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Sample records for aneurysm repair evar

  1. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  2. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  3. Open surgery (OS) versus endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for hemodynamically stable and unstable ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Simeng; Feng, Jiaxuan; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Yongxue; Lu, Qingsheng; Jing, Zaiping

    2016-08-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an alternative treatment for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) in hemodynamically (hd) stable patients. Treatment for patients with hd-unstable rAAA remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of EVAR and open surgery (OS) in hd-stable and hd-unstable rAAA patients using meta-analysis. The first part of this study included 48 articles that reported the treatment outcomes of rAAA managed with EVAR (n = 9610) and OS (n = 93867). The second part, which is the focus of this study, included 5 out of 48 articles, which further reported treatment results in hd-stable (n = 198) and hd-unstable (n = 185) patients. When heterogeneity among the groups was observed, a random-effects model was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (OR) or in cases of non-heterogeneity, a fixed-effects model analysis was employed. In the first part of this study, the in-hospital mortality rate was found to be lower in the EVAR group than in the OS group (29.9 vs 40.8 %; OR 0.59; 95 % CI 0.52-0.66; P OS. The total mortality was 147/383 (38.4 %), while the mortality of the EVAR group and the OS group was 25.7 % (39/152) and 46.8 % (108/231), respectively. In the hd-stable group, the in-hospital mortality after EVAR was significantly lower than that after OS [18.9 % (18/95) vs 28.2 % (29/103); OR 0.47; 95 % CI 0.22-0.97; P = 0.04]. For the hd-unstable rAAA patients, the in-hospital mortality after EVAR was significantly lower than that after OS [36.8 % (21/57) vs 61.7 % (79/128); OR 0.40; 95 % CI 0.20-0.79; P OS, EVAR in hd-unstable rAAA patients is associated with improved outcomes. Available publications are currently limited; thus, the best treatment strategy for this subgroup of patients remains unclear. Further clinical studies are needed to provide more detailed data, such as the shock index and long-term results.

  4. Surgeon Modified Fenestrated Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Repair (F-EVAR for Subacute Multifocal Mycotic Abdominal and Iliac Artery Saccular Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Sule

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endovascular repair of suprarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs requires customized fenestrated stent grafts when they involve visceral vessels such as the renal (clinically ignored here in this specific scenario, celiac, and superior mesenteric arteries. Report: On table fenestrated endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (F-EVAR, using a parallel endograft approach, was performed for enlarging saccular subacute mycotic suprarenal and left common iliac artery aneurysms in a 58 year old man with recent methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA bacteremia, who was high risk for open surgical repair. Fenestrations were performed for the coeliac artery (CA and superior mesenteric artery (SMA using a Bovie® (Clearwater, FL, USA cautery device. The initial procedure was complicated by a type II endoleak that resolved spontaneously within 6 months of surgery. The patient remained well on follow up a year post surgery. Conclusion: On table surgeon modified F-EVAR is a safe and viable option for patients with subacute suprarenal mycotic abdominal aneurysms. Keywords: Aneurysm, Endovascular, Aortic, Mycotic, Surgeon modified, Fenestrated

  5. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J. T.; Sweeting, M. J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Lederle, F. A.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Beard, J. D.; Buxton, M. J.; Brown, L. C.; Harris, P. L.; Rose, J. D. G.; Russell, I. T.; Sculpher, M. J.; Thompson, S. G.; Lilford, R. J.; Bell, P. R. F.; Whitaker, S. C.; Poole-Wilson, The Late P. A.; Ruckley, C. V.; Campbell, W. B.; Dean, M. R. E.; Ruttley, M. S. T.; Coles, E. C.; Halliday, A.; Gibbs, S. J.; Epstein, D.; Hannon, R. J.; Johnston, L.; Bradbury, A. W.; Henderson, M. J.; Parvin, S. D.; Shepherd, D. F. C.; Mitchell, A. W.; Edwards, P. R.; Abbott, G. T.; Higman, D. J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; Wyatt, M. G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D. P.; McCarter, D. H.; Taylor, P. R.; Reidy, J. F.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Clason, A. E.; Leen, G. L. S.; Wilson, N. V.; Downes, M.; Walker, S. R.; Lavelle, J. M.; Gough, M. J.; McPherson, S.; Scott, D. J. A.; Kessell, D. O.; Naylor, R.; Sayers, R.; Fishwick, N. G.; Gould, D. A.; Walker, M. G.; Chalmers, N. C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M. A.; Gaines, P. A.; Ashour, M. Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Davies, J. N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; Platts, A.; Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B. A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A. D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P. H. B.; Ellis, P. K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; Thompson, M.; Loosemore, T. M. L.; Belli, A. M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; Brookes, J. A. S.; McCollum, C. N.; Ashleigh, R.; Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; Bell, J.; Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Bak, A. A. A.; Buth, J.; Pattynama, P. M.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.; Balm, R.; Cuypers, P. W. M.; Prinssen, M.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; Baas, A. F.; Hunink, M. G.; van Engelshoven, J. M.; Jacobs, M. J. H. M.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van Bockel, J. H.; Reekers, J.; Tielbeek, X.; Wisselink, W.; Boekema, N.; Heuveling, L. M.; Sikking, I.; de Bruin, J. L.; Tielbeek, A. V.; Pattynama, P.; Prins, T.; van der Ham, A. C.; van der Velden, J. J. I. M.; van Sterkenburg, S. M. M.; ten Haken, G. B.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; van Overhagen, H.; Tutein Nolthenius, R. P.; Hendriksz, T. R.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Odink, H. F.; de Smet, A. A. E. A.; Vroegindeweij, D.; van Loenhout, R. M. M.; Rutten, M. J.; Hamming, J. F.; Lampmann, L. E. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; Pasmans, H.; Vahl, A. C.; de Vries, C.; Mackaay, A. J. C.; van Dortmont, L. M. C.; van der Vliet, A. J.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Boomsma, J. H. B.; van Dop, H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Rooij, T. P. W.; Smits, T. M.; Yilmaz, E. N.; van den Berg, F. G.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Linden, E.; Schurink, G. W. H.; de Haan, M.; Smeets, H. J.; Stabel, P.; van Elst, F.; Poniewierski, J.; Vermassen, F. E. G.; Freischlag, J. A.; Kohler, T. R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F. T.; Kyriakides, T. C.; Swanson, K. M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, The Late A.; LeGwin, Mary; McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, The Late S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A. J.; Thornton, J.; Haakenson, C. M.; Stroupe, K. T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J. W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D. A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J. P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, The Late D.; O'Leary, T. J.; Huang, G. D.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E. R.; Kingsley, D. D.; Marek, J. M.; Massen, R. J.; Matteson, B. D.; Pitcher, J. D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J. D.; Goff, J. M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D. C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B. K.; Busuttil, S. J.; Lilly, M. P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M. A.; Jordan, W. D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H. H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M. R.; Baraniewski, H. M.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J. S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A. B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J. M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, The Late R.; Timaran, C. H.; Modrall, J. G.; Welborn, M. B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J. K. Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A. G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T. A.; Krupski, The Late W. C.; Nehler, M. R.; Johnson, S. P.; Jones, D. N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M. A.; Shortell, C. K.; Gray, J. L.; Lawson, J. H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M. W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P. A.; Lee, N.; Cerveira, J. J.; Zickler, R. W.; Hauck, K. A.; Berceli, S. A.; Lee, W. A.; Ozaki, C. K.; Nelson, P. R.; Irwin, A. S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F. N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P. H.; Bush, R. L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S. G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J. J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W. J.; McCandless, J. L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T. H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J. F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I. L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S. M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J. R.; Carr, S. C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J. M.; Weiman, D. S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H. E.; Walsh, S. M.; Wilson, K. L.; Seabrook, G. R.; Cambria, R. A.; Brown, K. R.; Lewis, B. D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R. A.; Santilli, S. M.; d'Audiffret, A. C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L. L.; Jacobowitz, G. R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; Gagne, P.; Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L. J.; Pipinos, I. I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J. T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S. M.; Wren, S. M.; Bahmani, D. D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M. A.; Mitchell, M. E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M. A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N. M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; Moneta, G. L.; Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, The Late B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B. A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J. H.; Reilly, L. M.; Perez, S. L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S. S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Hatsukami, T. S.; Glickerman, D. G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T. S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R. L.; Thomas, S. C.; Hunter, G. C.; Leon, L. R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R. J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J. L.; Hughes, J. D.; Escalante, A. M.; Psalms, S. B.; Day, N. N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B. J.; Dardik, A.; Gahtan, V.; Muhs, B. E.; Sumpio, B. E.; Gusberg, R. J.; Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E. L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H. A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D. A.; Cole, L.; Marzelle, J.; Sapoval, M.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; Stockx, L.; Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Jourdain, C.; DAVID, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J. N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J. P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; C, Dupreix; Verhoye, J. P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J. F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; Beregi, J. P.; Bergeron, P.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J. P.; Vahdat, O.; Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair

  6. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, Janet T; Sweeting, Michael J; Ulug, P; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Lederle, F A; Becquemin, J.P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Grobbee, DE|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071889256

    BACKGROUND: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. METHODS: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR

  7. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J.T.; Sweeting, M.J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Lederle, F.A.; Becquemin, J.P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Evar, D.O.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. METHODS: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR

  8. Investigation of reference levels and radiation dose associated with abdominal EVAR (endovascular aneurysm repair) procedures across several European Centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuthill, E.; Rainford, L. [University College Dublin, Diagnostic Imaging, School of Medicine, Dublin (Ireland); O' Hora, L.; O' Donohoe, M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Panci, S. [San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Florence (Italy); Gilligan, P.; Fox, E. [Mater Private Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Campion, D. [Mauriziano-Umberto Hospital, Turin (Italy); Trenti, R. [Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Catania, D. [AITRI, Association of Italian Interventional Radiographers, Milan (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is considered the treatment of choice for abdominal aortic aneurysms with suitable anatomy. In order to improve radiation safety, European Directive (2013/59) requires member states to implement diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in radio-diagnostic and interventional procedures. This study aimed to determine local DRLs for EVAR across five European centres and identify an interim European DRL, which currently remains unestablished. Retrospective data was collected for 180 standard EVARs performed between January 2014 and July 2015 from five specialist centres in Ireland (n=2) and Italy (n=3). Data capture included: air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), total air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), fluoroscopic time (FT), number of acquisitions, frame rate of acquisition, type of acquisition, patient height, weight, and gender. The mean values for each site A, B, C, D, and E were: P{sub KA}s of 4343 ± 994 μGym{sup 2}, 18,200 ± 2141 μGym{sup 2}, 11,423 ± 1390 μGym{sup 2}, 7796 ± 704 μGym{sup 2}, 31,897 ± 5798 μGym{sup 2}; FTs of 816 ± 92 s, 950 ± 150 s, 708 ± 70 s, 972 ± 61 s, 827 ± 118 s; and number of acquisitions of 6.72 ± 0.56, 10.38 ± 1.54, 4.74 ± 0.19, 5.64 ± 0.36, 7.28 ± 0.65, respectively. The overall pooled 75th percentile P{sub KA} was 15,849 μGym{sup 2}. Local reference levels were identified. The pooled data has been used to establish an interim European DRL for EVAR procedures. (orig.)

  9. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Powell (Janet); Sweeting, M.J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; F.A. Lederle (Frank); Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. Methods: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized

  10. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J T; Sweeting, M J; Ulug, P; Blankensteijn, J D; Lederle, F A; Becquemin, J-P; Greenhalgh, R M

    2017-02-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair was conducted to a prespecified analysis plan, reporting on mortality, aneurysm-related mortality and reintervention. The analysis included 2783 patients, with 14 245 person-years of follow-up (median 5·5 years). Early (0-6 months after randomization) mortality was lower in the EVAR groups (46 of 1393 versus 73 of 1390 deaths; pooled hazard ratio 0·61, 95 per cent c.i. 0·42 to 0·89; P = 0·010), primarily because 30-day operative mortality was lower in the EVAR groups (16 deaths versus 40 for open repair; pooled odds ratio 0·40, 95 per cent c.i. 0·22 to 0·74). Later (within 3 years) the survival curves converged, remaining converged to 8 years. Beyond 3 years, aneurysm-related mortality was significantly higher in the EVAR groups (19 deaths versus 3 for open repair; pooled hazard ratio 5·16, 1·49 to 17·89; P = 0·010). Patients with moderate renal dysfunction or previous coronary artery disease had no early survival advantage under EVAR. Those with peripheral artery disease had lower mortality under open repair (39 deaths versus 62 for EVAR; P = 0·022) in the period from 6 months to 4 years after randomization. The early survival advantage in the EVAR group, and its subsequent erosion, were confirmed. Over 5 years, patients of marginal fitness had no early survival advantage from EVAR compared with open repair. Aneurysm-related mortality and patients with low ankle : brachial pressure index contributed to the erosion of the early survival advantage for the EVAR group. Trial registration numbers: EVAR-1, ISRCTN55703451; DREAM (Dutch Randomized Endovascular Aneurysm Management), NCT00421330; ACE (Anévrysme de l'aorte abdominale, Chirurgie versus

  11. Carbon dioxide (CO2) angiography as an option for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco; Perego, Matteo; Alì, Marco; Casilli, Francesco; Inglese, Luigi; Mauri, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    To assess feasibility, efficacy and safety of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). After Ethical Committee approval, the records of 13 patients (all male, mean age 74.6 ± 8.0 years) with CKD, who underwent EVAR to exclude an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under CO 2 angiography guidance, were reviewed. The AAA to be excluded had a mean diameter of 52.0 ± 8.0 mm. CO 2 angiography was performed by automatic (n = 7) or hand (n = 6) injection. The endograft was correctly placed and the AAA was excluded in all cases, without any surgical conversions. Two patients (15.4%) had an endoleak: one type-Ia, detected by CO 2 -DSA and effectively treated with prosthesis dilatation; one type-III, detected by CO 2 -DSA, confirmed using 10 ml of ICM, and conservatively managed. In one patient, CO 2 angiograms were considered of too low quality for guiding the procedure and 200 ml of ICM were administered. Overall, 11 patients (84.6%) underwent a successful EVAR under the guidance of the sole CO 2 angiography. No patients suffered from major complications, including those typically CO 2 -related. Two patients suffered from abdominal pain during the procedure secondary to a transient splanchnic perfusion's reduction due to CO 2 , and one patient had a worsening of renal function probably caused by a cholesterol embolization during the procedure. In patients with CKD, EVAR under CO 2 angiography guidance is feasible, effective, and safe.

  12. The influence of neck thrombus on clinical outcome and aneurysm morphology after endovascular aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); K. Chinsakchai (Khamin); J.W. van Keulen (Jasper); M.T. Voûte (Michiel); H.J.A. Zandvoort (Herman); F.L. Moll (Frans); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: This study investigated the influence of significant aneurysm neck thrombus in clinical and morphologic outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: The patient population was derived from a prospective EVAR database from two university institutions in The

  13. Fenestrated Stent-Grafts for Salvage of Prior Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsargyris, A.; Yazar, O.; Oikonomou, K.; Bekkema, F.; Tielliu, I.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.

    Objectives: To review our experience with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (F-EVAR) to treat complications after previous standard infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: A prospectively maintained database including all consecutive patients with juxtarenal abdominal aortic

  14. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); H. Baderkhan (H.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); A. Wanhainen (A.); E. Björck (Erik); R.J. Stolker (Robert); S.E. Hoeks (Sanne); A.R. Mani (Ali)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR

  15. Mid-term results of EVAR in severe proximal aneurysm neck angulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, N. F G; Bastos Gonçalves, F. M.; de Vries, J. P P M; Ultee, K. H J; Werson, D. A B; Hoeks, S. E.; Moll, F.; Van Herwaarden, J. A.; Verhagen, H. J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if mid-term outcome following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the Endurant Stent Graft (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) is influenced by severe proximal neck angulation. Methods A retrospective case–control study was performed using data from a prospective multicenter

  16. Mid-term results of EVAR in severe proximal aneurysm neck angulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.F. Oliveira (N.); F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); J.-P.P.M. de Vries (Jean-Paul); K.H.J. Ultee (Klaas); D.A.B. Werson (Debora); S.E. Hoeks (Sanne); F.L. Moll (Frans); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To determine if mid-term outcome following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the Endurant Stent Graft (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) is influenced by severe proximal neck angulation. Methods A retrospective case-control study was performed using data from a prospective

  17. EVAR of aortoiliac aneurysms with branched stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, N V; Resch, T A; Sonesson, B; Ivancev, K; Malina, M

    2008-06-01

    Branched iliac stent-grafts (bSG) have recently been developed in order to preserve internal iliac artery (IIA) flow in patients with aneurysmal or short common iliac arteries. The aim of this study is to evaluate a single-center experience with bSG for the IIA. Twenty-two male patients (70 (IQR 65-79) years old) underwent EVAR with 23 bSG (1 bilateral repair) between September 2002 and August 2007. Median AAA diameter was 52 (37-60) mm while common iliac diameter on the side of the bSG was 34 (27-41) mm. Two in-house modified Zenith SG and subsequently 21 commercially available bSG (18 Zenith Iliac Side and 3 Helical Branches) were used. Follow-up (FU) included CT at one month and yearly thereafter. Data was prospectively entered in a database. Primary technical success was 91% (21 bSG). Median FU duration was 20 (8-31) months. One patient (5 %) died after discharge from acute myocardial infarction on day 13. Another patient died 30 months after EVAR of an unrelated cause. The overall bSG patency was 74% due to 6 branch occlusions (2 intraoperative and 4 late). All patients with patent bSG were asymptomatic. Three occlusions were asymptomatic findings on CT, while the other three developed claudication (two patients with contralateral IIA occlusion and one with simultaneous occlusion of the external iliac). One patient (5%) developed an asymptomatic type III endoleak at 1 month and was successfully treated with a bridging SG. Overall, four patients (18%) required reinterventions (1 bilateral stenting of the external iliac arteries, 1 external and 1 internal SG extensions and 1 femoro-femoral cross-over bypass). Nine out of 16 patients (56%) with CT-FU>/=1 year had shrinking aneurysms. There were no postoperative aneurysm expansions. EVAR of aortoiliac aneurysms with IIA bSG is a good alternative to occlusion of the IIA in patients with challenging distal anatomy.

  18. MRI-based Assessment of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, M.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Imaging techniques play a key role in the Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) follow-up. The most important parameters monitored after EVAR are the aneurysm size and the presence of endoleaks. Currently, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is the most commonly used imaging

  19. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  20. Flow and wall shear stress characterization following endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersen, Johannes Thomas; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H.; Ku, David N.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is

  1. The influence of neck thrombus on clinical outcome and aneurysm morphology after endovascular aneurysm repair

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos Gonçalves, Frederico; Verhagen, Hence; Chinsakchai, Khamin; Keulen, Jasper; Voûte, Michiel; Zandvoort, Herman; Moll, Frans; Herwaarden, Joost

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: This study investigated the influence of significant aneurysm neck thrombus in clinical and morphologic outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: The patient population was derived from a prospective EVAR database from two university institutions in The Netherlands from 2004 to 2008. Patients with significant thrombus in the neck (>2 mm in thickness in at least >25% of circumference) were identified as the thrombus group and were compared with the rem...

  2. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Using a Reverse Chimney Technique in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome and Contained Ruptured Chronic Type B Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Kalender, Guenay; Heuschmid, Martin; Syha, Roland; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Brechtel, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We report endovascular thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) with reverse chimney technique in a patient with contained ruptured type B dissection. EVAR seems feasible as a bailout option in Marfan patients with acute life-threatening disease.

  3. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required inform...

  4. Outcomes after open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with friendly versus hostile aortoiliac anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, S. C.; Reimerink, J. J.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Balm, R.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), anatomic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) depends on aortic neck and iliac artery characteristics. If the aortoiliac anatomy is unsuitable for EVAR ("hostile anatomy"), open repair (OR) is the next option. We

  5. Potential value of aneurysm sac volume measurements in addition to diameter measurements after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, J.W. van; Prehn, J. van; Prokop, M.; Moll, F.L.; Herwaarden, J.A. van

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE:To investigate the value of aneurysm sac volume measurement in addition to diameter measurements based on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). METHODS:Interrogation of a vascular database identified 56 patients (51 men; median age 77 years, range

  6. Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first to use a nonsurgical technique to treat high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. This technique is useful for patients who cannot have surgery because their overall health would make it too ...

  7. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  8. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravastu, Sharath Chandra Vikram; Jayarajasingam, Rubaraj; Cottam, Rachel; Palfreyman, Simon J; Michaels, Jonathan A; Thomas, Steven M

    2014-01-23

    An abnormal dilatation of the abdominal aorta is referred to as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Due to the risk of rupture, surgical repair is offered electively to individuals with aneurysms greater than 5.5 cm in size. Traditionally, conventional open surgical repair (OSR) was considered the first choice approach. However, over the past two decades endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has gained popularity as a treatment option. This article intends to review the role of EVAR in the management of elective AAA. To assess the effectiveness of EVAR versus conventional OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery, and EVAR versus best medical care in those considered unfit for surgery. This was determined by the effect on short, intermediate and long-term mortality, endograft related complications, re-intervention rates and major complications. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (January 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12). The TSC also searched trial databases for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. Prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing EVAR with OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery. and comparing EVAR with best medical care in individuals considered unfit for surgery. We excluded studies with inadequate data or using an inadequate randomisation technique. Three reviewers independently evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and extracted data using pro forma designed by the Cochrane PVD Group. We assessed the quality of trials using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. We entered collected data in to Review Manager (version 5.2.3) for analysis. Where direct comparisons could be made, we determined odds ratios (OR). We tested studies for heterogeneity and, when present, we used a random-effects model; otherwise we used a fixed-effect model. We tabulated

  9. Semiautomatic sizing software in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, Jorik J.; Marquering, Henk A.; Vahl, Anco; Wisselink, Willem; Schreve, Michiel A.; de Boo, Diederick W.; Reekers, Jim A.; Legemate, Dink A.; Balm, Ron

    2014-01-01

    In emergency endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured aneurysms of the aorta (rAAA), anatomical suitability must be determined. Semiautomatic three-dimensional assessment of the aortoiliac arteries has the potential to standardise measurements. This study assesses the fitness for purpose of such a

  10. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  11. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Yuya; Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Hase, Soichiro; Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients

  12. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  13. Evaluation of Aneurysm Neck Angle Change After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Clinical Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Trong Binh; Moon, Mi Hyoung [Inha University Hospital, Endovascular Training Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Sun, E-mail: radjeon@inha.ac.kr [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kee Chun [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun-Myoung [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the aneurysm neck angle changes and post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) complications.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed 72 cases of elective EVAR for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 109 consecutive cases from December 2005 to April 2014. Patients were divided into angulated and non-angulated groups. The angulated group was defined as neck angulation ≥60°. Neck angle was evaluated pre- and post-EVAR during short- (within 1 month), mid- (3–6 months), and long-term (>1 year) follow-up. Aneurysm sac diameter change, aneurysm neck morphology other than angulation, endoleaks, and other post-procedural complications were also documented.ResultsA total of 34 patients were enrolled in the angulated group. There were no statistical differences in age, sex, follow-up duration, and aneurysm neck profile between the two groups (p > 0.05). Both groups showed statistically significant and consistent decreases in angulation during the follow-up period (p < 0.01). The angulated group revealed 22.45 % more straightening than the non-angulated group. Recoil of the Endurant device occurred in the angulated group. No statistically significant intergroup differences were observed in any endoleaks, complications, or re-intervention rates (p > 0.05). Pre-EVAR angle was the only predictor for post-procedural angle change (p < 0.001).ConclusionEVAR is applicable for patients with highly angulated aneurysm neck and provides consistent neck straightening over long-term follow-up. Recoil was evident in the angulated group using the Endurant device.

  14. Emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with a preferential endovascular strategy : Mortality and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, Marten R.; Groen, Henk; Oranen, Bjorn I.; van der Hilst, Christian S.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Prins, Ted R.; van den Dungen, Jan J.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mortality and treatment costs of a new management protocol with preferential use of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: From September 2003 until February 2005, 49 consecutive patients (45 men; mean age 71 years) with

  15. Endovascular repair of para-anastomotic aortoiliac aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.

  16. Concept of the aortic aneurysm repair-related surgical stress: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Demetrios N; Kontos, Michalis I; Mantonakis, Eleftherios I; Athanasiou, Antonios K; Spartalis, Eleftherios D; Bakoyiannis, Chris N; Chrousos, George P; Georgopoulos, Sotirios E

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA) is a serious threat for human life. AAA repair is a high-risk procedure which results in a severe surgical stress response. We aim to give a conceptual description of the underlying pathophysiology of stress after surgical repair of AAA. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched for publications with the medical subject heading "surgical stress" and keywords "abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)", or "cytokines" or "hormones" or "open repair (OR)" or "endovascular repair (EVAR)". We restricted our search to English till 2012 and only in cases of abdominal and thoracoabdominal aneurysms (TAAA). We identified 93 articles that were available in English as abstracts or/and full-text articles that were deemed appropriate for our review. Literature highlights no statistical significance for early acute TNF-α production in EVAR and no TNF-α production in OR. IL-6 and IL-8 levels are higher after OR especially when compared with those of EVAR. IL-10 peak was observed during ischemic phase in aneurysm surgical repair. Cortisol and epinephrine levels are higher in OR patients in comparison to EVAR patients. Finally, the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome was significantly higher in OR than EVAR patients.

  17. Aortic Curvature Is a Predictor of Late Type Ia Endoleak and Migration After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmann, Richte C L; van Noort, Kim; Overeem, Simon P; Ouriel, Kenneth; Jordan, William D; Muhs, Bart E; 't Mannetje, Yannick; Reijnen, Michel; Fioole, Bram; Ünlü, Çağdaş; Brummel, Peter; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the association between aortic curvature and other preoperative anatomical characteristics and late (>1 year) type Ia endoleak and endograft migration in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) patients. Eight high-volume EVAR centers contributed 116 EVAR patients (mean age 81±7 years; 103 men) to the study: 36 patients (mean age 82±7 years; 31 men) with endograft migration and/or type Ia endoleak diagnosed >1 year after the initial EVAR and 80 controls without early or late complications. Aortic curvature was calculated from the preoperative computed tomography scan as the maximum and average curvature over 5 predefined aortic segments: the entire infrarenal aortic neck, aneurysm sac, and the suprarenal, juxtarenal, and infrarenal aorta. Other morphological characteristics included neck length, neck diameter, mural neck calcification and thrombus, suprarenal and infrarenal angulation, and largest aneurysm sac diameter. Independent risk factors were identified using backward stepwise logistic regression. Relevant cutoff values for each of the variables in the final regression model were determined with the receiver operator characteristic curve. Logistic regression identified maximum curvature over the length of the aneurysm sac (>47 m -1 ; p=0.023), largest aneurysm sac diameter (>56 mm; p=0.028), and mural neck thrombus (>11° circumference; pIa endoleak. Aortic curvature is a predictor for late type Ia endoleak and endograft migration after EVAR. These findings suggest that aortic curvature is a better parameter than angulation to predict post-EVAR failure and should be included as a hostile neck parameter.

  18. An anatomic risk model to screen post endovascular aneurysm repair patients for aneurysm sac enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Chien Yi M; Tadros, Rami O; Beckerman, William E; Han, Daniel K; Tardiff, Melissa L; Torres, Marielle R; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2017-09-01

    Follow-up computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans add considerable postimplantation costs to endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). By building a risk model, we hope to identify patients at low risk for aneurysm sac enlargement to minimize unnecessary CTAs. 895 consecutive patients who underwent EVAR for AAA were reviewed, of which 556 met inclusion criteria. A Probit model was created for aneurysm sac enlargement, with preoperative aneurysm morphology, patient demographics, and operative details as variables. Our final model included 287 patients and had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 68.9%, and an accuracy of 70.4%. Ninety-nine (35%) of patients were assigned to the high-risk group, whereas 188 (65%) of patients were assigned to the low-risk group. Notably, regarding anatomic variables, our model reported that age, pulmonary comorbidities, aortic neck diameter, iliac artery length, and aneurysms were independent predictors of post-EVAR sac enlargement. With the exception of age, all statistically significant variables were qualitatively supported by prior literature. With regards to secondary outcomes, the high-risk group had significantly higher proportions of AAA-related deaths (5.1% versus 1.1%, P = 0.037) and Type 1 endoleaks (9.1% versus 3.2%, P = 0.033). Our model is a decent predictor of patients at low risk for post AAA EVAR aneurysm sac enlargement and associated complications. With additional validation and refinement, it could be applied to practices to cut down on the overall need for postimplantation CTA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Impact of Centralisation and Endovascular Aneurysm Repair on Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Based on International Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Lilly, Jacob; Björck, Martin; Venermo, Maarit; Debus, Sebastian; Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Altreuther, Martin; Beiles, Barry; Szeberin, Zoltan; Eldrup, Nikolaj; Danielsson, Gudmundur; Thomson, Ian; Wigger, Pius; Khashram, Manar; Loftus, Ian; Mani, Kevin

    2018-02-23

    Current management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) varies among centres and countries, particularly in the degree of implementation of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and levels of vascular surgery centralisation. This study assesses these variations and the impact they have on outcomes. RAAA repairs from vascular surgical registries in 11 countries, 2010-2013, were investigated. Data were analysed overall, per country, per treatment modality (EVAR or open aortic repair [OAR]), centre volume (quintiles IV), and whether centres were predominantly EVAR (≥50% of RAAA performed with EVAR [EVAR(p)]) or predominantly OAR [OAR(p)]. Primary outcome was peri-operative mortality. Data are presented as either mean values or percentages with 95% CI within parentheses, and compared with chi-square tests, as well as with adjusted OR. There were 9273 patients included. Mean age was 74.7 (74.5-74.9) years, and 82.7% of patients were men (81.9-83.6). Mean AAA diameter at rupture was 7.6 cm (7.5-7.6). Of these aneurysms, 10.7% (10.0-11.4) were less than 5.5 cm. EVAR was performed in 23.1% (22.3-24.0). There were 6817 procedures performed in OAR(p) centres and 1217 performed in EVAR(p) centres. Overall peri-operative mortality was 28.8% (27.9-29.8). Peri-operative mortality for OAR was 32.1% (31.0-33.2) and for EVAR 17.9% (16.3-19.6), p  22 repairs per year), 23.3% (21.2-25.4) than in QII-V, 30.0% (28.9-31.1), p < .001. Peri-operative mortality after OAR was lower in high volume centres compared with the other centres, 25.3% (23.0-27.6) and 34.0% (32.7-35.4), respectively, p < .001. There was no significant difference in peri-operative mortality after EVAR between centres based on volume. Peri-operative mortality is lower in centres with a primary EVAR approach or with high case volume. Most repairs, however, are still performed in low volume centres and in centres with a primary OAR strategy. Reorganisation of acute vascular surgical services may improve

  20. Improving Patient Compliance With Post-EVAR Surveillance May Prevent Late Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skervin, Alicia L; Lim, Chung S; Sritharan, Kaji

    2017-10-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has gained increasing popularity in the treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. Despite its favorable early outcomes, the long-term efficacy of EVAR remains a concern. Late rupture is the ultimate treatment failure and continues to complicate EVAR. Univariate and multivariate analyses have identified factors predictive of late rupture. The importance of EVAR surveillance to prevent late complications is equally widely acknowledged. This article aims to present our current understanding of the precipitating factors of late rupture after EVAR and explores whether the key to its prevention lies within improving patient factors, particularly compliance to follow-up appointments or whether physicians hold the solution.

  1. High risk endovascular aneurysm repair: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Samanthi

    2017-10-01

    Mr AB is a 66-year old gentleman who presented for elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) following a routine screening scan identifying a 5.5cm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). He had a past history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with FEV1/FVC ratio of 48% on pre-assessment. He was hypertensive with a history of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), which has remained asymptomatic following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) eight years prior to this presentation. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  2. Influence of Gender on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevidomskyte, Daiva; Shalhub, Sherene; Singh, Niten; Farokhi, Ellen; Meissner, Mark H

    2017-02-01

    Women have been shown to experience inferior outcomes following intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) treatment in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and open surgical repair (OSR) groups. The goal of our study was to compare gender-specific presentation, management, and early outcomes after AAA repair using a statewide registry. We utilized the Washington State's Vascular Interventional Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program registry data collected in 19 hospitals from July 2010 to September 2013. Demographics, presentation, procedural data, and outcomes in elective and emergent AAA repair groups were analyzed. We identified 1,231 patients (19.6% women) who underwent intact (86.4%) or ruptured AAA (13.6%) repairs. Nine thousand seventy-two (79.0%) patients had EVAR and 259 (21.0%) had OSR. Men and women were of equivalent age and had similar comorbidities, except that women had less coronary artery disease (P aneurysm diameters (5.8 ± 1.1 vs. 6.2 ± 1.8 cm, P aneurysm size. Men were more likely to undergo EVAR, with significant differences in elective (82.1% vs. 74.1%, P = 0.01), but not ruptured repair. Women had significantly higher mortality rates following elective EVAR (3.1% vs. 0.6%, P = 0.01), but not after ruptured or elective open repair. Following elective EVAR, women were less likely to be discharged to home after longer hospital stays (3 vs. 2 days, P aneurysm diameter, and similar medical comorbidities, women experience substantially worse hospital outcomes primarily driven by elective endovascular procedures. Utilization of endovascular techniques in women still remains lower compared with men. Improvement of elective outcomes in women will likely depend on technical advancements in repair techniques and management strategies that may differ between genders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The financial implications of endovascular aneurysm repair in the cost containment era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David H; Horvath, Alexander J; Goodney, Philip P; Rzucidlo, Eva M; Nolan, Brian W; Walsh, Daniel B; Zwolak, Robert M; Powell, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with significant direct device costs. Such costs place EVAR at odds with efforts to constrain healthcare expenditures. This study examines the procedure-associated costs and operating margins associated with EVAR at a tertiary care academic medical center. All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (n = 127). Among this cohort, 49 patients met standard commercial instruction for use guidelines, were treated using a single manufacturer device, and billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) 238. Of these 49 patients, net technical operating margins (technical revenue minus technical cost) were calculated in conjunction with the hospital finance department. EVAR implant costs were determined for each procedure. DRG 238-associated costs and length of stay were benchmarked against other academic medical centers using University Health System Consortium 2012 data. Among the studied EVAR cohort (age 75, 82% male, mean length of stay, 1.7 days), mean technical costs totaled $31,672. Graft implants accounted for 52% of the allocated technical costs. Institutional overhead was 17% ($5495) of total technical costs. Net mean total technical EVAR-associated operating margins were -$4015 per procedure. Our institutional costs and length of stay, when benchmarked against comparable centers, remained in the lowest quartile nationally using University Health System Consortium costs for DRG 238. Stent graft price did not correlate with total EVAR market share. EVAR is currently associated with significant negative operating margins among Medicare beneficiaries. Currently, device costs account for over 50% of EVAR-associated technical costs and did not impact EVAR market share, reflecting an unawareness of cost differential among surgeons. These data indicate that EVAR must undergo dramatic care delivery redesign for this practice to remain sustainable. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular

  4. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeemuddin, M.; Pherwani, A.D.; Asquith, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  5. Procedure-related mortality of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using revised reporting standards.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konig, G.G.; Vallabhneni, S.R.; Marrewijk, C.J. van; Leurs, L.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the definition of Procedure-related mortality after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as defined by the Committee for Standardized Reporting Practices in Vascular Surgery. METHODS: Data on patients with an AAA were taken from the EUROSTAR database.

  6. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair complicated by spondylodiscitis and iliaco-enteral fistula.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, H.D. de; Sterkenburg, S.M. van; Pierie, M.; Reijnen, M.M.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Infections of abdominal aortic endografts are rare. There are no reports on the association with spondylodiscitis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and subsequently femorofemoral bypass placement due to occlusion of the right limb of the

  7. Endovascular aneurysm repair: state-of-art imaging techniques for preoperative planning and surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijers, M; Resch, T; Van Den Berg, J C

    2009-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) represents one of the greatest advances in vascular surgery over the past 50 years. In contrast to conventional aneurysm repair, EVAR requires accurate preoperative imaging and stringent postoperative surveillance. Duplex ultrasound (DUS), transesophageal...... echocardiography, intravascular ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), each provide useful information for patient selection, choice of endograft type and surveillance. Today most interventionists and surgeons will rely on CT or MR to assess aortic morphology, evaluate access artery...... and dual-source CT could reduce radiation dose and obviate the need for nephrotoxic contrast. Up-to-date knowledge of non-invasive vascular imaging and image processing is crucial for EVAR planning and is essential for the development of follow-up programs involving reduced risk of harmful side effects....

  8. Clinical Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with the Kilt Technique for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with Hostile Aneurysm Neck Anatomy: A Korean Multicenter Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Young Kwon; Song, Myung Gyu; Seo, Tae-Seok; Kim, Jeong Ho; Song, Soon-Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and short-term clinical outcomes of Kilt technique-based endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with Seal ® stent-grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with hostile neck anatomy (angle > 60°). We retrospectively evaluated the pre-EVAR and follow-up computed tomography angiography findings of 24 patients (mean age 71 ± 11 years; age range 32-87 years; mean follow-up 50 ± 12 months) with hostile neck AAAs treated between 2010 and 2015. Serial change in aneurysmal neck angle was calculated using a standardized protocol. Relationships between clinical variables and outcomes were evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox analyses and mixed-model regression. In addition, the Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the cumulative rates of survival, endoleak, and reintervention. The primary technical success rate (success within 24 h after EVAR) was 100% (24/24). The survival rate was 96 ± 8% at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, and 87 ± 18% at 5 years. Endoleaks occurred in three patients. Four reinterventions were performed in three patients; no surgical revisions were required. Causes of post-EVAR mortality included intracerebral hemorrhage at 14 days and rhabdomyolysis at 32 months. The most remarkable change after Kilt-based EVAR was an acute decrease in the neck angle, which was observed between the pre-EVAR and first follow-up visits (at 1 month) (P = 0.001). Kilt-based EVAR with Seal ® stent-grafts for AAAs with a severely angulated neck (angle > 60°) provided high technical success, low mortality, and low complication rates during short-term follow-up.

  9. The Role of Learning in Health Technology Assessments: An Empirical Assessment of Endovascular Aneurysm Repairs in German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    Changes in performance due to learning may dynamically influence the results of a technology evaluation through the change in effectiveness and costs. In this study, we estimate the effect of learning using the example of two minimally invasive treatments of abdominal aortic aneurysms: endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (fEVAR). The analysis is based on the administrative data of over 40,000 patients admitted with unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to more than 500 different hospitals over the years 2006 to 2013. We examine two patient outcomes, namely, in-hospital mortality and length of stay using hierarchical regression models with random effects at the hospital level. The estimated models control for patient and hospital characteristics and take learning interdependency between EVAR and fEVAR into account. In case of EVAR, we observe a significant decrease both in the in-hospital mortality and length of stay with experience accumulated at the hospital level; however, the learning curve for fEVAR in both outcomes is effectively flat. To foster the consideration of learning in health technology assessments of medical devices, a general framework for estimating learning effects is derived from the analysis. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  11. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  12. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh; Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 ± 7.5 years, range 51–88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  13. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into the artery. Then use a dye to define the extent of the aneurysm. Use x-rays ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  14. Patient Compliance with Surveillance Following Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Anthony D.; Morbi, Abigail H. M.; Nordon, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeIntegral to maintaining good outcomes post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a robust surveillance protocol. A significant proportion of patients fail to comply with surveillance, exposing themselves to complications. We examine EVAR surveillance in Wessex (UK), exploring factors that may predict poor compliance.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 179 consecutive elective EVAR cases [2008–2013] was performed. 167 patients were male, with the age range of 50–95. Surveillance was conducted centrally (tertiary referral trauma centre) and at four spoke units. Surveillance compliance and predictors of non-compliance including age, gender, co-morbid status, residential location and socioeconomic status were analysed for univariate significance.ResultsFifty patients (27.9 %) were non-compliant with surveillance; 14 (8.1 %) had no imaging post-EVAR. At 1 year, 56.1 % (of 123 patients) were compliant. At years 2 and 3, 41.5 and 41.2 % (of 65 and 34 patients, respectively) were compliant. Four years post-EVAR, only one of eight attended surveillance (12.5 %). There were no statistically significant differences in age (p = 0.77), co-morbid status or gender (p = 0.64). Distance to central unit (p = 0.67) and surveillance site (p = 0.56) was non-significant. While there was a trend towards compliance in upper-middle-class socioeconomic groups (ABC1 vs. C1C2D), correlating with >50 % of non-compliant patients living within <10 mile radius of the central unit, overall predictive value was not significant (p = 0.82).ConclusionsCompliance with surveillance post-EVAR is poor. No independent predictor of non-compliance has been confirmed, but socioeconomic status appears to be relevant. There is a worrying drop-off in attendance beyond the first year. This study highlights a problem that needs to be addressed urgently, if we are to maintain good outcomes post-EVAR

  15. Patient Compliance with Surveillance Following Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, Anthony D., E-mail: deangodfrey@yahoo.co.uk; Morbi, Abigail H. M., E-mail: a.morbi@soton.ac.uk; Nordon, Ian M., E-mail: ian.nordon@uhs.nhs.uk [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Unit of Cardiac Vascular and Thoracic Surgery - CV& T, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeIntegral to maintaining good outcomes post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a robust surveillance protocol. A significant proportion of patients fail to comply with surveillance, exposing themselves to complications. We examine EVAR surveillance in Wessex (UK), exploring factors that may predict poor compliance.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 179 consecutive elective EVAR cases [2008–2013] was performed. 167 patients were male, with the age range of 50–95. Surveillance was conducted centrally (tertiary referral trauma centre) and at four spoke units. Surveillance compliance and predictors of non-compliance including age, gender, co-morbid status, residential location and socioeconomic status were analysed for univariate significance.ResultsFifty patients (27.9 %) were non-compliant with surveillance; 14 (8.1 %) had no imaging post-EVAR. At 1 year, 56.1 % (of 123 patients) were compliant. At years 2 and 3, 41.5 and 41.2 % (of 65 and 34 patients, respectively) were compliant. Four years post-EVAR, only one of eight attended surveillance (12.5 %). There were no statistically significant differences in age (p = 0.77), co-morbid status or gender (p = 0.64). Distance to central unit (p = 0.67) and surveillance site (p = 0.56) was non-significant. While there was a trend towards compliance in upper-middle-class socioeconomic groups (ABC1 vs. C1C2D), correlating with >50 % of non-compliant patients living within <10 mile radius of the central unit, overall predictive value was not significant (p = 0.82).ConclusionsCompliance with surveillance post-EVAR is poor. No independent predictor of non-compliance has been confirmed, but socioeconomic status appears to be relevant. There is a worrying drop-off in attendance beyond the first year. This study highlights a problem that needs to be addressed urgently, if we are to maintain good outcomes post-EVAR.

  16. Validation of the Simbionix PROcedure Rehearsal Studio sizing module : A comparison of software for endovascular aneurysm repair sizing and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velu, Juliëtte F.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    An important determinant of successful endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is proper sizing of the dimensions of the aortic-iliac vessels. The goal of the present study was to determine the concurrent validity, a method for comparison of test scores, for EVAR sizing and planning of the recently

  17. Long-term decline in renal function is more significant after endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Adas, Ziad; Shepard, Alexander D; Nypaver, Timothy J; Weaver, Mitchell R; Maatman, Thomas; Yessayan, Lenar T; Balraj, Praveen; Kabbani, Loay S

    2018-03-20

    It is not clear whether endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) results in an increase in renal insufficiency during the long term compared with open repair (OR). We reviewed our experience with AAA repair to determine whether there was a significant difference in postoperative and long-term renal outcomes between OR and EVAR. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients who underwent AAA repair between January 1993 and July 2013 at a tertiary referral hospital. Demographics, comorbidities, preoperative and postoperative laboratory values, morbidity, and mortality were collected. Patients with ruptured AAAs, preoperative hemodialysis, juxtarenal or suprarenal aneurysm origin, and no follow-up laboratory values were excluded. Preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and yearly serum creatinine values were collected. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated on the basis of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was classified using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Change in GFR was defined as preoperative GFR minus the GFR at each follow-up interval. Comparison was made between EVAR and OR groups using multivariate logistics for categorical data and linear regression for continuous variables. During the study period, 763 infrarenal AAA repairs were performed at our institution; 675 repairs fit the inclusion criteria (317 ORs and 358 EVARs). Mean age was 73.9 years. Seventy-nine percent were male, 78% were hypertensive, 18% were diabetic, and 31% had preoperative renal dysfunction defined as GFR below 60 mL/min. Using a multivariate logistic model to control for all variables, OR was found to have a 1.6 times greater chance for development of immediate postoperative AKI compared with EVAR (P = .038). Hypertension and aneurysm size were independent risk factors for development of AKI (P = .012 and .022, respectively). Using a linear

  18. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  19. Endovascular aneurysm repair delivery redesign leads to quality improvement and cost reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Horvath, Alexander J; Powell, Richard J; Columbo, Jesse A; Walsh, Teri R; Goodney, Philip P; Walsh, Daniel B; Stone, David H

    2015-08-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is now a mainstay of therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, although it remains associated with significant expense. We performed a comprehensive analysis of EVAR delivery at an academic medical center to identify targets for quality improvement and cost reduction in light of impending health care reform. All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (N = 127). Procedures were included if they met standard commercial instructions for use guidelines, used a single manufacturer, and were billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group 238 (n = 49). By use of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) quality improvement methodology (define, measure, analyze, improve, control), targets for EVAR quality improvement were identified and high-yield changes were implemented. Procedure technical costs were calculated before and after process redesign. Perioperative services and clinic visits were identified as targets for quality improvement efforts and cost reduction. Mean technical costs before the intervention were $31,672, with endograft implants accounting for 52%. Pricing redesign in collaboration with hospital purchasing reduced mean EVAR technical costs to $28,607, a 10% reduction in overall cost, with endograft implants now accounting for 46%. Perioperative implementation of instrument tray redesign reduced instrument use by 32% (184 vs 132 instruments), saving $50,000 annually. Unnecessary clinic visits were reduced by 39% (1.6 vs 1.1 clinic visits per patient) through implementation of a preclinic imaging protocol. There was no difference in mean length of stay after the intervention. Comprehensive EVAR delivery redesign leads to cost reduction and waste elimination while preserving quality. Future efforts to achieve more competitive and transparent device pricing will make EVAR more cost neutral and enhance its financial sustainability for health care systems. Copyright © 2015 Society for

  20. Flow and wall shear stress characterization after endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersen, Johannes T; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H; Ku, David N; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is different from a bifurcation with a tapered trajectory of the flow lumen into the two limbs and may induce unfavorable flow conditions. These include low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS), linked to atherosclerosis, and high shear rates that may result in thrombosis. An in vitro study was performed to assess the impact of EVAR and EVAS on flow patterns and WSS. Four abdominal aortic aneurysm phantoms were constructed, including three stented models, to study the influence of the flow divider on flow (Endurant [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn], AFX [Endologix, Irvine, Calif], and Nellix [Endologix]). Experimental models were tested under physiologic resting conditions, and flow was visualized with laser particle imaging velocimetry, quantified by shear rate, WSS, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) in the suprarenal aorta, renal artery (RA), and common iliac artery. WSS and OSI were comparable for all models in the suprarenal aorta. The RA flow profile in the EVAR models was comparable to the control, but a region of lower WSS was observed on the caudal wall compared with the control. The EVAS model showed a stronger jet flow with a higher shear rate in some regions compared with the other models. Small regions of low WSS and high OSI were found near the distal end of all stents in the common iliac artery compared with the control. Maximum shear rates in each region of interest were well below the pathologic threshold for acute thrombosis. The different stent designs do not influence suprarenal flow. Lower WSS is observed in the caudal wall of the RA after EVAR and a higher shear rate after EVAS. All stented models have a small region of low WSS and high OSI near the distal outflow

  1. Can an accessory renal artery be safely covered during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair?

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, George A.; Karkos, Christos D.; Antoniou, Stavros A.; Georgiadis, George S.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether coverage of an accessory renal artery (ARA) in patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of renal impairment. Altogether, 106 papers were located using the reported searches, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, patient group studied, rel...

  2. [Simultaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and left main trunk lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Mikio; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Higashi, Shigeki

    2010-10-01

    To patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and expanding large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and AAA repair has been recommended. A 68-year-old woman had a CAD and an AAA 71 mm in diameter which was enlarging. Coronary angiography showed severe stenoses in the left main trunk (LMT), the left anterior descending artery and the circumflex artery. On-pump beating CABG and AAA repair with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) were performed simultaneously, because intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) might be needed due to severe stenoses of LMT. Just after EAVR, on-pump beating CABG was performed. The patient was discharged 15 days after the operation. It was suggested that a simultaneous operation of CABG and EVAR might be safe and effective for high risk patients with CAD and AAA.

  3. A simulator for training in endovascular aneurysm repair: The use of three dimensional printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, I O; De Luccia, N

    2017-08-01

    To develop an endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) simulation system using three dimensional (3D) printed aneurysms, and to evaluate the impact of patient specific training prior to EVAR on the surgical performance of vascular surgery residents in a university hospital in Brazil. This was a prospective, controlled, single centre study. During 2015, the aneurysms of patients undergoing elective EVAR at São Paulo University Medical School were 3D printed and used in training sessions with vascular surgery residents. The 3D printers Stratasys-Connex 350, Formlabs-Form1+, and Makerbot were tested. Ten residents were enrolled in the control group (five residents and 30 patients in 2014) or the training group (five residents and 25 patients in 2015). The control group performed the surgery under the supervision of a senior vascular surgeon (routine procedure, without simulator training). The training group practised the surgery in a patient specific simulator prior to the routine procedure. Objective parameters were analysed, and a subjective questionnaire addressing training utility and realism was answered. Patient specific training reduced fluoroscopy time by 30% (mean 48 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] 40-58 vs. 33 min, 95% CI 26-42 [p printers Form1+ (using flexible resin) and Makerbot (using silicone) provided the best performance based on simulator quality and cost. An EVAR simulation system using 3D printed aneurysms was feasible. The best results were obtained with the 3D printers Form1+ (using flexible resin) and Makerbot (using silicone). Patient specific training prior to EVAR at a university hospital in Brazil improved residents' surgical performance (based on fluoroscopy time, surgery time, and volume of contrast used) and increased their self confidence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul, E-mail: m.a.waduud@doctors.org.uk [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Choong, Wen Ling, E-mail: wenlingchoong@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Moira, E-mail: moirasim9@gmail.com; Williams, Claire, E-mail: c.williams.3@research.gla.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Institute of Health and Wellbeing Glasgow (United Kingdom); Yadavali, Reddi, E-mail: reddi.yadavali@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Lim, Shueh, E-mail: s.lim.06@aberdeen.ac.uk [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Buchanan, Fraser, E-mail: f.buchanan.11@aberdeen.ac.uk [University of Aberdeen, The School of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Bhat, Raj, E-mail: raj.bhat@nhs.net [Ninewells Hospital, NHS Tayside, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Ramanathan, Krishnappan, E-mail: k.ramanathan@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, School of Medicine (United Kingdom); Ingram, Susan, E-mail: susan.ingram@luht.scot.nhs.uk; Cormack, Laura, E-mail: lgcormack@googlemail.com [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Moss, Jonathan G., E-mail: jon.moss@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance.

  5. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul; Choong, Wen Ling; Ritchie, Moira; Williams, Claire; Yadavali, Reddi; Lim, Shueh; Buchanan, Fraser; Bhat, Raj; Ramanathan, Krishnappan; Ingram, Susan; Cormack, Laura; Moss, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance

  6. Endovascular Versus Open Repair as Primary Strategy for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A National Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, K; Wanhainen, A; Djavani Gidlund, K; Björck, M; Mani, K

    2016-01-01

    In randomized trials, no peri-operative survival benefit has been shown for endovascular (EVAR) repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) when compared with open repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary repair strategy on early and midterm survival in a non-selected population based study. The Swedish Vascular Registry was consulted to identify all rAAA repairs performed in Sweden in the period 2008-12. Centers with a primary EVAR strategy (treating > 50% of rAAA with EVAR) were compared with centers with a primary open repair strategy. Peri-operative outcome, midterm survival, and incidence of rAAA repair/100,000 inhabitants aged > 50 years were assessed. In total, 1,304 patients were identified. Three primary EVAR centers (pEVARc) operated on 236 patients (74.6% EVAR). Twenty-six primary open repair centers (pORc) operated 1,068 patients (15.6% EVAR). Patients treated at pEVARc were more often referrals (28.0% vs. 5.3%; p strategy at 30 days (pEVARc 28.0%, n = 66; pORc 27.4%, n = 296 [p = .87]), 1 year (pEVARc 39.9%, n = 93; pORc 34.7%, n = 366 [p = .19]), or 2 years (42.1%, n = 94; 38.3%, n = 394 [p = .28]), either overall or in subgroups based on age or referral status. Overall, patients treated with EVAR were older (mean age 76.4 vs. 74.0 years; p strategy, either peri-operatively or in the midterm. The study supports the early findings of the randomized controlled trials in a national population based setting. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular aneurysm repair patients who are lost to follow-up have worse outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Zarkowsky, Devin S; Bostock, Ian C; Stone, David H; Black, James H; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Goodney, Philip P; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2017-06-01

    Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines recommend 1- and 12-month follow-up with computed tomography imaging for the year after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). We describe the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of EVAR patients who are lost to follow-up (LTF). All patients undergoing elective EVAR in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) data set (January 2003-December 2015) were stratified according to long-term follow-up method (in-person vs phone call vs LTF). Mortality was captured for all patients by linkage with the Social Security Death Index. Univariable statistics, Kaplan-Meier estimated survival curves, and Cox proportional hazard modeling were used to compare groups. Coarsened exact matching analysis was then performed to refine the association between LTF and risk of post-EVAR death. During the study period, 11,309 patients underwent elective EVAR (78% in-person follow-up, 11% phone call follow-up, 11% LTF). On univariable analysis, LTF patients had larger baseline aneurysms, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, more comorbidities, and worse baseline functional status compared to patients with in-person or phone call follow-up (P ≤ .05). Procedural factors (contrast material volume, blood transfusions, postoperative vasopressor use) were higher in the LTF group, as was the incidence of postoperative complications (P ≤ .05). Accordingly, LTF patients had longer postoperative lengths of stay and were less frequently discharged to home (P importance of office-based postoperative follow-up to all EVAR patients, particularly those with poor baseline health and functional status and more complicated perioperative courses. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impaired renal function is associated with mortality and morbidity after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Sarafidis, Pantelis; Melas, Nikolaos; Saratzis, Nikolaos; Kitas, George

    2013-10-01

    Renal function may be associated with poor outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), but this relationship has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality after EVAR. Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing elective EVAR; eGFR was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and patients were divided in four groups (eGFR ≥ 90 mL/min/1.73 m(2), group 1; 60-89, group 2; 30-59, group 3; stroke, and vascular complications. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed, and between-group comparisons were performed adjusted for variables that differed at baseline. A total of 383 patients (mean age, 69 ± 8 years; mean abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter, 6.2 ± 1.4 cm) were included. Over a mean follow-up of 34 ± 12 months, the following events occurred: 20 deaths (5.2%), 15 nonfatal myocardial infarctions (3.9%), 9 nonfatal strokes (2.3%), and 7 peripheral vascular complications (1.8%). Patients with an eGFR function is associated with an increase in cardiovascular events and mortality following elective EVAR. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Internal Iliac Artery Embolization during an Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with Detachable Interlock Microcoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo ChuL; Jeon, Yong Sun; Hong, Kee Chun; Cho, Soon Gu; Park, Jae Young [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Yong [Dept. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of detachable interlock microcoils for an embolization of the internal iliac artery during an endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A retrospective review was conducted on 40 patients with aortic aneurysms, who had undergone an EVAR between January 2010 and March 2012. Among them, 16 patients were referred for embolization of the internal iliac artery for the prevention of type II endoleaks. Among 16 patients, 13 patients underwent embolization using detachable interlock microcoils during an EVAR. Computed tomographic angiographies and clinical examinations were performed during the follow-up period. Technical success, clinical outcome, and complications were reviewed. Internal iliac artery embolizations using detachable interlock microcoils were technically successful in all 13 patients, with no occurrence of procedure-related complications. Follow-up imaging was accomplished in the 13 cases. In all cases, type II endoleak was not observed with computed tomographic angiography during the median follow-up of 3 months (range, 1-27 months) and the median clinical follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-27 months). Two of 13 (15%) patients had symptoms of buttock pain, and one patient died due to underlying stomach cancer. No significant clinical symptoms such as bowel ischemia were observed. Internal iliac artery embolization during an EVAR using detachable interlock microcoils to prevent type II endoleaks appears safe and effective, although this should be further proven in a larger population.

