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Sample records for aneuploid drosophila s2

  1. A Store-operated Calcium Channel in Drosophila S2 Cells

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    Yeromin, Andriy V.; Roos, Jack; Stauderman, Kenneth A.; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Using whole-cell recording in Drosophila S2 cells, we characterized a Ca2+-selective current that is activated by depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Passive store depletion with a Ca2+-free pipette solution containing 12 mM BAPTA activated an inwardly rectifying Ca2+ current with a reversal potential >60 mV. Inward currents developed with a delay and reached a maximum of 20–50 pA at −110 mV. This current doubled in amplitude upon increasing external Ca2+ from 2 to 20 mM and was not affec...

  2. Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells induces only minor changes in mitochondrial dynamics.

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    Elizabeth Wen Sun

    Full Text Available During infection of cells by Legionella pneumophila, the bacterium secretes a large number of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm, allowing it to alter many cellular processes and make the vacuole and the host cell into more hospitable environments for bacterial replication. One major change induced by infection is the recruitment of ER-derived vesicles to the surface of the vacuole, where they fuse with the vacuole membrane and prevent it from becoming an acidified, degradative compartment. However, the recruitment of mitochondria to the region of the vacuole has also been suggested by ultrastructural studies. In order to test this idea in a controlled and quantitative experimental system, and to lay the groundwork for a genome-wide screen for factors involved in mitochondrial recruitment, we examined the behavior of mitochondria during the early stages of Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells. We found that the density of mitochondria near vacuoles formed by infection with wild type Legionella was not different from that found in dotA(- mutant-infected cells during the first 4 hours after infection. We then examined 4 parameters of mitochondrial motility in infected cells: velocity of movement, duty cycle of movement, directional persistence and net direction. In the 4 hours following infection, most of these measures were indistinguishable between wild type and dotA(-.infection. However, wild type Legionella did induce a modest shift in the velocity distribution toward faster movement compared dotA(- infection, and a small downward shift in the duty cycle distribution. In addition, wild type infection produced mitochondrial movement that was biased in the direction of the bacterial vacuole relative to dotA-, although not enough to cause a significant accumulation within 10 um of the vacuole. We conclude that in this host cell, mitochondria are not strongly recruited to the vacuole, nor is their motility

  3. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Amber L. Jolly; Chi-Hao Luan; Brendon E. Dusel; Sara F. Dunne; Michael Winding; Vishrut J. Dixit; Chloe Robins; Jennifer L. Saluk; David J. Logan; Anne E. Carpenter; Manu Sharma; Deborah Dean; Andrew R. Cohen; Vladimir I. Gelfand

    2016-01-01

    Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo”) occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an auto...

  4. A genome-wide RNAi screen for microtubule bundle formation and lysosome motility regulation in Drosophila S2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, Amber L.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Dusel, Brendon E.; Dunne, Sara Fernandez; Winding, Michael; Dixit, Vishrut J.; Robins, Chloe; Saluk, Jennifer L.; Logan, David J.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Sharma, Manu; Dean, Deborah; Cohen, Andrew R.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo”) occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins; the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automate...

  5. A store-operated calcium channel in Drosophila S2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeromin, Andriy V; Roos, Jack; Stauderman, Kenneth A; Cahalan, Michael D

    2004-02-01

    Using whole-cell recording in Drosophila S2 cells, we characterized a Ca(2+)-selective current that is activated by depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Passive store depletion with a Ca(2+)-free pipette solution containing 12 mM BAPTA activated an inwardly rectifying Ca2+ current with a reversal potential >60 mV. Inward currents developed with a delay and reached a maximum of 20-50 pA at -110 mV. This current doubled in amplitude upon increasing external Ca2+ from 2 to 20 mM and was not affected by substitution of choline for Na+. A pipette solution containing approximately 300 nM free Ca2+ and 10 mM EGTA prevented spontaneous activation, but Ca2+ current activated promptly upon application of ionomycin or thapsigargin, or during dialysis with IP3. Isotonic substitution of 20 mM Ca2+ by test divalent cations revealed a selectivity sequence of Ba2+ > Sr2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+. Ba2+ and Sr2+ currents inactivated within seconds of exposure to zero-Ca2+ solution at a holding potential of 10 mV. Inactivation of Ba2+ and Sr2+ currents showed recovery during strong hyperpolarizing pulses. Noise analysis provided an estimate of unitary conductance values in 20 mM Ca2+ and Ba2+ of 36 and 420 fS, respectively. Upon removal of all external divalent ions, a transient monovalent current exhibited strong selectivity for Na+ over Cs+. The Ca2+ current was completely and reversibly blocked by Gd3+, with an IC50 value of approximately 50 nM, and was also blocked by 20 microM SKF 96365 and by 20 microM 2-APB. At concentrations between 5 and 14 microM, application of 2-APB increased the magnitude of Ca2+ currents. We conclude that S2 cells express store-operated Ca2+ channels with many of the same biophysical characteristics as CRAC channels in mammalian cells. PMID:14744989

  6. 1.8 Å structure of murine GITR ligand dimer expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of mouse GITRL expressed in D. melanogaster S2 cells shows an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric assembly similar to that observed previously for the E. coli-expressed protein. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL

  7. Distinct effects of nuclear membrane localization on gene transcription silencing in Drosophila S2 cells and germ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Sui; Yanhong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelope proteins have important roles in chromatin organization and signal-dependent transcriptional regulation. A previous study reported that the inner nuclear membrane protein, Otefin (Ote), was essential for germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance via interaction with Smad complex. The interaction of Otc with the Smad complex recruits the bam locus to the nuclear periphery and subsequently results in bam transcriptional silencing, revealing that nuclear peripheral localization is essential for bam gene regulation. However, it remains unknown whether the nuclear peripheral localization is sufficient for bam silencing. To address this issue, we have established a tethering system, in which the Gal4 DNA binding domain (DBD) of the Flag:Gal4 DBD:Ote △ LEM fusion protein physically interacts with the Gal4 binding sites upstream of bamP-gfp to artificially recruit the reporter gene gfp to the nuclear membrane. Our data demonstrated that the nuclear peripheral localization seemed to affect the expression of the target naked gene in S2 cells. By contrast, in Drosophila germ cells, the nuclear membrane localization was not sufficient for gene silencing.

  8. Formulation of a protein-free medium based on IPL-41 for the sustained growth of Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Fabiana R. X.; Carlos A. Pereira; Mendonça, Ronaldo Z.; Moraes, Ângela M.

    2008-01-01

    An animal protein-free medium was developed for Drosophila melanogaster S2 (S2AcGPV2) cells genetically modified to produce the rabies virus G glycoprotein (GPV). IPL-41, used as a basal medium, was supplemented with yeastolate, carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids aiming initially to reduce and further to eliminate the need of fetal bovine serum. The S2AcGPV2 cells were fully capable of growing in serum-free supplemented IPL-41 medium containing 6 g L−1 yeastolate ultrafiltrate, 10 g L−1 gl...

  9. Drosophila S2 cells are non-permissive for vaccinia virus DNA replication following entry via low pH-dependent endocytosis and early transcription.

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    Zain Bengali

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV, a member of the chordopox subfamily of the Poxviridae, abortively infects insect cells. We have investigated VACV infection of Drosophila S2 cells, which are useful for protein expression and genome-wide RNAi screening. Biochemical and electron microscopic analyses indicated that VACV entry into Drosophila S2 cells depended on the VACV multiprotein entry-fusion complex but appeared to occur exclusively by a low pH-dependent endocytic mechanism, in contrast to both neutral and low pH entry pathways used in mammalian cells. Deep RNA sequencing revealed that the entire VACV early transcriptome, comprising 118 open reading frames, was robustly expressed but neither intermediate nor late mRNAs were made. Nor was viral late protein synthesis or inhibition of host protein synthesis detected by pulse-labeling with radioactive amino acids. Some reduction in viral early proteins was noted by Western blotting. Nevertheless, synthesis of the multitude of early proteins needed for intermediate gene expression was demonstrated by transfection of a plasmid containing a reporter gene regulated by an intermediate promoter. In addition, expression of a reporter gene with a late promoter was achieved by cotransfection of intermediate genes encoding the late transcription factors. The requirement for transfection of DNA templates for intermediate and late gene expression indicated a defect in viral genome replication in VACV-infected S2 cells, which was confirmed by direct analysis. Furthermore, VACV-infected S2 cells did not support the replication of a transfected plasmid, which occurs in mammalian cells and is dependent on all known viral replication proteins, indicating a primary restriction of DNA synthesis.

  10. Purification and characterization of recombinant full-length and protease domain of murine MMP-9 expressed in Drosophila S2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Morten G; Lund, Ida K.; Illemann, Martin; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    MMP-9. Constructs encoding zymogens of full-length murine MMP-9 and a version lacking the O-glycosylated linker region and hemopexin domains were therefore generated and expressed in stably transfected Drosophila S2 insect cells. After 7 days of induction the expression levels of the full-length and...... truncated versions were 5 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. The products were >95% pure after gelatin Sepharose chromatography and possessed proteolytic activity when analyzed by gelatin zymography. Using the purified full-length murine MMP-9 we raised polyclonal antibodies by immunizations of rabbits. These......Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a 92-kDa soluble pro-enzyme implicated in pathological events including cancer invasion. It is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention studies in mouse models. Development of inhibitors requires sufficient amounts of correctly folded murine...

  11. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans. PMID:20641042

  12. Flow cytofluorometric evidence for the differential radioresponsiveness of aneuploid and diploid cervix tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    348 patients have been included in the study over a 54-month period. Data on these patients have shown that DNA aneuploid tumours are significantly more radioresponsive than diploid cervix tumours. Analysis of the data on 213 patients with a minimum follow-up time of 15 months has, however, failed to show an overall more favourable prognosis conferred by tumour DNA aneuploidy. Analysis of the relationship between clinical stage and disease state and tumour DNA ploidy, however, suggests that (1) aneuploid tumours metastasize to distant sites at an earlier stage of the disease than diploid tumours and (2) local recurrence rates for diploid tumours, in late stage disease, are double those for aneuploid tumours. Improved staining procedures, and instrument modification, has also shown that cervix tumour heterogeneity is of considerably greater frequency than at first appeared to be the case (approximately 75% of DNA aneuploid tumours show heterogeneity). (Auth.)

  13. Improvement of phosphoproteome analyses using FAIMS and decision tree fragmentation. application to the insulin signaling pathway in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

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    Bridon, Gaëlle; Bonneil, Eric; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    This report examines the analytical benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) coupled to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for phosphoproteomics analyses. The ability of FAIMS to separate multiply charged peptide ions from chemical interferences confers a unique advantage in phosphoproteomics by enhancing the detection of low abundance phosphopeptides. LC-FAIMS-MS experiments performed on TiO(2)-enriched tryptic digests from Drosophila melanogaster provided a 50% increase in phosphopeptide identification compared to conventional LC-MS analysis. Also, FAIMS can be used to select different population of multiply charged phosphopeptide ions prior to their activation with either collision activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Importantly, FAIMS enabled the resolution of coeluting phosphoisomers of different abundances to facilitate their unambiguous identification using conventional database search engines. The benefits of FAIMS in large-scale phosphoproteomics of D. melanogaster are further investigated using label-free quantitation to identify differentially regulated phosphoproteins in response to insulin stimulation. PMID:22059388

  14. A tetraploid intermediate precedes aneuploid formation in yeasts exposed to fluconazole.

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    Benjamin D Harrison

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, is generally diploid. However, 50% of isolates that are resistant to fluconazole (FLC, the most widely used antifungal, are aneuploid and some aneuploidies can confer FLC resistance. To ask if FLC exposure causes or only selects for aneuploidy, we analyzed diploid strains during exposure to FLC using flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. FLC exposure caused a consistent deviation from normal cell cycle regulation: nuclear and spindle cycles initiated prior to bud emergence, leading to "trimeras," three connected cells composed of a mother, daughter, and granddaughter bud. Initially binucleate, trimeras underwent coordinated nuclear division yielding four daughter nuclei, two of which underwent mitotic collapse to form a tetraploid cell with extra spindle components. In subsequent cell cycles, the abnormal number of spindles resulted in unequal DNA segregation and viable aneuploid progeny. The process of aneuploid formation in C. albicans is highly reminiscent of early stages in human tumorigenesis in that aneuploidy arises through a tetraploid intermediate and subsequent unequal DNA segregation driven by multiple spindles coupled with a subsequent selective advantage conferred by at least some aneuploidies during growth under stress. Finally, trimera formation was detected in response to other azole antifungals, in related Candida species, and in an in vivo model for Candida infection, suggesting that aneuploids arise due to azole treatment of several pathogenic yeasts and that this can occur during the infection process.

  15. Cytogenetics of semi-fertile triploid and aneuploid intergeneric vine cacti hybrids.

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    Tel-Zur, N; Abbo, S; Mizrahi, Y

    2005-01-01

    Crosses between the diploid Hylocereus polyrhizus, as the female parent, and the tetraploid Selenicereus megalanthus, as the male parent, yielded triploid and aneuploid hybrids. The fruits of these hybrids combined the attractive appearance of Hylocereus fruits with the delicious taste of S. megalanthus fruits. The aim of this work was to assess the fertility and breeding potential of the triploid and aneuploid hybrids with a view to developing an improved vine cactus crop. Pollen mother cells at metaphase I revealed univalents, bivalents, trivalents, and occasionally quadrivalents. Chromosome distribution at anaphase I revealed different classes of chromosome segregation as well as lagging chromosomes. At metaphase II, parallel and tripolar spindles were observed. The occurrence of triads was frequent, whereas dyads were rarely observed. Pollen stainability varied among the clones studied ranging from 9.8% to 18.6%. The diameters of the stained pollen grains varied widely, probably as a result of the number of chromosomes. Despite the allotriploid origin of our hybrids, functional female and male gametes were produced in considerable proportions, most likely as a result of balanced chromosome segregation. The triploid and aneuploid clones studied yielded viable seeds whose number per fruit was strongly dependent on the pollen donor. PMID:15618308

  16. Prospects for using aneuploids and their derivatives for wheat protein improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospects for using the aneuploid technique in studies related to protein improvement in wheat are considered. Chromosomal location of gene(s) governing specific proteins or enzymes, separated by electrophoresis or electrofocusing, can be ascertained using ditelosomics where one arm of a homologous chromosome pair is absent. Reliable quantitative information on chromosomal effects on protein or specific amino-acid content can be obtained only from inter-varietal substitution lines in which a pair of the donor variety chromosomes substitutes for a pair of the recipient variety. Addition or substitution of certain rye chromosomes in wheat is reported to increase lysine of protein conten. Efficiency of mutation experiments, aimed to recover mutants with altered protein characteristics, can be greatly enhanced by treating the monosomic for the dhromosome that is known to carry the gene(s) having such influence. (author)

  17. Chromosome radiosensitivity and kinetics of proliferation of peripheral lymphocytes in individuals with aneuploid karyotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimentally investigated was the radiosensitivity of chromosomes and the kinetics of the proliferation of peripheral lymphocytes in patients with aneuploid (DS and TS) and normal karyotype irradiated in vitro in the Go stage of the cell cycle. Trisomic lymphocytes were found to proliferate more rapidly in the in vitro culture and to be more sensitive than diploid cell populations. In monosomic lymphocytes in Turner syndrome patients, the proliferation and incidence of chromosomal abberations was similar to the disomic lines in Down's syndrome patients and in Turner syndrome patients, and to that found in persons with a normal karyotype. The results of the experiment show that there is a relationship between the proliferation rate of peripheral lymphocytes cultures in vitro and the radiosensivity of chromosomes. (author). 1 tab., 3 figs., 11 refs

  18. The fate of chrysotile-induced multipolar mitosis and aneuploid population in cultured lung cancer cells.

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    Beatriz de Araujo Cortez

    Full Text Available Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes.

  19. Modeling abnormal early development with induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Xianming; Fan, Wenxia; Zhao, Ping; Chan, Yau-Chi; Chen, Shen; Zhang, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Ya; Li, Yanhua; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Li, Xingyan; Yang, Jiayin; Peng, Tianran; Zychlinski, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dirk; Zhang, Ruosi; Deng, Kang; Ng, Kwong-Man; Menten, Bjorn; Zhong, Mei; Wu, Jiayan; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yonglong; Schambach, Axel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Many human diseases share a developmental origin that manifests during childhood or maturity. Aneuploid syndromes are caused by supernumerary or reduced number of chromosomes and represent an extreme example of developmental disease, as they have devastating consequences before and after birth. Investigating how alterations in gene dosage drive these conditions is relevant because it might help treat some clinical aspects. It may also provide explanations as to how quantitative differences in gene expression determine phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility among natural populations. Here, we aimed to produce induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that can be used to improve our understanding of aneuploid syndromes. We have generated iPSCs from monosomy X [Turner syndrome (TS)], trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and partial trisomy 11;22 (Emanuel syndrome), using either skin fibroblasts from affected individuals or amniocytes from antenatal diagnostic tests. These cell lines stably maintain the karyotype of the donors and behave like embryonic stem cells in all tested assays. TS iPSCs were used for further studies including global gene expression analysis and tissue-specific directed differentiation. Multiple clones displayed lower levels of the pseudoautosomal genes ASMTL and PPP2R3B than the controls. Moreover, they could be transformed into neural-like, hepatocyte-like and heart-like cells, but displayed insufficient up-regulation of the pseudoautosomal placental gene CSF2RA during embryoid body formation. These data support that abnormal organogenesis and early lethality in TS are not caused by a tissue-specific differentiation blockade, but rather involves other abnormalities including impaired placentation. PMID:21949351

  20. 陆地棉非整倍体的诱发和鉴定%Induction of Aneuploids and Their Identification in Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-zhen GUO; Bao-min HU; Cheng-xin YI; Bao-liang ZHOU; Tian-zhen ZHANG; Jia-ju PAN

    2002-01-01

    @@ Aneuploid lines have been playing an important role in crop genetic studies and breeding utilization. Unfortunately, only several genetic materials of aneuploid can be used in Upland cotton. So far, there are 16 monosomics identified in cotton. In order to fill the gap, we carried on the irradiation research of mature pollen grains with γ-rays at different dosages and further produced F1 generation.

  1. High efficiency production and genomic in situ hybridization analysis of Brassica aneuploids and homozygous plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zaiyun; (李再云); M.; Ceccarelli; S.; Minelli; A.; Contento; LIU; Yan; (刘; 焰); P.; G.; Cionini

    2003-01-01

    Interspecific and intergeneric hybridizations have been widely used in plant genetics and breeding to construct stocks for genetic analysis and to introduce into crops the desirable traits and genes from their relatives. The intergeneric crosses between Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss., B. carinata A. Braun and Orychophragmus violaceus (L.) O. E. Schulz were made and the plants produced were subjected to genomic in situ hybridization analysis. The mixoploids from the cross with B. juncea were divided into three groups. The partially fertile mixoploids in the first group (2n = 36-42) mainly contained the somatic cells and pollen mother cells (PMCs) with the 36 chromosomes of B. juncea and additional chromosomes of O. violaceus. The mixoploids (2n = 30-36) in the second and third groups were morphologically quite similar to the mother plants B. juncea and showed nearly normal fertility. The plants in the second group produced the majority of PMCs (2n = 36) with their chromosomes paired and segregated normally, but 1-4 pairs of the O. violaceus chromosomes were included in some PMCs. The plants in the third group produced only PMCs with the 36 B. juncea chromosomes, which were paired and segregated normally. The mixoploids (2n = 29-34) from the cross with B. carinata produced the majority of PMCs (2n = 34) with normal chromosome pairing and segregation, but some plants had some PMCs with 1-3 pairs of chromosomes from O. violaceus and other plants had only PMCs with the B. carinata chromosomes. The Brassica homozygous plants and aneuploids with complete or partial chromosome complements of Brassica parents and various numbers of O. violaceus chromosomes were derived from these progeny plants. The results in this study provided the molecular cytogenetic evidence for the separation of parental genomes which was previously proposed to occur in the hybridizations of these two genera.

  2. Improved S2 approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Development of optimization rules for S2 quadrature sets. • Studying the dependency of optimized S2 quadratures on composition and geometry. • Demonstrating S2 procedures preserving the features of higher approximations. - Abstract: Discrete ordinates method relies on approximating the integral term of the transport equation with the aid of quadrature summation rules. These quadratures are usually based on certain assumptions which assure specific symmetry rules and transport/diffusion limits. Generally, these assumptions are not problem-dependent which results in inaccuracies in some instances. Here, various methods have been developed for more accurate estimation of the independent angle in S2 approximation, as it is tightly related to valid estimation of the diffusion coefficient/length. We proposed and examined a method to reduce a complicated problem that usually is consisting many energy groups and discrete directions (SN) to an equivalent one-group S2 problem while it mostly preserves general features of the original model. Some numerical results are demonstrated to show the accuracy of proposed method

  3. Occurrence of multipolar mitoses and association with Aurora-A/-B kinases and p53 mutations in aneuploid esophageal carcinoma cells

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    Münch Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aurora kinases and loss of p53 function are implicated in the carcinogenesis of aneuploid esophageal cancers. Their association with occurrence of multipolar mitoses in the two main histotypes of aneuploid esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC and Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BAC remains unclear. Here, we investigated the occurrence of multipolar mitoses, Aurora-A/-B gene copy numbers and expression/activation as well as p53 alterations in aneuploid ESCC and BAC cancer cell lines. Results A control esophageal epithelial cell line (EPC-hTERT had normal Aurora-A and -B gene copy numbers and expression, was p53 wild type and displayed bipolar mitoses. In contrast, both ESCC (OE21, Kyse-410 and BAC (OE33, OE19 cell lines were aneuploid and displayed elevated gene copy numbers of Aurora-A (chromosome 20 polysomy: OE21, OE33, OE19; gene amplification: Kyse-410 and Aurora-B (chromosome 17 polysomy: OE21, Kyse-410. Aurora-B gene copy numbers were not elevated in OE19 and OE33 cells despite chromosome 17 polysomy. Aurora-A expression and activity (Aurora-A/phosphoT288 was not directly linked to gene copy numbers and was highest in Kyse-410 and OE33 cells. Aurora-B expression and activity (Aurora-B/phosphoT232 was higher in OE21 and Kyse-410 than in OE33 and OE19 cells. The mitotic index was highest in OE21, followed by OE33 > OE19 > Kyse-410 and EPC-hTERT cells. Multipolar mitoses occurred with high frequency in OE33 (13.8 ± 4.2%, followed by OE21 (7.7 ± 5.0% and Kyse-410 (6.3 ± 2.0% cells. Single multipolar mitoses occurred in OE19 (1.0 ± 1.0% cells. Distinct p53 mutations and p53 protein expression patterns were found in all esophageal cancer cell lines, but complete functional p53 inactivation occurred in OE21 and OE33 only. Conclusions High Aurora-A expression alone is not associated with overt multipolar mitoses in aneuploid ESCC and BAC cancer cells, as specifically shown here for OE21 and OE33 cells, respectively

  4. Tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis induce mitotic chromosomal instability--an implication in aneuploid human tumors.

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    Chunyan Dai

    Full Text Available Mitotic chromosomal instability (CIN plays important roles in tumor progression, but what causes CIN is incompletely understood. In general, tumor CIN arises from abnormal mitosis, which is caused by either intrinsic or extrinsic factors. While intrinsic factors such as mitotic checkpoint genes have been intensively studied, the impact of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor CIN is largely unknown. We investigate if glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis--two tumor microenvironmental factors--could induce cancer cell CIN. We show that glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis significantly increases CIN in 4T1, MCF-7 and HCT116 scored by micronuclei, or aneuploidy, or abnormal mitosis, potentially via damaging DNA, up-regulating mitotic checkpoint genes, and/or amplifying centrosome. Of note, the feature of CIN induced by glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis is similar to that of aneuploid human tumors. We conclude that tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis can induce tumor CIN and propose that they are potentially responsible for human tumor aneuploidy.

  5. Metabolomic profiling and genomic analysis of wheat aneuploid lines to identify genes controlling biochemical pathways in mature grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francki, Michael G; Hayton, Sarah; Gummer, Joel P A; Rawlinson, Catherine; Trengove, Robert D

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly important tool in plant genomics to decipher the function of genes controlling biochemical pathways responsible for trait variation. Although theoretical models can integrate genes and metabolites for trait variation, biological networks require validation using appropriate experimental genetic systems. In this study, we applied an untargeted metabolite analysis to mature grain of wheat homoeologous group 3 ditelosomic lines, selected compounds that showed significant variation between wheat lines Chinese Spring and at least one ditelosomic line, tracked the genes encoding enzymes of their biochemical pathway using the wheat genome survey sequence and determined the genetic components underlying metabolite variation. A total of 412 analytes were resolved in the wheat grain metabolome, and principal component analysis indicated significant differences in metabolite profiles between Chinese Spring and each ditelosomic lines. The grain metabolome identified 55 compounds positively matched against a mass spectral library where the majority showed significant differences between Chinese Spring and at least one ditelosomic line. Trehalose and branched-chain amino acids were selected for detailed investigation, and it was expected that if genes encoding enzymes directly related to their biochemical pathways were located on homoeologous group 3 chromosomes, then corresponding ditelosomic lines would have a significant reduction in metabolites compared with Chinese Spring. Although a proportion showed a reduction, some lines showed significant increases in metabolites, indicating that genes directly and indirectly involved in biosynthetic pathways likely regulate the metabolome. Therefore, this study demonstrated that wheat aneuploid lines are suitable experimental genetic system to validate metabolomics-genomics networks. PMID:26032167

  6. Leigh Syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A.; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LSSurf1 patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS based on the post-transcriptional silencing of CG9943, the Drosophila homolog of SURF1. Knockdown of Surf1 was induced ubiquitously in larvae and adults, which led to lethality; in the mesodermal derivatives, which led to pupal lethality; or in the central nervous system, which allowed survival. A biochemical characterization was carried out in knockdown individuals, which revealed that larvae unexpectedly displayed defects in all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and in the F-ATP synthase, while adults had a COX-selective impairment. Silencing of Surf1 expression in Drosophila S2R+ cells led to selective loss of COX activity associated with decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve. We conclude that Surf1 is essential for COX activity and mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster, thus providing a new tool that may help clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of LS. PMID:25164807

  7. The ultrastructure of the kinetochore and kinetochore fiber in Drosophila somatic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maiato, Helder; Hergert, Polla J.; Moutinho-Pereira, Sara; Dong, Yimin; VandenBeldt, Kristin J.; Rieder, Conly L.; McEwen, Bruce F.

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for the molecular dissection of mitosis in animals. However, despite the popularity of this system, no studies have been published on the ultrastructure of Drosophila kinetochores and kinetochore fibers (K-fibers) in somatic cells. To amend this situation, we used correlative light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) to study kinetochores in cultured Drosophila S2 cells during metaphase, and after colchicine treatment to depolymerize all m...

  8. Adult Neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Fernández-Hernández; Christa Rhiner; Eduardo Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been linked to several cognitive functions and neurological disorders. Description of adult neurogenesis in a model organism like Drosophila could facilitate the genetic study of normal and abnormal neurogenesis in the adult brain. So far, formation of new neurons has not been detected in adult fly brains and hence has been thought to be absent in Drosophila. Here, we used an improved lineage-labeling method to show that, surprisingly, adult neurogenesis occurs in the m...

  9. Drosophila egg chamber elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Julie

    2012-01-01

    As tissues and organs are formed, they acquire a specific shape that plays an integral role in their ability to function properly. A relatively simple system that has been used to examine how tissues and organs are shaped is the formation of an elongated Drosophila egg. While it has been known for some time that Drosophila egg elongation requires interactions between a polarized intracellular basal actin network and a polarized extracellular network of basal lamina proteins, how these interac...

  10. Drosophila Rhomboid-1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stříšovský, Kvido

    Amsterdam : Academic Press, 2013 - (Salvesen, G.), s. 3563-3567 ISBN 978-0-12-382219-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/1886; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : rhomboid * intramembrane protease * Drosophila Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Cancer in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Héctor; Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genomics has greatly increased our understanding of the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic changes found in human tumors. Understanding the functional relationships among these elements calls for the use of flexible genetic models. We discuss the use of Drosophila models to study...

  12. S = -2 dibaryons and hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future prospects for the exploration of doubly strange hypernuclear systems are evaluated. Such systems may be produced via the double strangeness exchange reactions (K-,K+) or (K-,K0) on nuclear targets. Theoretical estimates are given of the formation cross sections for Xi- hypernuclear states via the one-step K-p → K+Xi- process, or discrete states of the ΛΛ hypernucleus in the two step reaction K-p → π0Λ followed by π0p → K+Λ. Recently, there has been much discussion of six quark (dibaryon) states in the Bag Model. Arguments are given which indicate that the (K-,K+) reaction on light nuclear targets (ex. 3He) affords a very promising way of producing the lowest-lying S = -2 dibaryon

  13. DNA aneuploidy in colorectal adenomas: Role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence Aneuploidía del ADN en adenomas colónicos: Papel en la secuencia adenoma-carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alcántara Torres

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: aneuploidy has been observed in 6-27% of lesions known to be precursors of colorectal cancer, such as adenomas or ulcerative colitis. It has been suggested that aneuploidy may predispose to malignancy in these cases. However, its role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence has not been definitely established. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of aneuploidy in colon adenomas, as well as to study its possible role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Material and methods: the study was performed on a series of 57 large bowel adenomas measuring 10 mm or more, collected from 54 consecutive patients. All specimens were obtained either by endoscopic or by surgical resection. There were 49 adenomas with low-grade dysplasia, two with high-grade dysplasia, two intramucous carcinomas, and four microinvasive carcinomas. A flow cytometric DNA analysis was performed in fresh specimens following Vindelov´s method. Results: aneuploid DNA was detected in five out of 49 low-grade dysplasia adenomas (10%, in all four high-grade dysplasia adenomas or intramucous carcinomas (100%, and in three out of four microinvasive carcinomas (75%. The association between aneuploidy and high-grade dysplasia adenomas, intramucous, or microinvasive carcinoma was statistically significant (p Introducción: en patología benigna de intestino grueso precursora del cáncer colorrectal, como adenomas o colitis ulcerosa, se ha observado aneuploidía en el 6-27% de los casos y se ha sugerido que su presencia predispone al desarrollo de malignidad. Sin embargo, su papel en la secuencia adenoma-carcinoma no se ha demostrado de forma concluyente. El objetivo de nuestro trabajo fue valorar la incidencia de aneuploidía en adenomas colónicos, con y sin signos de malignidad, y estudiar su posible papel en la secuencia adenoma-carcinoma. Material y métodos: el estudio se realizó en una serie de 57 adenomas de intestino grueso, de 10 o más mil

  14. Neuroanatomical localization and quantification of amyloid precursor protein mRNA by in situ hybridization in the brains of normal, aneuploid, and lesioned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid precursor protein mRNA was localized in frozen sections from normal and experimentally lesioned adult mouse brain and from normal and aneuploid fetal mouse brain by in situ hybridization with a 35S-labeled mouse cDNA probe. The highest levels of hybridization in adult brain were associated with neurons, primarily in telencephalic structures. The dense labeling associated with hippocampal pyramidal cells was reduced significantly when the cells were eliminated by injection of the neurotoxin ibotenic acid but was not affected when electrolytic lesions were placed in the medial septum. Since the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein has been localized to mouse chromosome 16, the authors also examined the expression of this gene in the brains of mouse embryos with trisomy 16 and trisomy 19 at 15 days of gestation. RNA gel blot analysis and in situ hybridization showed a marked increase in amyloid precursor protein mRNA in the trisomy 16 mouse head and brain when compared with euploid littermates or with trisomy 19 mice

  15. Drosophila comet assay: insights, uses, and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Gaivão, Isabel; Sierra, L. María

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay, a very useful tool in genotoxicity and DNA repair testing, is being applied to Drosophila melanogaster since around 15 years ago, by several research groups. This organism is a valuable model for all kind of processes related to human health, including DNA damage response. The assay has been performed mainly in vivo using different larvae cell types (from brain, midgut, hemolymph, and imaginal disk), but also in vitro with the S2 cell line. Since its first application, it has...

  16. Drosophila by the dozen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  17. Olfactory learning in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Nehrkorn, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Animals are able to form associative memories and benefit from past experience. In classical conditioning an animal is trained to associate an initially neutral stimulus by pairing it with a stimulus that triggers an innate response. The neutral stimulus is commonly referred to as conditioned stimulus (CS) and the reinforcing stimulus as unconditioned stimulus (US). The underlying neuronal mechanisms and structures are an intensely investigated topic. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster...

  18. Selective Autophagy in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis P. Nezis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular self-eating and is a major pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic material by the lysosomal machinery. Autophagy functions as a cellular response in nutrient starvation, but it is also associated with the removal of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore plays an important role in the quality control of proteins and organelles. Although it was initially believed that autophagy occurs randomly in the cell, during the last years, there is growing evidence that sequestration and degradation of cytoplasmic material by autophagy can be selective. Given the important role of autophagy and selective autophagy in several disease-related processes such as neurodegeneration, infections, and tumorigenesis, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of selective autophagy, especially at the organismal level. Drosophila is an excellent genetically modifiable model organism exhibiting high conservation in the autophagic machinery. However, the regulation and mechanisms of selective autophagy in Drosophila have been largely unexplored. In this paper, I will present an overview of the current knowledge about selective autophagy in Drosophila.

  19. Působení extracelulárního adenosinu na buňky \\kur{Drosophila melanogaster}

    OpenAIRE

    HOLÁ, Hana

    2009-01-01

    The effects of extracellular adenosine on Drosophila melanogaster cell lines Cl.8+, Mbn-2, S2 were examined. The cells were grown in the complete medium and tested for growth rate with in presence or absence of adenosine, dipyridamole, uridine and deoxycoformycin. The S2 cells were tested for cAMP production in presence or absence of adenosine.

  20. High-Resolution Flow Cytometry: a Suitable Tool for Monitoring Aneuploid Prostate Cancer Cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Klaus; Ehemann, Volker; Wiessler, Manfred; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Didinger, Bernd; Mueller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2009-01-01

    If metastatic prostate cancer gets resistant to antiandrogen therapy, there are few treatment options, because prostate cancer is not very sensitive to cytostatic agents. Temozolomide (TMZ) as an orally applicable chemotherapeutic substance has been proven to be effective and well tolerated with occasional moderate toxicity especially for brain tumors and an application to prostate cancer cells seemed to be promising. Unfortunately, TMZ was inefficient in the treatment of symptomatic progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). The reasons could be a low sensitivity against TMZ the short plasma half-life of TMZ, non-adapted application regimens and additionally, the aneuploid DNA content of prostate cancer cells suggesting different sensitivity against therapeutical interventions e.g. radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Considerations to improve this unsatisfying situation resulted in the realization of higher local TMZ concentrations, sufficient to kill cells regardless of intrinsic cellular sensitivity and cell DNA-index. Therefore, we reformulated the TMZ by ligation to a peptide-based carrier system called TMZ-BioShuttle for intervention. The modular-composed carrier consists of a transmembrane transporter (CPP), connected to a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) cleavably-bound, which in turn was coupled with TMZ. The NLS-sequence allows an active delivery of the TMZ into the cell nucleus after transmembrane passage of the TMZ-BioShuttle and intra-cytoplasm enzymatic cleavage and separation from the CPP. This TMZ-BioShuttle could contribute to improve therapeutic options exemplified by the hormone refractory prostate cancer. The next step was to syllogize a qualified method monitoring cell toxic effects in a high sensitivity under consideration of the ploidy status. The high-resolution flow cytometric analysis showed to be an appropriate system for a better detection and distinction of several cell populations dependent on their different DNA

  1. High-Resolution Flow Cytometry: a Suitable Tool for Monitoring Aneuploid Prostate Cancer Cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Braun, Volker Ehemann, Manfred Wiessler, Ruediger Pipkorn, Bernd Didinger, Gabriele Mueller, Waldemar Waldeck

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available If metastatic prostate cancer gets resistant to antiandrogen therapy, there are few treatment options, because prostate cancer is not very sensitive to cytostatic agents. Temozolomide (TMZ as an orally applicable chemotherapeutic substance has been proven to be effective and well tolerated with occasional moderate toxicity especially for brain tumors and an application to prostate cancer cells seemed to be promising. Unfortunately, TMZ was inefficient in the treatment of symptomatic progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC. The reasons could be a low sensitivity against TMZ the short plasma half-life of TMZ, non-adapted application regimens and additionally, the aneuploid DNA content of prostate cancer cells suggesting different sensitivity against therapeutical interventions e.g. radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Considerations to improve this unsatisfying situation resulted in the realization of higher local TMZ concentrations, sufficient to kill cells regardless of intrinsic cellular sensitivity and cell DNA-index. Therefore, we reformulated the TMZ by ligation to a peptide-based carrier system called TMZ-BioShuttle for intervention. The modular-composed carrier consists of a transmembrane transporter (CPP, connected to a nuclear localization sequence (NLS cleavably-bound, which in turn was coupled with TMZ. The NLS-sequence allows an active delivery of the TMZ into the cell nucleus after transmembrane passage of the TMZ-BioShuttle and intra-cytoplasm enzymatic cleavage and separation from the CPP. This TMZ-BioShuttle could contribute to improve therapeutic options exemplified by the hormone refractory prostate cancer. The next step was to syllogize a qualified method monitoring cell toxic effects in a high sensitivity under consideration of the ploidy status. The high-resolution flow cytometric analysis showed to be an appropriate system for a better detection and distinction of several cell populations dependent on their

  2. SUMOylation in Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J. Courey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO, an ~90 amino acid ubiquitin-like protein, is highly conserved throughout the eukaryotic domain. Like ubiquitin, SUMO is covalently attached to lysine side chains in a large number of target proteins. In contrast to ubiquitin, SUMO does not have a direct role in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, like ubiquitin, SUMO does modulate protein function in a variety of other ways. This includes effects on protein conformation, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions. Significant insight into the in vivo role of SUMOylation has been provided by studies in Drosophila that combine genetic manipulation, proteomic, and biochemical analysis. Such studies have revealed that the SUMO conjugation pathway regulates a wide variety of critical cellular and developmental processes, including chromatin/chromosome function, eggshell patterning, embryonic pattern formation, metamorphosis, larval and pupal development, neurogenesis, development of the innate immune system, and apoptosis. This review discusses our current understanding of the diverse roles for SUMO in Drosophila development.

  3. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Drosophila and many other invertebrates, a subset of neurectodermal cells, called neuroblasts (NBs), delaminates and forms the neural primordium inside the embryo where they divide in an asymmetric, stem cell-like mode. The remainder of the neurectodermal cells that stay behind at the surface loose their neurogenic potential and later give rise to the ventral part of the epidermis. The genetic and molecular analysis of the mechanisms controlling specification and proliferation of NBs in the Drosophila embryo, which played a significant part in pioneering the field of modern developmental neurobiology, represents the topic of this review. PMID:24014455

  4. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the Spotted Wing Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Joanna C.; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A.; Cridland, Julie M; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A.; Lee, Ernest K.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zhang, Guojie; Frank G. Zalom; Walton, Vaughn M.; Begun, David J

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relativ...

  5. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yingxue Ren; Vera, Daniel L.; Kimberly A. Hughes; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the imm...

  6. Influencia de la estimulación ovárica durante un tratamiento de fecundación in vitro en la incidencia de aneuploidías embrionarias

    OpenAIRE

    Labarta Demur, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    La baja fecundidad humana podría deberse a la alta incidencia de anomalías cromosómicas embrionarias que justifica que hasta un 70% de las concepciones espontáneas no lleguen a término. La elevada tasa de aneuploidías observada en tratamientos de Fecundación in vitro (FIV) podría ser inherente a la especie humana o estar relacionada con los procedimientos derivados de la técnica, como las condiciones de cultivo in vitro o la estimulación ovárica (EO). Se ha especulado que esta última pudiera ...

  7. Construction of New Symplectic Cohomology S^2xS^2

    OpenAIRE

    Akhmedov, Anar

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we present new symplectic 4-manifolds with same integral cohomology as $S^{2}\\times S^{2}$. The generalization of this construction is given as well, an infinite family of symplectic 4-manifolds cohomology equivalent to $#_{(2g-1)}{(S^{2}\\times S^{2})}$ for any $g\\geq 2$. We also compute the Seiberg-Witten invariants of these manifolds.

  8. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild.

  9. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory. PMID:26965122

  10. Natural and Treated FeS2 in Li/FeS2 Coin Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Treated FeS2 samples were prepared by natural FeS2 samples which were ground first,heated in nitrogen and then washed in acid. The levels of impurity elements, primarily present as metallic oxides and sulfides, are higher in the natural FeS2 than those in the treated sample. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the grain sizes of treated FeS2 particles are smaller than those of natural FeS2 particles. The electrochemical performance of Li/treated FeS2 cells is attributed to the smaller grain sizes and higher purity of treated FeS2 particles in comparison to the natural FeS2sample.

  11. Suspended MoS2 devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Taiyu; Kang, Jinyoung; Liu, Renlong; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Changgu

    2013-03-01

    Single or a few layer MoS2 sheets have been reported to have high electric mobility and current on/off ratio comparable to those of silicon due to its semiconductor properties with bandgap of 1.3 ~ 1.9eV. However, its extremely high surface to volume ratio and low thickness prohibits it from reproducing its electronic properties on SiO2 substrates possibly because of charge scattering by surface charges and phonons. In order to investigate these surface effects, we fabricated MoS2 devices suspended from the SiO2 and characterized their electronic transport properties. We exfoliated single or a few layer MoS2 on SiO2 substrates first, and fabricated field effect transistors using e-beam lithography. After that, we suspended MoS2 sheets by etching SiO2 with hydrofluoric acid. We measured mobility and current on/off ratio before and after the etching process. We found that mobility of MoS2 devices increased by factor of 5-10 after etching for all devices. However, on/off ratio did not show significant variation. Our measurements suggest that atomically thin MoS2 devices are significantly affected by substrate surface and environment.

  12. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the spotted wing drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Joanna C; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A; Cridland, Julie M; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A; Lee, Ernest K; Kwok, Rosanna S; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G; Walton, Vaughn M; Begun, David J

    2013-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access. PMID:24142924

  13. Mutagenesis and homologous recombination in Drosophila cell lines using CRISPR/Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-12-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Drosophila S2 cells to generate targeted genetic mutations in more than 85% of alleles. By targeting a constitutive exon of the AGO1 gene, we demonstrate homozygous mutation in up to 82% of cells, thereby allowing the study of genetic knockouts in a Drosophila cell line for the first time. We have shown that homologous gene targeting is possible at 1–4% efficiency using this system, allowing for the construction of defined insertions and deletions. We demonstrate that a 1 kb homology arm length is optimal for integration by homologous gene targeting, and demonstrate its efficacy by tagging the endogenous AGO1 protein. This technology enables controlled genetic manipulation in Drosophila cell lines, and its simplicity offers the opportunity to study cellular phenotypes genome-wide.

  14. Nuclear Localization of the ERK MAP Kinase Mediated by Drosophila αPS2βPS Integrin and Importin-7

    OpenAIRE

    James, Brian P.; Bunch, Thomas A.; Krishnamoorthy, Srinivasan; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Brower, Danny L.

    2007-01-01

    The control of gene expression by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) requires its translocation into the nucleus. In Drosophila S2 cells nuclear accumulation of diphospho-ERK (dpERK) is greatly reduced by interfering double-stranded RNA against Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7) or by the expression of integrin mutants, either during active cell spreading or after stimulation by insulin. In both cases, total ERK phosphorylation (on Westerns) is n...

  15. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  16. Doble aneuploidía en un niño Colombiano: síndrome de Down–Klinefelter, con fenotipo de síndrome de Down = Double aneuploidy in a Colombian child: Down-Klinefelter syndrome with Down syndrome phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachajoa Londoño, Harry

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La ocurrencia de una doble aneuploidía en una misma persona es un evento relativamente raro. Se presenta el caso de un niño de siete meses de edad, de padres no consanguíneos con características clínicas de síndrome de Down y cariotipo 48XXY.

