLUSION TO INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION: THE CASE OF LATINO YOUTHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez R, Magaly

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I refer to structural tendencies reflected in the responses of excluded Latinos youths, who range from street children to radical youths (gangs or not) and finally to migrants. The latter, face unusual challenges as a result of being undocumented, forcing them to pursue mobility within a formal system that blocks their way. I review these tendencies through a "positive" lens, focusing mainly on Latino youth who are using different strategies to fight social exclusion. I aim to raise the paradoxical temporality , which indicates that as we learn and analyze more, we tend to move further away from the possibility of transforming pressing problems in society. I raise the question of how to intervene using more knowledge in the alarming situation of one of the most excluded social groups, Latino Youth and also of how to alert and visualize ways of integrating those youth who migrate and become undocumented.

  2. Poor representation of Blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, José E; Campbell, Kendall M; Adelson, Wendi J

    2015-04-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how various systems in medicine are limiting representation of blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans. Flat and decreasing percentages of Underrepresented Minorities in Medicine (URMM), especially in the black and Native American populations, is concerning for family medicine since members from URMM groups care for minority and underserved populations in greater numbers. Underrepresentation is not only noted in the medical community but also in our medical schools when it comes to numbers of URMM faculty. The changing definition of "disadvantaged" in medical school admissions has also played a part in limiting URMM representation. In addition, the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) excludes black, Latino, and Native American students in greater numbers. The authors support these arguments with evidence from the medical literature. Although unintentional, these systems effectively limit representation of blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans in medicine. Effective changes are suggested and can be implemented to ensure that URMM individuals have equal representation in careers in medicine.

  3. Masculinity and HIV Risk among Homeless Men in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David P.; Brown, Ryan A.; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.; Wertheimer, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    HIV continues to be a serious public health problem for men who have sex with women (MSW), especially homeless MSW. Although consideration of gender has improved HIV prevention interventions, most of the research and intervention development has targeted how women’s HIV risk is affected by gender roles. The effect of gender roles on MSW has received relatively little attention. Previous studies have shown mixed results when investigating the association between internalization of masculine gender roles and HIV risk. These studies use a variety of scales that measure individual internalization of different aspects of masculinity. However, this ignores the dynamic and culturally constructed nature of gender roles. The current study uses cultural consensus analysis (CCA) to test for the existence of culturally agreed upon masculinity and gender role beliefs among homeless MSW in Los Angeles, as well as the relationship between these beliefs and HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Interviews included 30 qualitative and 305 structured interviews with homeless MSW in Los Angeles’s Skid Row area. Analysis identified culturally relevant aspects of masculinity not represented by existing masculinity scales, primarily related to barriers to relationships with women. Behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to HIV were significantly associated with men’s level of agreement with the group about masculinity. The findings are discussed in light of implications for MSW HIV intervention development. PMID:23730216

  4. Figurino, moda e luxo no filme Zuzu Angel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haussen, Luciana Fagundes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa o figurino de cinema a partir do filme Zuzu Angel (Sergio Rezende, 2006, e discute como é representada a obra desta designer brasileira de roupas das décadas de 60 e 70, sob o aspecto da relação de seu trabalho com as idéias de moda e luxo. Destaca a trajetória da equipe de produção do figurino do filme e a repercussão das suas escolhas em cenas-chave desta produção audiovisual. Para tanto, trabalha com a contextualização histórica, a narrativa cinematográfica e com os conceitos de figurino de cinema, moda e luxo. Como suporte teórico, recorre às obras de, Michel Pastoureau, para as análises dos tecidos, de Jean-Jacques Roubine, Deborah Nadoolman Landis e Marcel Martin, sobre o papel do figurino na dramaturgia e no cinema, e Gilles Lipovetsky sobre os conceitos de moda e luxo

  5. Evaluating Community Partnerships Addressing Community Resilience in Los Angeles, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm V. Williams