  10. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 ± 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 ± 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 ± 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 ± 21 mmHg, 23 ± 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 ± 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 ± 0.13 vs. 0.54 ± 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 ± 0.10 to 0.55 ± 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 ± 0.12 vs. 0.55 ± 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 ± 0.12 vs. 0.57 ± 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  11. Embolization by Direct Puncture with a Transpedicular Approach Using an Isocenter Puncture (ISOP) Method in a Patient with a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yukihisa; Hamaguchi, Shingo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kon, Yuri; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Yuka; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundEndovascular aortic repair (EVAR) requires further intervention in 20-30 % of cases, often due to type II endoleak (T2EL). Management options for T2EL include transarterial embolization, direct puncture (DP), or transcaval embolization. We report the case of an 80-year-old man with T2EL who successfully underwent DP embolization.MethodsEmbolization by DP was performed with a transpedicular approach using an isocenter puncture (ISOP) method. An isocenter marker (ICM) was placed at a site corresponding to the aneurysm sac on fluoroscopy in two directions (frontal and lateral views). A vertebroplasty needle was inserted tangentially to the ICM under fluoroscopy and advanced to the anterior wall of the vertebral body. A 20 cm-length, 20-G-PTCD needle was inserted through the outer needle of the 13-G needle and advanced to the ICM. Sac embolization using 25 % N-buty-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with Lipiodol was performed. After complete embolization, rotational DA confirmed good filling of the sac with Lipiodol. The outer cannula and 13-G needle were removed and the procedure was completed.ResultsThe patient was discharged the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 and 8 months later showed no Lipiodol washout in the aneurysm sac, no endoleak recurrence, and no expansion of the excluded aneurysm.ConclusionDP with a transpedicular approach using ISOP may be useful when translumbar and transabdominal approaches prove difficult

  12. The risk of endoleak following stent covering of the internal iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesparan, K.; Partridge, W.; Refson, J.; Abidia, A.; Aldin, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the risk of endoleak during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) involving the distal common iliac artery (CIA) when the internal iliac artery (IIA) is covered without prior coil embolization. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 145 (125 men, 20 women) consecutive EVAR cases. Clinical notes and radiological images were reviewed, and data collected on patient demographics, aneurysm morphology, covering of the IIA with or without embolization, presence of endoleaks, and patient symptoms relating to IIA ischaemia. Results: A total of 29 IIAs (10%) were covered in a total of 25 patients. Seven IIAs (24%) were embolized before stent covering (Embolization group), and 22 IIAs (76%) were covered only without embolization (Cover group). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean size of the abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter or CIA diameter between each group. No endoleaks from IIA retrograde filling were found in either group. Conclusion: The results of the present study do not support the traditional view that coverage of the IIA without prior embolization carries a high risk of endoleak, with no endoleaks seen in all 22 cases. Large-scale trials are required. However, the advent of branched-stenting techniques and the emergence of their success in long-term follow-up may preclude the former. - Highlights: • No EVAR endoleaks due to retrograde filling of the internal iliac artery (IIA). • No increased risk of endoleak with stent coverage of the IIA without embolisation. • Current evidence does not support traditional views

  13. Successful Aortic Banding for Type IA Endoleak Due to Neck Dilatation after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Yasushi; Tamai, Koichi; Shirasugi, Takehiro; Sato, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Kobinata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-25

    A 69-year-old man with a type IA endoleak that developed approximately 21 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) of a 46 mm diameter aneurysm was referred to our department. He had impaired renal function, Parkinson's disease, and previous cerebral infarction. Computed tomography angiography showed a type IA endoleak with neck dilatation and that the aneurysm had grown to 60 mm in diameter. We decided to perform aortic banding. The type IA endoleak disappeared after banding and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. Aortic banding may be effective for type IA endoleak after EVAR and less invasive for high-risk patients in particular.

  14. Duplex ultrasound in aneurysm surveillance following endovascular aneurysm repair: a comparison with computed tomography aortography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, Brian J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cumulative radiation dose, cost, and increased demand for computed tomography aortography (CTA) suggest that duplex ultrasonography (DU) may be an alternative to CTA-based surveillance. We compared CTA with DU during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up. METHODS: Patients undergoing EVAR had clinical and radiological follow-up data entered in a prospectively maintained database. For the purpose of this study, the gold standard test for endoleak detection was CTA, and an endoleak detected on DU alone was assumed to be a false positive result. DU interpretation was performed independently of CTA and vice versa. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-two patients underwent EVAR, of whom 117 attended for follow-up ranging from six months to nine years (mean, 32 months). Adequate aneurysm sac visualisation on DU was not possible in 1.7% of patients, predominantly due to obesity. Twenty-eight endoleaks were detected in 28 patients during follow-up. Of these, 24 were initially identified on DU (four false negative DU examinations), and eight had at least one negative CTA with a positive DU prior to diagnosis. Twenty-three endoleaks were type II in nature and three of these patients had increased sac size. There was one type I and four type III endoleaks. Two of these (both type III) had an increased sac size. Of 12 patients with increased aneurysm size of 5 mm or more at follow-up, five had an endoleak visible on DU, yet negative CTA and a further five had endoleak visualisation on both DU and CTA. Of six endoleaks which underwent re-intervention, all were initially picked up on DU. One of these endoleaks was never demonstrated on CTA and a further two had at least one negative CTA prior to endoleak confirmation. Positive predictive value for DU was 45% and negative predictive value 94%. Specificity of DU for endoleak detection was 67% when compared with CTA, because of the large number of false positive DU results. Sensitivity for DU was 86%, with all

  15. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye Doo; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Jung, Sang Young; Chang, Nam Kyu; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and find the prognostic factors of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with hostile neck anatomy of the abdominal aorta. This study was performed on 100 patients with abdominal aneurysm who were treated with EVAR between March 2006 and December 2010. We divided the patients into two groups: good neck anatomy (GNA), and hostile neck anatomy (HNA) and then compared the primary success rate and the incidence rate of complications with EVAR between the two groups. Our aim was to determine the factors related to the complications of EVAR among HNA types. There were no significant differences of primary success rate and incidence rate of complications between the two groups. Among the types of HNA, the short neck angle [odd ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-18.70; p = 0.023] and large neck angle (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 0.15-11.85; p = 0.031) showed a low primary success rate. The short neck angle (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.18-12.29; p = 0.002) and large neck angle (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 0.14-19.07; p = 0.032) showed a high incidence rate of early type 1 complication. In the case of the large neck angle (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 0.96-20.80; p = 0.047), the large neck thrombus (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 0.24-7.12; p = 0.035) and large neck calcification (OR, 2.50; 95% CI, 0.08-18.37; p 0.043) showed a high incidence rate of complications within a year. The results suggest that patients with hostile neck anatomy can be treated with EVAR successfully, although there was a higher incidence of complications in patients with a short neck length, severe neck angulation, circumferential thrombosis, and calcified proximal neck.

  16. Variation in hospital costs and reimbursement for endovascular aneurysm repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Gary W; Neal, Dan; DeMartino, Randall R; Schneider, Joseph R; Singh, Tej; Kraiss, Larry; Scali, Salvatore; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Hoel, Andrew; Cronenwett, Jack L

    2017-10-01

    Comparing costs between centers is difficult because of the heterogeneity of vascular procedures contained in broad diagnosis-related group (DRG) billing categories. The purpose of this pilot project was to develop a mechanism to merge Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) clinical data with hospital billing data to allow more accurate cost and reimbursement comparison for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures across centers. Eighteen VQI centers volunteered to submit UB04 billing data for 782 primary, elective infrarenal EVAR procedures performed by 108 surgeons in 2014. Procedures were categorized as standard or complex (with femoral-femoral bypass or additional arterial treatment) and without or with complications (arterial injury or embolectomy; bowel or leg ischemia; wound infection; reoperation; or cardiac, pulmonary, or renal complications), yielding four clinical groups for comparison. MedAssets, Inc, using cost to charge ratios, calculated total hospital costs and cost categories. Cost variation analyzed across centers was compared with DRG 237 (with major complication or comorbidity) and 238 (without major complication or comorbidity) coding. A multivariable model to predict DRG 237 coding was developed using VQI clinical data. Of the 782 EVAR procedures, 56% were standard and 15% had complications, with wide variation between centers. Mean total costs ranged from $31,100 for standard EVAR without complications to $47,400 for complex EVAR with complications and varied twofold to threefold among centers. Implant costs for standard EVAR without complications varied from $8100 to $28,200 across centers. Average Medicare reimbursement was less than total cost except for standard EVAR without complications. Only 9% of all procedures with complications in the VQI were reported in the higher reimbursed DRG 237 category (center range, 0%-21%). There was significant variation in hospitals' coding of DRG 237 compared with their expected rates. VQI clinical

  17. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  18. A preoperative risk score for transfusion in infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair to avoid type and cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Thomas F X; Shean, Katie E; Deery, Sarah E; Bodewes, Thomas C F; Wyers, Mark C; O'Brien, Kerry L; Matyal, Robina; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2018-02-01

    Preoperative type and cross are often routinely ordered before elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), but the cost of this practice is high, and transfusion is rare. We therefore aimed to stratify patients by their risk of transfusion to identify a cohort in whom a type and screen would be sufficient. We queried the targeted vascular module of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) for all elective EVARs from 2011 to 2015. We included only infrarenal aneurysms and excluded ruptured aneurysms and patients transfused within 72 hours preoperatively. Two-thirds of the cases were randomly assigned to a model derivation cohort and one third to a validation cohort. We created and subsequently validated a risk model for transfusion within the first 24 hours of surgery (including intraoperatively), using logistic regression. Between 2011 and 2015, there were 4875 patients who underwent elective infrarenal EVAR, only 221 (4.5%) of whom received a transfusion within 24 hours of surgery. The frequency of transfusion during the study period declined monotonously from 6.5% in 2011 to 3.2% in 2015. The factors independently associated with transfusion were preoperative hematocrit risk prediction model based on these criteria produced a C statistic of 0.69 in the prediction cohort and 0.76 in the validation cohort and a Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit of 0.62 and 0.14, respectively. A score of cross in 86% of patients. Of the 4203 patients (86%) with a hematocrit >36%, only 6 (0.1%) had a risk score of >3. Perioperative transfusion for EVAR is becoming increasingly uncommon and is predicted well by a transfusion risk score or simply a hematocrit of risk score would avoid unnecessary type and cross in the majority of patients, leading to significant savings in both time and cost. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of endograft relining on sac expansion after endovascular aneurysm repair with the original-permeability Gore Excluder abdominal aortic aneurysm endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodney, Philip P; Fillinger, Mark F

    2007-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the original-permeability Excluder (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) has been associated with postoperative sac expansion in the absence of endoleak. In these cases, we have performed an endovascular revision, relining the original endograft with another Excluder, in an effort to arrest sac expansion by reducing permeability. We have studied these cases to determine the effect of relining on aneurysm expansion. Patients who demonstrated sac expansion (>or=5 mm diameter, >or=5% three-dimensional volume) after EVAR with the original Excluder were evaluated. Between 1999 and 2004, the original-permeability endoprosthesis was used in 97 patients who underwent EVAR for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Sac expansion occurred in 24 patients, of which multiple imaging modalities showed 12 had expansion without demonstrable endoleak. Nine of the 12 have had endovascular relining, and five of these nine have >6 months follow-up to form the primary basis for this report. AAA size was stable or smaller in the first 6 months after the original EVAR for all patients. Once expansion began (typically in the time frame of 6 to 12 months), multimodality imaging showed no aneurysm spontaneously decreased in size without intervention, despite the absence of endoleak (n = 12). Expansion exceeded clinically significant thresholds at 30 months (mean) by diameter criteria and 22 months (mean) by three-dimensional volume criteria for the five patients with >6 months follow-up after relining. Endovascular relining was performed at a mean of 36 months, with a mean hospital stay of 1 day, and no morbidity or mortality. Over the entire duration of expansion (mean, 26 months), aneurysms expanded by 6.0 +/- 1 mm/year diameter and by 12% +/- 2%/year by three-dimensional volume. At a mean of 16 months follow-up after relining with another Excluder, the mean diameter decrease was 2.0 mm/year (P 6 months follow-up after

  1. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm with severely angulated neck and tortuous artery access: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qinglong; Huang, Lianjun; Huang, Xiaoyong; Peng, Mingliang

    2015-03-08

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has revolutionized the therapeutic strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, hostile proximal aneurysmal neck and tortuosity of access vessels remain challenges in selecting optimal stent-grafts in abdominal aortic aneurysms with difficult anatomy. A 65-year-old woman complained of intermittent abdominal pain for one week. Computed tomography angiogram demonstrated a tortuous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a tapered neck and a 136° of infrarenal angulation. Aneurysmal dilatation and severe calcification of bilateral iliac arteries and tortuous aortoiliac access were also showed. Endovascular approach using Endurant stent-graft was attempted at an outside hospital, but failed because of the significant tortuosity of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. Since the patient refused to have open aneurysm repair, he was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and possible EVAR with a different approach. EVAR was performed successfully using Gore Excluder stent-grafts (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). During the procedure, cannulation of the contralateral limb was unable to be achieved because of the tortuous aortoiliac course. Therefore, a snare was inserted from right radial artery, through the contralateral gate, to grasp the wire from left femoral artery. Two iliac stent-grafts were sequentially deployed with the lower end distal to the opening of the left internal iliac artery. Angiography confirmed complete sealing of the aneurysm with patency of bilateral renal arteries and external iliac arteries. The postoperative courses were uneventful and follow-up computed tomography angiogram at 6 months demonstrated patent bilateral femoral and renal arteries without endoleaks or stent migration. Although endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm with hostile neck and tortuous access is rather challenging, choosing flexible stent-grafts and suitable techniques is able to achieve an encouraging outcome.

  2. The current status of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Hosam; Ramlawi, Basel

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been one of the most important advances in the management of thoracic aortic disease in the past two decades. The procedure was originally developed by Dake and colleagues in 1994 for the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA), using the same principles as EVAR for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The first device approved for this indication was the TAG device (W.L. Gore & Associated, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) in 2005. Since then there has been a plethora of changes and new developments related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This article will summarize the major updates related to TEVAR, focusing on three main aspects: what is new in device technology and future prospects; the expanding indications of TEVAR for the treatment of other pathologies and the newly developed techniques involved; and a glimpse at the expected future direction in the field.

  3. Applicability and midterm results of branch cuff closure with vascular plug in branched endovascular repair for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Resch, Timothy; Sonesson, Björn; Kristmundsson, Thorarinn; Dias, Nuno V

    2017-08-01

    This study assessed the applicability and outcomes of the closure of unused cuffs in branched endovascular aneurysm repair (b-EVAR) of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. We reviewed b-EVAR procedures at a tertiary referral center to identify patients who underwent incomplete branching and needed closure of the unused branch cuffs. An electronic database and intraoperative and follow-up imaging studies were reviewed to assess technical applicability and outcomes. Between January 2007 and December 2015, 17 patients underwent incomplete branching during b-EVAR. The unused branch cuff in one patient occluded spontaneously after b-EVAR and was excluded from this analysis. The remaining 16 patients underwent 11 elective and five emergency repairs. Amplatzer Vascular Plugs (St. Jude Medical, Plymouth, Minn) were used to successfully close 17 branches: 8 targeting preoperatively occluded target vessels, 3 optional branches where fenestrations were used instead, 5 after failures of catheterization or stent bridging to target vessels, and 1 renal branch of an atrophic kidney. Four branch cuffs were extended with a peripheral covered stent before plug deployment. Sixteen branch cuffs were closed intraoperatively, and the remaining cuff was closed percutaneously at a later occasion. Perioperative death occurred in two patients. Median follow-up duration was 19 months (interquartile range, 11-30 months). There was no endoleak or reintervention related to the plugged cuffs. Two late deaths occurred not related to the aneurysm. Two patients required reinterventions for type III endoleaks with interval sac expansions caused by aortic stent graft component separation in tortuous thoracic segments not related to the occluded cuffs. Closure of the branch cuff of multibranched stent graft with Amplatzer Vascular Plug is feasible and effective. It was not associated with adverse aneurysm outcomes, and it is very useful especially when using an off-the-shelf device in the acute setting

  4. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters 18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% ± 3% and 84% ± 9% for the <18-mm and ≥18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  5. Outcome of renal stenting for renal artery coverage during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Jade S; Chang, Catherine K; Reilly, Linda M; Schneider, Darren B; Rapp, Joseph H; Chuter, Timothy A M

    2009-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the outcome of adjunctive renal artery stenting for renal artery coverage at the time of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Between August 2000 and August 2008, 29 patients underwent elective EVAR using bifurcated Zenith stent grafts (Cook, Indianapolis, Ind) and simultaneous renal artery stenting. Renal artery stenting during EVAR was performed with endograft "encroachment" on the renal artery ostium (n = 23) or placement of a renal stent parallel to the main body of the endograft ("snorkel," n = 8). Follow-up included routine contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), multiview abdominal radiographs, and serum creatinine measurement at 1, 6, and 12 months, and then yearly thereafter. Thirty-one renal arteries were stented successfully in 29 patients. The 18 patients with planned renal artery stent placement had a proximal neck length technique (6.9 +/- 3.1 mm) compared with those with planned endograft encroachment (9.9 +/- 2.6 mm). None of the patients with unplanned endograft encroachment had neck lengths 1 month postoperatively) or stent graft migrations. Adjunctive renal artery stenting during endovascular AAA repair using the "encroachment" and "snorkel" techniques is safe and effective. Short- and medium-term primary patency rates are excellent, but careful follow-up is needed to determine the durability of these techniques.

  6. Hepatopancreaticobiliary Values after Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Darrell; Coselli, Joseph S.; Johnson, Michael L.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: After thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, blood tests assessing hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) organs commonly have abnormal results. The clinical significance of such abnormalities is difficult to determine because the expected postoperative levels have not been characterized. Therefore, we sought to establish expected trends in HPB laboratory values after TAAA repair. Methods: This 5-year study comprised 155 patients undergoing elective Crawford extent II TAAA repair...

  7. Open versus endovascular aneurysm repair trial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinkauf, Craig; George, Elizabeth; Zhou, Wei

    2017-11-01

    The Open versus Endovascular Aneurysm Repair trial is the only randomized controlled trial that is funded by the federal government to evaluate the treatment outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms. Since the initial publication, multiple post-hoc analyses have become available. This review summarizes these data, focusing on the primary outcome measures (ie, overall survival) and several key secondary outcomes including aneurysm-related death, age consideration, secondary procedures, and endoleaks. Cost-effectiveness of each treatment modality and the limitations of OVER trial also are discussed critically in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mortality in endovascular and open abdominal aneurysm repair - trends in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Beckerath, Olga; Schrader, Sebastian; Katoh, Marcus; Luther, Bernd; Santosa, Frans; Kröger, Knut

    2018-01-01

    We analysed trends in mortality of endovascular (EVAR) and open aortic repair (OAR) in patients hospitalized for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in Germany from 2005 to 2015. We used national statistics published by the Federal Statistical Office in Germany to calculate mortality rate of patients hospitalized with ruptured (rAAA, n = 2,448 in 2005, n = 2,180 in 2015) and non-ruptured (iAAA, n = 11,626 in 2005, n = 14,205 in 2015) AAA. Considering only those who were treated with EVAR or OAR, treatment rates of iAAA with EVAR increased to 78.2 % in males and 72.6 % in females in 2015 and treatment rates of rAAA to 36.9 % and 40.7 %, respectively. In cases with iAAA, death rates associated with EVAR decreased in males from 2.1 to 1.1 % (p = 0.0005) in the period from 2005 to 2015 but not in females (1.8 % in 2005 and 2.3 % in 2015, p = 0.8511). Similar trends are seen in cases with rAAA (males 30.1 % and 24 %, p = 0.1034, females 36.4 to 37.3 %, p = 0.8511). Death rates associated with OAR increased in males from 4.7 % in 2005 to 5.7 % in 2015 (p = 0.0103) and tended to increase in females from 6.8 to 8.2 % (p = 0.1476). In cases of rAAA, there were no changes. EVAR treatment rates increased in cases with iAAA in both genders with age, as well as in males with rAAA, but not in females. OAR associated death rates increased with age in rAAA (from around 30 % in the sixth/seventh decade of life to almost 80 % in cases with patients over the age of 90) and in iAAA (from 1.1 to 20 %). The general increase in EVAR procedures in males and females hospitalized for rAAA and iAAA went along with a decrease in in-hospital mortality in males treated with EVAR for iAAA only and an increasing mortality in males treated with OAR for iAAA.

  9. EVAR: Benefits of CEUS for monitoring stent-graft status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantisani, Vito, E-mail: vito.cantisani@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-Pathological Sciences, Università Sapienza di Roma, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); Grazhdani, Hektor [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-Pathological Sciences, Università Sapienza di Roma, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); Clevert, Dirk-André [Interdisciplinary Ultrasound Center, Munich University, Hospital Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Iezzi, Roberto [Policlinico A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Aiani, Luca; Martegani, Alberto [Ospedale Valduce, Como (Italy); Fanelli, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Luca; Wlderk, Andrea; Cirelli, Carlo; Catalano, Carlo; Di Leo, Nicola; Di Segni, Mattia; Malpassini, Flavio; D’Ambrosio, Ferdinando [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-Pathological Sciences, Università Sapienza di Roma, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • In the last two decades several studies have shown the role of contrast enhanced ultrasound [CEUS] in post-EVAR surveillance, with very good diagnostic performance, absence of renal impairment, and no radiation, accompanied by low costs, in comparison with CTA. • In numerous prospective studies and meta-analyses the detection and characterization of endoleaks with CEUS is comparable to that of CTA imaging. • Nowadays in the EVAR surveillance novel strategies which involve CEUS with a central role, are suggested by several authors and applied in many institutions. • CEUS technique, findings, diagnostic accuracy, and its role in the follow up program are discussed in this review article. - Abstract: Endo vascular aortic repair [EVAR] is performed with low peri-operative morbidity and mortality rate and short hospital stay. However, EVAR needs a close and lifelong imagining surveillance for a timely detection of possible complications including endoleaks, graft migration, fractures, and enlargement of aneurysm sac size with eventual rupture. Contrast enhanced computed tomography [CTA] is actually considered the gold-standard in EVAR follow-up, but it is accompanied with radiation burden and renal injury due to the use of contrast media. In the last two decades several studies have shown the role of contrast enhanced ultrasound [CEUS] in post-EVAR surveillance, with very good diagnostic performance, absence of renal impairment, and no radiation, accompanied by low costs, in comparison with CTA. In numerous prospective studies and meta-analyses the detection and characterization of endoleaks with CEUS is comparable to that of CTA imaging. Nowadays, in the EVAR surveillance novel strategies which involve CEUS with a central role, are suggested by several authors and applied in many institutions. In this review article we will present a comprehensive overview and analyses of the literature on the CEUS state-of-art imagining of EVAR follow-up, with

  10. A Novel Chimney Approach for Management of Horseshoe Kidney During EVAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs with coexisting horseshoe kidney (HSK can be difficult to repair, with variable blood supply from the aorta and iliac/mesenteric vessels. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR has become a popular, less invasive approach to aneurysm care, and a chimney approach to EVAR (ChEVAR has expanded its use to more complex anatomy. It is mandatory to maintain adequate perfusion to the HSK and visceral branches as part of the treatment of an AAA. Report: A 61-year-old male with an HSK was incidentally found to have an infrarenal AAA that measured 6 cm on a non-contrast computed tomography (CT scan performed originally for a urologic complaint. A diagnostic angiogram was performed to define arterial anatomy and he was found to have a large inferior mesenteric artery (IMA arising 1 cm above the level of the aneurysm. ChEVAR was performed to preserve the IMA and flow to the HSK with a completion angiogram revealing patent renal arteries, IMA, and no evidence of an endoleak. Follow-up CT imaging demonstrated a Type II endoleak that resolved upon partial nephrectomy for a right-sided transitional cell carcinoma with resection of the arterial blood supply feeding the Type II endoleak. Discussion: IMA preservation via ChEVAR is technically feasible and was crucial to preserve blood supply via the IMA to the HSK. Partial nephrectomy treated the transitional cell carcinoma and resolved the Type II endoleak requiring no additional endovascular intervention. A unique treatment course demonstrated the benefits of less invasive interventions when repairing AAA with an HSK. Keywords: EVAR, Abdominal aortic aneurysm, Inferior mesenteric artery, Snorkel, Chimney, Endoleak

  11. [Aneurysms of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries: paradigm shift - operative therapy, if possible endovascular?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, R I; Hanack, U; Aronés-Gomez, S; Yousefi, S

    2014-09-01

    Therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently based on a high level of evidence. This is not true in the same manner for iliac artery aneurysms (IAA) which are frequently associated with AAAs and occur only rarely as isolated lesions. The therapeutic principles apply in the same way to both aneurysm locations. New findings, improved perioperative care and the rapid development of minimally invasive techniques require a constant update which is the aim of this article concerning the therapy of AAAs and IAAs. A systematic literature review was performed in PubMed and Medline and priority was given to recent publications with a high level of evidence. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and open aneurysm repair (OAR) result in a similar long-term survival. The perioperative survival advantage with EVAR persists only during medium-term postoperative courses. The reintervention rate after EVAR is substantially higher compared to OAR. For older patients and those who are considered unfit for OAR the expected benefits from EVAR has not been proven to date. Aneurysmal ruptures after EVAR demonstrate that a life-long surveillance of these patients is necessary. Therapy of AAAs and IAAs is increasingly being performed by EVAR. Even the majority of complex aneurysms are amenable to minimally invasive treatment. Nevertheless, indications for OAR continue to exist. Screening for AAAs results in a decrease of aneurysmal ruptures for which EVAR is also gaining importance.

  12. The Influence of 4 or more Patent Lumbar Arteries on Persistent Type II Endoleak and Sac Expansion after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seike, Yoshimasa; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Inoue, Yosuke; Omura, Atsushi; Uehara, Kyokun; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2018-03-06

    This study aimed to review our clinical results and determine how preoperative patent lumbar arteries (LAs) influence the occurrence of type II endoleaks or aneurysm sac enlargement after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to identify the preoperative computed tomography findings of persistent type II endoleaks from patent LAs that indicate the need for preventive procedures during EVAR. A total of 293 patients who underwent EVAR for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) between August 2007 and July 2013 were reviewed. Follow-up data were available for 194 patients (76% male, mean age 78 ± 6.8 years), and the mean follow-up time was 57 ± 23 months. The number of patent LAs was identified as a significant positive predictor of persistent type II endoleaks (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-1.7; P patent LAs resulted in a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 48%. The rates of freedom from sac enlargement (≥5 mm) at 3 and 5 years after EVAR were significantly lower in patients with 4 or more patent LAs than in those with fewer (90% and 76% vs. 96% and 89%; P = 0.0008). The number of patent LAs is associated as a significant risk factor with the development of persistent type II endoleaks and sac enlargement after EVAR. Four or more patent LAs should be recognized as the group having an elevated risk of developing late sac enlargement after EVAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Remote ischemic preconditioning for renal and cardiac protection during endovascular aneurysm repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stewart R; Boyle, Jonathan R; Tang, Tjun Y; Sadat, Umar; Cooper, David G; Lapsley, Marta; Norden, Anthony G; Varty, Kevin; Hayes, Paul D; Gaunt, Michael E

    2009-12-01

    To report a randomized clinical trial designed to determine if remote ischemic preconditioning (IP) has the ability to reduce renal and cardiac damage following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Forty patients (all men; mean age 76+/-7 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms averaging 6.3+/-0.8 cm in diameter were enrolled in the trial from November 2006 to January 2008. Eighteen patients (mean age 74 years, range 72-81) were randomized to preconditioning and completed the full remote IP protocol; there were no withdrawals. Twenty-two patients (mean age 76 years, range 66-80) were assigned to the control group. Remote IP was induced using sequential lower limb ischemia. Serum and urinary markers of renal and cardiac injury were compared between the groups. Urinary retinol binding protein (RBP) levels increased 10-fold from a median of 235 micromol/L to 2356 micromol/L at 24 hours (p = 0.0001). There was a lower increase in the preconditioned group, from 167 micromol/L to 413 micromol/L at 24 hours (p = 0.04). The median urinary albumin:creatinine ratio was significantly lower in the preconditioned group at 24 hours (5 versus 8.8, p = 0.06). There were no differences in the rates of renal impairment or major adverse cardiac events. Remote preconditioning reduces urinary biomarkers of renal injury in patients undergoing elective EVAR. This small pilot trial was unable to detect an effect on clinical endpoints; further trials are warranted.

  14. Impact of obesity on outcomes after open surgical and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Owen N; Sidawy, Anton N; Scanlon, James M; Walcott, Roger; Arora, Subodh; Macsata, Robyn A; Amdur, Richard L; Henderson, William G

    2010-02-01

    This study examined impact of obesity on outcomes after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Data were obtained from the Veterans Affairs National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Body mass index (BMI) was categorized according to National Institutes of Health guidelines. Multivariate regression adjusted for 40 other risk factors to analyze trends in complications and death within 30 days. We identified 2,201 patients undergoing 1,185 open and 1,016 endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms from January 2004 through December 2005. BMI distribution was identical in both groups and reflected national population statistics: approximately 30% were normal (BMI 18.5 to 24.9), 40% were overweight (25.0 to 29.9), and 30% were obese class I (30.0 to 34.9), II (35.0 to 39.9), or III (>/=40.0). After open repair, obesity of any class was independently predictive of wound complications (adjusted odds ratio = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 5.3; p = 0.002). Class III obesity was also an independent predictor or renal complications (adjusted odds rato = 6.3; 95% CI, 2.2 to 18.0; p aggresive wound infection prevention measures.

  15. Sexual Dysfunction After Conventional and Endovascular AAA Repair: Results of the DREAM Trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinssen, M.; Buskens, E.; Nolthenius, R.P.T.; Sterkenburg, S. van; Teijink, J.A.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To assess sexual function in the first postoperative year after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and open repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).Methods: In the Dutch Randomized Endovascular Aneurysm Management (DREAM) trial, 153 patients (141 men; mean age 71 years,

  16. Ultrasound surveillance of endovascular aneurysm repair: a safe modality versus computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John T; Boros, Michael J; Combs, Kristin

    2007-11-01

    Routine ultrasound surveillance is adequate and safe for monitoring endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs). A retrospective chart review including 160 endograft patients was performed from August 2000 to September 2005. All ultrasound examinations (n = 359) were performed by a board-certified vascular surgery group's accredited laboratory. Registered vascular technologists utilized the same equipment consisting of Siemens Antares high-definition ultrasonography with tissue harmonics and color flow Doppler. An identical protocol was followed by each technologist: scan body and both limbs of the endograft and distal iliac vessels, measure anterior-posterior aneurysm sac size, and detect intrasac pulsatility and color flow. Statistical analysis utilized Pearson's correlation coefficient and the paired t-test. Forty-one endoleaks were discovered out of the 359 exams (11.4%). There were type I (7, 17%), type II (26, 63%), and combined type I with type II (8, 20%) endoleaks. Correlation with computed tomography (CT) was obtained in 35 of these cases. CT discovered three endoleaks that were not seen with ultrasound. However, these particular ultrasound exams were inadequate due to additional factors (bowel gas, body habitus, hernia), which prompted CT investigation and, hence, endoleak discovery. Of the 41 endoleaks found on ultrasound, only 14 were seen on CT. Specifically, 26 type II endoleaks were seen with ultrasound versus only nine during CT. Additional factors addressed included comparison between ultrasound and CT of residual aneurysm sac measurements and conditions limiting ultrasound examination. Although criticized in the past, color flow ultrasonography is a safe and effective modality for surveillance of aortic endografts. Utilizing ultrasound to analyze abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac dimensions and endoleak detection is statistically sound for screening AAA status post-EVAR.

  17. 3D printing of an aortic aneurysm to facilitate decision making and device selection for endovascular aneurysm repair in complex neck anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Matthew D B S; Laycock, Stephen D; Brown, James R I; Jakeways, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    To describe rapid prototyping or 3-dimensional (3D) printing of aneurysms with complex neck anatomy to facilitate endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A 75-year-old man had a 6.6-cm infrarenal aortic aneurysm that appeared on computed tomographic angiography to have a sharp neck angulation of ~90°. However, although the computed tomography (CT) data were analyzed using centerline of flow, the true neck length and relations of the ostial origins were difficult to determine. No multidisciplinary consensus could be reached as to which stent-graft to use owing to these borderline features of the neck anatomy. Based on past experience with rapid prototyping technology, a decision was taken to print a model of the aneurysm to aid in visualization of the neck anatomy. The CT data were segmented, processed, and converted into a stereolithographic format representing the lumen as a 3D volume, from which a full-sized replica was printed within 24 hours. The model demonstrated that the neck was adequate for stent-graft repair using the Aorfix device. Rapid prototyping of aortic aneurysms is feasible and can aid decision making and device delivery. Further work is required to test the value of 3D replicas in planning procedures and their impact on procedure time, radiation dose, and procedure cost.

  18. Hepatic artery aneurysm repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaunoo SS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hepatic artery aneurysms remain a clinically significant entity. Their incidence continues to rise slowly and mortality from spontaneous rupture is high. Repair is recommended in those aneurysms greater than 2 cm in diameter. It is not surprising that vascular comorbidities, such as ischaemic heart disease, are common in surgical patients, particularly those with arterial aneurysms such as these. The decision of when to operate on patients who require urgent surgery despite having recently suffered an acute coronary syndrome remains somewhat of a grey and controversial area. We discuss the role of delayed surgery and postoperative followup of this vascular problem. Case presentation A 58-year-old man was admitted with a 5.5 cm hepatic artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was asymptomatic and was an incidental finding as a result of an abdominal computed tomography scan to investigate an episode of haemoptysis (Figure 1. Three weeks prior to admission, the patient had suffered a large inferior myocardial infarction and was treated by thrombolysis and primary coronary angioplasty. Angiographic assessment revealed a large aneurysm of the common hepatic artery involving the origins of the hepatic, gastroduodenal, left and right gastric arteries and the splenic artery (Figures 2 and 3. Endovascular treatment was not considered feasible and immediate surgery was too high-risk in the early post-infarction period. Therefore, surgery was delayed for 3 months when aneurysm repair with reconstruction of the hepatic artery was successfully performed. Graft patency was confirmed with the aid of an abdominal arterial duplex. Plasma levels of conventional liver function enzymes and of alpha-glutathione-S-transferase were within normal limits. This was used to assess the extent of any hepatocellular damage perioperatively. The patient made a good recovery and was well at his routine outpatient check-ups. Conclusion There is no significant

  19. Endovascular repair versus open surgery in patients in the treatment of the ruptured of aneurysms abdominal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo Martínez, Gloria María; Ballesteros Pomar, Marta; Menéndez Sánchez, Elena; Santos Alcántara, Eliezer; Rodríguez Fernández, Inés; Zorita Calvo, Andrés Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm is still a difficult challenge for the vascular surgeon due to the high perioperative mortality. The aim of our study is to describe the characteristics of the population as well as to compare morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing open surgery or endovascular repair in our center. Database with 82 rAAA between January 2002-December 2014, studying two cohorts, open surgery and endovascular repair. Epidemiologic, clinical, surgical techniques, perioperative mortality and complications are analyzed. 82 rAAA cases were operated (men: 80, women: 2). Mean age 72±9.6 years. 76.8% (63 cases) was performed by open surgery. smokers 59, 7%, alcoholism 19.5%, DM 10.9%, AHT: 53.6%, dyslipidemia 30.5%. The most frequent clinical presentation was abdominal pain with lumbar irradiation: 50 cases (20.7% associating syncope). Overall hospital mortality was 58.5%. Hemodynamic shock prior to intervention was associated with increased mortality (p .05). The presence of iliac aneurysms was associated with increased mortality (p .05). Hospital stay was lower in the endovascular group (p=.3859). Hemodynamic shock and the presence of concomitant iliac aneurysms have a statistically significant association with perioperative mortality in both groups. We found clinically significant differences in mortality, complications and hospital stay when comparing both groups with better results for EVAR, without statistically significant differences. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatopancreaticobiliary Values after Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darrell; Coselli, Joseph S.; Johnson, Michael L.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: After thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, blood tests assessing hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) organs commonly have abnormal results. The clinical significance of such abnormalities is difficult to determine because the expected postoperative levels have not been characterized. Therefore, we sought to establish expected trends in HPB laboratory values after TAAA repair. Methods: This 5-year study comprised 155 patients undergoing elective Crawford extent II TAAA repair. In accordance with a prospective study protocol, all repairs involved left-sided heart bypass, selective visceral perfusion, and cold renal perfusion. Blood levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total bilirubin, amylase, and lipase were measured before TAAA repair and for 7 days afterward. Ratios between postoperative and baseline levels were compared for each time point with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Temporal patterns for the laboratory values varied greatly. Amylase, lipase, and AST underwent significant early increases before decreasing to preoperative levels. LDH increased immediately and remained significantly elevated, whereas ALT increased more gradually. GGT remained near baseline through postoperative day 4, and then increased to more than twice baseline. Total bilirubin never differed significantly from baseline. After adjusted analysis, the ischemic time predicted the maximum AST, lipase, GGT, and LDH values. Conclusions: Although most HPB laboratory values increase significantly after elective TAAA repair, the temporal trends for different values vary substantially. The ischemic time predicts the maximum AST, lipase, GGT, and LDH levels. These trends should be considered when laboratory values are assessed after TAAA repair. PMID:26798731

  1. Survival After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Population with a Low Incidence of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Nerea; Clara, Albert; Diaz-Duran, Carles; Ruiz-Carmona, Carlos; Ibañez, Sara

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a prophylactic procedure, so the decision to operate should consider, as recent guidelines suggest, the life expectancy of the patient. Several models for predicting life span have been already designed, but little is known about how intervened patients evolve in Southern European Countries, where the incidence of coronary artery disease, the main cause of death among these subjects, is low. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 176 consecutive patients who underwent elective EVAR at the Vascular Surgery Department of the Hospital del Mar (Barcelona, Spain) during 2000-2014. Cox regressions were performed to identify preoperative factors associated with long-term survival after EVAR, and a risk model was developed. Three- and five-year survival rates were 73.9 and 53.9 %, respectively. During the follow-up, 72 deaths (40.9 %) were registered, cancer being the most frequent cause (41.7 %). Preoperative variables negatively associated with long-term survival were serum creatinine ≥ 150 µmol/L (HR 2.5; 95 % CI 1.4-4.2), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 1.9; 95 % CI 1.2-3.1), atrial fibrillation (HR 2.0; 95 % CI 1.2-3.4), and prior cancer history (HR 1.9; 95 % CI 1.2-3.1). Distal pulses present in both lower limbs were marginally associated with survival (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.4-1.07). The survival predictive model showed a good discrimination capacity (C statistic = 0.703; 95 % CI 0.641-0.765). Long-term survival of patients submitted to EVAR in our setting was worse than expected and markedly related to cancer. Our study suggests that predictive models for long-term survival after EVAR may be influenced by regional characteristics of the intervened population. This effect should be taken in consideration in the decision-making process of these patients.

  2. Combined coronary artery bypass surgery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, J J; Desai, J B

    1995-01-01

    The proper management of patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms and significant coexistent coronary artery disease is still debatable. The most common approach has been to perform the coronary artery bypass surgery some weeks before the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the hope of reducing the cardiac morbidity and mortality. We report our initial experience of three consecutive elective cases where the coronary artery bypass surgery and the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair ...

  3. Trans-aortic repair of a sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Ieromonachos, Constantinos; Stavridis, George; Antoniou, Theofani A; Athanassopoulos, George; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Alivizatos, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare and vary in their presentation and approach of surgical repair. We report on a case of isolated right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that underwent successful excision and patch repair with individual sutures placed through the annulus of the aortic valve.

  4. Early inflammatory response following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A comparison between endovascular procedure and conventional, open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA represents a pathological enlargment of infrarenal portion of aorta for over 50% of its lumen. The only treatment of AAA is a surgical reconstruction of the affected segment. Until the late XX century, surgical reconstruction implied explicit, open repair (OR of AAA, which was accompanied by a significant morbidity and mortality of the treated patients. Development of endovascular repair of (EVAR AAA, especially in the last decade, offered another possibility of surgical reconstruction of AAA. The preliminary results of world studies show that complications of such a procedure, as well as morbidity and mortality of patients, are significantly lower than with OR of AAA. The aim of this paper was to present results of comparative clinical prospective study of early inflammatory response after reconstruction of AAA between endovascular and open, conventional surgical technique. Methods. A comparative clinical prospective study included 39 patients, electively operated on for AAA within the period of December 2008 - February 2010, divided into two groups. The group I counted 21 (54% of the patients, 58-87 years old (mean 74.3 years, who had been submited to EVAR by the use of excluder stent graft. The group II consisted of 18 (46% of the patients, 49-82 (mean 66.8 years, operated on using OR technique. All of the treated patients in both groups had AAA larager than 50 mm. The study did not include patients who have been treated as urgent cases, due to the rupture or with simptomatic AAA. Clinical, biochemical and inflamatory parameters in early postoperative period were analyzed, in direct postoperative course (number of leucocytes, thrombocytes, serum circulating levels of cytokine - interleukine (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10. Parameters were monitored on the zero, first, second, third and seventh postoperative days. The study was approved by the Ethics Commitee of the Military Medical Academy. Results

  5. Bilateral Extracranial Carotid Artery Aneurysms Treated by Staged Surgical Repair

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    K.-M. Park

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bilateral extracranial carotid artery aneurysms (ECAAs are very rare. The case of a patient with bilateral ECAA who underwent staged surgical repair is reported. Report: A 35 year old man was referred with a slow growing pulsatile neck mass causing mild discomfort. Computed tomography and duplex ultrasound showed a right ECAA, with a 3.0 cm diameter 5 cm long true aneurysm, and a left ECAA, with 2.1 cm diameter 4.5 cm long true aneurysm. In two stages, both aneurysms were excised and bypassed with an interposition graft using saphenous vein. Discussion: ECAAs are rare with an incidence of about 4% of all peripheral aneurysms. Selection of treatment options is largely dependent on the aneurysm anatomy, including size and length. During open repair, it is important to avoid nerve injury. Keywords: Extracranial carotid artery aneurysm

  6. Outcomes of endovascular aortic repair in the modern era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Lilly, Jacob; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring outcomes following endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is critical. Although evidence from randomized controlled trials has solidified the role of EVAR, the analysis of outcomes and "real-world" data has uncovered limitations, improved the selection of appropriate patients, and underscored...... the importance of instructions for use. Subsequent studies demonstrated the learning curve of EVAR and gradual improvement of outcomes over time. Outcomes analyses will continue to play an important role, particularly as technological growth of endovascular therapy has enabled treatment of more complex aneurysm...... pathologies and patients. The important analyses are herein reviewed, following the development of EVAR in the treatment of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) to ruptured AAAs, and finally to complex aneurysms, including thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms and mycotic aneurysms. This includes an overview...

  7. Neck diameter and inner curve seal zone predict endograft-related complications in highly angulated necks after endovascular aneurysm repair using the Aorfix endograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sophie; Hicks, Caitlin W; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2018-03-01

    Many studies have found that preoperative aneurysm anatomy can determine the postoperative complication rates for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). With continual improvement in endograft technology, patients with challenging anatomy are increasingly able to undergo successful treatment with EVAR. This study aimed to quantify the influence of proximal neck anatomy on contemporary outcomes in a cohort of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients with highly angulated aneurysm necks. The study included 205 patients originally enrolled in the Prospective Aneurysm Trial: High Angle Aorfix Bifurcated Stent Graft (PYTHAGORAS) trial, the largest study to date to enroll patients with aortic aneurysm neck angles >60 degrees. Anatomic parameters included measurements of the proximal aneurysm neck as well as seal zones modeled in preoperative computed tomography scans. Follow-up up to 5 years postoperatively was available, for which stent-related complications (defined as sac expansion, stent migration, and type Ia endoleak) were assessed. Predictive anatomic parameters were assessed by Cox regression models, and a final multivariate model was created to predict complications. The cohort was also stratified by neck diameter for further comparison of complication rates. Of 205 patients enrolled in the trial, 67 stent-related complications occurred in 36 patients (17.6%) at 5 years after EVAR. Median follow-up was 48 months. Demographic and medical comorbidities did not predict risk of complications, nor did proximal neck length or neck angle. Independent predictors of post-EVAR complications included increasing proximal neck diameter (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.27; P < .05) and decreasing seal zone inner curve length (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.06; P < .05), which yielded a fair discriminatory utility (concordance, 0.67). Stratification by median neck diameter of 22.5 mm yielded two groups; patients with larger aortic necks

  8. An Artificial Neural Network Stratifies the Risks of Reintervention and Mortality after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair; a Retrospective Observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Karthikesalingam

    Full Text Available Lifelong surveillance after endovascular repair (EVAR of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is considered mandatory to detect potentially life-threatening endograft complications. A minority of patients require reintervention but cannot be predictively identified by existing methods. This study aimed to improve the prediction of endograft complications and mortality, through the application of machine-learning techniques.Patients undergoing EVAR at 2 centres were studied from 2004-2010. Pre-operative aneurysm morphology was quantified and endograft complications were recorded up to 5 years following surgery. An artificial neural networks (ANN approach was used to predict whether patients would be at low- or high-risk of endograft complications (aortic/limb or mortality. Centre 1 data were used for training and centre 2 data for validation. ANN performance was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis to compare the incidence of aortic complications, limb complications, and mortality; in patients predicted to be low-risk, versus those predicted to be high-risk.761 patients aged 75 +/- 7 years underwent EVAR. Mean follow-up was 36+/- 20 months. An ANN was created from morphological features including angulation/length/areas/diameters/volume/tortuosity of the aneurysm neck/sac/iliac segments. ANN models predicted endograft complications and mortality with excellent discrimination between a low-risk and high-risk group. In external validation, the 5-year rates of freedom from aortic complications, limb complications and mortality were 95.9% vs 67.9%; 99.3% vs 92.0%; and 87.9% vs 79.3% respectively (p<0.001.This study presents ANN models that stratify the 5-year risk of endograft complications or mortality using routinely available pre-operative data.

  9. The impact of stent graft evolution on the results of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Rami O; Faries, Peter L; Ellozy, Sharif H; Lookstein, Robert A; Vouyouka, Ageliki G; Schrier, Rachel; Kim, Jamie; Marin, Michael L

    2014-06-01

    There have been four eras in the development of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR): physician-made grafts, early industry devices, intermediary commercial endografts, and modern stent grafts. This study analyzes differences in outcomes between these four groups and the impact of device evolution and increased physician experience. From 1992 to 2012, 1380 patients underwent elective EVAR. Fourteen different devices were used during this time. The four generations were defined as follows: era 1, all physician-made devices; era 2, June 1994 to June 2003; era 3, June 2003 to January 2008; and era 4, January 2008 to July 2012. Grafts used in each era were the following: era 1, physician made; era 2, early industry, such as EVT, Talent, AneuRx, Excluder, Quantum LP, Vanguard, Ancure, and Teramed; era 3, Talent, Endologix, Excluder, AAAdvantage, Zenith, and Aptus; and era 4, Zenith, Endurant, and Excluder. Mean age was 75.2 years, and 84.5% were men. Adjunctive procedures decreased from era 1 to era 2 (P < .001) but rose again in eras 3 and 4 (P < .001). Procedure times (P < .001), blood loss (P < .001), and length of stay (P < .001) have decreased in eras 2, 3, and 4 compared with era 1. Major perioperative complications (era 1, 23%; era 2, 5.9%; era 3, 4.9%; and era 4, 4.7%; P < .001), abdominal aortic aneurysm-related perioperative mortality (era 1, 4.3%; era 2, 0.2%; era 3, 0.06%; and era 4, 0.5%; P < .001), and all-cause perioperative mortality (era 1, 7.7%; era 2, 1.9%; era 3, 1.5%; and era 4, 0.47%; P < .001) have also decreased in eras 2, 3, and 4 compared with era 1. Type I and type III endoleaks (P < .001) and the need for reintervention (P < .001) have decreased. Freedom from aneurysm-related mortality has significantly improved. EVAR has evolved during the last 20 years, resulting in an improvement in efficiency, outcomes, and procedural success. The most significant advance is seen in the transition from era 1 to the later eras. Copyright © 2014 Society for

  10. The effects of combining fusion imaging, low-frequency pulsed fluoroscopy, and low-concentration contrast agent during endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Nuno V; Billberg, Helen; Sonesson, Björn; Törnqvist, Per; Resch, Tim; Kristmundsson, Thórarinn

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a combined imaging protocol using low-frequency pulsed fluoroscopy, fusion imaging, and low-concentration iodine contrast for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of aortic aneurysms of varying complexity. The study retrospectively reviewed the data of 103 patients treated between May 2013 and November 2014 with the combined imaging protocol (group A) with low-dose fluoroscopy at 3.75 frames/s, fusion imaging, and iodine contrast of 140 mg iodine/mL. A control group (group B) consisted of 123 consecutive patients who underwent EVAR before the combined imaging protocol was introduced by matching the type of procedure. In group B, low-dose 7.5 frames/s fluoroscopy, no fusion imaging, and 200 mg iodine/mL contrast were used. All patients were reviewed for preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables, with emphasis on intraoperative radiation (dose area product) and iodine exposure, fluoroscopy, and operation times, as well as technical success. Values are presented as median and interquartile range (IQR) when not stated otherwise. Group A included 22 infrarenal EVARs, 17 iliac branch devices, 10 thoracic endovascular aortic repairs, 21 fenestrated EVARs, and 33 thoracoabdominal branched/fenestrated EVARs. Groups A and B were similar in types of procedure, body mass index (P > .05), and intraoperative technical success (92% and 92%, respectively; P > .05). Operation time (230 [IQR, 138-331] minutes vs 235 [IQR, 158-364] minutes) and fluoroscopy time (66 [IQR, 33-101] minutes vs 72 [IQR, 42-102] minutes) were similar in both groups (P > .05), but radiation exposure (19,934 [IQR, 11,340-30,615] μGym(2) vs 32,856 [IQR, 19,562-55,677] μGym(2); P involvement of the superior mesenteric artery in the repairs (81% vs 17%; P product by 22%. Only four of the group A patients (3.9%) showed a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate ≥30% after EVAR, although 32% of the entire group had at least moderately impaired renal

  11. Select early type IA endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair will resolve without secondary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Thomas F X; Corey, Michael R; Deery, Sarah E; Tsougranis, Gregory; Maruthi, Rohit; Clouse, W Darrin; Cambria, Richard P; Conrad, Mark F

    2018-01-01

    Although it is traditionally considered ominous, the natural history of early proximal attachment site endoleaks (IA) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is not well known. Our aim was to identify risk factors for persistent type IA endoleaks and to determine their effect on long-term outcomes after EVAR. All patients who underwent infrarenal EVAR at a single institution between 1998 and 2015 were identified. Preoperative axial imaging and intraoperative arteriograms were reviewed, and those patients with a type IA endoleak were further studied. Aneurysm features were characterized by two reviewers and were studied for predictors of persistent endoleaks at the conclusion of the case. Patient records and the Social Security Death Index were used to record 1-year and overall survival. We identified 1484 EVARs, 122 (8%) of which were complicated by a type IA endoleak on arteriography after graft deployment, with a median follow-up of 4 years. The majority of patients underwent additional ballooning of the proximal site (52 [43%]) or placement of an aortic cuff (47 [39%]); 30 patients (25%) received a Palmaz stent, and four patients were treated with coils or anchors. At case end, only 43 (35%) of the type IA endoleaks remained; at 1 month, only 16 endoleaks persisted (13%), and only six persisted at 1 year (6%). In multivariable analysis, the only independent predictor of persistence of type IA endoleak at the conclusion of the case was the presence of extensive neck calcifications (odds ratio [OR], 9.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-67.9; P = .02). Thirteen patients (11%) underwent reintervention for type IA endoleaks, with a time frame ranging from 3 days postoperatively to 11 years. There were three patients (2.4%) who experienced aneurysm rupture. Postoperative type IA endoleak was associated with lower survival at 1 year (79% vs 91%; relative risk, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4; P = .02), but it did not affect long-term survival (log-rank, P = .45

  12. Percutaneous endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair within the infrarenal region. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iłżecki, Marek; Zubilewicz, Tomasz; Terlecki, Piotr; Przywara, Stanisław

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to thoroughly evaluate the closure device ProStar XL in terms of its efficiency and safety in the percutaneous endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the infrarenal section of the body. Additionally, it was crucial to assess if there were any occurrences of regional complications at any step of the procedure. It was also important to stipulate the estimated hospitalization period as well as the overall cost of the PEVAR treatment with the use of ProStar XL. The analysis included 21 cases with PEVAR performed in the infrarenal region. The final success was achieved in 98.2% of the cases. One PEVAR case (that constituted 0.2% of this group) was unsuccessful because of the bleeding while the placement of the sutures with the use of ProStar XL was being performed. This resulted in the emergency treatment of the CFA with the continuous stitch (Prolene 5-0). During the postoperative period the above described patient was given 2 units of the Packed Red Blood Cells (PRBC). However, this complication (unexpected bleeding) did not influence the length of the hospitalization period in any significant way. Percutaneous vascular closure device ProStar XL used in the treatment of the common femoral artery (CFA) constitutes a necessary and safe supplement for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). The implementation of ProStar XL closure device proves to significantly shorten the hospitalization period after the EVAR treatment. Additionally, the safety of the entire procedure is exponentially linked to the experience of the operating surgeon.