  17. LDPC decoder architecture for DVB-S2 and DVB-S2X standards

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Cédric; Boutillon, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    A particular type of conflict due to multiple-diagonal sub-matrices in the DVB-S2 parity-check matrices is known to complicate the implementation of the layered decoder architecture. The new matrices proposed in DVB-S2X no longer use such sub-matrices. For implementing a decoder compliant both with DVB-S2 and DVB-S2X, we propose an elegant solution which overcomes this conflicts relying on an efficient write disable of the memories, allowing a straightforward implementation of layered LDPC de...

  18. Highly stretchable MoS2 kirigami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakata, Paul Z.; Qi, Zenan; Campbell, David K.; Park, Harold S.

    2015-12-01

    We report the results of classical molecular dynamics simulations focused on studying the mechanical properties of MoS2 kirigami. Several different kirigami structures were studied based upon two simple non-dimensional parameters, which are related to the density of cuts, as well as the ratio of the overlapping cut length to the nanoribbon length. Our key findings are significant enhancements in tensile yield (by a factor of four) and fracture strains (by a factor of six) as compared to pristine MoS2 nanoribbons. These results, in conjunction with recent results on graphene, suggest that the kirigami approach may be generally useful for enhancing the ductility of two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  19. Drosophila neuroblasts retain the daughter centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Januschke, Jens; Llamazares, Salud; Reina, Jose; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2011-01-01

    During asymmetric mitosis, both in male Drosophila germline stem cells and in mouse embryo neural progenitors, the mother centrosome is retained by the self-renewed cell; hence suggesting that mother centrosome inheritance might contribute to stemness. We test this hypothesis in Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs) tracing photo converted centrioles and a daughter-centriole-specific marker generated by cloning the Drosophila homologue of human Centrobin. Here we show that upon asymmetric mitosis, the...

  20. Role of extracellular adenosine in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    FENCKOVÁ, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects of the role for extracellular adenosine in Drosophila. Reverse genetic, molecular and microscopic methods together with the most forefront Drosophila research techniques have been applied to elucidate the role of adenosine signaling in the regulation of development, physiology and metabolism of Drosophila larvae. The thesis helps to establish the model for extracellular adenosine as a stress-signal for the release of energy stores. It also describes the e...

  1. Signal Propagation in Drosophila Central Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gouwens, Nathan W.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila is an important model organism for investigating neural development, neural morphology, neurophysiology, and neural correlates of behaviors. However, almost nothing is known about how electrical signals propagate in Drosophila neurons. Here we address these issues in antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs), one of the most well-studied classes of Drosophila neurons. We use morphological and electrophysiological data to deduce the passive membrane properties of these neurons and to b...

  2. DVB-S2 FEC Encoder: Implementation of DVB-S2 FEC encoder in FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Myhr, Reidar

    2007-01-01

    This Master Thesis describe how DVB-S2 Forward Error Correction (FEC) encoding can be implemented in hardware like a FPGA. It include the design, simulation, verification and synthesis of a complete encoder for the DVB-S2 FEC system. First the Thesis gives a introduction to the history behind DVB-S2 and the FEC system. It describe shortly the theory behind the error correcting codes used in the FEC, BCH and LDPC codes. To get an effective implementation in hardware it was necessary to studies...

  3. Integrative Model of Drosophila Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, William B.; Andrew D Straw; Dickinson, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for simulating the flight dynamics and control strategies of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The framework consists of five main components: an articulated rigid-body simulation, a model of the aerodynamic forces and moments, a sensory systems model, a control model, and an environment model. In the rigid-body simulation the fly is represented by a system of three rigid bodies connected by a pair of actuated ball joints. At each instant of th...

  4. Leigh Syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A.; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LS Surf1 patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS ba...

  5. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Revadi; Sébastien Lebreton; Peter Witzgall; Gianfranco Anfora; Teun Dekker; Becher, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly’s reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Se...

  6. Visual attention in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Sareen, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    There is such vast amount of visual information in our surroundings at any time that filtering out the important information for further processing is a basic requirement for any visual system. This is accomplished by deploying attention to focus on one source of sensory inputs to the exclusion of others (Luck and Mangun 2009). Attention has been studied extensively in humans and non human primates (NHPs). In Drosophila, visual attention was first demonstrated in 1980 (Wolf and Heisenberg 198...

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster Cajal body

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ji-Long; Murphy, Christine; Buszczak, Michael; Clatterbuck, Sarah; Goodman, Robyn; Gall, Joseph G.

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles that are usually identified by the marker protein p80-coilin. Because no orthologue of coilin is known in Drosophila melanogaster, we identified D. melanogaster CBs using probes for other components that are relatively diagnostic for CBs in vertebrate cells. U85 small CB–specific RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA, the survival of motor neurons protein, and fibrillarin occur together in a nuclear body that is closely associated with the nucleolus. Based on its...

  8. Covalent functionalization of MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Presolski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available MoS2 nanosheets have been used extensively in catalytic, electronic, optoelectronic and electrochemical research due to their diverse properties that are often determined by the method of fabrication. Fine tuning of the colloidal behaviour, specific interactions and further reactivity of the materials is typically achieved by subsequent surface modifications. Arguably the most permanent of these involve covalent attachment of molecules to either the molybdenum or the sulphur atoms in the lattice. Here we review of the nascent field of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD covalent functionalization and explore the prospective avenues for hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials.

  9. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila. PMID:24907371

  10. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  11. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound 125I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to 125I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to 125I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development

  12. AdS2xS2 as an exact heterotic string background

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando, Domenico

    2005-01-01

    An exact heterotic string theory on an AdS2xS2 background supported by an electromagnetic flux is found as a marginal deformation of an SL(2,R)xSU(2) WZW model. Based on a talk given at NATO Advanced Study Institute and EC Summer School on String Theory: from Gauge Interactions to Cosmology, Cargese, Corsica, France, 7 Jun - 19 Jun 2004.

  13. Superstrings in AdS2 x S2 x T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the type IIB Green-Schwarz superstring theory on AdS2 x S2 x T6 supported by homogeneous Ramond-Ramond 5-form flux and its type IIA T-duals. One motivation is to understand the solution of this theory based on integrability. This background is a limit of a 1/4 supersymmetric supergravity solution describing four intersecting D3-branes and represents a consistent embedding of AdS2 x S2 into critical superstring theory. Its AdS2 x S2 part with corresponding fermions can be described by a classically integrable PSU(1, 1|2)/SO(1, 1) x U(1) supercoset sigma model. We point out that since the RR 5-form field has non-zero components along the 6-torus directions one cannot, in general, factorize the 10D superstring theory into the supercoset part plus six bosons and six additional massless fermions. Still, we demonstrate that the full superstring model (i) is classically integrable, at least to quadratic order in fermions, and (ii) admits a consistent classical truncation to the supercoset part. Following the analogy with other integrable backgrounds and starting with the finite-gap equations of the PSU(1, 1|2)/SO(1, 1) x U(1) supercoset, we propose a set of asymptotic Bethe ansatz equations for a subset of the quantum string states.

  14. Regulation of a Drosophila cGMP-PDE by prenylation and interaction with a prenyl-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Jonathan P.; Cleghon, Vaughn; Houslay, Miles Douglas; Davies, Shireen A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Post-translational modification by isoprenylation is a pivotal process for the correct functioning of many signalling proteins. The Drosophila melanogaster cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, DmPDE5/6, possesses a CaaX-box prenylation signal-motif, as do several novel cGMP-PDEs from insect and echinoid species. DmPDE5/6 is prenylated in vivo at Cys1128 and is localised to the plasma membrane when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. Site-directed mutagenesis of the prenylated c...

  15. Biology and physiology of Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, quickly emerged as a devastating invasive pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe. To better understand the population dynamics of D. suzukii, we reviewed recent work on juvenile development, adult reproduction, and seasonal variation in...

  16. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the mechanisms controlling radioresistant in Drosophila the sensibility of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster to sex-linked recessive lethal mutations induced by 5kR Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 0,006 M EMS or 0,25% of caffeine was determined. (M.A.C.)

  17. Drosophila and Beer: An Experimental Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvink, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a popular organism for studying genetics and development. Maintaining Drosophila on medium prepared with varying concentrations of beer and evaluating the effects on reproduction, life cycle stages and other factors is one of the exercises that is versatile and applicable to many student levels.

  18. Circadian transcription contributes to core period determination in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kadener

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Clock-Cycle (CLK-CYC heterodimer constitutes a key circadian transcription complex in Drosophila. CYC has a DNA-binding domain but lacks an activation domain. Previous experiments also indicate that most of the transcriptional activity of CLK-CYC derives from the glutamine-rich region of its partner CLK. To address the role of transcription in core circadian timekeeping, we have analyzed the effects of a CYC-viral protein 16 (VP16 fusion protein in the Drosophila system. The addition of this potent and well-studied viral transcriptional activator (VP16 to CYC imparts to the CLK-CYC-VP16 complex strongly enhanced transcriptional activity relative to that of CLK-CYC. This increase is manifested in flies expressing CYC-VP16 as well as in S2 cells. These flies also have increased levels of CLK-CYC direct target gene mRNAs as well as a short period, implicating circadian transcription in period determination. A more detailed examination of reporter gene expression in CYC-VP16-expressing flies suggests that the short period is due at least in part to a more rapid transcriptional phase. Importantly, the behavioral effects require a period (per promoter and are therefore unlikely to be merely a consequence of generally higher PER levels. This indicates that the CLK-CYC-VP16 behavioral effects are a consequence of increased per transcription. All of this also suggests that the timing of transcriptional activation and not the activation itself is the key event responsible for the behavioral effects observed in CYC-VP16-expressing flies. The results taken together indicate that circadian transcription contributes to core circadian function in Drosophila.

  19. Identification of Drosophila Gene Products Required for Phagocytosis of Candidaalbicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is a highly conserved aspect of innate immunity. We used Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells as a model system to study the phagocytosis of Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans, by screening an RNAi library representing 7,216 fly genes conserved among metazoans. After rescreening the initial genes identified and eliminating certain classes of housekeeping genes, we identified 184 genes required for efficient phagocytosis of C. albicans. Diverse biological processes are represented, with actin cytoskeleton regulation, vesicle transport, signaling, and transcriptional regulation being prominent. Secondary screens using Escherichia coli and latex beads revealed several genes specific for C. albicans phagocytosis. Characterization of one of those gene products, Macroglobulin complement related (Mcr, shows that it is secreted, that it binds specifically to the surface of C. albicans, and that it promotes its subsequent phagocytosis. Mcr is closely related to the four Drosophila thioester proteins (Teps, and we show that TepII is required for efficient phagocytosis of E. coli (but not C. albicans or Staphylococcus aureus and that TepIII is required for the efficient phagocytosis of S. aureus (but not C. albicans or E. coli. Thus, this family of fly proteins distinguishes different pathogens for subsequent phagocytosis.

  20. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A. Apostolopoulou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances.

  1. In Focus: Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, across perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jana C; Bruck, Denny J; Dreves, Amy J; Ioriatti, Claudio; Vogt, Heidrun; Baufeld, Peter

    2011-11-01

    In August 2008, the first detection of the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, to the North America mainland in California caused great concern, as the fly was found infesting a variety of commercial fruits. Subsequent detections followed in Oregon, Washington, Florida and British Columbia in 2009; in Utah, North Carolina, South Carolina, Michigan, and Louisiana in 2010; and in Virginia, Montana, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland and Mexico in 2011. In Europe, it has been detected in Italy and Spain in 2009 and in France in 2010. Economic costs to the grower from D. suzukii include the increased cost of production (increased labor and materials for chemical inputs, monitoring and other management tools) and crop loss. An effective response to the invasion of D. suzukii requires proper taxonomic identification at the initial phase, understanding basic biology and phenology, developing management tools, transferring information and technology quickly to user groups, and evaluating the impact of the research and extension program on an economic, social, and environmental level. As D. suzukii continues to expand its range, steps must be initiated in each new region to educate and inform the public as well as formulate management tactics suitable for the crops and growing conditions in each. PMID:21990168

  2. Novel Bonding Character of the Cyclic AlS2 and GaS2 Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG, Xin- Yu

    2001-01-01

    The geometries, the harmonic vibrational frequencies and thebooding properties have been predicted for cyclic Als2 andGaS2 species at the density functional theiry(DFT), MPn (n=2, 3, 4), QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) levels with 6-311 + G(2df)basis set. Tne novel bonding was discussed.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of isomeric CH3S2 and CH3S+2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining molecular beam photodissociation and photoionization measurements with ab initio Gaussian-2 (G2) calculations on the CH3S2 and CH3S+2 systems, we have shown that CH3SS is the dominant isomer formed in the photodissociation process, CH3SSCH3+hν(193 nm) →CH3S2+CH3. The experimental ionization energy for CH3SS (8.97±0.02 eV) and the heat of formation at 0 K for CH3SS+ (217.7±1.2 kcal/mol) are in excellent agreement with the G2 results. The photoionization efficiency spectrum observed for CH3SS is also consistent with the theoretical prediction that the Franck--Condon factor for the photoionization process, CH3SS+hν →CH3SS++e-, is not favorable. Based on the statistical modeling of experimental rates obtained previously for HS loss in the unimolecular decomposition of CH3SSCH+3 and the comparison with G2 ab initio predictions, we conclude that CH2SSH+ is most likely the isomer structure formed near the experimental appearance energy (11.07 eV) observed for the photodissociative ionization process, CH3SSCH3+hν→CH3S+2+CH3+e-

  4. The Spotted Wing Drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931) – Monitoring And First Records In Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Łabanowska Barbara H.; Piotrowski Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) (SWD) monitoring was carried out between 2012-2014 in eight locations. In order to determine the presence of Drosophila suzukii, several types of traps and baits were used. In 2014, Polish (prototype of Drosinal) and Spanish (Cera Trap) traps and baits were used in our study. In each year, traps were placed on the plantations of blueberry, strawberry, raspberry and at a wholesale market at the beginning of July, and monitored once or twice a we...

  5. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm. PMID

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiongbin; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Junqing; Bi, Guiqi

    2016-09-01

    Drosophila albomicans has been widely used as an important animal model for chromosome evolution. In this study, the mitochondrial genome sequence of this species is determined and described for the first time. The mitochondrial genome (15 849 bp) encompasses two rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 13 protein-coding genes. Genome content and structure are similar to those reported from other Drosophila mitochondrial genomes. Phylogeny analysis indicates that D. albomicans have a closer genetic relationship with Drosophil aincompta and Drosophil alittoralis. This mitochondrial genome is potentially important for studying molecular evolution and conservation genetics in Drosophila genus. PMID:26358579

  7. Influence of relaxation effects on probabilities of the 2s2p3 S2—2s2 2p2 3p1,2intercombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁萍; 刘欣生; 等

    2003-01-01

    Transition probabilities of the 2s2p3 5S2-2s2 2P2 3P1,2 intercombination transitions in NII have been calculated by using a large-scale multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method.In the calculation themost important effects of relativity,correlation,and relaxation are considered.From the calculated transition probabilities,the lifetime of the s22p3 5S2 metastable state is derived.The result is in excellent agreement agreement with the latest experimental result.In the meantime the influence of anomalously strong relaxation effects on probabilities of the 2s2p3 5S2-2s2 2p2 3P1,2 lines in NII have been found.

  8. Rheb-TOR signaling promotes protein synthesis, but not glucose or amino acid import, in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Cruz Aida

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras-related GTPase, Rheb, regulates the growth of animal cells. Genetic and biochemical tests place Rheb upstream of the target of rapamycin (TOR protein kinase, and downstream of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1/TSC2 and the insulin-signaling pathway. TOR activity is regulated by nutritional cues, suggesting that Rheb might either control, or respond to, nutrient availability. Results We show that Rheb and TOR do not promote the import of glucose, bulk amino acids, or arginine in Drosophila S2 cells, but that both gene products are important regulators of ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, and cell size. S2 cell size, protein synthesis, and glucose import were largely insensitive to manipulations of insulin signaling components, suggesting that cellular energy levels and TOR activity can be maintained through insulin/PI3K-independent mechanisms in S2 cell culture. In vivo in Drosophila larvae, however, we found that insulin signaling can regulate protein synthesis, and thus may affect TOR activity. Conclusion Rheb-TOR signaling controls S2 cell growth by promoting ribosome production and protein synthesis, but apparently not by direct effects on the import of amino acids or glucose. The effect of insulin signaling upon TOR activity varies according to cellular type and context.

  9. Study of tribological behavior of Cu–MoS2 and Ag–MoS2 nanocomposite lubricants

    OpenAIRE

    An, V.; Anisimov, E.; Druzyanova, V.; Burtsev, N.; Shulepov, I.; Khaskelberg, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tribological behavior of Cu–MoS2 and Ag–MoS2 nanocomposite lubricant was studied. Cu nanoparticles produced by electrical explosion of copper wires and Ag nanoparticles prepared by electrospark erosion were employed as metal cladding modifiers of MoS2 nanolamellar particles. The tribological tests showed Cu–MoS2 and Ag–MoS2 nanocomposite lubricants changed the friction coefficient of the initial grease and essentially improved its wear resistance.

  10. The S-matrix algebra of the AdS2 X S2 superstring

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, Ben; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we find the Yangian algebra responsible for the integrability of the AdS2 X S2 X T^6 superstring in the planar limit. We demonstrate the symmetry of the corresponding exact S-matrix in the massive sector, including the presence of the secret symmetry. We give two alternative presentations of the Hopf algebra, along with related discussions on the issue of evaluation representations. We study the classical r-matrix, and re-discover the need for a secret symmetry also in this context. Finally, taking the simplifying zero-coupling limit of the S-matrix as a generating R-matrix for the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz, we obtain an effective model of free fermions on a periodic spin-chain. This limit should provide hints to the one-loop anomalous dimension of the mysterious superconformal quantum mechanics dual to the superstring theory in this geometry.

  11. Supersymmetric Branes in AdS_2 x S^2 x CY_3

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, A; Thompson, D; Yin, X; Simons, Aaron; Strominger, Andrew; Thompson, David; Yin, Xi

    2004-01-01

    The problem of finding supersymmetric brane configurations in the near-horizon attractor geometry of a Calabi-Yau black hole with magnetic-electric charges (p^I,q_I) is considered. Half-BPS configurations, which are static for some choice of global AdS2 coordinate, are found for wrapped brane configurations with essentially any four-dimensional charges (u^I,v_I). Half-BPS multibrane configurations can also be found for any collection of wrapped branes provided they all have the same sign for the symplectic inner product p^Iv_I-u^Iq_I of their charges with the black hole charges. This contrasts with the Minkowski problem for which a mutually preserved supersymmetry requires alignment of all the charge vectors. The radial position of the branes in global AdS2 is determined by the phase of their central charge.

  12. A Drosophila metallophosphoesterase mediates deglycosylation of rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jinguo; Li, Yi; Xia, Wenjing; Reddig, Keith; Hu, Wen; XIE, Wei; Li, Hong-Sheng; Han, Junhai

    2011-01-01

    The glycosylation status of Rhodopsin controls its trafficking and stability, and is hence critical for photoreceptor function. Here, a Drosophila metallophosphoesterase is identified that affects Rhodopsin glycosylation by regulating the activity of an enzyme involved in glycan processing.

  13. Tuberous sclerosis complex: A Drosophila connection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Arun; Girimaji, SC

    2001-01-01

    Recent findings based on experiments with Drosophila melanogaster significantly advance our understanding of a human disease known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The present note begins with background information and goes on to explain what these findings are.

  14. Behavioral modification in choice process of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Shunpeng; (王顺鹏); TANG; Shiming; (唐世明); LI; Yan; (李; 岩); GUO; Aike; (郭爱克)

    2003-01-01

    In visual operant conditioning of Drosophila at the flight simulator, only motor output of flies--yaw torque--is recorded, which is involved in the conditioning process. The current study used a newly-designed data analysis method to study the torque distribution of Drosophila. Modification of torque distribution represents the effects of operant conditioning on flies' behavioral mode. Earlier works[10] showed that, when facing contradictory visual cues, flies could make choices based upon the relative weightiness of different cues, and it was demonstrated that mushroom bodies might play an important role in such choice behavior. The new "torque-position map" method was used to explore the CS-US associative learning and choice behavior in Drosophila from the aspect of its behavioral mode. Finally, this work also discussed various possible neural bases involved in visual associative learning, choice processing and modification processing of the behavioral mode in the visual operant conditioning of Drosophila.

  15. ATAXIN-2 activates PERIOD translation to sustain circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chunghun; Allada, Ravi

    2013-05-17

    Evidence for transcriptional feedback in circadian timekeeping is abundant, yet little is known about the mechanisms underlying translational control. We found that ATAXIN-2 (ATX2), an RNA-associated protein involved in neurodegenerative disease, is a translational activator of the rate-limiting clock component PERIOD (PER) in Drosophila. ATX2 specifically interacted with TWENTY-FOUR (TYF), an activator of PER translation. RNA interference-mediated depletion of Atx2 or the expression of a mutant ATX2 protein that does not associate with polyadenylate-binding protein (PABP) suppressed behavioral rhythms and decreased abundance of PER. Although ATX2 can repress translation, depletion of Atx2 from Drosophila S2 cells inhibited translational activation by RNA-tethered TYF and disrupted the association between TYF and PABP. Thus, ATX2 coordinates an active translation complex important for PER expression and circadian rhythms. PMID:23687047

  16. The Drosophila Anion Exchanger (DAE lacks a detectable interaction with the spectrin cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Base Christine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current models suggest that the spectrin cytoskeleton stabilizes interacting ion transport proteins at the plasma membrane. The human erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1 was the first membrane transport protein found to be associated with the spectrin cytoskeleton. Here we evaluated a conserved anion exchanger from Drosophila (DAE as a marker for studies of the downstream effects of spectrin cytoskeleton mutations. Results Sequence comparisons established that DAE belongs to the SLC4A1-3 subfamily of anion exchangers that includes human AE1. Striking sequence conservation was observed in the C-terminal membrane transport domain and parts of the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, but not in the proposed ankyrin-binding site. Using an antibody raised against DAE and a recombinant transgene expressed in Drosophila S2 cells DAE was shown to be a 136 kd plasma membrane protein. A major site of expression was found in the stomach acid-secreting region of the larval midgut. DAE codistributed with an infolded subcompartment of the basal plasma membrane of interstitial cells. However, spectrin did not codistribute with DAE at this site or in anterior midgut cells that abundantly expressed both spectrin and DAE. Ubiquitous knockdown of DAE with dsRNA eliminated antibody staining and was lethal, indicating that DAE is an essential gene product in Drosophila. Conclusions Based on the lack of colocalization and the lack of sequence conservation at the ankyrin-binding site, it appears that the well-characterized interaction between AE1 and the spectrin cytoskeleton in erythrocytes is not conserved in Drosophila. The results establish a pattern in which most of the known interactions between the spectrin cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane in mammals do not appear to be conserved in Drosophila.

  17. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens Bergwitz; Wee, Mark J.; Sumi Sinha; Joanne Huang; Charles DeRobertis; Mensah, Lawrence B.; Jonathan Cohen; Adam Friedman; Meghana Kulkarni; Yanhui Hu; Arunachalam Vinayagam; Michael Schnall-Levin; Bonnie Berger; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. ...

  18. RNA Binding Specificity of Drosophila Muscleblind†

    OpenAIRE

    Goers, Emily S.; Voelker, Rodger B.; Gates, Devika P.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Members of the muscleblind family of RNA binding proteins found in Drosophila and mammals are key players in both the human disease myotonic dystrophy and the regulation of alternative splicing. Recently, the mammalian muscleblind-like protein, MBNL1, has been shown to have interesting RNA binding properties with both endogenous and disease-related RNA targets. Here we report the characterization of RNA binding properties of the Drosophila muscleblind protein Mbl. Mutagenesis of double-strand...

  19. The Digestive Tract of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Bassler, Bl; Lichten, M; Schupbach, G.; Lemaitre, Bruno; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The digestive tract plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Far from being a passive tube, it provides the first line of defense against pathogens and maintains energy homeostasis by exchanging neuronal and endocrine signals with other organs. Historically neglected, the gut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has recently come to the forefront of Drosophila research. Areas as diverse as stem cell biology, neurobiology, metabolism, and immunity are benefitting ...

  20. The Drosophila cyst stem cell lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Zoller, Richard; Schulz, Cordula

    2012-01-01

    In all animals, germline cells differentiate in intimate contact with somatic cells and interactions between germline and soma are particularly important for germline development and function. In the male gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, the developing germline cells are enclosed by somatic cyst cells. The cyst cells are derived from cyst stem cells (CySCs) of somatic origin and codifferentiate with the germline cells. The fast generation cycle and the genetic tractability of Drosophila has ...

  1. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Wee, Mark J.; Sinha, Sumi; Huang, Joanne Hyunjung; DeRobertis, Charles; Mensah, Lawrence; Cohen, Jonathan Brewer; Friedman, Adam Amiel Laufer; Kulkarni, Meghana; Hu, Yanhui; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Mohr, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. ...

  2. On the Morphology of the Drosophila Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Rotstein; Achim Paululat

    2016-01-01

    The circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster represents an easily amenable genetic model whose analysis at different levels, i.e., from single molecules up to functional anatomy, has provided new insights into general aspects of cardiogenesis, heart physiology and cardiac aging, to name a few examples. In recent years, the Drosophila heart has also attracted the attention of researchers in the field of biomedicine. This development is mainly due to the fact that several genes causing hum...

  3. Saccadic Body Turns in walking Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart R.H. Geurten

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster structures its optic flow during flight by interspersing translational movements with abrupt body rotations. Whether these ‘body saccades’ are accompanied by steering movements of the head is a matter of debate. By tracking single flies moving freely in an arena, we now discovered that walking Drosophila also perform saccades. Movement analysis revealed that the flies separate rotational from translational movements by quickly turning their bodies by 15 degrees within a tenth of a second. Although walking flies moved their heads by up to 20 degrees about their bodies, their heads moved with the bodies during saccadic turns. This saccadic strategy contrasts with the head saccades reported for e.g. blowflies and honeybees, presumably reflecting optical constraints: modelling revealed that head saccades as described for these latter insects would hardly affect the retinal input in Drosophila because of the lower acuity of its compound eye. The absence of head saccades in Drosophila was associated with the absence of haltere oscillations, which seem to guide head movements in other flies. In addition to adding new twists to Drosophila walking behavior, our analysis shows that Drosophila does not turn its head relative to its body when turning during walking.

  4. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thanh Men

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity.

  5. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Tran Thanh; Thanh, Duong Ngoc Van; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hattori, Gen; Arii, Masayuki; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-01-01

    Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm) gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity. PMID:27247940

  6. Symmetry lowering in LaOBiS2. A mother material for BiS2-based layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report X-ray diffraction studies of single-crystal samples of LaOBiS2 and CeOBiS2, which are mother materials for BiS2-based layered superconductors. The structural symmetry in LaOBiS2 is lowered from tetragonal to monoclinic, whereas no such symmetry lowering occurs in CeOBiS2. Crystal structure analysis demonstrates that the space group of LaOBiS2 is monoclinic P21m. The in-plane S atoms uniformly shift along the a-axis in each BiS2 layer. Because the directions of the shift are opposite in the two adjacent BiS2 layers, the spatial inversion symmetry remains. The distortion is attributed to the in-plane lattice mismatch between the BiS2 layers and the block layers. (author)

  7. Current Recommendations for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, in PNW Blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, was reported in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia) in 2009. The fly is able to oviposit directly into intact ripe and ripening fruit, so it is of great economic concern to the small fruit industries in region. Fruit i...

  8. Current Recommendations for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, in PNW Strawberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, was reported in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia) in 2009. The fly is able to oviposit directly into intact ripe and ripening fruit, so it is of great economic concern to the small fruit industries in region. Fruit i...

  9. The susceptibility of small fruits and cherries to Spotted Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is native to Asia and has been detected in the North American mainland and Europe in 2008-10. SWD is a serious economic pest because it lays eggs within ripening fruit before harvest which can lead to crop loss. The aim ...

  10. Behavioral and antennal responses of spotted wing drosophila, drosophila suzukii, to volatiles from fruit extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native to Southeast Asia, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, has become a serious pest of soft-skinned fruit crops since its introduction into North America and Europe in 2008. Current monitoring strategies use baits based on fermentation products; however, to date, no fruit-based vola...

  11. Current Recommendations for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, in PNW Caneberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, was reported in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia) in 2009. The fly is able to oviposit directly into intact ripe and ripening fruit, so it is of great economic concern to the small fruit industries in region. Fruit i...

  12. Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: drosophilidae), trapped with combinations of wines and vinegars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field trapping experiments evaluated wine and vinegar baits for spotted wing drosophila flies, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), and assessed variance in biat attractiveness with wit type, vinegar type, and bait age. A mixture of apple cider vinegar and a Merlot wine attracted more flies than a mixtur...

  13. The modulation of Schottky barriers of metal-MoS2 contacts via BN-MoS2 heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; Feng, Liping; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Zhengtang

    2016-06-22

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we systematically studied the effect of BN-MoS2 heterostructure on the Schottky barriers of metal-MoS2 contacts. Two types of FETs are designed according to the area of the BN-MoS2 heterostructure. Results show that the vertical and lateral Schottky barriers in all the studied contacts, irrespective of the work function of the metal, are significantly reduced or even vanish when the BN-MoS2 heterostructure substitutes the monolayer MoS2. Only the n-type lateral Schottky barrier of Au/BN-MoS2 contact relates to the area of the BN-MoS2 heterostructure. Notably, the Pt-MoS2 contact with n-type character is transformed into a p-type contact upon substituting the monolayer MoS2 by a BN-MoS2 heterostructure. These changes of the contact natures are ascribed to the variation of Fermi level pinning, work function and charge distribution. Analysis demonstrates that the Fermi level pinning effects are significantly weakened for metal/BN-MoS2 contacts because no gap states dominated by MoS2 are formed, in contrast to those of metal-MoS2 contacts. Although additional BN layers reduce the interlayer interaction and the work function of the metal, the Schottky barriers of metal/BN-MoS2 contacts still do not obey the Schottky-Mott rule. Moreover, different from metal-MoS2 contacts, the charges transfer from electrodes to the monolayer MoS2, resulting in an increment of the work function of these metals in metal/BN-MoS2 contacts. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the future design of new MoS2-based FETs with ohmic contact or p-type character. PMID:27282959

  14. MoS2 PARTICLES MODIFIED WITH POLYSTYRENE FOR PRODUCING Ni–PS/MoS2 COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    ZHONGJIA HUANG; DANGSHENG XIONG

    2008-01-01

    The MoS2 particles were coated with polystyrene and can be written as PS/MoS2 hereinafter. Ni–PS/MoS2 coatings and Ni–MoS2 coatings were produced by PC electrodeposition technique. The surface morphology of Ni–PS/MoS2 coating was examined and compared with those of Ni–MoS2 coating. The effect of particle concentrations on the volume percent of particles incorporated in the coatings was investigated. And the microhardness of coatings was also investigated. Results show that the surface morphol...

  15. Electron microscopy studies on MoS2 nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilsgaard

    Industrial-style MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts are studied using electron microscopy. The MoS2 nanostructures are imaged with single-atom sensitivity to reveal the catalytically important edge structures. Furthermore, the in-situ formation of MoS2 crystals is imaged for the first time....

  16. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    OpenAIRE

    James Angus Chandler; James, Pamela M.; Guillaume Jospin; Lang, Jenna M.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adu...

  17. FlyBase: the Drosophila database. The Flybase Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    FlyBase is a database of genetic and molecular data concerning Drosophila. FlyBase is maintained as a relational database (in Sybase). The scope of FlyBase includes: genes, alleles (and phenotypes), aberrations, pointers to sequence data, clones, stock lists, Drosophila workers and bibliographic references. FlyBase is also available on CD-ROM for Macintosh systems (Encyclopaedia of Drosophila).

  18. Characterization of the equine infectious anaemia virus S2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Wilson, S A; Mitrophanous, K A

    2000-09-01

    S2 is an accessory protein of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV), the function of which is unknown. In order to gain insight into the function of S2, the intracellular localization of the protein, its interaction with viral proteins and its incorporation into viral particles have been investigated. Immunolocalization of S2 revealed punctate staining in the cytoplasm and the S2 protein co-precipitated with the EIAV Gag precursor. Despite overexpression of S2 through the use of a codon-optimized sequence, there was no preferential association of S2 with EIAV particles. These data suggest that S2 may function to organize the Gag protein during particle assembly in the cytoplasm but that it is unlikely to be involved in the early stages of the virus life-cycle. PMID:10950976

  19. Supergravity background of λ-deformed model for AdS2 × S2 supercoset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsato, R.; Tseytlin, A. A.; Wulff, L.

    2016-04-01

    Starting with the F ˆ / G supercoset model corresponding to the AdSn ×Sn superstring one can define the λ-model of arxiv:arXiv:1409.1538 either as a deformation of the F ˆ / F ˆ gauged WZW model or as an integrable one-parameter generalisation of the non-abelian T-dual of the AdSn ×Sn superstring sigma model with respect to the whole supergroup F ˆ . Here we consider the case of n = 2 and find the explicit form of the 4d target space background for the λ-model for the PSU (1 , 1 | 2) / SO (1 , 1) × SO (2) supercoset. We show that this background represents a solution of type IIB 10d supergravity compactified on a 6-torus with only metric, dilaton Φ and the RR 5-form (represented by a 2-form F in 4d) being non-trivial. This implies that the λ-model is Weyl invariant at the quantum level and thus defines a consistent superstring sigma model. The supergravity solution we find is different from the one in arXiv:1410.1886 which should correspond to a version of the λ-model where only the bosonic subgroup of F ˆ is gauged. Still, the two solutions have equivalent scaling limit of arxiv:arXiv:1504.07213 leading to the isometric background for the metric and eΦ F which is related to the η-deformed AdS2 ×S2 sigma model of arXiv:1309.5850. Similar results are expected in the AdS3 ×S3 and AdS5 ×S5 cases.

  20. String theory in the Penrose limit of AdS2xS2 spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The string theory in the Penrose limit of AdS2xS2 is investigated. The specific Penrose limit is the background known as the Nappi-Witten spacetime, which is a plane-wave background with an axion field. The string theory on it is given as the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) model on nonsemi-simple group H4. It is found that, in the past literature, an important type of irreducible representations of the corresponding algebra, h4, were missed. We present these 'new' representations, which have the type of continuous series representations. All three types of representations of the previous literature can be obtained from the new representations by setting the momenta in the theory to special values. Then we realized the affine currents of the WZNW model in terms of four bosonic free fields and constructed the spectrum of the theory by acting the negative frequency modes of free fields on the ground level states in the h4 continuous series representation. The spectrum is shown to be free of ghosts, after the Virasoro constraints are satisfied. In particular we argued that there is no need for constraining one of the longitudinal momenta to have unitarity. The tachyon vertex operator, that correspond to a particular state in the ground level of the string spectrum, is constructed. The operator products of the vertex operator with the currents and the energy-momentum tensor are shown to have the correct forms, with the correct conformal weight of the vertex operator

  1. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  2. Gold nanoparticles on MoS2 layered crystal flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic layered crystal MoS2 is considered as one of the most promising and efficient semiconductor materials for future transistors, photoelectronics, and electrocatalysis. To boost MoS2-based material applications, one direction is to grow physically and chemically reactive nanoparticles onto MoS2. Here we report on a simple route to synthesis crystalized MoS2–Au complexes. The gold nanoparticles were grown on MoS2 flakes through a wet method in the oxygen free environment at room temperature. Nanoparticles with diameters varying from 9 nm to 429 nm were controlled by the molar ratios of MoS2 and HAuCl4 precursors. MoS2 host flakes keep intrinsic honeycomb layered structures and the Au nanoparticles cubic-center crystal microstructures. From product chemical states analysis, the synthesis was found driven by redox reactions between the sulphide and the chloroauric acid. Photoluminescence measurement showed that introducing Au nanoparticles onto MoS2 stacks substantially prompted excitonic transitions of stacks, as an analogy for doping Si wafers with dopants. Such composites may have potential applications in wide ranges similar as the doped Si. - Highlights: • The Au nanoparticles were decorated on MoS2 in oxygen free ambiences via a wet method. • The Au nanoparticles are size-controllable and crystalized. • Chemical reaction scheme was clarified. • The MoS2–Au complexes have strong photoluminescent properties

  3. Bending response of single layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Si; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-03-01

    Using molecular mechanics (or dynamics) simulations, three different approaches, including the targeted molecular mechanics, four-point bending and nanotube methods, are employed to investigate the bending response of single layer MoS2 (SLMoS2), among which four-point bending is the most accurate approach to determine the bending stiffness according to the continuum theory. It is found that when the bending curvature radius is large enough (e.g. >4 nm), three approaches will give the same bending stiffness of SLMoS2 and the bending behavior is isotropic for SLMoS2, whereas the nanotube method with small tubes (e.g. theory, the revised Stillinger-Weber (SW) and reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potentials can give the reasonable bending stiffness of SLMoS2 (8.7-13.4 eV) as well as the effective deformed conformation. In addition, since the Mo-S bond deformation of SLMoS2 under bending is similar to that under in-plane tension/compression, the continuum bending theory can quite accurately predict the bending stiffness of SLMoS2 if a reasonable thickness of SLMoS2 is given. For SLMoS2, the reasonable thickness should be larger than the distance between its two S atomic planes and lower than the distance between two Mo atomic planes of bulk MoS2 crystal, e.g. 0.375-0.445 nm.

  4. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human. PMID:26679112

  5. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila. PMID:20360379

  6. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Revadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly’s reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools.

  7. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revadi, Santosh; Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Dekker, Teun; Becher, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly's reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools. PMID:26463074

  8. Volatile pheromone signalling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dean P

    2012-03-01

    Once captured by the antenna, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA) binds to an extracellular binding protein called LUSH that undergoes a conformational shift upon cVA binding. The stable LUSH-cVA complex is the activating ligand for pheromone receptors present on the dendrites of the aT1 neurones, comprising the only neurones that detect cVA pheromone. This mechanism explains the single molecule sensitivity of insect pheromone detection systems. The receptor that recognizes activated LUSH consists of a complex of several proteins, including Or67d, a member of the tuning odourant receptor family, Orco, a co-receptor ion channel, and SNMP, a CD36 homologue that may be an inhibitory subunit. In addition, genetic screens and reconstitution experiments reveal additional factors that are important for pheromone detection. Identification and functional dissection of these factors in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen should permit the identification of homologous factors in pathogenic insects and agricultural pests, which, in turn, may be viable candidates for novel classes of compounds to control populations of target insect species without impacting beneficial species. PMID:24347807

  9. Bicaudal is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases and is essential for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Creagh

    Full Text Available Members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases coordinate cell death through restricted proteolysis of diverse protein substrates and play a conserved role in apoptosis from nematodes to man. However, while numerous substrates for the mammalian cell death-associated caspases have now been described, few caspase substrates have been identified in other organisms. Here, we have utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are cleaved by caspases during apoptosis in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells, a subline of the Schneider S2 cell line. This approach identified multiple novel substrates for the fly caspases and revealed that bicaudal/betaNAC is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases. RNAi-mediated silencing of bicaudal expression in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells resulted in a block to proliferation, followed by spontaneous apoptosis. Similarly, silencing of expression of the mammalian bicaudal homologue, betaNAC, in HeLa, HEK293T, MCF-7 and MRC5 cells also resulted in spontaneous apoptosis. These data suggest that bicaudal/betaNAC is essential for cell survival and is a conserved target of caspases from flies to man.

  10. Leigh syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster: morphological and biochemical characterization of Surf1 post-transcriptional silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-10-17

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LS(Surf1) patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS based on the post-transcriptional silencing of CG9943, the Drosophila homolog of SURF1. Knockdown of Surf1 was induced ubiquitously in larvae and adults, which led to lethality; in the mesodermal derivatives, which led to pupal lethality; or in the central nervous system, which allowed survival. A biochemical characterization was carried out in knockdown individuals, which revealed that larvae unexpectedly displayed defects in all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and in the F-ATP synthase, while adults had a COX-selective impairment. Silencing of Surf1 expression in Drosophila S2R(+) cells led to selective loss of COX activity associated with decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve. We conclude that Surf1 is essential for COX activity and mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster, thus providing a new tool that may help clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of LS. PMID:25164807

  11. Bicaudal is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases and is essential for cell survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creagh, Emma M

    2009-01-01

    Members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases coordinate cell death through restricted proteolysis of diverse protein substrates and play a conserved role in apoptosis from nematodes to man. However, while numerous substrates for the mammalian cell death-associated caspases have now been described, few caspase substrates have been identified in other organisms. Here, we have utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are cleaved by caspases during apoptosis in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells, a subline of the Schneider S2 cell line. This approach identified multiple novel substrates for the fly caspases and revealed that bicaudal\\/betaNAC is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases. RNAi-mediated silencing of bicaudal expression in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells resulted in a block to proliferation, followed by spontaneous apoptosis. Similarly, silencing of expression of the mammalian bicaudal homologue, betaNAC, in HeLa, HEK293T, MCF-7 and MRC5 cells also resulted in spontaneous apoptosis. These data suggest that bicaudal\\/betaNAC is essential for cell survival and is a conserved target of caspases from flies to man.

  12. Heterologous expression of mammalian Plk1 in Drosophila reveals divergence from Polo during late mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila Polo kinase is the founder member of a conserved kinase family required for multiple stages of mitosis. We assessed the ability of mouse Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) to perform the multiple mitotic functions of Polo kinase, by expressing a Plk1-GFP fusion in Drosophila. Consistent with the previously reported localization of Polo kinase, Plk1-GFP was strongly localized to centrosomes and recruited to the centromeric regions of condensing chromosomes during early mitosis. However, in contrast to a functional Polo-GFP fusion, Plk1-GFP failed to localize to the central spindle midzone in both syncytial embryo mitosis and the conventional mitoses of cellularized embryos and S2 cells. Moreover, unlike endogenous Polo kinase and Polo-GFP, Plk1-GFP failed to associate with the contractile ring. Expression of Plk1-GFP enhanced the lethality of hypomorphic polo mutants and disrupted the organization of the actinomyosin cytoskeleton in a dominant-negative manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endogenous Polo kinase has specific roles in regulating actinomyosin rearrangements during Drosophila mitoses that its mammalian counterpart, Plk1, cannot fulfill. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed defects in the cortical recruitment of myosin and myosin regulatory light chain in Polo deficient cells

  13. Tuning the electronic properties of Ti-MoS2 contacts through introducing vacancies in monolayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-ping; Su, Jie; Li, Da-peng; Liu, Zheng-tang

    2015-03-14

    The effect of vacancies in monolayer MoS2 on the electronic properties of a Ti-MoS2 top contact has been investigated using first-principles calculations. A Mo-vacancy is easier to form than a S-vacancy in a Ti-MoS2 top contact, especially under oxidation conditions. A Mo-vacancy eliminates the Schottky barrier of the Ti-MoS2 top contact, and a S-vacancy reduces the Schottky barrier from 0.28 to 0.15 eV. Mo-vacancies are beneficial for obtaining a high quality p-type Ti-MoS2 top contact, whereas S-vacancies are favorable to achieve a high quality n-type Ti-MoS2 top contact. Moreover, defective Ti-MoS2 top contacts have stronger dipole layers, a higher potential step and more transferred charges than a perfect ones. The electronic properties of Ti-MoS2 top contacts can be tuned by intrinsic vacancies in monolayer MoS2. Our findings provide important insights into the future design and fabrication of novel nanoelectronic devices with monolayer MoS2. PMID:25679945

  14. Contribution of Drosophila TRPA1 to Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Yunjung; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Do Yup; Lee, Youngseok

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are highly conserved in humans and insects. Some of these channels are expressed in internal organs and their functions remain incompletely understood. By direct knock-in of the GAL4 gene into the trpA1 locus in Drosophila, we identified the expression of this gene in the subesophageal ganglion (SOGs) region. In addition, the neurites present in the dorsal posterior region as well as the drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (dILP2)-positive neur...