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Community resilience has grown in importance in national disaster response and recovery efforts. However, measurement of community resilience, particularly the content and quality of relationships aimed at improving resilience, is lacking. To address this gap, we used a social network survey to measure the number, type, and quality of relationships among organizations participating in 16 coalitions brought together to address community resilience in the Los Angeles Community Disaster Resilience project. These coalitions were randomized to one of two approaches (community resilience or preparedness. Resilience coalitions received training and support to develop these partnerships and implement new activities. Both coalition types received expert facilitation by a public health nurse or community educator. We also measured the activities each coalition engaged in and the extent to which partners participated in these activities at two time points. We found that the community resilience coalitions were initially larger and had lower trust among members than the preparedness communities. Over time, these trust differences dissipated. While both coalitions grew, the resilience community coalitions maintained their size difference throughout the project. We also found differences in the types of activities implemented by the resilience communities; these differences were directly related to the trainings provided. This information is useful to organizations seeking guidance on expanding the network of community-based organizations that participate in community resilience activities.

  6. Silent angels the genetic and clinical aspects of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziwota Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder and, because of some behavioral characteristics, individuals affected by the disease are known as silent angels. Girls with Rett syndrome perform stereotyped movements, they have learning difficulties, their reaction time is prolonged, and they seem alienated in the environment. These children require constant pediatric, neurological and orthopedic care. In the treatment of Rett syndrome physical therapy, music therapy, hydrotherapy, hippotherapy, behavioral methods, speech therapy and diet, are also used. In turn, psychological therapy of the syndrome is based on the sensory integration method, using two or more senses simultaneously. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is related to mutations of the MECP2 gene, located on chromosome X. The pathogenesis of Rett syndrome is caused by the occurrence of a non-functional MeCP2 protein, which is a transcription factor of many genes, i.e. Bdnf, mef2c, Sgk1, Uqcrc1. Abnormal expression of these genes reveals a characteristic disease phenotype. Clinical symptoms relate mainly to the nervous, respiratory, skeletal and gastrointestinal systems. Currently causal treatment is not possible. However, researchers are developing methods by which, perhaps in the near future, it will be possible to eliminate the mutations in the MECP2 gene, and this will give a chance to the patient for normal functioning.

  7. Magnetic eye tracking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Hannah L; Raymond, Jennifer L

    2017-09-05

    Eye movements provide insights about a wide range of brain functions, from sensorimotor integration to cognition; hence, the measurement of eye movements is an important tool in neuroscience research. We describe a method, based on magnetic sensing, for measuring eye movements in head-fixed and freely moving mice. A small magnet was surgically implanted on the eye, and changes in the magnet angle as the eye rotated were detected by a magnetic field sensor. Systematic testing demonstrated high resolution measurements of eye position of coil and video-oculography methods. Most notably, it provides the first method for reliable, high-resolution measurement of eye movements in freely moving mice, revealing increased eye movements and altered binocular coordination compared to head-fixed mice. Overall, magnetic eye tracking provides a lightweight, inexpensive, easily implemented, and high-resolution method suitable for a wide range of applications.

  8. King and Eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suwannakij, Sing

    King and Eye explores the visual formation of kingship in Siam in its multifarious aspects. This dissertation identifies the leitmotifs in the dynamics between seeing the king and being seen by him, which burst forth in different eras. The visual sense has been a repository for the ontologization...... devices, most significantly the photographic and the cine cameras, but also encompassing other ocular apparatuses. The images produced through the contraptions were brought together under the royal eye at the apex, which in turn claimed its supremacy over space, time, and the vast and diverse population...

  9. Danish Rural Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Tracy B; Moldow, Birgitte; Ellervik, Christina

    2015-01-01

    and older from a Danish rural municipality received a complete general health examination and an ophthalmological interview and examination. This study included a comprehensive ophthalmologic interview, measurement of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in each eye, Hirschberg's test for strabismus and two...... 45-degree retinal fundus photographs of each eye. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed when indicated. RESULTS: The prevalence of monocular visual impairment (MVI) was 4.26% (95% CI, 3.66-4.95, n = 163). Amblyopia was the most common cause, accounting for 33%. The prevalence...