  13. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and acute kidney injury in endovascular aneurysm repair or open aortic repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampoldi, Benedetta; Tessarolo, Serena; Giubbilini, Paola; Gaia, Paola; Corino, Samantha D; Mazza, Sarah; Rigolini, Roberta; Poli, Marco Dei; Vianello, Elena; Romanelli, Massimiliano M Corsi; Costa, Elena

    2018-02-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently after abdominal aortic surgery and there is currently no effective marker able to detect early onset. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) to early identify the development of acute renal damage in patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) or open aortic repair (OAR). Serial samples of blood and urine were obtained from 25 patients undergoing both EVAR and OAR. Seven male subjects with AKI and 18 subjects with no-AKI (17 males, 1 female) were included in the study. We determined concentrations of serum creatinine (sCr) and urinary, serum and whole blood NGAL (uNGAL, sNGAL, bNGAL) collected at baseline, and after 4 and 18 hours. AKI was defined according to the RIFLE criteria (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage kidney disease): increase by 50% in sCr or reduction of at least 25% of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from baseline. Seven patients developed AKI in the stage Risk. There was no significant difference in sNGAL concentrations in the AKI group as compared to no-AKI group. However, the uNGAL/uCreatinine ratio and bNGAL concentrations were significantly higher after 18 hours in the AKI group (no-AKI 1.69 (0.91 - 2.47) vs AKI 3.2 (2.08 - 5.92) ng/mg for uNGAL/uCreatinine ratio, P = 0.036; and no-AKI 83 (59 - 131) vs AKI 164 (126 - 263) ng/mL for bNGAL, P = 0.029). Our results suggest that uNGAL, sNGAL and bNGAL, after abdominal aortic surgery, are not suitable as early biomarkers of AKI.

  14. Systolic Sac Pressure Index for the Prediction of Persistent Type II Endoleak for 12 Months After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikoma, Akira, E-mail: yfb04322@nifty.com; Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio, E-mail: morisato@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Hirotatsu, E-mail: kuppa1220@yahoo.co.jp; Minamiguchi, Hiroki, E-mail: hiromina4@hotmail.com; Sonomura, Tetsuo, E-mail: sonomura@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Departments of Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshiharu, E-mail: nishim-y@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Okamura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: y-ok@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between the systolic sac pressure index (SPI) and the presence of endoleaks 12 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and MethodsWe performed a single-center prospective trial of consecutively treated patients. SPI (calculated as systolic sac pressure/systolic aortic pressure) was measured by catheterization immediately after EVAR. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was scheduled 12 months after EVAR to detect possible endoleaks.ResultsData were available for 34 patients who underwent EVAR for an AAA. Persisting type II endoleak was found in 8 patients (endoleak-positive group) but not in the other 26 patients (endoleak-negative group). The mean ± standard deviation SPI was significantly greater in the endoleak-positive group than in the endoleak-negative group (0.692 ± 0.048 vs. 0.505 ± 0.081, respectively; P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that an SPI of 0.638 was the optimum cutoff value for predicting a persistent endoleak at 12 months with high accuracy (0.971; 33/34), sensitivity (1.00), and specificity (0.962) values. The mean change in AAA diameter was −4.28 ± 5.03 mm and 2.22 ± 4.54 mm in patients with SPI of <0.638 or ≥0.638, respectively (P = .002).ConclusionPatients with an SPI of ≥0.638 immediately after EVAR were more likely to have a persistent type II endoleak at 12 months with an accuracy of 0.971, and showed increases in aneurysm sac diameter compared with patients with an SPI of <0.638.

  15. Intensive care unit admission after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is primarily determined by hospital factors, adds significant cost, and is often unnecessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Alshaikh, Husain N; Zarkowsky, Devin; Bostock, Ian C; Nejim, Besma; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2018-04-01

    A large proportion of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) patients are routinely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for postoperative observation. In this study, we aimed to describe the factors associated with ICU admission after EVAR and to compare the outcomes and costs associated with ICU vs non-ICU observation. All patients undergoing elective infrarenal EVAR in the Premier database (2009-2015) were included. Patients were stratified as ICU vs non-ICU admission according to location on postoperative day 0. Both patient-level (sociodemographics, comorbidities) and hospital-level (teaching status, hospital size, geographic location) factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with ICU vs non-ICU admission. Overall outcomes and hospital costs were compared between groups. Overall, 8359 patients underwent elective EVAR during the study period, including 4791 (57.3%) ICU and 3568 (42.7%) non-ICU admissions. Patients admitted to ICU were more frequently nonwhite and had more comorbidities, including congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and hypertension, than non-ICU patients (all, P postoperative adverse events, ICU admission after EVAR cost $1475 (95% confidence interval, $768-2183) more than non-ICU admission (P postoperative ICU admission is more closely associated with hospital practice patterns than with individual patient risk. Routine ICU admission after EVAR adds significant cost without reducing failure to rescue or in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: surveillance of endoleak using maximum transverse diameter of aorta on non-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Hiroki; Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)], E-mail: sueyo@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-15

    Background. Repeat volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is time-consuming and requires advanced processing, dedicated equipment, and skilled operators. Purpose. To clarify the validity of measuring the maximal short-axis diameter (Dmax) of AAA in follow-up non-enhanced axial CT as a means of detecting substantial endoleaks after EVAR. Material and Methods. CT images were retrospectively reviewed in 47 patients (7 women, 40 men; mean age, 76.2 years) who had no endoleak on initial contrast-enhanced CT after EVAR. Regular follow-up CT studies were performed every 6 months. At each CT study, the Dmax on the CT axial image was measured and compared with that on the last CT (115 data-sets). Contrast-enhanced CT was regarded as the standard of reference to decide the presence or absence of endoleaks. The appearance of endoleak was defined as the end point of this study. Results. Endoleaks were detected in 17 patients during the follow-up period. Mean Dmax changes for 6 months were significant between positive and negative endoleak cases (1.8 {+-} 1.9 vs. -1.1 {+-} 3.0 mm, P < 0.0001). When the Dmax change {<=} 0 mm for 6 months was used as the threshold for negative endoleak, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 74.5, 82.4, 96.1, and 35.9%, respectively. When Dmax change {<=}-1 mm was used as the threshold, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 38.8, 100, 100, and 22.1%, respectively. Conclusion. Contrast-enhanced CT is not required for the evaluation of endoleaks when the Dmax decreases by at least 1 mm over 6 months after EVAR.

  17. Frequency of concomitant ischemic heart disease and risk factor analysis for an early postoperative myocardial infarction after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Rim; Kim, Young-Wook; Heo, Seon-Hee; Woo, Shin-Young; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Dong Ik; Yang, Jeonghoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to see the frequency of concomitant ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Korean patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and to determine risk factors for an early postoperative acute myocardial infarction (PAMI) after elective open or endovascular AAA repair. We retrospectively reviewed a database of patients who underwent elective AAA repair over the past 11 years. Patients were classified into 3 groups: control group; group I, medical IHD treatment; group II, invasive IHD treatment. Rates of PAMI and mortality at 30 days were compiled and compared between groups according to the type of AAA repair. Six hundred two elective repairs of infrarenal or juxtarenal AAAs were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified into control group (n = 398, 66.1%), group I (n = 73, 12.1%) and group II (n = 131, 21.8%). PAMI developed more frequently after open surgical repair (OSR) than after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (5.4% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.012). In OSR patients (n = 373), PAMI developed 2.1% in control group, 18.0% in group I and 7.1% in group II (P < 0.001). In EVAR group (n = 229), PAMI developed 0.6% in control group, 4.3% in group I and 2.2% in group II (P = 0.211). On the multivariable analysis of risk factors of PAMI, PAMI developed more frequently in patients with positive functional stress test. The prevalence of concomitant IHD was 34% in Korean AAA patients. The risk of PAMI was significantly higher after OSR compared to EVAR and in patients with IHD compared to control group. Though we found some risk factors for PAMI, these were not applied to postoperative mortality rate.

  18. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kasahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion.

  19. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  20. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopiński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  1. Early endovascular aneurysm repair after percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Wilhelm, Markus; Kaufmann, Angela R; Bettex, Dominique; Maier, Willibald; Mayer, Dieter; Veith, Frank J; Lachat, Mario

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to report long-term results of early endovascular aortic aneurysm repair after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This was a retrospective analysis of all patients presenting with abdominal aortic aneurysm and coronary artery disease treated during the same hospitalization by endovascular aortic aneurysm repair performed soon after PCI. Primary outcomes were perioperative mortality, perioperative complications, survival after treatment, and freedom from reintervention. A total of 20 patients were included, and all completed both procedures. No deaths or abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures occurred between the PCI and the aortic intervention. Perioperative mortality was 5% as one patient died of mesenteric ischemia after endovascular aneurysm repair. Major cardiovascular vascular complications occurred in four patients (20%) and included non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (one) and access vessel complication (three). Mean follow-up was 94 (range, 1-164; standard deviation, 47) months. Estimated survival at 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, and 10 years was 90%, 90%, 90%, and 60%, respectively. A reoperation was required in six patients. Estimated freedom from reintervention at 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, and 10 years was 83%, 83%, 78%, and 72%, respectively. Our study indicates that early endovascular aneurysm repair performed within a week after PCI may be a reasonable approach in patients with large or symptomatic aneurysms. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Collected world and single center experience with endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, F.J.; Lachat, M.; Mayer, D.; Malina, M.; Holst, J.; Mehta, M.; Verhoeven, E.L.; Larzon, T.; Gennai, S.; Coppi, G.; Lipsitz, E.C.; Gargiulo, N.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Buth, J.; Lee, W.A.; Biasiol, G.; Deleo, G.; Kasirajan, K.; Moore, R.; Soong, C.V.; Cayne, N.S.; Farber, M.A.; Raithel, D.; Greenberg, R.K.; Sambeek, M.R. van; Brunkwall, J.S.; Rockman, C.B.; Hinchliffe, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. OBJECTIVE: To clarify these we examined a

  3. Collected World and Single Center Experience With Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, Frank J.; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter; Malina, Martin; Holst, Jan; Mehta, Manish; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Larzon, Thomas; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Gioacchino; Lipsitz, Evan C.; Gargiulo, Nicholas J.; van der Vliet, J. Adam; Blankensteijn, Jan; Buth, Jacob; Lee, W. Anthony; Biasi, Giorgio; Deleo, Gaetano; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Moore, Randy; Soong, Chee V.; Cayne, Neal S.; Farber, Mark A.; Raithel, Dieter; Greenberg, Roy K.; van Sambeek, Marc R. H. M.; Brunkwall, Jan S.; Rockman, Caron B.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. Objective: To clarify these we examined a

  4. Effects of study design and trends for EVAR versus OSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hopkins

    2008-10-01

    populations. EVAR adverse outcomes have decreased in recent times.Conclusion: EVAR highlights the problem of performing meta-analysis when the experience evolves over time.Keywords: abdominal aortic aneurysm, endovascular repair, open surgical repair, systematic review, meta-analysis

  5. MRI follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms after endovascular repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, S.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysm size changes form the basis of the follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, because aneurysm growth increases rupture risk. Aneurysm growth can be caused by endoleak (leakage of blood in the aneurysm sac). Therefore, accurate endoleak detection is important in growing

  6. Bifurcated-bifurcated aneurysm repair is a novel technique to repair infrarenal aortic aneurysms in the setting of iliac aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Susanna Hewon; Starnes, Benjamin Ware

    2017-11-01

    Up to 40% of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) have coexistent iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). In the past, successful endovascular repair required internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization, which can lead to pelvic or buttock ischemia. This study describes a technique that uses a readily available solution with a minimally altered off-the-shelf bifurcated graft in the IAA to maintain IIA perfusion. From August 2009 to May 2015, 14 patients with AAAs and coexisting IAAs underwent repair with a bifurcated-bifurcated approach. A 22-mm or 24-mm bifurcated main body device was used in the IAA with extension of the "contralateral" limb into the IIA. Intraoperative details including operative time, fluoroscopy time, and contrast agent use were recorded. Outcome measures assessed were operative technical success and a composite outcome measure of IIA patency, freedom from reintervention, and clinically significant endoleak at 1 year. Fourteen patients underwent bifurcated-bifurcated repair during the study period. Technical success was achieved in 93% of patients, with successful treatment of the AAA and IAA and preservation of flow to at least one IIA. The procedure was performed with a completely percutaneous bilateral femoral approach in 92% of patients. Three patients had a type II endoleak on initial follow-up imaging, but none were clinically significant. There were no cases of bowel ischemia or erectile dysfunction. One patient had buttock claudication ipsilateral to IIA coil embolization (contralateral to bifurcated iliac repair and preserved IIA) that resolved by 6-month follow-up. Two patients required reinterventions. One patient presented to his first follow-up visit on postoperative day 25 with thrombosis of the right external iliac limb ipsilateral to the bifurcated iliac repair, which was successfully treated with thrombectomy and stenting of the limb. This same patient presented at 83 months with growth of the preserved IIA to 3.9 cm and underwent coil

  7. A multiregional registry experience using an electronic medical record to optimize data capture for longitudinal outcomes in endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hye, Robert J; Inui, Tazo S; Anthony, Faith F; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Chang, Robert W; Rehring, Thomas F; Nelken, Nicolas A; Hill, Bradley B

    2015-05-01

    Registries have been proven useful to assess clinical outcomes, but data entry and personnel expenses are challenging. We developed a registry to track patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in an integrated health care system, leveraging an electronic medical record (EMR) to evaluate clinical practices, device performance, surgical complications, and medium-term outcomes. This study describes the registry design, data collection, outcomes validation, and ongoing surveillance, highlighting the unique integration with the EMR. EVARs in six geographic regions of Kaiser Permanente were entered in the registry. Cases were imported using a screening algorithm of inpatient codes applied to the EMR. Standard note templates containing data fields were used for surgeons to enter preoperative, postoperative, and operative data as part of normal workflows in the operating room and clinics. Clinical content experts reviewed cases and entered any missing data of operative details. Patient comorbidities, aneurysm characteristics, implant details, and surgical outcomes were captured. Patients entered in the registry are followed up for life, and all relevant events are captured. Between January 2010 and June 2013, 2112 procedures were entered in the registry. Surgeon compliance with data entry ranges from 60% to 90% by region but has steadily increased over time. Mean aneurysm size was 5.9 cm (standard deviation, 1.3). Most patients were male (84%), were hypertensive (69%), or had a smoking history (79%). The overall reintervention rate was 10.8%: conversion to open repair (0.9%), EVAR revision (2.6%), other surgical intervention (7.3%). Of the reinterventions, 27% were for endoleaks (I, 34.3%; II, 56.9%; III, 8.8%; IV and V, 0.0%), 10.5% were due to graft malfunction, 3.4% were due to infection, and 2.3% were due to rupture. Leveraging an EMR provides a robust platform for monitoring short-term and midterm outcomes after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  8. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Prakash; Hughes, John; Patel, Ashish S.; Donati, Tommaso; Sallam, Morad; Patel, Sanjay D.; Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan; Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities

  9. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  10. Clinical impact of chronic renal insufficiency on endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian; Mavanur, Arun; Drezner, A David; Gallagher, James; Menzoian, James O

    Endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a viable alternative to open repair. A significant proportion of this patient population has chronic renal insufficiency. The surgical outcomes associated with endovascular repair in 342 patients, with and without chronic renal insufficiency, are reported. Perioperative mortality, length of admission, length of intensive care unit admission, and rates of acute renal failure, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, conversion to open surgery, progression to hemodialysis, and incidence of endoleaks were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Endovascular repair demonstrated higher rates of acute renal failure, longer length of stay, and longer intensive care unit admissions in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Patients with severe renal dysfunction demonstrated markedly elevated mortality and morbidity. These results indicate that chronic renal insufficiency is not an absolute contraindication to endovascular repair in patients with moderate renal dysfunction, but patients with severe renal dysfunction perform poorly after aortic reconstruction.

  11. Endoleak detection after endovascular aneurysm repair using unenhanced MRI with flow suppression technique: Feasibility study in comparison with contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kensaku; Saida, Tsukasa; Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Nasu, Katsuhiro; Minami, Manabu [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology Faculty of Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sato, Fujio [University of Tsukuba, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Uchikawa, Yoko [Hitachi General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Konishi, Takahiro; Ishiguro, Toshitaka; Hiyama, Takashi [University of Tsukuba Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hoshiai, Sodai [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kasama, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of unenhanced motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE)-prepared balanced turbo field echo (BTFE) sequences for detecting endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Forty-six patients treated with EVAR for aortic and/or iliac arterial aneurysms underwent contrast-enhanced CT and MSDE-prepared BTFE sequences with and without flow suppression. Two independent observers reviewed these sequences and their subtraction images and assigned confidence levels for detecting endoleaks. Relative contrast values were calculated by dividing signal intensities by those of paraspinal muscles. CT provided the reference standard. CT showed types I and II endoleaks in one and ten patients, respectively. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.92 and 0.97 for observers 1 and 2, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of both observers were 91 (10/11), 91(32/35), 91 (42/46), 77 (10/13) and 97 % (32/33), respectively. Relative contrast values of endoleaks and flowing blood significantly decreased by flow suppression on MSDE-prepared BTFE images (P = 0.002 and P < 0.0001 respectively), and were significantly higher than those of the excluded aneurysms on subtraction images (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001, respectively). Unenhanced MSDE-prepared BTFE sequences are feasible for detecting endoleaks. (orig.)

  12. The Burden of Hard Atherosclerotic Plaques Does Not Promote Endoleak Development After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Risk Stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Johannes; Glodny, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To objectify the influence of the atherosclerotic burden in the proximal landing zone on the development of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) or thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) using objective aortic calcium scoring (ACS). Materials and Methods: This retrospective observation study included 267 patients who received an aortic endograft between 1997 and 2010 and for whom preoperative computed tomography (CT) was available to perform ACS using the CT-based V600 method. The mean follow-up period was 2 ± 2.3 years. Results: Type I endoleaks persisted in 45 patients (16.9%), type II in 34 (12.7%), type III in 8 (3%), and type IV or V in 3 patients, respectively (1.1% each). ACS in patients with type I endoleaks was not increased: 0.029 ± 0.061 ml compared with 0.075 ± 0.1349 ml in the rest of the patients, (p > 0.05; Whitney–Mann U-Test). There were significantly better results for the indication “traumatic aortic rupture” than for the other indications (p < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, age was an independent risk factor for the development of type I endoleaks in the thoracic aorta (Wald 9.5; p = 0.002), whereas ACS score was an independent protective factor (Wald 6.9; p = 0.009). In the abdominal aorta, neither age nor ACS influenced the development of endoleaks. Conclusion: Contrary to previous assumptions, TEVAR and EVAR can be carried out without increasing the risk of an endoleak of any type, even if there is a high atherosclerotic “hard-plaque” burden of the aorta. The results are significantly better for traumatic aortic.

  13. Contained rupture of a mycotic infrarenal aortic aneurysm infected with Campylobacter fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrief, Maria; Déglise, Sébastien; Pezzetta, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms (MAAAs) are rare entities accounting for 0.65–2% of aortic aneurysms. Campylobacter fetus has a tropism for vascular tissue and is a rare cause of mycotic aneurysm. We present a 73-year-old male patient with contained rupture of a MAAA caused by C. fetus, successfully treated with endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and antibiotics, which is not previously described for this aetiology. Although open surgery is the gold standard, EVAR is nowadays feasible and potentially represents a durable option, especially in frail patients. PMID:27852656

  14. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  15. Endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: technical and team training in an immersive virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudarakanchana, Nung; Van Herzeele, Isabelle; Bicknell, Colin D; Riga, Celia V; Rolls, Alexander; Cheshire, Nicholas J W; Hamady, Mohamad S

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates a fully immersive simulated angiosuite for training and assessment of technical endovascular and human factor skills during a crisis scenario. Virtual reality (VIST-C, Mentice) simulators were integrated into a simulated angiosuite (ORCAMP, Orzone). Teams, lead by experienced (N = 5) or trainee (N = 5) endovascular specialists, performed simulated endovascular ruptured aortic aneurysm repair (rEVAR). Timed performance metrics were recorded as surrogate measures of performance. Participants (N = 22) completed postprocedure questionnaires evaluating face validity, as well as technical and human factor aspects, of the simulation on a Likert scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very much). Experienced team leaders were significantly faster than trainees in obtaining proximal control with an intra-aortic occlusion balloon (352 vs. 501 s, p = 0.047) and all completed the procedure within the allotted time, whilst no trainee was able to do so. Total fluoroscopy times were significantly lower in the experienced group (782 vs. 1,086 s, p = 0.016). Realism of the simulated angiosuite was scored highly by experienced team leaders (median 4/5, IQR 4-5). Participants found the simulation useful for acquiring technical (4/5, IQR 4-5) and communication skills (4/5, IQR 4-5) and particularly valuable for enhancing teamwork (5/5, IQR 4-5) and patient safety (5/5, IQR 4-5). This study shows feasibility of creation of a crisis scenario in a fully immersive angiosuite simulation and team performance of a simulated rEVAR. Performance metrics differentiated between experienced specialists and trainees, and the realism of the simulation exercise and environment were rated highly by experienced endovascular specialists. This simulation has potential as a powerful training and assessment tool with opportunities to improve team performance in rEVAR through both technical and human factor skills training.

  16. Validation of the Simbionix PROcedure Rehearsal Studio sizing module: A comparison of software for endovascular aneurysm repair sizing and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velu, Juliëtte F; Groot Jebbink, Erik; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Slump, Cornelis H; Geelkerken, Robert H

    2017-02-01

    An important determinant of successful endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is proper sizing of the dimensions of the aortic-iliac vessels. The goal of the present study was to determine the concurrent validity, a method for comparison of test scores, for EVAR sizing and planning of the recently introduced Simbionix PROcedure Rehearsal Studio (PRORS). Seven vascular specialists analyzed anonymized computed tomography angiography scans of 70 patients with an infrarenal aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, using three different sizing software packages Simbionix PRORS (Simbionix USA Corp., Cleveland, OH, USA), 3mensio (Pie Medical Imaging BV, Maastricht, The Netherlands), and TeraRecon (Aquarius, Foster City, CA, USA). The following measurements were included in the protocol: diameter 1 mm below the most distal main renal artery, diameter 15 mm below the lowest renal artery, maximum aneurysm diameter, and length from the most distal renal artery to the left iliac artery bifurcation. Averaged over the locations, the intraclass correlation coefficient is 0.83 for Simbionix versus 3mensio, 0.81 for Simbionix versus TeraRecon, and 0.86 for 3mensio versus TeraRecon. It can be concluded that the Simbionix sizing software is as precise as two other validated and commercially available software packages.

  17. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    shorter arteries was implanted into the long artery, and another one into PTFE graft. After 30 minutes of explanation, autotransplantation of the kidney into the right iliac fossa was performed. The right renal vein was implanted into the inferior vein cava, and PTFE graft into the right limb of Dacron graft. Immediately following the completion of both anastomoses, large volume of urine was evident. Finally, ureteneocystostomy was performed with previous insertion of double "J" catheter. In the immediate postoperative period, renal function was restored to normal, while postoperative angiography revealed all patent grafts. DISCUSSION The most common causes of renal artery aneurysms are arteriosclerosis, as in our case, and fibro-muscular dysplasia. Very often, renal artery aneurysms are asymptomatic and discovered only during angiography in patients with aneurysmal and occlusive aortic disease. Other cases include: arterial hypertension, groin pain and acute or chronic renal failure. Due to relatively small number of evaluated cases, the risk of aneurysmal rupture is not known. According to some authors, the overall rupture rate of renal artery aneurysm is 5%, however, the rupture risk becomes higher in young pregnant woman. Several standard surgical procedures are available for the repair of renal artery aneurysms. These include saphenous vein angioplasty, bypass grafting, as well as ex vivo reconstruction with reimplantation or autotransplantation. Furthermore, interventional embolization therapy, as well as endovascular treatment with ePTFE covered stent, or autologous vein-coverage stent graft, have been also reported to be successful. CONCLUSION The major indications for surgical treatment of renal artery aneurysms are to eliminate the source of thromboembolism which leads to fixed renal hypertension and kidney failure, as well as prevention of aneurysmal rupture.

  18. Elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--transperitoneal, retroperitoneal, endovascular?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Orend, Karl Heinz; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger

    2009-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the peri-operative outcome of 210 consecutive patients undergoing elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair according to the surgical approach: transperitoneal (TP; 63 patients), retroperitoneal (RP; 81 patients) and endovascular (EV; 66 patients) repair. Concerning gender, AAA diameter and classification of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA score) all groups were comparable; the median age in the EV group was significantly higher (78 years vs. 68 years and 67 years, respectively, P=0.001). Mortality rates were 0% for TP, 1.2% for RP and 3% for EV repair (n.s.). Morbidity rates did not significantly differ between the groups. In specialized centres mortality rates of elective infrarenal aneurysm repair are low - regardless of the surgical approach. In such centres the best treatment options for each patient as to the surgical approach as well as peri-operative management can be provided individually.

  19. [Transient delayed paraplegia after repair of thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Torrijos, M; Aguilar Lloret, C; Ariño Irujo, J J; Serrano Hernando, F J; López Timoneda, F

    2013-11-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysm requires multidisciplinary management due to its complexity both in surgical technique and anesthetic considerations. One of the most feared postoperative complication is spinal cord ischemia. It can be presented as different clinical patterns, and its recovery may be partial or complete. The postoperative management of spinal cord ischemia is mainly based on techniques to increase spinal cord perfusion, above all, hemodynamic stability and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. We present two cases of delayed paraplegia after an open repair of a thoracoabdominal aneurysm and a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair using an endovascular stent graft. They both had a complete neurological recovery after cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B

    2017-01-01

    items with tentative anchors. Iterative Delphi rounds were executed. The panellists rated the importance of each item on a 5 point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as 80% of the panel rating an item 4 or 5 in the primary round and 90% in subsequent rounds. Consensus on the final assessment tool......, and superior performance on a 5 point Likert scale. CONCLUSION: The Delphi methodology allowed for international consensus on a new procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of competence in EVAR. The resulting scale, EndoVascular Aortic Repair Assessment of Technical Expertise (EVARATE......OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: To develop a procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of operator competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). METHODS: A Delphi approach was used to achieve expert consensus. A panel of 32 international experts (median 300 EVAR procedures, range 200...

  1. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ziheng, E-mail: wuziheng303@hotmail.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Xu, Liang, E-mail: maxalive@163.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Qu, Lefeng, E-mail: qulefeng@gmail.com [The Second Military Medical University, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Changzheng Hospital (China); Raithel, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.raithel@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de [Nuremberg Southern Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  2. Source of errors and accuracy of a two-dimensional/three-dimensional fusion road map for endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Claude; Douane, Frédéric; Therasse, Eric; Lessard, Simon; Elkouri, Stephane; Gilbert, Patrick; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Pfister, Marcus; Blair, Jean François; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and source of errors using a two-dimensional (2D)/three-dimensional (3D) fusion road map for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm. A rigid 2D/3D road map was tested in 16 patients undergoing EVAR. After 3D/3D manual registration of preoperative multidetector computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, abdominal aortic aneurysm outlines were overlaid on live fluoroscopy/digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Patient motion was evaluated using bone landmarks. The misregistration of renal and internal iliac arteries were estimated by 3 readers along head-feet and right-left coordinates (z-axis and x-axis, respectively) before and after bone and DSA corrections centered on the lowest renal artery. Iliac deformation was evaluated by comparing centerlines before and during intervention. A score of clinical added value was estimated as high (z-axis 5 mm). Interobserver reproducibility was calculated by the intraclass correlation coefficient. The lowest renal artery misregistration was estimated at x-axis = 10.6 mm ± 11.1 and z-axis = 7.4 mm ± 5.3 before correction and at x-axis = 3.5 mm ± 2.5 and z-axis = 4.6 mm ± 3.7 after bone correction (P = .08), and at 0 after DSA correction (P artery was estimated at x-axis = 2.4 mm ± 2.0 and z-axis = 2.2 mm ± 2.0. Score of clinical added value was low (n = 11), good (n= 0), and high (n= 5) before correction and low (n = 5), good (n = 4), and high (n = 7) after bone correction. Interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient for misregistration measurements was estimated at 0.99. Patient motion before stent graft delivery was estimated at x-axis = 8 mm ± 5.8 and z-axis = 3.0 mm ± 2.7. The internal iliac artery misregistration measurements were estimated at x-axis = 6.1 mm ± 3.5 and z-axis = 5.6 mm ± 4.0, and iliac centerline deformation was estimated at 38.3 mm ± 15.6. Rigid registration is feasible and fairly accurate. Only a partial reduction of vascular

  3. A comparison study of radiation exposure to patients during EVAR and Dyna CT in an angiosuite vs. an operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Andrea; Michelagnoli, Stefano; Chisci, Emiliano; Mazzocchi, Silvia; Panci, Simone; Didona, Annamaria; Ghirelli, Alessandro; Zatelli, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the patient dosimetric impact of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), both in an operating theatre (OR) and in an angiosuite (AS), with the facility of Dynamic CT (Dyna CT, Siemens AG, Berlin, Germany). One hundred and forty-six consecutive EVAR procedures dating from May 2011 to March 2013 were analysed. These were performed either in an OR (n = 97) using a mobile C-arm or in an AS (n = 49) equipped with a ceiling-mounted angiography system. Air kerma area product (P(KA)) and total air kerma at reference point (K(a,r)) values were reported for all procedures and Dyna CT. Radiation exposure during EVAR was quite low in the majority of patients but nearly 50 % higher if performed in AS vs. OR. Median Dyna CT K(a,r) was the same as an entire EVAR procedure in OR. The higher patient's radiation exposure recorded in the AS should be balanced with the technical advantages given to the EVAR procedure. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Sigala, F; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Mess, W H; Schurink, G W H; Jacobs, M J

    2008-02-01

    We assessed the surgical outcome of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (DTAA) and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurym (TAAA) repair in patients with Marfan syndrome. During a six year period, 206 patients underwent DTAA and TAAA repair. In 22 patients, Marfan syndrome was confirmed. The median age was 40 years with a range between 18 and 57 years. The extend of the aneurysms included 6 DTAA (1 with total arch, 2 with distal hemi-arch), 11 type II TAAA (2 with total arch, 3 with distal hemi-arch), 4 type III and one type IV TAAA. All patients suffered from previous type A (n=6) or type B (n=16) aortic dissection and 15 already underwent aortic procedures like Bentall (n=7) and ascending aortic replacement (n=8). All patients were operated on according to the standard protocol with cerebrospinal fluid drainage, distal aortic and selective organ perfusion and monitoring motor evoked potentials. In patients undergoing simultaneous arch replacement (via left thoracotomy), transcranial Doppler and EEG assessed cerebral physiology during antegrade brain perfusion. In four patients circulatory arrest under moderate hypothermia was required. In-hospital mortality did not occur. Major postoperative complications like paraplegia, renal failure, stroke and myocardial infarction were not encountered. Mean pre-operative creatinine level was 125mmol/L, which peaked to a mean maximal level of 130 and returned to 92mmol/L at discharge. Median intubation time was 1.5 days (range 0.33-30 days). Other complications included bleeding requiring surgical intervention (n=1), arrhythmia (n=2), pneumonia (n=2) and respiratory distress syndrome (n=1). At a median follow-up of 38 months all patients were alive. Using CT surveillance, new or false aneurysms were not detected, except in one patient who developed a visceral patch aneurysm six years after open type II repair. Surgical repair of descending and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms provides excellent short- and mid-term results in

  5. Five-year outcomes of the PYTHAGORAS U.S. clinical trial of the Aorfix endograft for endovascular aneurysm repair in patients with highly angulated aortic necks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malas, Mahmoud B; Hicks, Caitlin W; Jordan, William D; Hodgson, Kim J; Mills, Joseph L; Makaroun, Michel S; Belkin, Michael; Fillinger, Mark F

    2017-06-01

    Early and midterm outcomes of the Prospective Aneurysm Trial: High Angle Aorfix Bifurcated Stent Graft (PYTHAGORAS) trial in patients with highly angulated aortic necks (≥60 degrees) have already been published and shown comparable outcomes to other endografts in normal anatomy. Herein, we present the long-term outcomes of the PYTHAGORAS trial of Aorfix (Lombard Medical, Irvine, Calif) for patients with highly angulated aortic neck anatomy. The Aorfix endograft is a highly conformable nitinol/polyester device designed for transrenal fixation. The U.S. trial enrolled 218 patients and observed all patients at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months and then annually for a total of 5 years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)-specific complications were compared between the standard-angle (PYTHAGORAS trial of the Aorfix endograft is the first EVAR clinical trial to include a majority of highly angulated (≥60 degrees) infrarenal aortic necks and is the first to produce evidence after 5 years of implantation. Despite predictors of worse short- and long-term outcomes, pertinent outcomes were better than or similar to those of trials with less severe anatomy. These results support the use of this "on-label" endovascular option, particularly in patients with highly angulated aortic neck anatomy. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mid-term Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Thoraco-abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with Off the Shelf Branched Stent Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Sonesson, Björn; Björses, Katarina; Holst, Jan; Resch, Timothy; Dias, Nuno V

    2018-03-01

    To assess the mid-term outcomes and feasibility of branched endovascular repair (b-EVAR) of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (rTAAAs). All patients undergoing b-EVAR of rTAAAs between 2011 and 2016 were included. Pre-, intra and postoperative imaging was reviewed to assess technical success, outcomes, and feasibility of b-EVAR in the emergent setting. Eleven emergency b-EVAR of rTAAAs (10 aneurysms and 1 chronic dissection) were performed using off-the-shelf (OTS) branched stentgrafts. Only 18% of patients complied to the anatomical instruction-for-use of the OTS device; a small aortic lumen and occluded target vessels were the main violations. Median operative time was 430 (IQR 395-629) minutes. Technical failure was 36% including one intraoperative death, one target vessel catheterization failure, one type Ia and one type III endoleak. Thirty-day mortality was 27%. Only early re-intervention was for the type Ia endoleak. Spinal cord ischemia occurred in 4 patients (30%), of which 2 recovered completely. Median clinical follow-up were 15 (IQR 7-39) months respectively. The median clinical follow-up index (FUI) was 0.65 (0.32-0.95). Overall survival was 75 ± 21.7% at 18 months. Four branch occlusions occurred; one renal stent occlusion led to permanent hemodialysis. Branch patency was 87.5 ± 8.3% and 72.2 ± 12% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One stentgraft migrated but no late major endoleak occurred. Emergency b-EVAR of rTAAA with OTS device is feasible despite a low anatomical suitability. With proper adjunctive procedures, it can be offered to most hemodynamically stable patients. These time-consuming complex procedures are not suitable for unstable patients. Often the procedure is done as life-saving in the emergency setting and reinterventions may be needed later. Consequently, the success rates are lower than in the elective setting. These results need to be confirmed by larger studies and longer follow-up. Copyright © 2017 European

  7. The Protective Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on Post-EVAR AAA Growth and Reinterventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Chien Yi M; Tadros, Rami O; Kang, Ming; Beckerman, William E; Tardiff, Melissa L; Vouyouka, Ageliki G; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of diabetes on post-endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). A total of 1,479 consecutive patients who underwent AAA EVAR were reviewed. The cohorts were divided based on their diabetes status and compared. Preoperative demographic and comorbidity data were analyzed using the t-test and chi-squared test, whereas post-EVAR outcomes were analyzed using Probit multivariate model, followed by Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox regression. Of our 1,479 patients, 993 met inclusion criteria. One hundred eighty-three were diabetics (18.4%) compared with 810 nondiabetics (81.6%). Coronary artery disease (CAD; diabetics: 70.49%, nondiabetics: 60.76%, P = 0.014) and hypertension (HTN; diabetics: 90.16%, nondiabetics: 79.46%, P = 0.0008) were the only comorbidities analyzed, including follow-up length, which had any significant differences between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Probit multivariate analysis using a combined cohort follow-up mean of 51 months showed a significant decrease in aneurysm sac enlargement in diabetic patients (diabetics: 13.11%, nondiabetics: 19.43%, model estimate: 0.3058; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.0486-0.5629, Pr > ChiSq = 0.0198) and trended toward significantly fewer reinterventions (diabetics: 23.50%, nondiabetics: 28.41%, model estimate: 0.1990; 95% CI: -0.0262 to 0.4243, Pr > ChiSq = 0.0833). In the Cox regressions, diabetes had a significant protective factor on reinterventions (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.697, Pr > ChiSq = 0.0151), and was trending toward significance for aneurysm sac enlargement (HR: 0.750, Pr > ChiSq = 0.1961). There was no significant difference across diabetic status in any other outcomes, including mortality and endoleak occurrence. Although a higher proportion of diabetic patients present with HTN and CAD, they have decreased long-term rates of aneurysm sac enlargement after EVAR. As a result, this cohort trends

  8. Third- versus Second-Generation Stent Graft for Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Device-Specific Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonti, Marco; Teruzzi, Giovanni; Santagostino, Giulia; Grancini, Luca; Ferrari, Cristina; Trabattoni, Daniela; Lualdi, Alessandro; Bartorelli, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Our purpose is to analyze the outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients treated with Excluder endograft (W.L. Gore and Associate, Flagstaff, AZ), comparing second generation, featuring SIM-PULL delivery system (ExSP) and third generation, featuring C3 (ExC3), concerning intraprocedural data and long-term outcomes. In our single-center, comparative study, we retrospectively analyzed all patients undergoing elective EVAR with Excluder from May 2008 to December 2015. This cohort was firstly divided according to the design of the endograft used, and then, two subgroups of complex procedures were identified according to International Standards. Preliminary end points were early- and mid-term outcomes. Primary end point was procedural data (i.e., procedural and fluoroscopy time, radiation dose (DAP), and contrast medium amount). The study included 64 patients (24 ExSP and 40 ExC3) with a mean follow-up of 31.6 ± 22.9 months. Patients in ExC3 group had significantly more risk factors (past or present history of smoking, P = 0.019), comorbidities (chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease, both P = 0.032), as well as a more unfavorable anatomy (neck angulation, P = 0.035). Concerning preliminary outcome, no significant between-group difference was noted. As for intraoperative data, procedure duration was significantly shorter: 120 vs. 151 min (P = 0.002) in the overall population and 129 vs. 173 min (P = 0.004) in complex cases. A significant reduction was also found in fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure: 24,084 vs. 32,548 cGy/cm 2 (P = 0.020) in the overall population and 26,770 vs. 41,104 cGy/cm 2 (P = 0.003) in complex cases. No significant difference was found for contrast volume. The study shows that new C3 excluder enables to reduce radiation exposure and procedural time compared to the previous device. C3 excluder results are comparable to those of the previous device in spite of more comorbidities and complex anatomy

  9. Mortalidade relacionada ao tratamento endovascular do aneurisma da aorta abdominal com o uso dos modelos revisados Procedure-related mortality of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using revised reporting standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosen Gabriel Konig

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a definição da mortalidade relacionada ao procedimento após tratamento endovascular do aneurisma de aorta abdominal (EVAR como definido pelo Committee for Standardized Reporting Practices in Vascular Surgery. MÉTODO: Dados de pacientes com aneurisma de aorta abdominal foram analisados do banco de dados EUROSTAR. Os pacientes foram submetidos ao EVAR entre junho de 1996 a fevereiro de 2004 e foram estudados retrospectivamente. A probabilidade explicita da causa de morte foi registrada. O intervalo entre a operação, alta hospitalar ou intervenção secundária até a morte foi registrado. RESULTADOS: De um total de 5612 pacientes, 589 (10,5% faleceram após o EVAR em acompanhamento total e qualquer causa de morte foi inclusa. Cento e quarenta e um pacientes (12,5% morreram devido a causa relacionada ao aneurisma, sendo que 28 (4,8% foram rupturas, 25 (4,2% infecções do implante e 88 (14,9% foram pacientes que morreram num prazo de 30 dias após o procedimento inicial (definição atualmente utilizada, também conhecido como resultado clínico a curto prazo. Além disso, 25 pacientes faleceram após 30 dias, mas continuavam ainda hospitalizados (ou transferidos a home-care para reavaliação posterior, ou necessitaram intervenção secundária. Levando em conta a duração da admissão ao hospital e a mortalidade imediata após o procedimento relacionada a intervenções secundárias, 49 mortes tardias também podem ser relacionadas ao EVAR. CONCLUSÃO: Morte tardia compõe uma proporção considerável da mortalidade relacionada ao EVAR dentro do tempo de análise revisado.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the definition of Procedure-related mortality after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR as defined by the Committee for Standardized Reporting Practices in Vascular Surgery. METHODS: Data on patients with an AAA were taken from the EUROSTAR database. The patients underwent EVAR

  10. TECHNIQUES OF LEFT VENTRICULAR ANEURYSM REPAIR: CHALLENGES AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Left ventricular aneurysm is commonly secondary to coronary artery disease. The resulting abnormal geometry after surgical treatment is most important. Many techniques have evolved over a period to restore near normal geometry of left ventricle (LV. It is mandatory to address atherosclerotic lesions which are root ca use of ischemia and its sequel. METHOD AND MATERIALS : Four patients with myocardial infarction presented to our institute were investigated with 2 Dimensional Echocardiography and contrast enha nced computerized tomography (CECT of thorax. All patients underwent left ventricle aneurysm repair and two patients also underwent Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG. We followed all of them with CECT and clinical examination. RESULT: All patients ha d good post - operative recovery. Their Intensive Care Unit parameters were within acceptable limits. The functional class improved to New York Heart Association class II for these patients. Post - operative CECT showed significant reduction in LV dimension an d no alteration in LV geometry. CONCLUSION: The technique of Left Ventricle aneurysm repair should be determined by pre - operative evaluation and CABG must be attempted if possible

  11. 3D printing guiding stent graft fenestration: A novel technique for fenestration in endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianhua; Li, Gan; Wang, Wei; Wu, Keming; Le, Tianming

    2017-08-01

    Objective To describe a novel approach, 3D printing guiding stent graft fenestration, for fenestration during endovascular aneurysm repair for juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods A 69-year-old male with juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm underwent endovascular aneurysm repair with "off the label" fenestrated stent graft. To precisely locate the fenestration position, we reconstructed a 3D digital abdominal aortic aneurysm model and created a skin template covering this abdominal aortic aneurysm model. Then the skin template was physically printed and the position of the visceral vessel was hollowed out, thereby helping in locating the fenestration on stent graft. Results and conclusions With the help of this 3D printed skin template, we fenestrated the stent graft accurately and rebuilt the bilateral renal artery successfully. This is the first clinical case that used 3D printing guiding stent graft fenestration, which is a novel approach for precise fenestration on stent graft on the table during endovascular aneurysm repair.

  12. Complex aortic and bilateral renal artery aneurysm repair in a young patient with multiple arterial aneurysm syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Hinojosa, MD, MSc

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal disease affecting the aorta and visceral vessels in young patients is uncommon and typically associated with connective tissue disorders. We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with acute onset of abdominal pain; computed tomography scan revealed aortic and bilateral renal artery aneurysms and a perirenal hematoma. She was taken to the angiography suite; rupture of the right renal artery aneurysm was identified and immediately treated successfully with coil embolization. The left renal artery aneurysm was repaired with ex-vivo renal autotransplantation; 2 years later, the aorta and right renal artery underwent surgical reconstruction.

  13. Treatment of post-implantation aneurysm growth by laparoscopic sac fenestration: Long-term results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Voûte (Michiel); F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); J.M. Hendriks (Joke); R. Metz (Roderik); M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (Marc); B.E. Muhs (Bart); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Sac growth after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an important finding, which may influence prognosis. In case of a type II endoleak or endotension, clipping of side branches and subsequent sac fenestration has been presented as a therapeutic alternative. The long-term

  14. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  15. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  16. Jaundice as a Rare Indication for Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieß, Henrik C; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Behrendt, Christian A; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Compression of adjacent anatomic structures by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can result in a variety of symptoms. We describe the case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with jaundice, elevated laboratory parameters for extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis, and concomitant juxtarenal AAA compressing the liver hilum. Following exclusion of other common causes for cholestasis, the patient was considered to have a symptomatic AAA. Open abdominal aortic surgery revealed a contained rupture and was repaired. Obstructive jaundice secondary to a compromising AAA is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical repair of an asymptomatic giant right coronary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangeer, Saleem; Anjum, Nadeem; O'Donnell, Aonghus; Doddakula, Kishore

    2013-12-01

    Background Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) is a rare finding, being mostly diagnosed on angiography or at autopsies. It is defined as being a dilation of the coronary artery that exceeds the diameter of the patient's largest coronary vessel by 1.5 to 2 times. Case Report We describe the operative correction of a giant right CAA measuring in excess of 10 cm. Conclusion Management of giant CAAs is not standardized and surgical strategy remains controversial. In our case, the patient has a successful surgical repair with no postoperative shunts on follow-up investigations.

  18. Persistent type II endoleak after EVAR: the predictive value of the AAA thrombus volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitto, Enrico; Gargiulo, Mauro; Mascoli, Chiara; Freyrie, Antonio; DE Matteis, Massimo; Serra, Carla; Bianchini Massoni, Claudio; Faggioli, Gianluca; Stella, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    Persistent type II endoleaks (ELIIp, ≥6 months) after an endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) can be associated with adverse outcomes. The aims of this study are the evaluation of the incidence of ELIIp, their preoperative morphological predictive features (PMF) and the post-EVAR abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution in the presence of ELIIp. Patients underwent EVAR between 2008 and 2010 were prospectively collected. Cases with ELIIp (group A: AG) were identified. A control group without ELIIp (group B: BG), homogeneous for clinical characteristics, follow-up timing and methods (CTA and/or CEUS at 6.12 months and yearly thereafter) was retrospectively selected. The PMF evaluated by computed-tomography-angiography (CTA) were: AAA-diameter, number and diameter of AAA efferent patent vessels (EPV), AAA-total volume (TV), AAA-thrombus volume (THV) and TV/THV rate (%VR). Volumes were calculated by the dedicated vessels analysis software. AG and BG were compared. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the incidence of ELIIp. Secondary endpoints were to analyze the relation between PMF and ELIIp and to assess the post-EVAR AAA-evolution in the presence of ELIIp. Between 2008 and 2010, 200 patients underwent EVAR to treat AAA electively. An ELIIp was detected in 35cases (17.5%) (AG). Twenty-seven patients (13.5%) were included in BG. An overall of 62 patients (GA+GB) were analyzed. The mean pre-operative AAA diameter and EPV were 58±11.6 mm and 5.5±1.8 mm, respectively. The mean TV and THV were 187±111.5 cc and 82±75 cc, respectively. The median %VR was 42.3%. ELIIp was correlated to EPV≥6 (χ2, p=.015) and %VR <40% (logistic regression, P=0.032). The mean follow-up was 22±9 months. Seven (20%) ELIIp spontaneously sealed and 6 (17%) required reinterventions (2 conversions to OR). There were not PMF associated to ELIIp evolution and AAA growth post-EVAR. ELIIp is a not rare complication and it could require re-interventions. Our data suggest that VEP≥6 or %VT<40

  19. Determination of Endograft Apposition, Position, and Expansion in the Aortic Neck Predicts Type Ia Endoleak and Migration After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmann, Richte C L; van Noort, Kim; Overeem, Simon P; van Veen, Ruben; Ouriel, Kenneth; Jordan, William D; Muhs, Bart E; 't Mannetje, Yannick W; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Fioole, Bram; Ünlü, Çağdaş; Brummel, Peter; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2018-03-01

    To describe the added value of determining changes in position and apposition on computed tomography angiography (CTA) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to detect early caudal displacement of the device and to prevent type Ia endoleak. Four groups of elective EVAR patients were selected from a dataset purposely enriched with type Ia endoleak and migration (>10 mm) cases. The groups included cases of late type Ia endoleak (n=36), migration (n=9), a type II endoleak (n=16), and controls without post-EVAR complications (n=37). Apposition of the endograft fabric with the aortic neck, shortest distance between the fabric and the renal arteries, expansion of the main body (or dilatation of the aorta in the infrarenal sealing zone), and tilt of the endograft toward the aortic axis were determined on the first postoperative and the last available CTA scan without type Ia endoleak or migration. Differences in these endograft dimensions were compared between the first vs last scan and among the 4 groups. No significant differences in endograft configurations were observed among the groups on the first postoperative CTA scan. On the last CTA scan before a complication arose, the position of the fabric relative to the renal arteries, expansion of the main body, and apposition of the fabric with the aortic neck were significantly different between the type Ia endoleak (median follow-up 15 months) and migration groups (median follow-up 23 months) compared with the control group (median follow-up 19 months). Most endograft dimensions had changed significantly compared with the first postoperative CTA scan for all groups. Apposition had increased in the control group but had decreased significantly in the type Ia endoleak and migration groups. Progressive changes in dimensions of the endograft within the infrarenal neck could be detected on regular CTA scans before the complication became urgent in many patients.

  20. Nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan; Chen Rumei; Xiao Zhanqiang; Qi Youfei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the main points of nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection. Methods: Preoperative psychological care and the other preparations were carefully conducted. During the operation, the patient's body was correctly placed. Active cooperation with the performance of angiography and close observation during heparinization were carried out. The proper delivery of catheter and stent to the operator was carefully done. Close observation for the patient's vital signs, the renal function and the changes of limb blood supply were made. Results: Under close cooperation of' the operators, nurses, anesthesiologists and technicians, the surgery was successfully accomplished in 35 patients. The monitoring of vital signs during the entire performance of operation was well executed. No surgical instruments delivery error's or surgery failure due to unsuitable cooperation occurred. Conclusion: Perfect preoperative preparation, strict nursing cooperation and team cooperation are the key points to ensure a successful endovascular aneurysm repair for aortic dissection. (authors)

  1. Salvage of bilateral renal artery occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair with open splenorenal bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Jessula, MDCM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report renal salvage maneuvers after accidental bilateral renal artery coverage during endovascular aneurysm repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 79-year-old man with an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated coverage of the renal arteries. Several revascularization techniques were attempted, including endograft repositioning and endovascular stenting through the femoral and brachial approach. The patient eventually underwent open splenorenal bypass with a Y Gore-Tex graft (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz. After 3 months, computed tomography showed no evidence of endoleak and patent renal arteries. Renal function was well maintained, and the patient did not require dialysis.

  2. Follow up CT angiography post EVAR: Endoleaks detection, classification and management planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer W. Kassem

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The goal of this study was to highlight the role of follow up CT angiography examination in detection and classification of endoleaks and therefore deciding management plans after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR. Patients and Methods: During one year duration 37 patients who have been operated were examined 1 and 6 months after EVAR as routine follow up. The images obtained were interpreted and reconstructed using dedicated software and work stations. Results: Out of 37 cases, 14 cases (37.8% had positive endoleaks and 23 cases (62.2% were free. Type I endoleak was diagnosed in 4 cases (10.8% and type II endoleaks was diagnosed in 10 cases (27% as 7 cases (18.9% showed leak through lumbar arteries and 3 cases (8.1% showed leak through the inferior mesenteric arteries. Conclusion: CT angiography can accurately detect and classify endoleaks and thus determine line of treatment. Endoleaks are often asymptomatic and may become evident intra operatively or many years after the operation, therefore lifelong imaging supervision is necessary. Keywords: CT angiography, EVAR, Endoleaks, Detection, Classification

  3. Preoperative methylprednisolone enhances recovery after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik; Vogt, Katja

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid on the inflammatory response and recovery after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). BACKGROUND: The postimplantation syndrome after EVAR may delay recovery due to the release of proinflammatory mediators. Glucocortico......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid on the inflammatory response and recovery after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). BACKGROUND: The postimplantation syndrome after EVAR may delay recovery due to the release of proinflammatory mediators....../kg of methylprednisolone (MP) (n = 77) or placebo (n = 76) preoperatively. Primary outcome was a modified version of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Secondary outcome measures were the effect on inflammatory biomarkers, morbidity, and time to meet discharge criteria. RESULTS: Of 153 randomized patients, 150...... not modified. No differences in 30-day medical (23% vs 36%) (P = 0.1) or surgical (20% vs 21%) morbidity were found in the active group versus the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative MP attenuates the inflammatory response with a faster recovery after EVAR for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Further safety...

  4. Changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Fredrik; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    The epidemiology and treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has changed over the past 30 years. This review aims to give the reader an overview of these changes and current trends in AAA epidemiology, management and outcome. In the past decades there have been three changes in AAA management and epidemiology: 1) introduction of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR); 2) population screening; and 3) a markedly reduced prevalence of the disease. These developments have resulted in an increased incidence of intact AAA-repair and reduced incidence of ruptured AAA-repair. Overall, survival after both intact and ruptured AAA repair has improved, much thanks to the broad introduction of EVAR. Additionally, both elective and rupture repair in the elderly population has increased, with octogenarians constituting >20% of intact AAA repairs performed in several countries. International analyses of vascular registries indicate that important variations remain in AAA management and results. The changes in AAA epidemiology and management have led to a situation where most AAAs today are treated with EVAR electively. The incidence of ruptured AAA-repair continues to decrease. These changes are accompanied by improvements in both short- and long-term survival.

  5. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    OpenAIRE

    G?rer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. Case Report: A 74-year-old ma...

  6. Repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms with aortouni- iliac stentgraft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aorto-uni-iliac (AUI) graft configuration with femoro-femoral bypass (FFBP) is a promising alternative which may extend the scope of EVAR for AAAs. The aim of ... Open surgery posed an unacceptably high risk to all patients owing to advanced age and/or American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification 3/4.

  7. Partial renal coverage in endovascular aneurysm repair causes unfavorable renal flow patterns in an infrarenal aneurysm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, Lennart; Donselaar, Esmé J.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Boersen, Johannes T.; Lajoinie, Guillaume P.R.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Versluis, Michel; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To achieve an optimal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair, the intended positioning of the proximal end of the endograft fabric should be as close as possible to the most caudal edge of the renal arteries. Some endografts exhibit a small offset between the radiopaque markers

  8. Identification of predictive CT angiographic factors in the development of high-risk type 2 endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair in patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenthal, D.; Herzog, L.; Rogits, B.; Bulla, K.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J.; Dudeck, O.; Weston, S.; Meyer, F.; Halloul, Z.

    2015-01-01

    An extensive analysis of the value of computed tomography (CT) parameters as potential predictors of the clinical outcome of type 2 endoleaks after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Initial CT scans of 130 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were retrospectively reviewed. On the basis of postoperative CT scans and angiographies, patients were stratified into a low-risk group (LRG; without or transient type 2 endoleak; n = 80) and a high-risk group (HRG, persistent type 2 endoleak or need for reintervention; n = 50). Statistical analysis comprised a univariate and multivariate analysis. Anatomical, thrombus-specific, as well as aortic side branch parameters were assessed on the initial CT scan. Of all anatomical parameters, the diameter of the immediate infrarenal aorta was significantly different in the univariate analysis (LRG 22.4 ± 3.8 mm; HRG 23.6 ± 2.5 mm; p = 0.03). The investigation of the thrombus-specific parameters showed a trend towards statistical significance for the relative thrombus load (LRG 31.7 ± 18.0 %; HRG 25.3 ± 17.5 %; p = 0.09). Assessment of aortic side branches revealed only for the univariate analysis significant differences in the patency of the inferior mesenteric artery (LRG 71.3 %; HRG 92.0 %; p = 0.003) and their diameter (LRG 3.3 ± 0.7 mm; HRG 3.8 ± 0.9 mm; p = 0.004). In contrast, the number of lumbar arteries (LAs; LRG 2.7 ± 1.4; HRG 3.6 ± 1.2; univariate: p = 0.01; multivariate: p = 0.006) as well as their diameter (LRG 2.1 ± 0.4 mm; HRG 2.4 ± 0.4 mm; univariate: p < 0.001; multivariate: p = 0.006) were highly significantly associated with the development of type 2 endoleaks of the HRG. The most important predictive factors for the development of high-risk type 2 endoleaks were mainly the number and the diameter of the LAs which perfused the AAA.