  15. Associations of Yeasts with Spotted-Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii; Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Cherries and Raspberries

    OpenAIRE

    Hamby, Kelly A.; Hernández, Alejandro; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Frank G. Zalom

    2012-01-01

    A rich history of investigation documents various Drosophila-yeast mutualisms, suggesting that Drosophila suzukii similarly has an association with a specific yeast species or community. To discover candidate yeast species, yeasts were isolated from larval frass, adult midguts, and fruit hosts of D. suzukii. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) technology and decimal dilution plating were used to identify and determine the relative abundance of yeast species present in fr...

  16. Invasion biology of spotted wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii): a global perspective and future priorities

    OpenAIRE

    Asplen, Mark K.; Anfora, Gianfranco; Biondi, Antonio; Choi, Deuk-Soo; Chu, Dong; Daane, Kent M.; Gibert, Patricia; Gutierrez, Andrew P.; Kim A. Hoelmer; Hutchison, William D.; Isaacs, Rufus; Jiang, Zhi-Lin; Karpati, Zsolt; KIMURA, Masahito T.; Pascual, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The Asian vinegar fly Drosophila suzukii (spotted wing Drosophila [SWD]) has emerged as a major invasive insect pest of small and stone fruits in both the Americas and Europe since the late 2000s. While research efforts have rapidly progressed in Asia, North America, and Europe over the past 5 years, important new insights may be gained in comparing and contrasting findings across the regions affected by SWD. In this review, we explore common themes in the invasion biology of SWD by examining...

  17. First record of spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Montenegro

    OpenAIRE

    Snježana Hrnčić; Sanja Radonjić

    2015-01-01

    The spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is an invasive pest originating from Southeast Asia. It was detected for the first time in Europe in 2008 (Spain and Italy) and subsequently in other European countries. It is a highly polyphagous pest that infests healthy, ripening fruit and presents a serious threat to fruit production, particularly of soft skinned fruit. In the first half of October 2013, a new fruit fly sp...

  18. Ab initio study of bilateral doping within the MoS2-NbS2 system

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanovskaya, Viktoriya V.; Zobelli, Alberto; Gloter, Alexandre; Brun, Nathalie; Serin, Virginie; Colliex, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic study on the stability and the structural and electronic properties of mixed molybdenum-niobium disulphides. Using density functional theory we investigate bilateral doping with up to 25 % of MoS2 (NbS2) by Nb (Mo) atoms, focusing on the precise arrangement of dopants within the host lattices. We find that over the whole range of considered concentrations, Nb doping of MoS2 occurs through a substitutional mechanism. For Mo in NbS2 both interstitial and substitutional d...

  19. Magnetoresistance in Co/2D MoS2/Co and Ni/2D MoS2/Ni junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Quhe, Ruge; Pan, Yuanyuan; Guo, Ying; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Jinbo; Guo, Wanlin; Lu, Jing

    2016-06-28

    Semiconducting single-layer (SL) and few-layer MoS2 have a flat surface, free of dangling bonds. Using density functional theory coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function method, we investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of Co/2D MoS2/Co and Ni/2D MoS2/Ni junctions with MoS2 layer numbers of N = 1, 3, and 5. Well-defined interfaces are formed between MoS2 and metal electrodes. The junctions with a SL MoS2 spacer are almost metallic owing to the strong coupling between MoS2 and the ferromagnets, while those are tunneling with a few layer MoS2 spacer. Both large magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance are found when fcc or hcp Co is used as an electrode. Therefore, flat single- and few-layer MoS2 can serve as an effective nonmagnetic spacer in a magnetoresistance or tunneling magnetoresistance device with a well-defined interface. PMID:27257639

  20. Synthesis and characterization of MoS2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deokar, G.; Vignaud, D.; Arenal, R.; Louette, P.; Colomer, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report on the synthesis of MoS2 nanosheets using a simple two-step additive-free growth technique. The as-synthesized nanosheets were characterized to determine their structure and composition, as well as their optical properties. The MoS2 nanosheets were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), including high-resolution scanning TEM imaging and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL). The as-produced MoS2 nanosheets are vertically aligned with curved edges and are densely populated. The TEM measurements confirmed that the nanosheets have the 2H-MoS2 crystal structure in agreement with the Raman results. The XPS results revealed the presence of high purity MoS2. Moreover, a prominent PL similar to mechanically exfoliated few and mono-layer MoS2 was observed for the as-grown nanosheets. For the thin (≤50 nm) nanosheets, the PL feature was observed at the same energy as that for a direct band-gap monolayer MoS2 (1.83 eV). Thus, the as-produced high-quality, large-area, MoS2 nanosheets could be potentially useful for various optoelectronic and catalysis applications.

  1. Drosophila bitter taste(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eFrench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called bitter. By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induce aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to inhibitory pheromones such as 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different categories of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction

  2. Automated measurement of Drosophila wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezey Jason

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in evolutionary biology and genetics are limited by the rate at which phenotypic information can be acquired. The wings of Drosophila species are a favorable target for automated analysis because of the many interesting questions in evolution and development that can be addressed with them, and because of their simple structure. Results We have developed an automated image analysis system (WINGMACHINE that measures the positions of all the veins and the edges of the wing blade of Drosophilid flies. A video image is obtained with the aid of a simple suction device that immobilizes the wing of a live fly. Low-level processing is used to find the major intersections of the veins. High-level processing then optimizes the fit of an a priori B-spline model of wing shape. WINGMACHINE allows the measurement of 1 wing per minute, including handling, imaging, analysis, and data editing. The repeatabilities of 12 vein intersections averaged 86% in a sample of flies of the same species and sex. Comparison of 2400 wings of 25 Drosophilid species shows that wing shape is quite conservative within the group, but that almost all taxa are diagnosably different from one another. Wing shape retains some phylogenetic structure, although some species have shapes very different from closely related species. The WINGMACHINE system facilitates artificial selection experiments on complex aspects of wing shape. We selected on an index which is a function of 14 separate measurements of each wing. After 14 generations, we achieved a 15 S.D. difference between up and down-selected treatments. Conclusion WINGMACHINE enables rapid, highly repeatable measurements of wings in the family Drosophilidae. Our approach to image analysis may be applicable to a variety of biological objects that can be represented as a framework of connected lines.

  3. Characterization of novel microsatellites from Drosophila transversa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, L; Roininen, E; Liimatainen, J O

    2009-03-01

    We investigated a partial genomic library of Drosophila transversa for microsatellites and developed 12 markers for genetic analyses. This is the first time that microsatellite primers from the quinaria species group have been described. Four loci were cross-amplified in D. phalerata. Nine out of the 12 microsatellite markers developed are likely to be on the X chromosome. PMID:21564716

  4. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  5. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y+ y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  6. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  7. A Drosophila Model of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Paululat, Achim; Baccam, Gabriel C; Wallrath, Lori L; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    The blistering skin disorder epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) results from dominant mutations in keratin 5 (K5) or keratin 14 (K14) genes, encoding the intermediate filament (IF) network of basal epidermal keratinocytes. The mechanisms governing keratin network formation and collapse due to EBS mutations remain incompletely understood. Drosophila lacks cytoplasmic IFs, providing a 'null' environment to examine the formation of keratin networks and determine mechanisms by which mutant keratins cause pathology. Here, we report that ubiquitous co-expression of transgenes encoding wild-type human K14 and K5 resulted in the formation of extensive keratin networks in Drosophila epithelial and non-epithelial tissues, causing no overt phenotype. Similar to mammalian cells, treatment of transgenic fly tissues with phosphatase inhibitors caused keratin network collapse, validating Drosophila as a genetic model system to investigate keratin dynamics. Co-expression of K5 and a K14(R125C) mutant that causes the most severe form of EBS resulted in widespread formation of EBS-like cytoplasmic keratin aggregates in epithelial and non-epithelial fly tissues. Expression of K14(R125C)/K5 caused semi-lethality; adult survivors developed wing blisters and were flightless due to a lack of intercellular adhesion during wing heart development. This Drosophila model of EBS is valuable for the identification of pathways altered by mutant keratins and for the development of EBS therapies. PMID:25830653

  8. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  9. Drosophila lifespan enhancement by exogenous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Brummel, Ted; Ching, Alisa; Seroude, Laurent; Simon, Anne F.; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-01-01

    We researched the lifespan of Drosophila under axenic conditions compared with customary procedure. The experiments revealed that the presence of bacteria during the first week of adult life can enhance lifespan, despite unchanged food intake. Later in life, the presence of bacteria can reduce lifespan. Certain long-lived mutants react in different ways, indicating an interplay between bacteria and longevity-enhancing genes.

  10. Organization of descending neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cynthia T; Bhandawat, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing in the brain controls behavior through descending neurons (DNs) - neurons which carry signals from the brain to the spinal cord (or thoracic ganglia in insects). Because DNs arise from multiple circuits in the brain, the numerical simplicity and availability of genetic tools make Drosophila a tractable model for understanding descending motor control. As a first step towards a comprehensive study of descending motor control, here we estimate the number and distribution of DNs in the Drosophila brain. We labeled DNs by backfilling them with dextran dye applied to the neck connective and estimated that there are ~1100 DNs distributed in 6 clusters in Drosophila. To assess the distribution of DNs by neurotransmitters, we labeled DNs in flies in which neurons expressing the major neurotransmitters were also labeled. We found DNs belonging to every neurotransmitter class we tested: acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine and octopamine. Both the major excitatory neurotransmitter (acetylcholine) and the major inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA) are employed equally; this stands in contrast to vertebrate DNs which are predominantly excitatory. By comparing the distribution of DNs in Drosophila to those reported previously in other insects, we conclude that the organization of DNs in insects is highly conserved. PMID:26837716

  11. [Recombination in Drosophila in space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L P; Vaulina, E N; Lapteva, N Sh; Grozdova, T Ia

    1988-04-01

    An experiment with Drosophila melanogaster males was performed aboard the Artificial Satellite "Kosmos-1667". Mutagenic effects of a 7-day space flight on intergene recombination in chromosome 2 were studied. The space flight factors decreased the frequency of recombination. A model experiment on a laboratory centrifuge demonstrated insignificant increase in recombination frequency caused by acceleration. PMID:3135244

  12. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507.

  13. Plasma nanocoating of thiophene onto MoS2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkaslan, Banu Esencan; Dikmen, Sibel; Öksüz, Lütfi; Öksüz, Aysegul Uygun

    2015-12-01

    MoS2 nanotubes were coated with conductive polymer thiophene by atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (RF) glow discharge. MoS2 nanotubes were prepared by thermal decomposition of hexadecylamine (HDA) intercalated laminar MoS2 precursor on anodized aluminum oxide template and the thiophene was polymerized directly on surface of these nanotubes as in situ by plasma method. The effect of plasma power on PTh/MoS2 nanocomposite properties has been investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). The presence of PTh bands in the FTIR spectra of PTh/MoS2 nanotube nanocomposites corresponding XRD results indicates that the polythiophene coating onto MoS2 nanotube. The chemical structure of PTh is not changed when the plasma power of discharge differ from 117 to 360 W. SEM images of nanocomposites show that when the discharge power is increased between 117 and 360 W the average diameter of PTh/MoS2 nanotube nanocomposites are changed and the structure become more uniformly.

  14. State diagram and monocrystal growth of solid solutions of AgGaS2-AgInS2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented upon studying the state diagram and growing of AgGaS2, AgInS2 monocrystals and associated solid solutions. The AgInS2 ternary compound, at its hardening from 800 deg C down to room temperature, has been prepared in the form of an orthorhombic modification with the lattice parameters 1 = 7.002 +- 0.05, b = 8.275 +- 0.005, c = 6.699 +- 0.05 A. Lattice parameters variation has been studied depending on a solid solution composition in the AgGaS2-AgInS2 system. The state diagram is characterized by a very narrow crystallization interval. The solidus and liquidus curves are shown to concave downwards. The process and conditions of crystallization are described

  15. Emergence of topological and topological crystalline phases in TlBiS2 and TlSbS2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun

    2015-02-11

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the band structure evolution and topological phase transitions in TlBiS2 and TlSbS2 under hydrostatic pressure as well as uniaxial and biaxial strain. The phase transitions are identified by parity analysis and by calculating the surface states. Zero, one, and four Dirac cones are found for the (111) surfaces of both TlBiS2 and TlSbS2 when the pressure grows, which confirms trivial-nontrivial-trivial phase transitions. The Dirac cones at the (M) over bar points are anisotropic with large out-of-plane component. TlBiS2 shows normal, topological, and topological crystalline insulator phases under hydrostatic pressure, thus being the first compound to exhibit a phase transition from a topological to a topological crystalline insulator.

  16. Genomics of ecological adaptation in cactophilic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G; Dias, Guilherme B; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P; Kuhn, Gustavo C S; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene-environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  17. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  18. Pharmacological modulation of histone demethylase activity by a small molecule isolated from subcritical water extracts of Sasa senanensis leaves prolongs the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa-Yagi Yuzo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracts of Sasa senanensis Rehder are used in traditional Japanese medicine; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their potential health benefits. Methods S. senanensis leaves were extracted with subcritical water. An active small-molecule was isolated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and identified as 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (protocatechuic aldehyde or PA. The effects of PA on the activity of histone demethylase, the Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and gene expression in Drosophila S2 cells were investigated. Results PA inhibited the activity of Jumonji domain-containing protein 2A (JMJD2A histone demethylase in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 11.6 μM. However, there was no effect on lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 or HDAC8. PA significantly extended the lifespan of female, but not male, Drosophila. In Drosophila S2 cells, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP was up-regulated by PA exposure. Conclusions Our findings provide insight into the possible relationship between the pharmacological modulation of histone demethylation and lifespan extension by PA; they might also be important in the development of alternative therapies for age-related disorders.

  19. Dirac operator on fuzzy AdS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on fuzzy AdS2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated to AdS2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space. (author)

  20. Dirac Operator on Noncommutative AdS_2

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhri, H

    2003-01-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS_2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated with AdS_2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS_2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  1. Dirac operator on fuzzy AdS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Imaanpur, Ali

    2003-03-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated to AdS2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  2. Dirac Operator on Fuzzy AdS_2

    OpenAIRE

    H. Fakhri; Imaanpur, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS_2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated with AdS_2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS_2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  3. Doping Mechanisms in Graphene-MoS2 Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, B.; Britnell, L.; Wehling, T.O.; Eckmann, A.; Jalil, R.; Belle, B. D.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; K. S. Novoselov

    2013-01-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of charge doping and electronic potential landscapes in hybrid structures composed of graphene and semiconducting single layer MoS2. From first-principles simulations we find electron doping of graphene due to the presence of rhenium impurities in MoS2. Furthermore, we show that MoS2 edges give rise to charge reordering and a potential shift in graphene, which can be controlled through external gate voltages. The interplay of edge ...

  4. The elusive S2 state, the S1/S2 splitting, and the excimer states of the benzene dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observe the weak S0 → S2 transitions of the T-shaped benzene dimers (Bz)2 and (Bz-d6)2 about 250 cm−1 and 220 cm−1 above their respective S0 → S1 electronic origins using two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. Spin-component scaled (SCS) second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) calculations predict that for the tipped T-shaped geometry, the S0 → S2 electronic oscillator strength fel(S2) is ∼10 times smaller than fel(S1) and the S2 state lies ∼240 cm−1 above S1, in excellent agreement with experiment. The S0 → S1 (ππ∗) transition is mainly localized on the “stem” benzene, with a minor stem → cap charge-transfer contribution; the S0 → S2 transition is mainly localized on the “cap” benzene. The orbitals, electronic oscillator strengths fel(S1) and fel(S2), and transition frequencies depend strongly on the tipping angle ω between the two Bz moieties. The SCS-CC2 calculated S1 and S2 excitation energies at different T-shaped, stacked-parallel and parallel-displaced stationary points of the (Bz)2 ground-state surface allow to construct approximate S1 and S2 potential energy surfaces and reveal their relation to the “excimer” states at the stacked-parallel geometry. The fel(S1) and fel(S2) transition dipole moments at the C2v-symmetric T-shape, parallel-displaced and stacked-parallel geometries are either zero or ∼10 times smaller than at the tipped T-shaped geometry. This unusual property of the S0 → S1 and S0 → S2 transition-dipole moment surfaces of (Bz)2 restricts its observation by electronic spectroscopy to the tipped and tilted T-shaped geometries; the other ground-state geometries are impossible or extremely difficult to observe. The S0 → S1/S2 spectra of (Bz)2 are compared to those of imidazole ⋅ (Bz)2, which has a rigid triangular structure with a tilted (Bz)2 subunit. The S0 → S1/ S2 transitions of imidazole-(benzene)2 lie at similar energies as those of (Bz)2, confirming our assignment

  5. The elusive S2 state, the S1/S2 splitting, and the excimer states of the benzene dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Franziska A.; Trachsel, Maria A.; van der Avoird, Ad; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    We observe the weak S0 → S2 transitions of the T-shaped benzene dimers (Bz)2 and (Bz-d6)2 about 250 cm-1 and 220 cm-1 above their respective S0 → S1 electronic origins using two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. Spin-component scaled (SCS) second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) calculations predict that for the tipped T-shaped geometry, the S0 → S2 electronic oscillator strength fel(S2) is ˜10 times smaller than fel(S1) and the S2 state lies ˜240 cm-1 above S1, in excellent agreement with experiment. The S0 → S1 (ππ∗) transition is mainly localized on the "stem" benzene, with a minor stem → cap charge-transfer contribution; the S0 → S2 transition is mainly localized on the "cap" benzene. The orbitals, electronic oscillator strengths fel(S1) and fel(S2), and transition frequencies depend strongly on the tipping angle ω between the two Bz moieties. The SCS-CC2 calculated S1 and S2 excitation energies at different T-shaped, stacked-parallel and parallel-displaced stationary points of the (Bz)2 ground-state surface allow to construct approximate S1 and S2 potential energy surfaces and reveal their relation to the "excimer" states at the stacked-parallel geometry. The fel(S1) and fel(S2) transition dipole moments at the C2v-symmetric T-shape, parallel-displaced and stacked-parallel geometries are either zero or ˜10 times smaller than at the tipped T-shaped geometry. This unusual property of the S0 → S1 and S0 → S2 transition-dipole moment surfaces of (Bz)2 restricts its observation by electronic spectroscopy to the tipped and tilted T-shaped geometries; the other ground-state geometries are impossible or extremely difficult to observe. The S0 → S1/S2 spectra of (Bz)2 are compared to those of imidazole ṡ (Bz)2, which has a rigid triangular structure with a tilted (Bz)2 subunit. The S0 → S1/ S2 transitions of imidazole-(benzene)2 lie at similar energies as those of (Bz)2, confirming our assignment of the (Bz)2 S0

  6. Organization and evolution of Drosophila terminin: similarities and differences between Drosophila and human telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Daniela Raffa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi and Ver. These proteins are not conserves outside Drosophilidae and localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  7. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for innate immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cole R. Spresser; Sarah E. Marshall; Kimberly A. Carlson

    2008-08-01

    OTK18 is a human transcriptional suppressor implicated in the regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-one infection of mononuclear phagocytes. It is ubiquitously expressed in all normal tissues, but its normal homeostatic function is yet to be characterized. One hypothesis is that OTK18 aids in the regulation of the innate immune system. To test this hypothesis, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the total RNA extracted from Drosophila melanogaster embryonic Schneider 2 (S2) cells transfected with either pEGFP-OTK18 (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or empty vector controls (pEGFP-N3) for 6, 12 and 24 h. cDNA microarray analysis revealed differential expression of genes known to be important in regulation of Drosophila innate immunity. The expression levels of two genes, Metchnikowin and CG16708 were verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. These results suggest a role for OTK18 in innate immunity.

  8. (S*)-2,7,8-Trihydroxychroman-4-one

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Yi Chen; Ming-Jen Cheng; Hung-Chun Yeh; Wen-Li Lo

    2009-01-01

    Reticumanone (1), a new chromanone, isolated from the leaves of Cinnamomum reticulatum Hay (Lauraceae), has been characterized as (S*)-2,7,8-trihydroxychroman-4-one, by means of spectroscopic methods.

  9. New Einstein Metrics on 8#(S^2 times S^3)

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Charles P.; Galicki, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    We show that #8(S^2 times S^3) admits two 8-dimensional complex families of inequivalent non-regular Sasakian-Einstein structures. These are the first known non-regular Sasakian-Einstein metrics on this 5-manifold.

  10. Monolayer MoS2 heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Menglin

    2014-08-26

    We realized photovoltaic operation in large-scale MoS2 monolayers by the formation of a type-II heterojunction with p-Si. The MoS 2 monolayer introduces a built-in electric field near the interface between MoS2 and p-Si to help photogenerated carrier separation. Such a heterojunction photovoltaic device achieves a power conversion efficiency of 5.23%, which is the highest efficiency among all monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide-based solar cells. The demonstrated results of monolayer MoS 2/Si-based solar cells hold the promise for integration of 2D materials with commercially available Si-based electronics in highly efficient devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. Sample (S): SE19_S2 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SE19_S2 Mouse white adipose tissue (WAT) Mus musculus NCBI taxonomy:10090 Mice (C57...BL/6) were purchased from SLC, Shizuoka, Japan. White adipose tissue was extracted and used. ...

  12. Bandgap tuning in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qu; Chang, Shengli; Kang, Jun; Zhang, Xueao; Shao, Zhengzheng; Qin, Shiqiao; Li, Jingbo

    2012-08-01

    We report on the first-principles calculations of bandgap modulation in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon (AMoS2NR) by transverse and perpendicular electric fields respectively. In the monolayer AMoS2NR case, it is shown that the bandgap can be significantly reduced and be closed by transverse field, whereas the bandgap modulation is absent under perpendicular field. The critical strength of transverse field for gap closure decreases as ribbon width increases. In the multilayer AMoS2NR case, in contrast, it is shown that the bandgap can be effectively reduced by both transverse and perpendicular fields. Nevertheless, it seems that the two fields exhibit different modulation effects on the gap. The critical strength of perpendicular field for gap closure decreases with increasing number of layers, while the critical strength of transverse field is almost independent of it.

  13. Facile synthesis of MoS2 and MoxW1-xS2 triangular monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single- and few-layered transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS2 and WS2, are emerging two-dimensional materials exhibiting numerous and unusual physico-chemical properties that could be advantageous in the fabrication of unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Here we report a novel and alternative route to synthesize triangular monocrystals of MoS2 and MoxW1-xS2 by annealing MoS2 and MoS2/WO3 precursors, respectively, in the presence of sulfur vapor. In particular, the MoxW1-xS2 triangular monolayers show gradual concentration profiles of W and Mo whereby Mo concentrates in the islands’ center and W is more abundant on the outskirts of the triangular monocrystals. These observations were confirmed by atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, as well as Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The presence of tunable PL signals depending on the MoxW1-xS2 stoichiometries in 2D monocrystals opens up a wide range of applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  14. Phonon Bandgap Engineering of Strained Monolayer MoS2

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2014-01-01

    The phonon band structure of monolayer MoS2 is characteristic for a large energy gap between acoustic and optical branches, which protects the vibration of acoustic modes from being scattered by optical phonon modes. Therefore, the phonon bandgap engineering is of practical significance for the manipulation of phonon-related mechanical or thermal properties in monolayer MoS2. We perform both phonon analysis and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the tension effect on the phonon ban...

  15. Chaos and hydrodynamics near AdS$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kristan

    2016-01-01

    We revisit AdS$_2$ holography with the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev models in mind. Our main result is to rewrite a generic theory of gravity near an AdS$_2$ throat as a novel hydrodynamics coupled to the correlation functions of a conformal quantum mechanics. This gives a prescription for the computation of $n$-point functions in the dual quantum mechanics. We thereby find that the dual is maximally chaotic.

  16. Few-layer HfS2 transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Toru; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Upadhyaya, Vikrant; Tsuruta, Kenji; Tanaka, Takuo; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    HfS2 is the novel transition metal dichalcogenide, which has not been experimentally investigated as the material for electron devices. As per the theoretical calculations, HfS2 has the potential for well-balanced mobility (1,800 cm(2)/V·s) and bandgap (1.2 eV) and hence it can be a good candidate for realizing low-power devices. In this paper, the fundamental properties of few-layer HfS2 flakes were experimentally evaluated. Micromechanical exfoliation using scotch tape extracted atomically thin HfS2 flakes with varying colour contrasts associated with the number of layers and resonant Raman peaks. We demonstrated the I-V characteristics of the back-gated few-layer (3.8 nm) HfS2 transistor with the robust current saturation. The on/off ratio was more than 10(4) and the maximum drain current of 0.2 μA/μm was observed. Moreover, using the electric double-layer gate structure with LiClO4:PEO electrolyte, the drain current of the HfS2 transistor significantly increased to 0.75 mA/μm and the mobility was estimated to be 45 cm(2)/V·s at least. This improved current seemed to indicate superior intrinsic properties of HfS2. These results provides the basic information for the experimental researches of electron devices based on HfS2. PMID:26926098

  17. Studies of Mo-MoS2 friction surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot-pressed samples of the Mo-MoS2-base compositions with alloying additives activating sintering process are studied. MoS2 contained in the composite material is shown to form a stable separating lubricating layer during friction within the 20-1200 deg C temperature range. Th alloy working relief structure formed in the process of friction is determined by the behaviour of the solid lubricant film formed in the contact zone

  18. DVB-S2 Spectrum Efficiency Improvement with Hierarchical Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Meric, Hugo; Piquer, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We study the design of a DVB-S2 system in order to maximise spectrum efficiency. This task is usually challenging due to channel variability. Modern satellite communications systems such as DVB-SH and DVB-S2 rely mainly on a time sharing strategy to optimise the spectrum efficiency. Recently, we showed that combining time sharing with hierarchical modulation can provide significant gains (in terms of spectrum efficiency) compared to the best time sharing strategy. However, our previous design...

  19. The first complete Mag family retrotransposons discovered in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, I A; Kotnova, A P; Stefanov, Y E; Ilyin, Y V

    2016-01-01

    A retrotransposon of the Mag family was found in the Drosophila simulans genome for the first time. We also identified novel transposable elements representing the Mag family in seven Drosophila species. The high similarity between the 3' and 5' long terminal repeats in the found copies of transposable elements indicates that their retrotransposition has occurred relatively recently. Thus, the Mag family of retrotransposons is quite common for the genus Drosophila. PMID:27025475

  20. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal–ventral body axis

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, David S.; Stevens, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal–ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growt...

  1. Isothermal compressibility and some elastic properties of TlInS2-TlGdS2 system alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependence of isothermal compression coefficient in alloys of the TlInS2-TlGdS2 system was studied. An anomaly was revealed, which was related to the second type phase transition. It is ascertained that with the growth of gadolinium atom content in TlIn1-xGdxS2 elasticity parameters: the Young modulus, shear modulus, the Poisson ratio and longitudinal velocity of ultrasonic waves - increase, which is in all probability explained by chemical bond weakening

  2. Expression of particulate-form of Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein in a stably transfected Drosophila cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, a member of the family Flaviviridae, is an important mosquito-borne human pathogen. Its envelope glycoprotein (E is the major determinant of the pathogenicity and host immune responses. In the present study, we explored the feasibility of producing recombinant JEV E protein in the virus-free Drosophila expression system. Results The coding sequence for the signal sequence of premembrane and E protein was cloned into the Drosophila expression vector pAc5.1/V5-His. A Drosophila cell line S2 was cotransfected with this construct as well as a plasmid providing hygromycin B resistance. A cell line expressing the JEV E protein was selected by immunofluoresence, confocal microscopy, and western blot analysis using three different monoclonal antibodies directed against JEV E protein. This cell line was stable in the yield of JEV E protein during two months in vitro maintenance in the presence of hygromycin B. The results showed that the recombinant E protein had an expected molecular weight of about 50 kilodalton, was immunoreactive with all three monoclonal antibodies, and found in both the cytoplasm and culture supernatant. Sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation analysis revealed that the secreted E protein product was in a particulate form. It migrated to the sucrose fraction with a density of 1.13 g/ml. Balb/c mice immunised with the sucrose fraction containing the E protein particles developed specific antibodies. These data show that functioning JEV E protein was expressed in the stable S2 cell line. Conclusion The Drosophila expression system is a more convenient, cheaper and safer approach to the production of vaccine candidates and diagnostic reagents for JEV.

  3. Mutants dissecting development and behaviour in drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have traced in this paper the progress in Drosophila genetics research from the 1960s, at the IARI, spearheaded by the visionary insight of M. S. Swaminathan. The work started with the study of indirect effect of radiation and the synergistic interaction of physical and chemical mutagens on chromosomal and genetic changes. This paved the way for the study of single gene mutants in dissecting developmental and behavioural processes. New genes discovered by us have been shown to encode conserved cell signalling molecules controlling developmental and behavioural pathways. With the complete sequencing of the Drosophila genome, in the year 2000, mounting evidence for the homology between Drosophila and human genes controlling genetic disorders became available. This has led to the fly becoming an indispensable tool for studying human diseases as well as a model to test for drugs and pharmaceuticals against human diseases and complex behavioural processes. For example wingless in Drosophila belongs to the conserved Wnt gene family and aberrant WNT signalling is linked to a range of human diseases, most notably cancer. Inhibition as well as activation of WNT signalling form the basis of an effective therapy for some cancers as well as several other clinical conditions. Recent experiments have shown that WNTs might also normally participate in self-renewal, proliferation or differentiation of stem cells and altering WNT signalling might be beneficial to the use of stem cells for therapeutic means. Likewise, the stambhA mutant of Drosophila which was discovered for its temperature-dependent paralytic behaviour is the fly homologue of Phospholipase Cβ. Phospholipase C mediated G protein signalling plays a central role in vital processes controlling epilepsy, vision, taste, and olfaction in animals. Proteins of the G-signalling pathway are of intense research interest since many human diseases involve defects in G-protein signalling pathways. In fact, approximately 50

  4. The interface of the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the nonmagnetic semiconductor FeS2

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, S.

    2010-11-05

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the cubic pyriteCoS2/FeS2interface are studied using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. We find that this contact between a ferromagneticmetal and a nonmagnetic semiconductor shows a metallic character. The CoS2 stays close to half-metallicity at the interface, while the FeS2 becomes metallic. The magnetic moment of the Co atoms at the interface slightly decreases as compared to the bulk value and a small moment is induced on the Fe atoms. Furthermore, at the interfaceferromagnetic ordering is found to be energetically favorable as compared to antiferromagnetic ordering.

  5. Isothermal compressibility and elastic properties of TlInS2-TlDyS2 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependences of isothermal compression factor in solid solutions TlIn1-xDyxS2 (x= 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, 0.08) of alloys in the system TlInS2-TlDyS2 were studied. It was revealed that temperature increase gives rise to increase in isothermal compression factor. Relying on experimental data on isothermal compression factor, parameters of elasticity, i.e. the Young modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio and velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic waves, were calculated. It was ascertained that increase in dysprosium atoms content in TlIn1-xDyxS2 involves enhancement of elasticity parameters, which is explained by weakening of chemical bond between atoms in the lattice

  6. Control of spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii [Matsumura], Diptera, Drosophilidae) with the emphasis on environmentally acceptable methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bohinc, Tanja; Stanislav TRDAN

    2015-01-01

    Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) is an economically important insect pest, which causes damage on cultivated and wild-growing fruit plants. The pest, which is placed in A2 EPPO list, occurred in Slovenia since 2010 and it is spreading progressively. Since its first record in Spain and Italy (2008), it is now present in the majority of Mediterranean countries. In the review paper the most important control methods against the spotted wing drosophila are presented. In some parts of ...

  7. Surface Defects on Natural MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addou, Rafik; Colombo, Luigi; Wallace, Robert M

    2015-06-10

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are being considered for a variety of electronic and optoelectronic devices such as beyond complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) switches, light-emitting diodes, solar cells, as well as sensors, among others. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is the most studied of the TMDs in part because of its availability in the natural or geological form. The performance of most devices is strongly affected by the intrinsic defects in geological MoS2. Indeed, most sources of current transition metal dichalcogenides have defects, including many impurities. The variability in the electrical properties of MoS2 across the surface of the same crystal has been shown to be correlated with local variations in stoichiometry as well as metallic-like and structural defects. The presence of impurities has also been suggested to play a role in determining the Fermi level in MoS2. The main focus of this work is to highlight a number of intrinsic defects detected on natural, exfoliated MoS2 crystals from two different sources that have been often used in previous reports for device fabrication. We employed room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the pristine surface of MoS2(0001) immediately after exfoliation. ICPMS used to measure the concentration of impurity elements can in part explain the local contrast behavior observed in STM images. This work highlights that the high concentration of surface defects and impurity atoms may explain the variability observed in the electrical and physical characteristics of MoS2. PMID:25980312

  8. Heat capacity of vitreous GeS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Heat capacity for amorphous GeS2 and the basic thermodynamic quantity. • Difference between heat capacity of vitreous and glassy GeS2. • Relation to density of vibrational state/structural relaxation/molar volume. - Abstract: The heat capacity for GeS2 glass was measured by relaxation method, adiabatic calorimetry and DSC from T/K = (2 to 600). Values of the standard molar enthalpy and the standard molar entropy are 12.713 kJ · mol−1 and 88.46 J · K−1 · mol−1, respectively. The molar heat capacity data for GeS2 glass were compared with those reported previously for crystalline α-GeS2. The molar heat capacity of the glass is higher than of the crystal above T = 75 K. However, the molar heat capacity of the glass is lower than that of crystal in the temperature range between (23 and 70) K. This anomaly can probably be attributed to structural differences between vitreous and crystalline state considering that the medium range order of the germanium sulfide glass is similar to that of the crystalline polymorph α-GeS2 although the dimensionality of network is probably higher than 2D. The heat capacity of GeS2 glass obtained by quenching from equilibrium liquid at T = 1270 K is higher than that of the glass resulting from quenching from metastable supercooled liquid within the glass transition range (about 0.2% for 100 < T/K < 200 and 0.4% at T = 50 K). This proves that parameters defining thermal history of the glass (i.e. cooling rate and initial temperature) may affect the value of heat capacity

  9. Plasticity in the Drosophila larval visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abud J Farca-Luna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of the nervous system to modify its structure and function is mostly experience and activity modulated. The molecular basis of neuronal plasticity has been studied in higher behavioral processes, such as learning and memory formation. However, neuronal plasticity is not restricted to higher brain functions, but may provide a basic feature of adaptation of all neural circuits. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful genetic model to gain insight into the molecular basis of nervous system development and function. The nervous system of the larvae is again a magnitude simpler than its adult counter part, allowing the genetic assessment of a number of individual genetically identifiable neurons. We review here recent progress on the genetic basis of neuronal plasticity in developing and functioning neural circuits focusing on the simple visual system of the Drosophila larva.

  10. [The comeback of mitochondria in Drosophila apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    The role of the mitochondrion in mammalian cell apoptosis has been established since the mid-1990s. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, notably because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and apoptosis in Drosophila cell death occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins that appear key for Drosophila apoptosis regulation constitutively or transiently bind to mitochondria. They participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of an IAP caspase inhibitor, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. The aim of this review is to take stock of these events that might have their counterpart in humans. PMID:27225920

  11. Exquisite light sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Vinayak

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

  12. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Buescher

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  13. Remembering components of food in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eDas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies. This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. Dopaminergic neurons are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila.

  14. Remembering Components of Food in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gaurav; Lin, Suewei; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies (MBs). This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. DANs are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here, we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila. PMID:26924969

  15. Imaging Calcium in Drosophila at Egg Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Christopher J; York-Andersen, Anna H; Weil, Timothy T

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation is a universal process that includes a series of events to allow the fertilized egg to complete meiosis and initiate embryonic development. One aspect of egg activation, conserved across all organisms examined, is a change in the intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca(2+)) often termed a 'Ca(2+) wave'. While the speed and number of oscillations of the Ca(2+) wave varies between species, the change in intracellular Ca(2+) is key in bringing about essential events for embryonic development. These changes include resumption of the cell cycle, mRNA regulation, cortical granule exocytosis, and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. In the mature Drosophila egg, activation occurs in the female oviduct prior to fertilization, initiating a series of Ca(2+)-dependent events. Here we present a protocol for imaging the Ca(2+) wave in Drosophila. This approach provides a manipulable model system to interrogate the mechanism of the Ca(2+) wave and the downstream changes associated with it. PMID:27584955

  16. Phonon thermal conductivity of monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaonan; Tabarraei, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    We use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling using Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoribbons. We study the impact of factors such as length, edge chirality, monovacancies, and uniaxial stretching on the thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons. Our results show that longer ribbons have a higher thermal conductivity, and the thermal conductivity of infinitely long zigzag and armchair MoS2 nanoribbons is, respectively, 54 W/mK and 33 W/mK. This is significantly lower than the thermal conductivity of some other graphene-like two-dimensional materials such as graphene and boron nitride. While the presence of molybdenum or sulfur vacancies reduces the thermal conductivity of ribbons, molybdenum vacancies have a more deteriorating effect on thermal conductivities. We also have studied the impact of uniaxial stretching on the thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons. The results show that in contrast to three dimensional materials, thermal conductivity of MoS2 is fairly insensitive to stretching. We have used the phonon dispersion curves and group velocities to investigate the mechanism of this unexpected behavior. Our results show that tensile strain does not alter the phonon dispersion curves and hence the thermal conductivity does not change.

  17. Structure and Development of Glia in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Insect glia represents a conspicuous and diverse population of cells and plays a role in controlling neuronal progenitor proliferation, axonal growth, neuronal differentiation and maintenance, and neuronal function. Genetic studies in Drosophila have elucidated many aspects of glial structure, function and development. Just as in vertebrates, it appears as if different classes of glial cells are specialized for different functions. Based on topology and cell shape, glial cells of the central ...

  18. The development of the Drosophila larval brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Spindler, Shana; Pereanu, Wayne; Fung, Siaumin

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we will start out by describing in more detail the progenitors of the nervous system, the neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells. Subsequently we will survey the generic cell types that make up the developing Drosophila brain, namely neurons, glial cells and tracheal cells. Finally, we will attempt a synopsis of the neuronal connectivity of the larval brain that can be deduced from the analysis of neural lineages and their relationship to neuropile compartments. PMID:18683635

  19. Remembering Components of Food in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Gaurav; Lin, Suewei; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies (MBs). This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a pote...

  20. Accelerated food source location in aging Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Egenriether, Sada M; Chow, Eileen S.; Krauth, Nathalie; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate energy stores are essential for survival, and sophisticated neuroendocrine mechanisms evolved to stimulate foraging in response to nutrient deprivation. Food search behavior is usually investigated in young animals, and it is not known how aging alters this behavior. To address this question in Drosophila melanogaster, we compared the ability to locate food by olfaction in young and old flies using a food-filled trap. As aging is associated with a decline in motor functions, learning...

  1. Identification of Synaptic Targets of Drosophila Pumilio

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gengxin; Li, Wanhe; Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Regulski, Michael; Sinha, Nishi; Barditch, Jody; Tully, Tim; Krainer, Adrian R.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Dubnau, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) protein is a translational regulator involved in embryonic patterning and germline development. Recent findings demonstrate that Pum also plays an important role in the nervous system, both at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in long-term memory formation. In neurons, Pum appears to play a role in homeostatic control of excitability via down regulation of para, a voltage gated sodium channel, and may more generally modulate local protein synthesis in neurons via t...

  2. Reduced Variation in Drosophila Simulans Mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, JWO.; Hatzidakis, J.; Karr, T L; Kreitman, M

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of infection of a Drosophila simulans population by a maternally inherited insect bacterial parasite, Wolbachia, by analyzing nucleotide variability in three regions of the mitochondrial genome in four infected and 35 uninfected lines. Mitochondrial variability is significantly reduced compared to a noncoding region of a nuclear-encoded gene in both uninfected and pooled samples of flies, indicating a sweep of genetic variation. The selective sweep of...

  3. A Drosophila Model to Image Phagosome Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo.

  4. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint ma...

  5. A Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, Rebekah F.; Ryan, Emily L.; Sefton, Jennifer M. I.; Rebecca D Sanders; Lucioni, Patricia Jumbo; Kenneth H Moberg; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Despite decades of research, the underlying pathophysiology of classic galactosemia remains unclear, in part owing to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, we report the establishment of a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia; this is the first whole-animal genetic model to mimic aspects of the patient phenotype. Analogous t...

  6. Recombineering Homologous Recombination Constructs in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A.; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineeri...

  7. Tools for neuroanatomy and neurogenetics in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Jenett, Arnim; Hammonds, Ann S.; Ngo, Teri-T B.; Misra, Sima; Murphy, Christine; Scully, Audra; Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Laverty, Todd R.; Mungall, Chris; Svirskas, Rob; Kadonaga, James T.; Doe, Chris Q.; Eisen, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of generating thousands of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster lines in which the expression of an exogenous gene is reproducibly directed to distinct small subsets of cells in the adult brain. We expect the expression patterns produced by the collection of 5,000 lines that we are currently generating to encompass all neurons in the brain in a variety of intersecting patterns. Overlapping 3-kb DNA fragments from the flanking noncoding and intronic regions of gene...

  8. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation

    OpenAIRE

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry exten...

  9. Towards a Molecular Understanding of Drosophila Hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Jason C.; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila auditory system is presented as a powerful new genetic model system for understanding the molecular aspects of development and physiology of hearing organs. The fly’s ear resides in the antenna, with Johnston’s organ serving as the mechanoreceptor. New approaches using electrophysiology and laser vibrometry have provided useful tools to apply to the study of mutations that disrupt hearing. The fundamental developmental processes that generate the peripheral nervous system are f...

  10. Genetics and genomics of Drosophila mating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Heinsohn, Stefanie L.; Lyman, Richard F.; Amanda J Moehring; Morgan, Theodore J; Rollmann, Stephanie M

    2005-01-01

    The first steps of animal speciation are thought to be the development of sexual isolating mechanisms. In contrast to recent progress in understanding the genetic basis of postzygotic isolating mechanisms, little is known about the genetic architecture of sexual isolation. Here, we have subjected Drosophila melanogaster to 29 generations of replicated divergent artificial selection for mating speed. The phenotypic response to selection was highly asymmetrical in the direction of reduced matin...

  11. A Drosophila model of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    OpenAIRE

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Paululat, Achim; Baccam, Gabriel C.; Wallrath, Lori L.; Magin, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The blistering skin disorder Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) results from dominant mutations in K5 or K14 genes, encoding the intermediate filament network of basal epidermal keratinocytes. The mechanisms governing keratin network formation and collapse due to EBS mutations remain incompletely understood. Drosophila lacks cytoplasmic intermediate filaments, providing a ‚null’ environment to examine the formation of keratin networks and determine mechanisms by which mutant keratins cause p...

  12. Quantification of Food Intake in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Wong; Matthew D W Piper; Bregje Wertheim; Linda Partridge

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of food intake in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is often necessary for studies of behaviour, nutrition and drug administration. There is no reliable and agreed method for measuring food intake of flies in undisturbed, steady state, and normal culture conditions. We report such a method, based on measurement of feeding frequency by proboscis-extension, validated by short-term measurements of food dye intake. We used the method to demonstrate that (a) female flies feed more ...