  10. Political Identity Convergence: On Being Latino, Becoming a Democrat, and Getting Active

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Huddy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of Latinos in the United States identify with the Democratic Party, a tendency with broad political implications as Latinos become an increasingly large segment of the population. Little research, however, has delved into the origins of this preference. In this research, we contrast two explanations for Latinos’ Democratic proclivities: an instrumental explanation grounded in ideological policy preferences and an expressive identity account based on the defense of Latino identity and status. In analysis of data from two large national datasets, the 2012 Latino Immigrant National Election Study and American National Election Study focused on Latino immigrants and citizens respectively, we find strong support for the expressive identity explanation. Hispanic and partisan identities have converged among Latinos in the United States to create a large number of Latino Democrats regardless of citizenship status. Those who identify strongly as Latinos and see pervasive discrimination against Latinos are the strongest Democrats, a process that further intensified over the course of the 2012 election. A strong partisan preference increased political campaign activity, though this activity level was modest overall. Relatively few Latinos had worked on a campaign or given money to a candidate; somewhat larger numbers had tried to convince others about a candidate or worn a button or displayed a sticker. Finally, some support was evident for an instrumental account. Latino support for government-provided health insurance in 2012 consistently increased support for the Democratic Party.

  11. Social work practice with Latinos: key issues for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Rich; Negi, Nalini Junko; Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Rowan, Diana; Shukraft, Allison; Gragg, Jennifer

    2009-04-01

    The Latino population is the fastest growing group in the United States; thus, it is imperative that social workers and other mental health practitioners be knowledgeable about the current literature on how to effectively serve this population. This article elucidates key issues and knowledge, such as immigration and migration concerns; discusses how to assess for levels of acculturation; examines cultural values; and highlights salient work issues and health disparities that Latinos experience. Recommendations on how agencies and universities can recruit and promote bilingual practitioners are introduced. Finally, culturally responsive strategies for professional use of self and fostering the therapeutic alliance are discussed.

  12. High cancer mortality for US-born Latinos: evidence from California and Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Callahan, Karen E; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Cobb, Taylor R; Roca-Barcelo, Aina; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2017-07-11

    Latinos born in the US, 36 million, comprise 65% of all US Latinos. Yet their cancer experience is nearly always analyzed together with their foreign-born counterparts, 19 million, who constitute a steady influx of truly lower-risk populations from abroad. To highlight specific cancer vulnerabilities for US-born Latinos, we compare their cancer mortality to the majority non-Latino white (NLW) population, foreign-born Latinos, and non-Latino blacks. We analyzed 465,751 cancer deaths from 2008 to 2012 occurring among residents of California and Texas, the two most populous states, accounting for 47% of US Latinos. This cross-sectional analysis, based on granular data obtained from death certificates on cause of death, age, race, ethnicity and birthplace, makes use of normal standardization techniques and negative binomial regression models. While Latinos overall have lower all-cancers-combined mortality rates than NLWs, these numbers were largely driven by low rates among the foreign born while mortality rates for US-born Latinos approach those of NLWs. Among Texas males, rates were 210 per 100,000 for NLWs and 166 for Latinos combined, but 201 per 100,000 for US-born Latinos and 125 for foreign-born Latinos. Compared to NLWs, US-born Latino males in California had mortality rate ratios of 2.83 (95% CI: 2.52-3.18) for liver cancer, 1.44 (95% CI: 1.30-1.61) for kidney cancer, and 1.25 (95% CI: 1.17-1.34) for colorectal cancer (CRC). Texas results showed a similar site-specific pattern. Specific cancer patterns for US-born Latinos, who have relatively high cancer mortality, similar overall to NLWs, are masked by aggregation of all Latinos, US-born and foreign-born. While NLWs had high mortality for lung cancer, US-born Latinos had high mortality for liver, kidney and male colorectal cancers. HCV testing and reinforcement of the need for CRC screening should be a priority in this specific and understudied population. The unprecedented proximity of overall rates between