  9. Endovascular aortic repair: First twenty years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Končar Igor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aortic/aneurysm repair (EVAR was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the nineties. Its fast development had a great influence on clinicians, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists, educational curriculums, patients, industry and medical insurance. The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of clinicians and industry to the development and advancement of endovascular aortic repair over the last 20 years. This review article presents the development of EVAR by focusing on the contribution of physicians, surgeons and interventional radiologists in the creation of the new field of vascular surgery termed hybrid vascular surgery, and also the contribution of technological advancement by a significant help of industrial representatives – engineers and their counselors. This article also analyzes studies conducted in order to compare the successfulness of EVAR with up-to-now applied open surgical repair of aortic aneurysms, and some treatment techniques of other aortic diseases. During the first two decades of its development the EVAR method was rapidly progressing and was adopted concurrently with the expansion of technology. Owing to large randomized studies, early and long-term results indicate specific complications of this method, thus influencing further technological improvement and defining risk patients groups in whom the use of the technique should be avoided. Good results are insured only in centers, specialized in vascular surgery, which have on their disposal adequate conditions for solving all complications associated with this method.

  10. Outcomes of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie; Durgin, Jonathan; Aiello, Francesco A; Doucet, Danielle; Steppacher, Robert; Messina, Louis M

    2017-09-01

    More than 80% of infrarenal aortic aneurysms are treated by endovascular repair. However, adoption of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair for complex aortic aneurysms has been limited, despite high morbidity and mortality associated with open repair. There are few published reports of consecutive outcomes, inclusive of all fenestrated and branched endovascular repairs, starting from the inception of a complex aortic aneurysm program. Therefore, we examined a single center's consecutive experience of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. This is a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study evaluating 30-day and 1-year outcomes in all consecutive patients who underwent fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms (definition: requiring one or more fenestrations or branches). Data were collected prospectively through an Institutional Review Board-approved registry and a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption clinical trial (G130210). We performed 100 consecutive complex endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs (November 2010 to March 2016) using 58 (58%) commercially manufactured custom-made devices and 42 (42%) physician-modified devices to treat 4 (4%) common iliac, 42 (42%) juxtarenal, 18 (18%) pararenal, and 36 (36%) thoracoabdominal aneurysms (type I, n = 1; type II, n = 4; type III, n = 12; type IV, n = 18; arch, n = 1). The repairs included 309 fenestrations, branches, and scallops (average of 3.1 branch arteries/case). All patients had 30-day follow-up for 30-day event rates: three (3%) deaths; six (6%) target artery occlusions; five (5%) progressions to dialysis; eight (8%) access complications; one (1%) paraparesis; one (1%) bowel ischemia; and no instances of myocardial infarction, paralysis, or stroke. Of 10 type I or type III endoleaks, 8 resolved (7 with secondary intervention, 1 without intervention). Mean follow-up time was 563 days (interquartile range

  11. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  12. Thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair using a four-branched thoracoabdominal graft: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John; Lazopoulos, George; Ashrafian, Hutan; Misthos, Panagiotis; Athanasiou, Thanos; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2009-07-17

    Revascularization of the visceral arteries during thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair is usually performed sequentially by an anastomosis between a prosthetic graft and an aortic patch. There are immediate operative risks such as bleeding and distortion. In the longer term, aneurysm, pseudo-aneurysm and rupture may occur. These require reoperation and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality.We present our experience with Crawford IV thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair in four patients, using a prefabricated four-branched graft (Coselli graft). At two years there were no deaths, no complications and no vessel abnormalities on computed tomography. We recommend its use as the graft of choice in young patients with an aortic tissue disorder requiring total resection of the aortic wall at the level of the visceral vessels.

  13. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  14. Importance of stent-graft design for aortic arch aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysm of the aorta is currently treated by open surgical repair or endovascular repair. However, when the aneurysm occurs in regions between the aortic arch and proximal descending aorta, it can be a complex pathology to treat due to its intricate geometry. When complex aortic aneurysms are treated with the conventional procedures, some of the patients present with significant post-operative complications and high mortality rate. Consequently, a clinically driven hybrid innovation known as the frozen elephant trunk procedure was introduced to treat complex aortic aneurysms. Although this procedure significantly reduces mortality rate and operating time, it is still associated with complications such as endoleaks, spinal cord ischemia, renal failure and stroke. Some of these complications are consequences of a mismatch in the biomechanical behaviour of the stent-graft device and the aorta. Research on complex aneurysm repair tended to focus more on the surgical procedure than the stent-graft design. Current stent-graft devices are suitable for straight vessels. However, when used to treat aortic aneurysm with complex geometry, these devices are ineffective in restoring the normal biological and biomechanical function of the aorta. A stent-graft device with mechanical properties that are comparable with the aorta and aortic arch could possibly lead to fewer post-operative complications, thus, better outcome for patients with complex aneurysm conditions. This review highlights the influence stent-graft design has on the biomechanical properties of the aorta which in turn can contribute to complications of complex aneurysm repair. Design attributes critical for minimising postoperative biomechanical mismatch are also discussed.

  15. Repair of a Mycotic Coronary Artery Aneurysm with an Intact Prosthetic Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mitsugu; Bell, David; Marshman, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with a mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm without evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Eight years previously he had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement. He presented with methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus septicaemia after a prolonged hospital admission. Further investigation revealed a large mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm prompting urgent surgical repair. This case, of a mycotic coronary artery aneurysm in an atherosclerotic native coronary artery, is an extremely rare entity, which is further complicated by the presence of a prosthetic aortic valve. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mycotic aneurysm in a child with history of coarctation of the aorta repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Santiago Restrepo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm is a rare condition occasionally seen in patients with a history of prior cardiac or vascular surgery. Here we report the presentation of a mycotic aneurysm in a pediatric patient at the site of prior aortic coarctation repair. This patient′s initial presentation suggested rheumatologic or oncologic disease, and after diagnosis he continued to show evidence of splenic, renal and vascular injury distal to the mycotic aneurysm site while being treated with antibiotics. We discuss the diagnosis, treatment and management of this condition.

  17. Sex differences in 30-day and 5-year outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the EUROSTAR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grootenboer, Nathalie; Hunink, M G Myriam; Hendriks, Johanna M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair....

  18. Influence of endoleaks on aneurysm volume and hemodynamics after endovascular aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Welter, B.; Schmenger, P.; Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Neufang, A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the aneurysm volume and the intra-aneurysmatic pressure and maximal pressure pulse (dp/dtmax) in completely excluded aneurysms and cases with endoleaks. Materials and Methods: In 36 mongrel dogs, experimental autologous aneurysms were treated with stent-grafts. All aortic side branches were ligated in 18 cases (group I) but were preserved in group II (n=18). Aneurysm volumes were calculated from CT scans before and after intervention, and from follow-up CT scans at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months. Finally, for hemodynamic measurements, manometer-tipped catheters were introduced into the excluded aneurysm sac (group I and II), selectively in endoleaks (group II), and intraluminally for aortic reference measurement. Systemic hypertension was induced by volume load and pharmacologic stress. Pressure curves and dp/dt were simultaneously recorded and the ratios of aneurysm pressure to systemic reference pressure calculated. Results: At follow-up, type-II, endoleaks were excluded in all cases of group I by selective angiography. In contrast, endoleaks were evident in all cases of group II. Volumetric analysis of the aneurysms showed a benefit for group I with an improved aneurysm shrinkage: ΔVolume +0.08%, -1.62% and -9.76% at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months follow-up (median, group I), compared to +1.43%, +0.67%, and -4.04% (group II), p [de

  19. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  20. Combined repair of ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and abdominal aortic aneurysm: in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N; Lioulias, Achilleas G; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T; Milonakis, Michael K; Bastounis, Elias A; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients.

  1. Preoperative percutaneous coronary intervention in patients undergoing open thoracoabdominal and descending thoracic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Leonard N; Rabotnikov, Yury; Avgerinos, Dimitrios V

    2014-01-01

    Current guidelines have recommended against coronary revascularization before noncardiac surgery in patients with asymptomatic coronary artery disease. However, myocardial infarction after thoracic aneurysm (TA) repair dramatically increases the morbidity and mortality. Revascularization with coronary artery bypass grafting before TA repair minimizes the incidence of perioperative ischemia. However, the recovery can be prolonged, and a percentage of patients will either never return for aneurysm repair or will develop a rupture during convalescence. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) before TA repair might be preferable. Previous studies examining PCI before major vascular surgery included few patients with TAs. We examined the outcomes of patients undergoing PCI before TA repair. From 1997 to 2012, 592 patients underwent TA repair. Patients presenting for elective repair underwent cardiac catheterization before surgery. Those with significant single- or double-vessel coronary artery disease underwent PCI. The perioperative outcomes were examined and compared with those of patients undergoing TA repair without revascularization. A total of 44 patients (7.4%) underwent PCI with bare metal stents before surgery. No PCI-related complications occurred. Dual antiplatelet therapy was administered for 4 to 6 weeks. No instances of aneurysm rupture occurred in the interval between PCI and surgery. The incidence of stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and mortality for those undergoing PCI was 0. No bleeding complications occurred. PCI is safe and efficacious in patients undergoing TA repair. Aneurysm rupture did not occur in the interval before surgery. Antiplatelet therapy did not increase the risk of bleeding complications. Stent thrombosis was not seen. We recommend PCI those with significant single- or double-vessel coronary artery disease before elective TA repair. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc

  2. Repair of left coronary artery aneurysm, recurrent ascending aortic aneurysm, and mitral valve prolapse 19 years after Bentall's procedure in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmanaban, Balaji; Mallon, Peter; Campbell, Norman; Sarsam, Mazin A I

    2004-01-01

    A 45-year-old female with Marfan syndrome had a Bentall's procedure performed 19 years ago. She presented with a 4-year history of gradually worsening dyspnea and decreasing exercise tolerance. Investigations revealed severe mitral valve prolapse, a left main stem coronary artery (LMSCA) aneurysm, and a recurrent aneurysm of the ascending aorta. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic aneurysmal sac and the LMSCA aneurysm were then repaired by a modified Bentall procedure. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged home.

  3. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Male, 74 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: - Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery. Rare disease. Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. A 74-year-old man who presented at our clinic with chest pain was diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. His medical history included right coronary artery stenting. Physical examination revealed a pulsatile abdominal mass on the left side and palpable peripheral pulses. Computed tomography scans showed an infrarenal abdominal aneurysm with a 61-mm enlargement. Coronary angiography revealed 80% stenosis in the stent within the right coronary artery and 20% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. The patient underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimal invasive coronary artery bypass grafting with right gastroepiploic artery were performed simultaneously in a single surgery. We report this case to emphasize the safety and effectiveness of transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This combined approach shortens hospital stay and decreases cost.

  4. Emergency endovascular repair of ruptured visceral artery aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Tjun

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral artery aneurysms although rare, have very high mortality if they rupture. Case presentation An interesting case of a bleeding inferior pancreaticduodenal artery aneurysm is reported in a young patient who presented with hypovolemic shock while being treated in the hospital after undergoing total knee replacement. Endovascular embolization was successfully employed to treat this patient, with early hospital discharge. Conclusion Prompt diagnosis and endovascular management of ruptured visceral aneuryms can decrease the associated mortality and morbidity.

  5. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: Optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Praveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative β-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  6. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, Praveen Kumar; Vijayakumar, Arun; Manikandan, S; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative beta-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined) coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  7. Outcomes of Open Repair of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysms with In Situ Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Hyun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycotic aortic aneurysms are rare and life-threatening. Unfortunately, no established guidelines exist for the treatment of patients with mycotic aortic aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of the open repair of mycotic thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms and suggest a therapeutic strategy. Methods: From 2006 to 2016, 19 patients underwent open repair for an aortic aneurysm. All infected tissue was extensively debrided and covered with soft tissue. We recorded the clinical findings, anatomic location of the aneurysm, bacteriology results, antibiotic therapy, morbidity, and mortality for these cases. Results: The median age was 62±7.2 years (range, 16 to 78 years, 13 patients (68% were men, and the mean aneurysm size was 44.5±4.9 mm. The mean time from onset of illness to surgery was 14.5±2.4 days. Aortic continuity was restored in situ with a Dacron prosthesis (79%, homograft (16%, or Gore-Tex graft (5%. Soft-tissue coverage of the prosthesis was performed in 8 patients. The mean follow-up time was 43.2±11.7 months. The early mortality rate was 10.5%, and the 5-year survival rate was 74.9%±11.5%. Conclusion: This study showed acceptable early and midterm outcomes of open repair of my-cotic aneurysms. We emphasize that aggressive intraoperative debridement with soft-tissue coverage results in a high rate of success in these high-risk patients.

  8. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  9. Statin use is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Visser, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that preoperative statin therapy reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing major noncardiac vascular surgery. In this report, we investigated the influence of statin use on early and late outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  10. Impact of technique of left ventricular aneurysm repair on clinical outcomes: current best available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shahzad G; Salehi, Salim; Bahrami, Toufan T

    2009-01-01

    Postinfarction left ventricular aneurysm is a serious disorder that can lead to congestive heart failure, lethal ventricular arrhythmia, and premature death. Surgical treatment is indicated in established cases of congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, malignant ventricular arrhythmia, or recurrent embolization from the left ventricle. The goal of surgical intervention is to correct the size and geometry of the left ventricle, reduce wall tension and paradoxical movement, and improve systolic function. Surgical techniques for repair of left ventricular aneurysm have evolved over the last five decades. Aneurysmectomy and linear repair of the left ventricle was introduced by Cooley and colleagues in 1958 and remained the standard procedure until the late 1980s. Endoventricular patch plasty (EVPP) was then introduced as a more physiologic repair than the linear closure technique, especially when the aneurysm extends into the septum. However, there is still controversy whether EVPP is superior to simple linear resection in terms of impact on early and late clinical outcomes. In the current era of evidence-based medicine, the best strategy to resolve a controversy is through the explicit and conscientious assessment of current best evidence. This review article attempts to evaluate the current best available evidence on the impact of technique of left ventricular aneurysm repair on postoperative clinical outcomes.

  11. Comparison between endovascular repair and open surgery for isolated iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahito; Jibiki, Masatoshi; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2015-03-01

    This study was performed to compare endovascular repair with conventional open repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients who underwent repair of isolated IAAs between January 2008 and June 2012. Patients with infected, mycotic and ruptured iliac aneurysms and those with concurrent infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms greater than 30 mm in diameter were excluded from this analysis. A total of 32 patients were treated with isolated IAAs. There were 20 open and 12 endovascular repairs. A comparison of the length of the operation (238 ± 84 min in the open group vs 176 ± 72 min in the endovascular group, P = 0.03) and intraoperative blood loss (1,735 ± 1,177 ml in the open group vs 503 ± 711 ml in the endovascular group, P = 0.01), revealed significant differences in favor of the endovascular procedure. Postoperative complications were less common in the endovascular group, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. The management of isolated IAAs with both endovascular and open repair can be accomplished with very low morbidity rates. Therefore, endovascular repair can be considered an alternative treatment for isolated IAAs.

  12. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; de la Cruz, Kim I.; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were succe...

  13. Mycotic aneurysm in a turtle hunter: brief review and a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Moole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella-associated mycotic aneurysm is a rare, but dreaded, complication of salmonellosis. Immunocompromised and elderly populations are more susceptible to develop this extra-intestinal complication. Salmonella is spread via fecal–oral and vehicle-borne routes. Reptiles, especially small pet turtles, have been linked with an increased risk of Salmonella infection. Diagnosis of mycotic aneurysm is a challenge due to atypical presentations. Recently, widespread use of CT scan imaging to evaluate for unexplained abdominal pain and sepsis has led to early identification of mycotic aneurysms. Antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention are the cornerstones of management. Open surgery has been the gold standard of treatment but is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A relatively new alternative to open surgery is endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR. It is comparatively less invasive and is associated with reduced early morbidity and mortality in the setting of mycotic aneurysm. However, there is a risk of late infection. Here, we present a patient with Salmonella mycotic aneurysm initially treated conservatively with antibiotic therapy who later underwent successful interval EVAR with no complications to date. Also included is a brief review of Salmonella-associated mycotic aneurysms.

  14. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using physician-modified endovascular grafts versus company-manufactured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossabhoy, Shernaz S; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Aiello, Francesco A; Sheth, Parth; Arous, Edward J; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-12-07

    Fenestrated endografts are customized, patient-specific endovascular devices with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality of complex aortic aneurysm repair. With approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, our center began performing fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair through a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE #G130210), using both physician-modified endografts (PMEGs) and company-manufactured devices (CMDs). Because these techniques are associated with specific advantages and disadvantages, we sought to investigate differences in outcomes between PMEG and CMD cases. A single-institution retrospective review of all fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repairs was performed. The cohort was analyzed by device type (PMEG or CMD) after matching of cases on the basis of (1) number of target vessels intended for treatment, (2) extent of aneurysm, (3) aneurysm diameter, (4) device configuration, and (5) date of operation. Outcomes of ruptures, common iliac artery aneurysms, and aortic arch aneurysms were excluded. Demographics, operative details, perioperative complications, length of stay, and reinterventions were compared. For patients with >1 year of follow-up time, survival, type I or type III endoleak rate, target artery patency, and reintervention rate were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Between November 30, 2010, and July 30, 2016, 82 patients were identified and matched. The cohort included 41 PMEG and 41 CMD patients who underwent repair of 38 juxtarenal (PMEG, 17; CMD, 21; P = .38), 14 pararenal (PMEG, 6; CMD, 8; P = .56), and 30 thoracoabdominal type I to type IV (PMEG, 18; CMD, 12; P = .17) aneurysms. There were significant differences in presentation requiring urgent aneurysm repair (PMEG, 9; CMD, 0; P = .002), total fluoroscopy time (PMEG, 76 minutes; CMD, 61 minutes; P = .02), volume of contrast material used (PMEG, 88 mL; CMD, 70 mL; P = .02), in-operating room to out-of-operating room time

  15. Aortic stentgrafts and en dovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-19

    Jul 19, 2007 ... with or without hooks or barbs attached to the proximal covered stent), or suprarenal with uncovered metal stent struts that maintain perfusion of the renal arteries, while the infrarenal covered component provides the seal. Distally, a seal requires normal common iliac arteries. Associated iliac aneurysms.

  16. Reporting standards for endovascular repair of saccular intracranial cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Philip M; Schumacher, H Christian; Higashida, Randall T; Derdeyn, Colin P; Nesbit, Gary M; Sacks, David; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Bederson, Joshua B; Lavine, Sean D; Rasmussen, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this article is to provide consensus recommendations for reporting standards, terminology, and written definitions when reporting on the radiological evaluation and endovascular treatment of intracranial, cerebral aneurysms. These criteria can be used to design clinical trials, to provide uniformity of definitions for appropriate selection and stratification of patients, and to allow analysis and meta-analysis of reported data. This article was written under the auspices of the Joint Writing Group of the Technology Assessment Committee, Society of Neurolnterventional Surgery, Society of Interventional Radiology; Joint Section on Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons; and Section of Stroke and Interventional Neurology of the American Academy of Neurology. A computerized search of the National Library of Medicine database of literature (PubMed) from January 1991 to December 2007 was conducted with the goal to identify published endovascular cerebrovascular interventional data about the assessment and endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms useful as benchmarks for quality assessment. We sought to identify those risk adjustment variables that affect the likelihood of success and complications. This article offers the rationale for different clinical and technical considerations that may be important during the design of clinical trials for endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Included in this guidance article are suggestions for uniform reporting standards for such trials. These definitions and standards are primarily intended for research purposes; however, they should also be helpful in clinical practice and applicable to all publications. The evaluation and treatment of brain aneurysms often involve multiple medical specialties. Recent reviews by the American Heart Association have surveyed the medical literature to develop guidelines for the clinical

  17. Elective visceral hybrid repair of type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the classification given by Crawford et al. type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is dilatation of the aorta from the level of the rib 6 to the separation of the aorta below the renal arteries, capturing all the visceral branch of aorta. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA is a procedure developed in recent years in the world, which involves a combination of conventional, open and endovascular aortic reconstruction surgery at the level of separation of the left subclavian artery to the level of visceral branches of aorta. Case report. We presented a 75-years-old man, with elective visceral hybrid reconstruction of type III TAAA. Computerized scanning (CT angiography of the patient showed type III TAAA with the maximum transverse diameter of aneurysm of 92 mm. Aneurysm started at the level of the sixth rib, and the end of the aneurysm was 1 cm distal to the level of renal arteries. Aneurysm compressed the esophagus, causing the patient difficulty in swallowing act, especially solid food, and frequent back pain. From the other comorbidity, the patient had been treated for a long time, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension. In general endotracheal anesthesia with epidural analgesia, the patient underwent visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA, which combines classic, open vascular surgery and endovascular procedures. Classic vascular surgery is visceral reconstruction using by-pass procedure from the distal, normal aorta to all visceral branches: celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and both renal arteries, with ligature of all arteries very close to the aorta. After that, by synchronous endovascular technique a complete aneurysmal exclusion of thoracoabdominal aneurysm with thoracic stent-graft was performed. The postoperative course was conducted properly and the patient left the Clinic for Vascular Surgery on postoperative day 21. Control CT, performed 3 months after the surgery

  18. Percutaneous Transabdominal Approach for the Treatment of Endoleaks after Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Yun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Hoon; Shim, Won Heum [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transabdominal treatment of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair. Between 2000 and 2007, six patients with type I (n = 4) or II (n = 2) endoleaks were treated by the percutaneous transabdominal approach using embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate with or without coils. Five patients underwent a single session and one patient had two sessions of embolization. The median time between aneurysm repair and endoleak treatment was 25.5 months (range: 0-84 months). Follow-up CT images were evaluated for changes in the size and shape of the aneurysm sac and presence or resolution of endoleaks. The median follow-up after endoleak treatment was 16.4 months (range: 0-37 months). Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was achieved in four patients with complete resolution of the endoleak confirmed by follow-up CT. Clinical failure was observed in two patients. One eventually underwent surgical conversion, and the other was lost to follow-up. There were no procedure-related complications. The percutaneous transabdominal approach for the treatment of type I or II endoleaks, after endovascular aneurysm repair, is an alternative method when conventional endovascular methods have failed.

  19. Endovascular stent grafting of thoracic aortic aneurysms: technological advancements provide an alternative to traditional surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lauren E Beste

    2005-01-01

    The use of endovascular stent grafts is a leading technological advancement in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, and is being trialed in the United States as an alternative to medical management and traditional surgical repair. Aortic stent grafts, initially used only for abdominal aortic aneurysms, have been used for over 10 years in Europe and are currently under United States Food and Drug Administration investigation for the treatment of chronic and acute aortic aneurysms. Diseases of the thoracic aorta are often present in high-risk individuals, and, as a result, there is a high morbidity and mortality rate associated with both medical and surgical management of these patients. The development and refinement of endovascular approaches have the potential to decrease the need for traditional surgical repair, especially in high-risk populations such as the elderly and those with multiple comorbidities. Endovascular technology for thoracic repair has only been used in Europe for the last 10 years, with no long-term outcomes available; however, preliminary research demonstrates favorable early and midterm outcomes showing that endovascular stent graft placement to exclude the dilated, dissected, or ruptured aorta is both technically feasible and safe for patients. The article highlights the historical perspective of endovascular stent grafting as well as a description of patient selection, the operative procedure, benefits, risks, and unresolved issues pertaining to the procedure. A brief review of aneurysm and dissection pathophysiology and management is provided, as well as postoperative management for acute care nurses and recommendations for clinical practice.

  20. The retroperitoneal approach combined with epidural anesthesia reduces morbidity in elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Meierhenrich, Rainer; Thiere, Matthias; Bischoff, Gisela; Oberhuber, Alexander; Orend, Karl Heinz; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    In elective open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair the surgical approach and the use of epidural anesthesia (EDA) may determine patients' outcome. Hence we analyzed our results after elective open aneurysm repair in the light of the surgical approach and the use of EDA. Retrospective analysis of a prospective data base. From December 2005 to April 2008, 125 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysm underwent elective open repair. Patients were divided into four groups: retro- and transperitoneal approach with and without epidural anesthesia (RP+/-EDA and TP+/-EDA). In terms of age, sex, aneurysm diameter, ASA score and clamping time all groups were comparable. In the retroperitoneal groups significantly more tube grafts were implanted (63 vs. 27; P=0.001). The rate of surgical complications did not differ between the groups. The RP+EDA group had the lowest rate of postoperative assisted mechanical ventilation (5.1% vs. 35.7%; P=0.002) and medical complications (17.9% vs. 42.8%; P=0.032). Concerning frequency of surgical complications, the retroperitoneal incision was comparable to the transperitoneal approach in infrarenal aortic reconstruction. Supplementation with EDA resulted in a decreased rate of postoperative assisted mechanical ventilation and in lower morbidity rates.

  1. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  2. Planning, Execution, and Follow-up for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Using a Highly Restrictive Iodinated Contrast Protocol in Patients with Severe Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitto, Enrico; Faggioli, Gianluca; Gargiulo, Mauro; Freyrie, Antonio; Pini, Rodolfo; Mascoli, Chiara; Ancetti, Stefano; Vento, Vincenzo; Stella, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The cumulative amount of iodinated contrast medium necessary for endovascular repair (EVAR) planning, operative procedure, and subsequent follow-up is a threat for the onset of end-stage renal disease in patients with preoperative impaired kidney function. The purpose of this study was to describe a mini-invasive approach aimed to minimize the exposure of these patients to iodinated contrast medium and the subsequent risk of renal function worsening. From 2012 to 2015, all patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) at high surgical risk and fit for standard EVAR (simple aortic-iliac anatomy: proximal and distal neck length ≥15 mm, no severe angulation), underwent EVAR through the following "near-zero contrast" approach, if their glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was <30 mL/min: preoperative planning was performed by noncontrast-enhanced computed tomography and duplex ultrasound (DU); the origin of renal/hypogastric arteries and aortic bifurcation was evaluated and matched with vertebral bone landmarks and the endograft deployed accordingly, using <20 cc of isotonic iodinate contrast medium and contrast-enhancement DU (CEUS). Follow-up was by DU/CEUS at 1, 6, and 12 months. Primary end points were technical success (TS: renal/hypogastric artery patency, absence of type I/III endoleaks, iliac stenosis/kinking, intraoperative mortality, and conversion), 30-day mortality, and new onset of permanent dialysis with renal function evaluation at 1, 6, and 12 months. Secondary end points were type II endoleaks, reinterventions, AAA, and renal-related mortality during the follow-up. Eighteen patients (median age: 74 years, interquartile range [IQR]: 6, male: 78%, American Society of Anaesthesiologists [ASA] IV: 100%) were enrolled. The median AAA diameter and preoperative GFR were 66 mm (IQR: 13) and 22 mL/min (IQR: 4), respectively. Infrarenal (n = 10) and suprarenal fixation (n = 8) endografts were implanted, with a mean dose of iodinate contrast medium

  3. Hybrid repair of penetrating aortic ulcer associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum with simultaneous repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bin; Cai, Hongbo; Jin, Hui

    2014-02-01

    We present the first case of a hybrid endovascular approach to a penetrating aortic ulcer on the left descending aorta with a right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from an aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum. The patient also had bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms. The three-step procedure consisted of a carotid-carotid bypass, followed by endovascular exclusion of the ulcer and the aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum, and then completion by covering the iliac aneurysms. The patient had no complications at 18 months after surgery. In such rare configurations, endovascular repair is a safe therapeutic option. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Giant coronary artery aneurysm after Takeuchi repair for anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlay, Shannon M; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Dearani, Joseph A; Warnes, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with an anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery who had undergone Takeuchi repair at age 7 years presented for evaluation. The Takeuchi procedure creates an aortopulmonary window and an intrapulmonary tunnel that baffles the left coronary artery to the aorta. A mediastinal mass was identified as a giant aneurysm of the left coronary artery resulting in compression of the pulmonary artery and left upper pulmonary vein. The patient underwent open repair with patch closure at the aortic entrance of the left coronary Takeuchi repair and resection and evacuation of the aneurysm. A saphenous vein graft to the left anterior descending artery was performed. Postoperative echocardiography demonstrated normal left ventricular function. This is the first reported case of giant aneurysm formation after Takeuchi repair. The reported complications have included the development of pulmonary artery stenosis at the intrapulmonary baffle, baffle leak, decreased left ventricular function, and mitral regurgitation. In conclusion, late complications of the Takeuchi procedure are common, underscoring the importance of lifelong follow-up at a center with experience in treating coronary anomalies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  6. Long-term results after repair of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Ilija B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be repaired by elective procedure while asymptomatic, or immediately when it is complicated - mostly due to rupture. Treating abdominal aneurysm electively, before it becomes urgent, has medical and economical reason. Today, the first month mortality after elective operations of the abdominal aorta aneurysm is less than 3%; on the other hand, significant mortality (25%-70% has been recorded in patients operated immediately because of rupture of the abdominal aneurysm. In addition, the costs of elective surgical treatment are significantly lower. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to compare long-term survival of patients that underwent elective or immediate repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (due to rupture, and to find out the factors influencing the long-term survival of these patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Through retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, 56 patients that had elective surgery and 35 patients that underwent urgent operation due to rupture of abdominal aneurysm were followed up. Only the patients that survived 30 postoperative days were included in this review, and were followed up (ranging from 2 to 126 months. Electively operated patients were followed during 58.82 months on the average (range 7 to 122, and urgently operated were followed over 52.26 months (range 2 to 126. There was no significant difference of the length of postoperative follow-up between these two groups. RESULTS During this period, out of electively operated and immediately operated patients, 27 and 22 cases died, respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0,05a of long-term survival between these two groups. Obesity and early postoperative complications significantly decreased long-term survival of both electively and immediately operated patients. Graft infection, ventral hernia, aneurysm of

  7. Predictors of Reintervention After Endovascular Repair of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, Hany A.; Attia, Rizwan; Modarai, Bijan; Clough, Rachel E.; Bell, Rachel E.; Carrell, Tom; Sabharwal, Tarun; Reidy, John; Taylor, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors predicting the need for reintervention after endovascular repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). We reviewed prospectively collected database records of all patients who underwent endovascular repair of IIAA between 1999 and 2008. Detailed assessment of the aneurysms was performed using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Follow-up protocol included CTA at 3 months. If this showed no complication, then annual duplex scan was arranged. Multivariate analysis and analysis of patient survival and freedom from reintervention were performed using Kaplan–Meier life tables. Forty IIAAs (median diameter 44 mm) in 38 patients were treated (all men; median age 75 years), and median follow-up was 27 months. Endovascular repair of IIAA was required in 14 of 40 aneurysms (35%). The rate of type I endoleak was significantly higher with proximal landing zone (PLZ) diameter >30 mm in the aorta or >24 mm in the common iliac artery or distal landing zone (DLZ) diameter >24 mm (P = 0.03, 0.03, and 0.0014, respectively). Reintervention rate (RR) increased significantly with increased diameter or decreased length of PLZ; increased DLZ diameter; and endovascular IIAA repair (P = 0.005, 0.005, 0.02, and 0.02 respectively); however, RR was not significantly affected by length of PLZ or DLZ. Freedom-from-reintervention was 97, 93, and 86% at 12, 24, and 108 months. There was no in-hospital or aneurysm-related mortality. Endovascular IIAA repair is a safe treatment option. Proper patient selection is essential to decrease the RR.

  8. Polar orientation of renal grafts within the proximal seal zone affects risk of early type IA endoleaks after chimney endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenneth; Ullery, Brant W; Itoga, Nathan; Lee, Jason T

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the polar orientation of renal chimney grafts within the proximal seal zone and to determine whether graft orientation is associated with early type IA endoleak or renal graft compression after chimney endovascular aneurysm repair (ch-EVAR). Patients who underwent ch-EVAR with at least one renal chimney graft from 2009 to 2015 were included in this analysis. Centerline three-dimensional reconstructions were used to analyze postoperative computed tomography scans. The 12-o'clock polar position was set at the takeoff of the superior mesenteric artery. Relative polar positions of chimney grafts were recorded at the level of the renal artery ostium, at the mid-seal zone, and at the proximal edge of the graft fabric. Early type IA endoleaks were defined as evidence of a perigraft flow channel within the proximal seal zone. There were 62 consecutive patients who underwent ch-EVAR (35 double renal, 27 single renal) for juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms with a mean follow-up of 31.2 months; 18 (29%) early type IA "gutter" endoleaks were identified. During follow-up, the majority of these (n = 13; 72%) resolved without intervention, whereas two patients required reintervention (3.3%). Estimated renal graft patency was 88.9% at 60 months. Left renal chimney grafts were most commonly at the 3-o'clock position (51.1%) at the ostium, traversing posteriorly to the 5- to 7-o'clock positions (55.5%) at the fabric edge. Right renal chimney grafts started most commonly at the 9-o'clock position (n = 17; 33.3%) and tended to traverse both anteriorly (11 to 1 o'clock; 39.2%) and posteriorly (5 to 7 o'clock; 29.4%) at the fabric edge. In the polar plane, the majority of renal chimney grafts (n = 83; 85.6%) traversed 90 degrees were independently associated with early type IA endoleaks (odds ratio, 11.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-64.8) even after controlling for other device and anatomic variables. Polar orientation of the chimney

  9. Redo Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Single-Center Experience Over 25 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Rana O; Sandhu, Harleen K; Trott, Amy E; Nguyen, Tom C; Miller, Charles C; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2017-05-01

    Aortic disease is a lifelong, progressive illness that may require repeated intervention over time. We reviewed our 25-year experience with open redo thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) repair. Our objectives were to determine patient outcomes after redo repair of DTAA/TAAA and compare them with nonredo repair. We also attempted to identify the risk factors for poor outcome. We reviewed all open redo TAAA and DTAA repairs between 1991 and 2014. Patient characteristics, preoperative, intraoperative variables, and postoperative outcomes were gathered. Data were analyzed by contingency table and by multiple logistic regression. We performed 1,900 open DTAA/TAAA repairs, with 266 (14%) being redos. Redos were associated with younger age (62 ± 16.4 years vs 64.5 ± 13.4 years, p 70 years, glomerular filtration rate <48 mL/min per 1.73m 2 , extent III TAAA, and emergency presentation) for predicting early death. In the presence of all four risk factors in a redo patient, a maximal risk of 82% for early death was predicted. The need for a redo operation in DTAA/TAAA repair is common and most often presents as an extension of the disease into an adjacent segment. A hybrid or completely endovascular treatment should be considered in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Does lower limb exercise worsen renal artery hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqiang Sun

    Full Text Available Renal artery stenosis (RAS and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA. The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS, increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI and increased the relative residence time (RRT. EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients.

  11. Endovascular treatment of Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ji, Donghua; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    In very rare cases, a primary infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is caused by a species of Brucella. In this report, we report such a case that was successfully treated with a novel approach. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case occurring in China, in which an infection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was caused by a Brucella species. The clinical findings included high fever, fatigue, and abdominal pain. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography angiography and by bacteriologic isolation from the patient's blood culture. The patient was given endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and Brucella-sensitive antibiotics for 6 weeks. During the 10-month follow-up, the patient's clinical course remained uneventful. Our case study supports the premise that endovascular aneurysm repair is an appropriate alternative strategy to treat an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Compared with conventional surgical treatment, EVAR with long-term oral antibiotics is a simpler, less traumatic, and more efficient procedure. However, this needs to be further evaluated through long-term follow-up.

  12. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Nandipati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy‐like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints.

  13. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  14. A multidetector tomography protocol for follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moraes Bastos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the use of 64-channel multidetector computed tomography using lower doses of ionizing radiation during follow-up procedures in a series of patients with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. METHODS: Thirty patients receiving 5 to 29 months of follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed using a 64-channel multidetector computed tomography device by an exam that included pre-and postcontrast with both arterial and venous phases. Leak presence and type were classified based on the exam phase. RESULTS: Endoleaks were identified in 8/30 of cases; the endoleaks in 3/8 of these cases were not visible in the arterial phases of the exams. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that multidetector computed tomography with pre-contrast and venous phases should be a part of the ongoing follow-up of patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The arterial phase can be excluded when the aneurism is stable or regresses. These findings permit a lower radiation dose without jeopardizing the correct diagnosis of an endoleak.

  15. Prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate "fast-track" elective open infrarenal aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Halter, Gisela; Lang, Gunter; Schelzig, Hubert; Steffen, Peter; Wagner, Florian; Meierhenrich, Rainer; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger; Orend, Karl-Heinz

    2008-05-01

    Fast-track programs have been introduced in many surgical fields to minimize postoperative morbidity and mortality. Morbidity after elective open infrarenal aneurysm repair is as high as 30%; mortality ranges up to 10%. In terms of open infrarenal aneurysm repair, no randomized controlled trials exist to introduce and evaluate such patient care programs. This study involved prospective randomization of 82 patients in a "traditional" and a "fast-track" treatment arm. Main differences consisted in preoperative bowel washout (none vs. 3 l cleaning solution) and analgesia (patient controlled analgesia vs. patient controlled epidural analgesia). Study endpoints were morbidity and mortality, need for postoperative mechanical ventilation, and length of stay (LOS) on intensive care unit (ICU). The need for assisted postoperative ventilation was significantly higher in the traditional group (33.3% vs. 5.4%; p = 0.011). Median LOS on ICU was shorter in the fast-track group, 41 vs. 20 h. The rate of postoperative medical complications was significantly lower in the fast-track group, 16.2% vs. 35.7% (p = 0.045). We introduced and evaluated an optimized patient care program for patients undergoing open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair which showed a significant advantage for "fast-track" patients in terms of postoperative morbidity.

  16. Hybrid repair of a very late, post-aortic coarctation surgery thoracic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilea Ioan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Local aneurysms after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta occur mainly in patients surgically treated by Dacron patch plasty during adulthood. The management of these patients is always problematic, with frequent complications and increased mortality rates. Percutaneous stent-graft implantation avoids the need for surgical reintervention. Case presentation We report a case involving the hybrid treatment by stent-graft implantation and transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery of an aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta that occurred in a 64-year-old Caucasian man, operated on almost 40 years earlier with a Dacron patch plasty for aortic coarctation. Our patient presented to our facility for evaluation with back pain and shortness of breath after minimal physical effort. A physical examination revealed stony dullness to percussion of the left posterior thorax, with no other abnormalities. The results of chest radiography, followed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and aortography, led to a diagnosis of giant aortic thoracic aneurysm. Successful treatment of the aneurysm was achieved by percutaneous stent-graft implantation combined with transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. His post-procedural recovery was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm, without any clinical signs of left lower limb ischemia or new onset neurological abnormalities. Conclusions Our patient’s case illustrates the clinical outcomes of surgical interventions for aortic coarctation. However, the very late appearance of a local aneurysm is rather unusual. Management of such cases is always difficult. The decision-making should be multidisciplinary. A hybrid approach was considered the best solution for our patient.

  17. Endograft Limb Occlusion in EVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, M; Jensen, L P; Vogt, K C

    2014-01-01

    % at 3 years. Logistic regression showed that iliac artery tortuosity (DIS) (p = .001) and body mass index (p = .007) had a significant impact on graft patency. CONCLUSION: A tortuous vessel on the preoperative CTA is associated with an increased risk of limb occlusion after EVAR. Adjunctive stenting...

  18. Individual-patient meta-analysis of three randomized trials comparing endovascular versus open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeting, M. J.; Balm, R.; Desgranges, P.; Ulug, P.; Powell, J. T.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Idu, M. M.; Kox, C.; Legemate, D. A.; Huisman, L. C.; Willems, M. C. M.; Reekers, J. A.; van Delden, O. M.; van Lienden, K. P.; Hoornweg, L. L.; Reimerink, J. J.; van Beek, S. C.; Vahl, A. C.; Leijdekkers, V. J.; Bosma, J.; Montauban van Swijndregt, A. D.; de Vries, C.; van der Hulst, V. P. M.; Peringa, J.; Blomjous, J. G. A. M.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Wisselink, W.; Hoksbergen, A. W. J.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Visser, M. T. J.; Coveliers, H. M. E.; Nederhoed, J. H.; van den Berg, F. G.; van der Meijs, B. B.; van den Oever, M. L. P.; Lely, R. J.; Meijerink, M. R.; Voorwinde, A.; Ultee, J. M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, R. C.; Dwars, B. J.; Nagy, T. O. M.; Tolenaar, P.; Wiersema, A. M.; Lawson, J. A.; van Aken, P. J.; Stigter, A. A.; van den Broek, T. A. A.; Vos, G. A.; Mulder, W.; Strating, R. P.; Nio, D.; Akkersdijk, G. J. M.; van der Elst, A.; van Exter, P.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Allaire, E.; Cochennec, F.; Marzelle, J.; Louis, N.; Schneider, J.; Majewski, M.; Castier, Y.; Leseche, G.; Francis, F.; Steinmetz, E.; Berne, J.-P.; Favier, C.; Haulon, S.; Koussa, M.; Azzaoui, R.; Piervito, D.; Alimi, Y.; Boufi, M.; Hartung, O.; Cerquetta, P.; Amabile, P.; Piquet, P.; Penard, J.; Demasi, M.; Alric, P.; Canaud, L.; Berthet, J.-P.; Julia, P.; Fabiani, J.-N.; Alsac, J. M.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Favre, J.-P.; Albertini, J.-N.; Martinez, R.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Jean, E.; Sosa, M.; Declemy, S.; Destrieux-Garnier, L.; Lermusiaux, P.; Feugier, P.; Ashleigh, R.; Gomes, M.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Grieve, R.; Hinchliffe, R.; Sweeting, M.; Thompson, M. M.; Thompson, S. G.; Cheshire, N. J.; Boyle, J. R.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Smyth, J. V.; Hinchliffe, R. J.; Bell, R.; Wilson, N.; Bown, M.; Dennis, M.; Davis, M.; Howell, S.; Wyatt, M. G.; Valenti, D.; Bachoo, P.; Walker, P.; MacSweeney, S.; Davies, J. N.; Rittoo, D.; Parvin, S. D.; Yusuf, W.; Nice, C.; Chetter, I.; Howard, A.; Chong, P.; Bhat, R.; McLain, D.; Gordon, A.; Lane, I.; Hobbs, S.; Pillay, W.; Rowlands, T.; El-Tahir, A.; Asquith, J.; Cavanagh, S.; Dubois, L.; Forbes, T. L.

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remain controversial, without any strong evidence about advantages in specific subgroups. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of three recent randomized trials of endovascular versus open repair of abdominal aortic

  19. Deep gluteal grounding pad burn after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Paolo; Venturini, Luigi; Cigna, Emanuele; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Biacchi, Daniele; di Marzo, Luca

    2015-06-24

    Although skin burns at the site of grounding pad are a known risk of surgery, their exact incidence is unknown. We first report the case of a patient who presented a deep gluteal burn at the site of the grounding pad after an abdominal aortic aneurism repair, the etiology and the challenging treatment required to overcome this complication.

  20. Dynamic aortic changes in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms evaluated with electrocardiography-triggered computed tomographic angiography before and after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prehn, J. van; Bartels, L.W.; Mestres, G.; Vincken, K.L.; Prokop, M.; Verhagen, H.J.; Moll, F.L.; Herwaarden, J.A. van

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize dynamic computed tomographic angiography (CTA) on pre- and postoperative thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) patients to characterize cardiac pulsatility-induced aortic motion on essential TEVAR proximal sealing zones and to study the influence of

  1. Mortality after open aortic aneurysm surgery by Australasian surgeons trained in the endovascular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, C Barry; Walker, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Reduced exposure of trainees to open repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) during training has been considered detrimental to outcome. The Australasian experience is examined. The Australasian Vascular Audit (AVA) was interrogated for AAA procedures between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. Surgeons completing training before 2006 (group 1) were compared with those attaining their qualification subsequently (group 2). The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) database was also interrogated to confirm the trends over time of open and endovascular repair (EVAR) since 2000. Actual exposure to OR and EVAR of AAA by trainees from 2010 to 2014 was also extracted. One hundred and forty-six surgeons in group 1 performed 3049 OR compared with 997 for the 66 surgeons in group 2. Overall mortality for group 1 was 9.8% and for group 2, 15% (P Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospitalization rates and post-operative mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysm in Italy over the period 2000-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Sensi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have reported declines in incidence, prevalence and mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs in various countries, but evidence from Mediterranean countries is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine the trend of hospitalization and post-operative mortality rates for AAAs in Italy during the period 2000-2011, taking into account the introduction of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR in 1990s. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was carried out in Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with 4.5 million inhabitants. A total of 19,673 patients hospitalized for AAAs between 2000 and 2011, were identified from the hospital discharge records (HDR database. Hospitalization rates, percentage of OSR and EVAR and 30-day mortality rates were calculated for unruptured (uAAAs and ruptured AAAs (rAAAs. RESULTS: Adjusted hospitalization rates decreased on average by 2.9% per year for uAAAs and 3.2% for rAAAs (p<0.001. The temporal trend of 30-day mortality rates remained stable for both groups. The percentage of EVAR for uAAAs increased significantly from 2006 to 2011 (42.7 versus 60.9% respectively, mean change of 3.9% per year, p<0.001. No significant difference in mortality was found between OSR and EVAR for uAAAs and rAAAs. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence and trend of hospitalization rates for rAAAs and uAAAs decreased significantly in the last decade, while 30-day mortality rates in operated patients remained stable. OSR continued to be the most common surgery in rAAAs, although the gap between OSR and EVAR recently declined. The EVAR technique became the preferred surgery for uAAAs since 2008.

  4. Outcomes of surgical versus endovascular repair of unruptured brain aneurysms in individuals aged ≥ 75 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Tanaka, Teppei; Sadato, Akiyo; Hayakawa, Motoharu; Adachi, Kazuhide; Hayashi, Takuro; Kato, Yoko; Hirose, Yuichi

    2014-10-01

    Therapeutic intervention to repair unruptured aneurysms (UA) has not been strongly recommended for the elderly, because of their limited life expectancy and low annual bleeding rate. However, physically and mentally healthy older adults with seemingly high risk of aneurysmal bleeding might benefit from having their UA repaired. A single-center retrospective study was carried out. Among 1078 patients admitted for treatment of UA between 2007 and 2011, the number of patients aged ≥ 75 years who underwent surgical and endovascular repair of UA was 30 and 31, respectively. The operative and mid-term outcomes were compared between the two groups. For evaluation of the operative outcomes, frequency and types of adverse events that occurred within 30 days of intervention (operative morbidity) were described. For assessment of the mid-term outcomes, activities of daily living (ADL) at 24 months after intervention were evaluated with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The operative morbidity rate was 6.7% in the open surgery group and 6.5% in the endovascular surgery group, and they did not differ significantly. The frequency of patients with mRS 0-2 at 24 months after intervention was 85.7% in the open surgery group and 82.8% in the endovascular surgery group, and they did not differ significantly. The adverse event rate of patients with middle cerebral artery aneurysms treated endovascularly was high (80%). The outcomes of individuals aged ≥ 75 years who underwent repair of UA were generally favorable in either treatment group, with more than 80% living an independent life at 24 months after intervention. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Renal function after elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with pelvic kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trung D; Wilson, Samuel E; Gordon, Ian L; Fujitani, Roy M; Carson, John; Montgomery, Russell S

    2007-03-01

    Pelvic kidneys complicate aortic reconstructions because of increased risk of renal ischemia. Strategies for protection include shunting, cooling, and reliance on collaterals. A review identified two congenital pelvic kidney (not solitary) and five transplanted kidney patients who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. For congenital pelvic kidneys, topical cooling was used in one patient while no preservation was performed for the other patient. Three transplanted kidney patients were shunted, and one had endovascular repair. Postoperative creatinine values were compared to preoperative values. The two congenital pelvic kidney patients had no significant elevation of creatinine postoperatively. The transplanted kidney patient who underwent endovascular repair had no increase in creatinine postoperatively. All transplanted kidney patients who had open repair had significant but transient increase in creatinine postoperatively. Three patients who were shunted intraoperatively had normalization of creatinine. The patient who had persistent elevation of creatinine at discharge was not shunted. Aortorenal shunting or endovascular repair in transplanted pelvic kidney patients maintains renal function. For patients with congenital pelvic kidneys and adequate collaterals, cooling and collateral perfusion is usually sufficient. Though experience is limited, endovascular repair is likely to be superior to open repair in minimizing renal ischemia.

  6. Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair using the Ovation Stent Graft System in Adverse Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Moore, Aiden; Seriki, Dare; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2018-04-01

    The aim was the evaluation of mid-term efficacy and safety outcome measures for the Ovation (Endologix, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) stent graft system in the management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (iAAA) with adverse anatomy. A retrospective observational study of all patients undergoing elective iAAA repair was carried out from 2012 to 2017 using Ovation Prime or iX stent grafts with a minimum of 3 months follow-up at a single UK vascular centre. Post-operative surveillance involved computed tomography scans at 3 months and 1 year, with duplex ultrasound yearly thereafter. Outcome measures were established with retrospective analysis of pre- and post-operative imaging, and included peri-operative mortality, major adverse events, limb complications, aneurysm diameter change, and endoleak rates. All patients were within Ovation instructions for use (IFU), and assessment was made to determine whether aneurysms had anatomical features considered adverse for other commonly used stent graft platforms. Ovation stent grafts were implanted in 52 patients (79% male, mean age 75.7 years) with a mean aneurysm diameter of 62.5 mm (range 55-107 mm). There was 100% technical deployment success. The 30 day mortality was 0% and there was no aneurysm related mortality during follow-up (median 24 months, range 3-48 months). There were no type I or III endoleaks, but 19% developed type II endoleaks with one patient requiring re-intervention. No iliac limb occlusions were identified but one case required relining for limb kinking. All 52 cases were within the IFU for Ovation but only 12% met the IFU criteria for the Cook and Medtronic devices. The mid-term experience with Ovation demonstrates safe, durable treatment of iAAAs, including those with unfavourable anatomy, frequently off IFU for other commonly used devices. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  8. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  9. Successful endovascular aneurysm repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with severe coronary artery disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Min; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Ju Han; Park, Keun-Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) often have concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD). In cases of AAA with severe CAD requiring coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), two therapeutic strategies regarding the timing of CABG can be considered: staged or simultaneous operations. However, the ideal treatment of patients with large AAA and critical CAD remains controversial. We experienced a case of successful endovascular aneurysm repair after off-pump CABG in a 70-year-old patient who had a huge AAA and critical CAD.

  10. Coronary risk in candidates for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borioni, Raoul; Tomai, Fabrizio; Pederzoli, Alessio; Fratticci, Laura; Barberi, Filippo; De Luca, Leonardo; Albano, Marzia; Garofalo, Mariano

    2014-11-01

    Current guidelines do not recommend routine coronary evaluation preceding abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) repair in low-risk patients. The purpose of the present study is to report the incidence of coronary lesions in candidates for AAA repair with a Revised Cardiac Risk (Lee) Index (RCRI) coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention, PCI; coronary artery bypass grafting, CABG) before elective open or endovascular AAA repair (January 2005-December 2012). Severe coronary artery disease (CAD) was revealed in 43 patients (28.9%), who underwent successful myocardial revascularization by means of PCI (n.35) or off-pump CABG (n.8). The incidence of severe CAD in patients resulted at low risk on the basis of risk models was approximately 25%. The incidence of severe CAD in asymptomatic patients was 29.8%. Endovascular (n.52, 35.1%) and open (n.96, 64.9%) AAA repair was performed with low morbidity (0.6%) and mortality (0.6%) in 148 patients. The long-term estimated survival (freedom from fatal cardiovascular events) was 97% at 60 months and 82% at 90 months. The incidence of severe correctable CAD is not negligible in low-risk patients scheduled for AAA repair. Waiting for further recommendations based on large population studies of vascular patients, a more extensive indication to coronary angiography and revascularization should be considered in many candidates for AAA repair.

  11. Contemporary strategies for repair of complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms: real-world experiences and multilayer stents as an alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Robert Kolvenbach

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA present special challenges for repair due to their extent, their distinctive pathology, and the fact that they typically cross the ostia of one or more visceral branch vessels. Historically, the established treatment for TAAA was open surgical repair, with the first procedure reported in 1955. Endovascular repair of TAAA with fenestrated and/ or branched endografts, has been studied since the beginning of the current century as a means of mechanical aneurysm exclusion. More recently, flow modulator stents have been employed with the aim at reducing shear stress on aortic aneurysmal wall. In this review we present technical and main results of these techniques, based on literature review and personal experience.