  13. The Drosophila EKC/KEOPS complex

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Benítez, Diego; Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The TOR signaling pathway is crucial in the translation of nutritional inputs into the protein synthesis machinery regulation, allowing animal growth. We recently identified the Bud32 (yeast)/PRPK (human) ortholog in Drosophila, Prpk (p53-related protein kinase), and found that it is required for TOR kinase activity. Bud32/PRPK is an ancient and atypical kinase conserved in evolution from Archeae to humans, being essential for Archeae. It has been linked with p53 stabilization in human cell c...

  14. Three-dimensional imaging of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeanne McGurk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major hindrance to imaging the intact adult Drosophila is that the dark exoskeleton makes it impossible to image through the cuticle. We have overcome this obstacle and describe a method whereby the internal organs of adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D by bleaching and clearing the adult and then imaging using a technique called optical projection tomography (OPT. The data is displayed as 2D optical sections and also in 3D to provide detail on the shape and structure of the adult anatomy. METHODOLOGY: We have used OPT to visualize in 2D and 3D the detailed internal anatomy of the intact adult Drosophila. In addition this clearing method used for OPT was tested for imaging with confocal microscopy. Using OPT we have visualized the size and shape of neurodegenerative vacuoles from within the head capsule of flies that suffer from age-related neurodegeneration due to a lack of ADAR mediated RNA-editing. In addition we have visualized tau-lacZ expression in 2D and 3D. This shows that the wholemount adult can be stained without any manipulation and that this stain penetrates well as we have mapped the localization pattern with respect to the internal anatomy. CONCLUSION: We show for the first time that the intact adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D using OPT, also we show that this method of clearing is also suitable for confocal microscopy to image the brain from within the intact head. The major advantage of this is that organs can be represented in 3D in their natural surroundings. Furthermore optical sections are generated in each of the three planes and are not prone to the technical limitations that are associated with manual sectioning. OPT can be used to dissect mutant phenotypes and to globally map gene expression in both 2D and 3D.

  15. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Niewalda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  16. Global patterns of sequence evolution in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marín Ignacio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of the genomes of several Drosophila allows for the first precise analyses of how global sequence patterns change among multiple, closely related animal species. A basic question is whether there are characteristic features that differentiate chromosomes within a species or between different species. Results We explored the euchromatin of the chromosomes of seven Drosophila species to establish their global patterns of DNA sequence diversity. Between species, differences in the types and amounts of simple sequence repeats were found. Within each species, the autosomes have almost identical oligonucleotide profiles. However, X chromosomes and autosomes have, in all species, a qualitatively different composition. The X chromosomes are less complex than the autosomes, containing both a higher amount of simple DNA sequences and, in several cases, chromosome-specific repetitive sequences. Moreover, we show that the right arm of the X chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura, which evolved from an autosome 10 – 18 millions of years ago, has a composition which is identical to that of the original, left arm of the X chromosome. Conclusion The consistent differences among species, differences among X chromosomes and autosomes and the convergent evolution of X and neo-X chromosomes demonstrate that strong forces are acting on drosophilid genomes to generate peculiar chromosomal landscapes. We discuss the relationships of the patterns observed with differential recombination and mutation rates and with the process of dosage compensation.

  17. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint machinery are expressed in these cells and behave as their homologue proteins do in systems with an active spindle checkpoint. To establish whether the spindle checkpoint is active in Drosophila spermatocytes we have followed meiosis progression by time-lapse microscopy under conditions where the checkpoint is likely to be activated. We have found that the presence of a relatively high number of misaligned chromosomes or a severe disruption of the meiotic spindle results in a significant delay in the time of entry into anaphase. These observations provide the first direct evidence substantiating the activity of a meiotic spindle checkpoint in male Drosophila. PMID:11256627

  18. dachshund Potentiates Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Retinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Stein; Casares, Fernando; Janody, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Proper organ patterning depends on a tight coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation. The patterning of Drosophila retina occurs both very fast and with high precision. This process is driven by the dynamic changes in signaling activity of the conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which coordinates cell fate determination, cell cycle and tissue morphogenesis. Here we show that during Drosophila retinogenesis, the retinal determination gene dachshund (dac) is not only a target of the Hh signaling pathway, but is also a modulator of its activity. Using developmental genetics techniques, we demonstrate that dac enhances Hh signaling by promoting the accumulation of the Gli transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci) parallel to or downstream of fused. In the absence of dac, all Hh-mediated events associated to the morphogenetic furrow are delayed. One of the consequences is that, posterior to the furrow, dac- cells cannot activate a Roadkill-Cullin3 negative feedback loop that attenuates Hh signaling and which is necessary for retinal cells to continue normal differentiation. Therefore, dac is part of an essential positive feedback loop in the Hh pathway, guaranteeing the speed and the accuracy of Drosophila retinogenesis. PMID:27442438

  19. Shallow donor in natural MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using electron paramagnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations, we show that the shallow donor responsible for the n-type conductivity in natural MoS2 is rhenium (Re) with a typical concentration in the low 1017 cm-3 range and the g -values: g parallel = 2.0274 and g perpendicular to = 2.2642. In bulk MoS2, the valley-orbit (VO) splitting and ionization energy of the Re shallow donor are determined to be ∝3 meV and ∝27 meV, respectively. Calculations show that the VO splitting of Re approaches the value in bulk if the number of MoS2 layers is larger than four and increases to 97.9 meV in a monolayer. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. S2 BHCA-Multiple AUVs cooperation oriented control architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Oceanographic survey, or other similar applications should be the applications of multiple AUVs. In this paper, the skill & simulation based hybrid control architecture (S2BHCA) as the controller's design reference was proposed. It is a multi-robot cooperation oriented intelligent control architecture based on hybrid ideas. The S2 BHCA attempts to incorporate the virtues of the reactive controller and of the deliberative controller by introducing the concept of the "skill". The additional online task simulation ability for cooperation is supported, too. As an application, a multiple AUV control system was developed with three "skills" for the MCM mission including two different cooperative tasks. The simulation and the sea trials show that simple task expression, fast reaction and better cooperation support can be achieved by realizing the AUV controller based on the S2 BHCA.

  1. Band gap engineering of MoS2 upon compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Suárez, Miquel; Neri, Igor; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising candidate for 2D nanoelectronic devices, which shows a direct band-gap for monolayer structure. In this work we study the electronic structure of MoS2 upon both compressive and tensile strains with first-principles density-functional calculations for different number of layers. The results show that the band-gap can be engineered for experimentally attainable strains (i.e., ±0.15). However, compressive strain can result in bucking that can prevent the use of large compressive strain. We then studied the stability of the compression, calculating the critical strain that results in the on-set of buckling for free-standing nanoribbons of different lengths. The results demonstrate that short structures, or few-layer MoS2, show semi-conductor to metal transition upon compressive strain without bucking.

  2. Synthesis of Large Scale MoS2 -Graphene Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Kathleen; Hanbicki, Aubrey; Friedman, Adam; Robinson, Jeremy; Jonker, Berend

    2014-03-01

    A rapidly progressing field involves the stacking of multiple two dimensional materials to form heterostructures. These heterosctructures have exhibited unique and interesting properties. For the most part, heterostructure devices are produced via mechanical exfoliation followed by careful aligning and stacking of the various components, limiting dimensions to micron-scale devices. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proven to be a useful tool in the production of graphene and has very recently been investigated as a means for the growth of other 2D materials such as MoS2, hexagonal boron nitride and WS2. Using a two-step CVD process we are able to synthesize MoS2 on CVD grown graphene. AFM and Raman microscopy of the MoS2-graphene heterostructure show a uniform and continuous film on the cm scale.

  3. Plasma assisted CVD of TiS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, S.; Shimanouchi-Futagami, R.; Koizumi, M.

    1989-07-01

    Fine powder and highly oriented thin film TiS2 were prepared by a reaction between TiCl4 and H2S in low-pressure glow discharge at low substrate temperatures (≦450°C). The products were investigated by changing the reaction conditions, e.g. the substrate temperature, the applied rf power between electrodes, and the reactant ratio ([H2S]/[TiCl4]). The fine powder product was an aggregate of plate-like crystallites of some ten nm in width and less than ten nm in thickness. Lithium batteries using the fine TiS2 powder showed a flat discharge voltage around 2.2 V up to 100% utilization. Submicron TiS2 crystallites had their lattice planes perpendicular to the substrate in the thin films having thicknesses greater than 1 μm. This orientation is expected to be favorable for the application to lithium rechargable batteries.

  4. MoS2 nanotube field effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Strojnik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on electric field effects on electron transport in multi-walled MoS2 nanotubes (NTs, fabricated using a two-step synthesis method from Mo6SxI9-x nanowire bundle precursors. Transport properties were measured on 20 single nanotube field effect transistor (FET devices, and compared with MoS2 layered crystal devices prepared using identical fabrication techniques. The NTs exhibited mobilities of up to 0.014 cm2V−1s−1 and an on/off ratio of up to 60. As such they are comparable with previously reported WS2 nanotube FETs, but materials defects and imperfections apparently limit their performance compared with multilayer MoS2 FETs with similar number of layers.

  5. Photoconductivities in MoS2 Nanoflake Photoconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Chu; Chen, Ruei-San; Huang, Ying-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Photoconductivities in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) layered nanostructures with two-hexagonal crystalline structure prepared by mechanical exfoliation were investigated. The photoconductor-type MoS2 nanoflakes exhibit remarkable photoresponse under the above bandgap excitation wavelength of 532 nm at different optical intensity. The photocurrent responsivity and photoconductive gain of nanoflakes can reach, respectively, 30 AW(-1) and 103 at the intensity of 50 Wm(-2), which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of their bulk counterparts. The vacuum-enhanced photocurrent and power-independent responsivity/gain indicate a surface-controlled photoconduction mechanism in the MoS2 nanomaterial. PMID:26935304

  6. MoS2 nanotube field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on electric field effects on electron transport in multi-walled MoS2 nanotubes (NTs), fabricated using a two-step synthesis method from Mo6SxI9-x nanowire bundle precursors. Transport properties were measured on 20 single nanotube field effect transistor (FET) devices, and compared with MoS2 layered crystal devices prepared using identical fabrication techniques. The NTs exhibited mobilities of up to 0.014 cm2V−1s−1 and an on/off ratio of up to 60. As such they are comparable with previously reported WS2 nanotube FETs, but materials defects and imperfections apparently limit their performance compared with multilayer MoS2 FETs with similar number of layers

  7. Plasmons on the edge of MoS2 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2014-10-01

    Using ab initio calculations we predict the existence of one-dimensional (1D), atomically confined plasmons at the edges of a zigzag MoS2 nanoribbon. The strongest plasmon originates from a metallic edge state localized on the sulfur dimers decorating the Mo edge of the ribbon. A detailed analysis of the dielectric function reveals that the observed deviations from the ideal 1D plasmon behavior result from single-particle transitions between the metallic edge state and the valence and conduction bands of the MoS2 sheet. The Mo and S edges of the ribbon are clearly distinguishable in calculated spatially resolved electron energy loss spectrum owing to the different plasmonic properties of the two edges. The edge plasmons could potentially be utilized for tuning the photocatalytic activity of MoS2 nanoparticles.

  8. Large-Area Epitaxial Monolayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Marinov, Kolyo; Lazić, Predrag; Gibertini, Marco; Marzari, Nicola; Lopez Sanchez, Oriol; Kung, Yen-Cheng; Krasnozhon, Daria; Chen, Ming-Wei; Bertolazzi, Simone; Gillet, Philippe; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Kis, Andras

    2015-04-28

    Two-dimensional semiconductors such as MoS2 are an emerging material family with wide-ranging potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and energy harvesting. Large-area growth methods are needed to open the way to applications. Control over lattice orientation during growth remains a challenge. This is needed to minimize or even avoid the formation of grain boundaries, detrimental to electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of MoS2 and other 2D semiconductors. Here, we report on the growth of high-quality monolayer MoS2 with control over lattice orientation. We show that the monolayer film is composed of coalescing single islands with limited numbers of lattice orientation due to an epitaxial growth mechanism. Optical absorbance spectra acquired over large areas show significant absorbance in the high-energy part of the spectrum, indicating that MoS2 could also be interesting for harvesting this region of the solar spectrum and fabrication of UV-sensitive photodetectors. Even though the interaction between the growth substrate and MoS2 is strong enough to induce lattice alignment via van der Waals interaction, we can easily transfer the grown material and fabricate devices. Local potential mapping along channels in field-effect transistors shows that the single-crystal MoS2 grains in our film are well connected, with interfaces that do not degrade the electrical conductivity. This is also confirmed by the relatively large and length-independent mobility in devices with a channel length reaching 80 μm. PMID:25843548

  9. Thermal conductivity of MoS2 polycrystalline nanosheets

    OpenAIRE

    Sledzinska, M.; Graczykowski, B.; Placidi, M.; Reig, D. Saleta; Sachat, A. El; Reparaz, J. S.; Alzina, F.; Roche, S.; B. Mortazavi; Quey, R.; Torres, C. M. Sotomayor

    2016-01-01

    We report a technique for transferring large areas of the CVD-grown, few-layer MoS2 from the original substrate to another arbitrary substrate and onto holey substrates, in order to obtain free-standing structures. The method consists of a polymer- and residue-free, surface-tension-assisted wet transfer, in which we take advantage of the hydrophobic properties of the MoS2. The methods yields better quality transferred layers, with fewer cracks and defects, and less contamination than the wide...

  10. MoS2 nanotube field effect transistors

    OpenAIRE

    M. Strojnik; A. Kovic; Mrzel, A; J. Buh; Strle, J.; Mihailovic, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on electric field effects on electron transport in multi-walled MoS2 nanotubes (NTs), fabricated using a two-step synthesis method from Mo6SxI9-x nanowire bundle precursors. Transport properties were measured on 20 single nanotube field effect transistor (FET) devices, and compared with MoS2 layered crystal devices prepared using identical fabrication techniques. The NTs exhibited mobilities of up to 0.014 cm2V−1s−1 and an on/off ratio of up to 60. As such they are comparable with p...

  11. High pressure synthesis of BiS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard-Pedersen, Simone; Nielsen, Morten Bormann; Bremholm, Martin

    possibilities of using high pressure synthesis to discover new phases in the Bi-S binary system were investigated as early as the 1960’s.4 The research led to discovery of a compound with BiS2 stoichiometry, but no structure solution of BiS2 was reported. A reason behind making this new phase is to study the...... contains Bi atoms in distorted square-based pyramidal coordination to five surrounding sulfur atoms. The results will be displayed together with a comparison to other metal dichalcogenide compounds. Experimental details and physical properties will also be presented together with theoretical calculations...

  12. Carrier transport at the metal-MoS2 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faisal; Choi, Min Sup; Liu, Xiaochi; Yoo, Won Jong

    2015-05-01

    This study illustrates the nature of electronic transport and its transition from one mechanism to another between a metal electrode and MoS2 channel interface in a field effect transistor (FET) device. Interestingly, measurements of the contact resistance (Rc) as a function of temperature indicate a transition in the carrier transport across the energy barrier from thermionic emission at a high temperature to tunneling at a low temperature. Furthermore, at a low temperature, the nature of the tunneling behavior is ascertained by the current-voltage dependency that helps us feature direct tunneling at a low bias and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at a high bias for a Pd-MoS2 contact due to the effective barrier shape modulation by biasing. In contrast, only direct tunneling is observed for a Cr-MoS2 contact over the entire applied bias range. In addition, simple analytical calculations were carried out to extract Rc at the gating range, and the results are consistent with the experimental data. Our results describe the transition in carrier transport mechanisms across a metal-MoS2 interface, and this information provides guidance for the design of future flexible, transparent electronic devices based on 2-dimensional materials.This study illustrates the nature of electronic transport and its transition from one mechanism to another between a metal electrode and MoS2 channel interface in a field effect transistor (FET) device. Interestingly, measurements of the contact resistance (Rc) as a function of temperature indicate a transition in the carrier transport across the energy barrier from thermionic emission at a high temperature to tunneling at a low temperature. Furthermore, at a low temperature, the nature of the tunneling behavior is ascertained by the current-voltage dependency that helps us feature direct tunneling at a low bias and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at a high bias for a Pd-MoS2 contact due to the effective barrier shape modulation by biasing. In contrast

  13. Optimal DVB-S2 spectral efficiency with hierarchical modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Meric, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    We study the design of a DVB-S2 system in order to maximise spectral efficiency. This task is usually challenging due to channel variability. The solution adopted in modern satellite communications systems such as DVB-SH and DVB-S2 relies mainly on a time sharing strategy. Recently, we proposed to combine time sharing with hierarchical modulation to increase the transmission rate of broadcast systems. However, the optimal spectral efficiency remained an open question. In this paper, we show t...

  14. Spotted wing drosophila: a new invasive pest of Mississippi berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, a native fly of Southeast Asia, is a widely reported and highly invasive pest of fruit crops in North America and Mediterranean Europe. Between 2010 and 2011, SWD was confirmed in most States in eastern North America. During this same period, SWD was...

  15. Ionizing radiation causes the stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentiality of the stress-reaction arising in Drosophila melanogaster under gamma-irradiation of the source with 137Cs (irradiation dose is 10 Gy , radiation dose rate amounts 180 c Gy/min) is studied. It is shown that radiation induces the stress-reaction in Drosophila resulting in alterations in energetic metabolism (biogenic amines metabolic system) and in reproductive function

  16. RNA interference modulates replication of dengue virus in Drosophila melanogaster cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Kathryn A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV, genus Flavivirus has emerged as a major threat to global human health in recent decades, and novel strategies to contain the escalating dengue fever pandemic are urgently needed. RNA interference (RNAi induced by exogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs has shown promise for treatment of flavivirus infections in hosts and prevention of transmission by vectors. However, the impact of RNAi triggered by authentic virus infection on replication of DENV, or any flavivirus, has received little study. The objectives of the current study were threefold: first, to assess the utility of Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells for the study of DENV, second to investigate the impact of multiple enzymes in the RNAi pathway on DENV replication; and third to test for variation in the response of the four serotypes of DENV to modulation of RNAi. Results Three strains from each of the four DENV serotypes showed replication in S2 cells following infection at multiplicity of infection (MOI 0.1 and MOI 10; each strain achieved titers > 4.0 log10pfu/ml five days after infection at MOI 10. The four serotypes did not differ in mean titer. S2 cells infected with DENV-1, 2, 3 or 4 produced siRNAs, indicating that infection triggered an RNAi response. Knockdown of one of the major enzymes in the RNAi pathway, Dicer-2 (Dcr-2, resulted in a 10 to 100-fold enhancement of replication of all twelve strains of DENV in S2 cells. While serotypes did not differ in their average response to Dcr-2 knockdown, strains within serotypes showed significant differences in their sensitivity to Dcr-2 knockdown. Moreover, knockdown of three additional components of the RNAi pathway, Argonaute 2 (Ago-2, Dcr-1 and Ago-1, also resulted in a significant increase in replication of the two DENV strains tested, and the magnitude of this increase was similar to that resulting from Dcr-2 knockdown. Conclusions These findings indicate that DENV can

  17. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  18. Thermal transport in MoS2/Graphene hybrid nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Peng, Qing; Chen, Yuanping

    2015-09-18

    Heat dissipation is a very critical problem for designing nano-functional devices, including MoS2/graphene heterojunctions. In this paper we investigate thermal transport in MoS2/graphene hybrid nanosheets under various heating conditions, by using molecular dynamics simulation. Diverse transport processes and characteristics, depending on the conducting layers, are found in these structures. The thermal conductivities can be tuned by interlayer coupling, environment temperature, and interlayer overlap. The highest thermal conductivity at room temperature is achieved as more than 5 times of that of single-layer MoS2 when both layers are heated and 100% overlapped. Different transport mechanisms in the hybrid nanosheets are explained by phonon density of states, temperature distribution, and interlayer thermal resistance. Our results could not only provide clues to master the heat transport in functional devices based on MoS2/graphene heterojunctions, but are also useful for analyzing thermal transport in other van der Waals hybrid nanosheets. PMID:26313739

  19. Magnetoresistance in molybdenite (MoS2) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal magnetoresistance ratios of molybdenite (MoS2), the naturally occurring semiconducting crystal, have been investigated at magnetic fields ranging from 4.5 KOe and within the temperature range 3000K to 7000K. Unlike some previous observations, magnetoresistance has been found to be negative. (author)

  20. The PI2S2 project: grid and new challenges .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciani, U.

    The new grid e-Infrastructure in Sicily is offering new perspectives and important resources for both scientific and industrial application in the National context. This paper shows the infrastructure of the Cometa Consortium built with the PI2S2 project, the current status of the project and the new challenges, mainly in the HPC area, that the project is carrying out.

  1. Atomic and electronic structure of MoS2 nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2003-01-01

    edges. The electronic structure of the edge states is studied and we discuss their influence on the chemical properties of the edges. In particular, we study the reactivity towards hydrogen and show that hydrogen may form stable chemical bonds with both the two low-Miller indexed edges of MoS2. A model...

  2. Single-layer MoS2 transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, B; Radenovic, A; Brivio, J; Giacometti, V; Kis, A

    2011-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials are attractive for use in next-generation nanoelectronic devices because, compared to one-dimensional materials, it is relatively easy to fabricate complex structures from them. The most widely studied two-dimensional material is graphene, both because of its rich physics and its high mobility. However, pristine graphene does not have a bandgap, a property that is essential for many applications, including transistors. Engineering a graphene bandgap increases fabrication complexity and either reduces mobilities to the level of strained silicon films or requires high voltages. Although single layers of MoS(2) have a large intrinsic bandgap of 1.8 eV (ref. 16), previously reported mobilities in the 0.5-3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) range are too low for practical devices. Here, we use a halfnium oxide gate dielectric to demonstrate a room-temperature single-layer MoS(2) mobility of at least 200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), similar to that of graphene nanoribbons, and demonstrate transistors with room-temperature current on/off ratios of 1 × 10(8) and ultralow standby power dissipation. Because monolayer MoS(2) has a direct bandgap, it can be used to construct interband tunnel FETs, which offer lower power consumption than classical transistors. Monolayer MoS(2) could also complement graphene in applications that require thin transparent semiconductors, such as optoelectronics and energy harvesting. PMID:21278752

  3. Detecting novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sanggyu; Bao, Jingyue; Zhou, Guolin; Shapiro, Joshua; Xu, Jinhua; Shi, Run Zhang; Lu, Xuemei; Clark, Terry; Johnson, Deborah; Kim, Yeong C; Wing, Claudia; Tseng, Charles; Sun, Min; Lin, Wei; Wang, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Du, Wei; Wu, Chung-I; Zhang, Xiuqing; Wang, San Ming

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244......,313 SAGE tags from transcripts expressed in Drosophila embryonic, larval, pupae, adult, and testicular tissue. From these SAGE tags, we identified 40,823 unique SAGE tags. Our analysis showed that 55% of the 40,823 unique SAGE tags are novel without matches in currently known Drosophila transcripts, and...... Drosophila genome. Our study reveals the presence of a significant number of novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila, and highlights the need to isolate these novel low-abundant transcripts for further biological studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Jun...

  4. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  5. Virtual half-metallicity at the CoS2/FeS2 interface induced by strain

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2013-01-01

    Spin polarized ab initio calculations based on density functional theory are performed to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of the interface between the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the nonmagnetic semiconductor FeS2. Relaxation of the interface structure is taken into account by atomic force minimization. We find that both Co and Fe are close to half-metallicity at the interface. Tensile strain is shown to strongly enhance the spin polarization so that a virtually half-metallic interface can be achieved, for comparably moderate strain. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. The influence of temperature and photoperiod on the reproductive diapause and cold tolerance of spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge regarding the reproductive status of spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: Drosophilidae) is of critical importance in predicting potential infestations of this invasive pest, as eggs are laid in ripe or ripening fruit of several commercially important small frui...

  7. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila; Efectos biologicos del radon en Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-15

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  8. The Spotted Wing Drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931 – Monitoring And First Records In Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łabanowska Barbara H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii (SWD monitoring was carried out between 2012-2014 in eight locations. In order to determine the presence of Drosophila suzukii, several types of traps and baits were used. In 2014, Polish (prototype of Drosinal and Spanish (Cera Trap traps and baits were used in our study. In each year, traps were placed on the plantations of blueberry, strawberry, raspberry and at a wholesale market at the beginning of July, and monitored once or twice a week until mid-December. During 2012 and 2013 there were no flies of the spotted wing drosophila in traps. First flies of this species were captured in 2014 in two locations: Września (3rd week of October and Brzezna (1st week of December – western and southern Poland respectively, in both types of the traps. However, Polish traps were more effective in trapping D. suzukii. In addition, the Polish product has small holes and therefore captures less no target and beneficial insects than Spanish traps. Despite detection of SWD in Poland, damaged fruits were not found.

  9. First record of spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Hrnčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae is an invasive pest originating from Southeast Asia. It was detected for the first time in Europe in 2008 (Spain and Italy and subsequently in other European countries. It is a highly polyphagous pest that infests healthy, ripening fruit and presents a serious threat to fruit production, particularly of soft skinned fruit. In the first half of October 2013, a new fruit fly species was unexpectedly detected in Tephri traps baited with the three-component female-biased attractant BioLure that is regularly used for monitoring the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wiedem. (Diptera: Tephritidae in Montenegro. Brief visual inspection identified the new species as the spotted wing drosophila D. suzukii. The pest was first recorded in several localities on the Montenegrin seacoast around Boka Kotor Bay. After the finding, all Drosophila specimens were collected from traps for further laboratory observation. A quick follow-up monitoring of other Tephri traps was carried out within the next few days on the rest of the seacoast (localities from Tivat to Ulcinj. Additionally, Tephri traps were set up around Lake Skadar and in the city of Podgorica, as well as on fresh fruit markets in Podgorica. The results of this preliminary study showed that D. suzukii was present in all surveyed locations and adults were captured until late December. Both sexes were found in traps with BioLure. Our data show that D. suzukii is present in southern parts of Montenegro and there is a serious threat of its further spreading, particularly towards northern parts of the country where the main raspberry and blueberry production is placed. The results also show that Tephri traps baited with BioLure can be used for detection and monitoring of spotted wing drosophila.

  10. BPS Wilson Loops on S^2 at Higher Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Donovan

    2008-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric Wilson loops of the variety constructed by Drukker, Giombi, Ricci, and Trancanelli, whose spatial contours lie on a two-sphere. Working to second order in the 't Hooft coupling in planar N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory (SYM), we compute the vacuum expectation value of a wavy-latitude and of a loop composed of two longitudes. We evaluate the resulting integrals numerically and find that the results are consistent with the zero-instanton sector calculation of Wilson loops in 2-d Yang-Mills on S^2 performed by Bassetto and Griguolo. We also consider the connected correlator of two distinct latitudes to third order in the 't Hooft coupling in planar N=4 SYM. We compare the result in the limit where the latitudes become coincident to a perturbative calculation in 2-d Yang-Mills on S^2 using a light-cone Wu-Mandelstam-Leibbrandt prescription. The two calculations produce differing results.

  11. Theoretical study of thermoelectric properties of MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We systematically studied the thermoelectric properties of MoS2 with doping based on the Boltzmann transport theory and first-principles calculations. We obtained an optimal doping region (around 1019 cm−3) for thermoelectric properties along in-plane and cross-plane directions. MoS2 in the optimal doping region has a vanishingly small anisotropy of thermopower possibly due to the decoupling of in-plane and cross-plane conduction channels, but big anisotropies of electrical conductivity σ and electronic thermal conductivity κe arising from the anisotropic electronic scattering time. The κe is comparable to the lattice counterpart κ1 in the plane, while κ1 dominates over κe across the plane. The figure of merit ZT can reach 0.1 at around 700 K with in-plane direction preferred by doping. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. SnS2 Thin Film Deposition by Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia Jaber, Abdallah; Noaiman Alamri, Saleh; Salah Aida, Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    Tin disulfide (SnS2) thin films have been synthesized using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique using a perfume atomizer. The films were deposited using two different solutions prepared by the dilution of SnCl2 and thiourea in distilled water and in methanol. The obtained films have a microcrystalline structure. The film deposited using methanol as the solvent is nearly stochiometric SnS2 with a spinel phase having a (001) preferential orientation. The film prepared with an aqueous solution is Sn-rich. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images reveal that the film deposited with the aqueous solution is rough and is formed with large wires. However, the film deposited with methanol is dense and smooth. Conductivity measurements indicate that the aqueous solution leads to an n-type semiconductor, while methanol leads to a p-type semiconductor.

  13. MoS2-Titanium Contact Interface Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Stephen; Smyth, Christopher; Hinkle, Christopher L; Wallace, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Ti-MoS2 interface, which is heavily utilized in nanoelectronic device research, is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that, if deposition under high vacuum (∼1 × 10(-6) mbar) as opposed to ultrahigh vacuum (∼1 × 10(-9) mbar) conditions are used, TiO2 forms at the interface rather than Ti. The high vacuum deposition results in an interface free of any detectable reaction between the semiconductor and the deposited contact. In contrast, when metallic titanium is successfully deposited by carrying out depositions in ultrahigh vacuum, the titanium reacts with MoS2 forming Ti(x)S(y) and metallic Mo at the interface. These results have far reaching implications as many prior studies assuming Ti contacts may have actually used TiO2 due to the nature of the deposition tools used. PMID:26967016

  14. Magnetic structure of NiS2 -xSex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, S.; Louca, Despina; Yang, J.; Chatterjee, U.; Bugaris, D. E.; Chung, D. Y.; Peng, L.; Grayson, M.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2016-01-01

    NiS2 -2 xSex is revisited to determine the magnetic structure using neutron diffraction and magnetic representational analysis. Upon cooling, the insulating parent compound, NiS2, becomes antiferromagnetic with two successive magnetic transitions. The first transition (M 1 ) occurs at TN˜39 K with Γ1ψ1 symmetry and a magnetic propagation vector of k =(000 ) . The second transition (M 2 ) occurs at TN˜30 K with k =(0.5 ,0.5 ,0.5 ) and a Γ1ψ2 symmetry with face-centered translations, giving rise to four possible magnetic domains. With doping, the system becomes metallic. The transition to the M 2 state is suppressed prior to x =0.4 while the M 1 state persists. The M 1 magnetic structure gradually vanishes by x ˜0.8 at a lower concentration than previously reported. The details of the magnetic structures are provided.

  15. Ion channels to inactivate neurons in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J L Hodge

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are the determinants of excitability; therefore, manipulation of their levels and properties provides an opportunity for the investigator to modulate neuronal and circuit function. There are a number of ways to suppress electrical activity in Drosophila neurons, for instance, over-expression of potassium channels (i.e. Shaker Kv1, Shaw Kv3, Kir2.1 and DORK that are open at resting membrane potential. This will result in increased potassium efflux and membrane hyperpolarisation setting resting membrane potential below the threshold required to fire action potentials. Alternatively over-expression of other channels, pumps or co-transporters that result in a hyperpolarised membrane potential will also prevent firing. Lastly, neurons can be inactivated by, disrupting or reducing the level of functional voltage-gated sodium (Nav1 paralytic or calcium (Cav2 cacophony channels that mediate the depolarisation phase of action potentials. Similarly, strategies involving the opposite channel manipulation should allow net depolarisation and hyperexcitation in a given neuron. These changes in ion channel expression can be brought about by the versatile transgenic (i.e. Gal4/UAS based systems available in Drosophila allowing fine temporal and spatial control of (channel transgene expression. These systems are making it possible to electrically inactivate (or hyperexcite any neuron or neural circuit in the fly brain, and much like an exquisite lesion experiment, potentially elucidate whatever interesting behaviour or phenotype each network mediates. These techniques are now being used in Drosophila to reprogram electrical activity of well-defined circuits and bring about robust and easily quantifiable changes in behaviour, allowing different models and hypotheses to be rapidly tested.

  16. Whole genome phylogenies for multiple Drosophila species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Arun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of organisms using traditional phylogenetic methods may suffer from inaccurate sequence alignment. An alternative approach, particularly effective when whole genome sequences are available, is to employ methods that don’t use explicit sequence alignments. We extend a novel phylogenetic method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD to reconstruct the phylogeny of 12 sequenced Drosophila species. SVD analysis provides accurate comparisons for a high fraction of sequences within whole genomes without the prior identification of orthologs or homologous sites. With this method all protein sequences are converted to peptide frequency vectors within a matrix that is decomposed to provide simplified vector representations for each protein of the genome in a reduced dimensional space. These vectors are summed together to provide a vector representation for each species, and the angle between these vectors provides distance measures that are used to construct species trees. Results An unfiltered whole genome analysis (193,622 predicted proteins strongly supports the currently accepted phylogeny for 12 Drosophila species at higher dimensions except for the generally accepted but difficult to discern sister relationship between D. erecta and D. yakuba. Also, in accordance with previous studies, many sequences appear to support alternative phylogenies. In this case, we observed grouping of D. erecta with D. sechellia when approximately 55% to 95% of the proteins were removed using a filter based on projection values or by reducing resolution by using fewer dimensions. Similar results were obtained when just the melanogaster subgroup was analyzed. Conclusions These results indicate that using our novel phylogenetic method, it is possible to consult and interpret all predicted protein sequences within multiple whole genomes to produce accurate phylogenetic estimations of relatedness between

  17. The Drosophila EKC/KEOPS complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Benítez, Diego; Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The TOR signaling pathway is crucial in the translation of nutritional inputs into the protein synthesis machinery regulation, allowing animal growth. We recently identified the Bud32 (yeast)/PRPK (human) ortholog in Drosophila, Prpk (p53-related protein kinase), and found that it is required for TOR kinase activity. Bud32/PRPK is an ancient and atypical kinase conserved in evolution from Archeae to humans, being essential for Archeae. It has been linked with p53 stabilization in human cell culture and its absence in yeast causes a slow-growth phenotype. This protein has been associated to KEOPS (kinase, putative endopeptidase and other proteins of small size) complex together with Kae1p (ATPase), Cgi-121 and Pcc1p. This complex has been implicated in telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, bud site selection and chemical modification of tRNAs (tRNAs). Bud32p and Kae1p have been related with N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) synthesis, a particular chemical modification that occurs at position 37 of tRNAs that pair A-starting codons, required for proper translation in most species. Lack of this modification causes mistranslations and open reading frame shifts in yeast. The core constituents of the KEOPS complex are present in Drosophila, but their physical interaction has not been reported yet. Here, we present a review of the findings regarding the function of this complex in different organisms and new evidence that extends our recent observations of Prpk function in animal growth showing that depletion of Kae1 or Prpk, in accordance with their role in translation in yeast, is able to induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) in Drosophila. We suggest that EKC/KEOPS complex could be integrating t6A-modified tRNA availability with translational rates, which are ultimately reflected in animal growth. PMID:23823807

  18. Pheromones mediating copulation and attraction in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweck, Hany K M; Ebrahim, Shimaa A M; Thoma, Michael; Mohamed, Ahmed A M; Keesey, Ian W; Trona, Federica; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Svatoš, Aleš; Sachse, Silke; Knaden, Markus; Hansson, Bill S

    2015-05-26

    Intraspecific olfactory signals known as pheromones play important roles in insect mating systems. In the model Drosophila melanogaster, a key part of the pheromone-detecting system has remained enigmatic through many years of research in terms of both its behavioral significance and its activating ligands. Here we show that Or47b-and Or88a-expressing olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect the fly-produced odorants methyl laurate (ML), methyl myristate, and methyl palmitate. Fruitless (fru(M))-positive Or47b-expressing OSNs detect ML exclusively, and Or47b- and Or47b-expressing OSNs are required for optimal male copulation behavior. In addition, activation of Or47b-expressing OSNs in the male is sufficient to provide a competitive mating advantage. We further find that the vigorous male courtship displayed toward oenocyte-less flies is attributed to an oenocyte-independent sustained production of the Or47b ligand, ML. In addition, we reveal that Or88a-expressing OSNs respond to all three compounds, and that these neurons are necessary and sufficient for attraction behavior in both males and females. Beyond the OSN level, information regarding the three fly odorants is transferred from the antennal lobe to higher brain centers in two dedicated neural lines. Finally, we find that both Or47b- and Or88a-based systems and their ligands are remarkably conserved over a number of drosophilid species. Taken together, our results close a significant gap in the understanding of the olfactory background to Drosophila mating and attraction behavior; while reproductive isolation barriers between species are created mainly by species-specific signals, the mating enhancing signal in several Drosophila species is conserved. PMID:25964351

  19. The Cometa Consortium and the PI2S2 project .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciani, U.

    The new grid e-Infrastructure in Sicily is offering new perspectives and important resources and starts to give new great opportunity for research using the HPC resources. We will show the infrastructure of the Cometa Consortium, the main activities of the PI2S2 project and the new challenges, mainly in the HPC area, that the project is carrying out. A simple but useful procedure for running HPC is also described.

  20. Atomic and electronic structure of MoS2 nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2003-01-01

    Using density-functional theory (DFT) we present a detailed theoretical study of MoS2 nanoparticles. We focus on the edge structures, and a number of different edge terminations are investigated. Several, but not all, of these configurations have one-dimensional metallic states localized at the edges. The electronic structure of the edge states is studied and we discuss their influence on the chemical properties of the edges. In particular, we study the reactivity towards hydrogen and show th...

  1. Unusual reactivity of MoS2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Biswajit; Som, Anirban; Chakraborty, Indranath; Baksi, Ananya; Sarkar, Depanjan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of the 2D nanosheets of MoS2 with silver ions in solution, leading to their spontaneous morphological and chemical transformations, is reported. This unique reactivity of the nanoscale form of MoS2 was in stark contrast to its bulk counterpart. While the gradual morphological transformation involving several steps has been captured with an electron microscope, precise chemical identification of the species involved was achieved by electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The energetics of the system investigated supports the observed chemical transformation. The reaction with mercury and gold ions shows similar and dissimilar reaction products, respectively and points to the stability of the metal-sulphur bond in determining the chemical compositions of the final products.The reactivity of the 2D nanosheets of MoS2 with silver ions in solution, leading to their spontaneous morphological and chemical transformations, is reported. This unique reactivity of the nanoscale form of MoS2 was in stark contrast to its bulk counterpart. While the gradual morphological transformation involving several steps has been captured with an electron microscope, precise chemical identification of the species involved was achieved by electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The energetics of the system investigated supports the observed chemical transformation. The reaction with mercury and gold ions shows similar and dissimilar reaction products, respectively and points to the stability of the metal-sulphur bond in determining the chemical compositions of the final products. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00878j

  2. Discovery and Classification of DES15S2lam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.

    2015-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of DES15S2lam discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectrum (540-965nm) was obtained using GMOS on Gemini-North. Object classification was performed using superfit (Howell et al, 2005, ApJ, 634, 1190) and SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024), the details of which are reported in the table below.

  3. Performance Analysis of Strained Monolayer MoS$_{2}$ MOSFET

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Amretashis; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational study on the impact of tensile/compressive uniaxial ($\\varepsilon_{xx}$) and biaxial ($\\varepsilon_{xx}=\\varepsilon_{yy}$) strain on monolayer MoS$_{2}$ NMOS and PMOS FETs. The material properties like band structure, carrier effective mass and the multi-band Hamiltonian of the channel, are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Using these parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schr\\"{o}dinger solution under the Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) fo...

  4. Visible Aligned Carbon Nanotube-MoS2 Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Wang, Tianjiao; Ali, Ahmad Iffat; Chani, Devpaul Singh; Xu, Yaqiong

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have gained great interest due to their excellent electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. Recent progress in two-dimensional (2D) materials has opened up new horizons in the realm of physics and engineering that could lead to the revolution of future electronics and optoelectronics. Various hybrid structures have been developed for different applications. Here we report a facile method to synthesize ultrathin 2D hybrids between horizontally-aligned SWNT and monolayer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These hybrid structures can be imaged under an optical microscope; and their Raman mapping indicates that MoS2 flakes are partially grown on top of SWNTs. Moreover, strong photocurrent signals have been observed in SWNT-MoS2 hybrids through scanning photocurrent measurements. These fundamental studies may provide a new way to fabricate 2D hybrids for future electronics and optoelectronics. Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235, USA.

  5. Monolayer MoS2 self-switching diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Mohammed, Mahmood A.; Hossain, Md Sharafat; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) nanodevice that acts as a two-terminal field-effect rectifier. The device is an atomically-thin two-dimensional self-switching diode (SSD) that can be realized within a single MoS2 monolayer with very minimal process steps. Quantum simulation results are presented confirming the device's operation as a diode and showing strong non-linear I-V characteristics. Interestingly, the device shows p-type behavior, in which conduction is dominated by holes as majority charge carriers and the flow of reverse current is enhanced, while the flow of forward current is suppressed, in contrast to monolayer graphene SSDs, which behave as n-type devices. The presence of a large bandgap in monolayer MoS2 results in strong control over the channel, showing complete channel pinch-off in forward conduction, which was confirmed with transmission pathways plots. The device exhibited large leakage tunnelling current through the insulating trenches, which may have been due to the lack of passivation; nevertheless, reverse current remained to be 6 times higher than forward current, showing strong rectification. The effect of p-type substitutional channel doping of sulphur with phosphorus was investigated and showed that it greatly enhances the performance of the device, increasing the reverse-to-forward current rectification ratio more than an order of magnitude, up to a value of 70.

  6. Band structural properties of MoS2 (molybdenite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductivity and superconductivity in MoS2 (molybdenite) can be understood in terms of the band structure of MoS2. The band structural properties of MoS2 are presented here. The energy dependence of nsub(eff) and epsilon(infinity)sub(eff) is investigated. Using calculated values of nsub(eff) and epsilon(infinity)sub(eff), the Penn gap has been determined. The value thus obtained is shown to be in good agreement with the reflectivity data and also with the value obtained from the band structure. The Ravindra and Srivastava formula has been shown to give values for the isobaric temperature gradient of Esub(G)[(deltaEsub(G)/deltaT)sub(P)], which are in agreement with the experimental data, and the contribution to (deltaEsub(G)/deltaT)sub(P) due to the electron lattice interaction has been evaluated. In addition, the electronic polarizability has been calculated using a modified Lorentz-Lorenz relation. (author)

  7. Ab initio study of MoS2 nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Matthieu; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2003-07-01

    Recently, the synthesis of a new phase of MoS2I1/3 stoichiometry was reported [M. Remskar, A. Mrzel, Z. Skraba, A. Jesih, M. Ceh, J. Demšar, P. Stadelmann, F. Lévy, and D. Mihailovic, Science 292, 479 (2001)]. Electron microscope images and diffraction data were interpreted to indicate bundles of sub-nanometer-diameter single-wall MoS2 nanotubes. After experimental characterization, the structure was attributed to an assembly of “armchair” nanotubes with interstitial iodine. Using first-principles total-energy calculations, bundles of MoS2 nanotubes with different topologies and stoichiometries are investigated. All of the systems are strongly metallic. Configurations with “zigzag” structures are found to be more stable energetically than the “armchair” ones, though all of the structures have similar stabilities. After relaxation, there remain several candidates which give a lattice parameter in relative agreement with experiment. Further, spin-polarized calculations indicate that a structure with armchair tubes iodine atoms in their center acquires a very large spontaneous magnetic moment of 12μB, while the other structures are nonmagnetic. Our ab initio calculations show that in most of the other structures, the tubes are very strongly bound together, and that the compounds should be considered as a crystal, rather than as a bundle of tubes in the habitual sense.