  13. NGC6543: Cat's Eye and Bull's Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, B.; Wilson, J. M.

    2000-05-01

    Deep Hubble images of NGC 6543 reveal a series of regularly spaced circular concentric ``rings'' that surround the famous Cat's Eye nebula. The rings seen in the lines of Hα , [O III], and [N II] but not the continuum. These photoionized rings are almost certainly the result of periodic spherical mass pulsations by the nucleus before the Cat's Eye formed. A good fit to the observed Hα surface brightness distribution is obtained if the bubbles were ejected with constant mass, thickness, and ejection velocity. The model can be used to estimate the total mass of the rings, ~ 0.1M⊙ , which lies between that of the core ( ~ 0.05 M⊙ ) and the surrounding halo ( ~ 0.5 M⊙ ). Assuming an ejection speed of 10 km s-1 the interpulse period is 1500 +/- 300 y, the same as the expansion age of the core itself. Hubble images of other planetaries displayed on the poster, IC 418, NGC 7027, and Hubble 5 (a bipolar) show similar sets of multiple concentric rings. Hence, it appears, regular isotropic AGB mass pulses often precede the formation of brighter and more complex PN cores. However, the interpulse time scale, ~ 103 y, is a serious problem for extant models of core thermal pulses and surface pulsations. The cores of PNe seem to form in an abrupt change of mode of mass loss, as predicted by disrputive binary companion merger models. A preprint is available from ftp://ftp.astro.washington.edu/pub/users/balick/6543paper. Financial support from NASA/STScI grant GO 7501 is very gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Closure of Los Angeles Air Force Base, California and Relocation of Space Systems Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    scheduled airlines provide Santa Maria and the surrounding region with flights to Los Angeles and San Francisco . Currently, Sky West Airlines flies to Los...Angeles International and has a shuttle service to Delta Airlines. West Air flies to Los Angeles and San Francisco and has a shuttle service to United...physiographic province, is characterized by flat to gently sloping topography. Bedrock surface outcrops include the Perris Block, Gavilan Hills, Lakeview

  15. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... is the center of the macula, where your vision is sharpest. Optic nerve (OP-tic nurv) is the bundle of more than 1 ...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español ... film of tears spreads over the eye. This keeps the eye’s surface smooth and clear. The tear film is important for good vision. The tear film is made of three ...

  17. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Units Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications eyeGENE Research Directors Office Office of the Scientific Director Sheldon S. ... NEI Intranet (Employees Only) *PDF files require the free Adobe® Reader® software for viewing. This website is ...

  18. Diabetes and the eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-10-11

    Oct 11, 2007 ... Diabetes causes a wide spectrum of diseases in and around the eye. Diabetic damage is not limited to the lens and retina, but also includes other orbital, ocular and neurological complications. The. WHO estimates that there are 150 million people worldwide living with diabetes, and expects this figure to ...

  19. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... make the right type of tears or tear film. How do tears work? When you blink, a film of tears spreads over the eye. This keeps the eye’s surface smooth and clear. The tear film is important for good vision. The tear film ...

  20. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect ... Emily Y. Chew, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic ...

  1. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the ... Contact Us A-Z Site Map NEI on Social Media Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, ...

  2. The Learned Eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doel, van den Marieke; Eck, van Natasja; Korevaar, Gerbrand; Tummers, Anna; Weststeijn, Thijs

    2005-01-01

    The 'learned eye' or oculus eruditus was a concept used by seventeenth-century writers on painting. It illustrated their view that the ideal artist was not only skilled in painting techniques, but also had knowledge of the history of art and an interest in poetry and literature.In this book,

  3. Through the creator's eyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lahlou, Saadi

    2012-01-01

    of an adapted Subjective Evidence-Based Ethnography (SEBE). This methodology combines (a) obtaining first person audio-visual recordings of creative action with a miniature video-camera worn at eye-level, (b) accessing the subjective experience of the participant through a confrontation interview based...

  4. [Eye and the pregnacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with changes in many organs and systems including the eyes. Sometimes in pregnancy may appear physiological and pathological ocular changes that may be associated with pre-existing problems. In such cases it is very important interdisciplinary collaboration gynecologist, ophthalmologist.

  5. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  6. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / ... 19, 2013 Follow The Academy Professionals: Education Guidelines News Multimedia Public & Patients: Contact Us About the Academy ...

  7. The allergic eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several non-infective inflammatory conditions presenting as hypersensitivity reactions may be associated with clinical manifestations of ocular allergy.[2] Typically the anterior segment of the eye is affected, and all four types of hypersensitivity reactions may be involved; either as a single cause, or as an overlap between the ...

  8. The ageing eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-10

    Nov 10, 2007 ... As people age, most will inevitably encounter some changes in their vision that may be attributed solely to the ageing process. These processes are distinct from age-related eye diseases, although the visual changes they produce may be similar. One of the truest signs of ageing is the gradual loss of ...