  12. Simultaneous thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting through median sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutachi, Akira; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Ikeda, Kazuyuki; Nogami, Eijiro; Takaki, Jun

    2014-09-01

    Patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) often have severe ischemic heart disease. The determination of which condition to treat first is based on disease severity, but in some cases the conditions are equally severe. A 78-year-old woman received a diagnosis of a 59-mm TAAA and coronary artery stenosis. We performed simultaneous TAAA repair, using the patched aortoplasty method, and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) through a median sternotomy. No perioperative complications occurred, the patient was discharged in stable condition, and early follow-up visits were uneventful. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in New Zealand: a validation of the Australasian Vascular Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashram, Manar; Thomson, Ian A; Jones, Gregory T; Roake, Justin A

    2017-05-01

    In New Zealand (NZ), there are two major sources of operative data for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair: the Australasian Vascular Audit (AVA) and the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS). Since the introduction of the AVA in NZ, there has not been any attempt at the validation of outcome data. The aims of this study were to report the outcomes of AAA repair and validate the AAA data captured by AVA using the NMDS. AAA procedures performed in NZ from January 2010 to December 2014 were extracted from the AVA and NMDS. Patients identified from the AVA had their survival status matched to the NMDS. Only primary AAA procedures were included for the analysis, with re-interventions and graft infections excluded. Demographical, risk factors and outcome data were used for validation. The number of patients undergoing primary AAA procedure from AVA and NMDS was 1713 and 2078, respectively. The AVA inpatient mortality for elective and rupture AAA was 1.6 and 32.2%, respectively. The NMDS 30-day mortality from AAA was 2.5 and 31.5%. Overall, 1604 patients were available for matching, and the NMDS correctly reported 98.1% of endovascular aneurysm repair and 94.2% of elective AAA repairs; however, there were major differences in comorbidity reporting between the data sets. Both data sets were incomplete, but combining administrative (NMDS) and clinical (AVA) data sets provided a more accurate assessment of mortality figures. More than 80% of AAA repairs are captured by AVA, but further work to improve compliance and comorbidity documentation is required. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Adjusted Hospital Outcomes of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery Reported in the Dutch Surgical Aneurysm Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijftogt, N; Vahl, A C; Wilschut, E D; Elsman, B H P; Amodio, S; van Zwet, E W; Leijdekkers, V J; Wouters, M W J M; Hamming, J F

    2017-04-01

    The Dutch Surgical Aneurysm Audit (DSAA) is mandatory for all patients with primary abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in the Netherlands. The aims are to present the observed outcomes of AAA surgery against the predicted outcomes by means of V-POSSUM (Vascular-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity). Adjusted mortality was calculated by the original and re-estimated V(physiology)-POSSUM for hospital comparisons. All patients operated on from January 2013 to December 2014 were included for analysis. Calibration and discrimination of V-POSSUM and V(p)-POSSUM was analysed. Mortality was benchmarked by means of the original V(p)-POSSUM formula and risk-adjusted by the re-estimated V(p)-POSSUM on the DSAA. In total, 5898 patients were included for analysis: 4579 with elective AAA (EAAA) and 1319 with acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAAA), acute symptomatic (SAAA; n = 371) or ruptured (RAAA; n = 948). The percentage of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) varied between hospitals but showed no relation to hospital volume (EAAA: p = .12; AAAA: p = .07). EAAA, SAAA, and RAAA mortality was, respectively, 1.9%, 7.5%, and 28.7%. Elective mortality was 0.9% after EVAR and 5.0% after open surgical repair versus 15.6% and 27.4%, respectively, after AAAA. V-POSSUM overestimated mortality in most EAAA risk groups (p high risk groups, and underestimated in low risk groups (p Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  16. Iliac artery recanalization of chronic occlusions to facilitate endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Raghuveer; Sorial, Ehab E; Jordan, William D; Minion, David J; Farber, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Concurrent iliac occlusion and abdominal aortic aneurysm is rare. Traditionally, the endovascular approach to these patients has consisted of aortouniiliac devices combined with femoral-femoral bypass. With improved facility of endovascular techniques, standard bifurcated endografts represent an alternative option in these patients. This study examined outcomes of patients undergoing iliac recanalization and traditional bifurcated endovascular aneurysm repair in the face of access vessel occlusion. Outcomes of patients at three academic tertiary referral centers who underwent attempted iliac recanalization of chronic iliac occlusions and concurrent endovascular aneurysm repair of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with acute iliac thrombosis and those with severely stenotic (but patent) iliac vessels were excluded. During a 6-year period, 15 occluded iliac arteries were treated in 14 patients (13 men). Mean age was 67.8 years (range, 52-80 years). Primary indication for intervention was disabling claudication in four patients, size of abdominal aortic aneurysm in nine, and symptomatic aneurysm in one. Seven patients presented with a unilateral common iliac artery (CIA) occlusion, four with a unilateral external iliac artery (EIA) occlusion, three with a unilateral combined CIA and EIA occlusion, and one with bilateral CIA occlusions. Stents had been placed previously in two of the occluded CIAs and in one of the occluded EIAs. Average length of the occluded segment was 7.5 cm (range, 2-17 cm). The occluded CIAs and EIAs had mean diameters of 8.6 and 5.7 mm, respectively. Successful recanalization was achieved in 14 of the 15 vessels (93.3%). One EIA ruptured during recanalization but was easily controlled with a covered stent. A re-entry device was used in two cases. Overall, 13 bifurcated devices were successfully implanted. Bilateral iliac occlusions in one patient were recanalized. One Talent (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, Calif

  17. Durability of endovascular infrarenal aneurysm repair: when does late failure occur and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuter, Timothy A M

    2009-06-01

    The first commercially available stent grafts were unable to withstand the hemodynamic forces of the vascular environment. The past 15 years have seen a gradual improvement in long-term stent graft performance as designs evolved through the elimination of features associated with late failure and the replication of features associated with durable success. Clinical experience provides the following principles on which to base device design and implantation techniques. Few patients have an adequate length of non-dilated aorta distal to the aneurysm to allow implantation of an aorto-aortic stent graft; bifurcated stent grafts are usually required for AAA repair. Friction, column strength and tissue ingrowth do not prevent migration of the stent graft from its attachment within the neck into the aneurysm; some form of active fixation is required, usually in the form of barbs. Any movement between the apex of a stent and the overlying graft material will erode the fabric; stents and grafts need to move as a single unit. Nitinol is versatile, but fragile; Nitinol components must be polished to eliminate all surface irregularities and they cannot be subjected to compression loading, or excessive pulsatile movement. The neck of an aneurysm is unstable; it will dilate unless protected by a securely fixed, non-compliant stent graft. The aneurysm does not heal; freedom from risk of rupture depends on durable depressurization of the sac. The sole objective of image-based follow-up is the early detection, and catheter-based correction, of device failure. Once any given design has been in use long enough to identify its failure modes, the frequency of follow-up studies can be adjusted accordingly. However, it takes a long time to identify all the potential forms of late failure, and pre-clinical testing remains an imprecise science. New, or recently modified, devices cannot necessarily be assumed to be as durable as their predecessors.

  18. Provider volume and outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower extremity revascularization procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Intuitively, vascular procedures performed by high-volume vascular subspecialists working at high-volume institutions should be associated with improved patient outcome. Although a large number of studies assess the relationship between volume and outcome, a single contemporary compilation of such studies is lacking. METHODS: A review of the English language literature was performed incorporating searches of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (elective and emergent), carotid endarterectomy, and arterial lower limb procedures for any volume outcome relationship. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1980 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcomes (mortality and morbidity) as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. RESULTS: We identified 74 relevant studies, and 54 were included. All showed either an inverse relationship of variable magnitude between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. The reduction in the risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for high-volume providers was 3% to 11% for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, 2.5 to 5% for emergent AAA repair, 0.7% to 4.7% carotid endarterectomy, and 0.3% to 0.9% for lower limb arterial bypass procedures. Subspeciality training also conferred a considerable morbidity and mortality benefit for emergent AAA repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb arterial procedures. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have significantly better outcomes for vascular procedures both in the elective and emergent setting. Subspeciality training also has a considerable impact. These data provide further evidence for the specialization of vascular services, whereby vascular procedures should generally be preformed by high-volume, speciality trained providers.

  19. Transient postoperative atrial fibrillation after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair increases mortality risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N.; Halandras, Pegge M.; Drescher, Max; Blackwell, Robert H.; Graunke, Dawn M.; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Kuo, Paul C.; Cho, Jae S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether new-onset transient postoperative atrial fibrillation (TPAF) affects mortality rates after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and to identify predictors for the development of TPAF. Methods Patients who underwent open aortic repair or endovascular aortic repair for a principal diagnosis AAA were retrospectively identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Database (Florida) for 2007 to 2011 and monitored longitudinally for 1 year. Inpatient and 1-year mortality rates were compared between those with and without TPAF. TPAF was defined as new-onset atrial fibrillation that developed in the postoperative period and subsequently resolved in patients without a history of atrial fibrillation. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities, rupture status, and repair method, were used to assess 1-year survival. Predictive models were built with preoperative patient factors using Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector decision trees and externally validated on patients from California. Results A 3.7% incidence of TPAF was identified among 15,148 patients who underwent AAA repair. The overall mortality rate was 4.3%. The inpatient mortality rate was 12.3% in patients with TPAF vs 4.0% in those without TPAF. In the ruptured setting, the difference in mortality was similar between groups (33.7% vs 39.9%, P = .3). After controlling for age, gender, comorbid disease severity, urgency (ruptured vs nonruptured), and repair method, TPAF was associated with increased 1-year postoperative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.48; P predict an individual's probability of developing TPAF at the point of care. Conclusions The development of TPAF is associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients undergoing repair of nonruptured AAA. Predictive modeling can be used to identify those patients at highest risk for developing TPAF and guide interventions to improve

  20. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; de la Cruz, Kim I; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were successfully repaired by means of a surgical bypass technique in which a Dacron graft was placed between the carotid and brachial arteries. We also discuss our strategy for determining the optimal surgical approach in these patients.

  1. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  2. Endovascular treatment of late thoracic aortic aneurysms after surgical repair of congenital aortic coarctation in childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Juszkat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1 to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2 to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs and (3 to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. METHODS: This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. RESULTS: Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19% (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch and mild recoarctation in other six (16%. Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA, in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary.

  3. The incidence of contrast medium-induced nephropathy following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: assessment of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneyli, Serkan; Bozkaya, Halil; Cinar, Celal; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Duman, Soner; Acar, Turker; Akin, Yigit; Parildar, Mustafa; Oran, Ismail

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) and risk factors for CIN following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair or thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. After exclusion criteria, 139 (121 males, 18 females) patients aged 20-86 (median 65.5) years who underwent endovascular aortic aneurysm repair between January 2002 and September 2013 were included in this retrospective study. CIN, with ≥25% increase in serum creatinine levels within 3 days after contrast medium administration, was compared to the patients' demographics, risk factors, type and complexity of the endovascular operation, parameters regarding to the contrast medium, preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and preoperative and early postoperative serum parameters. Statistical analyses were performed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, χ (2) and Student's t tests. CIN, detected in 39 of 139 patients (28%), was correlated with preoperative eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.04) and high preoperative and postoperative serum urea and creatinine levels. Postoperative serum urea levels (P < 0.001) were significant in multivariate analysis. In patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, CIN was correlated with preoperative and postoperative renal impairment, while it was not correlated with the contrast medium dose.

  4. Single-stage surgical repair in a complex case of aberrant right subclavian artery aneurysm and common carotid trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, Ioannis; Harling, Leanne; Anagnostakou, Vania; Tassopoulos, Dimitris; Charitos, Christos; Ashrafian, Hutan; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-04-25

    Aberrant right subclavian artery with coexisting common carotid trunk is an extremely rare congenital anomaly affecting <0.1% of the population. We report the case of a 77-year-old Caucasian man presenting with dysphagia and dyspnea secondary to an aberrant right subclavian artery aneurysm and describe our technique for open surgical repair.

  5. The effect of surgeon specialization on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alexander T; Smith, Ann D; Schaumeier, Maria J; de Vos, Marit S; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Nguyen, Louis L

    2014-09-01

    Although mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has steadily declined, operative mortality for a ruptured AAA (rAAA) remains high. Repair of rAAA at hospitals with a higher elective aneurysm workload has been associated with lower mortality rates irrespective of the mode of treatment. This study sought to determine the association between surgeon specialization and outcomes after rAAA repair. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database from 2005 to 2010 was used to examine the 30-day mortality and morbidity outcomes of patients undergoing rAAA repair by vascular and general surgeons. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed for each death and morbidity, adjusting for all independently predictive preoperative risk factors. Survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. We identified 1893 repairs of rAAAs, of which 1767 (96.1%) were performed by vascular surgeons and 72 (3.9%) were performed by general surgeons. There were no significant differences between patients operated on by general vs vascular surgeons in preoperative risk factors or method of repair. Overall 30-day mortality was 34.3% (649 of 1893). After risk adjustment, mortality was significantly lower in the vascular surgery group compared with the general surgery group (odds ratio [OR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.86; P = .011). The risk of returning to the operating room (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.97; P = .038), renal failure (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.95; P = .034), and a cardiac complication (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.28-0.99; P = .047) were all significantly less in the vascular surgery group. Despite similar preoperative risk factors profiles, patients who were operated on by vascular surgeons had lower mortality, less frequent returns to the operating room, and decreased incidences of postoperative renal failure and cardiac events. These data add weight to the case for further centralization of

  6. Contemporary economic and clinical evaluations of endovascular repair for intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silingardi, Roberto; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Giovanni; Chester, Johanna; Marcheselli, Luigi; Brunetti, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical and contemporary costs associated with elective endovascular repair of intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA) into the mid-term follow-up. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database including 29 consecutive patients from July 2005 to December 2009 treated with elective endovascular repair (TEVAR) or TEVAR and surgical infrarenal repair (hybrid) of intact DTAA was performed. Mean age was 74.5 years old (±7.1). Primary clinical endpoints include mortality and major morbidity. Additionally a comprehensive economic appraisal of individual in-hospital and follow-up costs was executed. Economic endpoints include in-hospital and follow-up costs and patient discharge status. Elective endovascular and open repairs' clinical and economical outcomes in contemporary literature were assessed for comparison according to PRISMA standards. Immediate mortality was 6.9% (1/24 TEVAR and 1/5 hybrid). Three respiratory complications were recorded (11%; 2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid). Renal and cardiac complication rates were 7.4% (1 TEVAR, 1 hybrid) and 3.7% (1 TEVAR) respectively. Routine discharge home was achieved for 85% of patients (95.7% TEVAR, 25% hybrid). Three endoleaks were treated throughout the follow-up (2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid; mean 30.4 mo, ±19.9) rendering an 11% (3/27) reintervention rate. Average immediate cost was €21,976.87 for elective endovascular repair and €33,783.21 for elective endovascular hybrid repair. Additional reintervention and routine follow-up costs augmented immediate costs by 12.4%. This study supports satisfying immediate clinical outcomes for TEVAR and TEVAR+surgical infrarenal procedures. Although limited by a small population size and difficulties in economic comparisons, this study presents the real world social and economic cost scenario for both elective TEVAR and TEVAR hybrid treatment of DTAA of both the in-hospital and at mid term follow-up periods.

  7. Systemic inflammation, coagulopathy, and acute renal insufficiency following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catherine K; Chuter, Timothy A M; Niemann, Claus U; Shlipak, Michael G; Cohen, Mitchell J; Reilly, Linda M; Hiramoto, Jade S

    2009-05-01

    To characterize the inflammatory and coagulopathic response after endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair and to evaluate the effect of the response on postoperative renal function. From July 2005 to June 2008, 42 patients underwent elective endovascular repair of a TAAA using custom designed multi-branched stent-grafts at a single academic institution. Four patients were excluded from the analysis. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), and creatinine were measured in all patients. In the last nine patients, interleukin-6 (IL-6), protein C, Factor V, d-dimers, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) levels were also measured. Change in lab values were expressed as a percentage of baseline values. The 30-day mortality rate was 5% (2/38). All patients (n = 38) had a higher WBC (mean +/- SD: 139 +/- 80%, P acute renal insufficiency (>50% rise in creatinine). Patients with renal insufficiency had significantly larger changes in WBC (178 +/- 100% vs 121 +/- 64%, P = .04) and platelet count (64 +/- 17% vs 52 +/- 12%, P = .02) compared with those without renal insufficiency. All patients (n = 9) had significant increases in NGAL (182 +/- 115%, P = .008) after stent-graft insertion. Six of nine patients (67%) had increased cystatin C (35 +/- 43%, P = .04) after stent-graft insertion, with a greater rise in those with postoperative renal insufficiency (87 +/- 32% vs 8 +/- 13%, P = .02). IL-6 levels were markedly increased in all patients (n = 9) after repair (9840 +/- 6160%, P = .008). Protein C (35 +/- 10%, P = .008) and Factor V levels (28 +/- 20%, P = .008) were uniformly decreased, while d-dimers were elevated after repair in all patients (310 +/- 213%, P = .008). Leukocytosis and thrombocytopenia were uniform following endovascular TAAA repair, and the severity of the response correlated with post-operative renal dysfunction. Elevation of a sensitive marker of renal injury (NGAL) suggests that

  8. Role of preoperative radionuclide ejection fraction in direct abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmers, A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Zierler, R.E.

    1988-08-01

    Preoperative radionuclide ventriculography was performed in 60 patients to assess whether such testing could define those at increased risk after direct abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. None of the patients had prophylactic coronary artery reconstruction to reduce the risk of AAA repair despite angina in 27% and previous myocardial infarction (MI) in 42%. The mean ejection fraction (EF) was 52% +/- 15% (range 14% to 78%). Low EF (normal greater than 50%) was present in 40%, whereas ventricular wall motion abnormalities were present in 39% of patients. The overall perioperative (30-day) mortality rate was 5%. MI occurred in 7% within 30 postoperative days; none was fatal. Life-table analysis revealed that overall survival after AAA repair was significantly lower in patients with an EF of 50% or less (p less than 0.025, Mantel-Cox) during a follow-up of 20.1 +/- 11.9 months. Overall survival differences were even more striking for those with an EF of 35% or less (p = 0.003, Mantel-Cox). There was a marked difference in the cumulative mortality rate during follow-up, being 50% in those patients with an EF of 35% or less (n = 10) compared with 14% in those with an EF greater than 35% (n = 50, p = 0.036, Fisher exact test). There was no statistical difference in the incidence of perioperative MI or perioperative death for those with an EF of 35% or less vs EF greater than 35%. 50 references.

  9. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length 30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy

  10. Embolization by micro navigation for treatment of persistent type 2 Endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lorenção de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Endovascular repair has become established as a safe and effective method for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. One major complication of this treatment is leakage, or endoleaks, of which type 2 leaks are the most common.Objective:To conduct a brief review of the literature and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of embolization by micronavigation for treatment of type 2 endoleaks.Method:A review of medical records from patients who underwent endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms identified 5 patients with persistent type 2 endoleaks. These patients were submitted to embolization by micronavigation.Results:In all cases, angiographic success was achieved and control CT scans showed absence of type 2 leaks and aneurysm sacs that had reduced in size after the procedure.Conclusion:Treatment of type 2 endoleaks using embolization by micronavigation is an effective and safe method and should be considered as a treatment option for this complication after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  11. Case Report: A Durable Open Repair of a Rare Profunda Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Pouria; Cantu, Kristha; Eidt, John; Gable, Dennis; Pearl, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    Profunda femoris artery aneurysms (PFAAs) are rare and difficult to diagnose in the early stages of development due to location and encasement in the deep thigh musculature. We report the case of a 74-year-old male who was discovered to have a right PFAA during evaluation for progressively worsening short distance claudication. He had undergone an angioplasty of the left iliofemoral system several months ago with no improvement of his symptoms. The PFAA was diagnosed through computed tomography angiography and repaired via syndactylization of profunda femoris branches and interposition grafting with a polytetrafluoroethylene stretch graft. The imaging features are described in the article. Although PFAAs are rare clinical presentations, their development should be considered, in particular when symptoms such as progressive or unchanging claudication are present in a patient following an angioplasty of the affected iliofemoral system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome of endovascular repair for intact and ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Tina; Wanhainen, Anders; Steuer, Johnny; Mani, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term outcome after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). All patients who underwent TEVAR for TAA at Uppsala University Hospital from December 1999 to December 2014 were included. Characteristics of the patients and outcome data were collected from medical records, national population registry, and cause of death registry. Perioperative survival was analyzed with the χ 2 test, and 5-year survival was estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis. Predictors of long-term survival were assessed with Cox regression. There were 77 patients included in the study, 49 with intact TAAs (iTAAs) and 28 with ruptured TAAs (rTAAs). Mean follow-up was 83.7 months for iTAA patients and 82.0 months for rTAA patients (P = .853). Mean age was 71.5 years for iTAA patients and 74.8 years for rTAA patients (P = .04). Survival after iTAA repair was 95.9% at 30 days, 91.8% at 90 days, and 62.5% at 5 years. After rTAA repair, survival was 71.4% at 30 days and decreased to 57.1% at 90 days (P < .01), with most deaths after 30 days being related to the aortic event. The 3-year survival rate after rTAA repair was 27.8%, and only one rTAA patient with 5 years of follow-up remained alive. Six aorta-related deaths occurred after 90 days (three iTAA patients, three rTAA patients); five were due to rupture of nontreated aortic segments. The 5-year reintervention rate was 13.2% for iTAA patients and 17.9% for rTAA patients (P = .682). All reinterventions occurred within 14 months of TEVAR. The age-adjusted hazard ratio for long-term mortality was 4.4 after rTAA repair compared with iTAA repair. TEVAR for iTAA was associated with low perioperative mortality and acceptable 5-year survival at 62.5%. Results were more pessimistic after rTAA repair, however, for which two-thirds of the patients were deceased at 3-year follow-up. Improved selection of patients is necessary to identify patients who are

  13. Combined abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass: presentation of 13 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Thomas; Baykut, Doan; Zerkowski, Hans-Reinhand; Stierli, Peter; Gürke, Lorenz

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease remains the major cause of perioperative mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The beneficial effect of coronary artery bypass (CAB) before AAA repair in patients with severe coronary artery disease has been proven. The coexistence of a very large or symptomatic AAA and coronary artery disease remains a therapeutic challenge since there is the risk of AAA rupture in the interval between CAB and AAA repair. Combined CAB and aortic aneurysm repair has been suggested for these cases, and results on several series of patients have been published. However, the exact indication for the combined operation remains to be clarified. We present a series of 13 patients who underwent CAB on cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic aneurysm repair as a one-stage procedure. The indication was a large AAA in seven patients and a symptomatic AAA in six patients. In four patients, the aortic reconstruction was performed without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass; in nine patients, the aortic reconstruction was performed under partial cardiopulmonary bypass. Thirty-day mortality was 15%. Major morbidity was 31%. All major complications were due to excessive bleeding and occurred in patients who had AAA repair performed with partial cardiopulmonary bypass, suggesting that prolonged bypass time represents a major source of morbidity. A detailed review of the literature is presented. From the evidence available we suggest that the combined procedure can be recommended only for patients with very high rupture risk, such as in symptomatic AAA. In all other cases, the staged approach--CAB followed by AAA repair 2-4 weeks later--is preferable. During the combined procedure, cardiopulmonary bypass support during AAA repair should be used only in patients with clear evidence of hemodynamic instability.

  14. Natural History of Gutter-Related Type Ia Endoleaks after Snorkel/Chimney EVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W.; Tran, Kenneth; Itoga, Nathan K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Lee, Jason T.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Alternative endovascular strategies utilizing parallel or snorkel/chimney (ch-EVAR) techniques have been developed to address the lack of widespread availability and manufacturing limitations with branched/fenestrated aortic devices for the treatment of complex abdominal aortic aneurysms. Despite high technical success and mid-term patency of snorkel stent configurations, concerns remain regarding the perceived increased incidence of early gutter-related type Ia endoleaks. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and natural history of gutter-related type Ia endoleaks following ch-EVAR. Methods Review of medical records and available imaging studies, including completion angiography and serial computed tomographic angiography, was performed for all patients undergoing ch-EVAR at our institution between September 2009 and January 2015. Only procedures involving ≥1 renal artery with or without visceral snorkel stents were included. Primary outcomes of the study were presence and persistence or resolution of early gutter-related type Ia endoleak. Secondary outcomes included aneurysm sac shrinkage and need for secondary intervention related to the presence of type Ia gutter endoleak. Results Sixty patients (mean age, 75.8 ± 7.6 years; male, 70.0%) underwent ch-EVAR with a total of 111 snorkel stents (97 renal [33 bilateral renal], 12 SMA, 2 celiac). A median of 2 (range, 1-4) snorkel stents were placed per patient. Early gutter-related type Ia endoleaks were noted on 30.0% (n=18) of initial postoperative imaging studies. Follow-up imaging revealed spontaneous resolution of these gutter endoleaks in 47.3% and 71.8% of patients at 6- and 12 months post-procedure, respectively. Long-term anticoagulation, degree of oversizing, stent type and diameter, and other clinical/anatomic variables were not significantly associated with presence of gutter endoleaks. Two patients (3.3%) required secondary intervention related to persistent gutter endoleak. At a mean radiologic

  15. Tips and tricks in vascular access for (T)EVAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Beatrice; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Rohlffs, Fiona; Heidemann, Franziska; Debus, Sebastian E; Kölbel, Tilo

    2017-04-01

    Endovascular repair has become the treatment of choice for thoracic and abdominal aortic pathologies in the last decades, and is associated with excellent results in terms of perioperative, mid- and long-term morbidity and mortality. Access vessels play a central role in these procedures since access-related issues can increase the rates of technical failures and determine clinical complications for the patient. Therefore, accurate preoperative clinical evaluation and review of the preoperative images are mandatory. In this review, we report on the access-related issues that can be encountered during EVAR and TEVAR, and present solutions and strategies to minimize access-related adverse outcomes.

  16. Management of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Complications via Retrograde Catheterization Through the Distal Stent-Graft Landing Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xicheng; Sun, Yuan; Chen, Zhaolei; Jing, Yuanhu; Xu, Miao

    2017-08-01

    A retrograde technique through the gap between the distal stent landing zone and the iliac artery wall has been applied to treat type II endoleak after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). In this study, we tried to investigate its efficacy in the management of type III endoleak and intraoperative accidental events. We reported 2 complications of EVAR that were difficult to treat with conventional methods. One patient had a sustained type III endoleak after EVAR, and the right renal artery was accidentally sealed by a graft stent in the other patient during the operation. Both complications were managed by the retrograde technique from the distal stent landing zone. In the first case, the endoleak was easily embolized by the retrograde catheterization technique, and in the second case, a stent was implanted in the right renal artery using the retrograde technique to restore blood flow. In some EVAR cases, the technique of retrograde catheterization through the distal stent-graft landing zone is feasible, safe, and easy to perform.

  17. Repair of an Autologous Saphenous Vein Graft Aneurysm Ten Years after Renal Artery Reconstruction during Live Donor Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlaeger, Markus; Sokolakis, Ioannis; Kalogirou, Charis; Frey, Lea; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Kübler, Hubert; Kellersmann, Richard; Vergho, Daniel

    2017-10-06

    Saphenous vein graft (SVG) aneurysms (SVGA) after renal transplantation represents a rare vascular complication with subsequent challenging multidisciplinary treatment. We present a case of a 30-year-old female who received a live donor kidney transplantation for end-stage renal disease that was caused due to the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Postoperatively, an insufficient graft perfusion due to an arterial kinking was noted and repaired using an autologous SVG interposition. Ten years later, a 3-cm aneurysm of the SVG at the anastomotic site with the common iliac artery was discovered. Multidisciplinary surgical exploration with excision of the aneurysm-carrying vein graft and interposition of a new autologous SVG was successfully carried out with preservation of renal allograft's function. Treatment of SVGA after rental transplantation with a new autologous SVG is challenging but feasible, requiring a multidisciplinary approach in order to guarantee successful rates and to prevent allograft loss. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Management of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yusuke; Takano, Hitoshi; Aoki, Asako; Inami, Toru; Ogano, Michio; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Tanabe, Jun; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takayoshi; Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya; Takayama, Morimasa; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2008-12-01

    The efficacy of prophylactic coronary revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) scheduled for open repair surgery remains controversial. Concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) with no inducible ischemia can be medically treated in AAA patients undergoing open repair as long as the existence of CAD is recognized. A retrospective analysis of acute and long-term outcomes was performed for 122 patients with AAA who underwent coronary arteriography (CAG) for preoperative evaluation followed by elective open repair. Preoperative CAG revealed no CAD in 54 patients (non-CAD group) and the existence of CAD in 68 patients. Prophylactic PCI or CABG surgery was performed in 16 patients (CAD-PCI/CABG group) with symptomatic angina, ischemia proven by pharmacological stress scintigraphy, or coexistence of reduced cardiac contraction and coronary stenosis in multiple vessels. Medical treatment was administered to 52 patients who had no signs of ischemia (CAD-medical group). During the perioperative period, no cardiac event occurred irrespective of the existence of CAD. The long-term outcomes in the CAD-medical group were equivalent to those in the non-CAD group. In the CAD-PCI/CABG group, the cardiac event-free rate was comparable with that of other groups, although mortality was higher. In patients undergoing AAA open repair, medical treatment for concomitant CAD with no obvious inducible ischemia does not confer unfavorable outcomes. Although prophylactic coronary revascularization possibly prevents future cardiac events, it appears to be necessary in a very limited number of cases. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  20. Duodenal Obstruction after Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yao Lin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract complications after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair are well known. The reported frequency ranges from 6.6% to 21%. However, the incidence of duodenal obstruction following AAA has probably been underestimated. This report concerns a 78-year-old male who was admitted for elective repair of an infrarenal AAA. On the ninth postoperative day, the patient presented with large quantities of bile-stained vomitus despite passing flatus per rectum. Metoclopramide and ranitidine were given under the initial impression of paralytic ileus. However, the upper gastrointestinal obstruction persisted, and on day 12, computerized tomography (CT revealed marked distension of the gastric tube and duodenum, down to the level of the third portion, with abrupt change of caliber at the point of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. SMA syndrome was diagnosed. After nasogastric tube aspiration, parenteral nutrition, and 11 days of conservative treatment, abdominal CT and upper gastrointestinal series showed no apparent duodenal obstruction. The patient was discharged on the 29th postoperative day; follow-up abdominal CT 4 months later was unremarkable.

  1. Cost comparison of aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion versus open surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiwert, A J; Wolfe, J; Whalen, R C; Pigott, J P; Kritpracha, B; Beebe, H G

    1999-08-01

    Shrinking health care resources impose a requirement to evaluate new technology for cost as well as clinical effectiveness. We studied an initial clinical experience with endograft treatment (EAG) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) at the beginning of an endovascular program in comparison with open surgical repair (OSR), which had been in use for decades. From March 1997 to April 1998, the utilization of hospital resources, actual cost, clinical descriptors, and treatment outcomes were recorded for two contemporaneous groups, each having 16 consecutive patients with AAA, treated with either EAG or OSR. Subjects were not randomized; EAG treatment was based on predetermined exclusion/inclusion criteria. Statistical comparison was by either Fisher's exact test or the Wilcoxon rank sum test. There were no differences between OSR and EAG in age, gender, AAA size, smoking status, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, history of coronary artery bypass grafts, previous vascular surgery, or other comorbidity. There were no deaths in either group. Patients treated by EAG procedure had significantly lower length of hospital stay, length of stay in intensive care unit, time in operating room, and cost of operating room without graft (P use. Endograft treatment utilizes significantly less hospital resources than open surgical repair. The endograft prosthesis contributes a significant cost increment that may decline with expanded use.

  2. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  3. Aorto-hepatic bypass graft for repair of an inferior pancreatico-duodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac axis occlusion: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tom; Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Richards, James; Harper, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Inferior pancreatico-duodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysms are very rare and commonly associated with coeliac axis stenosis or occlusion due to atherosclerosis, thrombosis or median arcuate ligament syndrome. We present a case of a surgical repair of an IPDA aneurysm with the use of a supra-coeliac aorto-hepatic bypass with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft, following a failed initial attempt at an endovascular repair. A 75 year old female, who was under investigation for night sweats, was referred to our team with an incidental finding of a 19mm fusiform IPDA aneurysm. Initial attempt at endovascular coiling of the aneurysm was unsuccessful. Elective surgical repair involved excision of the aneurysm and to restore arterial inflow to the hepatic artery, a PTFE bypass graft was used from the supra-coeliac aorta to the hepatic artery. The patient was well 2 months following the procedure with a patent graft shown on contrast enhanced computer tomography (ceCT). Management options for IPDA aneurysms include radiologically guided endovascular approach or surgical repair. Given the high mortality of greater than 50% with ruptured aneurysms intervention is indicated in all detected cases. Surgical excision with bypass grafting from the supra-coeliac aorta, as reported by our team, represents a satisfactory management option in patients where interventional approaches have failed or are not appropriate. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of gender on EVAR outcomes with new low-profile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendermacher, B L W; Grootenboer, Nathalie; Cuypers, Ph W

    2013-01-01

    Women have not benefitted to the same extent as men of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR). Besides differences in hormones and the higher rate of undiagnosed cardiovascular disease, there are anatomical differences between men and women influencing the outcome of endovascular treatment......-term mortality in women and that women's survival begins to equal men's after 2 years. However, detailed, adjusted anatomical data from population-based samples are needed for better understanding of the differences in AAA anatomy and EVAR eligibility. This information will contribute to enhance the design...

  5. Three Year Follow-Up of a Vein Patch Repair for a Coronary Artery Saccular Aneurysm of the Left Main Bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Yosuke; Yoshio, Takahide; Nishina, Dai; Bessho, Ryuzo; Nitta, Takashi

    2017-04-20

    This report describes a case of surgical treatment for a coronary artery saccular aneurysm of the left main bifurcation. A coronary artery saccular aneurysm (7 mm × 10 mm) and three vessel disease, including the left main trunk, were diagnosed by coronary angiography. A surgical resection and saphenous vein patch repair of the left main coronary artery aneurysm was performed concomitantly with coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathological findings of the aneurysm clarified that the aneurysm wall was atrophic and extremely thin because of a collapsed trilaminar arterial structure due to atherosclerosis. A coronary computed tomographic scan revealed no aneurysmal formation in the patent left main trunk and patent grafts 3 years after surgery.

  6. Off-the-shelf multibranched endograft for urgent endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitto, Enrico; Gargiulo, Mauro; Freyrie, Antonio; Pini, Rodolfo; Mascoli, Chiara; Ancetti, Stefano; Faggioli, Gianluca; Stella, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to report early and midterm results of endovascular repair of urgent thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) by the off-the-shelf multibranched Zenith t-Branch endograft (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind). Between January 2014 and April 2016, all patients with urgent TAAAs (asymptomatic with diameter >8 cm, symptomatic, or ruptured TAAAs) and aortoiliac anatomic feasibility underwent endovascular repair by t-Branch and were prospectively enrolled. Clinical, morphologic, intraoperative, and postoperative data were recorded. Follow-up was performed by duplex ultrasound, contrast-enhanced duplex ultrasound, and computed tomography angiography. Early end points were technical success (absence of type I or type III endoleak, loss of target visceral vessels [TVVs], conversion to open repair, or 24-hour mortality), spinal cord ischemia, and 30-day mortality. Follow-up end points were survival, TVV patency, type I or type III endoleaks, and freedom from reintervention. Seventeen patients (male, 71%; age, 73 ± 6 years; American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3/4, 60%/40%) affected by type II (47%), III (29%), and IV (24%) TAAAs were enrolled. The indications for t-Branch were as follows: contained TAAA rupture, four (24%); symptomatic TAAA (pain or peripheral embolism), four (24%); and TAAA diameter ≥8 cm, nine (52%). The mean TAAA diameter was 80 ± 19 mm, with 63 TVVs. Fifteen patients (87%) needed adjunctive intraoperative procedures: 14 proximal thoracic endografts (thoracic endovascular aortic repair), 1 left carotid-subclavian bypass, 2 endovascular hypogastric branches, and 2 surgical iliac conduits. In four cases (24%), a significant malorientation (≥60 degrees) of the main body occurred during t-Branch deployment. Technical success was achieved in 14 cases (82%), with technical failures consisting of the loss of three renal arteries (TVV patency, 95%). Spinal cord ischemia occurred in one case (6%) with temporary

  7. Platypnea-orthodeoxia: a rare complication after repair of a contained rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sebastian; Scheerer, Nico; Stahl, Wolfgang; Muehling, Bernd; Georgieff, Michael; Bracht, Hendrik; Wepler, Martin

    2014-02-01

    After open repair of a contained rupture of a giant abdominal aortic aneurysm, the patient, a 67-year-old man, developed respiratory insufficiency, and his hemoglobin oxygen saturation dramatically decreased when his position was changed from supine to upright. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome due to a patent foramen ovale and subsequent right-to-left-shunting despite normal intracardiac pressures. After interventional patent foramen ovale closure, the patient could be separated from the respirator without difficulty.

  8. Transarterial Endoleak Closure After Endovascular Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair: When the "Sandwich" Goes Wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoulas, Vasileios F; Montorfano, Matteo; Latib, Azeem; Giustino, Gennaro; Spagnolo, Pietro; Taramasso, Maurizio; Chieffo, Alaide; Civilini, Efrem; Chiesa, Roberto; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    To describe the use of vascular plugs to close a complex type Ib endoleak following the sandwich procedure used in conjunction with endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair. A 59-year-old man with a 6.5-mm TAAA was treated with initial deployment proximally of 2 Zenith TX2 stent-grafts. In preparation for the sandwich technique to preserve flow to the celiac trunk, a 10×100-mm Viabahn covered stent was delivered from a brachial access into the celiac trunk unprotected by the sheath of the introducer. The trigger wire system became snagged on the struts of the distal aortic stent-graft; when the wire was pulled, the proximal end of the Viabahn migrated outside the aortic stent-graft, which migrated upward. The main body extension intended for the aortic component of the sandwich technique was deployed close to the distal end of the aneurysm sac, but a large type Ib endoleak formed in the gutter between the Viabahn, aortic extension, and sac wall. The leak perfused the celiac trunk, and the procedure was terminated. Increasing sac size on 3-month imaging prompted closure of the leak with 2 type II Amplatzer vascular plugs aiming to occlude the endoleak outflow into the Viabahn and the endoleak outflow at the site of the gutter. Imaging follow-up at 6 months demonstrated successful exclusion of the TAAA with no residual endoleak and excellent perfusion of the celiac trunk. Transarterial treatment of complex endoleaks is feasible when preceded by meticulous imaging and detailed preprocedural planning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Endovascular Repair of a Type III Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Occlusion of Visceral Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klonaris, Chris; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris; Tsigris, Chris; Michail, Othon; Marinos, George; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-01-01

    The successful endovascular repair of a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) with the use of a tube endograft is reported. A 56-year-old male with a 6.4-cm type III TAAA, a 4.2-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chronic renal insufficiency presented with flank pain, nausea, acute anuria, and serum creatinine of 6.1 mg/dl. Acute occlusion of the left solitary renal artery was diagnosed and emergent recanalization with percutaneus transluminal angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully, with reversal of the serum creatinine level at 1.6 mg/dl. Further imaging studies for TAAA management revealed ostial occlusion of both the celiac artery (CA) and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) but a hypertrophic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) providing retrograde flow to the aforementioned vessels. This rare anatomic serendipity allowed us to repair the TAAA simply by using a two-component tube endograft without fenestrations (Zenith; William Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) that covered the entire length of the aneurysm, including the CA and SMA origins, since a natural arterial bypass from the IMA to the CA and SMA already existed, affording protection from gastrointestinal ischemic complications. The patient had a fast and uneventful recovery and is currently doing well 6 months after the procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of successful endovascular repair of a TAAA involving visceral arteries with the simple use of a tube endograft

  10. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steingruber, I.E.; Neuhauser, B.; Seiler, R.; Greiner, A.; Chemelli, A.; Kopf, H.; Walch, C.; Waldenberger, P.; Jaschke, W.; Czermak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions

  11. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingruber, I.E. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: iris.steingruber@uibk.ac.at; Neuhauser, B. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Seiler, R. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Greiner, A. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Chemelli, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kopf, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Walch, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Waldenberger, P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, W. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Czermak, B. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions.

  12. Automated pressure-controlled cerebrospinal fluid drainage during open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshomba, Yamume; Leopardi, Marco; Mascia, Daniele; Kahlberg, Andrea; Carozzo, Andrea; Magrin, Silvio; Melissano, Germano; Chiesa, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    Perioperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage is a well-established technique for spinal cord protection during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) open repair and is usually performed using dripping chamber-based systems. A new automated device for controlled and continuous CSF drainage, designed to maintain CSF pressure around the desired set values, thus avoiding unnecessary drainage, is currently available. The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of the new LiquoGuard automated device (Möller Medical GmbH, Fulda, Germany) during TAAA open repair was safe and effective in maintaining the desired CSF pressure values and whether the incidence of complications was reduced compared with a standard catheter connected to a dripping chamber. Data of patients who underwent surgical TAAA open repair using perioperative CSF drainage at our institution between October 2012 and October 2014 were recorded. The difference in CSF pressure values between patients who underwent CSF drainage with a conventional dripping chamber-based system (manual group) and patients who underwent CSF drainage with the LiquoGuard (automated group) was measured at the beginning of the intervention (T1), 15 minutes after aortic cross-clamping (T2), just before unclamping (T3), at the end of surgery (T4), and 4 hours after the end of surgery (T5). The choice of the draining systems was randomly alternated with one-to-one rate until the last six patients consecutively treated with LiquoGuard were enrolled. Primary outcomes were occurrence of spinal cord ischemia, intracranial hemorrhage, postdural puncture headache, and in-hospital mortality. The study included 152 patients who underwent open surgical TAAA repair during the study period: 73 patients underwent CSF drainage with the traditional system and 79 with LiquoGuard. The CSF pressure values at T1 and T5 were not considerably different in the two groups. By repeated-measures analysis of variance, a significant upward

  13. The value of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for elective aortic abdominal aneurysm repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauro, A.J.; Low, R.D.; McKay, W.J. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The value of pre-operative myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in assessing the perioperative cardiac risk associated with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (AAA) is controversial. We reviewed the files of 106 patients over the past 5 years at our institution who underwent MPS prior to elective AAA repair. The patients were stratified according to their clinical risk factors. MPS result (normal risk=normal study or likely artifact, intermediate risk=fixed defect or a single. small non-LAD (left anterior descending) reversible defect, high risk=one large reversible defect or two small non-LAD reversible defects, very high risk=increased lung uptake, post stress left ventricular dilatation or two large reversible defects including LAD territory), any subsequent coronary angiography/intervention and outcome at 12 months post surgery with regard to cardiac morbidity and mortality. 40 patients had normal MPS studies and all had AAA repairs. One patient died of a myocardial infarct 3 days after surgery. Of the 27 patients with intermediate risk MPS studies, 23 were operated on with no cardiac complications (2 refused surgery, one had a small AAA and high clinical risk and one had carcinoma). Of the 24 patients with high risk MPS, 21 underwent surgery (3 were cancelled due in part to the MPS result) with only 3 minor cardiac complications (no deaths). 13 patients had very high risk MPS and of these only 10 had AAA repairs performed (2 were deemed unsuitable for AAA repair after coronary angiography and one without angiography). Three of the 10 patients had significant post-operative cardiac events (one unstable angina and 2 myocardial infarcts). Patients with very high risk MPS had a high peri-operative cardiac complication rate (even after cancellation due to clinical selection and MPS result) and warrant further investigation. Patients with high risk scans had a low complication rate (after cancellation due to clinical selection and MPS results

  14. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Procedures: A Novel Rating Scale Developed by the Delphi Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B; Schroeder, T V; Konge, L

    2017-07-01

    To develop a procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of operator competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). A Delphi approach was used to achieve expert consensus. A panel of 32 international experts (median 300 EVAR procedures, range 200-3000) from vascular surgery (n = 21) and radiology (n = 11) was established. The first Delphi round was based on a review of endovascular skills assessment papers, stent graft instructions for use, and structured interviews. It led to a primary pool of 83 items that were formulated as global rating scale items with tentative anchors. Iterative Delphi rounds were executed. The panellists rated the importance of each item on a 5 point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as 80% of the panel rating an item 4 or 5 in the primary round and 90% in subsequent rounds. Consensus on the final assessment tool was defined as Cronbach's alpha > .8 after a minimum of three rounds. Thirty-two of 35 invited experts participated. Three rounds of surveys were completed with a completion rate of 100% in the first two rounds and 91% in round three. The 83 primary assessment items were supplemented with five items suggested by the panel and reduced to seven pivotal assessment items that reached consensus, Cronbach's alpha = 0.82. The seven item rating scale covers key elements of competence in EVAR stent placement and deployment. Each item has well defined grades with explicit anchors at unacceptable, acceptable, and superior performance on a 5 point Likert scale. The Delphi methodology allowed for international consensus on a new procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of competence in EVAR. The resulting scale, EndoVascular Aortic Repair Assessment of Technical Expertise (EVARATE), represents key elements in the procedure. EVARATE constitutes an assessment tool for providing structured feedback to endovascular operators in training. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  15. Preservação das artérias hipogástricas com endoprótese ramificada no tratamento endovascular de aneurismas aorto-ilíacos The Zenith iliac bifurcation Device (IBD for preservation of the internal iliac arteries during endovascular repair of aortic-iliac aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Os doentes com indicação para tratamento endovascular de aneurismas da aorta abdominal (EVAR apresentam frequentemente artérias ilíacas comuns ectasiadas ou aneurismáticas, o que impossibilita a sua utilização como zona de encoragem distal da endoprótese. Em cerca de 15 a 30% dos casos pode existir necessidade de oclusão/embolização de uma ou de ambas as hipogástricas, com extensão da endoprótese para a artéria ilíaca externa. Isto tem sido associado a casos de claudicação glútea, isquémia intestinal, deficits neurológicos, e de disfunção vesical, intestinal e eréctil. O uso de endopróteses com ramo para a artéria hipogástrica apresenta-se como uma recente inovação que permite a preservação desta artéria e evitar estas complicações. Caso clínico: Homem de 63 anos, com antecedentes de cirurgia aórtica com interposição protésica aorto-aórtica em 2008 por aneurisma da aorta abdominal (AAA infra-renal, admitido para tratamento endovascular de aneurisma das artérias ilíaca comum e hipogástrica direitas, com 3,3 cm de maior diâmetro. O doente foi submetido a colocação por via femoral de endoprótese Zenith® ramificada para bifurcação ilíaca com preservação da artéria hipogástrica. Conclusões: A utilização de endopróteses ramificadas para a bifurcação ilíaca durante a correcção endovascular de aneurismas aorto-ilíacos para ser uma forma segura e pouco complexa de garantir a preservação das artérias hipogástricas e minimizar as complicações associadas à sua oclusão.Introduction: A significant portion of patients presenting for endovascular aneurysm repair of the abdominal aorta (EVAR have aneurysmatic or ectasied common iliac arteries, raising distal anchorage issues. In these cases, it may be necessary occlusion / embolization of one or both hipo gastric arteries with extension of the endoprothesis to the external iliac artery. This procedure has been associated to

  16. Outcomes of original and low-permeability Gore Excluder endoprosthesis for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanski, William; Fillinger, Mark

    2007-02-01

    Because of concern about the percentage of enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) after endovascular repair with the Excluder device (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Inc, Sunnyvale, Calif), the graft material was modified to reduce its permeability and released for commercial use in mid-2004. We studied all AAA repairs with Excluder endografts performed at our institution, including the original-permeability (OP) version (n = 99) and the low-permeability (LP) version (n = 48). All patients were followed up with serial computed tomography (CT) angiography and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Morphologic measurements, including AAA diameter and 3D volume, were prospectively entered into a database to evaluate changes in AAA size over time. Owing to the length of available follow-up for the LP version, the primary end point was AAA size change at 6 and 12 months, evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test for unpaired samples. Preoperative and postoperative anatomy was similar in the two groups, including AAA diameter (OP, 5.6 +/- 1 cm; LP, 5.8 +/- 2 cm; P = .3), aortic neck length (OP, 21 +/- 1 mm; LP, 22 +/- 2 mm; P = .9), postoperative aortic seal zone (OP, 18 +/- 1 mm; LP, 16 +/- 1 mm, P > .1) and iliac seal zone (OP, 33 +/- 1 mm, LP 31 +/- 1 mm, P = .2). The rate of sac shrinkage differed significantly. Orthogonal diameter measurements showed a significant difference in the rate of shrinkage by 12 months postoperatively (OP, -2.1 +/- 1 mm; LP, -5.1 +/- 1 mm; P = .01). By 3D volume, the rate of shrinkage was considerably different between the two groups at both 6 and 12 months (12 months: OP, -6% +/- 1%; LP, -20 +/- 4%; P = .0006). There was no enlargement by diameter in either group at 6 or 12 months postoperative. By standard volume criteria, however, 12 of 99 patients in the OP group and one of 48 patients in the LP group had significant AAA enlargement < or =12 months (P = .04). Of these, four of 12 patients in the OP group had enlargement without apparent endoleak, even

  17. Canadian experience with the pipeline embolization device for repair of unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, C J; Spears, J; Chow, M; Wong, J; Boulton, M; Weill, A; Willinsky, R A; Kelly, M; Marotta, T R

    2013-02-01

    Flow-diverting stents, such as the PED, have emerged as a novel means of treating complex intracranial aneurysms. This retrospective analysis of the initial Canadian experience provides insight into technical challenges, clinical and radiographic outcomes, and complication rates after the use of flow-diverting stents for unruptured aneurysms. Cases were compiled from 7 Canadian centers between July 2008 and December 2010. Each center prospectively tracked their initial experience; these data were retrospectively updated and pooled for analysis. During the defined study period, 97 cases of unruptured aneurysm were treated with the PED, with successful stent deployment in 94 cases. The overall complete or near-complete occlusion rate was 83%, with a median follow-up at 1.25 years (range 0.25-2.5 years). Progressive occlusion was witnessed over time, with complete or near-complete occlusion in 65% of aneurysms followed through 6 months, and 90% of aneurysms followed through 1 year. Multivariate analysis found previous aneurysm treatment and female sex predictive of persistent aneurysm filling. Most patients were stable or improved (88%), with the most favorable outcomes observed in patients with cavernous carotid aneurysms. The overall mortality rate was 6%. Postprocedural aneurysm hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients (3%), while ipsilateral distal territory hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients (3.4%). Flow-diverting stents represent an important tool in the treatment of complex intracranial aneurysms. The relative efficacy and morbidity of this treatment must be considered in the context of available alternate interventions.

  18. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery.

  19. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device

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    Tetsuro Uchida, MD, PhD; Azumi Hamasaki, MD, PhD; Yoshinori Kuroda, MD; Atsushi Yamashita, MD; Jun Hayashi, MD; Mitsuaki Sadahiro, MD, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif) to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating...

  20. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-12-01

    Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif) to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating the need for aortic clamping. This system is thought to make direct proximal aortic anastomosis safe and easy in patients requiring surgical reconstruction of celiac artery aneurysms.

  1. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Uchida, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating the need for aortic clamping. This system is thought to make direct proximal aortic anastomosis safe and easy in patients requiring surgical reconstruction of celiac artery aneurysms.

  2. Sequential Hybrid Repair of Aorta and Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Secondary to Chronic Aortic Dissection with Extensive Aneurysmal Degeneration in a Marfan Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder associated with aortic dissection, aneurysmal degeneration and rupture. These cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of mortality, therefore repair is indicated. We present a 35-year-old woman who experienced acute onset of chest pain. Her imaging revealed a chronic DeBakey type I dissection with aortic root dilation and descending thoracic aneurysmal degeneration. She underwent a Bentall procedure and endovascular exclusion of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She was closely followed and 2 years later a computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the aneurysmal degeneration of the thoracoabominal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries. The patient underwent a composite reconstruction using multi-visceral branched and bifurcated Dacron grafts. At 5 years from her last surgery, a CTA revealed no new dissection or further aneurysmal degenerations. Aortic disease in Marfan patients is a complex clinical problem that may lead to secondary or tertiary aortic reconstructions; close follow-up is mandatory.

  3. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Presentation of 3 Cases and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew M; Watson, Jennifer; Mansour, M Ashraf; Sugiyama, George T

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysmal disease can occur in a single patient, and a therapeutic conundrum presents when open surgical repair is indicated for both conditions. The traditional standard of care is to conduct coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) followed by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair 2-6 months later, but there is significant risk with staging these 2 major surgeries. An alternative method is to surgically repair both diseases in 1 combined operation. The aim of our study is to review our own experience with the combined procedure and to review the published literature to assess morbidity and mortality of combined CABG and AAA repair. A systematic search for relevant studies was performed in the PubMed/Medline database. Short-term mortality (repair. The mean age was 71 years, the average AAA size was 8.9 cm, and average operative time was 328 min. None experienced any postoperative complications. Two are still alive at 9 and 10 years after surgery, and 1 died of unrelated causes 8 years postoperatively. The results of this systematic review suggest that combined CABG and AAA repair is a viable procedure with low operative mortality. Patients with preserved ejection fractions, large AAA, and limited comorbidities appear to receive the most benefit from a combined approach based on reported data from the literature. We have experienced promising results in our highly selected patient population. More research is warranted to devise criteria to determine which patients would be good surgical candidates for this combined procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with stenosis of bilateral common iliac artery stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daab, Leo J; Aidinian, Gilbert; Weber, Michael A; Kembro, Ronald J; Cook, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    The explosion in endovascular interventions for peripheral vascular disease has resulted in procedures being used by a multitude of specialties. Nonvascular surgeons performing these interventions can create scenarios that may make future vascular interventions difficult. In this article, we present a case report illustrating this point. A 68-year-old man with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease with prior myocardial infarction, and multiple abdominal operations presented with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In our opinion, this patient was at a prohibitive operative risk for open repair. Review of his imaging results revealed a 6.7-cm infrarenal aneurysm with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) stents (right: 8 mm; left: 6 mm) and 6-mm self-expanding stents extending from the right external iliac artery through the common femoral artery. A Cook Zenith Renu (30 × 108 mm) graft (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN) was advanced after serial dilation and balloon angioplasty of the stenotic right CIA stent. Left brachial access was used for arteriographic imaging. The left common femoral artery was accessed and the left CIA was coil-embolized to prevent backbleeding. A femoro-femoral artery crossover bypass was then performed after segmental resection of the right common femoral artery stent. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home on postoperative day 3. Subsequent postoperative computed tomography arteriogram after 1 month showed palpable pulses and no evidence of endoleak with flow in the femoro-femoral graft on clinical exam. This case demonstrates an endovascular intervention which limited the potential options available for aneurysm repair. Similar problems may become increasingly common as more providers offer endovascular interventions, thus emphasizing the importance of a collaborative approach to the patient with complex aorto-iliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is the duty of the

  6. Usefulness of one-stage coronary artery bypass grafting on the beating heart and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Iwao; Miyasaka, Shigeto; Aoki, Tetsuya; Kato, Ippei; Yamaga, Takeshi

    2004-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is commonly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) under cardiac arrest and AAA repair may be considerably invasive. Recently CABG under the beating heart without CPB has been reported as a less invasive method. We report the combined operation of CABG on a beating heart and AAA repair for AAA patients with CAD, and compare it with a separate operation. A retrospective review of the records of consecutive patients who underwent elective combined procedure or single operation for CABG on a beating heart and/or repair of the AAA between May 1999 and October 2001 was carried out. Ten patients underwent combined procedures. A single operation, CABG on a beating heart or repair of AAA, were performed in 27 or 19 patients. There were no significant differences with regard to intraoperative blood loss, transfusion and postoperative intubation time among the three groups. There was no operative mortality for any of the three groups. All cases were discharged without severe complications and with patent coronary bypass grafts. There was a decrease in mean total hospital costs for the combined operation group compared with the CABG group plus AAA repair group (3.34 million versus 5.87 million yen). Combined CABG on a beating heart and AAA repair on a one-step approach appears to be a safe and useful therapeutic strategy for AAA patients with CAD.