  8. Memristive Phenomena in Polycrystalline Single Layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Vinod; Jariwala, Deep; Kim, In-Soo; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Marks, Tobin; Lauhon, Lincoln; Hersam, Mark; Hersam Laboratory Team

    Recently, a new class of layered two-dimensional semiconductors has shown promise for various electronic applications. In particular, single layer transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2) present a host of attractive features such as high electrical conductivity, tunable band-gap, and strong light-matter interaction. However, available growth methods produce large-area polycrystalline films with grain-boundaries and point defects that can be detrimental in conventional electronic devices. In contrast, we have developed unconventional device structures that exploit these defects for useful electronic functions. In particular, we observe grain-boundary mediated memristive phenomena in single layer MoS2 transistors. Memristor current-voltage characteristics depend strongly on the topology of grain-boundaries in MoS2. A grain boundary directly connecting metal electrodes produces thermally assisted switching with dynamic negative differential resistance, whereas a grain boundary bisecting the channel shows non-filamentary soft-switching. In addition, devices with intersecting grain boundaries in the channel show bipolar resistive switching with high on/off ratios up to ~103. Furthermore, the gate electrode in the field-effect geometry can be used to control the absolute resistance of the on and off states. Complementary electrostatic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman microscopy reveal the role of sulfur vacancies in the switching mechanism.

  9. Monolayer MoS2 self-switching diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) nanodevice that acts as a two-terminal field-effect rectifier. The device is an atomically-thin two-dimensional self-switching diode (SSD) that can be realized within a single MoS2 monolayer with very minimal process steps. Quantum simulation results are presented confirming the device's operation as a diode and showing strong non-linear I-V characteristics. Interestingly, the device shows p-type behavior, in which conduction is dominated by holes as majority charge carriers and the flow of reverse current is enhanced, while the flow of forward current is suppressed, in contrast to monolayer graphene SSDs, which behave as n-type devices. The presence of a large bandgap in monolayer MoS2 results in strong control over the channel, showing complete channel pinch-off in forward conduction, which was confirmed with transmission pathways plots. The device exhibited large leakage tunnelling current through the insulating trenches, which may have been due to the lack of passivation; nevertheless, reverse current remained to be 6 times higher than forward current, showing strong rectification. The effect of p-type substitutional channel doping of sulphur with phosphorus was investigated and showed that it greatly enhances the performance of the device, increasing the reverse-to-forward current rectification ratio more than an order of magnitude, up to a value of 70

  10. Simulace přenosu DVB-S2

    OpenAIRE

    Klíma, Jindřich

    2011-01-01

    Tématem mé diplomové práce byl druhý standard satelitní digitální televize, DVB-S2. Je sepsán princip digitální televize a první standard DVB-S. Dále je popsán samotný vznik a charakteristika standardu DVB-S2, nové použité techniky, architektura a jednotlivé bloky jsou detailněji vysvětleny. Součástí práce je také vytvořený program Simulace přenosu DVB-S2 v prostředí MATLAB. V laboratoři televizní techniky UREL byly změřeny oba standardy a srovnány s hodnotami získanými z programu. Byla ověře...

  11. Highly Stretchable MoS2 and Phosphorene Kirigami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David; Hanakata, Paul; Park, Harold

    Several recent works have shown how nanomesh and kirigami patterning can be used to increase the ductility of monolayer graphene and thin film electrodes, suggesting that this approach should be useful for other 2D materials. We have studied the effects of kirigami patterning on the mechanical properties of MoS2 and phosphorene ``monolayers,'' using classical molecular dynamics simulations. We have explored several different kirigami structures, focusing on two simple non-dimensional parameters found to be relevant in our previous study of graphene. These parameters are related to the density of cuts and to the ratio of the overlapping cut length to the nanoribbon length. We found that these membranes, despite not having the single atomic layer planar structure of graphene, show a significantly enhanced ductility that can be understood in terms of the two geometric parameters. For instance, fracture strains of MoS2 kirigami can be enhanced by a factor of six relative to pristine MoS2 nanoribbons. Our findings suggest that the kirigami cuts are the key to changing the morphology of 2D membranes to allow out of plane deflection and to prevent early failure

  12. Graphene/MoS2 heterostructures for optoelectronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, P.; Wong, Q.; El Fatimy, A.; Ishigami, M.; Barbara, P.

    Graphene and other atomically thin materials can be combined to make novel ultra-thin devices that are suitable for flexible substrates. However, fabricating these heterostructures is a challenge. Most previous work was done by stacking monolayers exfoliated from bulk materials , which is a very time-consuming, low-yield method. Large-area monolayer can also be grown by CVD and stacked, as demonstrated by the successful transfer of graphene on as-grown MoS2, yet the optical properties of some materials like MoS2 may be degraded by the processing required to detach them from the growth substrate, thereby limiting options in device architecture. Here we develop a method to transfer, align and stack large flakes and films of MoS2 and graphene after transferring both from the growth substrate onto an arbitrary substrate. The Raman and photoluminescence measurements show that the optical properties of the stacked monolayers are not degraded, making this method viable for fabrication of optoelectronics devices. . Work supported by the U.S. ONR (Award: N000141310865) and the NSF-REU (DMR-1358978).

  13. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  14. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Niewalda; Ines Jeske; Birgit Michels; Bertram Gerber

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group ...

  15. Studying tauopathies in Drosophila: A fruitful model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingkuan; Chen, Liam

    2015-12-01

    Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that include hereditary frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) such as FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), as well as sporadic variants of FTDs like progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and Pick's disease. These diverse diseases all have in common the presence of abnormally phosphorylated tau aggregates. In this review, we will summarize key features of transgenic Drosophila models of tauopathies and a number of insights into disease mechanisms as well as therapeutic implications gained from the fruit fly models. PMID:25862286

  16. Drosophila suzukii Monitoring in verschiedenen Habitaten 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Claudia; Matray, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Die Kirschessigfliege (Drosophila suzukii) wurde 2008 aus Südostasien nach Europa eingeschleppt und verursacht seitdem z.T. massive Ertragsausfälle. Mit ihrem sägeartigen Eiablagestachel ist sie in der Lage, Eier direkt in reifende Weichobstarten, wie z.B. Beeren, Kirschen, Zwetschgen und Trauben abzulegen. Auch viele wilde Pflanzen, wie z.B. Holunder und Schneeball dienen als Wirtspflanzen. Die Larven entwickeln sich in den Früchten und ernähren sich vom Fruchtfleisch. Die befallenen Früchte...

  17. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  18. Enigma of radiation effects in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear relations between induced mutation and x-ray dose and related inconsistencies are discussed. Some of the inconsistencies are concerned with the frequency of induced sex-linked lethal mutations in ring chromosomes and the frequency of whole-body mutations after irradiation. The hypothesis of totipotency or the developmental competence of a single first-cleavage product after loss of the other by its involvement in chromatid rearrangements suggests that interchanges predominantly involve the chromatids within each of the two nuclei and not between the two nuclei. It is concluded that the hypothesis of totipotency of the cleavage products in Drosophila explains many puzzling results from radiation experiments

  19. A connectionist model of the Drosophila blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinitz, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences); Mjolsness, E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Sharp, D.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA). Theoretical Div.)

    1990-11-01

    The authors present a phenomenological modeling framework for development, and apply it to the network of segmentation genes operating in the blastoderm of Drosophila. Their purpose is to provide a systematic method for discovering and expressing correlations in experimental data on gene expression and other developmental processes. The modeling framework is based on a connectionist or neural net dynamics for biochemical regulators, coupled to grammatical rules which describe certain features of the birth, growth, and death of cells, synapses and other biological entities. They present preliminary numerical results regarding regulatory interactions between the genes Kruppel and knirps that demonstrate the potential utility of the model. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Wolfgang [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Mikkelsen, Nils Egil [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Clausen, Anders Ranegaard [Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden); Willer, Mette [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Gojkovic, Zoran [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Piskur, Jure, E-mail: Jure.Piskur@cob.lu.se [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  1. Evolution of a Distinct Genomic Domain in Drosophila: Comparative Analysis of the Dot Chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila virilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Cordonnier, Taylor; Wong, Jeannette; Itano, Michelle S.; Slawson Tempel, Elizabeth E.; Kellmann, Elmer; Desruisseau, David Michael; Cain, Carolyn; Carrasquillo, Robert; Chusak, Tien M.; Falkowska, Katazyna; Grim, Kelli D.; Guan, Rui; Honeybourne, Jacquelyn; Khan, Sana; Lo, Louis; McGaha, Rebecca; Plunkett, Jevon; Richner, Justin M.; Richt, Ryan; Sabin, Leah; Shah, Anita; Sharma, Anushree; Singhal, Sonal; Song, Fine; Swope, Christopher; Wilen, Craig B.; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The distal arm of the fourth (“dot”) chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster is unusual in that it exhibits an amalgamation of heterochromatic properties (e.g., dense packaging, late replication) and euchromatic properties (e.g., gene density similar to euchromatic domains, replication during polytenization). To examine the evolution of this unusual domain, we undertook a comparative study by generating high-quality sequence data and manually curating gene models for the dot chromosome of D. virilis (Tucson strain 15010–1051.88). Our analysis shows that the dot chromosomes of D. melanogaster and D. virilis have higher repeat density, larger gene size, lower codon bias, and a higher rate of gene rearrangement compared to a reference euchromatic domain. Analysis of eight “wanderer” genes (present in a euchromatic chromosome arm in one species and on the dot chromosome in the other) shows that their characteristics are similar to other genes in the same domain, which suggests that these characteristics are features of the domain and are not required for these genes to function. Comparison of this strain of D. virilis with the strain sequenced by the Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium (Tucson strain 15010–1051.87) indicates that most genes on the dot are under weak purifying selection. Collectively, despite the heterochromatin-like properties of this domain, genes on the dot evolve to maintain function while being responsive to changes in their local environment. PMID:20479145

  2. Evidence for horizontal transfer of Wolbachia by a Drosophila mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy N; Lloyd, Vett K

    2015-07-01

    Mites are common ectoparasites of Drosophila and have been implicated in bacterial and mobile element invasion of Drosophila stocks. The obligate endobacterium, Wolbachia, has widespread effects on gene expression in their arthropod hosts and alters host reproduction to enhance its survival and propagation, often with deleterious effects in Drosophila hosts. To determine whether Wolbachia could be transferred between Drosophila melanogaster laboratory stocks by the mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae, mites were introduced to Wolbachia-infected Drosophila vials. These vials were kept adjacent to mite-free and Wolbachia-uninfected Drosophila stock vials. The Wolbachia infection statuses of the infected and uninfected flies were checked from generation 1 to 5. Results indicate that Wolbachia DNA could be amplified from mites infesting Wolbachia-infected fly stocks and infection in the previously uninfected stocks arose within generation 1 or 2, concomitant with invasion of mites from the Wolbachia-infected stock. A possible mechanism for the transfer of Wolbachia from flies to mites and vice versa, can be inferred from time-lapse photography of fly and mite interactions. We demonstrated that mites ingest Drosophila corpses, including Wolbachia-infected corpses, and Drosophila larva ingest mites, providing possible sources of Wolbachia infection and transfer. This research demonstrated that T. putrescentiae white mites can facilitate Wolbachia transfer between Drosophila stocks and that this may occur by ingestion of infected corpses. Mite-vectored Wolbachia transfer allows for rapid establishment of Wolbachia infection within a new population. This mode of Wolbachia introduction may be relevant in nature as well as in the laboratory, and could have a variety of biological consequences. PMID:25921489

  3. Genetic effects of plutonium in Drosophila. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This three year project, initiated in 1987, involved the genetic effects of alpha radiations on Drosophila. This document represents the final technical report. Plutonium residue was used as the alpha source of radon gas. Spontaneous mutation frequency in the Drosophila stock was very low. In the experiments using alpha radiation from radon gas, radiation doses as low as 20R induced significant numbers of mutations, with higher numbers of mutations at higher doses. If X-ray induced mutation frequencies reported in the literature are used for comparison, it can be concluded that alpha radiation from radon gas induces at least 2 to 3 time more mutations in Drosophila.

  4. Twisted Duality Symmetry and Integrability of Hybrid Superstring on AdS2×S2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we show that there exists a twisted duality symmetry between the Maurer-Cartan equations and the equations of motion in the hybrid formalism for the type IIB superstring in an AdSz×S2 background with Ramond-Ramond flux. As a result, from the twisted duality transformation, we construct the Lax connection with the spectral parameter, which ensures the integrability of the system.

  5. Synthesis And Electrochemical Characteristics Of Mechanically Alloyed Anode Materials SnS2 For Li/SnS2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J.H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demand for efficient and economic energy storage, tin disulfide (SnS2, as one of the most attractive anode candidates for the next generation high-energy rechargeable Li-ion battery, have been paid more and more attention because of its high theoretical energy density and cost effectiveness. In this study, a new, simple and effective process, mechanical alloying (MA, has been developed for preparing fine anode material tin disulfides, in which ammonium chloride (AC, referred to as process control agents (PCAs, were used to prevent excessive cold-welding and accelerate the synthesis rates to some extent. Meanwhile, in order to decrease the mean size of SnS2 powder particles and improve the contact areas between the active materials, wet milling process was also conducted with normal hexane (NH as a solvent PCA. The prepared powders were both characterized by X-ray diffraction, Field emission-scanning electron microscopeand particle size analyzer. Finally, electrochemical measurements for Li/SnS2 cells were takenat room temperature, using a two-electrode cell assembled in an argon-filled glove box and the electrolyte of 1M LiPF6 in a mixture of ethylene carbonate(EC/dimethylcarbonate (DMC/ethylene methyl carbonate (EMC (volume ratio of 1:1:1.

  6. Pressure Effects on Superconducting Properties of the BiS2-Based Superconductor Bi2(O,F)S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoyuki; Ogino, Hiraku; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Kishio, Kohji; Takeshita, Nao; Shirakawa, Naoki; Iyo, Akira; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Pressure effects on the recently discovered BiS2-based superconductor Bi2(O,F)S2 (Tc = 5.1 K) were examined by two different methods: high-pressure resistivity measurement and high-pressure annealing. The effects of these two methods on the superconducting properties of Bi2(O,F)S2 were significantly different, although in both methods, hydrostatic pressure is applied to the sample using a cubic-anvil-type apparatus. In high-pressure resistivity measurement, Tc linearly decreased at a rate of -1.2 K GPa-1. In contrast, the Tc of 5.1 K is maintained after high-pressure annealing under 2 GPa and 470 °C of an optimally doped sample despite a significant change in lattice parameters. In addition, superconductivity was observed in fluorine-free Bi2OS2 after high-pressure annealing. These results suggest that high-pressure annealing has a unique effect on the physical properties of layered compounds.

  7. Band renormalization and spin polarization of MoS2 in graphene/MoS2 heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition metal dichalcogenides exhibit spin-orbit split bands at the K-point that become spin polarized for broken crystal inversion symmetry. This enables simultaneous manipulation of valley and spin degrees of freedom. While the inversion symmetry is broken for monolayers, we show here that spin polarization of the MoS2 surface may also be obtained by interfacing it with graphene, which induces a space charge region in the surface of MoS2. Polarization induced symmetry breaking in the potential gradient of the space charge is considered to be responsible for the observed spin polarization. In addition to spin polarization we also observe a renormalization of the valence band maximum (VBM) upon interfacing of MoS2 with graphene. The energy difference between the VBM at the Γ-point and K-point shifts by ∝150 meV between the clean and graphene covered surface. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Deconstructing host-pathogen interactions in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Bier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the cellular mechanisms underlying host responses to pathogens have been well conserved during evolution. As a result, Drosophila can be used to deconstruct many of the key events in host-pathogen interactions by using a wealth of well-developed molecular and genetic tools. In this review, we aim to emphasize the great leverage provided by the suite of genomic and classical genetic approaches available in flies for decoding details of host-pathogen interactions; these findings can then be applied to studies in higher organisms. We first briefly summarize the general strategies by which Drosophila resists and responds to pathogens. We then focus on how recently developed genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screens conducted in cells and flies, combined with classical genetic methods, have provided molecular insight into host-pathogen interactions, covering examples of bacteria, fungi and viruses. Finally, we discuss novel strategies for how flies can be used as a tool to examine how specific isolated virulence factors act on an intact host.

  9. The smell of love in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna B. eZiegler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Odors are key sensory signals for social communication and food search in animals including insects. Drosophila melanogaster, is a powerful neurogenetic model commonly used to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in odorant detection. Males use olfaction together with other sensory modalities to find their mates. Here, we review known olfactory signals, their related olfactory receptors, and the corresponding neuronal architecture impacting courtship. OR67d receptor detects 11-cis-Vaccenyl Acetate (cVA, a male specific pheromone transferred to the female during copulation. Transferred cVA is able to reduce female attractiveness for other males after mating, and is also suspected to decrease male-male courtship. cVA can also serve as an aggregation signal, maybe through another OR. OR47b was shown to be activated by fly odors, and to enhance courtship depending on taste pheromones. IR84a detects phenylacetic acid (PAA and phenylacetaldehyde. These two odors are not pheromones produced by flies, but are present in various fly food sources. PAA enhances male courtship, acting as a food aphrodisiac. Drosophila males have thus developed complementary olfactory strategies to help them to select their mates.

  10. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity [3H]-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature

  11. Quantification of food intake in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wong

    Full Text Available Measurement of food intake in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is often necessary for studies of behaviour, nutrition and drug administration. There is no reliable and agreed method for measuring food intake of flies in undisturbed, steady state, and normal culture conditions. We report such a method, based on measurement of feeding frequency by proboscis-extension, validated by short-term measurements of food dye intake. We used the method to demonstrate that (a female flies feed more frequently than males, (b flies feed more often when housed in larger groups and (c fly feeding varies at different times of the day. We also show that alterations in food intake are not induced by dietary restriction or by a null mutation of the fly insulin receptor substrate chico. In contrast, mutation of takeout increases food intake by increasing feeding frequency while mutation of ovo(D increases food intake by increasing the volume of food consumed per proboscis-extension. This approach provides a practical and reliable method for quantification of food intake in Drosophila under normal, undisturbed culture conditions.

  12. Lamin C and chromatin organization in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. V. Gurudatta; L. S. Shashidhara; Veena K. Parnaik

    2010-04-01

    Drosophila lamin C (LamC) is a developmentally regulated component of the nuclear lamina. The lamC gene is situated in the fifth intron of the essential gene tout velu (ttv). We carried out genetic analysis of lamC during development. Phenotypic analyses of RNAi-mediated downregulation of lamC expression as well as targeted misexpression of lamin C suggest a role for lamC in cell survival. Of particular interest in the context of laminopathies is the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by the overexpression of lamin C. Interestingly, misexpression of lamin C in the central nervous system, where it is not normally expressed, did not affect organization of the nuclear lamina. lamC mutant alleles suppressed position effect variegation normally displayed at near-centromeric and telomeric regions. Further, both downregulation and misexpression of lamin C affected the distribution of heterochromatin protein 1. Our results suggest that Drosophila lamC has a tissue-specific role during development and is required for chromatin organization.

  13. Drosophila Porin/VDAC affects mitochondrial morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehye Park

    Full Text Available Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC has been suggested to be a mediator of mitochondrial-dependent cell death induced by Ca(2+ overload, oxidative stress and Bax-Bid activation. To confirm this hypothesis in vivo, we generated and characterized Drosophila VDAC (porin mutants and found that Porin is not required for mitochondrial apoptosis, which is consistent with the previous mouse studies. We also reported a novel physiological role of Porin. Loss of porin resulted in locomotive defects and male sterility. Intriguingly, porin mutants exhibited elongated mitochondria in indirect flight muscle, whereas Porin overexpression produced fragmented mitochondria. Through genetic analysis with the components of mitochondrial fission and fusion, we found that the elongated mitochondria phenotype in porin mutants were suppressed by increased mitochondrial fission, but enhanced by increased mitochondrial fusion. Furthermore, increased mitochondrial fission by Drp1 expression suppressed the flight defects in the porin mutants. Collectively, our study showed that loss of Drosophila Porin results in mitochondrial morphological defects and suggested that the defective mitochondrial function by Porin deficiency affects the mitochondrial remodeling process.

  14. Selective anticancer agents suppress aging in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Kogan, Valeria; Fedichev, Peter; Moskalev, Alexey

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of the PI3K, TOR, iNOS, and NF-κB genes increase lifespan of model organisms and reduce the risk of some aging-associated diseases. We studied the effects of inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), TOR (rapamycin), iNOS (1400W), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate and QNZ), and the combined effects of inhibitors: PI3K (wortmannin) and TOR (rapamycin), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamates) and PI3K (wortmannin), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamates) and TOR (rapamycin) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and quality of life (locomotor activity and fertility). Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, TOR, NF-κB, and iNOS increases lifespan of Drosophila without decreasing quality of life. The greatest lifespan expanding effect was achieved by a combination of rapamycin (5 μM) and wortmannin (5 μM) (by 23.4%). The bioinformatic analysis (KEGG, REACTOME.PATH, DOLite, and GO.BP) showed the greatest aging-suppressor activity of rapamycin, consistent with experimental data. PMID:24096697

  15. Microarray analysis of immune challenged Drosophila hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Karin C; Metzendorf, Christoph; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2005-04-15

    Insect hemocytes play multiple roles in immunity and carry out cellular responses like phagocytosis, encapsulation and melanization as well as producing humoral effector proteins in the first line of defense after injury and invasion of microorganisms. In this work, we used the Drosophila melanogaster hemocyte-like cell line mbn-2 and Affymetrix Drosophila GeneChips to investigate the transcriptome of a single type of immune competent tissue exposed to Gram-negative cell wall components (crude LPS) or high dose infection with live Escherichia coli. We found that gene expression profiles of both treatments overlap but show important differences in expression levels of several genes involved in immunity. In addition, cell morphology during infection was monitored and revealed distinct alterations in cell shape and adhesion. Presence of large numbers of bacteria also increased the number of cells taking on crystal cell fate. Taken together, our results indicate that hemocytes sense and respond differently to purified bacterial surface molecules and infection with live and actively growing bacteria both at the level of gene expression and in cell behavior. PMID:15777795

  16. Behavioural reproductive isolation and speciation in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Punita Nanda; Bashisth Narayan Singh

    2012-06-01

    The origin of premating reproductive isolation continues to help elucidate the process of speciation and is the central event in the evolution of biological species. Therefore, during the process of species formation the diverging populations must acquire some means of reproductive isolation so that the genes from one gene pool are prevented from dispersing freely into a foreign gene pool. In the genus Drosophila, the phenomenon of behavioural reproductive isolation, which is an important type of premating (prezygotic) reproductive isolating mechanisms, has been extensively studied and interesting data have been documented. In many cases incomplete sexual isolation has been observed and the pattern and degree of isolation within and between the species have often been used to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships. The present review documents an overview of speciation mediated through behavioural incompatibility in different species groups of Drosophila with particular reference to the models proposed on the basis of one-sided ethological isolation to predict the direction of evolution. This study is crucial for understanding the mechanism of speciation through behavioural incompatibility and also for an understanding of speciation genetics in future prospects.

  17. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Manjunatha; Shantala Hari Dass; Vijay Kumar Sharma

    2008-12-01

    Extensive research has been carried out to understand how circadian clocks regulate various physiological processes in organisms. The discovery of clock genes and the molecular clockwork has helped researchers to understand the possible role of these genes in regulating various metabolic processes. In Drosophila melanogaster, many studies have shown that the basic architecture of circadian clocks is multi-oscillatory. In nature, different neuronal subgroups in the brain of D. melanogaster have been demonstrated to control different circadian behavioural rhythms or different aspects of the same circadian rhythm. Among the circadian phenomena that have been studied so far in Drosophila, the egg-laying rhythm is unique, and relatively less explored. Unlike most other circadian rhythms, the egg-laying rhythm is rhythmic under constant light conditions, and the endogenous or free-running period of the rhythm is greater than those of most other rhythms. Although the clock genes and neurons required for the persistence of adult emergence and activity/rest rhythms have been studied extensively, those underlying the circadian egg-laying rhythm still remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the circadian egg-laying rhythm in D. melanogaster, and the possible molecular and physiological mechanisms that control the rhythmic output of the egg-laying process.

  18. The complexity of Drosophila innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Reumer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metazoans rely on efficient mechanisms to oppose infections caused by pathogens. The immediate and first-line defense mechanism(s in metazoans, referred to as the innate immune system, is initiated upon recognition of microbial intruders by germline encoded receptors and is executed by a set of rapid effector mechanisms. Adaptive immunity is restricted to vertebrate species and it is controlled and assisted by the innate immune system.Interestingly, most of the basic signaling cascades that regulate the primeval innate defense mechanism(s have been well conserved during evolution, for instance between humans and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Being devoid of adaptive signaling and effector systems, Drosophila has become an established model system for studying pristine innate immune cascades and reactions. In general, an immune response is evoked when microorganisms pass the fruit fly’s physical barriers (e.g., cuticle, epithelial lining of gut and trachea, and it is mainly executed in the hemolymph, the equivalent of the mammalian blood. Innate immunity in the fruit fly consists of a phenoloxidase (PO response, a cellular response (hemocytes, an antiviral response, and the NF-κB dependent production of antimicrobial peptides referred to as the humoral response. The JAK/STAT and Jun kinase signaling cascades are also implicated in the defence against pathogens.

  19. Mapping Sites of O-Glycosylation and Fringe Elongation on Drosophila Notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Beth M; Rana, Nadia A; Moss, Hillary; Leonardi, Jessica; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2016-07-29

    Glycosylation of the Notch receptor is essential for its activity and serves as an important modulator of signaling. Three major forms of O-glycosylation are predicted to occur at consensus sites within the epidermal growth factor-like repeats in the extracellular domain of the receptor: O-fucosylation, O-glucosylation, and O-GlcNAcylation. We have performed comprehensive mass spectral analyses of these three types of O-glycosylation on Drosophila Notch produced in S2 cells and identified peptides containing all 22 predicted O-fucose sites, all 18 predicted O-glucose sites, and all 18 putative O-GlcNAc sites. Using semiquantitative mass spectral methods, we have evaluated the occupancy and relative amounts of glycans at each site. The majority of the O-fucose sites were modified to high stoichiometries. Upon expression of the β3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe with Notch, we observed varying degrees of elongation beyond O-fucose monosaccharide, indicating that Fringe preferentially modifies certain sites more than others. Rumi modified O-glucose sites to high stoichiometries, although elongation of the O-glucose was site-specific. Although the current putative consensus sequence for O-GlcNAcylation predicts 18 O-GlcNAc sites on Notch, we only observed apparent O-GlcNAc modification at five sites. In addition, we performed mass spectral analysis on endogenous Notch purified from Drosophila embryos and found that the glycosylation states were similar to those found on Notch from S2 cells. These data provide foundational information for future studies investigating the mechanisms of how O-glycosylation regulates Notch activity. PMID:27268051

  20. Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Viviane; Zhang, Renyun; Bäckström, Joakim; Dahlström, Christina; Andres, Britta; Norgren, Magnus; Andersson, Mattias; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants and other funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generally believed, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achieved and systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and the stabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14 ± 0.01 g L-1). This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2 by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dispersing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2 nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of the nanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the stabilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare the stability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as a solvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be as high as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable. PMID:27120098

  1. Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Viviane; Zhang, Renyun; Bäckström, Joakim; Dahlström, Christina; Andres, Britta; Norgren, Magnus; Andersson, Mattias; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants and other funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generally believed, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achieved and systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and the stabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14 ± 0.01 g L−1). This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2 by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dispersing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2 nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of the nanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the stabilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare the stability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as a solvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be as high as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable. PMID:27120098

  2. Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Forsberg

    Full Text Available Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants and other funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generally believed, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achieved and systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and the stabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14 ± 0.01 g L-1. This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2 by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dispersing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2 nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of the nanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the stabilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare the stability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as a solvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be as high as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable.

  3. Open Strings on AdS_2 Branes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Peter; Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Jongwon; Tannenhauser, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    We study the spectrum of open strings on AdS_2 branes in AdS_3 in an NS-NS background, using the SL(2,R) WZW model. When the brane carries no fundamental string charge, the open string spectrum is the holomorphic square root of the spectrum of closed strings in AdS_3. It contains short and long strings, and is invariant under spectral flow. When the brane carries fundamental string charge, the open string spectrum again contains short and long strings in all winding sectors. However, branes w...

  4. Investigation of LDPC code in DVB-S2

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Hanxiao

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most powerful error-correcting codes, Low-density parity check codes are widely used in digital communications. Because of the performance of LDPC codes are capable to close the shannon limited extraordinarily, LDPC codes are to be used in the new Digital Video Broadcast-Satellite-Second Generation(DVB-S2) and it is the first time that LDPC codes are included in the broadcast standard in 2003. In this thesis, a restructured parity-check matrices which can be divided into sub-mat...

  5. Codificador LDPC e interleaver para DVB-S2

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Solórzano, Víctor Manuel; Pérez Llano, Jesús Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Codificador LDPC e interleaver para DVB-S2. La arquitectura propuesta define una novedosa forma de almacenaje de bits en memoria, almacenando los bits sistemáticos en las primeras filas de forma secuencial y los datos de paridad en las últimas “q” filas, almacenados de forma que valores consecutivos en memoria sean valores separados un valor “q”. Esto permite una codificación del “LDPC” con menos latencia al poder realizar 360 operaciones XOR en paralelo, una acumulación de bits más rápida al...

  6. Plasmons on the edge of MoS2 nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kirsten; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    Using ab initio calculations we predict the existence of one-dimensional (1D), atomically confined plasmons at the edges of a zigzag MoS2 nanoribbon. The strongest plasmon originates from a metallic edge state localized on the sulfur dimers decorating the Mo edge of the ribbon. A detailed analysis of the dielectric function reveals that the observed deviations from the ideal 1D plasmon behavior result from single-particle transitions between the metallic edge state and the valence and conduct...

  7. MoS2 Nanosheet-Modified CuInS2 Photocatalyst for Visible-Light-Driven Hydrogen Production from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Chen, Da-Qin; Huang, Yan-Wei; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Zhong, Jia-Song; Chen, Ting-Ting; Tu, Wen-Guang; Guan, Zhong-Jie; Cao, Da-Peng; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-05-10

    Exploiting photocatalysts respond to visible light is of huge challenge for photocatalytic H2 production. Here, we synthesize a new composite material consisting of few-layer MoS2 nanosheets grown on CuInS2 surface as an efficient photocatalyst for solar H2 generation. The photocatalytic results demonstrate that the 3 wt % MoS2 /CuInS2 photocatalyst exhibits the highest H2 generation rate of 316 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) under visible light irradiation, which is almost 28 times higher than that of CuInS2 . Importantly, the MoS2 /CuInS2 photocatalyst shows a much higher photocatalytic activity than that of Pt-loaded CuInS2 photocatalyst. The enhanced photocatalytic activities of MoS2 /CuInS2 photocatalysts can be attributed to the improved charge separation at the interface of MoS2 and CuInS2, which is demonstrated by the significant enhancement of photocurrent responses in MoS2 /CuInS2 photoelectrodes. This work presents a noble-metal-free photocatalyst that responds to visible light for solar H2 generation. PMID:27062042

  8. Associations of yeasts with spotted-wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii; Diptera: Drosophilidae) in cherries and raspberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, Kelly A; Hernández, Alejandro; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Zalom, Frank G

    2012-07-01

    A rich history of investigation documents various Drosophila-yeast mutualisms, suggesting that Drosophila suzukii similarly has an association with a specific yeast species or community. To discover candidate yeast species, yeasts were isolated from larval frass, adult midguts, and fruit hosts of D. suzukii. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) technology and decimal dilution plating were used to identify and determine the relative abundance of yeast species present in fruit juice samples that were either infested with D. suzukii or not infested. Yeasts were less abundant in uninfested than infested samples. A total of 126 independent yeast isolates were cultivated from frass, midguts, and fruit hosts of D. suzukii, representing 28 species of yeasts, with Hanseniaspora uvarum predominating. This suggests an association between D. suzukii and H. uvarum that could be utilized for pest management of the highly pestiferous D. suzukii. PMID:22582060

  9. Efficient chromosomal gene modification with CRISPR/cas9 and PCR-based homologous recombination donors in cultured Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Romy; Hollmann, Manuel; Merk, Karin; Nitschko, Volker; Obermaier, Christina; Philippou-Massier, Julia; Wieland, Isabella; Gaul, Ulrike; Förstemann, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    The ability to edit the genome is essential for many state-of-the-art experimental paradigms. Since DNA breaks stimulate repair, they can be exploited to target site-specific integration. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/cas9 system from Streptococcus pyogenes has been harnessed into an efficient and programmable nuclease for eukaryotic cells. We thus combined DNA cleavage by cas9, the generation of homologous recombination donors by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and transient depletion of the non-homologous end joining factor lig4. Using cultured Drosophila melanogaster S2-cells and the phosphoglycerate kinase gene as a model, we reached targeted integration frequencies of up to 50% in drug-selected cell populations. Homology arms as short as 29 nt appended to the PCR primer resulted in detectable integration, slightly longer extensions are beneficial. We confirmed established rules for S. pyogenes cas9 sgRNA design and demonstrate that the complementarity region allows length variation and 5'-extensions. This enables generation of U6-promoter fusion templates by overlap-extension PCR with a standardized protocol. We present a series of PCR template vectors for C-terminal protein tagging and clonal Drosophila S2 cell lines with stable expression of a myc-tagged cas9 protein. The system can be used for epitope tagging or reporter gene knock-ins in an experimental setup that can in principle be fully automated. PMID:24748663

  10. Conservation of Olfactory Avoidance in Drosophila Species and Identification of Repellents for Drosophila suzukii

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Krause Pham; Anandasankar Ray

    2015-01-01

    Flying insects use olfaction to navigate towards fruits in complex odor environments with remarkable accuracy. Some fruits change odor profiles substantially during ripening and related species can prefer different stages. In Drosophila species attractive odorants have been studied extensively, but little is understood about the role of avoidance pathways. In order to examine the role of the avoidance cue CO2 emitted from fruit on behavior of two species with different ripening stage preferen...

  11. Photoluminescence properties of S2 molecule trapped in Melanophlogite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Fabrizio; Todaro, Michela; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Vaccaro, Lavinia; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco M.

    2016-03-01

    We studied the photoluminescence properties of a sample of SiO2-clathrate Melanophlogite, a crystalline microporous material which is found in nature as a rare mineral. Upon β irradiation, the material displays an intense light emission under near-UV illumination. We studied in detail this optical activity by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements as a function of temperature. The spectroscopic properties we find can be ascribed to a population of quasi-free molecules trapped within each of the two different types of cage available in the structure of this clathrate, although the spectroscopic properties of the guest molecules are affected by their interactions with the host matrix. Based on the available data, we attribute the observed photoluminescence to trapped S2 molecules, emitting from their excited 3Σ u - or 3Π u electronic states, depending on the cage they are trapped in and on temperature. Our results have an impact on the fundamental understanding of host-guest interactions characteristic of microporous systems such as clathrates. Indeed, the data highlight that even a relatively weak coupling between quasi-free S2 molecules and the two types of cages provided by the Melanophlogite host has a surprisingly complex influence on the optical properties of the guest.

  12. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization on MoS 2; Theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonnevylle, Marjanne C.; Hoffmann, Roald; Harris, Suzanne

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the removal of sulfur in the form of H 2S from petroleum, is a crucial step in the industrial refinement process. Using the extended Hückel tight binding method, we have examined the nature of the active site and the mechanism of desulfurization in the case of thiophene on MoS 2. The η 5-bound sites, in which the thiophene ring lies parallel to the surface, are particularly advantageous to weakening the SC bond. η 1-bound sites are less active. The removal of sorrounding surface sulfurs increases the HDS potential of the η 5 geometry, but is ineffective at promoting the poorer adsorption modes. Surface reconstruction has also been examined; the possibility of MoMo pairing is suggested. The effect of poisons and promoters is considered. The role they play in HDS catalysis may be determined by the position they occupy in the MoS 2 lattice. Metals which replace a surface molybdenum tend to poison HDS, whereas those which "pseudo-intercalate" between the SS layers can serve to promote the reaction.

  13. MoS2 memristor with photoresistive switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Panin, Gennady N; Fu, Xiao; Zhang, Lei; Ilanchezhiyan, P; Pelenovich, Vasiliy O; Fu, Dejun; Kang, Tae Won

    2016-01-01

    A MoS2 nanosphere memristor with lateral gold electrodes was found to show photoresistive switching. The new device can be controlled by the polarization of nanospheres, which causes resistance switching in an electric field in the dark or under white light illumination. The polarization charge allows to change the switching voltage of the photomemristor, providing its multi-level operation. The device, polarized at a voltage 6 V, switches abruptly from a high resistance state (HRSL6) to a low resistance state (LRSL6) with the On/Off resistance ratio of about 10 under white light and smooth in the dark. Analysis of device conductivity in different resistive states indicates that its resistive state could be changed by the modulation of the charge in an electric field in the dark or under light, resulting in the formation/disruption of filaments with high conductivity. A MoS2 photomemristor has great potential as a multifunctional device designed by using cost-effective fabrication techniques. PMID:27492593

  14. MoS2 memristor with photoresistive switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Panin, Gennady N.; Fu, Xiao; Zhang, Lei; Ilanchezhiyan, P.; Pelenovich, Vasiliy O.; Fu, Dejun; Kang, Tae Won

    2016-08-01

    A MoS2 nanosphere memristor with lateral gold electrodes was found to show photoresistive switching. The new device can be controlled by the polarization of nanospheres, which causes resistance switching in an electric field in the dark or under white light illumination. The polarization charge allows to change the switching voltage of the photomemristor, providing its multi-level operation. The device, polarized at a voltage 6 V, switches abruptly from a high resistance state (HRSL6) to a low resistance state (LRSL6) with the On/Off resistance ratio of about 10 under white light and smooth in the dark. Analysis of device conductivity in different resistive states indicates that its resistive state could be changed by the modulation of the charge in an electric field in the dark or under light, resulting in the formation/disruption of filaments with high conductivity. A MoS2 photomemristor has great potential as a multifunctional device designed by using cost-effective fabrication techniques.

  15. Quantum cat map dynamics on AdS$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2016-01-01

    We present a toy model for the chaotic unitary scattering of single particle wave packets on the radial AdS$_2$ geometry of extremal BH horizons. Based on our recent work for the discretization of the AdS$_2$ space-time, which describes a finite and random geometry, by modular arithmetic, we investigate the validity of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), as well as that of the fast scrambling time bound conjecture (STB), for an observer with time evolution operator the quantum Arnol'd cat map (QACM). We find that the QACM, while possessing a linear spectrum, has eigenstates, which can be expressed in closed form, are found to be random and to satisfy the assumptions of the ETH.The implications are that the dynamics is described by a chaotic, unitary, single particle S-matrix, which completely delocalizes and randomizes initial gaussian wave packets . Applying results obtained by Dyson and Falk for the periods of the Arnol'd Cat Map(ACM),which are related to its mixing time, we also find that the t...

  16. The dominant mutation Suppressor of black indicates that de novo pyrimindine biosynthesis is involved in the Drosophila tan pigmentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Kolbak, D.; Søndergaard, Leif;

    1993-01-01

    Pyrimidines, beta-alanine, cuticle, drosophila, pyrimidine analogs, molecular genetics, rudimentary......Pyrimidines, beta-alanine, cuticle, drosophila, pyrimidine analogs, molecular genetics, rudimentary...

  17. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches. PMID:27160896

  18. Correction: Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species

    OpenAIRE

    Salzberg, Steven L.; Julie C Dunning Hotopp; Delcher, Arthur L; Pop, Mihai; Smith, Douglas R; Eisen, Michael B; Nelson, William C.

    2005-01-01

    A correction to Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species by SL Salzberg, JC Dunning Hotopp, AL Delcher, M Pop, DR Smith, MB Eisen and WC Nelson. Genome Biology 2005, 6:R23

  19. Behavioral modification in choice process ofDrosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunpeng; Tang, Shiming; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2003-08-01

    In visual operant conditioning ofDrosophila at the flight simulator, only motor output of flies-yaw torque-is recorded, which is involved in the conditioning process. The current study used a newly-designed data analysis method to study the torque distribution ofDrosophila. Modification of torque distribution represents the effects of operant conditioning on flies' behavioral mode. Earlier works([10]) showed that, when facing contradictory visual cues, flies could make choices based upon the relative weightiness of different cues, and it was demonstrated that mushroom bodies might play an important role in such choice behavior. The new "torque-position map" method was used to explore the CS-US associative learning and choice behavior inDrosophila from the aspect of its behavioral mode. Finally, this work also discussed various possible neural bases involved in visual associative learning, choice processing and modification processing of the behavioral mode in the visual operant conditioning ofDrosophila. PMID:21072612

  20. Is premating isolation in Drosophila overestimated due to uncontrolled factors?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pelayo Casares; Rafael Piñeiro; Maria C. Carracedo

    2005-12-01

    Sexual isolation in Drosophila is typically measured by multiple-choice mating tests. While many environmental variables during such tests are controlled by the researcher, there are some factors that are usually uncontrolled. We demonstrate, using Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura flies, that the temperature of rearing, preadult density, and level of consanguinity, can all produce differences in mating propensity between genetically equivalent flies. These differences in mating propensity, in turn, can give rise to statistically significant results in multiple-choice mating tests, leading to positive isolation values and the artifactual inference of sexual isolation between populations. This fact agrees with a nonrandom excess of significant positive tests found in a review of the literature of Drosophila intraspecific mating choice. An overestimate of true cases of sexual isolation in Drosophila in the literature can, therefore, not be ruled out.

  1. Loss of Drosophila pheromone reverses its role in sexual communication in Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Teun; Revadi, Santosh; Mansourian, Suzan; Ramasamy, Sukanya; Lebreton, Sebastien; Becher, Paul G; Angeli, Sergio; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Anfora, Gianfranco

    2015-04-01

    The Drosophila pheromone cis-11-octadecenyl acetate (cVA) is used as pheromone throughout the melanogaster group and fulfils a primary role in sexual and social behaviours. Here, we found that Drosophila suzukii, an invasive pest that oviposits in undamaged ripe fruit, does not produce cVA. In fact, its production site, the ejaculatory bulb, is atrophied. Despite loss of cVA production, its receptor, Or67d, and cognate sensillum, T1, which are essential in cVA-mediated behaviours, were fully functional. However, T1 expression was dramatically reduced in D. suzukii, and the corresponding antennal lobe glomerulus, DA1, minute. Behavioural responses to cVA depend on the input balance of Or67d neurons (driving cVA-mediated behaviours) and Or65a neurons (inhibiting cVA-mediated behaviours). Accordingly, the shifted input balance in D. suzukii has reversed cVA's role in sexual behaviour: perfuming D. suzukii males with Drosophila melanogaster equivalents of cVA strongly reduced mating rates. cVA has thus evolved from a generic sex pheromone to a heterospecific signal that disrupts mating in D. suzukii, a saltational shift, mediated through offsetting the input balance that is highly conserved in congeneric species. This study underlines that dramatic changes in a species' sensory preference can result from rather 'simple' numerical shifts in underlying neural circuits. PMID:25716789

  2. Conservation of Olfactory Avoidance in Drosophila Species and Identification of Repellents for Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause Pham, Christine; Ray, Anandasankar

    2015-01-01

    Flying insects use olfaction to navigate towards fruits in complex odor environments with remarkable accuracy. Some fruits change odor profiles substantially during ripening and related species can prefer different stages. In Drosophila species attractive odorants have been studied extensively, but little is understood about the role of avoidance pathways. In order to examine the role of the avoidance cue CO2 emitted from fruit on behavior of two species with different ripening stage preferences, we investigated the CO2-detection pathway in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila suzukii, a harmful pest of fruits. Avoidance to CO2 is not conserved in D. suzukii suggesting a behavioral adaptation that could facilitate attraction to younger fruit with higher CO2 emission levels. We investigated known innate avoidance pathways from five species at different evolutionary distances: D. melanogaster, D. yakuba, D. suzukii, D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. Surprisingly, only DEET shows strong repellency across all species, whereas CO2, citronellal and ethyl 3-hydroxybutyrate show only limited conservation. These findings guide us to test recently discovered safe DEET substitutes, and we identify one that protects fruits from D. suzukii thus providing a new behavioral strategy for controlling agricultural pests. PMID:26098542

  3. Functional gustatory role of chemoreceptors in drosophila wings

    OpenAIRE

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reductio...