  9. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... million nerve fibers that carry visual messages from the retina to the brain. Retina (REH-tin-uh) is the light-sensitive ...

  10. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements ... is the center of the macula, where your vision is sharpest. Optic nerve (OP-tic nurv) is the bundle of more than 1 ...

  11. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are made up of many different parts that work together to help you see. Check out the diagrams below to learn about each part of your eye and what it does. Macula (MACK-yoo-luh) is the ...

  12. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the white outer coating of the eye. Vitreous humor (VIT-ree-us HYOO-mer) is the clear ... in Spanish (Información en español) Website, Social Media Policies and Other Important Links NEI Employee Emergency Information ...

  13. Two eyes in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, E.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Do relative binocular disparities guide our movements in depth? In order to find out we asked subjects to move a 'cursor' to a target within a simulated horizontal plane at eye height. They did so by moving a computer mouse. We determined how quickly subjects responded to the target jumping in

  14. Common eye emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-10-11

    Oct 11, 2007 ... salt water Acanthamoeba species is typically seen in young patients who wear contact lenses and who wash their lenses or lens cases in tap water. It presents as an unbearably painful, injected eye with photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Fungal keratitis is particularly severe in. HIV-positive patients ...

  15. Herpetic Eye Disease in a Public Eye Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the aetiology, pattern and complications of herpetic eye disease seen at the Guinness Eye Centre,. Onitsha, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The case files of all patients with herpetic eye disease who presented at the centre between. January 1998 and December 2003 were reviewed. Information ...

  16. Disability: recommendations for eye programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, CBM’s Medical Eye Care Advisory Working Group met in Hyderabad, India to discuss the inclusion of people with disabilities in eye care.As a result of these discussions, recommendations were made.

  17. Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teenagers Baby's Vision Development: What to Expect the First Year Normal Vision Development in Children Refractive Errors in Children Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions Children’s Eye Injuries: Prevention ...

  18. Unilateral Amblyopia Affects Two Eyes: Fellow Eye Deficits in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Kimberly; Giaschi, Deborah

    2017-03-01

    Unilateral amblyopia is a visual disorder that arises after selective disruption of visual input to one eye during critical periods of development. In the clinic, amblyopia is understood as poor visual acuity in an eye that was deprived of pattern vision early in life. By its nature, however, amblyopia has an adverse effect on the development of a binocular visual system and the interactions between signals from two eyes. Visual functions aside from visual acuity are impacted, and many studies have indicated compromised sensitivity in the fellow eye even though it demonstrates normal visual acuity. While these fellow eye deficits have been noted, no overarching theory has been proposed to describe why and under what conditions the fellow eye is impacted by amblyopia. Here, we consider four explanations that may account for decreased fellow eye sensitivity: the fellow eye is adversely impacted by treatment for amblyopia; the maturation of the fellow eye is delayed by amblyopia; fellow eye sensitivity is impacted for visual functions that rely on binocular cortex; and fellow eye deficits reflect an adaptive mechanism that works to equalize the sensitivity of the two eyes. To evaluate these ideas, we describe five visual functions that are commonly reported to be deficient in the amblyopic eye (hyperacuity, contrast sensitivity, spatial integration, global motion, and motion-defined form), and unify the current evidence for fellow eye deficits. Further research targeted at exploring fellow eye deficits in amblyopia will provide us with a broader understanding of normal visual development and how amblyopia impacts the developing visual system.

  19. Pink Eye: What To Do

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-12

    In this podcast, CDC's Adam Cohen, MD, a pediatrician and parent, discusses conjunctivitis (pink eye), a common eye condition in children and adults. He reviews pink eye causes and treatment, suggestions on when to call or visit a doctor, and practical tips to prevent pink eye from spreading.  Created: 10/12/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 10/13/2010.