  7. Laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turley, Ryan S; Benrashid, Ehsan; Cox, Mitchell W; Mureebe, Leila; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2017-02-01

    Subset analyses from small case series suggest patients requiring laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (REVAR) have worse survival than those undergoing REVAR without laparotomy. Most concomitant laparotomies are performed for abdominal compartment syndrome. This study used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to determine whether the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with increased mortality. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant user files based on Current Procedural Terminology (American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill) and International Classification of Diseases-9 Edition coding. Patient and procedure-related characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categoric variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. A backward-stepwise multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify patient- and procedure-related factors associated with increased death after REVAR. We identified 1241 patients who underwent REVAR, and 91 (7.3%) required concomitant laparotomy. The 30-day mortality was 60% in the laparotomy group and 21% in the standard REVAR group (P < .001). The major complication rate was also higher in the laparotomy group (88% vs 63%; P < .001). Multivariable analysis showed laparotomy was strongly associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 3.62-9.62; P < .001). Laparotomy during REVAR is a commonly used technique for the management of elevated intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome development. The results of this study strongly confirm findings from smaller studies that the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with significantly worse 30-day survival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Fitness plus American Society of Anesthesiologists grade improve outcome prediction after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boult, Margaret; Cowled, Prue; Barnes, Mary; Fitridge, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    Although the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade was established for statistical purposes, it is often used prognostically. However, older patients undergoing elective surgery are typically ASA III, which limits patient stratification. We look at the prognostic effect on early complications and survival of using ASA and self-reported physical fitness to stratify patients undergoing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Data were extracted from a trial database. All patients were assigned a fitness level (A (fit) or B (unfit)) based on their self-reported ability to walk briskly for 1 km or climb two flights of stairs. Fitness was used to stratify ASA III patients, with fitter patients assigned ASA IIIA and less fit patients ASA IIIB. Outcomes assessed included survival, reinterventions, endoleak, all early and late complications and early operative complications. A combined ASA/fitness scale (II, IIIA, IIIB and IV) correlated with 1- and 3-year survival (1-year P = 0.001, 3-year P = 0.001) and early and late complications (P = 0.001 and P = 0.05). On its own, ASA predicted early complications (P = 0.0004) and survival (1-year P = 0.01, 3-year P = 0.01). Fitness alone was predictive for survival (1-year P = 0.001, 3-year P = 0.001) and late complications (P = 0.009). This study shows that even a superficial assessment of fitness is reflected in surgical outcomes, with fitter ASA III patients showing survival patterns similar to ASA II patients. Physicians should be alert to differences in fitness between patients in the ASA III group, despite similarities based on preexisting severe systemic disease. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. A prospective randomized trial comparing traditional and fast-track patient care in elective open infrarenal aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd; Schelzig, Hubert; Steffen, Peter; Meierhenrich, Rainer; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger; Orend, Karl-Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Fast-track recovery programs have led to reduced patient morbidity and mortality after major surgery. In terms of elective open infrarenal aneurysm repair, no evidence is available about such programs. To address this issue, we have conducted a randomized prospective pilot study. The study involved prospective randomization of 101 patients with the indication for elective open aneurysm repair in a traditional and a fast-track treatment arm. The basic fast-track elements were no bowel preparation, reduced preoperative fasting, patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), enhanced postoperative feeding, and postoperative mobilization. Morbidity and mortality, need for postoperative mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in the intensive care unit (ICU) and total length of postoperative hospital stay were analyzed in terms of an intention to treat. Demographic data for the two groups were similar. In the fast-track group the need for postoperative ventilation was significantly lower (6.1% versus 32%; p = 0.002), the median LOS on ICU did not significantly differ (20 h versus 32 h; p = 0.183), full enteral feeding was achieved significantly earlier (5 versus 7 days; p < 0.0001), and the rate of postoperative medical complications-gastrointestinal, cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and infective-was significantly lower (16% versus 36%; p = 0.039). The postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the fast-track group (10 days versus 11 days; p = 0.016); the mortality rate in both groups was 0%. An optimized patient care program in open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair shows favorable results concerning need for postoperative assisted mechanical ventilation, time to full enteral feeding, and incidence of medical complications. Further ranomized multicentric trials are necessary to justify broad implementation (clinical trials. gov identifier NCT 00615888).

  10. Distal small bowel motility and lipid absorption in patients following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Robert J; Ritz, Marc; Matteo, Addolorata C Di; Vozzo, Rosalie; Kwiatek, Monika; Foreman, Robert; Stanley, Brendan; Walsh, Jack; Burnett, Jim; Jury, Paul; Dent, John

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate distal small bowel motility and lipid absorption in patients following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair surgery. METHODS: Nine patients (aged 35-78 years; body mass index (BMI) range: 23-36 kg/m2) post-surgery for AAA repair, and seven healthy control subjects (20-50 years; BMI range: 21-29 kg/m2) were studied. Continuous distal small bowel manometry was performed for up to 72 h, during periods of fasting and enteral feeding (Nutrison®). Recordings were analyzed for the frequency, origin, length of migration, and direction of small intestinal burst activity. Lipid absorption was assessed on the first day and the third day post surgery in a subset of patients using the 13C-triolein-breath test, and compared with healthy controls. Subjects received a 20-min intraduodenal infusion of 50 mL liquid feed mixed with 200 μL 13C-triolein. End-expiratory breath samples were collected for 6 h and analyzed for 13CO2 concentration. RESULTS: The frequency of burst activity in the proximal and distal small intestine was higher in patients than in healthy subjects, under both fasting and fed conditions (P < 0.005). In patients there was a higher proportion of abnormally propagated bursts (71% abnormal), which began to normalize by d 3 (25% abnormal) post-surgery. Lipid absorption data was available for seven patients on d 1 and four patients on d 3 post surgery. In patients, absorption on d 1 post-surgery was half that of healthy control subjects (AUC 13CO2 1 323 ± 244 vs 2 646 ±365; P < 0.05, respectively), and was reduced to the one-fifth that of healthy controls by d 3 (AUC 13CO2 470 ± 832 vs 2 646 ± 365; P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: Both proximal and distal small intestinal motor activity are transiently disrupted in critically ill patients immediately after major surgery, with abnormal motility patterns extending as far as the ileum. These motor disturbances may contribute to impaired absorption

  11. The importance of structures and processes in determining outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Sandeep S; Ozdemir, Baris A; Oladokun, Dare; Holt, Peter J E; Loftus, Ian M; Thompson, Matt M; Karthikesalingam, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Annual procedural mortality reports have become mandatory for vascular surgery in England, reflecting a more widespread appetite for transparency and accountability across the National Health Service (NHS) [BMJ 2013;346:f854]. The outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, in particular, have attracted considerable commentary: from 1999 to 2006, postoperative mortality was higher in England than in many other countries (7.9 vs. 1.9-4.5%) [European Society for Vascular Surgery. 2nd Vascunet Report. 2008]. This stimulated considerable service reconfiguration (centralization), quality improvement initiatives, the uptake of endovascular technology, and the examination of institution-level mortality data [http://www.vascularsociety.org.uk/library/quality-improvement.html], which resulted in a fall in elective AAA mortality to 1.8% by 2012 [http://www.hqip.org.uk/assets/NCAPOP-Library/NCAPOP-2013-2014/Outcomes-after-Elective-Repair-of-Infra-renal-Abdominal-Aortic-Aneurysm.pdf (February 2015)]. Despite improvements at a national level, the outcomes of AAA repair vary considerably between different hospitals in the NHS [Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2014;7:131-141], analogous to interprovider variation that has been reported across a range of emergency medical and surgical conditions [BMC Health Serv Res 2014;14:270]. This suggests that underlying institution structures and processes contribute independently to patients' outcomes. There is also considerable evidence that the outcomes of AAA repair vary in different healthcare systems, both in the elective European Society for Vascular Surgery, 2008 and emergency settings. A consideration of the role of structures and processes in influencing outcomes for AAA repair can be conducted across different institutions or even different healthcare systems. This can help identify which factors are consistently associated with the best outcomes, informing efforts to better organize and deliver services for patients

  12. A ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm repaired by combined endovascular and open techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Wang; Sarfati, Mark R; Mueller, Michelle T; Kraiss, Larry W

    2006-11-01

    Aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arteries (PDA) are rare, accounting for man was transferred to our hospital with a 1-day history of abdominal pain and syncope. On admission, an abdominal and pelvis computerized tomographic (CT) scan identified a large mesenteric hematoma, a 1.9 cm PDA aneurysm, and an occluded celiac axis. Mesenteric angiography revealed no active aneurysm leak and a stenotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) origin. All hepatic blood flow originated from the stenotic SMA via markedly enlarged PDA collaterals. The patient was brought to the operating room, where absence of the celiac axis was confirmed. An aorto-to-proper hepatic and SMA bypass was performed using a bifurcated polyester graft. The next day, the patient was brought to the angiography suite, where the PDA aneurysm was coiled. Postprocedure CT scans confirmed thrombosis of the aneurysm. Ruptured mesenteric artery aneurysms are a challenging problem for the vascular surgeon. PDA aneurysms are rare and often occur in an unfavorable location. There appears to be an association with anatomic anomalies of the mesenteric circulation. Prompt invasive and noninvasive diagnostic studies aid in the definitive management of this often fatal problem. Combined endovascular and open techniques can be used for successful treatment.

  13. Microsurgical Repair of Ruptured Aneurysms Associated with Moyamoya-Pattern Collateral Vessels of the Middle Cerebral Artery: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Min; Moore, Nina Z; Witek, Alex M; Kshettry, Varun R; Bain, Mark D

    2017-09-01

    Patients with Moyamoya or other intracranial steno-occlusive disease are at risk for developing aneurysms associated with flow through collateral vessels. Because these lesions are rare, the optimal management remains unclear. Here, we describe 2 cases of microsurgical repair of ruptured collateral vessel aneurysms associated with middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. The first patient was a 61-year-old man who presented with right frontal and intraventricular hemorrhage. Angiography revealed chronic right M1 occlusion and a 3-mm spherical lenticulostriate aneurysm. The frontal lobe hematoma was evacuated to reveal the aneurysm, which was safely cauterized and resected by coagulating and dividing the lenticulostriate parent vessel. The procedure was carried out with neuronavigation guidance and intraoperative neuromonitoring. The patient was discharged with no neurologic deficits. The second patient was a 53-year-old woman who presented with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage. Computed tomography angiogram showed a 2-mm saccular MCA aneurysm. Emergency left decompressive hemicraniectomy and hematoma evacuation were performed. The aneurysm, arising from a small collateral type vessel, was safely clipped without complications. Postoperative angiography revealed absence of the superior MCA trunk with a dense network of collateral vessels at the site of the clipped aneurysm. The patient recovered well and was ambulating independently 6 months postoperatively. No rebleeding occurred in the 2 patients. Our experience suggests that patients with MCA occlusion can harbor associated aneurysms related to flow through collateral vessels and can present with hemorrhage. Microsurgical repair of these aneurysms can be performed safely to prevent rebleeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Open repair management of a patient with aortic arch saccular aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, one vessel coronary artery disease and an isolated dissection of the abdominal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romolo, Harvey; Wartono, Dicky A; Suyuti, Sugisman; Herlambang, Bagus; Caesario, Michael; Sunu, Ismoyo

    2017-01-01

    Isolated saccular compared to fusiform aneurysm is considered to be a rare entity with challenges of its own. A 62-year-old female was diagnosed with a case of saccular aneurysm and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch. Additionally, she also had one vessel coronary artery disease and type B abdominal aortic dissection. She was then managed with open aortic arch repair and coronary artery bypass grafting. If required, elective endovascular repair will be done for the abdominal aorta on a later date.

  15. Morphological State as a Predictor for Reintervention and Mortality After EVAR for AAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohrlander, Tomas [Eksjoe County Hospital (Sweden); Dencker, Magnus [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine (Sweden); Acosta, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.acosta@telia.com [Malmoe University Hospital, Vascular Center Malmoe-Lund (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess aorto-iliac morphological characteristics in relation to reintervention and all-cause long-term mortality in patients undergoing standard EVAR for infrarenal AAA. Methods: Patients treated with EVAR (Zenith{sup Registered-Sign} Stentgrafts, Cook) between May 1998 and February 2006 were prospectively enrolled in a computerized database where comorbidities and preoperative aneurysm morphology were entered. Reinterventions and mortality were checked until December 1, 2010. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Results: A total of 304 patients were included, of which 86% were men. Median age was 74 years. The reintervention rate was 23.4% (71/304). A greater diameter of the common iliac artery (p = 0.037; hazard ratio (HR) 1.037 [1.002-1.073]) was an independent factor for an increased number of reinterventions. The 30-day mortality rate was 3.0% (9/304). Aneurysm-related deaths due to AAA occurred in 4.9% (15/304). Five patients died due to a concomitant ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm. The mortality until end of follow-up was 54.3% (165/304). The proportion of deaths caused by vascular diseases was 61.6%. The severity of angulation of the iliac arteries (p = 0.014; HR 1.018 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.004-1.033]) and anemia (p = 0.044; HR 2.79 [95% CI 1.029-7.556]) remained as independent factors associated with all-cause long-term mortality. The crude reintervention-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 84.5%, 64.8%, and 51.6%, respectively. Conclusions: The initial aorto-iliac morphological state in patients scheduled for standard EVAR for AAA seems to be strongly related to the need for reinterventions and long-term mortality.

  16. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Stent Graft Sizing and Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L.; Bech, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives and background: The aims of this study were to develop a test of competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) stent graft sizing and selection; to examine the test for evidence of validity; and to explore the experience required for the task. Methods: The test was developed based...... on a literature review resulting in 22 anatomical assessment points and a graft selection. Validity evidence was explored in an international cross sectional study. Twenty-two consultants with varying levels of experience in the field (novices, intermediates, and experts) were presented with computed tomography...... angiography of the aortic vessels from three patients. Test scores were based on summed z-scores using the anatomical measurements and graft choices of the experts as a reference. A proficiency score was established using the contrasting groups standard setting method. Results: The assessment was shown...

  17. Impact of iliac artery anatomy on the outcome of fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitto, Enrico; Gargiulo, Mauro; Faggioli, Gianluca; Pini, Rodolfo; Mascoli, Chiara; Freyrie, Antonio; Ancetti, Stefano; Stella, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Fenestrated and branched endovascular aneurysm repair (FB-EVAR) is a valid option to treat juxtarenal and pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysms and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. Because successful deployment depends on complex maneuvers, hostile iliac artery anatomy (HIA) can prejudice the FB-EVAR outcome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of HIA on FB-EVAR outcome. Between 2010 and 2015, all patients undergoing FB-EVAR were prospectively categorized according to iliac anatomy (friendly iliac artery anatomy [FIA] or HIA). HIA was defined as the presence of one of the following: severe (>90-degree) iliac angle, extensive (>50%) iliac circumferential calcification, hemodynamic iliac stenosis or obstruction, external iliac artery diameter <7 mm, or previous aortoiliac/femoral graft. Early end points were technical success (absence of type I or type III endoleak, target visceral vessel [TVV] loss, conversion to open repair), intraoperative adjunctive maneuvers (IAMs; iliac percutaneous transluminal angioplasty/stenting, surgical iliac conduit, intra-aortic graft rotations, several attempts of TVV cannulation), intraoperative technical problems (iliac rupture, significant endograft twisting, difficult TVV cannulations, TVV injuries, TVV loss), and 30-day mortality. Follow-up end points were survival, TVV patency, and freedom from reintervention. Ninety-four patients (male, 87%; age, 73 ± 6 years) with 59 (63%) juxtarenal and pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysms and 35 (37%) thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms underwent FB-EVAR, for a total of 324 TVVs; 60 (64%) patients had HIA and 34 (36%) had FIA. Patients with HIA and FIA had similar preoperative clinical characteristics, except for coronary artery disease, peripheral artery occlusive disease, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 4 (47% vs 24% [P = .03], 12% vs 0% [P = .04], and 28% vs 9% [P = .03], respectively). Technical success was 96% (HIA, 97%; FIA, 95%; P = .6). In HIA

  18. Three-dimensional finite volume modelling of blood flow in simulated angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algabri, Y. A.; Rookkapan, S.; Chatpun, S.

    2017-09-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is considered a deadly cardiovascular disease that defined as a focal dilation of blood artery. The healthy aorta size is between 15 and 24 mm based on gender, bodyweight, and age. When the diameter increased to 30 mm or more, the rupture can occur if it is kept growing or untreated. Moreover, the proximal angular neck of aneurysm is categorized as a significant morphological feature with prime harmful effects on endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Flow pattern in pathological vessel can influence the vascular intervention. The aim of this study is to investigate the blood flow behaviours in angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm with simulated geometry based on patient’s information using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3D angular neck AAA models have been designed by using SolidWorks Software. Consequently, CFD tools are used for simulating these 3D models of angular neck AAA in ANSYS FLUENT Software. Eventually, based on the results, we summarized that the CFD techniques have shown high performance in explaining and investigating the flow patterns for angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Drug eluting stent induced coronary artery aneurysm repair by exclusion. Where are we headed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Krishnan Ganapathy; Akhunji, Zakir

    2009-07-01

    We present a case of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery aneurysm at the site of previous stent placement 3 years previously. The patient presented with recent worsening of angina. Angiography and 64 slice CT angiography confirmed the presence of 6mm aneurysm of LAD at the site of previous stent involving the origin of diagonal, with thrombus proximal and distal to the stent. This patient was successfully managed by taking the posterior wall of the anterior descending artery while suturing the heel of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA)-LAD anastomosis. The idea was to create severe stenosis upstream to prevent distal embolisation from the site of aneurysm. The diagonal was grafted with a saphenous venous graft. Follow-up angiogram at 3 months demonstrated successful exclusion of the aneurysm and unobstructed flow through the grafts.

  20. Identification of predictive CT angiographic factors in the development of high-risk type 2 endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair in patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms; Identifikation praediktiver CT-angiographischer Faktoren fuer die Entstehung eines Hochrisiko Typ-2 Endoleaks nach endovaskulaerem Aortenrepair bei Patienten mit infrarenalen Bauchaortenaneurysmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, D.; Herzog, L.; Rogits, B.; Bulla, K.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J.; Dudeck, O. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Weston, S. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Biometry and Medical Informatics; Meyer, F.; Halloul, Z. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery

    2015-01-15

    An extensive analysis of the value of computed tomography (CT) parameters as potential predictors of the clinical outcome of type 2 endoleaks after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Initial CT scans of 130 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were retrospectively reviewed. On the basis of postoperative CT scans and angiographies, patients were stratified into a low-risk group (LRG; without or transient type 2 endoleak; n = 80) and a high-risk group (HRG, persistent type 2 endoleak or need for reintervention; n = 50). Statistical analysis comprised a univariate and multivariate analysis. Anatomical, thrombus-specific, as well as aortic side branch parameters were assessed on the initial CT scan. Of all anatomical parameters, the diameter of the immediate infrarenal aorta was significantly different in the univariate analysis (LRG 22.4 ± 3.8 mm; HRG 23.6 ± 2.5 mm; p = 0.03). The investigation of the thrombus-specific parameters showed a trend towards statistical significance for the relative thrombus load (LRG 31.7 ± 18.0 %; HRG 25.3 ± 17.5 %; p = 0.09). Assessment of aortic side branches revealed only for the univariate analysis significant differences in the patency of the inferior mesenteric artery (LRG 71.3 %; HRG 92.0 %; p = 0.003) and their diameter (LRG 3.3 ± 0.7 mm; HRG 3.8 ± 0.9 mm; p = 0.004). In contrast, the number of lumbar arteries (LAs; LRG 2.7 ± 1.4; HRG 3.6 ± 1.2; univariate: p = 0.01; multivariate: p = 0.006) as well as their diameter (LRG 2.1 ± 0.4 mm; HRG 2.4 ± 0.4 mm; univariate: p < 0.001; multivariate: p = 0.006) were highly significantly associated with the development of type 2 endoleaks of the HRG. The most important predictive factors for the development of high-risk type 2 endoleaks were mainly the number and the diameter of the LAs which perfused the AAA.

  1. Surgical Repair of Bland-White-Garland Syndrome With Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Zheng, Xiaomei; Liu, Kexiang

    2017-11-01

    A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with adult-type anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery (or Bland-White-Garland syndrome) and a giant right coronary artery aneurysm. He underwent a thorough anatomic correction to excise the aneurysm and reconstruct a coronary system of two vessels. The postoperative period of this patient was uneventful. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple infected aortic aneurysms repaired by staged in situ graft replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yusuke; Kurisu, Kazuhiro; Hisahara, Manabu; Mashiba, Kouichi; Maeda, Takako

    2010-08-01

    The development of multiple infected aortic aneurysms is extremely rare, and treatment remains challenging. We report here a 72-year-old man with multiple infected aortic aneurysms in whom a staged in situ graft replacement for the aortic arch and pararenal abdominal aorta was successfully performed. A rifampicin-bonded graft seemed to be effective in preventing postoperative infection. Perioperative control of infection played a key role in the patient's surviving this critical condition.

  3. Low mortality rates after endovascular aortic repair expand use to high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turner, Megan C; Leraas, Harold J; Gilmore, Brian F; Nag, Uttara; Turley, Ryan S; Shortell, Cynthia K; Mureebe, Leila

    2018-02-01

    The 2010 endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) trial 2 (EVAR 2) reported that patients with comorbidity profiles rendering them unfit for open aneurysm repair who underwent EVAR did not experience a survival advantage compared with those who did not undergo intervention. These patients experienced a 30-day mortality of 7.3%, whereas reports from similar cohorts reported far lower mortality rates. The primary objective of our study was to compare the incidence of 30-day mortality in low- and high-risk patients undergoing EVAR in a contemporary data set, using patient risk stratification criteria from EVAR 2. Secondarily, we sought to identify risk factors associated with a disproportionate contribution to 30-day mortality risk. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Participant Use Data Files (N = 24,813). Patients were included in the high-risk cohort with the presence of renal, respiratory, or cardiac preoperative criteria alone or in combination. Renal impairment criteria were defined as dialysis and creatinine concentration >2.26 mg/dL. Respiratory impairment criteria included history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and preoperative ventilator support. Cardiac impairment criteria included history of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, angina, and prior coronary intervention. Patient and procedural characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. Among 24,813 patients undergoing EVAR, 12,043 (48%) patients were characterized as high risk (at least one impairment criterion); 12,770 (52%) patients were stratified as low risk. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.9% in the high-risk cohort compared with the 7.3% reported by EVAR 2, and it was higher in the high-risk cohort compared with the low-risk cohort (1.9% vs 0.9%; P < .001). Whereas the

  4. Surgical repair of complicated coronary arteriovenous fistula and coronary artery aneurysm in an elderly patient after 26 years of conservative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yuki; Shikawa, Akira; Ayusawa, Yoshikazu; Hosoda, Susumu; Muroi, Kennichi; Yagi, Masahiro; Fuji, Shinya; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Kannichi; Shimatani, Yukiko; Shimoyama, Yujin; Uchida, Tatsuro

    2011-01-01

    We describe a rare case of surgical repair of a coronary artery aneurysm with arteriosclerotic changes accompanied by coronary arteriovenous fistula (CAVF) after 26 years of conservative therapy. A 71-year-old woman, diagnosed with CAVF 26 years previously, was admitted to our hospital for general fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. Physical examinations revealed that the CAVF originated from the distal portion of the left circumflex artery (LCX), draining into the coronary sinus (CS); it affected the coronary artery aneurysm with arteriosclerotic changes and was calcified from the left coronary main trunk to the distal portion of the LCX. Treatment without resection of the calcified coronary aneurysm was suggested because of fear of excessive bleeding. The CAVF was closed directly from inside the dilated coronary sinus under cardiopulmonary bypass. The dilated ostium of the left coronary artery was closed using a Xenomedica patch. Coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and posterolateral branch (PL) of the LCX using saphenous vein grafts. Postoperatively, the coronary aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed for low blood flow. The bleeding might have been uncontrolled if the arteriosclerotic and calcified coronary aneurysm had been incised. Therefore, we successfully thrombosed the calcified coronary aneurysm without resection, after reducing the systemic blood flow to the coronary aneurysm and sustaining the coronary blood flow, performed with CABG.

  5. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound can Replace Computed Tomography Angiography for Surveillance After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Taudorf, M; Lönn, L

    2016-01-01

    were also detected by CEUS; however, three out of 11 patients were missed by DUS and underwent re-intervention: limb extension, re-cuff, and attempt to coil lumbar leaks. Endoleaks missed by CEUS or CTA were type II endoleaks without sac expansion. CONCLUSION: In surveillance programs after EVAR...... August 2011 and 31 October 2014 were prospectively and consecutively enrolled. CEUS was added to the existing surveillance protocol, which included DUS, plain abdominal X-ray, and CTA at 3 and 12 months after stent implantation. RESULTS: In 278 patients, endoleaks were detected in 68, 69, and 46 cases...... by CTA, CEUS, and DUS, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of DUS and CEUS were 46% and 93%, and 85% and 95%, respectively. CEUS and CTA were diagnostically equivalent, as opposed to DUS and CTA (p = .002). Endoleaks detected by CTA led to re-intervention in 11 (4%) patients. These endoleaks...

  6. Endovascular aneurysm repair: state-of-art imaging techniques for preoperative planning and surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijers, M; Resch, T; Van Den Berg, J C

    2009-01-01

    to rigorous follow-up protocols including duplex ultrasound and regular CT examinations. The use of these intense follow-up protocols has recently been questioned because of high radiation dose and the frequent use of nephrotoxic contrast agents. New imaging modalities like contrast enhanced DUS, dynamic MR...... and dual-source CT could reduce radiation dose and obviate the need for nephrotoxic contrast. Up-to-date knowledge of non-invasive vascular imaging and image processing is crucial for EVAR planning and is essential for the development of follow-up programs involving reduced risk of harmful side effects....... echocardiography, intravascular ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), each provide useful information for patient selection, choice of endograft type and surveillance. Today most interventionists and surgeons will rely on CT or MR to assess aortic morphology, evaluate access artery...

  7. Early and late outcomes of open repair for dissecting aneurysms of the descending or thoraco-abdominal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Atsushi; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsuo, Jiro; Inoue, Yosuke; Seike, Yoshimasa; Uehara, Kyokun; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2017-10-09

    Although open repair is the standard surgical option for dissecting descending thoracic aneurysms (DTAs) and thoraco-abdominal aorta aneurysms (TAAAs), it remains a significant challenge with considerable perioperative morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively analysed early and late outcomes of open repair for these aortic aneurysms. Early and late outcomes were investigated for 223 consecutive patients who underwent open repair for dissecting DTA or TAAA between January 2003 and December 2014 (mean age 55 ± 16 years). The basic strategy for open surgery comprised liberal use of deep hypothermia and aggressive preservation or reattachment of intercostal arteries, i.e. donor arteries for the artery of Adamkiewicz. Deep hypothermia was used in 150 (67.3%) patients. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 3.6% and 1.5% for elective cases. The rates of spinal cord ischaemic injury and stroke were 3.1% and 4.5%, respectively. During follow-up (mean 63 ± 40 months), overall 5-year survival rates was 89.2 ± 2.4% and 91.3 ± 2.8% and 86.3 ± 4.1% for DTA and TAAA, respectively. Five- and 10-year rates of freedom from aortic events, defined as surgery for initial operation-related events or for downstream aortic dilation, were 89.1 ± 3.5% and 68.2 ± 7.8% for DTA and 100% and 96.6 ± 3.4% for TAAA, respectively (P < 0.01). Our approach in treating this aortic pathology showed favourable early and long-term outcomes with acceptable neurological complication rates. More careful follow-up is necessary in patients with DTA repair, because downstream aortic enlargement occurs in some patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Aorfix™ device for abdominal aortic aneurysm with challenging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarzaglia, P; Grattoni, C; Oshoala, K; Castriota, F; D'Alessandro, G; Cremonesi, A

    2014-02-01

    Anatomical characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most critical factors for successful endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). Of these, severe proximal aortic neck angulation and iliac axis tortuosity increase the complexity of EVAR. Neck angulation seems to have a pivotal potential for fixation failure, a situation that may lead to complications, including endoleak and late rupture. Bench-test studies identified that the relative stiffness of a stent-graft was responsible for its inability to conform to neck angulation, therefore creating leaks through gaps between the stent graft and the neck. Aorfix™ stent graft (Lombard Medical, Didcot, UK) is a flexible stent-graft designed and manufactured with the purpose of overcoming the issue of stent-graft stiffness. Many studies have shown good results in term of procedural success and mid-term type-I endoleak. PYTHAGORAS trial evaluated mainly patients with highly angulated infrarenal neck and showed that high performance of Aorfix™ stent graft did not present any significant difference between neck >60° and <60°. In the series of 27 patients treated at our Institution we had a primary technical success of 96.3% and an assisted primary technical success of 100%. In this review we will analyze the available data in literature regarding Aorfix™ stent graft and will discuss the outcome of the patients treated with Aorfix™ stent graft at our centre.

  9. Orthogonal Rings, Fiducial Markers, and Overlay Accuracy When Image Fusion is Used for EVAR Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutouzi, G; Sandström, C; Roos, H; Henrikson, O; Leonhardt, H; Falkenberg, M

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of orthogonal rings, fiducial markers, and overlay accuracy when image fusion is used for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). This was a prospective single centre study. In 19 patients undergoing standard EVAR, 3D image fusion was used for intra-operative guidance. Renal arteries and targeted stent graft positions were marked with rings orthogonal to the respective centre lines from pre-operative computed tomography (CT). Radiopaque reference objects attached to the back of the patient were used as fiducial markers to detect patient movement intra-operatively. Automatic 3D-3D registration of the pre-operative CT with an intra-operative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as well as 3D-3D registration after manual alignment of nearby vertebrae were evaluated. Registration was defined as being sufficient for EVAR guidance if the deviation of the origin of the lower renal artery was less than 3 mm. For final overlay registration, the renal arteries were manually aligned using aortic calcification and vessel outlines. The accuracy of the overlay before stent graft deployment was evaluated using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as direct comparison. Fiducial markers helped in detecting misalignment caused by patient movement during the procedure. Use of automatic intensity based registration alone was insufficient for EVAR guidance. Manual registration based on vertebrae L1-L2 was sufficient in 7/19 patients (37%). Using the final adjusted registration as overlay, the median alignment error of the lower renal artery marking at pre-deployment DSA was 2 mm (0-5) sideways and 2 mm (0-9) longitudinally, mostly in a caudal direction. 3D image fusion can facilitate intra-operative guidance during EVAR. Orthogonal rings and fiducial markers are useful for visualization and overlay correction. However, the accuracy of the overlaid 3D image is not always ideal and further technical development is needed. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery

  10. A systematic review on the safety of Prostar XL versus ProGlide after TAVR and EVAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniotis, Christos [2nd Cardiology Department, Hellenic Red Cross Hospital of Athens, Athens (Greece); Andreou, Constantinos; Karalis, Ioannis [Interventional Cardiology Department, University Hospital of Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands); Koutouzi, Giasemi [Interventional Radiology Department, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Agelaki, Maria [2nd Cardiology Department, Hellenic Red Cross Hospital of Athens, Athens (Greece); Koutouzis, Michael, E-mail: koutouzismike@yahoo.gr [2nd Cardiology Department, Hellenic Red Cross Hospital of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2017-03-15

    Background: Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are widely spreading minimally invasive procedures performed mainly through the femoral artery. Prostar XL and ProGlide vascular closure devices are used in clinical practice for the hemostasis in these procedures and they have been shown to be safe and effective. Purpose: The aim of our systematic review is to compare the safety of these two devices for percutaneous closure of large arteriotomies in patients undergoing TAVR and EVAR. Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all randomized and observational published studies that compared Prostar XL vs. ProGlide. Relative risk was calculated by random-effects model. Review Manager 5.1 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total number of 2909 patients were included in our analysis. The rate of overall vascular complications did not differ between Prostar XL and ProGlide {RR 1.35 (0.80–2.29), p = 0.27}. In contrary, the risk ratio of all bleeding complications with Prostar XL compared to ProGlide was 1.82 (1.47–2.24, p < 0.001) and for major and life-threatening bleeding complications was 2.48 (1.65–3.73, p < 0001, suggesting a lower bleeding risk with ProGlide). No statistical difference was found between groups for end-stage acute kidney injury (AKI), with a risk ratio of 2.14 (0.81–5.66), p = 0.05. Finally, there were no differences in in-hospital and 30-days mortality rate between the two groups (1.41, 0.56–3.54, p = 0.46 and 1.43, 0.55–3.73, p = 0.47, respectively). Conclusions: Prostar XL is associated with greater risk of any bleeding as well as life threatening bleeding compared to the ProGlide device. However, no significant differences were observed in the rate of overall vascular complications, end stage AKI and in-hospital and 30-days mortality. - Highlights: • We present a systematic review

  11. [Surgical treatment for pseudoaneurysm of the sinus of valsalva ruptured into the right atrium after mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm repair;report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Bito, Yasuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Suehiro, Yasuo; Kaku, Daisuke; Miyabe, Makoto; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2015-02-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted to our hospital by ambulance after syncope due to complete A-V block. He had received surgical treatment for mycotic aneurysm of the right coronary artery 3 months before, with patch plasty of the right sinus of Valsalva and bypass grafting to the right coronary artery (RCA) as well as the left anterior descending branch. Computed tomography revealed pseudoaneurysm of the right Valsalva sinus of about 8 cm in diameter and a shunt flow to the right atrium. The previous bypass graft to RCA had been occluded due to compression by the aneurysm. As he was in a shock state, emergency operation was performed. Cardiopulmonary bypass was first established, and after the rectal temperature reached to 26 degrees centigrade, the chest was opened. The pseudoaneurysm burst out when the sternum was re-opened. Under circulatory arrest, the ascending aorta was clamped, and then the circulation was resumed. The previous bovine pericardium patch repairing the Valsalva sinus was detached due to infection, and mural thrombus and pus were observed in the aneurysm. At the bottom of the aneurysm, a fistula connected to the right atrium was found. Debridement around the aneurysm was performed as much as possible. The defect of the Valsalva sinus was repaired with a Dacron patch immersed in gentian violet. The postoperative course was uneventful without any recurrence of infection.

  12. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chaichana, Thanapong

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair

  13. Repair of an Atherosclerotic Coronary Artery Aneurysm by Implantation of a Coronary Covered Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antenor Portela

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available An atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right coronary artery complicated by a recent myocardial infarction was successfully treated with coronary artery stenting, using a device consisting of 2 stents with a layer of expandable polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE placed between them. A follow-up angiograph 5 months after the procedure showed sustained initial results.

  14. Repair of an Atherosclerotic Coronary Artery Aneurysm by Implantation of a Coronary Covered Stent

    OpenAIRE

    Portela, Antenor; Bastos, Raldir; Costa, Itamar; Paiva, Jayro

    2002-01-01

    An atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right coronary artery complicated by a recent myocardial infarction was successfully treated with coronary artery stenting, using a device consisting of 2 stents with a layer of expandable polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) placed between them. A follow-up angiograph 5 months after the procedure showed sustained initial results.

  15. Fast track management reduces the systemic inflammatory response and organ failure following elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Ortlieb, Lutz; Oberhuber, Alexander; Orend, Karl Heinz

    2011-05-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is common after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of a multimodal fast track (FT) regimen on incidence rates of SIRS after elective infrarenal AAA repair. Post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial including 99 patients after either traditional (TC) or FT care. Basic FT elements were no bowel preparation, reduced preoperative fasting, patient controlled epidural analgesia, enhanced postoperative feeding and mobilization. The presence of SIRS, organ failure and mortality, length of stay (LOS) on intensive care unit (ICU) were analyzed during the postoperative course. The incidence of SIRS in the FT treatment arm was significantly lower as compared to TC: 28% vs. 50%, P = 0.04. The rate of any organ failure (AOF) and multiple organ failure (MOF) was lower in the FT group: AOF: 16% vs. 36%, P = 0.039; MOF: 2% vs. 12%; P = 0.112. LOS on ICU showed a slight advantage for FT care: 20 hours vs. 32 hours (P = 0.183). An optimized patient care program in elective open AAA repair significantly decreases the postoperative incidence of SIRS as well as rates of organ failure.

  16. Combined coronary artery bypass grafting and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is a reasonable treatment approach: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Karathanos, Christos; Rousas, Nikolaos; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2014-08-01

    We reviewed the literature for studies investigating the outcomes of combined 1-stage coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) open repair (OR) procedures. An electronic search of the English literature was conducted using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. Age, coronary heart disease severity, AAA size, mean duration from CABG to AAA OR procedures, details of each procedure, mortality, and morbidity rates were analyzed. Between 1994 and 2012, 12 studies (256 patients) with 1-stage treatment fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 20 early (30 days) deaths, accounting for a 30-day mortality rate of 7.8%. The early morbidity was 53% (136 of 256). One-stage treatment when necessary can be undertaken with acceptable mortality and reasonable morbidity rates considering the complexity of both the operations. Nowadays, endovascular AAA repair is preferred over OR. The outcomes of combined cardiac surgery and endovascular AAA repair have not been extensively evaluated. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Remote ischemic preconditioning for renal protection during elective open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stewart R; Sadat, Umar; Boyle, Jonathan R; Tang, Tjun Y; Lapsley, Marta; Norden, Anthony G; Gaunt, Michael E

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to determine whether remote ischemic preconditioning (IP) reduces renal damage following elective open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Sequential common iliac clamping was used to induce remote IP in randomized patients. Urinary retinol binding protein (RBP) and albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured following induction and 3, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. In controls (n = 22), median urinary RBP increased from 112 microg/mL (interquartile range [IQR] 96-173 microg/mL) preoperatively to 5919 microg/mL (IQR 283-17 788 microg/mL) at 3 hours. Preoperative urinary RBP in preconditioned patients was 96 microg/mL (IQR 50 to 229 microg/mL) preoperatively, rising to 1243 microg/mL (IQR 540 to 15400 microg/mL) at 3 hours. Although control patients' median urinary RBP level was 5 times greater at 3 hours, there were no statistically significant differences in renal outcome indices. This trial could not confirm that remote IP reduces renal injury following elective open aneurysm surgery.

  18. Graft Distortion After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Association with Sac Morphology and Mid-Term Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, Derek Alan; Edwards, Richard David; McWilliams, Richard Gregory; Rowlands, Peter Christopher; Martin, Janis; White, Donagh; Fear, Simon; Bakran, Ali; Brennan, John; Gilling-Smith, Geoffrey; Harris, Peter Lyon

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, significance, and mechanism of stent-graft distortion after endovascular repair (EVR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm.Methods: EVR of abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed in 51 cases (49 modular, bifurcated; 2 tube). Thirty-two patients were followed for 6 or more months and had equivalent baseline and follow-up images which could be used to determine changes in graft configuration. Sac dimensions were measured using computed tomographic (CT) images and graft-related complications were recorded.Results: Amongst 32 patients evaluated on follow-up, there was graft distortion in 24. Distorted grafts were significantly (p= 0.002) associated with sac diameter reduction (mean 5 mm) and sac length reduction (mean 8.1 mm). All graft-related complications occurred in the limbs of eight distorted grafts, with a mean reduction of sac length in this group of 7.8 mm on reformatted CT images.Conclusion: There was a highly significant association between graft distortion and limb complications, and reduced sac dimensions

  19. Repair of aortic arch aneurysm under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezwanul Hoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic arch surgery is the challenging and most difficult surgery among the cardiovascular operations. Cerebral and spinal complications are the most feared and common complications of aortic arch surgery. With best available techniques for cerebral and spinal protection, anesthetic management and good post-operative care; aortic arch surgery is considerably safer nowadays and satisfactory results can be achieved in most patients. Also, selecting the sites for arterial cannulation to maintain whole body circulation, during isolation of the aortic arch to operate on it, need proper anatomical description of the extent of the aneurysm. This is also achievable by the availability of the imaging techniques like Computed Tomog­raphy (CT with or without contrast, CT Angiography (CTA and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. We are reporting a case of aneurysm of aortic arch in a young adult, who had undergone repair under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow and had normal convalescence without any cerebral or spinal complications.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Short and Angulated Neck in High-Risk Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Koutsias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is an established alternative to open repair. However lifelong surveillance is still required to monitor endograft function and signal the need for secondary interventions (Hobo and Buth 2006. Aortic morphology, especially related to the proximal neck, often complicates the procedure or increases the risk for late device-related complications (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. The definition of a short and angulated neck is based on length (60° (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. A challenging neck also offers difficulties during open repairs (OR, necessitating extensive dissection with juxta- or suprarenal aortic cross-clamping. Patients with extensive aneurysmal disease typically have more comorbidities and may not tolerate extensive surgical trauma (Sarac et al. 2002. It is, therefore, unclear whether aneurysms with a challenging proximal neck should be offered EVAR or OR (Cox et al. 2006, Choke et al. 2006, Robbins et al. 2005, Sternbergh III et al. 2002, Dillavou et al. 2003, and Greenberg et al. 2003. In our case the insertion of a thoracic endograft followed by the placement of a bifurcated aortic endograft for the treatment of a very short and severely angulated neck proved to be feasible offering acceptable duration of aneurysm exclusion. This adds up to our armamentarium in the treatment of high-risk patients, and it should be considered in emergency cases when the fenestrated and branched endografts are not available.

  1. Retracted: Reversal of Spinal Cord Ischemia Following Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Hyperbaric Oxygen and Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta, Emmanuel; Jye Poi, Mun; Varon, Joseph; Lin, Peter H

    2015-12-14

    This article has been officially retracted. The senior author, Emmanuel Urquieta, of the article entitled, "Reversal of Spinal Cord Ischemia Following Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Hyperbaric Oxygen and Therapeutic Hypothermia," has requesed that the article, published online ahead of print (DOI: 10.1089/ther.2015.0025), be retracted because he discovered one of his coauthors mistakenly submitted the same article to the Journal of Vascular Surgery due to a miscommunication between them. The editorial leadership of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management agree that the article must be retracted as a matter of proper scientific publishing protocol whereby an article may not be simultaneously submitted to two journals. The Editors commend Dr. Urquieta for willingly bringing this situation to their attention. Dr. Urquieta and his coauthors sincerely apologize to the Editors and the readership of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management.

  2. Endovascular abdominal aortic repair for AAA. Anatomical suitability and limitation in Japanese population according to the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Atsushi; Okita, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Since 2007, the EVAR (endovascular abdominal aortic repair) grafts, Zenith, Excluder and Powerlink had been commercially available in Japan. However, a small iliac artery, typical of Japanese population especially in women, was a limiting factor to indicate EVAR. We analyzed the suitability of EVAR in Japanese population according to the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft in the current study. From January 2006 to December 2007, 106 AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) patients (88 men, 18 women) with a mean age of 73 years were investigated in our institution by multi-slice CT scan in terms of suitability of EVAR, then we measured their abdominal aorta and iliac artery parameters as follows; proximal neck diameter (PND) and length (PNL), common iliac artery diameter (CIAD) and length (CIAL), suprarenal (SNA) and infrarenal neck angulation (INA), external iliac artery diameter (EIAD) and aortic length from the lowest renal artery to the aortic bifurcation (AOL). The inclusion criteria for Zenith AAA stent graft treatment were; PND: 18-28 mm, PNL more than 15 mm, unilateral CIAD less than 20 mm, CIAL at least 10 mm, SNA less than 45 degree and INA less than 60 degree, unilateral EIAD more than 7.5 mm. The indication of EVAR was 25.5% (27/106 patients), and was especially very low in women (5.6%) strictly according to the inclusion criteria of the Zenith AAA stent graft. The main reason of exclusion of EVAR was proximal short neck (40.5%), small iliac artery (30.4%) and infrarenal aortic neck angulation (29.1%). In our analysis, female AAA patients had small PNL and EIAD with angulated neck compared with male AAA ones. Anatomical suitability of EVAR in Japanese population strictly following by the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft was low due to their characteristic differences from the European Union (EU) and the United States (US) patients, such as short proximal neck, steep neck angulation and small iliac artery, especially in women. More flexible

  3. Flow diversion in vasculitic intracranial aneurysms? Repair of giant complex cavernous carotid aneurysm in polyarteritis nodosa using Pipeline embolization devices: first reported case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Santos, Jaime; Kaderali, Zul; Spears, Julian; Rubin, Laurence A; Marotta, Thomas R

    2016-07-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) are exceedingly rare lesions with unpredictable behavior that pose real challenges to microsurgical and endovascular interventions owing to their inflammatory nature. We introduce a safe and effective alternative for treating these aneurysms using Pipeline embolization devices (PEDs). A 20-year-old man presented with diplopia, headaches, chronic abdominal pain, and weight loss. Diagnostic evaluations confirmed PAN, including bilateral giant cavernous carotid aneurysms. Cyclophosphamide and steroids achieved significant and sustained clinical improvement, with a decision to follow the aneurysms serially. Seven years later the left unruptured aneurysm enlarged, causing a sudden severe headache and a cavernous sinus syndrome. Treatment of the symptomatic aneurysm was pursued using flow diversion (PED) and the internal carotid artery was successfully reconstructed with a total of four overlapping PEDs. At 6 months follow-up, complete exclusion of the aneurysm was demonstrated, with symptomatic recovery. This is the first description of using a flow-diverting technique in an inflammatory vasculitis. In this case, PEDs not only attained a definitive closure of the aneurysm but also reconstructed the damaged and fragile arterial segment affected with vasculitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Ten-Year Follow-Up of Endovascular Aneurysm Treatment with Talent Stent-Grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, Michael B.; Scheschkowski, Tobias; Ring, Markus; Herber, Sascha; Oberholzer, Katja; Leicher-Dueber, Annegret; Neufang, Achim; Schmiedt, Walther; Dueber, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results, complications, and secondary interventions during long-term follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to investigate the impact of endoleak sizes on aneurysm shrinkage. From 1997 to March 2007, 127 patients (12 female, 115 male; age, 73.0 ± 7.2 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with Talent stent-grafts. Follow-up included clinical visits, contrast-enhanced MDCT, and radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical outcome, secondary interventions, endoleak rate and management, and change in aneurysm size. There was no need for primary conversion surgery. Thirty-day mortality was 1.6% (two myocardial infarctions). Procedure-related morbidity was 2.4% (paraplegia, partial infarction of one kidney, and inguinal bleeding requiring surgery). Mean follow-up was 47.7 ± 34.2 months (range, 0-123 months). Thirty-nine patients died during follow-up; three of the deaths were related to aneurysm (aneurysm rupture due to endoleak, n = 1; secondary surgical reintervention n = 2). During follow-up, a total of 29 secondary procedures were performed in 19 patients, including 14 percutaneous procedures (10 patients) and 15 surgical procedures (12 patients), including 4 cases with late conversion to open aortic repair (stent-graft infection, n = 1; migration, endoleak, or endotension, n = 3). Overall mean survival was 84.5 ± 4.7 months. Mean survival and freedom from any event was 66.7 ± 4.5 months. MRI depicted significantly more endoleaks compared to MDCT (23.5% vs. 14.3%; P 10% of the aneurysm area were associated with reduced aneurysm shrinkage compared to no endoleaks or <10% endoleaks (Δ at 3 years, -1.8% vs. -12.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, endovascular aneurysm treatment with Talent stent-grafts demonstrated encouraging long-term results with moderate secondary intervention rates. Primary occlusion of all aortic side

  5. Aortic root repair for thoracic aorta false aneurysm following Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jones, Steve; Sivananthan, U M; McGoldrick, J P

    2008-08-01

    The Bentall procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan's syndrome is safe and durable. We describe successful repair of periprosthetic valvular leak, 12 years following Bentall repair with composite graft. The aim of this report is to analyse and evaluate technical factors leading to this unusual occurrence.

  6. Emergency Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Patient with Failing Heart: Axillofemoral Bypass Using a Centrifugal Pump Combined with Levosimendan for Inotropic Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Pavel; Sebesta, Pavel; Stern, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old patient requiring repair of a large symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The patient was known to have coronary artery disease (CAD) with symptoms and signs of significant myocardial dysfunction, left-heart failure, and severe aortic insufficiency. The procedure was performed with the help of both mechanical and pharmacological circulatory support. Distal perfusion was provided by an axillofemoral bypass with a centrifugal pump, with dobutamine and levosimendan administered as pharmacological inotropic support. The patient's hemodynamic status was monitored with continuous cardiac output monitoring and transesophageal echocardiography. No serious circulatory complications were recorded during the perioperative and postoperative periods. This paper suggests a potential novel approach to combined circulatory support in patients with heart failure, scheduled for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:22937463

  7. Emergency Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Patient with Failing Heart: Axillofemoral Bypass Using a Centrifugal Pump Combined with Levosimendan for Inotropic Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Michalek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of an 83-year-old patient requiring repair of a large symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The patient was known to have coronary artery disease (CAD with symptoms and signs of significant myocardial dysfunction, left-heart failure, and severe aortic insufficiency. The procedure was performed with the help of both mechanical and pharmacological circulatory support. Distal perfusion was provided by an axillofemoral bypass with a centrifugal pump, with dobutamine and levosimendan administered as pharmacological inotropic support. The patient's hemodynamic status was monitored with continuous cardiac output monitoring and transesophageal echocardiography. No serious circulatory complications were recorded during the perioperative and postoperative periods. This paper suggests a potential novel approach to combined circulatory support in patients with heart failure, scheduled for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

  8. Endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms with a novel multibranch stent-graft design: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinstner, C; Teufelsbauer, H; Neumayer, C; Domenig, C; Wressnegger, A; Wolf, F; Funovics, M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to report our preliminary experience in outcome, safety and mid-term results in the treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) with a novel multibranchstentgraft (E-xtra DESIGN ENGINEERING, JOTEC, Germany). Eight patients (mean age 66 years, 2 female) with TAAA (Crawford type I: 2 cases, type III: 3 cases, type IV: 3 cases), mean aneurysm diameter 61 mm, growth over 5 mm per year were treated. Implantation was performed under general anesthesia and surgical exposition of the common femoral artery. Brachial access was percutaneous in 5/8 patients. Balloon-expandable (Advanta V12) bridging stent-grafts were employed and lined with self-expanding nitinol stents. All patients except type IV TAAA received a spinal drainage catheter. The device was successfully deployed in 8/8 patients. 29/32 visceral branches were engaged. One stenosed celiac trunk was left untreated without further consequences, two renal arteries which could not be cannulated were revascularized with iliorenal bypass. One patient needed surgical revision of groin hematoma, one patient suffered from permanent protopathic sensory deficit. No renal complications occurred. Since the primary implantation was deliberately kept short and amount of contrast agent was minimised, four patients needed a secondary percutaneous procedure (Palmaz stent implantation for type I endoleak, re-PTA or additional bridging stent-graft implantation for type III endoleak). The assisted primary success rate was 8/8. Mean follow-up was 18 months. Success was stable in 7/8 patients, one patient shows type V endoleak with 5mm sac expansion. No mortality or complication occurred during follow-up. The JOTEC E-xtra DESIGN ENGINEERING multibranch stent-graft is a promising new candidate for endovascular TAAA treatment with sufficient safety and efficacy. Its short delivery time suggests its use in patients with rapid aneurysm growth or high anxiety.

  9. Severe tracheobronchial compression in a patient with Turner′s syndrome undergoing repair of a complex aorto-subclavian aneurysm: Anesthesia perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C .C. Hudson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of severe tracheobronchial compression from a complex aorto-subclavian aneurysm in a patient with Turner′s syndrome undergoing open surgical repair. Significant airway compression is a challenging situation and requires careful preoperative preparation, maintenance of spontaneous breathing when possible, and consideration of having an alternative source of oxygenation and circulation established prior to induction of general anesthesia. Cardiopulmonary monitoring is essential for safe general anesthesia and diagnosis of unexpected intraoperative events.

  10. The pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in patients undergoing elective & semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections are common, so effective antibiotic concentrations at the sites of infection are required. Surgery can lead to physiological changes influencing the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics. The aim of the study is to evaluate contemporary peri-operative prophylactic dosing of cefazolin by determining plasma and subcutaneous interstitial fluid concentrations in patients undergoing elective of semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA open repair surgery. Methods/Design This is an observational pharmacokinetic study of patients undergoing AAA open repair surgery at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. All patients will be administered 2-g cefazolin by intravenous injection within 30-minutes of the procedure. Participants will have samples from blood and urine, collected at different intervals. Patients will also have a microdialysis catheter inserted into subcutaneous tissue to measure interstitial fluid penetration by cefazolin. Participants will be administered indocyanine green and sodium bromide as well as have cardiac output monitoring performed and tetrapolar bioimpedance to determine physiological changes occurring during surgery. Analysis of samples will be performed using validated liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis will be performed using non-linear mixed effects modeling to determine individual and population pharmacokinetic parameters and the effect of peri-operative physiological changes on cefazolin disposition. Discussion The study will describe cefazolin levels in plasma and the interstitial fluid of tissues during AAA open repair surgery. The effect of physiological changes to the patient mediated by surgery will also be determined. The results of this study will guide clinicians and pharmacists to effectively dose cefazolin in order to maximize the concentration of antibiotics in the tissues which are the most common site of surgical site infections.

  11. State-of the-art review on the renal and visceral protection during open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waked, Karl; Schepens, Marc

    2018-01-01

    During open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair (OTAAAR), there is an inevitable organ ischemic period that occurs when the abdominal arteries are being reattached to the aortic graft. Despite various protective techniques, the incidence of renal and visceral complications remains substantial. This state-of-the-art review gives an overview of the current and most evidence-based organ protection methods during OTAAAR, based on the most recent publications and personal experience. An electronic search was performed in four medical databases, using the following MeSH terms: thoracoabdominal aneurysm, TAAAR, visceral protection, renal protection, kidney, perfusion, and intestines. Every publication type was considered. The literature search was ended on August 31st, 2017. The left heart bypass (LHB) is currently the most frequent adjunct to provide distal aortic perfusion (DAP) during aortic clamping. Together with systemic hypothermia, it forms the cornerstone in organ protection during aortic clamping. Further renal protection can be obtained by selective renal perfusion (SRP) with cold blood or cold crystalloid solution, the latter enriched with mannitol. The perfusion should be administered in a volume- and pressure-controlled way and, if possible, by use of a pulsatile pump. Selective visceral perfusion (SVP) is not routinely used, as it does not provide adequate blood flow for visceral protection. The best way to protect the intestines is by minimizing the ischemic time. The preservation of renal and visceral function after OTAAAR can only be obtained with specific strategies before, during, and after the operation. This involves a series of measures, including selective digestive decontamination (SDD), avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs, minimizing the renal and intestinal ischemic time, systemic cooling, avoidance of hemodynamic instability, and regional protective perfusion of the kidneys. Future innovations in catheters, cardiac bypass flow types, mechanical

  12. [Surgical Repair of Coronary-pulmonary Artery Fistulae with Giant Coronary Aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiyama, Naoki; Katayama, Yusuke; Mo, Makoto; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-03-01

    A 69-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to dyspnea on exertion and a heart murmur. A chest X-ray showed a bulge at the left 3rd arch and chest computed tomography( CT) revealed a giant mass adjacent to the right ventricular outflow. Multidetector-row CT and coronary angiography showed a giant coronary aneurysm (55×45 mm) and fistulae arising from the left main coronary trunk and entering into the main pulmonary artery (PA). The pulmonary to systemic flow ratio was 1.84. She was diagnosed with coronary-pulmonary artery fistulae with giant coronary aneurysm. Aneurysmorrhaphy and closure of the fistula outlet from the PA were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with cardiac arrest. After declamping the aorta, residual shunt flow was found at several sites of abnormal vessels in the right ventricular outflow using a Doppler flowmeter. The vessels were ligated with pledgeted sutures, but did not disappear completely. Postoperative coronary angiography and transthoracic echocardiogram showed a small residual shunt flow into the PA. The postoperative course was uneventful;she was discharged on postoperative day 18. Six months later, the residual shunt flow had disappeared. No recurrence has been detected for 7 years.

  13. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  14. Dual-energy CT for detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair: usefulness of colored iodine overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenti, Giorgio; Mazziotti, Silvio; Lamberto, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Caloggero, Simona; Racchiusa, Sergio; Mileto, Achille; Scribano, Emanuele

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the value of dual-source dual-energy CT with colored iodine overlay for detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. We also calculated the potential dose reduction by using a dual-energy CT single-phase protocol. From November 2007 to November 2009, 74 patients underwent CT angiography 2-7 days after endovascular repair during single-energy unenhanced and dual-energy venous phases. By using dual-energy software, the iodine overlay was superimposed on venous phase images with different percentages ranging between 0 (virtual unenhanced images) and 50-75% to show the iodine in an orange color. Two blinded readers evaluated the data for diagnosis of endoleaks during standard unenhanced and venous phase images (session 1, standard of reference) and virtual unenhanced and venous phase images with colored iodine overlay images (session 2). We compared the effective dose radiation of a single-energy biphasic protocol with that of a single-phase dual-energy protocol. The diagnostic accuracy of session 2 was calculated. The mean dual-energy effective dose was 7.27 mSv. By using a dual-energy single-phase protocol, we obtained a mean dose reduction of 28% with respect to a single-energy biphasic protocol. The diagnostic accuracy of session 2 was: 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% negative predictive value, and 100% positive predictive value. Statistically significant differences in the level of confidence for endoleak detection between the two sessions were found by reviewers for scores 3-5. Dual-energy CT with colored iodine overlay is a useful diagnostic tool in endoleak detection. The use of a dual-energy single-phase study protocol will lower radiation exposure to patients.