  4. Candidate Glutamatergic Neurons in the Visual System of Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Shamprasad Varija Raghu; Alexander Borst

    2011-01-01

    The visual system of Drosophila contains approximately 60,000 neurons that are organized in parallel, retinotopically arranged columns. A large number of these neurons have been characterized in great anatomical detail. However, studies providing direct evidence for synaptic signaling and the neurotransmitter used by individual neurons are relatively sparse. Here we present a first layout of neurons in the Drosophila visual system that likely release glutamate as their major neurotransmitter....

  5. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein Volker; Spindler Shana R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that mul...

  6. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differenti...

  7. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2008-01-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, a...

  8. Methods to assess Drosophila heart development, function and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Ocorr, Karen; Vogler, Georg; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the Drosophila heart has become an established model of many different aspects of human cardiac disease. This model has allowed identification of disease-causing mechanisms underlying congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies and has permitted the study underlying genetic, metabolic and age-related contributions to heart function. In this review we discuss methods currently employed in the analysis of the Drosophila heart structure and function, such as optical methods to ...

  9. Circadian Organization of Behavior and Physiology in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Allada, Ravi; Chung, Brian Y.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize behavior and physiology to adapt to daily environmental cycles. Genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have revealed widely conserved molecular gears of these 24-h timers. Yet much less is known about how these cell-autonomous clocks confer temporal information to modulate cellular functions. Here we discuss our current knowledge of circadian clock function in Drosophila, providing an overview of the molecular underpinnings of circadian clocks....

  10. Cloning of Drosophila choline acetyltransferase cDNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, N; Slemmon, J.R.; Hawke, D.H.; Williamson, R.; Morita, E.; Itakura, K; Roberts, E; Shively, J. E.; Crawford, G D; Salvaterra, P M

    1986-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.6) is the biosynthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. To isolate choline acetyltransferase cDNA clones, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of Drosophila melanogaster heads, these being one of the richest known sources of the enzyme. By screening the cDNA library with a mixture of three different monoclonal antibodies to Drosophila choline acetyltransferase, we isolated 14 positive clones. Only 1 of these clones was identified t...

  11. Dosage Compensation of the Period Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, M K; Hamblen-Coyle, M. J.; Liu, X; Rutila, J E; Hall, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The period (per) gene is located on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Its expression influences biological clocks in this fruit fly, including the one that subserves circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. Like most X-linked genes in Drosophila, per is under the regulatory control of gene dosage compensation. In this study, we assessed the activity of altered or augmented per(+) DNA fragments in transformants. Relative expression levels in male and female adults were inferred from...

  12. FlyBase: a Drosophila database. Flybase Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    FlyBase (http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu/) is a comprehensive database of genetic and molecular data concerning Drosophila . FlyBase is maintained as a relational database (in Sybase) and is made available as html documents and flat files. The scope of FlyBase includes: genes, alleles (with phenotypes), aberrations, transposons, pointers to sequence data, gene products, maps, clones, stock lists, Drosophila workers and bibliographic references.

  13. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien eLebreton; Peter eWitzgall; Marie eOlsson; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies ...

  14. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  15. The ratio of 1s-2s and 1s-2p excitation of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron-photon coincidence technique is used to separate the 54.4eV electron impact 2p and 2s excitation cross sections of atomic hydrogen. The 2s/2p cross section ratios, normalized to theory at 10 deg., are in excellent agreement with the close-coupling calculations of Kingston et al. (1976) but in strong disagreement with the DWBA calculation of Calhoun et al. (1976) and the hybrid pseudostate close coupling calculation of Callaway et al. (1976)

  16. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, James Angus; James, Pamela M; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila. PMID:25101226

  17. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Angus Chandler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila.

  18. The influence of sterol metabolism upon radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila melanogaster in the yeast-drosophila system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of sterol metabolism upon induced Drosophila melanogaster mutagenesis in an ecology-genetic yeast-drosophila system has been studied. The sterol deficit in fly organism has been created for account of using as food substrate for fremales of biomass of saccharomyces cerevisiae living cells of 9-2-PZ12 train with nyssup(r1) locus mutation which blocks the ergosterol synthesis. It has been found that the Drosophila females content on mutant yeast increases the frequency of losses and non discrepancy of X-chromosomes induced by X-radiation (1000 R). Addition into yeast biomass of 0.1 % cholesterol solution in 10 %-ethanol reduces the oocytes resistance to X-radiation up to control level. Possible hormonal and membrane mechanisms of increasing radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in organism resistance to damaging factors are discussed

  19. An Investigation of AdS2 Backreaction and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Engelsöy, Julius; Verlinde, Herman

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a dilaton gravity model in AdS2 proposed by Almheiri and Polchinski and develop an 1D effective description in terms of a dynamical boundary time with a Schwarzian derivative action. We show that the effective model is equivalent to a 1D version of Liouville theory, and investigate its dynamics and symmetries via a standard canonical framework. We include the coupling to arbitrary conformal matter and analyze the effective action in the presence of possible sources. We compute commutators of local operators at large time separation, and match the result with the time shift due to a gravitational shockwave interaction. We study a black hole evaporation process and comment on the role of entropy in this model.

  20. MoS2 and semiconductors in the flatland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Yazyev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fascinating properties of graphene, the first two-dimensional (2D material, and the accompanying strong activity in the research community have sparked a renewed interest in related layered crystalline materials with unique electronic and optical properties. Their superb mechanical properties, optical transparency, direct band gap and large degree of electrostatic control due to their atomic scale thickness make them interesting inorganic nanosystems for a wide variety of applications. In this review we will present a short history of research in the synthesis, band properties and potential applications of 2D semiconductors with a particular emphasis on MoS2, the prototypical and best-studied material from this family.

  1. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  2. An investigation of AdS2 backreaction and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsöy, Julius; Mertens, Thomas G.; Verlinde, Herman

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a dilaton gravity model in AdS2 proposed by Almheiri and Polchinski [1] and develop a 1d effective description in terms of a dynamical boundary time with a Schwarzian derivative action. We show that the effective model is equivalent to a 1d version of Liouville theory, and investigate its dynamics and symmetries via a standard canonical framework. We include the coupling to arbitrary conformal matter and analyze the effective action in the presence of possible sources. We compute commutators of local operators at large time separation, and match the result with the time shift due to a gravitational shockwave interaction. We study a black hole evaporation process and comment on the role of entropy in this model.

  3. Transitive Lie groups on S^1\\times S^{2m}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatsevich, Vladimir V.

    2007-10-01

    The structure of Lie groups acting transitively on the direct product of a circle and an even-dimensional sphere is described. For products of two spheres of dimension >1 a similar problem has already been solved by other authors. The minimal transitive Lie groups on S^1 and S^{2m} are also indicated. As an application of these results, the structure of the automorphism group of one class of geometric structures, generalized quadrangles (a special case of Tits buildings) is considered. A conjecture put forward by Kramer is proved: the automorphism group of a connected generalized quadrangle of type (1,2m) always contains a transitive subgroup that is the direct product of a compact simple Lie group and a one-dimensional Lie group. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  4. Phase transitions in jalpaite, Ag3CuS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag3CuS2 is comprehensively studied by applying synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction as well as thermal analysis in the range from 2 K up to the melting point around 960 K. The unique sequence of the reversible phase transitions P-based 110 K/↔ I41/a 250K/↔I 41/amd 387 K/↔ Im3-barm 483 K/reversible Im3'barm+Fm3-barm 549 K/reversible Fm3'barm was detected prior to the sample's melting. The transitions at 110, 387 and 483-549 K are found to be of first order, whereas the transition at 250 K is a second-order one. The major change in the structure of jalpaite resulting from the I41/amd 250 K/reversible I41/a phase transition is a modification in the coordination geometry of the silver atoms. A large degree of structural disorder is stated for Fm3-barm- and Im3-barm-structured Ag3CuS2, which correlates with the high ionic conductivity within both cubic polymorphs. The thermal expansion of jalpaite shows some unusual features, i.e. a negative expansion along the c-direction in the I41/amd phase, a nonlinear expansion within the Im3-barm polymorph and an expansion increase upon entering the mixed Im3-barm+Fm3-barm region. Low-temperature specific heat data confirm first- and second-order anomalies at 110 and 250 K, respectively, and illustrate a pronounced non-Debye-like behaviour of jalpaite.

  5. Gustatory processing and taste memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C

    2016-06-01

    Taste allows animals to discriminate the value and potential toxicity of food prior to ingestion. Many tastants elicit an innate attractive or avoidance response that is modifiable with nutritional state and prior experience. A powerful genetic tool kit, well-characterized gustatory system, and standardized behavioral assays make the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, an excellent system for investigating taste processing and memory. Recent studies have used this system to identify the neural basis for acquired taste preference. These studies have revealed a role for dopamine-mediated plasticity of the mushroom bodies that modulate the threshold of response to appetitive tastants. The identification of neural circuitry regulating taste memory provides a system to study the genetic and physiological processes that govern plasticity within a defined memory circuit. PMID:27328844

  6. Optogenetic Control of Gene Expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yick-Bun Chan

    Full Text Available To study the molecular mechanism of complex biological systems, it is important to be able to artificially manipulate gene expression in desired target sites with high precision. Based on the light dependent binding of cryptochrome 2 and a cryptochrome interacting bHLH protein, we developed a split lexA transcriptional activation system for use in Drosophila that allows regulation of gene expression in vivo using blue light or two-photon excitation. We show that this system offers high spatiotemporal resolution by inducing gene expression in tissues at various developmental stages. In combination with two-photon excitation, gene expression can be manipulated at precise sites in embryos, potentially offering an important tool with which to examine developmental processes.

  7. Quantitative neuroanatomy for connectomics in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M; Gerhard, Stephan; Longair, Mark; Kazimiers, Tom; Li, Feng; Zwart, Maarten F; Champion, Andrew; Midgley, Frank M; Fetter, Richard D; Saalfeld, Stephan; Cardona, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal circuit mapping using electron microscopy demands laborious proofreading or reconciliation of multiple independent reconstructions. Here, we describe new methods to apply quantitative arbor and network context to iteratively proofread and reconstruct circuits and create anatomically enriched wiring diagrams. We measured the morphological underpinnings of connectivity in new and existing reconstructions of Drosophila sensorimotor (larva) and visual (adult) systems. Synaptic inputs were preferentially located on numerous small, microtubule-free 'twigs' which branch off a single microtubule-containing 'backbone'. Omission of individual twigs accounted for 96% of errors. However, the synapses of highly connected neurons were distributed across multiple twigs. Thus, the robustness of a strong connection to detailed twig anatomy was associated with robustness to reconstruction error. By comparing iterative reconstruction to the consensus of multiple reconstructions, we show that our method overcomes the need for redundant effort through the discovery and application of relationships between cellular neuroanatomy and synaptic connectivity. PMID:26990779

  8. Heritability of Directional Asymmetry in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Houle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional asymmetry (DA, the consistent difference between a pair of morphological structures in which the same side is always larger than the other, presents an evolutionary mystery. Although many paired traits show DA, genetic variation for DA has not been unambiguously demonstrated. Artificial selection is a powerful technique for uncovering selectable genetic variation; we review and critique the limited number of previous studies that have been performed to select on DA and present the results of a novel artificial selection experiment on the DA of posterior crossvein location in Drosophila wings. Fifteen generations of selection in two genetically distinct lines were performed and none of the lines showed a significant response to selection. Our results therefore support and reconfirm previous findings; despite apparent natural variation and evolution of DA in nature, DA remains a paradoxical trait that does not respond to artificial selection.

  9. Adaptive genic evolution in the Drosophila genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Joshua A; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenhui;

    2007-01-01

    Determining the extent of adaptive evolution at the genomic level is central to our understanding of molecular evolution. A suitable observation for this purpose would consist of polymorphic data on a large and unbiased collection of genes from two closely related species, each having a large and....... melanogaster and its close relatives were adaptive. (iv) This signature of adaptive evolution is observable only in regions of normal recombination. Hence, the low level of polymorphism observed in regions of reduced recombination may not be driven primarily by positive selection. Finally, we discuss the...... sites than expected, hinting at the action of selective sweeps. (ii) The level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with the rate of nonsynonymous divergence across loci. Thus, even under strict neutrality, the ratio of amino acid to silent nucleotide changes (A:S) between Drosophila species is...

  10. Simulation of gene pyramiding in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Gene pyramiding has been successfully practiced in plant breeding for developing new breeds or lines in which favorable genes from several different lines were integrated.But it has not been used in animal breeding,and some theoretical investigation and simulation analysis with respect to its strategies,feasibility and efficiency are needed before it can be implemented in animals.In this study,we used four different pure fines of Drosophila melanogaster,each of which is homozygous at a specific mutant gene with a visible effect on phenotype,to simulate the gene pyramiding process and analyze the duration and population size required in different pyramiding strategies.We finally got the ideal individuals,which are homozygous at the four target genes simultaneously.This study demonstrates that gene pyramiding is feasible in animal breeding and the interaction between genes may affect the final results.

  11. A Protein Interaction Map of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giot, L.; Bader, J. S.; Brouwer, C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Kuang, B.; Li, Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Ooi, C. E.; Godwin, B.; Vitols, E.; Vijayadamodar, G.; Pochart, P.; Machineni, H.; Welsh, M.; Kong, Y.; Zerhusen, B.; Malcolm, R.; Varrone, Z.; Collis, A.; Minto, M.; Burgess, S.; McDaniel, L.; Stimpson, E.; Spriggs, F.; Williams, J.; Neurath, K.; Ioime, N.; Agee, M.; Voss, E.; Furtak, K.; Renzulli, R.; Aanensen, N.; Carrolla, S.; Bickelhaupt, E.; Lazovatsky, Y.; DaSilva, A.; Zhong, J.; Stanyon, C. A.; Finley, R. L.; White, K. P.; Braverman, M.; Jarvie, T.; Gold, S.; Leach, M.; Knight, J.; Shimkets, R. A.; McKenna, M. P.; Chant, J.; Rothberg, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a proven model system for many aspects of human biology. Here we present a two-hybrid-based protein-interaction map of the fly proteome. A total of 10,623 predicted transcripts were isolated and screened against standard and normalized complementary DNA libraries to produce a draft map of 7048 proteins and 20,405 interactions. A computational method of rating two-hybrid interaction confidence was developed to refine this draft map to a higher confidence map of 4679 proteins and 4780 interactions. Statistical modeling of the network showed two levels of organization: a short-range organization, presumably corresponding to multiprotein complexes, and a more global organization, presumably corresponding to intercomplex connections. The network recapitulated known pathways, extended pathways, and uncovered previously unknown pathway components. This map serves as a starting point for a systems biology modeling of multicellular organisms, including humans.

  12. Neural Mechanisms for Drosophila Contrast Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Armin; Serbe, Etienne; Meier, Matthias; Ammer, Georg; Borst, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Spatial contrast, the difference in adjacent luminance values, provides information about objects, textures, and motion and supports diverse visual behaviors. Contrast computation is therefore an essential element of visual processing. The underlying mechanisms, however, are poorly understood. In human psychophysics, contrast illusions are means to explore such computations, but humans offer limited experimental access. Via behavioral experiments in Drosophila, we find that flies are also susceptible to contrast illusions. Using genetic silencing techniques, electrophysiology, and modeling, we systematically dissect the mechanisms and neuronal correlates underlying the behavior. Our results indicate that spatial contrast computation involves lateral inhibition within the same pathway that computes motion of luminance increments (ON pathway). Yet motion-blind flies, in which we silenced downstream motion-sensitive neurons needed for optomotor behavior, have fully intact contrast responses. In conclusion, spatial contrast and motion cues are first computed by overlapping neuronal circuits which subsequently feed into parallel visual processing streams. PMID:26673659

  13. Innate immunity in Drosophila: Pathogens and pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shubha Govind

    2008-01-01

    Following in the footsteps of traditional developmental genetics, research over the last 15 years has shown that innate immunity against bacteria and fungi is governed largely by two NF-κB signal transduction pathways, Toll and IMD. Antiviral immunity appears to stem from RNA interference, whereas resistance against parasitoids is conferred by Toll signaling. The identification of these post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the annotation of most Drosophila immunity genes have derived from functional genomic studies using "model" pathogens, intact animals and cell lines. The D. melanogaster host has thus provided the core information that can be used to study responses to natural microbial and metazoan pathogens as they become identified, as well as to test ideas of selection and evolutionary change. These analyses are of general importance to understanding mechanisms of other insect host-pathogen interactions and determinants of variation in host resistance.

  14. Structure and Development of Glia in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Insect glia represents a conspicuous and diverse population of cells and plays a role in controlling neuronal progenitor proliferation, axonal growth, neuronal differentiation and maintenance, and neuronal function. Genetic studies in Drosophila have elucidated many aspects of glial structure, function and development. Just as in vertebrates, it appears as if different classes of glial cells are specialized for different functions. Based on topology and cell shape, glial cells of the central nervous system fall into three classes (Fig. 1A–C): (i) surface glia that extend sheath-like processes to wrap around the entire brain; (ii) cortex glia (also called cell body-associated glia) that encapsulate neuronal somata and neuroblasts which form the outer layer (cortex) of the central nervous system; (iii) neuropile glia that are located at the interface between the cortex and the neuropile, the central domain of the nervous system formed by the highly branched neuronal processes and their synaptic contacts. Surface glia is further subdivided into an outer, perineurial layer, and an inner, subperineurial layer. Likewise, neuropile glia comprises a class of cells that remain at the surface of the neuropile (ensheathing glia), and a second class that forms profuse lamellar processes around nerve fibers within the neuropile (astrocyte-like or reticular glia). Glia also surrounds the peripheral nerves and sensory organs; here, one also recognizes perineurial and subperineurial glia, and a third type called “wrapping glia” that most likely corresponds to the ensheathing glia of the central nervous system. Much more experimental work is needed to determine how fundamental these differences between classes of glial cells are, or how and when during development they are specified. To aid in this work the following review will briefly summarize our knowledge of the classes of glial cells encountered in the Drosophila nervous system, and then survey their development from

  15. Identification of Synaptic Targets of Drosophila Pumilio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulski, Michael; Sinha, Nishi; Barditch, Jody; Tully, Tim; Krainer, Adrian R.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Dubnau, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) protein is a translational regulator involved in embryonic patterning and germline development. Recent findings demonstrate that Pum also plays an important role in the nervous system, both at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in long-term memory formation. In neurons, Pum appears to play a role in homeostatic control of excitability via down regulation of para, a voltage gated sodium channel, and may more generally modulate local protein synthesis in neurons via translational repression of eIF-4E. Aside from these, the biologically relevant targets of Pum in the nervous system remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that Pum might play a role in regulating the local translation underlying synapse-specific modifications during memory formation. To identify relevant translational targets, we used an informatics approach to predict Pum targets among mRNAs whose products have synaptic localization. We then used both in vitro binding and two in vivo assays to functionally confirm the fidelity of this informatics screening method. We find that Pum strongly and specifically binds to RNA sequences in the 3′UTR of four of the predicted target genes, demonstrating the validity of our method. We then demonstrate that one of these predicted target sequences, in the 3′UTR of discs large (dlg1), the Drosophila PSD95 ortholog, can functionally substitute for a canonical NRE (Nanos response element) in vivo in a heterologous functional assay. Finally, we show that the endogenous dlg1 mRNA can be regulated by Pumilio in a neuronal context, the adult mushroom bodies (MB), which is an anatomical site of memory storage. PMID:18463699

  16. Genetic effects on heavy ions in drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal mutation test was used to study the dose response relation and relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions. The experiments were performed using the heavy ion beams at BEVALAC of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. These experiments were undertaken according to the proposed milestones and included Ne-20, A-40 and Fe-65 ions with respective energies of 600 MeV, 840 MeV and 850 MeV. At these energies several doses of these radiations ranging from 20 to 1280 R were used. Space radiation exposure to astronauts is supposed to be quite low and therefore very low dose experiments i.e., 20 R, were also performed for the three ions. The mutation response was measured in all germ cell types i.e., spermatozoa, spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia of treated Drosophila males. A linear dose frequency relation was observed for most of the range except at high doses where the saturation effect was observed. Also, a very significant difference was observed among the sensitivity of the four germ cell stages where spermatozoa and spermatids were more sensitive. At the higher doses of this range, most of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes were killed. Although comparative and identical experiments with X-rays or neutrons have not been performed, the compassion of our data with the ones available in literature suggest that the heavy ions have a high rbe and that they are several times more effective than low LET X-rays. The rbe compared to neutrons however appears to be only slightly higher.

  17. Vitrification-based cryopreservation of Drosophila embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuders, P.D.; Mazur, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 strains of Drosophila melanogaster are maintained by geneticists through regular transfer of breeding stocks. A more cost effective solution is to cryopreserve their embryos. Cooling and warming rates >10,000{degrees}C/min. are required to prevent chilling injury. To avoid the lethal intracellular ice normally produced at such high cooling rates, it is necessary to use {ge}50% (w/w) concentrations of glass-inducing solutes to vitrify the embryos. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to develop and evaluate ethylene glycol and polyvinyl pyrrolidone based vitrification solutions. The resulting solution consists of 8.5M ethylene glycol + 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone in D-20 Drosophila culture medium. A two stage method is used for the introduction and concentration of these solutes within the embryo. The method reduces the exposure time to the solution and, consequently, reduces toxicity. Both DSC and freezing experiments suggest that, while twelve-hour embryos will vitrify using cooling rates >200{degrees}C/min., they will devitrify and be killed with even moderately rapid warming rates of {approximately}1,900{degrees}C/min. Very rapid warming ({approximately}100,000{degrees}C/min.) results in variable numbers of successfully cryopreserved embryos. This sensitivity to warming rite is typical of devitrification. The variability in survival is reduced using embryos of a precisely determined embryonic stage. The vitrification of the older, fifteen-hour, embryos yields an optimized hatching rate of 68%, with 35 - 40% of the resulting larvae developing to normal adults. This Success rite in embryos of this age may reflect a reduced sensitivity to limited devitrification or a more even distribution of the ethylene glycol within the embryo.

  18. The Evolution of Olfactory Gene Families in Drosophila and the Genomic Basis of chemical-Ecological Adaptation in Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sukanya; Ometto, Lino; Crava, Cristina M.; Revadi, Santosh; Kaur, Rupinder; Horner, David S.; Pisani, Davide; Dekker, Teun; Anfora, Gianfranco; Rota-Stabelli, Omar

    2016-01-01

    How the evolution of olfactory genes correlates with adaption to new ecological niches is still a debated topic. We explored this issue in Drosophila suzukii, an emerging model that reproduces on fresh fruit rather than in fermenting substrates like most other Drosophila. We first annotated the repertoire of odorant receptors (ORs), odorant binding proteins (OBPs), and antennal ionotropic receptors (aIRs) in the genomes of two strains of D. suzukii and of its close relative Drosophila biarmipes. We then analyzed these genes on the phylogeny of 14 Drosophila species: whereas ORs and OBPs are characterized by higher turnover rates in some lineages including D. suzukii, aIRs are conserved throughout the genus. Drosophila suzukii is further characterized by a non-random distribution of OR turnover on the gene phylogeny, consistent with a change in selective pressures. In D. suzukii, we found duplications and signs of positive selection in ORs with affinity for short-chain esters, and loss of function of ORs with affinity for volatiles produced during fermentation. These receptors—Or85a and Or22a—are characterized by divergent alleles in the European and American genomes, and we hypothesize that they may have been replaced by some of the duplicated ORs in corresponding neurons, a hypothesis reciprocally confirmed by electrophysiological recordings. Our study quantifies the evolution of olfactory genes in Drosophila and reveals an array of genomic events that can be associated with the ecological adaptations of D. suzukii. PMID:27435796

  19. Synthesis, photocatalytic and antimicrobial properties of SnO2, SnS2 and SnO2/SnS2 nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Ali; Behrouz, Sajjad; Pourmand, Melika

    2015-08-01

    Nanoscale SnO2, SnS2 and SnO2/SnS2 were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment method and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) and UV-vis spectra. The photocatalytic activity of SnO2, SnS2 and SnO2/SnS2 were tested with Enrofloxacin antibiotic. The tetragonal and hexagonal SnO2 and SnS2 phase was confirmed through XRD, respectively. The photocatalytic results indicated that the SnO2/SnS2 enhanced the photocatalytic activity and could be effectively used as photocatalyst for degradation of Enrofloxacin antibiotic pollutant. The results of antibacterial experiment under visible light irradiation demonstrate that the SnO2/SnS2 nanocomposite exhibit enhanced antibacterial efficiency compared with pure SnO2 and SnS2. The antifungal activity of the nanoscale SnO2, SnS2 and SnO2/SnS2 against Candida albicans was assessed using the disc-diffusion susceptibility tests. It was seen that the antifungal activity of SnO2/SnS2 nanocomposite is higher than the pure SnO2 and SnS2 toward pathogenic C. albicans. PMID:26046748

  20. Multi-state Comparison of Attractants for Monitoring Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Blueberries and Caneberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii, also referred to as the spotted wing drosophila, has recently and dramatically expanded its global range with significant consequences for its primary host crops: blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and strawberries. D. suzukii populations can increase quickly, and ...

  1. Alightment of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) on Odorless Disks Varying in Color

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, D. M.; McGhee, P. S.; Hermann, S. L.; Gut, L. J.; Miller, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for trapping spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsmura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), have not yet been optimized for detecting this devastating pest of soft-skinned fruits. Here, we report outcomes of choice and no-choice laboratory bioassays quantifying the rates of spotted wing drosophila alightment on 5-cm-diameter sticky disks of various colors, but no fruit odors. Red, purple, and black disks captured the most spotted wing drosophila when presented against a white backgr...

  2. FlyBase: a Drosophila database. The FlyBase consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelbart, W. M.; Crosby, M.; Matthews, B; Rindone, W P; Chillemi, J; Russo Twombly, S; Emmert, D.; Ashburner, M; Drysdale, R A; Whitfield, E; Millburn, G H; Grey, A; Kaufman, T; Matthews, K.; Gilbert, D

    1997-01-01

    FlyBase is a database of genetic and molecular data concerning Drosophila. FlyBase is maintained as a relational database (in Sybase) and is made available as html documents and flat files. The scope of FlyBase includes: genes, alleles (and phenotypes), aberrations, transposons, pointers to sequence data, clones, stock lists, Drosophila workers and bibliographic references. The Encyclopedia of Drosophila is a joint effort between FlyBase and the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project which integr...

  3. Drosophila ARSs contain the yeast ARS consensus sequence and a replication enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1986-01-01

    A number of restriction fragments that function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in yeast have been isolated from Drosophila melanogaster DNA. The behaviour in yeast of plasmids containing Drosophila ARS elements was studied and compared to that exhibited by the archetypal yeast ARS-1 plasmid. ARS functions were localised by subcloning and BAL-31 deletion analysis. These studies demonstrated the structural and functional complexity of Drosophila ARSs. Each Drosophila ARS element h...

  4. Supergravity background of λ-deformed model for AdS2×S2 supercoset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Borsato

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the Fˆ/G supercoset model corresponding to the AdSn×Sn superstring one can define the λ-model of arXiv:1409.1538 either as a deformation of the Fˆ/Fˆ gauged WZW model or as an integrable one-parameter generalisation of the non-abelian T-dual of the AdSn×Sn superstring sigma model with respect to the whole supergroup Fˆ. Here we consider the case of n=2 and find the explicit form of the 4d target space background for the λ-model for the PSU(1,1|2/SO(1,1×SO(2 supercoset. We show that this background represents a solution of type IIB 10d supergravity compactified on a 6-torus with only metric, dilaton Φ and the RR 5-form (represented by a 2-form F in 4d being non-trivial. This implies that the λ-model is Weyl invariant at the quantum level and thus defines a consistent superstring sigma model. The supergravity solution we find is different from the one in arXiv:1410.1886 which should correspond to a version of the λ-model where only the bosonic subgroup of Fˆ is gauged. Still, the two solutions have equivalent scaling limit of arXiv:1504.07213 leading to the isometric background for the metric and eΦF which is related to the η-deformed AdS2×S2 sigma model of arXiv:1309.5850. Similar results are expected in the AdS3×S3 and AdS5×S5 cases.

  5. Asp1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe binds a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster which inhibits inositol pyrophosphate 1-phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanchen; Nair, Vasudha S; Holland, Ashley A; Capolicchio, Samanta; Jessen, Henning J; Johnson, Michael K; Shears, Stephen B

    2015-10-27

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are widely distributed protein cofactors that are vital to cellular biochemistry and the maintenance of bioenergetic homeostasis, but to our knowledge, they have never been identified in any phosphatase. Here, we describe an iron-sulfur cluster in Asp1, a dual-function kinase/phosphatase that regulates cell morphogenesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Full-length Asp1, and its phosphatase domain (Asp1(371-920)), were each heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The phosphatase activity is exquisitely specific: it hydrolyzes the 1-diphosphate from just two members of the inositol pyrophosphate (PP-InsP) signaling family, namely, 1-InsP7 and 1,5-InsP8. We demonstrate that Asp1 does not hydrolyze either InsP6, 2-InsP7, 3-InsP7, 4-InsP7, 5-InsP7, 6-InsP7, or 3,5-InsP8. We also recorded 1-phosphatase activity in a human homologue of Asp1, hPPIP5K1, which was heterologously expressed in Drosophila S3 cells with a biotinylated N-terminal tag, and then isolated from cell lysates with avidin beads. Purified, recombinant Asp1(371-920) contained iron and acid-labile sulfide, but the stoichiometry (0.8 atoms of each per protein molecule) indicates incomplete iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We reconstituted the Fe-S cluster in vitro under anaerobic conditions, which increased the stoichiometry to approximately 2 atoms of iron and acid-labile sulfide per Asp1 molecule. The presence of a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster in Asp1(371-920) was demonstrated by UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We determined that this [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is unlikely to participate in redox chemistry, since it rapidly degraded upon reduction by dithionite. Biochemical and mutagenic studies demonstrated that the [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster substantially inhibits the phosphatase activity of Asp1, thereby increasing its net kinase activity. PMID:26422458

  6. The creation of the magnetic and metallic characteristics in low-width MoS 2 nanoribbon (1D MoS 2): A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidpour, Reza; Manteghian, Merhrdad

    2009-06-01

    A basic understanding of the catalytic performance is needed to probe the physical properties that change with a reduction in the catalytic clusters size. It has been shown that the edge of low-width MoS2 nanoribbon has a metallic characteristic, while that of bulk MoS2 has a semi-conductive characteristic. For probing the observations, we constructed the models representing the surface atoms and the edge atoms of the MoS2 nanoribbon. The nanoribbon-like model can also be used to model the edge atoms of the nanocluster MoS2 .Then we calculated the density of states (DOS) of infinitely two-dimensional MoS2 and of the structure corresponding to the edge atoms of the MoS2 nanoribbon-like structure with Wien2K software. The magnetic moment of structures was calculated for identifying the magnetic structure. We found that the bulk MoS2 and infinitely two-dimensional MoS2 are semi-conductive and not magnetic, while the computation model corresponding to MoS2 nanoribbon is metallic. The calculation anticipates that the edges of the MoS2 nanocluster and the low-width MoS2 nanoribbon are strongly magnetic.

  7. The dopaminergic system in the aging brain of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E White

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila models of Parkinson’s disease are characterised by two principal phenotypes: the specific loss of dopaminergic neurons in the aging brain and defects in motor behavior. However, an age-related analysis of these baseline parameters in wildtype Drosophila is lacking. Here we analysed the dopaminergic system and motor behavior in aging Drosophila. Dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain can be grouped into bilateral symmetric clusters, each comprising a stereotypical number of cells. Analysis of TH>mCD8::GFP and cell type-specific MARCM clones revealed that dopaminergic neurons show cluster-specific, stereotypical projection patterns with terminal arborization in target regions that represent distinct functional areas of the adult brain. Target areas include the mushroom bodies, involved in memory formation and motivation, and the central complex, involved in the control of motor behavior, indicating that similar to the mammalian brain, dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain are involved in the regulation of specific behaviors. Behavioral analysis revealed that Drosophila show an age-related decline in startle-induced locomotion and negative geotaxis. Motion tracking however, revealed that walking activity and exploration behavior, but not centrophobism increase at late stages of life. Analysis of TH>Dcr2, mCD8::GFP revealed a specific effect of Dcr2 expression on walking activity but not on exploratory or centrophobic behavior, indicating that the siRNA pathway may modulate distinct dopaminergic behaviors in Drosophila. Moreover, dopaminergic neurons were maintained between early- and late life, as quantified by TH>mCD8::GFP and anti-TH labelling, indicating that adult onset, age-related degeneration of dopaminergic neurons does not occur in the aging brain of Drosophila. Taken together, our data establish baseline parameters in Drosophila for the study of Parkinson’s disease as well as other disorders affecting dopaminergic neurons

  8. Monolayer-by-monolayer stacked pyramid-like MoS2 nanodots on monolayered MoS2 flakes with enhanced photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cailei; Cao, Yingjie; Luo, Xingfang; Yu, Ting; Huang, Zhenping; Xu, Bo; Yang, Yong; Li, Qinliang; Gu, Gang; Lei, Wen

    2015-10-01

    The precise control of the morphology and crystal shape of MoS2 nanostructures is of particular importance for their application in nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we describe a single step route for the synthesis of monolayer-by-monolayer stacked pyramid-like MoS2 nanodots on monolayered MoS2 flakes using a chemical vapor deposition method. First-principles calculations demonstrated that the bandgap of the pyramid-like MoS2 nanodot is a direct bandgap. Enhanced local photoluminescence emission was observed in the pyramid-like MoS2 nanodot, in comparison with monolayered MoS2 flakes. The findings presented here provide new opportunities to tailor the physical properties of MoS2via morphology-controlled synthesis.

  9. Monolayer-by-monolayer stacked pyramid-like MoS2 nanodots on monolayered MoS2 flakes with enhanced photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cailei; Cao, Yingjie; Luo, Xingfang; Yu, Ting; Huang, Zhenping; Xu, Bo; Yang, Yong; Li, Qinliang; Gu, Gang; Lei, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The precise control of the morphology and crystal shape of MoS2 nanostructures is of particular importance for their application in nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we describe a single step route for the synthesis of monolayer-by-monolayer stacked pyramid-like MoS2 nanodots on monolayered MoS2 flakes using a chemical vapor deposition method. First-principles calculations demonstrated that the bandgap of the pyramid-like MoS2 nanodot is a direct bandgap. Enhanced local photoluminescence emission was observed in the pyramid-like MoS2 nanodot, in comparison with monolayered MoS2 flakes. The findings presented here provide new opportunities to tailor the physical properties of MoS2via morphology-controlled synthesis. PMID:26439853

  10. X-ray study of the thermal expansion in CuAlS2, CuGaS2, and CuInS2 compounds over the temperature range from 90 to 650 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the lattice parameters a and c and of the c/a axial ratio of CuAlS2, CuGaS2, and CuInS2 samples is investigated by X-ray diffraction in the temperature range of 90 to 650 K. The coefficients of thermal expansion are calculated and discussed in terms of tetragonal distortion of lattices

  11. NOVEL ASPECTS OF SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA BIOLOGY AND IMPROVED METHODS OF REARING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii (Mats.) or the spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), is a global pest of soft fruits that can now be reared on a standard Drosophila diet containing the fly's own natural food: soft-skinned berries. The techniques tested here can thwart bacterial and fungal disease that can destroy more ...

  12. A first principle Comparative study of electronic and optical properties of 1H –MoS2 and 2H –MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First principle calculations of electronic and optical properties of monolayer MoS2, so called 1H –MoS2, is performed which has emerged as a new direct band gap semiconductor. Before calculations of the properties of 1H –MoS2, we have calculated structural parameters, electronic properties (electronic band structure and electronic density of states) and frequency dependent optical response (real and imaginary part of dielectric function, energy loss function, absorption and reflectance spectra) of 2H –MoS2 and compared with existing experimental results and found that our calculated results are in very good agreements with experimental results. To compare the dielectric functions of bulk (2H –MoS2) and monolayer (1H –MoS2) phases we have further extended these calculations to the single layer MoS2 (1H –MoS2) which is analogous to graphene. Structural parameters of 1H –MoS2 are found very close to its bulk 2H –MoS2. We find direct electronic band gap at ‘K’ high symmetry point as compared to indirect band gap in its bulk 2H – MoS2. Our calculated dielectric function for 1H – MoS2 shows structure at nearly same energy positions as compared to 2H – MoS2 with additional structure at 3.8 eV. Also additional well defined energy loss peaks revealing the plasmonic resonances at 15.7 eV and 16.0 eV for E vector perpendicular and parallel to c axis respectively for 1H – MoS2 have been found, which are the signatures of surface plasmons at these energies. -- Highlights: ► Structural parameters of 2H-MoS2 and 1H-MoS2 are nearly identical. ► States around the Fermi energy are mainly due to the metal d states. ► Strong hybridization between Mo-d and S-p states below the Fermi energy has been found. ► Optical spectra of 2H-MoS2 finds very good agreements with experimental optical spectra. ► The band gap is found to be direct for 1H-MoS2 as compared to indirect for 2H-MoS2.

  13. MoS2 nanoribbons as promising thermoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoelectric properties of MoS2 armchair nanoribbons with different width are studied by using first-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory, where the relaxation time is predicted from deformation potential theory. Due to the dangling bonds at the armchair edge, there is obvious structure reconstruction of the nanoribbons which plays an important role in governing the electronic and transport properties. The investigated armchair nanoribbons are found to be semiconducting with indirect gaps, which exhibit interesting width-dependent oscillation behavior. The smaller gap of nanoribbon with width N = 4 (Here, N represents the number of dimer lines or zigzag chains across the ribbon width) leads to a much larger electrical conductivity at 300 K, which outweighs the relatively larger electronic thermal conductivity when compared with those of N = 5, 6. As a result, the ZT values can be optimized to 3.4 (p-type) and 2.5 (n-type) at room temperature, which significantly exceed the performance of most laboratory results reported in the literature.

  14. Identifying multiexcitons in Mo S2 monolayers at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-04-01

    One of the unique features of atomically thin two-dimensional materials is strong Coulomb interactions due to the reduced dielectric screening effect; this feature enables the study of many-body phenomena such as excitons, trions, and biexcitons. However, identification of biexcitons remains unresolved owing to their broad peak feature at room temperature. Here, we investigate multiexcitons in monolayer Mo S2 using both electrical and optical doping and identify the transition energies for each exciton. The binding energy of the assigned biexciton is twice that of the trion, in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The biexciton population is predominant under optical doping but negligible under electrical doping. The biexciton population is quadratically proportional to the exciton population, obeying the mass-action theory. Our results illustrate the stable formation of not only trions but also biexcitons due to strong Coulomb interaction even at room temperature; therefore, these results provide a deeper understanding of the complex excitonic behaviors in two-dimensional semiconductors.

  15. Thermoluminescence kinetics of pyrite (FeS2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence of pyrite (FeS2) has been investigated to study the kinetics of single peak glow curves. The material used normally exhibits one large and four small peaks. However a glow curve can be obtained with only the large single peak that is suitable for testing thermoluminescence kinetics. Glow curves from aliquots of a single natural pyrite crystal studied in detail contain two low intensity thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at ∼90 degree and ∼250 degree C, and two chemiluminescence (CL) peaks at ∼350 degree and ∼430 degree C. The CL peaks are largely removable by initially heating the sample chamber under vacuum, pumping through liquid nitrogen traps, and recording glow curves immediately after helium is introduced, procedures which reduce system contaminants that react with pyrite. The shape, the variation of the temperature of the peak maximum (Tmax) with dose, and the retrapping to recombination cross section ratio σ of the large 250 degree C peak are better described by the general one trap (GOT) kinetic equation, the basic equation from which the 1st and 2nd order kinetic equations are obtained as special cases (see text), than by the 1st and 2nd order equations. 12 refs., 7 figs

  16. Electric field effects on armchair MoS2 nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolui, Kapildeb; Pemmaraju, Chaitanya Das; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-06-26

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the electronic structure of MoS(2) armchair nanoribbons in the presence of an external static electric field. Such nanoribbons, which are nonmagnetic and semiconducting, exhibit a set of weakly interacting edge states whose energy position determines the band gap of the system. We show that, by applying an external transverse electric field, E(ext), the nanoribbon band gap can be significantly reduced, leading to a metal-insulator transition beyond a certain critical value. Moreover, the presence of a sufficiently high density of states at the Fermi level in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition leads to the onset of Stoner ferromagnetism that can be modulated, and even extinguished, by E(ext). In the case of bilayer nanoribbons we further show that the band gap can be changed from indirect to direct by applying a transverse field, an effect that might be of significance for opto-electronics applications. PMID:22546015

  17. MoS2 nanoribbons as promising thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, D. D.; Liu, H. J.; Cheng, L.; Jiang, P. H.; Shi, J.; Tang, X. F.

    2014-09-01

    The thermoelectric properties of MoS2 armchair nanoribbons with different width are studied by using first-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory, where the relaxation time is predicted from deformation potential theory. Due to the dangling bonds at the armchair edge, there is obvious structure reconstruction of the nanoribbons which plays an important role in governing the electronic and transport properties. The investigated armchair nanoribbons are found to be semiconducting with indirect gaps, which exhibit interesting width-dependent oscillation behavior. The smaller gap of nanoribbon with width N = 4 (Here, N represents the number of dimer lines or zigzag chains across the ribbon width) leads to a much larger electrical conductivity at 300 K, which outweighs the relatively larger electronic thermal conductivity when compared with those of N = 5, 6. As a result, the ZT values can be optimized to 3.4 (p-type) and 2.5 (n-type) at room temperature, which significantly exceed the performance of most laboratory results reported in the literature.

  18. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A.; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E.; Brown, Rebecca E.; Marshall, Jennifer M.; Labbé, Geneviève M.; Silk, Sarah E.; Cherry, Catherine J.; Clemmensen, Stine B.; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Alanine, Daniel G. W.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Draper, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS2, based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of ‘difficult-to-make’ proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen. PMID:27457156

  19. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Huaqi, E-mail: Huaqi.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu [Department of Developmental Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX, 75235 (United States); Edgar, Bruce A., E-mail: b.edgar@dkfz.de [ZMBH-DKFZ Alliance, Im Neuenheimer Feld 282, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  20. Research progress on Drosophila visual cognition in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Visual cognition,as one of the fundamental aspects of cognitive neuroscience,is generally associated with high-order brain functions in animals and human.Drosophila,as a model organism,shares certain features of visual cognition in common with mammals at the genetic,molecular,cellular,and even higher behavioral levels.From learning and memory to decision making,Drosophila covers a broad spectrum of higher cognitive behaviors beyond what we had expected.Armed with powerful tools of genetic manipulation in Drosophila,an increasing number of studies have been conducted in order to elucidate the neural circuit mechanisms underlying these cognitive behaviors from a genes-brain-behavior perspective.The goal of this review is to integrate the most important studies on visual cognition in Drosophila carried out in mainland China during the last decade into a body of knowledge encompassing both the basic neural operations and circuitry of higher brain function in Drosophila.Here,we consider a series of the higher cognitive behaviors beyond learning and memory,such as visual pattern recognition,feature and context generalization,different feature memory traces,salience-based decision,attention-like behavior,and cross-modal leaning and memory.We discuss the possible general gain-gating mechanism implementing by dopamine-mushroom body circuit in fly’s visual cognition.We hope that our brief review on this aspect will inspire further study on visual cognition in flies,or even beyond.