  20. Condom negotiation strategies and actual condom use among Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschann, Jeanne M; Flores, Elena; de Groat, Cynthia L; Deardorff, Julianna; Wibbelsman, Charles J

    2010-09-01

    To examine which condom negotiation strategies are effective in obtaining or avoiding condom use among Latino youth. Interviews were conducted with 694 Latino youth, 61% female, aged 16-22. Participants reported on their condom negotiation strategies, perceptions of whether their sexual partner wanted to use condoms, and actual condom use. Three strategies to obtain condom use (risk information, direct verbal/nonverbal communication, insist) and four strategies to avoid condom use (emotional coercion, ignore condom use, dislike condoms, seduction) were examined. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression, and included youth (n = 574) who reported wanting to use or avoid condoms. Almost 60% of participants reported wanting to use condoms, and nearly all of these used some strategy to obtain condom use. Young men who wanted to use condoms were more likely to do so, compared with young women. Risk information and direct verbal/nonverbal communication were effective strategies to obtain condom use, even among youth who perceived their sexual partners as not wanting to use condoms. Ignoring condom use was an effective condom avoidance strategy, even when youth thought their partners wanted to use condoms. Unexpectedly, young men who expressed dislike of condoms had higher rates of condom use than young men not using this condom avoidance strategy. This research identified condom negotiation strategies that are effective among Latino youth, even when they believe their partners do not want to use condoms. Health care providers could encourage Latino youth to use such condom negotiation strategies.

  1. A Description of Disordered Eating Behaviors in Latino Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Mae Lynn; Sala, Margarita; Von Holle, Ann; Unikel, Claudia; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Camara-Fuentes, Luis; Suarez-Torres, Alba

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore disordered eating and eating disorders (EDs) in Latino males. Participants: Participants are 722 male college students from a larger prevalence study conducted in the University of Puerto Rico system. Methods: Participants were selected from a list of sections of required courses for first-year students on each campus.…

  2. Dual Role Interpreters: Spanish Teachers in New Latino Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, Soria Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study documenting how Spanish teachers, as some of the few Spanish-speaking educators in new Latino diaspora communities, bear an especially heavy burden as dual role interpreters and unofficial school representatives. Drawing from the semistructured interview data of twenty-six north Georgia educators, I…

  3. Culinary School Gives Latinos a Taste of the Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lee

    2012-01-01

    With scholarships and other special programs, the Culinary Institute of America's (CIA) Texas campus hopes to make its Latino students into industry leaders. CIA is considered as the most august culinary school in the United States. CIA San Antonio dispatches chefs to study and document traditional cuisines throughout Latin America for its Center…

  4. Preschool Education: Delivering on the Promise for Latino Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This publication highlights opportunities to improve the educational outcomes of Hispanic children at an early age, a time that is critical to setting up the academic success of children. Specifically, this paper examines barriers to quality and access that limit the participation of Latino children and families in preschool and offers…

  5. Latino Farmworkers in Saskatchewan: Language Barriers and Health and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros-Guzmán, Arcadio; Gertler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As part of a study focused on the experiences of Latino migrant farmworkers in Saskatchewan, Canada, we have attempted to understand how language barriers (LBs) broadly understood may affect farmworkers and their employers, workplace communications, and occupational health and safety (OHS). Drawing on critical ethnography and intercultural communication theory, qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 Latino migrant farmworkers, 11 farmer-employers, two OHS civil servants, and two former Canadian farmworkers. Our findings suggest that LBs interfere with the establishment of effective communications between Latino farmworkers, other farm enterprise personnel, civil servants, and health services providers. LBs impede establishment of the kinds of sustained two-way communications needed for maintaining safe and healthy working environments. All of the stakeholders involved were found to contribute in some manner to the propagation of LBs. The risks for the physical and psychological well-being of migrant farmworkers are substantial, but despite the fact that LBs are generally recognized as a challenge and as a source of risk, they are not widely seen as warranting any systematic response. It is critical that Latino migrant workers learn more English and that their Canadian employers and supervisors learn more Spanish. Beyond that, there is an urgent need for a multistakeholder coalition that moves to address LBs by training certified interpreters and liaison personnel who can facilitate better communications between migrant workers, their employers, and other stakeholders.