  15. Predictive Factors for Mortality and Morbidity of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Shiraishi

    2012-04-01

    Conclusions: Emergency open repair can be safely performed in patients for infrarenal rAAA. In particular, we identified specific independent predictive factors of clinical examination and laboratory studies for mortality, major morbidity and renal insufficiency. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 94-101

  16. Anatomic severity grading score for primary descending thoracic aneurysms predicts procedural difficulty and aortic-related reinterventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Chad P; Larion, Sebastian; Ahanchi, Sadaf S; Lavingia, Kedar S; Dexter, David J; Panneton, Jean M

    2016-10-01

    An anatomic severity grading (ASG) score for primary descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAs) was developed. The objective of this study was to determine if an ASG score cutoff value for DTAs is predictive of procedural complexity, aortic-related reinterventions, and mortality in patients who undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A retrospective review from 2008 to 2013 of patient records was conducted of all consecutive patients who underwent TEVAR for a primary DTA. A comprehensive scoring system of preoperative DTA morphology on the basis of computed tomography angiography images was established to identify and classify anatomic features that might influence outcome after TEVAR. ASG score calculations were achieved using preoperative computed tomography angiography images. Primary outcomes included primary technical success, aortic-related reinterventions, aneurysm-related mortality, and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included procedural complexity (unplanned adjunctive procedures, number of endografts implanted, contrast volume, and procedure time), endoleak formation, endoleak requiring reintervention, stroke and paraplegia, and conversion to open repair. Of 469 patients with a diagnosis of a thoracic aortic aneurysm, 62 patients (13%) underwent TEVAR and had adequate preoperative imaging (mean age, 71 years). Applying the ASG score, we identified 39 patients (63%) with a score ≥24 (high-score group) and 23 patients (37%) with a score DTAs predicted procedure complexity and aortic-related reinterventions after TEVAR. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the aorta Injury from falls or motor vehicle accidents Syphilis Symptoms Aneurysms develop slowly over many ... rupture) if you do not have surgery to repair it. The treatment depends on the location of ...

  18. Aortic root and ascending aortic aneurysm in an adult with a repaired tetralogy of fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Sik; Na, Chan-Young; Baek, Jong Hyun; Yang, Jin Sung

    2011-08-01

    Surgical repair of the tetralogy of Fallot is one of the most successful operations in the treatment of congenital heart diseases. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who had an aortic valve replacement at the time of complete repair of the tetralogy of Fallot at the age of forty-three. He subsequently had progressive aortic root and ascending aorta dilation to 9 cm. The aortic root and ascending aorta replacement was done using a composite valve-graft and was performed along with other procedures. Thus, meticulous follow-up of aortic root and ascending aorta after corrective surgery for tetralogy of Fallot is recommended following initial curative surgery.

  19. Impact of hospital volume and type on outcomes of open and endovascular repair of descending thoracic aneurysms in the United States Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Virendra I; Mukhopadhyay, Shankha; Ergul, Emel; Aranson, Nathan; Conrad, Mark F; Lamuraglia, Glenn M; Kwolek, Christopher J; Cambria, Richard P

    2013-08-01

    Favorable outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) compared with open repair for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAs) have led to increasing TEVAR use. We evaluated the effect of case volume and hospital teaching status on clinical outcomes of intact DTA repair. The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) data set (2004 to 2007) was queried to identify open repair or TEVAR for DTA. Hospitals were stratified by DTA volume into high volume (HV; ≥ 8 cases/y) or low volume (LV; <8 cases/y) and teaching or nonteaching. The effect of hospital variables on the primary study end point of 30-day mortality and secondary end points of 30-day complications and long-term survival after open repair and TEVAR DTA repair were studied using univariate testing, multivariable regression modeling, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. We identified 763 hospitals performing 3554 open repairs and 3517 TEVARs. Overall DTA repair increased (P < .01) from 1375 in 2004 to 1987 in 2007. The proportion of hospitals performing open repair significantly decreased from 95% in 2004 to 57% in 2007 (P < .01), whereas those performing TEVAR increased (P < .01) from 24% to 76%. Overall repair type shifted from open (74% in 2004, the year before initial commercial availability of TEVAR) to TEVAR (39% open in 2007; P < .01). The fraction of open repairs at LV hospitals decreased from 56% in 2004 to 44% in 2007 (P < .01), whereas TEVAR increased from 24% in 2004 to 51% in 2007 (P < .01). Overall mortality during the study interval for open repair was 15% at LV hospitals vs 11% at HV hospitals (P < .01), whereas TEVAR mortality was similar, at 3.9% in LV vs 5.5% in HV hospitals (P = .43). LV was independently associated with increased mortality after open repair (odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.8; P < .01) but not after TEVAR. There was no independent effect of hospital teaching status on mortality or complications

  20. Comparative clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of endovascular strategy v open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: three year results of the IMPROVE randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Objective  To assess the three year clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of a strategy of endovascular repair (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) versus open repair for patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Design  Randomised controlled trial. Setting  30 vascular centres (29 in UK, one in Canada), 2009-16. Participants  613 eligible patients (480 men) with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm, of whom 502 underwent emergency repair for rupture. Interventions  316 patients were randomised to an endovascular strategy (275 with confirmed rupture) and 297 to open repair (261 with confirmed rupture). Main outcome measures  Mortality, with reinterventions after aneurysm repair, quality of life, and hospital costs to three years as secondary measures. Results  The maximum follow-up for mortality was 7.1 years, with two patients in each group lost to follow-up by three years. After similar mortality by 90 days, in the mid-term (three months to three years) there were fewer deaths in the endovascular than the open repair group (hazard ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.90), leading to lower mortality at three years (48% v 56%), but by seven years mortality was about 60% in each group (hazard ratio 0.92, 0.75 to 1.13). Results for the 502 patients with repaired ruptures were more pronounced: three year mortality was lower in the endovascular strategy group (42% v 54%; odds ratio 0.62, 0.43 to 0.88), but after seven years there was no clear difference between the groups (hazard ratio 0.86, 0.68 to 1.08). Reintervention rates up to three years were not significantly different between the randomised groups (hazard ratio 1.02, 0.79 to 1.32); the initial rapid rate of reinterventions was followed by a much slower mid-term reintervention rate in both groups. The early higher average quality of life in the endovascular strategy versus open repair group, coupled with the lower mortality at three years, led to a

  1. Editor's Choice - High Annual Hospital Volume is Associated with Decreased in Hospital Mortality and Complication Rates Following Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Secondary Data Analysis of the Nationwide German DRG Statistics from 2005 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenner, Matthias; Kuehnl, Andreas; Salvermoser, Michael; Reutersberg, Benedikt; Geisbuesch, Sarah; Schmid, Volker; Eckstein, Hans-Henning

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the association between annual hospital procedural volume and post-operative outcomes following repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in Germany. Data were extracted from nationwide Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) statistics provided by the German Federal Statistical Office. Cases with a diagnosis of AAA (ICD-10 GM I71.3, I71.4) and procedure codes for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR; OPS 5-38a.1*) or open aortic repair (OAR; OPS 5-38.45, 5-38.47) treated between 2005 and 2013 were included. Hospitals were empirically grouped to quartiles depending on the overall annual volume of AAA procedures. A multilevel multivariable regression model was applied to adjust for sex, medical risk, type of procedure, and type of admission. Primary outcome was in hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were complications, use of blood products, and length of stay (LOS). The association between AAA volume and in hospital mortality was also estimated as a function of continuous volume. A total of 96,426 cases, of which 11,795 (12.6%) presented as ruptured (r)AAA, were treated in >700 hospitals (annual median: 501). The crude in hospital mortality was 3.3% after intact (i)AAA repair (OAR 5.3%; EVAR 1.7%). Volume was inversely associated with mortality after OAR and EVAR. Complication rates, LOS, and use of blood products were lower in high volume hospitals. After rAAA repair, crude mortality was 40.4% (OAR 43.2%; EVAR 27.4%). An inverse association between mortality and volume was shown for rAAA repair; the same accounts for the use of blood products. When considering volume as a continuous variate, an annual caseload of 75-100 elective cases was associated with the lowest mortality risk. In hospital mortality and complication rates following AAA repair are inversely associated with annual hospital volume. The use of blood products and the LOS are lower in high volume hospitals. A minimum annual case threshold for AAA procedures might improve

  2. Clipping Surgery for Paraclinoid Carotid Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yasunaga; Suzuki, Yota; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Paraclinoid carotid aneurysm is widely treated with coil embolization. However, all paraclinoid carotid aneurysms cannot be obliterated by the endovascular approach. Our direct surgical procedure was presented. The clinical data of surgically treated paraclinoid carotid aneurysms were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred ninety paraclinoid carotid aneurysms in 181 patients were directly obliterated at the Shinshu University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals between 1991 and 2013. Direct surgical repair of the paraclinoid carotid aneurysm is still useful, even in the era of endovascular treatment.

  3. Hygroma following endovascular femoral aneurysm exclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wad, Morten; Pedersen, Brian Lindegaard; Lönn, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of aneurysms in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and popliteal segments is a suggested alternative to open surgical repair. Careful selection of patients for endovascular treatment of SFA aneurysms is mandatory.......Endovascular treatment of aneurysms in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and popliteal segments is a suggested alternative to open surgical repair. Careful selection of patients for endovascular treatment of SFA aneurysms is mandatory....

  4. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair.

  5. Surgical Repair of Post-Infarct True Posterobasal Ventricular Aneurysm with Mitral Valve Replacement and Coronary Revascularization: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasarathan Charumathi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-infarction ventricular aneurysm is a complication of myocardial infarction. While the involvement of the anterior wall is quite common, posterobasal left ventricular aneurysm is a rare clinical complication in this setting. In this case report, we report a post-infarction posterobasal left ventricular aneurysm combined with ischemic mitral regurgitation due to coronary artery disease, for which we successfully performed triple coronary artery bypass and ventricular geometry restitution via a modified Dor’s procedure with mitral valve replacement through an extracardiac approach.1

  6. Surgical repair for a coronary-pulmonary artery fistula with a saccular aneurysm of the coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kenta; Hisata, Yoichi; Hazam, Shiro

    2009-06-01

    The patient, a 69-year-old woman, had been diagnosed with a heart murmur. A chest X-ray at a local clinic had shown an abnormal shadow. Since CT revealed a 3-cm-diameter mass close to the pulmonary artery, we performed a coronary angiography and diagnosed her as having a coronary artery aneurysm associated with a coronary-pulmonary artery fistula. We incised the aneurysm under cardiac arrest, the wall of which had three openings that were suture closed from the inside and outside. The coronary-pulmonary artery fistula was suture closed. A postoperative angiography confirmed the disappearance of the coronary artery aneurysm and the abnormal blood vessels. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged on postoperative day 15. We report a rare case of coronary-pulmonary artery fistula with a coronary artery aneurysm for which surgery was followed by an uneventful postoperative course.

  7. Outcome and survival of patients aged 75 years and older compared to younger patients after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: do the results justify the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahidi, S; Schroeder, T Veith; Carstensen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated early mortality (days) rates, cost analyses, and preoperative variables that may be predictive of 30-day mortality in elderly patients compared to younger patients after emergency open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The survey is a retrospective analysis based...... with the variables that were found to be significant in the univariate analysis. Health economy and cost analysis for the two groups were estimated. Out of 72 open repairs of RAAA, 44 patients (61%) were under 75 years of age and 28 (39%) were 75 years or older. The average age of the patients was 71 years...... of the increased incidence of surgical risk factors and hospital mortality in this subset of patients (cut-off age). Demographic, clinical, and operative factors were analyzed together with 30-day mortality. Univariate analysis was performed with the chi-squared test. Multivariate analyses were also performed...

  8. Aortic aneurysm endovascular treatment with the parallel graft technique from the aortic arch to the iliac axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Gian F; Marino, Mario; Kasemi, Holta; DI Angelo, Costantino L; Dionisi, Carlo P; Cammalleri, Valeria; Setacci, Carlo

    2017-05-26

    The chimney technique has been developed for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysms. We analyzed the midterm to long-term outcomes of this approach from a single- centre experience. From October 2008 to July 2016, 58 patients underwent endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using the chimney technique. Indications for treatment were thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 11), thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) (n = 2), pararenal aortic aneurysm (PAAA) (n= 15), aortoiliac/isolated hypogastric artery aneurysm (n = 25), type I endoleak after previous TEVAR/EVAR (n=4), proximal pseudoaneurysm after AAA open repair (n = 1). Elective (82.8%) and emergent (17.2%) procedures were included. The immediate technical success was 100%. Single, double and triple chimneys were performed in 46, 10 and 2 patients, respectively. Overall, 61 target vessels (3 left common carotid arteries, 8 left subclavian arteries, 3 celiac trunks, 3 superior mesenteric arteries, 19 renal arteries and 25 hypogastric arteries) were involved. Post-operative mortality was 0. No neurologic complications were registered. Primary patency rate of the chimney stent/stent graft was 98.3%. Low flow type I endoleak was observed in 4 patients (6.9%). Post-operative chimney graft re-intervention rate was 1.7%. The median follow up was 32±20 months (range 3- 96 months). Overall estimated survival at 12, 50 and 80 months was 100%, 89% and 44%, respectively. Estimated freedom from endoleak at 1, 12, 24 and 36 months was 96.5%, 95%, 95% and 93%, respectively. One HA stent graft occluded at the 3rd month of follow up. No reintervention was performed. Our experience with the chimney technique for aortic aneurysms from the aortic arch to the iliac axis shows promising and durable mid- and long term results. Endograft oversizing, associated with the chimney graft diameter and length choice remain fundamental to reduce the risk of the most frequent procedure complications: type I endoleak and CG occlusion.The wider

  9. Six years' experience with prostaglandin I2 infusion in elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a parallel group observational study in a tertiary referral vascular center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beirne, Chris

    2008-11-01

    The prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analogue iloprost, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation, has traditionally been utilized in pulmonary hypertension and off-label use for revascularization of chronic critical lower limb ischemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of 72 hr iloprost infusion on systemic ischemia post-open elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (EAAA) surgery. Between January 2000 and 2007, 104 patients undergoing open EAAA were identified: 36 had juxtarenal, 15 had suprarenal, and 53 had infrarenal aneurysms, with a mean maximal diameter of 6.9 cm. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1, with a mean age of 71.9 years. No statistically significant difference was seen between the study groups with regard to age, sex, risk factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, or diameter of aneurysm repaired. All emergency, urgent, and endovascular procedures for aneurysms were excluded. Fifty-seven patients received iloprost infusion for 72 hr in the immediate postoperative period compared with 47 patients who did not. Patients were monitored for signs of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, systemic ischemia, and postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Statistically significantly increased ventilation rates (p=0.0048), pulmonary complication rates (p=0.0019), and myocardial ischemia (p=0.0446) were noted in those patients not receiving iloprost. These patients also had significantly higher renal indices including estimate glomerular filtration rate changes (p=0.041) and postoperative urea level rises (p=0.0286). Peripheral limb trashing was noted in five patients (11.6%) in the non-iloprost group compared with no patients who received iloprost. Increased rates of transfusion requirements and bowel complications were noted in those who did not receive iloprost, with their ICU stay greater than twice that of iloprost patients. All-cause morbidity affected 67% of patients not receiving iloprost compared to 40% who did

  10. Stent-graft repair of isolated iliac aneurysms with wide or ectatic necks with use of inverted zenith device legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonaris, Chris; Verikokos, Christos; Avgerinos, Efthimios D; Bellos, John; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Liapis, Christos D

    2009-03-01

    Although there is considerable experience in the management of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs) accompanying abdominal aortic aneurysms, less is known about endovascular management of isolated IAAs. The distal landing zone can be secured if necessary by extending the graft to the external iliac artery, but the proximal landing zone remains a challenging issue, on which technical success is dependent. The present report describes a novel technique for endovascular management of isolated IAAs with wide proximal necks for which no commercially available grafts with fitting sizes exist: inversion of the iliac leg of a Zenith device.

  11. Endovascular repair of early rupture of Dacron aortic graft--two case reports.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2005-01-01

    Complications after open aortic surgery pose a challenge both to the vascular surgeon and the patient because of aging population, widespread use of cardiac revascularization, and improved survival after aortic surgery. The perioperative mortality rate for redo elective aortic surgery ranges from 5% to 29% and increases to 70-100% in emergency situation. Endovascular treatment of the postaortic open surgery (PAOS) patient has fewer complications and a lower mortality rate in comparison with redo open surgical repair. Two cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were managed with the conventional open surgical repair. Subsequently, spiral contrast computer tomography scans showed reperfusion of the AAA sac remnant mimicking a type III endoleak. These graft-related complications presented as vascular emergencies, and in both cases endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure was performed successfully by aortouniiliac (AUI) stent graft and femorofemoral crossover bypass. These 2 patients add further merit to the cases reported in the English literature. This highlights the crucial importance of endovascular grafts in the management of such complex vascular problems.

  12. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thinking, muscle weakness, or numbness. Problems with your memory are common, but these may improve. You may ... apply pressure An arm or leg that changes color, becomes cool to touch, or becomes numb Redness, ...

  13. Why routine intensive care unit admission after elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is no longer an evidence based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, David

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair is major surgery performed on high-risk patients. Routine ICU admission postoperatively is the current accepted standard of care. Few of these patients actually require a level of care that cannot be provided just as effectively in a surgical high dependency unit (HDU). Our aim was to determine, \\'can high risk patients that will require ICU admission postoperatively be reliably identified preoperatively?\\'. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all elective open infrarenal AAA repairs in our institution over a 3-year period was performed. The Estimation of Physiological Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) model was used as our risk stratification tool for predicting post-operative morbidity. Renal function was also considered as a predictor of outcome, independent of the E-PASS. RESULTS: 80% (n = 16) were admitted to ICU. Only 30% (n = 6) of the total study population necessitated intensive care. There were 9 complications in 7 patients in our study. The E-PASS comprehensive risk score (CRS)\\/Surgical stress score (SSS) were found to be significantly associated with the presence of a complication (p = 0.009)\\/(p = 0.032) respectively. Serum creatinine (p = 0.013) was similarly significantly associated with the presence of a complication. CONCLUSIONS: The E-PASS model possessing increasing external validity is an effective risk stratification tool in safely deciding the appropriate level of post-operative care for elective infrarenal AAA repairs.

  14. Resultados da cirurgia do aneurisma da aorta abdominal em pacientes jovens Outcomes after surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo P. Bonamigo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A presença de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (AAA é rara em pacientes jovens. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da cirurgia do AAA em pacientes com idade BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are rare in young patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes after AAA repair in patients aged < 50 years. METHODS: Between June 1979 and January 2008, 946 patients underwent elective repair for an infrarenal AAA performed by the first author. Of these, 13 patients (1.4% were < 50 years old at surgery. Demographic characteristics and surgical data were analyzed, as well as early and late outcomes after surgical intervention. RESULTS: Mean age was 46±3.4 years (ranging from 43 to 50 years. Most patients were men (76.9%, hypertensive (76.9% and smokers (61.5%. Perioperative morbidity and mortality rates were low (15.4% and 0%, respectively; one patient had respiratory infection and another patient had unstable angina. Median follow-up was 85.5 months, and two patients died due to ischemic cardiopathy and cerebrovascular accident during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: AAA repair in young patients is a safe procedure, with good long-term results. In our study, there were no perioperative deaths, and a good long-term survival was observed.

  15. Heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP27 in the cerebral spinal fluid of patients undergoing thoracic aneurysm repair correlate with the probability of postoperative paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, James G; Sundram, Hari; Zou, Shaomin; Praestgaard, Amy; Bavaria, Joseph E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; McGarvey, Michael

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of the time course and correlation with injury of heat shock proteins (HSPs) released during brain and/or spinal cord cellular stress (ischemia) is critical in understanding the role of the HSPs in cellular survival, and may provide a clinically useful biomarker of severe cellular stress. We have analyzed the levels of HSPs in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients who are undergoing thoracic aneurysm repair. Blood and CSF samples were collected at regular intervals, and CSF was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HSP70 and HSP27. These results were correlated with intraoperative somatosensory-evoked potentials measurements and postoperative paralysis. We find that the levels of these proteins in many patients are elevated and that the degree of elevation correlates with the risk of permanent paralysis. We hypothesize that sequential measurement intraoperatively of the levels of the heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP27 in the CSF can predict those patients who are at greatest risk for paralysis during thoracic aneurysm surgery and will allow us to develop means of preventing or attenuating this severe and often fatal complication.

  16. Surgical repair of an aneurysm-like fistula connecting the left main coronary artery with the right atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Guang; Sun, Zhongchan; Zhang, Weida

    2016-08-01

    Coronary fistula is defined as an anomalous connection between a coronary artery and any of the four chambers of the heart or any of its great vessels. A coronary fistula connecting the left main coronary artery to the right atrium is the most uncommon. In the present study, we report the surgical management of a very uncommon case of an aneurysm-like fistula connecting the left main coronary artery to the right atrium in a 2-year-old boy.

  17. Coronary Anomalies: Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Varda, Rajsekhar; Chitimilla, Santosh Kumar; Lalani, Aslam

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysm is one of the rarest anomalies that we see in our medical practice and they are mostly associated with obstructive lesions due to atherosclerotic changes. Management of these aneurysm patients (conservative or surgical repair) usually depends on obstructive lesions and associated symptoms. We are presenting a case of left main aneurysm measuring around 1 4 × 2 8  mm with other obstructive leisons. It was treated with surgical repair in view of obstructive lesions and ...

  18. Coronary Anomalies: Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsekhar Varda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery aneurysm is one of the rarest anomalies that we see in our medical practice and they are mostly associated with obstructive lesions due to atherosclerotic changes. Management of these aneurysm patients (conservative or surgical repair usually depends on obstructive lesions and associated symptoms. We are presenting a case of left main aneurysm measuring around 14×28 mm with other obstructive leisons. It was treated with surgical repair in view of obstructive lesions and symptoms.

  19. Endovascular Repair of Saccular Ascending Aortic Aneurysm After Orthotopic Heart Transplantation Using an Investigational Zenith Ascend Stent-Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderich, Gustavo S; Pochettino, Alberto; Mendes, Bernardo C; Roeder, Blayne; Pulido, Juan; Gloviczki, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To report the use of an investigational stent-graft to treat an ascending aortic aneurysm in a patient with a heart transplant. A 48-year-old man presented with a 3.5×1.5-cm saccular aneurysm in the mid anterior ascending aorta, abutting the sternum. The patient's history was notable for placement of a left ventricular assist device followed by orthotopic heart transplantation 2 years prior to treat end-stage familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Under compassionate use, a custom-designed ascending aortic stent-graft (Zenith Ascend) was successfully delivered via an 18-F system and deployed just distal to the origin of the left main coronary artery under pulmonary artery catheter-guided rapid ventricular pacing. The patient was discharged the next day, and 6-month follow-up was unremarkable. Imaging at 5 months showed an excluded aneurysm sac with no endoleak or migration. The ideal ascending aortic stent-graft should be low profile, conformable to the arch anatomy, with short tip delivery system and a stepwise deployment mechanism that allows precise placement relative to the ostia of the coronary arteries and the innominate artery. This case illustrates the advancement of endovascular techniques to the most challenging segment of the aorta to decrease morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  1. Anastomotic femoral aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    between the original operation and the repair of the pseudoaneurysms was 9 years (range 1 month to 26 years). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the previously noted trend of an increasing time to aneurysm formation from 3 years before 1975, 5 years between 1976 and 1980, and 6 years between 1981 and 1990....

  2. Successful use of retrograde branched extension limb assembling technique in endovascular repair of pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiong, MD, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Surgeon-modified retrograde branched extension limb assembling technique and bridged endografts were successfully used to exclude an asymptomatic pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and to reconstruct the superior mesenteric artery and bilateral renal arteries in a case with high-grade celiac artery stenosis, nondilated aorta above the superior mesenteric artery, and large lumen below the renal arteries. In patient-specific models for hemodynamics analysis, enhanced flow diversion to visceral arteries up to 6-month follow-up confirmed treatment feasibility; however, endograft configurations could be improved to avoid sharp corners at bifurcations, thereby ensuring smooth flow transport and possibly reducing risk for endograft narrowing or the development of thrombosis.

  3. External validation of Vascular Study Group of New England risk predictive model of mortality after elective abdominal aorta aneurysm repair in the Vascular Quality Initiative and comparison against established models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Mohammad H; Rybin, Denis V; Doros, Gheorghe; Siracuse, Jeffrey J; Farber, Alik

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to externally validate a recently reported Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) risk predictive model of postoperative mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and to compare its predictive ability across different patients' risk categories and against the established risk predictive models using the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) AAA sample. The VQI AAA database (2010-2015) was queried for patients who underwent elective AAA repair. The VSGNE cases were excluded from the VQI sample. The external validation of a recently published VSGNE AAA risk predictive model, which includes only preoperative variables (age, gender, history of coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, creatinine levels, and aneurysm size) and planned type of repair, was performed using the VQI elective AAA repair sample. The predictive value of the model was assessed via the C-statistic. Hosmer-Lemeshow method was used to assess calibration and goodness of fit. This model was then compared with the Medicare, Vascular Governance Northwest model, and Glasgow Aneurysm Score for predicting mortality in VQI sample. The Vuong test was performed to compare the model fit between the models. Model discrimination was assessed in different risk group VQI quintiles. Data from 4431 cases from the VSGNE sample with the overall mortality rate of 1.4% was used to develop the model. The internally validated VSGNE model showed a very high discriminating ability in predicting mortality (C = 0.822) and good model fit (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = .309) among the VSGNE elective AAA repair sample. External validation on 16,989 VQI cases with an overall 0.9% mortality rate showed very robust predictive ability of mortality (C = 0.802). Vuong tests yielded a significant fit difference favoring the VSGNE over then Medicare model (C = 0.780), Vascular Governance Northwest (0.774), and Glasgow Aneurysm Score (0

  4. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  5. Implementation of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S) in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: an observational comparative cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2008-01-01

    The use of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S; Fresenius Hemotechnology, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany), which conserves allogenic blood, is reported in 187 patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm repair during a 9-year period. Patients were allocated to C.A.T.S if a Haemovigilance technician was available. A mean of 685 mL of retrieved blood was reinfused in 101 patients receiving C.A.T.S; 61% required 2 U or less. All control patients required 3 U or more of allogenic blood. Allogenic transfusion in C.A.T.S patients decreased significantly (P < .0001). Mean intensive care unit stay was significantly reduced in C.A.T.S patients (P = .042). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 18 days for C.A.T.S group and 25 days in control patients (P = .014). The respective 30-day mortality was 12% versus 19% (P = .199). The C.A.T.S markedly reduced the amount of blood transfused, was associated with reduced intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay, and was cost-effective.

  6. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eScaife

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs (EVAR has increased the need for repeat imaging especially in the post-operative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While CTA and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, ultrasound technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D or 4D contrast enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume and most importantly it can detect endoleaks post EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post EVAR follow-up, techniques and diagnostic accuracy.

  7. The best in vitro conditions for two and three parallel stenting during endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Gaspar; Yugueros, Xavier; Apodaka, Ana; Urrea, Rodrigo; Pasquadibisceglie, Savino; Alomar, Xavier; Riambau, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to identify which endograft-parallel stent combinations and which degree of oversizing result in the most adequate fit in a juxtarenal abdominal aneurysmal neck, when using a double or triple parallel-stent (chimney) technique. In vitro silicon, juxtarenal, abdominal aortic aneurysmal neck models of different diameters, with two and three side-branches (simulating both the renal and superior mesenteric arteries), were constructed. Two different endografts of three diameters each, with two or three parallel stents (of 6 mm and 6 mm; or 6 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm) were tested (Endurant-II endograft [Medtronic Inc, Santa Rosa, Calif] with balloon-expandable BeGraft stent [Bentley InnoMed, Hechingen, Germany] and an Excluder endograft [W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz] with self-expanding Viabahn stent [W. L. Gore and Associates]), applying three endograft-oversizing degrees: recommended (15%), excessive (30%), and over-excessive (40%). After remodeling, using the kissing-balloon technique at 37°C (98.6°F), 36 endograft-stent-oversizing models were scanned by computed tomography. The area of the gutters, parallel-stent compression, and main endograft infolding were recorded. Increasing oversizing (15%, 30%, and 40%) revealed a nonsignificant propensity toward smaller gutters and similar parallel-stent compression, but it significantly augmented infolding, more in three parallel-stent models (0%, 0%, 67% and 0%, 33%, 83% of cases; P = .015 and .018, for two and three parallel-stent models; n = 36) and mainly for the Excluder-Viabahn combination. The Excluder-Viabahn showed significantly smaller gutters, but with higher stent compression, than Endurant-BeGraft combinations for both two and three parallel stents (8.2 mm 2 , 22.6 mm 2 ; P = .002 and 14.4 mm 2 , 23.3 mm 2 ; P = .009 gutter area; and 18%, 2%; P parallel-stent techniques. Higher oversizing was related to nonsignificant smaller gutters but higher rates of infolding

  8. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thin tissues covering the brain. This type of hemorrhagic stroke is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. A ruptured aneurysm quickly becomes life-threatening and requires prompt medical treatment. Most brain aneurysms, however, don't rupture, create ...

  9. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  10. Surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair increases medical center contribution margin and physician reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Francesco; Durgin, Jonathan; Daniel, Vijaya; Messina, Louis; Doucet, Danielle; Simons, Jessica; Jenkins, James; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-10-01

    Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) allows endovascular treatment of thoracoabdominal and juxtarenal aneurysms previously outside the indications of use for standard devices. However, because of considerable device costs and increased procedure time, FEVAR is thought to result in financial losses for medical centers and physicians. We hypothesized that surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for FEVAR procedures will increase medical center contribution margin (CM) and physician reimbursement. At the UMass Memorial Center for Complex Aortic Disease, a vascular surgeon with experience in medical finances is supported to manage the billing and coding of FEVAR procedures for medical center and physician reimbursement. A comprehensive financial analysis was performed for all FEVAR procedures (2011-2015), independent of insurance status, patient presentation, or type of device used. Medical center CM (actual reimbursement minus direct costs) was determined for each index FEVAR procedure and for all related subsequent procedures, inpatient or outpatient, 3 months before and 1 year subsequent to the index FEVAR procedure. Medical center CM for outpatient clinic visits, radiology examinations, vascular laboratory studies, and cardiology and pulmonary evaluations related to FEVAR were also determined. Surgeon reimbursement for index FEVAR procedure, related adjunct procedures, and assistant surgeon reimbursement were also calculated. All financial analyses were performed and adjudicated by the UMass Department of Finance. The index hospitalization for 63 FEVAR procedures incurred $2,776,726 of direct costs and generated $3,027,887 in reimbursement, resulting in a positive CM of $251,160. Subsequent related hospital procedures (n = 26) generated a CM of $144,473. Outpatient clinic visits, radiologic examinations, and vascular laboratory studies generated an additional CM of $96,888. Direct cost analysis revealed that grafts

  11. Repair of aortic root in patients with aneurysm or dissection: comparing the outcomes of valve-sparing root replacement with those from the Bentall procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvard Skripochnik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Management of aortic root aneurysm or dissection has been the subject of much discussion that has led to some modifications. The current trend is a valve-sparing root replacement. We compared the outcome following valve sparing root repair with Bentall procedure. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 70 patients who underwent root replacement for aneurysm or dissection and compared the outcomes of valve-sparing root replacement with those of the Bentall procedure from January 2007 to December 2011 at our institution. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSR, including reimplantation or remodeling (23 males and 2 females, and 45 patients had the Bentall procedure (34 males and 11 females. Patients who underwent a VSR were younger with a mean age of 55.4 ± 14.8 years compared to those who underwent the Bentall procedure with a mean age of 60.6 ± 12.7 (P=ns. The preoperative aortic insufficiency (AI in the VSR group was moderate in 8 (32% patients, and severe in 6 (24%. Preoperative creatinine was 1 ± 0.35 mg/dl in the VSR group and 1.1 ± 0.87 mg/dl in the Bentall group. In the VSR group, 3 (12% patients had emergency surgery; by contrast, in the Bentall group, 8 (17% patients had emergent surgery. Concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (excluding coronary reimplantation was performed in 8 (32% patients in the VSR group and in 12 (26.6% patients in the Bentall group (P=0.78; additional valve procedures were performed in 2 (8% patients in the VSR group and in 11 (24.4% patients in the Bentall group. The perioperative mortality was 8% (n=2 and 13.3% (n=6, for the VSR and Bentall procedures, respectively (P=0.7, ns. The total duration of intensive care unit stay was 116.6 ± 106 hours for VSR patients and 152.5 ± 218.2 hours for Bentall patients (P=0.5. The overall length of stay in the hospital was 10 ± 8.1 days for VSR and 11 ± 9.52 days for Bentall (P=0.89. The one-year survival was 92

  12. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Treatment of Aortoiliac Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Mikkel; Rasmussen, John Bøje Grønvall; Schroeder, Torben V

    2016-01-01

    , and a branch iliac device was placed in 25 limbs. Gluteal claudication developed in 38% of limbs treated with IIA exclusion but in none of the limbs treated with branch iliac devices (P fluoroscopy time, and use of iodine contrast material did not differ between the two groups...

  13. Parallel-Stenting Technique in a Sandwich Configuration for Hypogastric Artery Preservation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugueros, Xavier; Mestres, Gaspar; Pasquadibisceglie, Savino; Alomar, Xavier; Apodaka, Ana; Riambau, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the best conditions in iliac sandwich procedure for hypogastric artery preservation during endovascular aneurysm repair, testing different devices, different oversizing (OS) degrees as well as different methods to measure it. Four external iliac devices (16-mm Endurant and 12-mm Aorfix limb extensions; 11- and 13-mm Viabahn endografts) were tested with 2 distinct internal iliac stent grafts (8-mm Advanta V12 and 8-mm Viabahn) inside different proximal silicon iliac limb models (10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 mm), simulating an iliac sandwich procedure for hypogastric preservation. After remodeling all devices in a saline bath at 37°C, the combinations were computed tomography scanned. Gutter size, parallel-stent compression, and inadequate parallel-stent deployment or infolding were recorded. Oversizing between both parallel stents and the iliac limb models were examined in terms of added diameter, perimeter, and area being additionally compared. All three sizing methods (diameter, perimeter, and area) were highly correlated (diameter OS to perimeter and area OS correlation coefficient 0.998 and 0.997, respectively, P  75%) showed a significant tendency toward smaller gutters (38.9, 12.2, 5.4, and 2.6 mm 2 , respectively, P parallel-stent compression (13.5%, 28.9%, 43.9%, and 55.1%, P parallel-stent compression. No clear recommendations in material selection can be performed. All sizing methods are highly correlated and predictable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Azizzadeh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made in the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA.  Improvements in perioperative care and surgical techniques have resulted in reductions in complication and mortality rates. Adjunctive use of distal aortic perfusion and cerebrospinal fluid drainage has been especially helpful, reducing the incidence of neurological deficits to 2.4%. Current research is aimed at improving organ preservation. This review focuses on the current diagnosis and management of TAAA.

  15. RARE PRESENTATION OF SYMPTOMATIC BILATERAL PROXIMAL POPLITEAL ARTERY ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasikumar Ganapathy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available True Popliteal artery aneurysm is the most common of all the peripheral artery aneurysms. We present a case of proximal popliteal artery aneurysm involvement both lower limb presented with gangrene in one lower limb and incapacitating claudication pain on the other lower limb. We have successfully repaired both sides aneurysm in the same sitting with Poly Tetra Fluro Ethylene (PTFE graft, as the patient also had multiple venous perforators’ involvement on both sides, which left us only with synthetic graft repair option rather than venous graft repair.

  16. Rumperet abdominalt aortaaneurisme trods endovaskulaer behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulla Lei; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2006-01-01

    An 84-year-old man with an abdominal aortal aneurysm (AAA) was treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Four years later, the aneurysm ruptured and an emergency operation was performed. On a short-term basis, EVAR has been proven to be a low-risk treatment compared to open surgery. However...

  17. Tratamento do aneurisma da aorta toracoabdominal com endoprótese ramificada para as artérias viscerais Branched endovascular stent graft for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Simi

    2007-03-01

    AATA com endoprótese ramificada é factível. A melhora dos recursos técnicos e da qualidade dos materiais poderá ampliar a indicação desse procedimento como alternativa à cirurgia aberta.We report a case of branched stent graft system for endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA. A 68-year-old female patient, smoker, hypertensive, with a large TAAA and multiple comorbid conditions that restricted indication for conventional surgery. The aneurysm originated from the descending thoracic aorta, extending until the infrarenal abdominal aorta, involving the emergence of visceral arteries, celiac trunk, superior and renal mesenteric arteries. The TAAA was treated with the endovascular technique using a branched stent graft. This stent graft was customized based on the anatomical characteristics of the aorta and on the position of visceral branches, which were obtained by tomographic angiography, with the aim of excluding the aneurysm and maintaining perfusion of visceral arteries. The procedure was performed under regional and general anesthesia in the surgical room, preceded by cerebrospinal fluid drainage under fluoroscopic guidance. The femoral arteries, which were previously dissected, were used to implement the branched stent graft and for radiological control. Through the stent graft branches, secondary extensions were implanted, with covered stents, to the respective visceral arteries, which were approached via left axillary artery. Total operative time was 14 hours, 4 hours and 30 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 120 mL of iodinated contrast. The patient became hemodynamically unstable after the surgery. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed a type A retrograde dissection of the thoracic aorta, followed by spontaneous thrombosis of the false lumen. Control tomography showed exclusion of the TAAA and patency of the bypasses to visceral branches, with no endoleaks. The patient was discharged on the 13th postoperative day. Branched

  18. Using multiple classifiers for predicting the risk of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair re-intervention through hybrid feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, Omneya; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Holt, Peter Je; Thompson, Matthew M; Sayers, Rob; Bown, Matthew J; Choke, Eddie C; Ma, Xianghong

    2017-11-01

    Feature selection is essential in medical area; however, its process becomes complicated with the presence of censoring which is the unique character of survival analysis. Most survival feature selection methods are based on Cox's proportional hazard model, though machine learning classifiers are preferred. They are less employed in survival analysis due to censoring which prevents them from directly being used to survival data. Among the few work that employed machine learning classifiers, partial logistic artificial neural network with auto-relevance determination is a well-known method that deals with censoring and perform feature selection for survival data. However, it depends on data replication to handle censoring which leads to unbalanced and biased prediction results especially in highly censored data. Other methods cannot deal with high censoring. Therefore, in this article, a new hybrid feature selection method is proposed which presents a solution to high level censoring. It combines support vector machine, neural network, and K-nearest neighbor classifiers using simple majority voting and a new weighted majority voting method based on survival metric to construct a multiple classifier system. The new hybrid feature selection process uses multiple classifier system as a wrapper method and merges it with iterated feature ranking filter method to further reduce features. Two endovascular aortic repair datasets containing 91% censored patients collected from two centers were used to construct a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. The results showed the proposed technique outperformed individual classifiers and variable selection methods based on Cox's model such as Akaike and Bayesian information criterions and least absolute shrinkage and selector operator in p values of the log-rank test, sensitivity, and concordance index. This indicates that the proposed classifier is more powerful in correctly predicting the risk of

  19. [Coronary artery aneurysm with various clinical course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, A; Kaneda, K; Yoshida, Y; Heima, D; Hirao, S; Nagasaka, S; Yokoyama, S; Nishiwaki, N

    2009-12-01

    Case 1: A 77-year-old woman had effort angina pectoris. Coronary angiography (CAG) revealed a coronary artery aneurysm on the left descending artery. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and patch angioplasty for the aneurysm were performed. Case 2 : A 69-year-old woman had effort dyspnea CAG showed dilation of the left main trunk and beaded aneurysms (maximum 6 cm in diameter) behind the ascending aorta with a fistula to the right atrium. We closed the fistula and performed CABG to the circumflex branch. Case 3 : A 78-year-old woman had had general fatigue for 2 weeks. Previous CAG had revealed coronary artery aneurysms and current chest computered tomography revealed pericardial effusion. She was, therefore, diagnosed with the rupture of the coronary artery aneurysm. We closed the coronary artery aneurysm and performed CABG. Case 4: A 55-year-old man had been diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction and had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention 3 years before. CAG revealed a coronary artery aneurysm on the right coronary artery. We resected the aneurysm and interposed with saphenous vein graft. Although coronary artery aneurysm often has no symptoms, in the cases of angina, myocardial infarction, rupture or large aneurysm more than 3 times larger than the normal diameter, surgical repair should be considered.

  20. Hérnias incisionais no pós-operatório de correção de aneurisma de aorta abdominal Postoperative incisional hernias after open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Hüsemann Menezes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A incidência de hérnia incisional no pós-operatório da correção aberta de aneurisma de aorta abdominal é alta, variando de 10 a 37% e mais de três vezes mais comum do que em pacientes submetidos à correção para doença obstrutiva aorto-ilíaca. OBJETIVO: Apresentar a incidência de hérnia incisional em um grupo de pacientes acompanhados no pós-operatório da correção aberta de aneurisma de aorta abdominal. MÉTODOS: Série de casos em uma população de 144 pacientes operados por aneurisma de aorta abdominal, entre junho de 1989 e junho de 2010, e que estão em acompanhamento regular no Ambulatório de Moléstias Vasculares. RESULTADOS: O seguimento médio dos pacientes foi de 63 meses (1 a 238. A idade média foi de 67 anos (45 a 91 e o tamanho médio dos aneurismas foi de 6,54 cm. Foram realizadas 130 laparotomias medianas xifo-púbicas e 13 acessos extraperitoniais pelo flanco esquerdo. Nestes pacientes, a incidência de hérnia incisional foi de 18,5 e 7,7%, respectivamente, para incisões na linha média ou no flanco (p=0,315. Um paciente apresentou abaulamento da musculatura oblíqua por denervação. Foi realizada uma laparotomia transversa, que não apresentou hérnia no pós-operatório tardio. CONCLUSÕES: A incidência de hérnia incisional na cirurgia aberta para correção de aneurisma de aorta abdominal é alta, ocorre com maior frequência em incisões da linha média e tem relação direta com a técnica empregada para o fechamento da aponeurose, exigindo do cirurgião atenção especial para este tempo cirúrgico para evitar a causa mais comum de reoperação em tal grupo de pacientes.BACKGROUND: The incidence of incisional hernia in the post operatory of patients submitted to open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is high, ranging from 10 to 37%, and is more than three times higher than the incidence of hernias in patients operated for aorto-iliac occlusion. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence of

  1. Successful repair for a giant coronary artery aneurysm with coronary arteriovenous fistula complicated by both right- and left-sided infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Kentaro; Hanayama, Naoji; Toyama, Akihiko; Hobo, Kyoko; Takazawa, Arifumi

    2009-10-01

    We report a rare case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent an emergent lifesaving heart operation for an undiagnosed right coronary artery aneurysm with a coronary arteriovenous fistula complicated by active infective endocarditis, which affected the aortic valve, mitral valve, and coronary sinus. We performed direct closure of the coronary arteriovenous fistula, ligation of the right coronary artery aneurysm, double coronary artery bypass grafting, and double valvular replacement. Five years after the operation, she had no sign of congestive heart failure or infection, and was not receiving antibiotics.

  2. Impact of study design on outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A comparison between the randomized controlled DREAM-trial and the observational EUROSTAR-registry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can be treated by transfemoral endovascular intervention and by conventional open surgery. Level-one evidence of the safety and efficacy of one treatment mode over the other is only provided by a randomised controlled trial (RCT). Results

  3. Advances in endovascular aneurysm treatment: are we making a difference?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Jeffrey M.; Ougorets, Igor; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Biondi, Alessandra; Salvaggio, Kimberly A.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Stieg, Philip E.; Riina, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advancements in endovascular aneurysm repair, including bioactive and expansile coils and intracranial stents, hold promise for improved aneurysm occlusion rates. We report the immediate and midterm clinical and angiographic outcomes of a consecutive series of patients treated since the advent of these technologies. Clinical and radiological records of 134 patients with 142 aneurysms treated between 2001 and 2004 were retrospectively evaluated by an independent neurologist. Endovascular procedures were analyzed by an independent neuroradiologist blinded to all clinical information. Seventy-two ruptured and 60 un-ruptured saccular aneurysms, nine fusiform and one post-traumatic aneurysm were treated. Matrix coils were used in 53% of saccular aneurysms and HydroCoils in 13% of all aneurysms. Neuroform stents were deployed in 19% of aneurysms. Angiographic total or subtotal occlusion was achieved in 76% of cases and in 96% at last follow-up. Aneurysm recanalization was observed in 14% over a mean follow-up of 12 months, and 18% of aneurysms were retreated. Clinically relevant complications occurred in 6.0%, resulting in procedure-related morbidity of 0.6% and 0.6% mortality at 6 months. No aneurysm bled over a cumulative 1,347 months of observation. Newer embolization technologies can be exploited successfully even in more complex aneurysms with very low morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  4. Giant left anterior descending artery aneurysm resulting in sudden death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hee Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery aneurysm is a rare congenital or vascular inflammation-based anomaly for which the clinical course and optimal timing of treatment remain unclear. Here, we report a case of sudden death caused by a giant coronary artery aneurysm of the left anterior descending artery that presented with chest pain. This case suggests that urgent interventional or surgical repair is needed when a large coronary aneurysm presents with acute ischemic symptoms.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molony, David S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. METHODS: Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. RESULTS: Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. CONCLUSION: In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces.

  6. Management of a patient with giant aneurysms in the popliteal and coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Funda; Senarslan, Dilsad Amanvermez; Ozturk, Tulun; Tetik, Omer

    2016-04-01

    Coexistence of multiple peripheric arterial and coronary artery aneurysms of different sizes is extremely rare in young adults. We present a case of rare giant coronary aneurysm and concurrent giant left popliteal aneurysm treated with classical open repair. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  7. Small pipes: preliminary experience with 3-mm or smaller pipeline flow-diverting stents for aneurysm repair prior to regulatory approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A R; Cruz, J P; O'Kelly, C; Kelly, M; Spears, J; Marotta, T R

    2015-03-01

    Flow diversion has become an established treatment option for challenging intracranial aneurysms. The use of small devices of ≤3-mm diameter remains unapproved by major regulatory bodies. A retrospective review of patients treated with Pipeline Embolization Devices of ≤3-mm diameter at 3 Canadian institutions was conducted. Clinical and radiologic follow-up data were collected and reported. Twelve cases were treated with ≥1 Pipeline Embolization Device of ≤3-mm diameter, including 2 with adjunctive coiling, with a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 4-42 months). One patient experienced a posttreatment minor complication (8%) due to an embolic infarct. No posttreatment hemorrhage or delayed complications such as in-stent stenosis/thrombosis were observed. Radiologic occlusion was seen in 9/12 cases (75%) and near-occlusion in 2/12 cases (17%). Intracranial aneurysm treatment with small-diameter flow-diverting stents provided safe and effective aneurysm closure in this small selected sample. These devices should be further studied and considered for regulatory approval. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. New method for retrospective study of hemodynamic changes before and after aneurysm formation in patients with ruptured or unruptured aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective observation of hemodynamic changes before and after formation of brain aneurysms is often difficult. We used a vessel surface repair method to carry out a retrospective hemodynamic study before and after aneurysm formation in a ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery (RPcomAA) and an unruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery (URPcomAA). Methods Arterial geometries obtained from three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography of cerebral angiograms were used for flow simulation by employing finite-volume modeling. Hemodynamic parameters such as wall shear stress (WSS), blood-flow velocity, streamlines, pressure, and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG) in the aneurysm sac and at the site of aneurysm formation were analyzed in each model. Results At “aneurysm” status, hemodynamic analyses at the neck, body, and dome of the aneurysm revealed the distal aneurysm neck to be subjected to the highest WSS and blood-flow velocity, whereas the aneurysm dome presented the lowest WSS and blood-flow velocity in both model types. More apparent changes in WSSG at the aneurysm dome with an inflow jet and narrowed impaction zone were revealed only in the RPcomAA. At “pre-aneurysm” status, hemodynamic analyses in both models showed that the region of aneurysm formation was subjected to extremely elevated WSS, WSSG, and blood-flow velocity. Conclusions These data suggest that hemodynamic analyses in patients with ruptured or unruptured aneurysms using the vessel surface repair method are feasible, economical, and simple. Our preliminary results indicated that the arterial wall was subjected to elevated WSS, WSSG and blood-flow velocity before aneurysm generation. However, more complicated flow patterns (often with an inflow jet or narrowed impaction zone) were more likely to be observed in ruptured aneurysm. PMID:24195732

  9. Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm Associated with a Fistula Draining into the Superior Vena Cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; Ott, David A

    2016-08-01

    Giant coronary artery aneurysm associated with a coronary-cameral fistula is an uncommon condition. Such aneurysms are usually associated with other cardiac diseases, such as coronary atherosclerosis, and therefore might augment myocardial ischemia in adults. The main indications for surgical intervention are severe coexisting coronary artery disease, evidence of embolization, and aneurysmal enlargement or rupture. We describe a large right coronary artery aneurysm and a coronary-cameral fistula that drained into the superior vena cava. The surgical repair was successful.

  10. Aneurysm in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/001414.htm Aneurysm in the brain To use the sharing features on this page, ... aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm. ...

  11. Aneurysm Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  12. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm after open repair of type a aortic dissection by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of chronic type B dissection and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA remaining after the emergency reconstruction of the ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch for acute type A dissection represents one of the major surgical challenges. Complications of chronic type B dissection are aneurysmal formation and rupture of an aortic aneurysm with a high mortality rate. We presented a case of visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA secondary to chronic dissection type B after the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique due to acute type A aortic dissection in a high-risk patient. Case report. A 62 year-old woman was admitted to our institution for reconstruction of Crawford type I TAAA secondary to chronic dissection. The patient had had an acute type A aortic dissection 3 years before and undergone reconstruction by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique with valve replacement. On admission the patient had coronary artery disease (myocardial infarction, two times in the past 3 years, congestive heart disease with ejection fraction of 25% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On computed tomography (CT of the aorta TAAA was revealed with a maximum diameter of 93 mm in the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection. All the visceral arteries originated from the true lumen with exception of the celiac artery (CA, and the end of chronic dissection was below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was operated on using surgical visceral reconstruction of the SMA, CA and the right renal artery (RRA as the first procedure. Postoperative course was without complications. Endovascular TAAA reconstruction was performed as the second procedure one month later, when the elephant trunk was used as the proximal landing zone for the endograft, and distal landing zone was the level of origin of the RRA. Postoperatively, the patient had no neurological deficit and

  13. Endoleak, a specific complication of the endovascular treatment of aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    BRULS, Samuel; CREEMERS, Etienne; TROTTEUR, Geneviève; Firket, Laurent; Chauveau, R.; Magotteaux, Paul; DESIRON, Quentin; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Endoleaks represent the most common complication of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. With the increasing use of endovascular techniques for aortic aneurysm repair, the prevalence of endoleaks has risen. While maintaining pressurization of the aneurysm sac, endoleaks expose to persistent risks of an evolution towards rupture. Long-term surveillance with imaging studies is necessary to reduce the incidence of these specific complications that may require intervention. The objective of this ...

  14. Simultaneous multi-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting, ischemic mitral regurgitation repair and descending aortic aneurysm replacement: analysis of technical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, Michael; Safuanov, Alexander; Borovikov, Dmitry; Malyshev, Anton

    2008-04-01

    The combination of coronary artery disease and its complications (ischemic mitral regurgitation etc.) with the aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta is not a rare case. The single-stage correction of coronary/intracardiac/aortic lesions may be considered as a way of managing the combined patients. Simultaneous multi-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting, suture mitral annuloplasty and descending aortic aneurysm replacement with synthetic prosthesis is described. The operation was performed through the left thoracotomy with cardiopulmonary bypass established by the cannulation of the ascending aorta and of the right atrial appendage. Ventricular fibrillation and no clamping of the ascending aorta were used. The circulatory arrest was induced for the construction of the proximal anastomosis between the descending aorta and the synthetic prosthesis. No complications related to the operation were diagnosed for the 14-month follow-up. Several technical points seem optimal for the combined procedure: (1) Minimization of manipulations on the ascending aorta (using of pedicled left internal thoracic artery; construction of the proximal anastomoses with synthetic aortic prosthesis; unclamped ascending aorta). (2) Revascularization of all coronary areas and correction of intracardiac lesions through the left thoracotomy. Individual planning of the procedural technical points for every patient may provide a safe feasibility of the combined procedure.

  15. The β-d-Endoglucuronidase Heparanase Is a Danger Molecule That Drives Systemic Inflammation and Correlates with Clinical Course after Open and Endovascular Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Lessons Learnt from Mice and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is a highly lethal disorder requiring open or endovascular TAAA repair, both of which are rare, but extensive and complex surgical procedures associated with a significant systemic inflammatory response and high post-operative morbidity and mortality. Heparanase is a β-d-endoglucuronidase that remodels the endothelial glycocalyx by degrading heparan sulfate in many diseases/conditions associated with systemic inflammation including sepsis, trauma, and major surgery. We hypothesized that (a perioperative serum levels of heparanase and heparan sulfate are associated with the clinical course after open or endovascular TAAA repair and (b induce a systemic inflammatory response and renal injury/dysfunction in mice. Using a reverse-translational approach, we assessed (a the serum levels of heparanase, heparan sulfate, and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 preoperatively as well as 6 and 72 h after intensive care unit (ICU admission in patients undergoing open or endovascular TAAA repair and (b laboratory and clinical parameters and 90-day survival, and (c the systemic inflammatory response and renal injury/dysfunction induced by heparanase and heparan sulfate in mice. When compared to preoperative values, the serum levels of heparanase, heparan sulfate, and syndecan-1 significantly transiently increased within 6 h of ICU admission and returned to normal within 72 h after ICU admission. The kinetics of any observed changes in heparanase, heparan sulfate, or syndecan-1 levels, however, did not differ between open and endovascular TAAA-repair. Postoperative heparanase levels positively correlated with noradrenalin dose at 12 h after ICU admission and showed a high predictive value of vasopressor requirements within the first 24 h. Postoperative heparan sulfate showed a strong positive correlation with interleukin-6 levels day 0, 1, and 2 post-ICU admission and a strong negative correlation with

  16. Risk factors for incisional hernia repair after aortic reconstructive surgery in a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Nadia A; Helgstrand, Frederik; Vogt, Katja C

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm disease has been hypothesized as associated with the development of abdominal wall hernia. We evaluated the risk factors for incisional hernia repair after open elective aortic reconstructive surgery for aortoiliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm....

  17. Thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with an extensively "shaggy" aorta repaired anatomically via a thoracoabdominal approach with supraceliac aortic clamping: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satofumi; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Morioka, Koichi; Yamada, Narihisa; Takamori, Atsushi; Handa, Mitsuteru; Ihaya, Akio; Sasaki, Masato; Ikeda, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    A 76-year-old man with a history of multiple laparotomies and severe coronary artery disease was referred to our hospital after the sudden development of pain and numbness in the lower extremities. Computed tomography showed a thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm and diffuse aortic atherosclerosis; compatible with a "shaggy aorta." A good response to thrombolytic therapy permitted elective scheduling of abdominal aortic surgery after coronary artery bypass grafting. We operated via an extended left retroperitoneal approach through a thoracoabdominal incision. Epiaortic ultrasonography revealed that only the supraceliac aorta was free of mobile thrombi and had minimal plaque; we therefore placed a proximal aortic cross-clamp there. Anatomic aortic reconstruction was then performed successfully using an aorto-biiliac graft to restore adequate distal blood flow. There were no vital-organ ischemic complications, and the postoperative course was satisfactory.