  1. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  2. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  3. Drosophila wing modularity revisited through a quantitative genetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Francesc; Carreira, Valeria Paula; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Ortiz, Victoria; González-José, Rolando; Soto, Ignacio M

    2016-07-01

    To predict the response of complex morphological structures to selection it is necessary to know how the covariation among its different parts is organized. Two key features of covariation are modularity and integration. The Drosophila wing is currently considered a fully integrated structure. Here, we study the patterns of integration of the Drosophila wing and test the hypothesis of the wing being divided into two modules along the proximo-distal axis, as suggested by developmental, biomechanical, and evolutionary evidence. To achieve these goals we perform a multilevel analysis of covariation combining the techniques of geometric morphometrics and quantitative genetics. Our results indicate that the Drosophila wing is indeed organized into two main modules, the wing base and the wing blade. The patterns of integration and modularity were highly concordant at the phenotypic, genetic, environmental, and developmental levels. Besides, we found that modularity at the developmental level was considerably higher than modularity at other levels, suggesting that in the Drosophila wing direct developmental interactions are major contributors to total phenotypic shape variation. We propose that the precise time at which covariance-generating developmental processes occur and/or the magnitude of variation that they produce favor proximo-distal, rather than anterior-posterior, modularity in the Drosophila wing. PMID:27272402

  4. Purification and characterization of recombinant full-length and protease domain of murine MMP-9 expressed in Drosophila S2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Morten G; Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin;

    2010-01-01

    truncated versions were 5 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. The products were >95% pure after gelatin Sepharose chromatography and possessed proteolytic activity when analyzed by gelatin zymography. Using the purified full-length murine MMP-9 we raised polyclonal antibodies by immunizations of rabbits. These....... No immunoreactivity was observed when the antibody was probed against skin wound material from MMP-9 deficient mice. In conclusion, we have generated and purified two proteolytically active recombinant murine MMP-9 protein constructs, which are critical reagents for future cancer drug discovery...... antibodies specifically identified pro-MMP-9 in incisional skin wound extracts from mice when used for Western blotting. Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin embedded skin wounds from mice showed that MMP-9 protein was localized at the leading-edge keratinocytes in front of the migrating epidermal layer...

  5. A new tagging system for production of recombinant proteins in Drosophila S2 cells using the third domain of the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Hansen, Line V; Jørgensen, Thomas J D;

    2007-01-01

    chromatography procedure using the immobilized anti-uPAR monoclonal antibody R2. An optional enterokinase cleavage site is included between the various recombinant proteins and the linker region of the tag, which enables generation of highly pure preparations of tag-free recombinant proteins. Using this system......The use of protein fusion tag technology greatly facilitates detection, expression and purification of recombinant proteins, and the demands for new and more effective systems are therefore expanding. We have used a soluble truncated form of the third domain of the urokinase receptor as a...... convenient C-terminal fusion partner for various recombinant extracellular human proteins used in basic cancer research. The stability of this cystein-rich domain, which structure adopts a three-finger fold, provides an important asset for its applicability as a fusion tag for expression of recombinant...

  6. Identification of Drosophila MicroRNA Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to target messenger RNAs and by controlling protein production or causing RNA cleavage. To date, functions have been assigned to only a few of the hundreds of identified miRNAs, in part because of the difficulty in identifying their targets. The short length of miRNAs and the fact that their complementarity to target sequences is imperfect mean that target identification in animal genomes is not possible by standard sequence comparison methods. Here we screen conserved 3' UTR sequences from the Drosophila melanogaster genome for potential miRNA targets. The screening procedure combines a sequence search with an evaluation of the predicted miRNA-target heteroduplex structures and energies. We show that this approach successfully identifies the five previously validated let-7, lin-4, and bantam targets from a large database and predict new targets for Drosophila miRNAs. Our target predictions reveal striking clusters of functionally related targets among the top predictions for specific miRNAs. These include Notch target genes for miR-7, proapoptotic genes for the miR-2 family, and enzymes from a metabolic pathway for miR-277. We experimentally verified three predicted targets each for miR-7 and the miR-2 family, doubling the number of validated targets for animal miRNAs. Statistical analysis indicates that the best single predicted target sites are at the border of significance; thus, target predictions should be considered as tentative until experimentally validated. We identify features shared by all validated targets that can be used to evaluate target predictions for animal miRNAs. Our initial evaluation and experimental validation of target predictions suggest functions for two miRNAs. For others, the screen suggests plausible functions, such as a role for miR-277 as a metabolic switch controlling amino acid catabolism. Cross-genome comparison proved essential

  7. Biological radiation effects of Radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to contribute to the knowledge on the effects of radon and its decay products, the aim of this investigation is to study the biological effects of radon using Drosophila melanogaster throught the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) and the analysis of some adaptative factors exposing larvaes to controlled radon atmosphers, considering that this insect could be used as biological monitor. Using the somatic mutation test a mutagenic effect was observed proportional to radon concentration, into an interval of 1 ± 0.3 to 111 ± 7.4 KBq/m3 equivalent to doses under 0.0106 Gy. The correlation analysis gives a linear (r=0.80) relationship with a positive slope of 0.2217. The same happens when gamma rays are used in the interval of 1 to 20 Gy, given a linear dose-dependent effect (r=0.878) is obtained; nevetheless the slop is smaller (m=0.003) than for radon. Analysing the results of adaptative factors of the nine exposed generations, it was found that probably radon exposition induced dominant lethals during gametogenesis or/and a selection of the more component gamets of the treated individuals in larval state. It was reflected in the significant decrease on fecundity of the generation exposed. Nevertheless the laying eggs had an increase in egg-to-adult viability and the develop velocity was higher than in control for 3 KBq/m3, this suggest that radon concentrations used were able to induce repair mechanisms. These data agree with the Hormesis hypothesis that says: low doses have positive effects on health. It was not possible to obtain a dose-effect relationship except with the develop velocity where it was found a dose-effect inverse proportion. In conclusion, Drosophila melanogaster could be a good system to obtain in vivo damaged induction concentration dependent of radon and its decay products, as well as to study the effects in an exposed population by the analysis of adaptative factors. (Author)

  8. Analysis of Thisbe and Pyramus functional domains reveals evidence for cleavage of Drosophila FGFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Angelike

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As important regulators of developmental and adult processes in metazoans, Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF proteins are potent signaling molecules whose activities must be tightly regulated. FGFs are known to play diverse roles in many processes, including mesoderm induction, branching morphogenesis, organ formation, wound healing and malignant transformation; yet much more remains to be learned about the mechanisms of regulation used to control FGF activity. Results In this work, we conducted an analysis of the functional domains of two Drosophila proteins, Thisbe (Ths and Pyramus (Pyr, which share homology with the FGF8 subfamily of ligands in vertebrates. Ths and Pyr proteins are secreted from Drosophila Schneider cells (S2 as smaller N-terminal fragments presumably as a result of intracellular proteolytic cleavage. Cleaved forms of Ths and Pyr can be detected in embryonic extracts as well. The FGF-domain is contained within the secreted ligand portion, and this domain alone is capable of functioning in the embryo when ectopically expressed. Through targeted ectopic expression experiments in which we assay the ability of full-length, truncated, and chimeric proteins to support cell differentiation, we find evidence that (1 the C-terminal domain of Pyr is retained inside the cell and does not seem to be required for receptor activation and (2 the C-terminal domain of Ths is secreted and, while also not required for receptor activation, this domain does plays a role in limiting the activity of Ths when present. Conclusions We propose that differential protein processing may account for the previously observed inequalities in signaling capabilities between Ths and Pyr. While the regulatory mechanisms are likely complex, studies such as ours conducted in a tractable model system may be able to provide insights into how ligand processing regulates growth factor activity.

  9. Isolation and characterization of glutaminyl cyclases from Drosophila: evidence for enzyme forms with different subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Stephan; Lindner, Christiane; Koch, Birgit; Wermann, Michael; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; von Bohlen, Alex; Rudolph, Thomas; Reuter, Gunter; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-09-25

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) present in plants and vertebrates catalyze the formation of pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) from N-terminal glutamine. Pyroglutamyl hormones also identified in invertebrates imply the involvement of QC activity during their posttranslational maturation. Database mining led to the identification of two genes in Drosophila, which putatively encode QCs, CG32412 (DromeQC) and CG5976 (isoDromeQC). Analysis of their primary structure suggests different subcellular localizations. While DromeQC appeared to be secreted due to an N-terminal signal peptide, isoDromeQC contains either an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting or a secretion signal due to generation of different transcripts from gene CG5976. According to the prediction, homologous expression of the corresponding cDNAs in S2 cells revealed either secreted protein in the medium or intracellular QC activity. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemistry support export of isoDromeQC into the mitochondrion. For enzymatic characterization, DromeQC and isoDromeQC were expressed heterologously in Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli, respectively. Compared to mammalian QCs, the specificity constants were about 1 order of magnitude lower for most of the analyzed substrates. The pH dependence of the specificity constant was similar for both enzymes, indicating the necessity of an unprotonated substrate amino group and two protonated groups of the enzyme, resulting in an asymmetric bell-shaped characteristic. The determination of the metal content of DromeQC revealed equimolar protein-bound zinc. These results prove conserved enzymatic mechanisms between QCs from invertebrates and mammals. Drosophila is the first organism for which isoenzymes of glutaminyl cyclase have been isolated. The identification of a mitochondrial QC points toward yet undiscovered physiological functions of these enzymes. PMID:17722885

  10. Three new species of Drosophila tripunctata group (Diptera: Drosophilidae in the eastern Andes of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Ramos Guillín

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of the Drosophila tripunctata group are described and illustrated. These new species were captured using plastic bottles containing pieces of fermented banana with yeast. The collections were from Napo Province, Ecuador at 2 200 m and 3 362 m above sea level. The new species are: Drosophila napoensis sp. nov., Drosophila cuyuja sp. nov. and Drosophila quijos sp. nov. The first two species belong to subgroup I and the latter species belong to subgroup III of the Drosophila tripunctata group.

  11. Electronic structures of ReS2, ReSe2 and TcS2 in the real and the hypothetical undistorted structures

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, CM; Wiegers, GA; Haas, C.; deGroot, RA

    1997-01-01

    The transition-metal dichalcogenides ReX2 (X = Sor Se) and TcS2 with a d(3) electron configuration have distorted; CdCl2 and Cd(OH)(2) structures, respectively, with the Re(Tc) atoms in each layer forming parallelogram-shaped connected clusters (diamond chain). Ab-initio band-structure calculations were performed for ReX2 and TcS2, and the hypothetical undistorted 1T-TcS2 and 3R-ReX2 structures. The calculations show that ReS2, ReS2 and TcS2 are semiconductors with energy gaps of about 1.0 eV...

  12. Quantifying host potentials: indexing postharvest fresh fruits for spotted wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Bellamy

    Full Text Available Novel methodology is presented for indexing the relative potential of hosts to function as resources. A Host Potential Index (HPI was developed as a practical framework to express relative host potential based on combining results from one or more independent studies, such as those examining host selection, utilization, and physiological development of the organism resourcing the host. Several aspects of the HPI are addressed including: 1 model derivation; 2 influence of experimental design on establishing host rankings for a study type (no choice, two-choice, and multiple-choice; and, 3 variable selection and weighting associated with combining multiple studies. To demonstrate application of the HPI, results from the interactions of spotted wing drosophila (SWD, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae, with seven "reported" hosts (blackberries, blueberries, sweet cherries, table grapes, peaches, raspberries, and strawberries in a postharvest scenario were analyzed. Four aspects of SWD-host interaction were examined: attraction to host volatiles; population-level oviposition performance; individual-level oviposition performance; and key developmental factors. Application of HPI methodology indicated that raspberries ( (meanHPIvaried  = 301.9±8.39; rank 1 of 7 have the greatest potential to serve as a postharvest host for SWD relative to the other fruit hosts, with grapes ( (meanHPIvaried  = 232.4±3.21; rank 7 of 7 having the least potential.

  13. Quantifying host potentials: indexing postharvest fresh fruits for spotted wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, David E; Sisterson, Mark S; Walse, Spencer S

    2013-01-01

    Novel methodology is presented for indexing the relative potential of hosts to function as resources. A Host Potential Index (HPI) was developed as a practical framework to express relative host potential based on combining results from one or more independent studies, such as those examining host selection, utilization, and physiological development of the organism resourcing the host. Several aspects of the HPI are addressed including: 1) model derivation; 2) influence of experimental design on establishing host rankings for a study type (no choice, two-choice, and multiple-choice); and, 3) variable selection and weighting associated with combining multiple studies. To demonstrate application of the HPI, results from the interactions of spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae), with seven "reported" hosts (blackberries, blueberries, sweet cherries, table grapes, peaches, raspberries, and strawberries) in a postharvest scenario were analyzed. Four aspects of SWD-host interaction were examined: attraction to host volatiles; population-level oviposition performance; individual-level oviposition performance; and key developmental factors. Application of HPI methodology indicated that raspberries ( (mean)HPIvaried  = 301.9±8.39; rank 1 of 7) have the greatest potential to serve as a postharvest host for SWD relative to the other fruit hosts, with grapes ( (mean)HPIvaried  = 232.4±3.21; rank 7 of 7) having the least potential. PMID:23593439

  14. Comparative population genomics of latitudinal variation in Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Heather E; Bergland, Alan O; O'Brien, Katherine R; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    Examples of clinal variation in phenotypes and genotypes across latitudinal transects have served as important models for understanding how spatially varying selection and demographic forces shape variation within species. Here, we examine the selective and demographic contributions to latitudinal variation through the largest comparative genomic study to date of Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster, with genomic sequence data from 382 individual fruit flies, collected across a spatial transect of 19 degrees latitude and at multiple time points over 2 years. Consistent with phenotypic studies, we find less clinal variation in D. simulans than D. melanogaster, particularly for the autosomes. Moreover, we find that clinally varying loci in D. simulans are less stable over multiple years than comparable clines in D. melanogaster. D. simulans shows a significantly weaker pattern of isolation by distance than D. melanogaster and we find evidence for a stronger contribution of migration to D. simulans population genetic structure. While population bottlenecks and migration can plausibly explain the differences in stability of clinal variation between the two species, we also observe a significant enrichment of shared clinal genes, suggesting that the selective forces associated with climate are acting on the same genes and phenotypes in D. simulans and D. melanogaster. PMID:26523848

  15. Relative roles of the cellular and humoral responses in the Drosophila host defense against three gram-positive bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine T Nehme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two NF-kappaB signaling pathways, Toll and immune deficiency (imd, are required for survival to bacterial infections in Drosophila. In response to septic injury, these pathways mediate rapid transcriptional activation of distinct sets of effector molecules, including antimicrobial peptides, which are important components of a humoral defense response. However, it is less clear to what extent macrophage-like hemocytes contribute to host defense. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to dissect the relative importance of humoral and cellular defenses after septic injury with three different gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, we used latex bead pre-injection to ablate macrophage function in flies wildtype or mutant for various Toll and imd pathway components. We found that in all three infection models a compromised phagocytic system impaired fly survival--independently of concomitant Toll or imd pathway activation. Our data failed to confirm a role of the PGRP-SA and GNBP1 Pattern Recognition Receptors for phagocytosis of S. aureus. The Drosophila scavenger receptor Eater mediates the phagocytosis by hemocytes or S2 cells of E. faecalis and S. aureus, but not of M. luteus. In the case of M. luteus and E. faecalis, but not S. aureus, decreased survival due to defective phagocytosis could be compensated for by genetically enhancing the humoral immune response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results underscore the fundamental importance of both cellular and humoral mechanisms in Drosophila immunity and shed light on the balance between these two arms of host defense depending on the invading pathogen.

  16. Synthesis of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) for lithium ion battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the use of a rheological phase reaction method for preparing MoS2 nanoflakes. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction indicated that MoS2 had been formed. High resolution electron microscopy observation revealed that the as-prepared MoS2 nanoflakes had started to curve and partly form MoS2 nanotubes. The lithium intercalation/de-intercalation behavior of as-prepared MoS2 nanoflake electrode was also investigated. It was found that the MoS2 nanoflake electrode exhibited higher specific capacity, with very high cycling stability, compared to MoS2 nanoparticle electrode. The possible reasons for the high electrochemical performance of the nanoflakes electrodes are also discussed. The outstanding electrochemical properties of MoS2 nanoflakes obtained by this method make it possible for MoS2 to be used as a promising anode material.

  17. Patterns of mutation and selection at synonymous sites in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Nadia D; Bauer DuMont, Vanessa L; Hubisz, Melissa J;

    2007-01-01

    That natural selection affects molecular evolution at synonymous sites in protein-coding sequences is well established and is thought to predominantly reflect selection for translational efficiency/accuracy mediated through codon bias. However, a recently developed maximum likelihood framework......, when applied to 18 coding sequences in 3 species of Drosophila, confirmed an earlier report that the Notch gene in Drosophila melanogaster was evolving under selection in favor of those codons defined as unpreferred in this species. This finding opened the possibility that synonymous sites may be...... subject to a variety of selective pressures beyond weak selection for increased frequencies of the codons currently defined as "preferred" in D. melanogaster. To further explore patterns of synonymous site evolution in Drosophila in a lineage-specific manner, we expanded the application of the maximum...

  18. Insights on TRP Channels from In Vivo Studies in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Baruch; Parnas, Moshe

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels mediate responses in a large variety of signaling mechanisms. Most studies on mammalian TRP channels rely on heterologous expression, but their relevance to in vivo tissues is not entirely clear. In contrast, Drosophila TRP and TRP-like (TRPL) channels allow direct analyses of in vivo function. In Drosophila photoreceptors, activation of TRP and TRPL is mediated via the phosphoinositide cascade, with both Ca2+ and diacylglycerol (DAG) essential for generating the light response. In tissue culture cells, TRPL channels are constitutively active, and lipid second messengers greatly facilitate this activity. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) completely blocks lipid activation of TRPL, suggesting that lipid activation is mediated via PLC. In vivo studies in mutant Drosophila also reveal an acute requirement for lipid-producing enzyme, which may regulate PLC activity. Thus, PLC and its downstream second messengers, Ca2+ and DAG, constitute critical mediators of TRP/TRPL gating in vivo. PMID:16460287

  19. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  20. On the origin of new genes in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Guojie; Zhang, Yue;

    2008-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to account for the origination of new genes. Despite extensive case studies, the general principles governing this fundamental process are still unclear at the whole-genome level. Here, we unveil genome-wide patterns for the mutational mechanisms leading to new...... genes and their subsequent lineage-specific evolution at different time nodes in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup. We find that (1) tandem gene duplication has generated approximately 80% of the nascent duplicates that are limited to single species (D. melanogaster or Drosophila yakuba); (2...... and reveal that 44.4% of them show copy number polymorphisms within a population. In conclusion, we provide a panoramic picture for the origin of new genes in Drosophila species....

  1. Intestinal stem cell response to injury: lessons from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huaqi; Tian, Aiguo; Jiang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Many adult tissues and organs are maintained by resident stem cells that are activated in response to injury but the mechanisms that regulate stem cell activity during regeneration are still poorly understood. An emerging system to study such problem is the Drosophila adult midgut. Recent studies have identified both intrinsic factors and extrinsic niche signals that control the proliferation, self-renewal, and lineage differentiation of Drosophila adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs). These findings set up the stage to interrogate how niche signals are regulated and how they are integrated with cell-intrinsic factors to control ISC activity during normal homeostasis and regeneration. Here we review the current understanding of the mechanisms that control ISC self-renewal, proliferation, and lineage differentiation in Drosophila adult midgut with a focus on the niche signaling network that governs ISC activity in response to injury. PMID:27137186

  2. Identification of common excitatory motoneurons in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Eiji; Komatsu, Akira; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2007-05-01

    In insects, four types of motoneurons have long been known, including fast motoneurons, slow motoneurons, common inhibitory motoneurons, and DUM neurons. They innervate the same muscle and control its contraction together. Recent studies in Drosophila have suggested the existence of another type of motoneuron, the common excitatory motoneuron. Here, we found that shakB-GAL4 produced by labels this type of motoneuron in Drosophila larvae. We found that Drosophila larvae have two common excitatory motoneurons in each abdominal segment, RP2 for dorsal muscles and MNSNb/d-Is for ventral muscles. They innervate most of the internal longitudinal or oblique muscles on the dorsal or ventral body wall with type-Is terminals and use glutamate as a transmitter. Electrophysiological recording indicated that stimulation of the RP2 axon evoked excitatory junctional potential in a dorsal muscle. PMID:17867850

  3. Chemical genetics and drug screening in Drosophila cancer models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara Gladstone; Tin Tin Su

    2011-01-01

    Drug candidates often fail in preclinical and clinical testing because of reasons of efficacy and/or safety.It would be time- and cost-efficient to have screening models that reduce the rate of such false positive candidates that appear promising at first but fail later.In this regard,it would be particularly useful to have a rapid and inexpensive whole animal model that can pre-select hits from high-throughput screens but before testing in costly rodent assays.Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a potential whole animal model for drug screening.Of particular interest have been drugs that must act in the context of multi-cellularity such as those for neurological disorders and cancer.A recent review provides a comprehensive summary of drug screening in Drosophila,but with an emphasis on neurodegenerative disorders.Here,we review Drosophila screens in the literature aimed at cancer therapeutics.

  4. Hybrid S2/Carbon Epoxy Composite Armours Under Blast Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, F.; Meo, Michele; Wright, A.; French, M.; Bernabei, M.

    2012-06-01

    Civil and military structures, such as helicopters, aircrafts, naval ships, tanks or buildings are susceptible to blast loads as terroristic attacks increases, therefore there is the need to design blast resistant structures. During an explosion the peak pressure produced by shock wave is much greater than the static collapse pressure. Metallic structures usually undergo large plastic deformations absorbing blast energy before reaching equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, fibre-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in blast resistant armours. A deep insight into the relationship between explosion loads, composite architecture and deformation/fracture behaviour will offer the possibility to design structures with significantly enhanced energy absorption and blast resistance performance. This study presents the results of a numerical investigation aimed at understanding the performance of a hybrid composite (glass/carbon fibre) plate subjected to blast loads using commercial LS-DYNA software. In particular, the paper deals with numerical 3D simulations of damages caused by air blast waves generated by C4 charges on two fully clamped rectangular plates made of steel and hybrid (S2/Carbon) composite, respectively. A Multi Materials Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (MMALE) formulation was used to simulate the shock phenomenon. For the steel plates, the Johnson-Cook material model was employed. For the composite plates both in-plane and out-of-plane failure criteria were employed. In particular, a contact tiebreak formulation with a mixed mode failure criteria was employed to simulate delamination failure. As for the steel plates the results showed that excellent correlation with the experimental data for the two blast load conditions in terms of dynamic and residual deflection for two different C4 charges. For the composite plates the numerical results showed that, as expected, a wider delamination damage was observed

  5. Structure of full-length Drosophila cryptochrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Widom, Joanne; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R. (Cornell); (Rockefeller)

    2011-12-15

    The cryptochrome/photolyase (CRY/PL) family of photoreceptors mediates adaptive responses to ultraviolet and blue light exposure in all kingdoms of life. Whereas PLs function predominantly in DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photolesions caused by ultraviolet radiation, CRYs transduce signals important for growth, development, magnetosensitivity and circadian clocks. Despite these diverse functions, PLs/CRYs preserve a common structural fold, a dependence on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and an internal photoactivation mechanism. However, members of the CRY/PL family differ in the substrates recognized (protein or DNA), photochemical reactions catalysed and involvement of an antenna cofactor. It is largely unknown how the animal CRYs that regulate circadian rhythms act on their substrates. CRYs contain a variable carboxy-terminal tail that appends the conserved PL homology domain (PHD) and is important for function. Here, we report a 2.3-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Drosophila CRY with an intact C terminus. The C-terminal helix docks in the analogous groove that binds DNA substrates in PLs. Conserved Trp536 juts into the CRY catalytic centre to mimic PL recognition of DNA photolesions. The FAD anionic semiquinone found in the crystals assumes a conformation to facilitate restructuring of the tail helix. These results help reconcile the diverse functions of the CRY/PL family by demonstrating how conserved protein architecture and photochemistry can be elaborated into a range of light-driven functions.

  6. Healthy aging – insights from Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GabrielleLBoulianne

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Human life expectancy has nearly doubled in the past century due, in part, to social and economic development, and a wide range of new medical technologies and treatments. As the number of elderly increase it becomes of vital importance to understand what factors contribute to healthy aging. Human longevity is a complex process that is affected by both environmental and genetic factors and interactions between them. Unfortunately, it is currently difficult to identify the role of genetic components in human longevity. In contrast, model organisms such as C. elegans, Drosophila and rodents have facilitated the search for specific genes that affect lifespan. Experimental evidence obtained from studies in model organisms suggests that mutations in a single gene may increase longevity and delay the onset of age-related symptoms including motor impairments, sexual and reproductive and immune dysfunction, cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. Furthermore, the high degree of conservation between diverse species in the genes and pathways that regulate longevity suggests that work in model organisms can both expand our theoretical knowledge of aging and perhaps provide new therapeutic targets for the treatment of age-related disorders.

  7. Insulin signaling mediates sexual attractiveness in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Han Kuo

    Full Text Available Sexually attractive characteristics are often thought to reflect an individual's condition or reproductive potential, but the underlying molecular mechanisms through which they do so are generally unknown. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS is known to modulate aging, reproduction, and stress resistance in several species and to contribute to variability of these traits in natural populations. Here we show that IIS determines sexual attractiveness in Drosophila through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the production of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC, many of which function as pheromones. Using traditional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS together with newly introduced laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-MS we establish that CHC profiles are significantly affected by genetic manipulations that target IIS. Manipulations that reduce IIS also reduce attractiveness, while females with increased IIS are significantly more attractive than wild-type animals. IIS effects on attractiveness are mediated by changes in CHC profiles. Insulin signaling influences CHC through pathways that are likely independent of dFOXO and that may involve the nutrient-sensing Target of Rapamycin (TOR pathway. These results suggest that the activity of conserved molecular regulators of longevity and reproductive output may manifest in different species as external characteristics that are perceived as honest indicators of fitness potential.

  8. Mechanosensory interactions drive collective behaviour in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdya, Pavan; Lichocki, Pawel; Cruchet, Steeve; Frisch, Lukas; Tse, Winnie; Floreano, Dario; Benton, Richard

    2015-03-12

    Collective behaviour enhances environmental sensing and decision-making in groups of animals. Experimental and theoretical investigations of schooling fish, flocking birds and human crowds have demonstrated that simple interactions between individuals can explain emergent group dynamics. These findings indicate the existence of neural circuits that support distributed behaviours, but the molecular and cellular identities of relevant sensory pathways are unknown. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster exhibits collective responses to an aversive odour: individual flies weakly avoid the stimulus, but groups show enhanced escape reactions. Using high-resolution behavioural tracking, computational simulations, genetic perturbations, neural silencing and optogenetic activation we demonstrate that this collective odour avoidance arises from cascades of appendage touch interactions between pairs of flies. Inter-fly touch sensing and collective behaviour require the activity of distal leg mechanosensory sensilla neurons and the mechanosensory channel NOMPC. Remarkably, through these inter-fly encounters, wild-type flies can elicit avoidance behaviour in mutant animals that cannot sense the odour--a basic form of communication. Our data highlight the unexpected importance of social context in the sensory responses of a solitary species and open the door to a neural-circuit-level understanding of collective behaviour in animal groups. PMID:25533959

  9. Caffeine Taste Signaling in Drosophila Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Köhn, Saskia; Stehle, Bernhard; Lutz, Michael; Wüst, Alexander; Mazija, Lorena; Rist, Anna; Galizia, C Giovanni; Lüdke, Alja; Thum, Andreas S

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal, and ventral organ). However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative co-receptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s). This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviors. PMID:27555807

  10. Tools for neuroanatomy and neurogenetics in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Jenett, Arnim; Hammonds, Ann S.; Ngo, Teri-T B.; Misra, Sima; Murphy, Christine; Scully, Audra; Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Laverty, Todd R.; Mungall, Chris; Svirskas, Rob; Kadonaga, James T.; Doe, Chris Q.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, Susan E.; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2008-08-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of generating thousands of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster lines in which the expression of an exogenous gene is reproducibly directed to distinct small subsets of cells in the adult brain. We expect the expression patterns produced by the collection of 5,000 lines that we are currently generating to encompass all neurons in the brain in a variety of intersecting patterns. Overlapping 3-kb DNA fragments from the flanking noncoding and intronic regions of genes thought to have patterned expression in the adult brain were inserted into a defined genomic location by site-specific recombination. These fragments were then assayed for their ability to function as transcriptional enhancers in conjunction with a synthetic core promoter designed to work with a wide variety of enhancer types. An analysis of 44 fragments from four genes found that >80% drive expression patterns in the brain; the observed patterns were, on average, comprised of <100 cells. Our results suggest that the D. melanogaster genome contains >50,000 enhancers and that multiple enhancers drive distinct subsets of expression of a gene in each tissue and developmental stage. We expect that these lines will be valuable tools for neuroanatomy as well as for the elucidation of neuronal circuits and information flow in the fly brain.

  11. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L

    2014-10-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry extending from the site(s) of acquisition to the site(s) controlling memory expression? (3) How is information processed across this circuit to consolidate early-forming, disruptable memories to stable, late memories? Much progress has been made and a few strong conclusions have emerged: (1) Acquisition occurs at multiple sites within the olfactory nervous system but is mediated predominantly by the γ mushroom body neurons. (2) The expression of long-term memory is completely dependent on the synaptic output of α/β mushroom body neurons. (3) Consolidation occurs, in part, through circuit interactions between mushroom body and dorsal paired medial neurons. Despite this progress, a complete and unified model that details the pathway from acquisition to memory expression remains elusive. PMID:25225297

  12. Host plant adaptation in Drosophila mettleri populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrezana, Sergio; Bono, Jeremy M

    2012-01-01

    The process of local adaptation creates diversity among allopatric populations, and may eventually lead to speciation. Plant-feeding insect populations that specialize on different host species provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate the causes of ecological specialization and the subsequent consequences for diversity. In this study, we used geographically separated Drosophila mettleri populations that specialize on different host cacti to examine oviposition preference for and larval performance on an array of natural and non-natural hosts (eight total). We found evidence of local adaptation in performance on saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) for populations that are typically associated with this host, and to chemically divergent prickly pear species (Opuntia spp.) in a genetically isolated population on Santa Catalina Island. Moreover, each population exhibited reduced performance on the alternative host. This finding is consistent with trade-offs associated with adaptation to these chemically divergent hosts, although we also discuss alternative explanations for this pattern. For oviposition preference, Santa Catalina Island flies were more likely to oviposit on some prickly pear species, but all populations readily laid eggs on saguaro. Experiments with non-natural hosts suggest that factors such as ecological opportunity may play a more important role than host plant chemistry in explaining the lack of natural associations with some hosts. PMID:22493678

  13. Host plant adaptation in Drosophila mettleri populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Castrezana

    Full Text Available The process of local adaptation creates diversity among allopatric populations, and may eventually lead to speciation. Plant-feeding insect populations that specialize on different host species provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate the causes of ecological specialization and the subsequent consequences for diversity. In this study, we used geographically separated Drosophila mettleri populations that specialize on different host cacti to examine oviposition preference for and larval performance on an array of natural and non-natural hosts (eight total. We found evidence of local adaptation in performance on saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea for populations that are typically associated with this host, and to chemically divergent prickly pear species (Opuntia spp. in a genetically isolated population on Santa Catalina Island. Moreover, each population exhibited reduced performance on the alternative host. This finding is consistent with trade-offs associated with adaptation to these chemically divergent hosts, although we also discuss alternative explanations for this pattern. For oviposition preference, Santa Catalina Island flies were more likely to oviposit on some prickly pear species, but all populations readily laid eggs on saguaro. Experiments with non-natural hosts suggest that factors such as ecological opportunity may play a more important role than host plant chemistry in explaining the lack of natural associations with some hosts.

  14. Farnesol-Detecting Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronderos, David S.; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Potter, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to deorphanize a subset of putative Drosophila odorant receptors expressed in trichoid sensilla using a transgenic in vivo misexpression approach. We identified farnesol as a potent and specific activator for the orphan odorant receptor Or83c. Farnesol is an intermediate in juvenile hormone biosynthesis, but is also produced by ripe citrus fruit peels. Here, we show that farnesol stimulates robust activation of Or83c-expressing olfactory neurons, even at high dilutions. The CD36 homolog Snmp1 is required for normal farnesol response kinetics. The neurons expressing Or83c are found in a subset of poorly characterized intermediate sensilla. We show that these neurons mediate attraction behavior to low concentrations of farnesol and that Or83c receptor mutants are defective for this behavior. Or83c neurons innervate the DC3 glomerulus in the antennal lobe and projection neurons relaying information from this glomerulus to higher brain centers target a region of the lateral horn previously implicated in pheromone perception. Our findings identify a sensitive, narrowly tuned receptor that mediates attraction behavior to farnesol and demonstrates an effective approach to deorphanizing odorant receptors expressed in neurons located in intermediate and trichoid sensilla that may not function in the classical “empty basiconic neuron” system. PMID:24623773

  15. Accelerated food source location in aging Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egenriether, Sada M; Chow, Eileen S; Krauth, Nathalie; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2015-10-01

    Adequate energy stores are essential for survival, and sophisticated neuroendocrine mechanisms evolved to stimulate foraging in response to nutrient deprivation. Food search behavior is usually investigated in young animals, and it is not known how aging alters this behavior. To address this question in Drosophila melanogaster, we compared the ability to locate food by olfaction in young and old flies using a food-filled trap. As aging is associated with a decline in motor functions, learning, and memory, we expected that aged flies would take longer to enter the food trap than their young counterparts. Surprisingly, old flies located food with significantly shorter latency than young ones. Robust food search behavior was associated with significantly lower fat reserves and lower starvation resistance in old flies. Food-finding latency (FFL) was shortened in young wild-type flies that were starved until their fat was depleted but also in heterozygous chico mutants with reduced insulin receptor activity and higher fat deposits. Conversely, food trap entry was delayed in old flies with increased insulin signaling. Our results suggest that the difference in FFL between young and old flies is linked to age-dependent differences in metabolic status and may be mediated by reduced insulin signaling. PMID:26102220

  16. Tracking individual nanodiamonds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, David A; Kowarsky, Mark; Zeeshan, Nida F; Barson, Michael S J; Hall, Liam; Yan, Yan; Kaufmann, Stefan; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Scholten, Robert; Saint, Robert B; Murray, Michael J; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2013-01-01

    Tracking the dynamics of fluorescent nanoparticles during embryonic development allows insights into the physical state of the embryo and, potentially, molecular processes governing developmental mechanisms. In this work, we investigate the motion of individual fluorescent nanodiamonds micro-injected into Drosophila melanogaster embryos prior to cellularisation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and wide-field imaging techniques are applied to individual fluorescent nanodiamonds in blastoderm cells during stage 5 of development to a depth of ~40 \\mu m. The majority of nanodiamonds in the blastoderm cells during cellularisation exhibit free diffusion with an average diffusion coefficient of (6 $\\pm$ 3) x 10$^{-3}$ \\mu m$^2$/s, (mean $\\pm$ SD). Driven motion in the blastoderm cells was also observed with an average velocity of 0.13 $\\pm$ 0.10 \\mu m/s (mean $\\pm$ SD) \\mu m/s and an average applied force of 0.07 $\\pm$ 0.05 pN (mean $\\pm$ SD). Nanodiamonds in the periplasm between the nuclei and yolk were also...

  17. Cerebral Innate Immunity in Drosophila Melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Leung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster has a rich history that includes ground-breaking discoveries in pathogen detection and signaling. These studies revealed the evolutionary conservation of innate immune pathways and mechanisms of pathogen detection, resulting in an explosion of findings in the innate immunity field. In D. melanogaster, studies have focused primarily on responses driven by the larval fat body and hemocytes, analogs to vertebrate liver and macrophages, respectively. Aside from pathogen detection, many recent mammalian studies associate innate immune pathways with development and disease pathogenesis. Importantly, these studies stress that the innate immune response is integral to maintain central nervous system (CNS health. Microglia, which are the vertebrate CNS mononuclear phagocytes, drive vertebrate cerebral innate immunity. The invertebrate CNS contains microglial-like cells-ensheathing glia and reticular glia-that could be used to answer basic questions regarding the evolutionarily conserved innate immune processes in CNS development and health. A deeper understanding of the relationship between D. melanogaster phagocytic microglial-like cells and vertebrate microglia will be key to answering basic and translational questions related to cerebral innate immunity.

  18. Transgenerational memory effect of ageing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, James G; Mery, Frederic

    2010-04-01

    Children born to older parents tend to have lower intelligence and are at higher risk for disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Such observations of ageing damage being passed on from parents to offspring are not often considered within the evolutionary theory of ageing. Here, we show the 25% memory impairment in Drosophila melanogaster offspring solely dependent on the age of the parents and also passed on to the F2 generation. Furthermore, this parental age effect was not attributed to a generalized reduction in condition of the offspring but was specific to short-term memory. We also provide evidence implicating oxidative stress as a causal factor by showing that lines selected for resistance to oxidative stress did not display a memory impairment in offspring of old parents. The identification of the parental age-related memory impairment in a model system should stimulate integration between mechanistic studies of age-related mortality risk and functional studies of parental age effects on the fitness of future generations. PMID:20149023

  19. Ultrafast magnetization and structural dynamics in the intercalated transition metal dichalcogenides Fe0.25TaS2 and Mn0.25TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Zhu, X. D.; Wang, L. H.; Cheong, S.-W.; Tobey, R. I.

    2016-05-01

    We measure magnetization and structural dynamics in two intercalant-ordered transition metal dichalcogenides: Fe0.25TaS2 and Mn0.25TaS2. The structurally equivalent materials allow us to probe the effect of orbital angular momentum which is active in Fe0.25TaS2 and absent in Mn0.25TaS2. Interestingly, we find that the magnetooptics dynamics are nearly indistinguishable in these two materials, in contradiction to conventional explanations of a spin–lattice mechanism. We compare our results to other materials where spin–lattice demagnetization has been put forth as a demagnetization channel.

  20. Drosophila as a genetically tractable model for social insect behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Camiletti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The relatively simple communication, breeding and egg-making systems that govern reproduction in female Drosophila retain homology to eusocial species in which these same systems are modified to the social condition. Despite having no parental care, division of labour or subfertile caste, Drosophila may nonetheless offer a living test of certain sociobiological hypotheses framed around gene function. In this review, we make this case, and do so around the recent discovery that the non-social fly, Drosophila melanogaster, can respond to the ovary-suppressing queen pheromone of the honey bee Apis meliffera. Here, we first explain the sociobiological imperative to reconcile kin theory with molecular biology, and qualify a potential role for Drosophila. Then, we offer three applications for the fly-pheromone assay. First, the availability and accessibility of massive mutant libraries makes immediately feasible any number of open or targeted gene screens against the ovary-inhibiting response. The sheer tractability of Drosophila may therefore help to accelerate the search for genes in pheromone-responsive pathways that regulate female reproduction, including potentially any that are preserved with modification to regulate worker sterility in response to queen pheromones in eusocial taxa. Secondly, Drosophila’s powerful Gal4/UAS expression system can complement the pheromone assay by driving target gene expression into living tissue, which could be well applied to the functional testing of genes presumed to drive ovary activation or de-activation in the honey bee or other eusocial taxa. Finally, coupling Gal4 with UAS-RNAi lines can facilitate loss-of-function experiments against perception and response to the ovary inhibiting pheromone, and do so for large numbers of candidates in systematic fashion. Drosophila's utility as an adjunct to the field of insect sociobiology is not ideal, but retains surprising potential.

  1. The making of a fusion branch in the Drosophila trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Louis; Lebreton, Gaelle; Casanova, Jordi

    2012-02-15

    Connection of epithelial tubes to generate a common network is a key step in the formation of tubular organs such as the tracheal respiratory and the vascular systems. However, it is not clear how these connecting tubes arise. Here we address this issue by studying the dorsal fusion branches in the Drosophila trachea, taking into account the morphology and contribution of each cell type on the basis of their individual labeling. Our results explain how a fusion branch forms and also illustrate the different nature of the two seamless tubes in the Drosophila trachea, generated by fusion and terminal cells respectively. PMID:22178247

  2. Genetic regulation of programmed cell death in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis during animal development, and has been conserved in animals as different as nematodes and humans. Recent studies of Drosophila have provided valuable information toward our understanding of genetic regulation of death. Different signals trigger the novel death regulators rpr, hid, and grim, that utilize the evolutionarily conserved iap and ark genes to modulate caspase function. Subsequent removal of dying cells also appears to be accomplished by conserved mechanisms. The similarity between Drosophila and human in cell death signaling pathways illustrate the promise of fruit flies as a model system to elucidate the mechanisms underlying regulation of programmed cell death.

  3. Modeling dietary influences on offspring metabolic programming in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookheart, Rita T; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    The influence of nutrition on offspring metabolism has become a hot topic in recent years owing to the growing prevalence of maternal and childhood obesity. Studies in mammals have identified several factors correlating with parental and early offspring dietary influences on progeny health; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these factors remain undiscovered. Mammalian metabolic tissues and pathways are heavily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster, making the fly an invaluable genetic model organism for studying metabolism. In this review, we discuss the metabolic similarities between mammals and Drosophila and present evidence supporting its use as an emerging model of metabolic programming. PMID:27450801

  4. Polypeptide components of Drosophila small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, T; Beggs, J D; Finnegan, D J; Lührmann, R

    1991-01-01

    In eukaryotes splicing of pre-mRNAs is mediated by the spliceosome, a dynamic complex of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) that associate transiently during spliceosome assembly and the splicing reaction. We have purified snRNPs from nuclear extracts of Drosophila cells by affinity chromatography with an antibody specific for the trimethylguanosine (m3G) cap structure of snRNAs U1-U5. The polypeptide components of Drosophila snRNPs have been characterized and shown to consist...

  5. Polypeptide components of Drosophila small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, T; Beggs, J D; Finnegan, D J; Luhrmann, R; Finnegan, David

    1991-01-01

    In eukaryotes splicing of pre-mRNAs is mediated by the spliceosome, a dynamic complex of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) that associate transiently during spliceosome assembly and the splicing reaction. We have purified snRNPs from nuclear extracts of Drosophila cells by affinity chromatography with an antibody specific for the trimethylguanosine (m3G) cap structure of snRNAs U1-U5. The polypeptide components of Drosophila snRNPs have been characterized and shown to consist...

  6. Getting started : an overview on raising and handling Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Hugo; Gallant, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has long been a prime model organism for developmental biologists. During their work, they have established a large collection of techniques and reagents. This in turn has made fruit flies an attractive system for many other biomedical researchers who have otherwise no background in fly biology. This review intends to help Drosophila neophytes in setting up a fly lab. It briefly introduces the biological properties of fruit flies, describes the minimal equipment required for working with flies, and offers some basic advice for maintaining fly lines and setting up and analyzing experiments. PMID:18641939

  7. Dual role of monolayer MoS2 in enhanced photocatalytic performance of hybrid MoS2/SnO2 nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuang-Shuang; Huang, Wei-Qing; Yang, Yin-Cai; Zhou, Bing-Xin; Hu, Wang-Yu; Long, Meng-Qiu; Peng, P.; Huang, Gui-Fang

    2016-05-01

    The enhanced photocatalytic performance of various MoS2-based nanomaterials has recently been observed, but the role of monolayer MoS2 is still not well elucidated at the electronic level. Herein, focusing on a model system, hybrid MoS2/SnO2 nanocomposite, we first present a theoretical elucidation of the dual role of monolayer MoS2 as a sensitizer and a co-catalyst by performing density functional theory calculations. It is demonstrated that a type-II, staggered, band alignment of ˜0.49 eV exists between monolayer MoS2 and SnO2 with the latter possessing the higher electron affinity, or work function, leading to the robust separation of photoexcited charge carriers between the two constituents. Under irradiation, the electrons are excited from Mo 4d orbitals to SnO2, thus enhancing the reduction activity of latter, indicating that the monolayer MoS2 is an effective sensitizer. Moreover, the Mo atoms, which are catalytically inert in isolated monolayer MoS2, turn into catalytic active sites, making the monolayer MoS2 to be a highly active co-catalyst in the composite. The dual role of monolayer MoS2 is expected to arise in other MoS2-semiconductor nanocomposites. The calculated absorption spectra can be rationalized by available experimental results. These findings provide theoretical evidence supporting the experimental reports and pave the way for developing highly efficient MoS2-based photocatalysts.