  6. Latino Bilingual Teachers: Negotiating the Figured World of Masculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Gilberto P.; Fránquiz, María E.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on a group of male teachers from Proyecto Bilingüe, a professional development master's degree program for bilingual teachers. The study is guided by one broad research question: How do Latino male bilingual teachers negotiate their identities in a gendered profession? Specifically the study addresses: What spaces for…

  7. Linking Urban Latino Families to School Using the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Barry; Kupperman, Jeff; Marx, Ron; Soloway, Elliot

    2001-01-01

    Describes a project in the Detroit Public Schools that provided television set-top Internet access devices to Latino families as part of a project to link the school and home in an inquiry-based science curriculum. Discusses early phases of adoption of the Internet and NetTV devices by families. (Author/LRW)

  8. Hispanics/Latinos & Cardiovascular Disease: Statistical Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statistical Fact Sheet 2013 Update Hispanics/Latinos & Cardiovascular Diseases Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) (ICD/10 codes I00-I99, Q20-Q28) (ICD/9 codes 390-459, 745-747)  Among Mexican-American adults age 20 ...

  9. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  10. Early College High School: Closing the Latino Achievement Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Kristen Ann

    2016-01-01

    The population of United States Latino students is growing at a rapid rate but their academic achievement lags behind white and Asian students. This issue has significant consequences for the nation's economy, as the job market continues to demand more education and better skills. Early College High School programs have the potential to improve…

  11. La Familia: Student Workbook. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This workbook comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Each lesson begins with an illustration that reflects the content of the lesson and an introductory page. Each introductory page…

  12. La Familia: Curriculum Unit. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This teaching guide comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Student objectives include the following: (1) define family; (2) describe similarities and differences among Latino…

  13. How Do Learning Communities Affect First-Year Latino Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Juan Carlos; Bray, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Do learning communities with pedagogies of active learning, collaborative learning, and integration of course material affect the learning, achievement, and persistence of first-year Latino university students? The data for this project was obtained from a survey of 1,330 first-year students in the First-Year Learning Community Program at Texas…

  14. Recommended and Not Recommended Bilingual Books and Books about Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Isabel

    1995-01-01

    Describes several noteworthy books about Latinos that contrast cultures, explain a unique Mexican and Mexican American celebration, explore the debate over illegal immigration, and convey the quandaries of adolescence. Several publications are considered inferior because they disregard the Spanish language and present negative historical…

  15. Two-Way Bilingual Education and Latino Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke-Garza, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Two-way bilingual immersion (TWBI) programs have demonstrated great success in improving Latino English learners' educational outcomes. Nevertheless, TWBI classrooms are not immune to the greater power dynamics and influences of United States society. This Participatory Action Research study brought together eight two-way bilingual immersion…

  16. "Coolin": The Psychosocial Communication of African and Latino Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cancela, Victor

    1993-01-01

    Explores the relationship between Latino "machismo" and the "cool pose" of the African-American male. It is suggested that both masculine postures can be used to design empowering psychological interventions in clinical, community, educational, and policy areas. Positive features could be used in curricula of diversity. (SLD)

  17. Redefining Rurality: Cosmopolitanism, Whiteness, and the New Latino Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierk, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    In mainstream discourse, rural generally implies white, while urban signifies not-white. However, what happens when "rural" communities experience demographic change? This paper examines how students from a rural, New Latino Diaspora community in a Midwestern state complicate traditional notions of rurality. Data from participant…

  18. Scattered Challenges, Singular Solutions: The New Latino Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Stanton; Clonan-Roy, Katherine; Link, Holly; Martinez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    A new Latino diaspora has seen the arrival of Spanish-speaking students in rural and suburban America--places that had not experienced Hispanic immigration in the way the Southwest and urban centers have. This new development presents educators with challenges in meeting these students' needs. But educators also have the opportunity to draw…

  19. Recruitment and Retention of Latino Children in a Lifestyle Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Angelica; Richardson, Irma M.; Gesell, Sabina; Barkin, Shari L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe promising recruitment and retention strategies for transient Latino populations, assisting investigators who work with this population in their research design and implementation. Methods: Strategies in recruitment and retention from a year-long intervention in children and their families are described. Results: Of the 159…

  20. Convivencia to Empowerment: Latino Parent Organizing at La Familia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasis, Pablo; Ordonez-Jasis, Rosario

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the emergence of La Familia Initiative, a Latino parent-organizing project at a public middle school. Motivated by their urgency to improve their children's schooling and enhance their opportunities for a better high school experience in the future, the participants organize to establish a more inclusive partnership with the…