  18. Case report: rupture of popliteal artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altino Ono Moraes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old female patient with a history of prior endovascular treatment to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm presented with intense pain and edema in the left leg, with hyperemia and localized temperature increase. Doppler ultrasonography revealed a voluminous aneurysm of the popliteal artery with a contained rupture, and hematoma involving the popliteal fossa and the medial and anterior surfaces of the knee causing compression of the popliteal vein. Endovascular repair was accomplished with covered stents and the rupture was confirmed. during the procedure The aneurysm was excluded and the signs and symptoms it had caused resolved completely, but during the postoperative period the patient developed sepsis of pulmonary origin and died.

  19. An 18-cm unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M. Droz, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a significant source of morbidity and ranked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the 15th leading cause of death among adults aged 60 to 64 years. Size confers the largest risk factor for aneurysm rupture, with aneurysms >6 cm having an annual rupture risk of 14.1%. We present the case of a 60-year-old man found on ultrasound imaging at a health fair screening to have a 15-cm AAA. Follow-up computed tomography angiography revealed an 18-cm × 10-cm unruptured, infrarenal, fusiform AAA. Giant AAAs, defined as >11 cm, are rarely described in the literature. Our patient underwent successful transperitoneal AAA repair with inferior mesenteric artery reimplantation and was discharged home on operative day 6. We believe this case represents one of the largest unruptured AAAs in the literature and demonstrates the feasible approach for successful repair.

  20. [Surgical Treatment of Left Main Trunk Coronary Artery Aneurysm with Asymptomatic Myocardial Ischemia;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugi, Satoshi; Saito, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Etsuji; Takiguchi, Yoji

    2017-05-01

    Coronary artery aneurysm is rare, and there is no established protocol for surgical indication. On preoperative examination of orthopedic surgery, a 76-year-old male was found with asymptomatic myocardial ischemia. Radiological examinations revealed triple vessel disease and a coronary artery aneurysm, 10 mm in size, at the bifurcation of the left main trunk. Combined with quintuple coronary artery bypass grafting, surgical repair of the aneurysm was peformed under cardiopulmonary bypass on beating heart. Epicardial echocardiography was used to detect the site and the blood flow on the aneurysm. Postoperative course was uneventful. Epicardial echocardiography was useful for detecting the coronary artery aneurysm in the myocardium and the residual aneurysmal blood flow.

  1. Early Enlargement of Aneurysmal Sac and Separation of EndoBags of Nellix Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing System as Signs of Increased Risk of Later Aneurysm Rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lik Fai, E-mail: rickieclf@yahoo.com.hk [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Cheung, Kwok Fai; Chan, Kwong Man [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Surgery (China); Ma, Johnny Ka Fai; Luk, Wing Hang [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Chan, Micah Chi King [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Surgery (China); Ng, Carol Wing Kei; Mahboobani, Neeraj Ramesh [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Ng, Wai Kin [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Surgery (China); Wong, Ting [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiology (China)

    2016-11-15

    Nellix Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing (EVAS) system is a new concept and technology of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Elective EVAS using Nellix device was performed for a 83-year-old man with AAA. 2-month post-EVAS CTA surveillance demonstrated mild enlargement of aneurysmal sac and separation of the EndoBags, but without detectable endoleak. The patient developed sudden AAA rupture with retroperitoneal hematoma at about 4 months after EVAS. We postulated that early enlargement of aneurysmal sac and separation of EndoBags of Nellix devices after EVAS, even without detectable endoleak, might indicate significant aneurysmal wall weakening with increased risk of later AAA rupture. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this was the first reported case of aortic rupture after EVAS without detectable endoleak during and after the procedure.

  2. Correção cirúrgica do aneurisma roto do seio de Valsalva: relato de dois casos Surgical repair of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourival BONATELLI FILHO

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é relatar a técnica cirúrgica empregada na correção de aneurisma do seio de Valsalva roto para dentro do ventrículo direito, em 2 pacientes adultos, tendo um deles, concomitantemente, leve coarctação da aorta. No primeiro caso, mulher de 22 anos com dispnéia progressiva, cuja avaliação ecocardiográfica revelou rotura do aneurisma do seio de Valsalva para dentro do ventrículo direito e coarctação da aorta leve, com gradiente de 25 mmHg. O cateterismo cardíaco confirmou o diagnóstico. No segundo caso, homem de 35 anos, com piora de dispnéia há 2 meses. Ecocardiograma e cateterismo cardíaco confirmaram o diagnóstico de aneurisma roto do seio de Valsalva para o ventrículo direito. Ambos foram operados através de esternotomia mediana; circulação extracorpórea convencional e cardioplegia sangüínea fria. No primeiro caso a valva aórtica era bivalvulada, com o aneurisma do seio de Valsalva anterior, relacionado à coronária direita, roto para dentro do VD, medindo 6 mm de diâmetro, foi fechado com sutura direta com fio 5-0. No segundo caso a valva aórtica era trivalvulada e o aneurisma do seio de Valsalva direito que rompeu, também, dentro do VD, media 12 mm de diâmetro e o fechamento foi feito com retalho de pericárdio bovino, suturado com pontos separados de polipropileno 5-0. Ambos os pacientes tiveram evolução pós-operatória sem intercorrências. Alta hospitalar ao final de uma semana. No controle ambulatorial, 120 e 60 dias após, respectivamente, estavam assintomáticos.The purpose of this article is to report the surgical treatment of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms in two patients. First case was a young woman whose aneurysm originated in the right sinus and entered the right ventricle, besides a mild coarctation of the aorta. Surgical repair was carried out using cardiopulmonary bypass with moderate hypothermia. After aortotomy the ruptured sinus of Valsalva was directly closed

  3. Endovascular management performed percutaneously of isolated iliac artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Florian; Loewe, Christian; Cejna, Manfred; Schoder, Maria; Rand, Thomas; Kettenbach, Joachim; Dirisamer, Albert; Lammer, Johannes; Funovics, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report about the endovascular treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IIAA) with stentgraft placement and transluminal or CT-guided embolization of the internal iliac artery or the combination of these methods. Methods and materials: Over a period of 5.6 years, 36 interventions were performed in 20 patients with 23 IIAAs. In a retrospective analysis patient records were reviewed. The CT-angiography follow-up was evaluated for the presence of re-perfusion of the IIAA and for change of aneurysm diameter. Results: Primary success was achieved in 15/23 aneurysms (65%), and secondary success in 21/23 aneurysms (91%). In 5/23 cases two interventions and in 1/23 cases three interventions were necessary to achieve secondary success. Embolization alone, as a therapy for aneurysms involving only the internal iliac artery, had a success rate of 27%. No procedure-related minor or major complications occurred. Mean decrease of aneurysm size during a mean observation period of 14.1 months was 6.9% which was not significant (p = 0.3; 95% confidence interval +7-21%). Conclusion: Endovascular therapy of isolated iliac artery aneurysms performed percutaneously has become a treatment alternative to open surgical repair. This method is feasible and safe with low procedure-related morbidity and mortality. However, on average more than one intervention has to be performed to achieve successful permanent exclusion of the aneurysm and embolization alone in isolated internal iliac artery aneurysms is not sufficient

  4. Self-efficacy is an independent predictor for postoperative six-minute walk distance after elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Shimizu, Miho; Tsuchikawa, Yohei; Kodama, Akio; Komori, Kimihiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2018-05-01

    Open surgery is performed to treat abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), although the subsequent surgical stress leads to worse physical status. Preoperative self-efficacy has been reported to predict postoperative physical status after orthopedic surgery; however, it has not been sufficiently investigated in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the correlation between preoperative self-efficacy and postoperative six-minute walk distance (6MWD) in open AAA surgery. Seventy patients who underwent open AAA surgery were included. Functional exercise capacity was measured using preoperative and 1 week postoperative 6MWD. Self-efficacy was preoperatively measured using self-efficacy for physical activity (SEPA). The correlations of postoperative 6MWD with age, height, BMI, preoperative 6MWD, SEPA, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) score, operative time, and blood loss were investigated using multivariate analysis. Single regression analysis showed that postoperative 6MWD was significantly correlated with age (r = -0.553, p ≤ 0.001), height (r = 0.292, p = 0.014), Charlson's comorbidity index (r = -0.268, p = 0.025), preoperative 6MWD (r = 0.572, p ≤ 0.001), SEPA (r = 0.586, p ≤ 0.001), and HADS-depression (r = -0.296, p = 0.013). Multiple regression analysis showed that age (p = 0.002), preoperative 6MWD (p = 0.013), and SEPA (p = 0.043) score were significantly correlated with postoperative 6MWD. Self-efficacy was an independent predictor for postoperative 6MWD after elective open AAA surgery. This suggests the importance of assessing not only physical status but also psychological factors such as self-efficacy. Implications for Rehabilitation Preoperative self-efficacy has been limited to reports after orthopedic surgery. We showed that preoperative self-efficacy predicted postoperative 6MWD after AAA surgery. Treatment to improve self

  5. History, Evolution, and Continuing Innovations of Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Leon T; O'Neill, Anthea H

    2017-06-01

    Evolution in the surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms is driven by the need to refine and innovate. From an early application of the Hunterian carotid ligation to modern-day sophisticated aneurysm clip designs, progress has been made through dedication and technical maturation of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons to overcome challenges in their practices. The global expansion of endovascular services has challenged the existence of aneurysm surgery, changing the complexity of the aneurysm case mix and volume that are referred for surgical repair. Concepts of how to best treat intracranial aneurysms have evolved over generations and will continue to do so with further technological innovations. As with the evolution of any type of surgery, innovations frequently arise from the criticism of current techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Technical Considerations of Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Barr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant coronary artery aneurysms are rare clinical entities. We report the case of a 49-year-old man who presented with dyspnoea and exertional chest pain. Investigations confirmed an aneurysmal right coronary artery measuring 4 cm with a fistulous communication to the right atrium. Following right atriotomy, the fistula was oversewn and the aneurysmal right coronary artery ligated at its origin and at several points along its course. A saphenous vein graft was anastomosed to the posterior descending artery. Persistent ventricular fibrillation occurred upon chest closure, attributed to ischaemia following ligation of the aneurysmal coronary artery. Emergent resternotomy and internal defibrillation were successfully performed. The sternum was stented open to reduce right ventricular strain and closed the following day. The patient made an unremarkable recovery. We here address the technical challenges associated with surgical repair of right coronary aneurysms and the physiology and management of potential complications.

  7. Self-Expandable Stent for Repairing Coarctation of the Left-Circumferential Aortic Arch with Right-sided Descending Aorta and Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery with Kommerell's Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajali, Zahra; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Mohebbi, Bahram; Aeinfar, Kamran; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular treatment offers a great advantage in the management of main arteries stenoses. However, simultaneous presence of a group of anomalies may complicate the situation. Here we present a case of 21-year-old man with aortic coarctation. Radiographic imaging and angiography demonstrated aortic coarctation of the left-circumferential aortic arch, right-sided descending aorta, and Kommerell's diverticulum at the origin of right subclavian artery. These anomalies have rarely been reported to concurrently exist in the same case and the treatment is challenging. Percutaneous treatment for repair of aortic coarctation was successfully performed with deployment of self-expanding nitinol stents. Follow-up demonstrated the correction of blood pressure and improvement of the symptoms. It appears that deployment of self-expandable nitinol stents present a viable option for the management of coarcted aorta in patients having all or some of these anomalies together. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Serratia liquefaciens Infection of a Previously Excluded Popliteal Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coelho

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs are rare in the general population, but they account for nearly 70% of peripheral arterial aneurysms. There are several possible surgical approaches including exclusion of the aneurysm and bypass grafting, or endoaneurysmorrhaphy and interposition of a prosthetic conduit. The outcomes following the first approach are favorable, but persistent blood flow in the aneurysm sac has been documented in up to one third of patients in the early post-operative setting. Complications from incompletely excluded aneurysms include aneurysm enlargement, local compression symptoms, and sac rupture. Notably infection of a previously excluded and bypassed PAA is rare. This is the third reported case of PAA infection after exclusion and bypass grafting and the first due to Serratia liquefaciens. Methods: Relevant medical data were collected from the hospital database. Results: This case report describes a 54 year old male patient, diagnosed with acute limb ischaemia due to a thrombosed PAA, submitted to emergency surgery with exclusion and venous bypass. A below the knee amputation was necessary 3 months later. Patient follow-up was lost until 7 years following surgical repair, when he was diagnosed with aneurysm sac infection with skin fistulisation. He had recently been diagnosed with alcoholic hepatic cirrhosis Child–Pugh Class B. The patient was successfully treated by aneurysm resection, soft tissue debridement and systemic antibiotics. Conclusion: PAA infection is a rare complication after exclusion and bypass procedures but should be considered in any patient with evidence of local or systemic infection. When a PAA infection is diagnosed, aneurysmectomy, local debridement, and intravenous antibiotic therapy are recommended. The “gold standard” method of PAA repair remains controversial. PAA excision or endoaneurysmorrhaphy avoids complications from incompletely excluded aneurysms, but is associated with

  9. Spontaneous isolated true aneurysms of the brachial artery in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A. Hirji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are rare, and have been previously reported in children to be associated with congenital malformations and infectious or inflammatory processes. In this case series, we present two unique cases of spontaneous isolated true aneurysms of the brachial artery in two children. Both cases were incidentally found on examination, diagnosed by ultrasonography, and successfully managed by surgical excision and micro-vascular repair with vein grafting.

  10. Brain Aneurysm Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We realized … Continue Reading View More Research From the Blog Depression Following Aneurysm November 11, 2017 05/29/15 Depression Following a Brain Aneurysm by Stanley J. Berman, PhD Some patients will experience depression following a brain aneurysm. This is certainly ...

  11. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm results in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a subtype of stroke with an incidence of 9 per 100,000 person-years and a case-fatality around 35%. In order to prevent SAH, patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be treated by neurosurgical or

  12. Surgical treatment of peripheral artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcivan, Muzaffer; Keceligil, H Tahsin; Kolbakir, Fersat; Gol, M Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial aneurysms (PAA) may rupture, cause emboli and ischemia, and local symptoms due to compression. A total of 109 patients who underwent surgery for PAA were analyzed retrospectively, including clinical presentation, surgical procedures used, and postoperative follow-up data obtained 10 days after discharge. True aneurysm was present in 59 (54.1%) patients and pseudoaneurysm in 50 (45.9%). The femoral artery was the most common location. The surgical procedures used were as follows: graft interposition in 31 patients, bypass with synthetic or autologous grafts in 33 patients, aneurysm ligation in 5 patients, primary repair in 41 patients, and patch angioplasty reconstruction in 7 patients. One patient died as a result of massive hemorrhage. In four patients, amputation had to be performed. It is possible to prevent amputation and other complications, including mortality, during the surgical treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic PAA.

  13. Diagnosis and management of aortic mycotic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Luis R; Mills, Joseph L

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed all papers most recently reported in the literature (January-December 2008) with regard to infected arterial aneurysms (IAAs) affecting the aorta. Most of the recently reported knowledge is limited to case reports and small series of aortic mycotic aneurysms. Most patients are elderly men and have comorbidities at presentation. Aneurysms were most commonly associated to Salmonella and Staphylococcus. However, several cases of aortic IAAs caused by atypical pathogens were also reported, likely due to an increase in immunosuppressive illnesses, increased life expectancy, improved diagnostic methods, and increasing medical awareness. Open surgical therapy of IAAs remains the gold standard. Some have reported successful outcomes with endovascular methodologies for patients medically compromised or for particular challenging clinical or anatomical scenarios. However, at this time, conclusive evidence is lacking and it should be in general considered a bridge to open repair. The latter should be planned at the earliest possible, when medically permissible.

  14. A novel flow diverter(Tubridge) for the treatment of recurrent aneurysms: A single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong Xin; Huang, Qing Hai; Fang, Yibin; Yang, Peng Fei; Xu, Yi; Hong Bo; Liu, Jian Min [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2017-09-15

    The Tubridge flow diverter (FD) is a novel device aimed at reconstructing the parent artery and occluding complex aneurysms. Retreatment of recurrent aneurysms using the FD is challenging. We report our initial experience in the repair of aneurysm recurrence with the FD. A database was reviewed prospectively, and 8 patients with 8 recurrent aneurysms (mean size, 16.7 mm) were identified. Four aneurysms had previously ruptured. The previous aneurysm treatment consisted of coiling in 1 aneurysm and single-stent-assisted coiling in 7 aneurysms. The procedural complications and clinical and angiographic outcomes were analyzed. Six aneurysms were treated by using a single Tubridge FD alone, while the remaining 2 were treated with FD + coiling. The immediate results of the 8 aneurysms were that they all showed incomplete occlusion. Neither major ischemic nor hemorrhagic complications occurred; however, 1 patient experienced a vasospasm. Follow-up angiographies were available for 7 aneurysms; the mean follow-up was 16.9 months (7–36 months). Five aneurysms were completely occluded, whereas 2 had a residual neck. Severe asymptomatic stenosis of 1 parent artery of a vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm was found. All visible branches covered by the FD were patent. All patients were clinically assessed as having attained a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤ 2) at discharge and follow-up. In selected patients, the Tubridge FD can provide a safe and efficient option for the retreatment of recurrent aneurysms. Nevertheless, attention should be paid to several technical points.

  15. Segmentation and motion estimation of stent grafts in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Almar

    2011-01-01

    Patients with an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm have a high risk of dying due to the rupture of a dilated aorta. Endovascular aneurysm repair is a technique to threat AAA, by which a stent graft prosthesis is implanted in the aorta of the patient. Due to its minimal invasive character, this intervention

  16. Management and outcomes of isolated renal artery aneurysms in the endovascular era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B; Curran, Thomas; McCallum, John C; Darling, Jeremy; Mamtani, Rishi; van Herwaarden, JA|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814733; Moll, Frans L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070246882; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Isolated renal artery aneurysms are rare, and controversy remains about indications for surgical repair. Little is known about the impact of endovascular therapy on selection of patients and outcomes of renal artery aneurysms. METHODS: We identified all patients undergoing open or

  17. Vilistlasküsimus: Kes endistest õpetajatest on olnud sulle elus eeskujuks? / Aino Arro, Kersti Luha, Evar Ojasaar ...[jt.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Küsimusele vastavad Väike-Maarja Gümnaasiumi vilistlased: 41. lennu lõpetanu Aino Arro, 73. lennu lõpetanu Kersti Luha, 73. lennu lõpetanu Evar Ojasaar, 76. lennu lõpetanu Nele Münter-Trušin ja 80. lennu lõpetanu Arnis Alt

  18. Automatic segmentation of the wire frame of stent grafts from CT data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Oostveen, L.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Renema, W.K.J.; Slump, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular aortic replacement (EVAR) is an established technique, which uses stent grafts to treat aortic aneurysms in patients at risk of aneurysm rupture. Late stent graft failure is a serious complication in endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms. Better understanding of the motion

  19. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm treated with surgical correction and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George; Nwakanma, Lois; Conte, John

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm is a rare clinical entity, and therefore the natural course and clinical management are not well established. We present the case of an elderly woman with a symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm who underwent surgical repair along with simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting. With long-term follow-up presented in this report, we describe the safety and durability of surgical repair.

  20. Hepatic artery aneurysms (HAAs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosratini, H.

    2004-01-01

    The hepatic artery aneurysms are rare, especially in interahepatic branches, The frequency consists of 75-80% extrahepatic and 20-25% intrahepatic. Catheterization is achieved usually from common femoral artery, other methods implemented in the case of unsuccessful catheterization from femoral artery, are translumbar and brachial catheterization. The study consist of 565 patients that were referred to the angiography ward, During seven years of assessment, five cases of hepatic artery aneurysm were found; this is a rare condition reported in the English literature. In the literature as well as in this case report the hepatic artery aneurysms are rare. In reported series the extrahepatic artery aneurysms are found more often than in the intrahepatic artery aneurysm but in this case report intrahepatic artery aneurysms are more than extrahepatic one. (author)

  1. Plasmatic vasopressin in patients undergoing conventional infra-renal abdominal aorta aneurysm repair Vasopressina plasmática em pacientes submetidos à correção de aneurisma de aorta infrarrenal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Camargo Carvalho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate plasmatic arginine vasopressin (AVP levels in patients undergoing scheduled conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair. METHODS: Plasmatic AVP concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay in 22 non-consecutive adult patients undergoing infra-renal AAA repair. They were under combined general and epidural anesthesia at the following time frames: 1 - pre-operative (T0; 2 - 2h (T1 and 6h (T2 after the surgical procedure; 3 - in the morning at the first (T3, second (T4 and third (T5 post-operative days. Some clinical and laboratory variables were also recorded. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 68±10 years; 17 were males. Plasmatic AVP (mean±SD; pg/mL was within the normal range at T0 (1.4±0.7; baseline, increasing significantly at T1 (62.6±62.9; POBJETIVOS: Avaliar os níveis plasmáticos de vasopressina (AVP em pacientes submetidos à correção convencional de aneurisma de aorta abdominal (AAA. MÉTODOS: A AVP plasmática foi mensurada por radioimunoensaio em 22 pacientes não-consecutivos submetidos à correção eletiva de AAA infrarrenal sob anestesia geral + epidural nos seguintes momentos: pré-operatório (T0; 2h (T1 e 6h (T2 após a cirurgia; e nas manhãs do primeiro (T3, segundo (T4 e terceiro (T5 dia pós-operatório (PO. Variáveis clínicas e laboratoriais de interesse também foram anotadas. RESULTADOS: A média de idade dos pacientes foi de 68±10 anos, sendo 17 homens. A AVP plasmática (média±DP; pg/ mL estava dentro de limites normais no T0 (1,4±0,7; basal, aumentando no T1 (62,6±62,9; P<0,001 e no T2 (31,5±49,7; P<0,001, e retornando aos valores basais no T5 (2,1±3,8; P=NS. Correlações positivas e significativas foram encontradas entre a AVP e glicemia, lactato sérico e leucócitos sanguíneos, mas não com a pressão arterial sistêmica ou com a osmolaridade plasmática no PO. CONCLUSÕES: Na cirurgia de reparação de AAA, considerando que nenhuma correlação foi encontrada

  2. Staged Management of a Ruptured Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Young Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rupture of an internal mammary artery (IMA aneurysm in a patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1 is a rare but life-threatening complication requiring emergency management. A 50-year-old man with NF-1 was transferred to the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital, where an IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were diagnosed and drained. The IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were successfully repaired by staged management combining endovascular treatment and subsequent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS. The patient required cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation, the staged management of coil embolization, and a subsequent VATS procedure. This staged approach may be an effective therapeutic strategy in cases of IMA aneurysmal rupture.

  3. Endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for isolated iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Masato; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mid-term outcomes of endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). Between January 2002 and March 2010, 20 patients (7 women and 13 men; mean age 74 years) underwent endovascular repair of 22 isolated IAAs. Two patients underwent endovascular repair for bilateral aneurysms. Ten para-anastomotic aneurysms (45%) developed after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair with an aorto-iliac graft, and 12 were true aneurysms (55%). Eleven straight and 11 tapered stent-grafts were placed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was performed to detect complications and evaluate aneurysmal shrinkage at week 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and once every year thereafter. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed in seven patients with chronic kidney disease. All procedures were successful, without serious complications, during the mean (range) follow-up period of 746 days (47-2651). Type II endoleak not requiring treatment was noted in one patient. The mean (SD) diameters of the true and para-anastomotic aneurysms significantly (p IAAs is safe and efficacious. Tapered stent-grafts of various sizes are required for accurate placement.

  4. Fortsat behov for både endovaskulær og åben kirurgisk behandling af abdominalt aortaaneurisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Jensen, Leif Panduro

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be treated by open surgical repair or by endovascular repair (EVAR) - a less invasive procedure, with lower 30-day mortality and morbidity rates. Twelve studies have been evaluated. The results indicate that for large aneurysms > 5.5 cm, EVAR can be recommended...... for patients with intermediate to high operative risk. For younger patients, with low operative risk, OR is the preferred method, in light of the continued small risk of rupture after EVAR and the need for lifelong surveillance....

  5. Sex-related differences in patients treated surgically for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Sex-related differences were examined in the clinical course of patients treated surgically for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retrospective analyses were carried out to evaluate sex-related differences in aneurysm location, aneurysm size, preoperative neurological condition, preoperative computed tomography findings, and outcome among 2577 patients who underwent surgical repair of ruptured aneurysms. The internal carotid artery was most frequently affected in women and the anterior cerebral artery in men. Intracerebral or intraventricular hematoma was more common in men than in women. Some differences may be related to the location of the aneurysm. Sex-related differences were prominent in the 5th decade of life. These findings might be related to the menopause. Sex hormones may be involved in aneurysm formation. (author)

  6. Estudo comparativo entre tratamento endovascular e cirurgia convencional na correção eletiva de aneurisma de aorta abdominal: revisão bibliográfica Endovascular elective treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm versus conventional open repair: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina P. Simão

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento eletivo do aneurisma de aorta abdominal é recomendado pela alta morbiletalidade decorrente da eventual ruptura. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar o reparo endovascular eletivo com a cirurgia aberta e avaliar as mortalidades hospitalar e perioperatória, em 1 ano, por todas as causas e relacionadas ao aneurisma, a permanência hospitalar, as complicações, as taxas de sobrevida, conversão e reintervenção, a durabilidade do enxerto, o custo-benefício e a relação desses dados com o treinamento da equipe médica responsável pelo tratamento. Realizou-se uma revisão da literatura sobre reparo endovascular versus cirurgia convencional. Foram observados vantagem na sobrevivência perioperatória e menor estresse pós-cirúrgico; no entanto, os benefícios iniciais são perdidos por complicações e reintervenções tardias. Trabalhos baseados nas primeiras gerações de endopróteses superestimam as taxas de mortalidade em curto prazo, complicações e reintervenções. A durabilidade do enxerto, a real vantagem na sobrevida e o custo-benefício são incertos, e outros estudos são necessários para o seguimento em longo prazo.The elective treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is recommended due to the high morbidity and mortality of a possible rupture. The objective of this study was to compare the elective endovascular aneurysm repair with open repair and to analyze the in-hospital and perioperative mortality rate during 1 year related to all causes and to the aneurysm, as well as the postoperative length of hospital stay, complications, survival rates, conversion and reintervention, graft durability, cost-benefit ratio, and relation with the medical team’s experience. A review of the scientific literature about endovascular versus open repair was carried out. We found a higher rate of perioperative survival and less postoperative stress; nevertheless, the initial benefits were lost due to late complications and

  7. Headache, cerebral aneurysms, and the use of triptans and ergot derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the correlation between unruptured cerebral aneurysms and their role in headache etiology. It is also unclear whether surgical endovascular treatment may improve or worsen the headache, and if there are predictable factors for headache outcome such as pre-existing headache features, aneurysm characteristics, or other medical history. There is debate regarding safe treatment of migraine in patients with aneurysms, both before and after endovascular treatments. Particularly, there is hesitancy to use the triptans and ergot derivatives such as dihydroergotamine because of their vasoconstrictive effects and concern for adverse events related to the aneurysm such as aneurysmal instability and rupture. To review the literature regarding the anatomy, pathophysiology, and association between headache, untreated vs surgically treated aneurysms, and the use of triptans and ergot derivatives for migraine treatment in this setting. Associations between some headaches and aneurysms may exist. Some chronic headaches may respond to surgical aneurysm repair while others may worsen. These associations are undefined by current literature because of variable results, study methods, and limited data. Prospective studies are needed which incorporate pre- and post-procedure headache character and diagnosis, aneurysm characteristics, type of aneurysm repair, associated risk factors for worsening post-procedure headache, and ultimately combining all of these data to better predict headache outcome following surgical aneurysm treatment. Lastly, the caution and avoidance of triptan and ergot derivative use for migraine in the setting of aneurysm is not supported by the current evidence, and much of this concern may be excessive and unwarranted, although more evidence confirming safety is needed. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  8. Erosion of elephant trunk Dacron graft limb by thoracic endograft causing acute aneurysm expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, John W; McCready, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    We recently treated a patient in whom a Gore TAG thoracic endograft (W.L. Gore and Assoc, Flagstaff, Arix) had been used to repair a descending thoracic aneurysm as the second stage of a hybrid procedure. This patient had previously undergone repair of ascending and aortic arch aneurysms, with an elephant trunk graft limb placed in the descending thoracic aorta for subsequent repair of the descending thoracic aneurysm. Eight months after placement of the thoracic endograft, the patient presented with an acutely expanding and symptomatic thoracic aneurysm. The patient was operated on urgently. The proximal portion of the endograft had eroded into the previously placed Dacron elephant trunk limb. The proximal portion of the endograft was removed and was replaced with a Dacron graft. The management of this patient forms the basis of this report.

  9. Surgical treatment of innominate artery and aortic aneurysm: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Erdinc; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Anagnostakou, Vania; Tassopoulos, Dimitris; Charitos, Christos; Kokotsakis, John; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-06-01

    Innominate artery (IA) aneurysms represent 3% of all arterial aneurysms. Due to the risk of thromboembolic complications and spontaneous rupture, surgical repair is usually recommended on an early elective basis. We present the case of 81-year-old Caucasian male presenting with atypical anterior chest pain secondary to a large innominate artery aneurysm who underwent successful open surgical repair at our institution. In our experience, open correction via median sternotomy with extension into the right neck provides excellent exposure and facilitates rapid reconstruction with good short and long-term outcomes. Minimally invasive and endovascular approaches provide emerging alternatives to open IA aneurysm repair, however further research is required to better define optimal patient selection criteria and determine the long-term outcomes of these novel therapies.

  10. Atherosclerotic femoral artery aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    Based on a clinical suspicion of an increase in the proportion of deep femoral aneurysms, we reviewed the case records of patients who underwent reconstructive procedures for femoral aneurysms to investigate if this could be confirmed and explained by selection of patient or modality of diagnosis...

  11. [False iatrogenic aneurysm complicating septic malunion of the femur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yazidi, A; Lahtaoui, A; Berrada, M S; Amezziane, L; El Yaacoubi, M; El Manouar, M

    2000-09-01

    We report a case of false iatrogenic aneurism of the femoral artery observed after external fixation for septic malunion of the femur subsequent to emergency plate fixation. This false aneurysm ruptured, requiring femoropopliteal arterial repair. In the septic context, the vascular sutures failed making it necessary to ligature the femoral artery. Vascularization was maintained by satisfactory collateral circulation.

  12. Acquired Jugular Vein Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopsu, Erkki; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Vento, Seija I.; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Venous malformations of the jugular veins are rare findings. Aneurysms and phlebectasias are the lesions most often reported. We report on an adult patient with an abruptly appearing large tumorous mass on the left side of the neck identified as a jugular vein aneurysm. Upon clinical examination with ultrasound, a lateral neck cyst was primarily suspected. Surgery revealed a saccular aneurysm in intimate connection with the internal jugular vein. Histology showed an organized hematoma inside the aneurysmal sac, which had a focally thinned muscular layer. The terminology and the treatment guidelines of venous dilatation lesions are discussed. For phlebectasias, conservative treatment is usually recommended, whereas for saccular aneurysms, surgical resection is the treatment of choice. While an exact classification based on etiology and pathophysiology is not possible, a more uniform taxonomy would clarify the guidelines for different therapeutic modalities for venous dilatation lesions. PMID:20107571

  13. Estudo prospectivo da morbi-mortalidade precoce e tardia da cirurgia do aneurisma da aorta abdominal Prospective study of early and late morbidity and mortality in the abdominal aortic aneurysm surgical repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine C. de Carvalho

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar, prospectivamente, a morbidade e mortalidade precoce e tardia de pacientes submetidos a correção cirúrgica eletiva de aneurisma de aorta abdominal infra-renal e determinar os preditores independentes de eventos cardiológicos. MÉTODOS: Estudados 130 pacientes durante seis anos consecutivos, submetidos a rotina de avaliação pré-operatória padronizada e cirúrgica, sempre pela mesma equipe clínica, cirúrgica e anestesiológica. RESULTADOS: A mortalidade hospitalar foi de 3,1% (4 pacientes, sendo a principal causa de óbito isquemia mesentérica, ocorrida em três pacientes. Houve 48 (37% complicações não-operatórias, 8,5% consistiram em complicações cardíacas e 28,5% em complicações não cardíacas. As complicações pulmonares foram as mais comuns, ocorridas em 14 (10,8% pacientes. A sobrevida no 1º, 3º e 6º ano pós-operatório foi, respectivamente, de 95%, 87% e 76%. As variáveis que se correlacionaram significativamente com a morbimortalidade foram preditor clínico, idade média de 70,5 anos, presença de insuficiência cardíaca e insuficiência renal crônica. Não foi identificado nenhum preditor de morbimortalidade tardia. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar de ser uma cirurgia considerada de alta complexidade, a mortalidade é baixa, as complicações cardíacas são de pequena monta e os pacientes apresentam boa evolução a longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: To prospectively assess early and late morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing elective surgical repair of abdominal infrarenal aortic aneurysms and to determine the independent predictors of cardiac events. METHODS: For 6 consecutive years, this study analyzed 130 patients, who underwent routine standardized preoperative assessment always with the same clinical, surgical, and anesthesia teams. RESULTS: In-hospital mortality was 3.1% (4 patients, and the major cause of death was mesenteric ischemia, which occurred in 3 patients. Forty-eight (37% nonsurgical

  14. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Nov ... About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis and Symptoms Damage Treatments What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a ...

  15. Posterior non-ischemic left ventricular aneurysm. Report of 2 surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioulias, A G; Kokotsakis, J N; Skouteli, E A T; Boulafendis, D G

    2002-12-01

    Posterior non-ischemic left ventricular aneurysms are unusual aneurysms of different etiology that develop adjacent to the mitral valve annulus causing mitral regurgitation and progressive heart failure. Surgical correction is mandatory and involves repair of the aneurysm along with repair or replacement of the mitral valve. Two cases of posterior non-ischemic left ventricular aneurysms are reported. Both patients were females (19 and 9 years old) and they presented with symptoms of progressive heart failure. Definite diagnosis was made with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and confirmed with left ventriculography. Both patients were successfully treated by surgery. The first patient underwent repair of the aneurysm from inside the left ventricle and mitral valve replacement. The second patient had resection of the aneurysm through an extracardiac route. Both patients are in NYHA class 1, 5 and 4 years respectively after their operation with no evidence of mitral valve dysfunction. Posterior non-ischemic left ventricular aneurysms can securely be diagnosed by TEE and angiocardiography. Surgical treatment is mandatory in order to forestall potential life threatening cardiovascular events and should be tailored to the operative findings.

  16. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms.

  17. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential circulating biomarkers for abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion and rupture--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Urbonaviciene, Grazina; Honoré, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    The maximal diameter of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is the dominating indication for repair. However half of the AAAs repaired would never have ruptured if left unrepaired, although small AAAs occasionally rupture. Earlier surgery may be associated with a lower mortality. More precise indic...

  19. Tratamento endovascular do aneurisma da aorta abdominal infrarrenal em pacientes com anatomia favorável para o procedimento: experiência inicial em um serviço universitário Endovascular treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients with favorable anatomy for the repair: initial experience in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manoel da Silva Silvestre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Desde sua introdução, em 1991, o reparo endovascular do aneurisma da aorta abdominal infrarrenal tem se tornado uma alternativa atraente para o tratamento dessa doença. Avaliar nossos resultados iniciais quanto à segurança e eficácia dessa técnica nos levou à realização deste estudo. OBJETIVOS: Analisar a mortalidade perioperatória, a sobrevida tardia, as reoperações, as taxas de perviedade e o comportamento do saco aneurismático em pacientes com anatomia favorável para a realização do procedimento. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo longitudinal, observacional e retrospectivo realizado entre outubro de 2004 e janeiro de 2009 com 41 pacientes que foram submetidos à correção endovascular do aneurisma de aorta abdominal infrarrenal por apresentarem anatomia favorável para o procedimento. Foram analisados os achados dos exames diagnósticos, o tratamento e o seguimento em todos os pacientes. RESULTADOS: Foram implantadas, com sucesso, 31 (75,6% próteses bifurcadas e 10 (24,5% monoilíacas, de 5 diferentes marcas. O diâmetro médio dos aneurismas fusiformes era de 62 mm. A mortalidade perioperatória foi de 4,8% e a sobrevida tardia, 90,2%. Durante o acompanhamento médio de 30 meses, 2 (4,8% pacientes necessitaram de reintervenção, um por migração da endoprótese e outro por vazamento tipo II. Dois (4,8% pacientes apresentaram oclusão de ramo da prótese. Oito (19,5% vazamentos foram diagnosticados e não houve nenhuma rotura dos aneurismas. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar do pequeno número de pacientes, os resultados observados parecem justificar a realização do procedimento endovascular nos pacientes com anatomia favorável.BACKGROUND: Since its introduction in 1991, endovascular repair of infrarenal aortic aneurysms has become an attractive option to treat this disease. The evaluation of our initial results about safety and efficacy of this technique has led us to carry out this study. OBJECTIVES: To analyze

  20. Endovascular treatment of a spontaneous aneurysm in the axillary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Kyun; Hwang, Jeong Kye; Park, Sun Cheol; Kim, Sang Dong

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous aneurysm in the axillary artery is extremely rare. The standard treatment for axillary artery aneurysm has been surgical repair, but endovascular management of select aneurysms using stent grafts has become more prevalent with the development of endoluminal technology. We report the case of a 36-year old man with a spontaneous aneurysm in the axillary artery. He experienced a tingling sensation and intermittent pain in the left upper extremity and had no history of trauma to the axilla. We performed endovascular treatment [placement of a Viabahn stent graft (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ, USA)] for a spontaneous aneurysm in the axillary artery. Following the procedure, his symptoms disappeared completely. After 6, 12 and 24 months, we carried out computed tomography angiography; all scans showed no complications. Now, the patient has no symptoms related to aneurysm in the axilla. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Endovascular treatment of isolated common iliac artery aneurysms with short necks using bifurcated stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Jin; Ko, Young-Guk; Kim, Jung-Sun; Choi, Donghoon; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Lee, Do-Youn; Jang, Yangsoo; Shim, Won-Heum

    2010-07-01

    Elective surgical repair has traditionally been considered to be the treatment of choice for the exclusion of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). Recently, endovascular repair has evolved as an alternative to surgical repair, especially in patients at high surgical risk. However, in the absence of sufficient proximal necks, iliac artery aneurysms are not suitable for direct deployment of a tubular-shaped endograft. Here we report two cases of IAAs with short proximal necks that were excluded using an endovascular bifurcated stent-graft. The bifurcated stent-graft was successfully deployed with complete exclusion of the aneurysm. In neither case was there evidence of procedural failures. There were no signs of significant complications. We conclude that endovascular repair of IAAs with short proximal necks is feasible and efficient using an endovascular bifurcated stent-graft.

  2. Pulmonary artery aneurysm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Hughes-Stovin's disease,. Behcet's disease), collagen vascular diseases, connective tissue disorders,. (Marfan's syndrome, Ehler's-Danlos. 30. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • October 2004. CASE REPORT. Pulmonary artery aneurysm.

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. ... Smoking . Some inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can also increase your ...

  4. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  5. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  6. Splenic artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcbc-Rj, Rui Antônio Ferreira; Ferreira, Myriam Christina Lopes; Ferreira, Daniel Antônio Lopes; Ferreira, André Gustavo Lopes; Ramos, Flávia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms - the most common visceral artery aneurysms - are found most often in multiparous women and in patients with portal hypertension. Indications for treatment of splenic artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm include specific symptoms, female gender and childbearing age, presence of portal hypertension, planned liver transplantation, a pseudoaneurysm of any size, and an aneurysm with a diameter of more than 2.5cm. Historically, the treatment of splenic artery aneurysm has been surgical ligation of the splenic artery, ligation of the aneurysm, or aneurysmectomy with or without splenectomy, depending on the aneurysm location. There are other percutaneous interventional techniques. The authors present a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in a 51-year-old woman, detected incidentally. RESUMO Aneurismas da artéria esplênica - os aneurismas arteriais viscerais mais comuns - são encontrados mais frequentemente em mulheres multíparas e em pacientes com hipertensão portal. As indicações para o seu tratamento incluem sintomas específicos, sexo feminino e idade fértil, presença de hipertensão portal, paciente em fila de transplante hepático, um pseudoaneurisma de qualquer tamanho, e um aneurisma com um diâmetro superior a 2,5cm. Historicamente, o tratamento do aneurisma da artéria esplênica tem sido a ligadura cirúrgica da artéria esplênica, a ligadura do aneurisma ou a aneurismectomia, com ou sem esplenectomia, dependendo do local do aneurisma. Existem outras técnicas intervencionistas percutâneas. Os autores apresentam o caso de um aneurisma de artéria esplênica em uma mulher de 51 anos de idade, diagnosticado incidentalmente.

  7. Open repair of adult aortic coarctation mostly by a resection and graft replacement technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Codreanu, Maria E; Leake, Samuel S; Sandhu, Harleen K; Calderon, Daniel; Azizzadeh, Ali; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2015-01-01

    We report on our experience with treatment of adults requiring de novo or redo open aortic coarctation repair mostly by a resection and interposition graft technique. We retrospectively reviewed all patients older than 16 years requiring open repair of aortic coarctation. Indications for repair, operative details, and outcomes were analyzed. Between 1996 and 2011, we treated 29 adult aortic coarctation patients with open repair. The mean age was 42 years (range, 17-69 years), and there were 15 men. Nine patients had previous repair with recurrence; the remaining 20 had native coarctation. Thoracic aortic aneurysms were present in 22 patients (76%), ranging in size from 3.0 to 9.6 cm (mean, 4.8 cm). Four patients had intercostal artery aneurysms (range, 1.0-2.5 cm), four had left subclavian artery aneurysms, and four had ascending/arch aneurysms. The most common repair was resection of aortic coarctation with interposition graft replacement (93%). Two patients without aneurysm had bypasses from the proximal descending thoracic aorta to the infrarenal aorta without aortic resection. There was no in-hospital mortality, stroke, or paraplegia. Long-term survival was 89% during a median follow-up of 81 months (interquartile range, 47-118 months), with no patient requiring reoperation on the repaired segment. Open repair of native and recurrent adult aortic coarctation has acceptable morbidity and low mortality. Especially in patients with concomitant aneurysm, resection with interposition graft replacement provides a safe and durable repair option. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Efficacy Analysis of a Script-based Guide for EVAR Execution: is it Possible to Reduce Patient Exposure to Contrast, Operative Time and Blood Loss even when Advanced Technologies are not Available?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani José Dal Poggetto Molinari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Despite the patient and medical staff exposure to radiation in endovascular aneurysm repair, the benefits of this abdominal aortic aneurysm type of surgical management are justfied by minor recovery time and hospitalization, as well as an option for patients not elected to conventional open repair. In this minimally invasive surgical aproach, time of procedure and radiation doses can be substantial - and the increasing frequency of these procedures and it's complexity have impelled vascular surgeons to face additional and successive risk to occupational radiation exposure. Meticulous study of the computed tomography angiography during the endovascular aneurysm repair preparation allows reduction of unnecessary radiation exposure, as also reduces consecutive image acquisition and contrast use (that may be related to renal overload in susceptible patients. Some studies have proposed strategies to optimize endovascular intervention to reduce contrast use and X-ray exposure. Although they might prove to be effective, they rely on use of additional specific and advanced equipment, available only in major centers. As an alternative to this expensive and restrict technology, it is presented a simpler technique through image manipulation on software OsiriX, aiming to reduce both exposures. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the efficacy of the adoption of a study protocol and a script-based guide in preparation for endovascular aneurysm repair through verifying it's impact over the surgical procedure - as referred to intravascular contrast infuse, effects over renal function, blood loss and operatory time. METHODS: A longitudinal prospective study from March 2014 through March 2015, where 30 performed endovascular aneurysm repair were compared to a historic control group. The planning for endovascular aneurysm repair through the patient's tomographic image manipulation in the prospective group was performed with OsiriX MD software. A script

  9. Preliminary Computational Hemodynamics Study of Double Aortic Aneurysms under Multistage Surgical Procedures: An Idealised Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Otsuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Double aortic aneurysm (DAA falls under the category of multiple aortic aneurysms. Repair is generally done through staged surgery due to low invasiveness. In this approach, one aneurysm is cured per operation. Therefore, two operations are required for DAA. However, post-first-surgery rupture cases have been reported. Although the problems involved with managing staged surgery have been discussed for more than 30 years, investigation from a hemodynamic perspective has not been attempted. Hence, this is the first computational fluid dynamics approach to the DAA problem. Three idealized geometries were prepared: presurgery, thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA cured, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA cured. By applying identical boundary conditions for flow rate and pressure, the Navier-Stokes equation and continuity equations were solved under the Newtonian fluid assumption. Average pressure in TAA was increased by AAA repair. On the other hand, average pressure in AAA was decreased after TAA repair. Average wall shear stress was decreased at the peak in post-first-surgery models. However, the wave profile of TAA average wall shear stress was changed in the late systole phase after AAA repair. Since the average wall shear stress in the post-first-surgery models decreased and pressure at TAA after AAA repair increased, the TAA might be treated first to prevent rupture.

  10. Symptomatic regrowth of a small intracranial aneurysm that had ruptured and completely thrombosed: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Ooigawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of small internal carotid–posterior communication artery (IC–PC aneurysm that was completely thrombosed after initial bleeding, but subsequently became symptomatic, causing a mass effect. A 54-year-old woman initially presented with grade-five subarachnoid hemorrhage from a small right IC–PC aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated conservatively and completely thrombosed within 35 days. The patient slowly recovered and remained well until 4 years later, when she developed right oculomotor nerve palsy. Imaging revealed relapse of the aneurysm, and repair led to symptom resolution. This case offers a reminder that totally thrombosed aneurysms carry a risk of regrowth if left untreated.

  11. Ruptured tuberculous false aneurysm of the abdominal aorta: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechchat, Alae; Lekehal, Brahim; Mesnaoui, Abbes; Ammar, Fannid; Bensaid, Younes

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculous false aneurysm of the aorta is rare and has an unpredictable complication of aneurysm rupture. We report a case of a 32-year old woman who was referred to the Department of Vascular Surgery, Avicenne Hospital for severe abdominal pain. Chest x-ray revealed miliary tuberculosis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan showed a false aortic aneurysm involving the juxtarenal aorta. Antituberculous treatment was started because of high presumption of tuberculosis. Five days later, the patient presented with symptoms of aneurysm rupture. She underwent an emergency a surgical resection of the aneurysm with repair of the aortic wall defect by a Dacron Silver patch. The histopathologic examination of the aortic wall showed features of tuberculosis.

  12. Endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, A; Nepper-Rasmussen, J

    2011-01-01

    to large aneurysms (> 3 mm). However the data also suggest that endovascular treatment of very small aneurysms might be associated with an increased risk of procedural ruptures and mortality. At nine-month follow-up results indicate significantly less compaction in the very small aneurysms....... endovascular treatment was attempted in 956 consecutive intracranial aneurysms. Of 956 aneurysms, 111 aneurysms were very small aneurysms with a maximal diameter of 3 mm or less. We conducted a retrospective analysis of angiographic and clinical outcome following coiling of very small aneurysms...... aneurysms and less than 90% aneurysm occlusion in six aneurysms. Complications occurred in the treatment of 15 aneurysms, including eight procedural ruptures, six thromboembolic events and one case of early hemorrhage. Compared with larger aneurysms, treatment of very small aneurysms was associated...

  13. Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Lactobacillus acidophilus Leading to Rupture of Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnacion, Carlos Omar; Loranger, Austin Mitchell; Bharatkumar, A G; Almassi, G Hossein

    2016-04-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus rarely causes bacterial endocarditis, because it usually resides in the mucosa of the vagina, gastrointestinal tract, and oropharynx. Moreover, sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare cardiac anomalies, either acquired or congenital. We present the case of a middle-aged man whose bacterial endocarditis, caused by Lactobacillus acidophilus, led to an aneurysmal rupture of the sinus of Valsalva into the right ventricular outflow tract. The patient underwent successful surgical repair, despite numerous complications and sequelae.

  14. An unusual case of left main coronary artery aneurysm with right ventricle fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Nathani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old boy presented with repeated respiratory tract infections. Echocardiography showed dilation of the left main coronary artery with flow into the Right Ventricular Outflow Tract (RVOT. Diagnosis of Left Coronary Artery Aneurysm (LMCA with RVOT fistula was made. A surgical repair of LMCA aneurysm by two-patch technique was performed. The patient had an excellent outcome postoperatively and is asymptomatic on follow-up.

  15. Giant true celiac artery aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljabri, Badr

    2009-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic. The management of these aneurysms is challenging, especially when they are large and involve the confluence of the trifurcation. We present here a case of a large celiac artery aneurysm involving its branches in a young woman. Preoperative investigations, intraoperative findings, and the operative procedure are also presented and discussed. (author

  16. Histological analysis of extracranial carotid artery aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna C Welleweerd

    Full Text Available Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms (ECAA are rare but may be accompanied with significant morbidity. Previous studies mostly focused on diagnostic imaging and treatment. In contrast, the pathophysiological mechanisms and natural course of ECAA are largely unknown. Understanding the pathophysiological background may add to prediction of risk for adverse outcome and need for surgical exclusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the histopathological characteristics of ECAA in patients who underwent complete surgical ECAA resection.From March 2004 till June 2013, 13 patients were treated with open ECAA repair. During surgery the aneurysm sac was resected and processed for standardized histological analysis. Sections were stained with routine hematoxylin and eosin and special stains to detect elastin, collagen, different types of inflammatory cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells.Histopathological characterization revealed two distinct categories: dissection (abrupt interruption of the media; n = 3 and degeneration (general loss of elastin fibers in the media; n = 10. In the degenerative samples the elastin fibers in the media were fragmented and were partly absent. Inflammatory cells were observed in the vessel wall of the aneurysms.Histological analysis in this small sample size revealed dissection and degeneration as the two distinct underlying mechanisms in ECAA formation.

  17. Immediate endovascular treatment of an aortoiliac aneurysm ruptured into the inferior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Reinhard; Weidenhagen, Rolf; Hoffmann, Ralf; Waggershauser, Tobias; Meimarakis, Georgios; Andrassy, Joachim; Clevert, Dirk; Czerner, Stephan; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2006-07-01

    An aortocaval fistula is a severe complication of an aortoiliac aneurysm, usually associated with high perioperative morbidity and mortality during open operative repair. We describe the successful endovascular treatment of a symptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm ruptured into the inferior vena cava with secondary interventional coiling of a persistent type II endoleak because of retrograde perfusion of the inferior mesenteric artery. Endovascular exclusion of ruptured abdominal aneurysms seems to be a valuable treatment option for selected patients even with complicated vascular conditions like an aortocaval fistula.

  18. Giant right coronary artery aneurysm with unusual physiology: Role of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Orozco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman presented with a history of dyspnea and atypical chest pain. She was diagnosed with a non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction due to a giant right coronary artery aneurysm. After a failed percutaneous embolization, she was scheduled for right coronary artery aneurysm resection, posterior descending artery revascularization and mitral valve repair. During the induction of anesthesia and institution of mechanical ventilation, the patient suffered cardiovascular collapse. The transesophageal echocardiographic examination revealed tamponade physiology owing to compression of the cardiac chambers by the unruptured aneurysm, which resolved with the sternotomy. The surgery was carried out uneventfully.

  19. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair. METHODS: All patients, undergoing elective primary endovascular repair of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm...

  20. The management of concomitant renal oncocytoma and giant coronary and bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jonathan; Choong, Andrew; Raja, Shahzad; Amrani, Mohamed; Hellawell, Giles; Hussain, Tahir

    2014-05-01

    We present the rare case of a 66-year-old Caucasian male patient presenting with intermittent left-side abdominal pain. He underwent a kidneys, ureters, and bladder computed tomography scan on which an incidental 45-mm giant aneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery was discovered along with 55-mm right-sided and 62-mm left-sided common iliac artery aneurysms and a 100-mm benign renal oncocytoma. He underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting of the left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries using internal mammary artery and saphenous vein grafts. He subsequently underwent simultaneous open left nephrectomy and bilateral common iliac aneurysm repair using a bifurcated tube graft. He made a full recovery postoperatively. Giant coronary artery aneurysms are rare. In the pediatric population, they are predominantly secondary to Kawasaki disease. In adults, atheromatous disease is the leading cause. The coexistence of giant coronary artery aneurysms with extracoronary artery aneurysms is extremely unusual. We propose that the identification of giant coronary artery aneurysms necessitates further imaging investigations to identify the presence of extracoronary aneurysms. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a case in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aneurysmal bone cysts

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    Rangachari P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: Aneurysmal bone cysts have raised intra-cystic pressures which are dynamic and diagnostic in nature. Aneurysmal bone cysts could be diagnosed from other benign cystic lesions of bone by recording their intra-cystic pressures with a spinal manometer. Raised intra-cystic pressures in aneurysmal bone cysts are maintained as long as the periosteum over the cyst is intact even in those with pathological fractures. Even though its pathology is definite its aetio-pathology is not clear Method: Fourteen out of 16 radiologically benign cystic lesions of bone were subjected to intra-cystic pressure recordings with spinal manometer. Other two cysts had displaced unimpacted pathological fractures and so their intra-cystic pressures could not be recorded. All 16 cysts were subjected to histo-pathological examination to confirm their diagnosis and to find out for any pre-existing benign pathology. All the cysts were surgically treated. Results: Fourteen benign cystic lesions of bone were diagnosed as aneurysmal bone cysts preoperatively by recording raised intra-cystic pressures and confirmed by histo-pathology. In addition, histo-pathology revealed pre-existing benign pathology. All cysts were successfully treated surgically. Conclusions: Since, there is appreciable rise in intra-cystic dynamic pressures, the aneurysmal bone cyst is considered to be due to either sudden venous obstruction or arterio-venous shunt. Pre-operative intra-cystic pressure recordings help not only to diagnose aneurysmal bone cysts but also to assess the quantum of blood loss and its replacement during surgery.

  2. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs  5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  3. Down syndrome: a risk factor for mycotic aneurysm?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Peter A

    2011-03-29

    Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, has a characteristic constellation of clinical findings, including various congenital heart defects. We report a case of an adult male with Down syndrome who presented with a 3-week history of lower limb pain and swelling, attributed to cellulitis. Clinical and angiographic evaluation identified a below-knee mycotic pseudoaneurysm secondary to infective endocarditis. Surgical aneurysmal repair and revascularization were performed. Various management options are outlined in this report.

  4. Mirror aneurysms : a reflection on natural history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, Irene; Torner, James; Huston III, John; Rajput, Michele L.; Wiebers, David O.; Jones, Lyell K.; Brown, Robert D.; Groen, Rob

    OBJECT: Investigators conducting the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, sought to evaluate predictors of future hemorrhage in patients who had unruptured mirror aneurysms. These paired aneurysms in bilateral arterial positions