  8. Role of vacancies in tuning the electronic properties of Au-MoS2 contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the electronic properties between molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and metal electrodes is vital for the designing and realization of nanoelectronic devices. In this work, influence of intrinsic vacancies in monolayer MoS2 on the electronic structure and electron properties of Au-MoS2 contacts is investigated using first-principles calculations. Upon formation of vacancies in monolayer MoS2, both tunnel barriers and Schottky Barriers between metal Au and monolayer MoS2 are decreased. Perfect Au-MoS2 top contact exhibits physisorption interface with rectifying character, whereas Au-MoS2 contact with Mo-vacancy shows chemisorption interface with Ohmic character. Partial density of states and electron density of defective Au-MoS2 top contacts are much higher than those of perfect one, indicating the lower contact resistance and higher electron injection efficiency of defective Au-MoS2 top contacts. Notably, Mo-vacancy in monolayer MoS2 is beneficial to get high quality p-type Au-MoS2 top contact, whereas S-vacancy in monolayer MoS2 is favorable to achieve high quality n-type Au-MoS2 top contact. Our results provide guidelines for designing and fabrication of novel 2D nanoelectronic devices

  9. Role of vacancies in tuning the electronic properties of Au-MoS2 contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the electronic properties between molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 and metal electrodes is vital for the designing and realization of nanoelectronic devices. In this work, influence of intrinsic vacancies in monolayer MoS2 on the electronic structure and electron properties of Au-MoS2 contacts is investigated using first-principles calculations. Upon formation of vacancies in monolayer MoS2, both tunnel barriers and Schottky Barriers between metal Au and monolayer MoS2 are decreased. Perfect Au-MoS2 top contact exhibits physisorption interface with rectifying character, whereas Au-MoS2 contact with Mo-vacancy shows chemisorption interface with Ohmic character. Partial density of states and electron density of defective Au-MoS2 top contacts are much higher than those of perfect one, indicating the lower contact resistance and higher electron injection efficiency of defective Au-MoS2 top contacts. Notably, Mo-vacancy in monolayer MoS2 is beneficial to get high quality p-type Au-MoS2 top contact, whereas S-vacancy in monolayer MoS2 is favorable to achieve high quality n-type Au-MoS2 top contact. Our results provide guidelines for designing and fabrication of novel 2D nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets with high MoS2 loading with enhanced electro-catalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Xiao, Han; Zhou, Bowen; Huang, Feifan; Zhou, Shoubin; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Incorporation of high-loading redox-active materials with small amounts of graphene is a general protocol to achieve high-performance catalysts. Herein, hierarchical MoS2-reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (denoted as MoS2-rGO nanosheets) hybrids with a loading of MoS2 as high as 94 wt% are synthesized. The obtained hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets simultaneously integrate the structural and compositional design rationales for high-efficiency and durable electrocatalysts based on high weight ratio of MoS2 in hybrid composite, highly stable/conducting rGO, well-dispersed two-dimensional ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets, more exposed edge sites and micro/nano hierarchical structure. When evaluated as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions, the hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets demonstrates enhanced activity and excellent stability, promising their applications in MoS2 based electrochemical, photo-catalytic and photo-elecrocatalytic cells.

  11. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael;

    2003-01-01

    diverse myotropic actions and are also initiating sex pheromone biosynthesis and embryonic diapause. Gene silencing, using the RNA-mediated interference technique, showed that CG8784 gene silencing caused lethality in embryos, whereas CG8795 gene silencing resulted in strongly reduced viability for both...... embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors to...

  12. Hydrogenation-induced edge magnetization in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon and electric field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed density functional theory study on the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS2 nanoribbons (AMoS2NR) with different edge hydrogenation. Although bare and fully passivated AMoS2NRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors, it was found that hydrogenation in certain patterns can induce localized ferromagnetic edge state in AMoS2NRs and make AMoS2NRs become antiferromagnetic semiconductors or ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electric field effects on the bandgap and magnetic moment of AMoS2NRs were investigated. Partial edge hydrogenation can change a small-sized AMoS2NR from semiconductor to metal or semimetal under a moderate transverse electric field. Since the rate of edge hydrogenation can be controlled experimentally via the temperature, pressure and concentration of H2, our results suggest edge hydrogenation is a useful method to engineer the band structure of AMoS2NRs

  13. Theoretical study on electronic properties of MoS2 antidot lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the state of the art method for etching hexagonal array holes in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), the electronic properties of MoS2 antidot lattices (MoS2ALs) with zigzag edge were studied with first-principles calculations. Monolayer MoS2ALs are semiconducting and the band gaps converge to constant values as the supercell area increases, which can be attributed to the edge effect. Multilayer MoS2ALs and chemical adsorbed MoS2ALs by F atoms show metallic behavior, while the structure adsorbed with H atoms remains to be semiconducting with a tiny bandgap. Our results show that forming periodically repeating structures in MoS2 can develop a promising technique for engineering nano materials and offer new opportunities for designing MoS2-based nanoscale electronic devices and chemical sensors.

  14. Hydrogenation-induced edge magnetization in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon and electric field effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Fangping; Yang, Zhixiong; Ni, Xiang; Wu, Nannan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xiang

    2014-02-01

    We performed density functional theory study on the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS2 nanoribbons (AMoS2NR) with different edge hydrogenation. Although bare and fully passivated AMoS2NRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors, it was found that hydrogenation in certain patterns can induce localized ferromagnetic edge state in AMoS2NRs and make AMoS2NRs become antiferromagnetic semiconductors or ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electric field effects on the bandgap and magnetic moment of AMoS2NRs were investigated. Partial edge hydrogenation can change a small-sized AMoS2NR from semiconductor to metal or semimetal under a moderate transverse electric field. Since the rate of edge hydrogenation can be controlled experimentally via the temperature, pressure and concentration of H2, our results suggest edge hydrogenation is a useful method to engineer the band structure of AMoS2NRs.

  15. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of TiO2/CuInS2 heterojunctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanu, M.; Boulch, F.; Schoonman, J.; Goossens, A.

    2005-01-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been used to measure the concentration and energy position of deep electronic states in CuInS2. Flat TiO2∣CuInS2 heterojunctions as well as TiO2-CuInS2 nanocomposites have been investigated. Subband-gap electronic states in CuInS2 films are mostly due to

  16. [Preparation technique of S2OF10 gas standard sample and determination method of the trace S2OF10 in SF6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, J

    1999-09-01

    In this paper a series of methods and techniques for the S2OF10 standard sample preparation and quantitative determination are presented. They are, the preparation of S2OF10 by preparative chromatography with adsorption/thermal desorption, the standard sample of S2OF10 gas prepared by exponential dilution and the gas chromatography/flame photometric detector(GC/FPD) determination of trace S2OF10 from an SF6 sample with quantitative calibration factor. Especially, the S2OF10 gas from a used SF6 sample was directly separated and concentrated through a U-adsorbent-tube packed with 300 mg of Porasil A in a cold trap (-63 degrees C) with liquid-nitrogen and chloroform. Then it was purified by preparative-GC and to be injected into a preparative system of standard gas sample. In the meantime, the S2OF10 gas obtained was confirmed by the methods of GC/FPD, infrared spectrophotometer(IR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer(GC/MS) separately. The sub-ppm(by volume) level of the S2OF10 and SF6 mixture samples were prepared by use of the exponential dilution system. The GC/FPD experimental results showed that the detection linear range of S2OF10 gas concentration was 0.80 x 10(-6)-2.60 x 10(-4) (volume fraction) and the quantitative calibration factor of the S2OF10 was 0.197 based on SF6. The determination errors of quantitative calibration factor were 1.8%-20% and S2OF10 recovery of the adsorption/thermal desorption was 98.2% (n = 9) and its relative standard deviation was 6.2%. In addition, the results also showed that it is a simple and rapid method with good linearity and reproducibility. PMID:12552882

  17. The role of Drosophila Merlin in spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanchuk Leonid V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila Merlin, the homolog of the human Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2 gene, is important for the regulation of cell proliferation and receptor endocytosis. Male flies carrying a Mer3 allele, a missense mutation (Met177→Ile in the Merlin gene, are viable but sterile; however, the cause of sterility is unknown. Results Testis examination reveals that hemizygous Mer3 mutant males have small seminal vesicles that contain only a few immotile sperm. By cytological and electron microscopy analyses of the Mer3, Mer4 (Gln170→stop, and control testes at various stages of spermatogenesis, we show that Merlin mutations affect meiotic cytokinesis of spermatocytes, cyst polarization and nuclear shaping during spermatid elongation, and spermatid individualization. We also demonstrate that the lethality and sterility phenotype of the Mer4 mutant is rescued by the introduction of a wild-type Merlin gene. Immunostaining demonstrates that the Merlin protein is redistributed to the area associated with the microtubules of the central spindle in telophase and its staining is less in the region of the contractile ring during meiotic cytokinesis. At the onion stage, Merlin is concentrated in the Nebenkern of spermatids, and this mitochondrial localization is maintained throughout sperm formation. Also, Merlin exhibits punctate staining in the acrosomal region of mature sperm. Conclusion Merlin mutations affect spermatogenesis at multiple stages. The Merlin protein is dynamically redistributed during meiosis of spermatocytes and is concentrated in the Nebenkern of spermatids. Our results demonstrated for the first time the mitochondrial localization of Merlin and suggest that Merlin may play a role in mitochondria formation and function during spermatogenesis.

  18. Modeling peripheral olfactory coding in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J Hoare

    Full Text Available The Drosophila larva possesses just 21 unique and identifiable pairs of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, enabling investigation of the contribution of individual OSN classes to the peripheral olfactory code. We combined electrophysiological and computational modeling to explore the nature of the peripheral olfactory code in situ. We recorded firing responses of 19/21 OSNs to a panel of 19 odors. This was achieved by creating larvae expressing just one functioning class of odorant receptor, and hence OSN. Odor response profiles of each OSN class were highly specific and unique. However many OSN-odor pairs yielded variable responses, some of which were statistically indistinguishable from background activity. We used these electrophysiological data, incorporating both responses and spontaneous firing activity, to develop a bayesian decoding model of olfactory processing. The model was able to accurately predict odor identity from raw OSN responses; prediction accuracy ranged from 12%-77% (mean for all odors 45.2% but was always significantly above chance (5.6%. However, there was no correlation between prediction accuracy for a given odor and the strength of responses of wild-type larvae to the same odor in a behavioral assay. We also used the model to predict the ability of the code to discriminate between pairs of odors. Some of these predictions were supported in a behavioral discrimination (masking assay but others were not. We conclude that our model of the peripheral code represents basic features of odor detection and discrimination, yielding insights into the information available to higher processing structures in the brain.

  19. MoS2/Nitrogen-doped graphene as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A simple yet effective method was developed for generating an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction by deposited MoS2 sheets on nitrogen-doped graphene (NG). Due to the synergistic effect of MoS2 and NG, enhancement of electrocatalytic oxygen-reduction was realized. Display Omitted -- Highlights: • MoS2/Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) composites were obtained by physically mixing method. • MoS2 sheets deposited NG could be used as effective electrocatalyst for ORR. • Enhanced electrocatalytic activity is due to the synergistic effect of MoS2 and NG. • The ORR is a four-electron process based on Koutecky-Levich equation. -- Abstract: A simple yet effective strategy was developed to generate a non-precious oxygen electrode electrocatalyst of MoS2/nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) by physical mixing MoS2 sheets with NG. The micrometer-sized MoS2 sheets were obtained through ultrasonication exfoliation of the bulk MoS2, only showing little oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. MoS2/NG hybrid was obtained by loading MoS2 sheets onto NG through ultrasonication, and the resulting nanocomposites exhibited improved electrocatalytic activity for ORR with dominant 4 electron pathway in alkaline solutions. The exposed active edges as well as the synergistic effect and reduced resistance connection jointly make the MoS2/NG composite a highly competitive ORR catalyst

  20. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah L Rogers

    Full Text Available Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10-9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10-10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes.

  1. The metabolic profile of long-lived Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Pedersen, Simon Metz; Nielsen, Niels Christian; Malmendal, Anders; Loeschcke, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the age-related changes in the metabolic profile of male Drosophila melanogaster and compared the metabolic profile of flies selected for increased longevity to that of control flies of equal age. We found clear differences in metabolite composition between selection regimes and...

  2. Genetic Analysis of the Hairy Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    OpenAIRE

    Ingham, P W; Pinchin, S M; Howard, K.R.; Ish-Horowicz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Mutations of the hairy locus in Drosophila may affect both adult chaeta differentiation and embryonic segmentation. In an effort to understand this phenotypic complexity, we have analyzed 30 mutant alleles of the locus. We find that the alleles fall into four groups according to their complementation properties, suggesting a structurally complex locus in which two distinct functions share a common coding region.

  3. Plexins function in epithelial repair in both Drosophila and zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Pascoe, Heath G.; Pereira, Telmo; Kondo, Shu; Jacinto, Antonio; Zhang, Xuewu; Hariharan, Iswar K.

    2016-01-01

    In most multicellular organisms, homeostasis is contingent upon maintaining epithelial integrity. When unanticipated insults breach epithelial barriers, dormant programmes of tissue repair are immediately activated. However, many of the mechanisms that repair damaged epithelia remain poorly characterized. Here we describe a role for Plexin A (PlexA), a protein with particularly well-characterized roles in axonal pathfinding, in the healing of damaged epithelia in Drosophila. Semaphorins, which are PlexA ligands, also regulate tissue repair. We show that Drosophila PlexA has GAP activity for the Rap1 GTPase, which is known to regulate the stability of adherens junctions. Our observations suggest that the inhibition of Rap1 activity by PlexA in damaged Drosophila epithelia allows epithelial remodelling, thus facilitating wound repair. We also demonstrate a role for Plexin A1, a zebrafish orthologue of Drosophila PlexA, in epithelial repair in zebrafish tail fins. Thus, plexins function in epithelial wound healing in diverse taxa. PMID:27452696

  4. The olfactory circuit of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The olfactory circuit of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged in recent years as an excellent paradigm for studying the principles and mechanisms of information processing in neuronal circuits. We discuss here the organizational principles of the olfactory circuit that make it an attractive model for experimental manipulations, the lessons that have been learned, and future challenges.

  5. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartenstein Volker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that multiple GAL4 drivers have been mapped to several lineages of the Drosophila brain enables investigation of the role of Bazooka from larval to adult stages Bazooka loss-of-function (LOF clones had abnormal morphologies, including aberrant pathway choice of ventral projection neurons in the BAla1 lineage, ectopic branching in the DALv2 and BAmv1 lineages, and excess BLD5 lineage axon projections in the optic medulla. Exogenous expression of Bazooka protein in BAla1 neurons rescued defective guidance, supporting an intrinsic requirement for Bazooka in the post-mitotic neuron. Elimination of the Par-complex member Par6 recapitulated Bazooka phenotypes in some but not all lineages, suggesting that the Par complex functions in a lineage-dependent manner, and that Bazooka may act independently in some lineages. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of using a multilineage approach when studying gene function during neural development in Drosophila.

  6. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-01-01

    In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that multiple GAL4 drivers have been mapped to several lineages of the Drosophila brain enables investigation of the role of Bazooka from larval to adult stages Bazooka loss-of-function (LOF) clones had abnormal morphologies, including aberrant pathway choice of ventral projection neurons in the BAla1 lineage, ectopic branching in the DALv2 and BAmv1 lineages, and excess BLD5 lineage axon projections in the optic medulla. Exogenous expression of Bazooka protein in BAla1 neurons rescued defective guidance, supporting an intrinsic requirement for Bazooka in the post-mitotic neuron. Elimination of the Par-complex member Par6 recapitulated Bazooka phenotypes in some but not all lineages, suggesting that the Par complex functions in a lineage-dependent manner, and that Bazooka may act independently in some lineages. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of using a multilineage approach when studying gene function during neural development in Drosophila. PMID:21524279

  7. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, V; Mitchell, H K; Young, P.; Petersen, N S

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  8. Characterization and manipulation of fruit susceptibility to Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is an economic pest of small fruits and cherries that attacks intact ripening fruits. Host susceptibility is influenced by characteristics such as flesh firmness, penetration force of the skin, total soluble solids (TSS, also known as °Brix) and pH. Improved knowledge ...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Drosophila suzukii

    OpenAIRE

    Siozios, Stefanos; Cestaro, Alessandro; Kaur, Rupinder; Pertot, Ilaria; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Anfora, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Wolbachia is one of the most successful and abundant symbiotic bacteria in nature, infecting more than 40% of the terrestrial arthropod species. Here we report the draft genome sequence of a novel Wolbachia strain named “wSuzi” that was retrieved from the genome sequencing of its host, the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siozios, Stefanos; Cestaro, Alessandro; Kaur, Rupinder; Pertot, Ilaria; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Anfora, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Wolbachia is one of the most successful and abundant symbiotic bacteria in nature, infecting more than 40% of the terrestrial arthropod species. Here we report the draft genome sequence of a novel Wolbachia strain named "wSuzi" that was retrieved from the genome sequencing of its host, the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii. PMID:23472225

  11. Monitoring Drosophila suzukii Matsumura in Oregon, USA sweet cherry orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii rapidly became a significant cherry pest in the western United States after it was observed damaging cherries in 2009 in California. It has caused significant damage to ripening cherries in all major USA cherry production districts leading to increased management costs and reduced...

  12. EGFR signaling regulates the proliferation of Drosophila adult midgut progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    In holometabolous insects, the adult appendages and internal organs form anew from larval progenitor cells during metamorphosis. As described here, the adult Drosophila midgut, including intestinal stem cells (ISCs), develops from adult midgut progenitor cells (AMPs) that proliferate during larval development in two phases. Dividing AMPs first disperse, but later proliferate within distinct islands, forming large cell clusters that eventually fuse during metamorphosis ...

  13. Drosophila phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase is required for tissue morphogenesis during oogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosveld, Floris; Rana, Anil; Lemstra - Wierenga, Willemina; Kampinga, Harm; Sibon, Ody

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coenzyme A (CoA) is an essential metabolite, synthesized from vitamin B5 by the subsequent action of five enzymes: PANK, PPCS, PPCDC, PPAT and DPCK. Mutations in Drosophila dPPCS disrupt female fecundity and in this study we analyzed the female sterile phenotype of dPPCS mutants in detai

  14. Neurogenetic approaches to habituation and dishabituation in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Jeff E.; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2008-01-01

    We review work in the major model systems for habituation in Drosophila melanogaster, encompassing several sensory modalities and behavioral contexts: visual (giant fiber escape response, landing response); chemical (proboscis extension reflex, olfactory jump response, locomotory startle response, odor-induced leg response, experience-dependent courtship modification); electric (shock avoidance); and mechanical (leg resistance reflex, cleaning reflex). Each model system shows several of Thomp...

  15. Metabolic Activity of Radish Sprouts Derived Isothiocyanates in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Nieves; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Schloesser, Anke; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Wagner, Anika E

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study the absorption, metabolism and potential health benefits of plant bioactives derived from radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus cv. Rambo), a Brassicaceae species rich in glucosinolates and other phytochemicals. Flies were subjected to a diet supplemented with lyophilized radish sprouts (10.6 g/L) for 10 days, containing high amounts of glucoraphenin and glucoraphasatin, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase to the isothiocyanates sulforaphene and raphasatin, respectively. We demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster takes up and metabolizes isothiocyanates from radish sprouts through the detection of the metabolite sulforaphane-cysteine in fly homogenates. Moreover, we report a decrease in the glucose content of flies, an upregulation of spargel expression, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PPARγ-coactivator 1 α, as well as the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. Overall, we show that the consumption of radish sprouts affects energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster which is reflected by lower glucose levels and an increased expression of spargel, a central player in mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes are often affected in chronic diseases associated with aging, including type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:26901196

  16. Metabolic Activity of Radish Sprouts Derived Isothiocyanates in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Baenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study the absorption, metabolism and potential health benefits of plant bioactives derived from radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus cv. Rambo, a Brassicaceae species rich in glucosinolates and other phytochemicals. Flies were subjected to a diet supplemented with lyophilized radish sprouts (10.6 g/L for 10 days, containing high amounts of glucoraphenin and glucoraphasatin, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase to the isothiocyanates sulforaphene and raphasatin, respectively. We demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster takes up and metabolizes isothiocyanates from radish sprouts through the detection of the metabolite sulforaphane-cysteine in fly homogenates. Moreover, we report a decrease in the glucose content of flies, an upregulation of spargel expression, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PPARγ-coactivator 1 α, as well as the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. Overall, we show that the consumption of radish sprouts affects energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster which is reflected by lower glucose levels and an increased expression of spargel, a central player in mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes are often affected in chronic diseases associated with aging, including type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maesani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs-locomotor bouts-matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior.

  18. LTR retrotransposons and the evolution of dosage compensation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald John F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dosage compensation in Drosophila is the epigenetic process by which the expression of genes located on the single X-chromosome of males is elevated to equal the expression of X-linked genes in females where there are two copies of the X-chromosome. While epigenetic mechanisms are hypothesized to have evolved originally to silence transposable elements, a connection between transposable elements and the evolution of dosage compensation has yet to be demonstrated. Results We show that transcription of the Drosophila melanogaster copia LTR (long terminal repeat retrotransposon is significantly down regulated when in the hemizygous state. DNA digestion and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analyses demonstrate that this down regulation is associated with changes in chromatin structure mediated by the histone acetyltransferase, MOF. MOF has previously been shown to play a central role in the Drosophila dosage compensation complex by binding to the hemizygous X-chromosome in males. Conclusion Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that MOF originally functioned to silence retrotransposons and, over evolutionary time, was co-opted to play an essential role in dosage compensation in Drosophila.

  19. Study of Ectonucleotidases and Adenosine Deaminases in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    PREUER, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate and extracellular adenosine are important regulatory molecules in the human immune system. The concentrations of these molecules are in turn regulated by ectonucleotidases and adenosine deaminases. In this thesis I attempt to test the gene silencing efficiency of RNA interference for three different genes coding for such enzymes in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

  20. Near-infrared photodetectors utilizing MoS2-based heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-infrared photodetectors are developed using graphene/MoS2 and WSe2/MoS2 vertical heterojunctions. These heterojunctions exhibit diode-rectifying behavior in the dark and enhanced photocurrent upon near-infrared irradiation. The photocurrent increases with increasing near-infrared power, leading to the photoresponsibility of 0.14 and 0.3 A W−1 for the graphene/MoS2 and WSe2/MoS2 heterojunctions, respectively, which are much higher than the photoresponsibility reported for a multilayer MoS2 phototransistor

  1. Enhanced absorption of monolayer MoS2 with resonant back reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiang-Tao; Li, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    By extracting the permittivity of monolayer MoS2 from experiments, the optical absorption of monolayer MoS2 prepared on top of one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) or metal films is investigated theoretically. The 1DPC and metal films act as resonant back reflectors that can enhance absorption of monolayer MoS2 substantially over a broad spectral range due to the Fabry-Perot cavity effect. The absorption of monolayer MoS2 can also be tuned by varying either the distance between the monolayer MoS2 and the back reflector or the thickness of the cover layers.

  2. Photoluminescence of freestanding single- and few-layer MoS2

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuschner, Nils; Ochedowski, Oliver; Kaulitz, Anne-Marie; Gillen, Roland; Schleberger, Marika; Maultzsch, Janina

    2013-01-01

    We present a photoluminescence study of freestanding and Si/SiO2 supported single- and few-layer MoS2. The single-layer exciton peak (A) is only observed in freestanding MoS2. The photoluminescence of supported single-layer MoS2 is instead originating from the A- (trion) peak as the MoS2 is n-type doped from the substrate. In bilayer MoS2, the van der Waals interaction with the substrate is decreasing the indirect band gap energy by up to ~ 80 meV. Furthermore, the photoluminescence spectra o...

  3. Sucrose Improves Insecticide Activity Against Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Richard S; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Loeb, Gregory M; Elsensohn, Johanna E; Hesler, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The addition of sucrose to insecticides targeting spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), enhanced lethality in laboratory, semifield, and field tests. In the laboratory, 0.1% sucrose added to a spray solution enhanced spotted wing drosophila feeding. Flies died 120 min earlier when exposed to spinosad residues at label rates enhanced with sucrose. Added sucrose reduced the LC50 for dried acetamiprid residues from 82 to 41 ppm in the spray solution. Laboratory bioassays of spotted wing drosophila mortality followed exposure to grape and blueberry foliage and/or fruit sprayed and aged in the field. On grape foliage, the addition of 2.4 g/liter of sugar with insecticide sprays resulted in an 11 and 6% increase of spotted wing drosophila mortality at 1 and 2 d exposures to residues, respectively, averaged over seven insecticides with three concentrations. In a separate experiment, spinetoram and cyantraniliprole reduced by 95-100% the larval infestation of blueberries, relative to the untreated control, 7 d after application at labeled rates when applied with 1.2 g/liter sucrose in a spray mixture, irrespective of rainfall; without sucrose infestation was reduced by 46-91%. Adding sugar to the organically acceptable spinosyn, Entrust, reduced larval infestation of strawberries by >50% relative to without sugar for five of the six sample dates during a season-long field trial. In a small-plot field test with blueberries, weekly applications in alternating sprays of sucrose plus reduced-risk insecticides, spinetoram or acetamiprid, reduced larval infestation relative to the untreated control by 76%; alternating bifenthrin and phosmet (without sucrose) reduced infestation by 65%. PMID:26470175

  4. Trapping spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: Drosophilidae) with combinations of vinegar and wine, and acetic acid and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recommendations for monitoring spotted wing drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, (Matsumura) are to use either vinegar or wine as a bait for traps. Traps baited with vinegar and traps baited with wine, in field tests in northern Oregon, captured large numbers of male and female SWD flies. Numbers of...

  5. Tuning the Schottky barrier height of the Pd-MoS2 contact by different strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Wu, Li-Juan; Zhao, Yu-Qing; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Cai, Meng-Qiu

    2015-10-28

    The structures and electronic properties of the Pd-MoS2 contact are investigated using density functional calculations under different strains. The height of Schottky barrier for the Pd-MoS2 contact can be tuned by different strains. Our results show that the contact nature is of n-type Schottky barrier and the barrier height can be decreased to zero under increased tensile strain (6%). However, under increased compressive strain, the MoS2 layers become indirect bandgap semiconductors, which is a disadvantage for the electron transition in the Pd-MoS2 interface. By analyzing the near band gaps and charge distribution of MoS2 orbitals, we find that the Schottky barrier height is determined by the Mo dz(2) orbitals in the Pd-MoS2 contact. Our calculation results may prove to be instrumental in future design and fabrication of MoS2-based field effect transistors. PMID:26412203

  6. Identification and characterization of the donkey CSN1S2 I and II cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Nicodemo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The αs2 casein, encoded by the CSN1S2 gene, is one of the three Calcium sensitive caseins present in the milk of ruminants of zootechnical interest and in the milk of Equidae species (horse and donkey. In the present study, we cloned, sequenced and analysed two different donkey CSN1S2 cDNAs that we called CSN1S2 I and CSN1S2 II. The first, which spans over a fragment of 1016 nt, is constituted by 19 exons and encodes for a predicted protein (called αs2-I of 221 aminoacids; the second, of which we determined the entire sequence (16 exons, encodes for a predicted peptide (called αs2-II of 168 aminoacids. Alternative splicing and genetic markers are reported for both genes.

  7. Single step, bulk synthesis of engineered MoS2 quantum dots for multifunctional electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Palve, Anil M.; Pal, Shubhadeep; Sudeep, P. M.; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.

    2016-07-01

    Bi- or tri- functional catalysts based on atomic layers are receiving tremendous scientific attention due to their importance in various energy technologies. Recent studies on molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) nanosheets revealed that controlling the edge states and doping/modifying with suitable elements are highly important in tuning the catalytic activities of MoS2. Here we report a bulk, single step method to synthesize metal modified MoS2 quantum dots (QDs). Three elements, namely Fe, Mg and Li, are chosen to study the effects of dopants in the catalytic activities of MoS2. Fe and Mg are found to act like dopants in the MoS2 lattice forming respective doped MoS2 QDs, while Li formed an intercalated MoS2 QD. The efficacy and tunability of these luminescent doped QDs towards various electrocatalytic activities (hydrogen evolution reaction, oxygen evolution reaction and oxygen reduction action) are reported here.

  8. Single step, bulk synthesis of engineered MoS2 quantum dots for multifunctional electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Palve, Anil M; Pal, Shubhadeep; Sudeep, P M; Narayanan, Tharangattu N

    2016-07-01

    Bi- or tri- functional catalysts based on atomic layers are receiving tremendous scientific attention due to their importance in various energy technologies. Recent studies on molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) nanosheets revealed that controlling the edge states and doping/modifying with suitable elements are highly important in tuning the catalytic activities of MoS2. Here we report a bulk, single step method to synthesize metal modified MoS2 quantum dots (QDs). Three elements, namely Fe, Mg and Li, are chosen to study the effects of dopants in the catalytic activities of MoS2. Fe and Mg are found to act like dopants in the MoS2 lattice forming respective doped MoS2 QDs, while Li formed an intercalated MoS2 QD. The efficacy and tunability of these luminescent doped QDs towards various electrocatalytic activities (hydrogen evolution reaction, oxygen evolution reaction and oxygen reduction action) are reported here. PMID:27231837

  9. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of polyelectrolyte functionalized MoS2 nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianfeng; Pei, Yu; Dong, Pei; Ji, Jin; Cui, Zheng; Yuan, Junhua; Baines, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Ye, Mingxin

    2016-05-01

    Few-layered polyelectrolyte functionalized MoS2 nanosheets were obtained for the first time through in situ polymerization of MoS2 nanosheets with poly(acrylic acid) and poly(acrylamide), both of which demonstrated excellent dispersibility and stability in water. After designing and optimizing the components of this series of polyelectrolyte functionalized MoS2 nanosheets, by exploiting the electrostatic interactions present in the modified MoS2 nanosheets, we further created a series of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembling MoS2-based films. To this end, uniform MoS2 nanosheet-based LBL films were precisely deposited on substrates such as quartz, silicon, and ITO. The polyelectrolyte functionalized MoS2 nanosheet assembled LBL film-modified electrodes demonstrated enhanced electrocatalytic activity for H2O2. As such, they are conducive to efficient sensors and advanced biosensing systems. PMID:27102889

  10. The Drosophila homolog of the mammalian imprint regulator, CTCF, maintains the maternal genomic imprint in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheva Vanya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTCF is a versatile zinc finger DNA-binding protein that functions as a highly conserved epigenetic transcriptional regulator. CTCF is known to act as a chromosomal insulator, bind promoter regions, and facilitate long-range chromatin interactions. In mammals, CTCF is active in the regulatory regions of some genes that exhibit genomic imprinting, acting as insulator on only one parental allele to facilitate parent-specific expression. In Drosophila, CTCF acts as a chromatin insulator and is thought to be actively involved in the global organization of the genome. Results To determine whether CTCF regulates imprinting in Drosophila, we generated CTCF mutant alleles and assayed gene expression from the imprinted Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome in the presence of reduced CTCF expression. We observed disruption of the maternal imprint when CTCF levels were reduced, but no effect was observed on the paternal imprint. The effect was restricted to maintenance of the imprint and was specific for the Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome. Conclusions CTCF in Drosophila functions in maintaining parent-specific expression from an imprinted domain as it does in mammals. We propose that Drosophila CTCF maintains an insulator boundary on the maternal X chromosome, shielding genes from the imprint-induced silencing that occurs on the paternally inherited X chromosome. See commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/104

  11. Control of spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii [Matsumura], Diptera, Drosophilidae with the emphasis on environmentally acceptable methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja BOHINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii is an economically important insect pest, which causes damage on cultivated and wild-growing fruit plants. The pest, which is placed in A2 EPPO list, occurred in Slovenia since 2010 and it is spreading progressively. Since its first record in Spain and Italy (2008, it is now present in the majority of Mediterranean countries. In the review paper the most important control methods against the spotted wing drosophila are presented. In some parts of the world the pest is efficiently controlled with synthetic insecticides, however their use is questionable owing to waiting period, since the insect occurs on fruits in the time of ripening and before harvesting. Thus, more and more researches are focused in the studies of alternative (environmentally sound control methods of this pest. So far, biological control of spotted wing drosophila is more effective in Asia than in Europe. In the upcoming years it is therefore important to investigate the distribution and efficiency of indigenous biological control agents in the Old continent. Among them we suggest to investigate how effective are the predatory bug Orius majusculus and entomopathogenic nematodes against this pest. For everyday practice, we recommend the use of traps filled with attractants for the massive trapping of adults, plant hygiene in plantations, covering the plants with dense net etc.

  12. Effect of sterol metabolism in the yeast-Drosophila system on the frequency of radiation-induced aneuploidy in the Drosophila melanogaster oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of sterol metabolism on induced mutagenesis of Drosophila melanogaster was studied in the ecogenetic system of yeast-Drosophila. Sterol deficiency was created in Drosophila by using the biomass of live cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 9-2-P712 till mutation in locus nys/sup r1/ blocking the synthesis of ergosterol as the food. It was found that rearing of Drosophila females on the mutant yeast increases the frequency of loss and nondisjunction of X chromosomes induced in mature oocytes by X rays (1000 R). Addition of 0.1% of cholesterol solution in 10% ethanol to the yeast biomass restores the resistance of oocyte to X irradiation to the control level. The possible hormonal effect on membrane leading to increased radiation-induced aneuploidy in Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in determining the resistance to various damaging factors are discussed

  13. Selective population of the [1s2s] 1S0 and [1s2s] 3S1 states of He-like uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of the [1s2s] S-states in helium-like uranium (U90+) has been studied in relativistic collisions of initially lithium-like uranium (U89+) ions with N2 target molecules. By measuring projectile X-ray emission in coincidence with projectile ionization, a strong selectivity for the formation of the [1s2s] S-states in helium-like uranium is observed. This selectivity is found to be unaffected by the subsequent rearrangement of the atomic orbitals involved. By measuring the photon emission associated with the decay of the [1s2s] 1S0 and the [1s2s] 3S1 substates we obtain for their relative population probabilities a ratio of close to one. This finding deviates considerably from the assumption of a statistical distribution 2J+1. (orig.)

  14. Ultrafast magnetization and structural dynamics in the intercalated transition metal dichalcogenides Fe0.25TaS2 and Mn0.25TaS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Zhu, X D; Wang, L H; Cheong, S-W; Tobey, R I

    2016-05-18

    We measure magnetization and structural dynamics in two intercalant-ordered transition metal dichalcogenides: Fe0.25TaS2 and Mn0.25TaS2. The structurally equivalent materials allow us to probe the effect of orbital angular momentum which is active in Fe0.25TaS2 and absent in Mn0.25TaS2. Interestingly, we find that the magnetooptics dynamics are nearly indistinguishable in these two materials, in contradiction to conventional explanations of a spin-lattice mechanism. We compare our results to other materials where spin-lattice demagnetization has been put forth as a demagnetization channel. PMID:27094012

  15. High-resolution absolute photoabsorption cross sections for Ne in the 1s2s and 1s2p resonant double excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masahiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Morishita, Yuichiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Koike, Fumihiro [School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Kitasato, Sagamihara 228-8555 (Japan); Fritzsche, Stephan [Physics Department, Kassel University, Heinrich-Plett-strasse 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Yamaoka, Hitoshi [RIKEN, Harima Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tamenori, Yusuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198, Japan (Japan); Okada, Kazumasa [Department of Chemistry, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Matsudo, Takahisa [Department of Chemistry, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Gejo, Tatsuo [University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Suzuki, Isao H [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Saito, Norio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2006-04-28

    The high-resolution absolute photoabsorption cross sections with an absolute photon energy scale for Ne 1s2p/1s2s double excitation in the energy region of 900-940 eV have been measured using a multi-electrode ionization chamber and monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The Ne [1s2p]({sup 3,1}P)nln'l' doubly excited states observed in the energy range of 900-920 eV are analysed with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. The second strongest peak in this energy region is assigned to be [1s2p]({sup 3}P)3p4p.

  16. Growth and morphology of the CuGaS2, CuAlSe2, CuGaSe2, and CuInS2 ternary compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monocrystals of the ternary compounds CuGaS2, CuAlSe2, CuGaSe2, and CuInS2 were grown from their elements by transport reactions; their cell parameters and melting temperature were determined. The character of the phase transition in these compounds was found out and also the boundary conditions of growing the monocrystals as well as their dislocation structure (by etching). (author)

  17. Energies of 1s2ng and 1s2nh (n = 5, 6, 7, and 8) States for Lithium Isoelectronic Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chao; WANG Zhi-Wen

    2005-01-01

    The nonrelativistic energies for lithium isoelectronic sequence 1s2n9 and 1s2nh (n = 5, 6, 7, and 8) states from Z = 3 to 8 are calculated by using a full core plus correlation (FCPC) method with multiconfiguration interaction wave functions. Relativistic and mass-polarization effects on the energy are evaluated as the first-order perturbation theory. Our predicted excitation energies are compared with previous experimental results in the literature.

  18. Measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in helium-like silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, M; Myers, E G

    2002-01-14

    Using Doppler-tuned fast-beam laser spectroscopy the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ has been measured to be 7230.5(2) cm(-1). The experiment made use of a single-frequency Nd:YAG (1.319 microm) laser and a high-finesse optical buildup cavity. The result provides a precision test of modern relativistic and QED atomic theory. PMID:11801009

  19. A Facile Way to Fabricate High-Performance Solution-Processed n-MoS2/p-MoS2 Bilayer Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Li, Xueliang; Zhao, Jianjun; Mei, Xuelan; Li, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) material has many advantages including high carrier mobilities and conductivity, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility, and chemical stability, which made 2D material an ideal material for various optoelectronic devices. Here, we developed a facile method of preparing MoS2 nanosheets followed by a facile liquid exfoliation method via ethyl cellulose-assisted doping and utilizing a plasma-induced p-doping approach to generate t effectively the partially oxided MoS2 (p-MoS2) nanosheets from the pristine n-type nanosheets. Moreover, an n-p junction type MoS2 photodetector device with the built-in potentials to separate the photogenerated charges is able to significantly improved visible light response. We have fabricated photodetector devices consisting of a vertically stacked indium tin oxide (ITO)/pristine n-type MoS2 nanosheets/p-MoS2/Ag structure, which exhibit reasonably good performance illumination, as well as high current values in the range of visible wavelength from 350 to 600 nm. We believe that this work provides important scientific insights for photoelectric response properties of emerging atomically layered 2D materials for photovoltaic and other optoelectronic applications.

  20. Interface Engineering of MoS2 /Ni3 S2 Heterostructures for Highly Enhanced Electrochemical Overall-Water-Splitting Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Pohl, Darius; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Dong, Renhao; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-06-01

    To achieve sustainable production of H2 fuel through water splitting, low-cost electrocatalysts for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER) are required to replace Pt and IrO2 catalysts. Herein, for the first time, we present the interface engineering of novel MoS2 /Ni3 S2 heterostructures, in which abundant interfaces are formed. For OER, such MoS2 /Ni3 S2 heterostructures show an extremely low overpotential of ca. 218 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) , which is superior to that of the state-of-the-art OER electrocatalysts. Using MoS2 /Ni3 S2 heterostructures as bifunctional electrocatalysts, an alkali electrolyzer delivers a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at a very low cell voltage of ca. 1.56 V. In combination with DFT calculations, this study demonstrates that the constructed interfaces synergistically favor the chemisorption of hydrogen and oxygen-containing intermediates, thus accelerating the overall electrochemical water splitting. PMID:27100374

  1. Crystal structure and electric resistance of MoS2-NbS2 alloys produced by self-propagating high temperature synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MoS2-NbS2 alloys produced by means of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis are studied for dependence of their crystal structure on conditions of charge preparation and alloy position in reactionary cake. It is shown that solid solutions of Nb in MoS2 may be obtained when diluting the starting charge either with a final product or with MoS2 and Nb (in the latter case substitution of Nb atoms for Mo atoms is less intensive). Formation of the solid solutions is shown to occur at a distance of 0.5-0.7 cm from the reactionary cake surface where charge is melted. It is found out that substitution of Nb atoms for Mo atoms in MoS2 leads to a sharp decrease in electric resistance as Nb is an acceptor impurity for MoS2; with a 5% substitution electric resistance falls to (1-2)x10-3 Ωxcm, i. e. to the graphite level

  2. Magnetism by interfacial hybridization and p-type doping of MoS2 in Fe4N/MoS2 superlattices: A first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Nan

    2014-03-26

    Magnetic and electronic properties of Fe4N(111)/MoS 2(√3 × √3) superlattices are investigated by first-principles calculations, considering two models: (I) FeIFe II-S and (II) N-S interfaces, each with six stacking configurations. In model I, strong interfacial hybridization between FeI/Fe II and S results in magnetism of monolayer MoS2, with a magnetic moment of 0.33 μB for Mo located on top of Fe I. For model II, no magnetism is induced due to weak N-S interfacial bonding, and the semiconducting nature of monolayer MoS2 is preserved. Charge transfer between MoS2 and N results in p-type MoS2 with Schottky barrier heights of 0.5-0.6 eV. Our results demonstrate that the interfacial geometry and hybridization can be used to tune the magnetism and doping in Fe4N(111)/MoS2(√3 × √3) superlattices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. Regulation of Sleep by Neuropeptide Y-Like System in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Chunxia He; Yunyan Yang; Mingming Zhang; Price, Jeffrey L.; Zhangwu Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is important for maintenance of normal physiology in animals. In mammals, neuropeptide Y (NPY), a homolog of Drosophila neuropeptide F (NPF), is involved in sleep regulation, with different effects in human and rat. However, the function of NPF on sleep in Drosophila melanogaster has not yet been described. In this study, we investigated the effects of NPF and its receptor-neuropeptide F receptor (NPFR1) on Drosophila sleep. Male flies over-expressing NPF or NPFR1 exhibited increased sl...

  4. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Embryonic Crystal Cell Formation During Drosophila Hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Milchanowski, Allison B.; Henkenius, Amy L.; Narayanan, Maya; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2004-01-01

    Parallels between vertebrate and Drosophila hematopoiesis add to the value of flies as a model organism to gain insights into blood development. The Drosophila hematopoietic system is composed of at least three classes of terminally differentiated blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. Recent studies have identified transcriptional and signaling pathways in Drosophila involving proteins similar to those seen in human blood development. To identify additional genes involv...

  5. Dissecting muscle and neuronal disorders in a Drosophila model of muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Shcherbata, H.; Yatsenko, A.; Patterson, L; Sood, V.; Nudel, U; Yaffe, D; Baker, D.; Ruohola-Baker, H

    2007-01-01

    Perturbation in the Dystroglycan (Dg)–Dystrophin (Dys) complex results in muscular dystrophies and brain abnormalities in human. Here we report that Drosophila is an excellent genetically tractable model to study muscular dystrophies and neuronal abnormalities caused by defects in this complex. Using a fluorescence polarization assay, we show a high conservation in Dg–Dys interaction between human and Drosophila. Genetic and RNAi-induced perturbations of Dg and Dys in Drosophila cause cell po...

  6. Host-plant specialization in the Drosophila melanogaster species complex: a physiological, behavioral, and genetical analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    R'Kha, S; Capy, P; David, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Drosophila sechellia, endemic to the Seychelles, breeds in a single resource, Morinda citrifolia, whereas its close sympatric relative, Drosophila simulans, is a cosmopolitan generalist breeding in a great variety of resources. The effects of morinda on various fitness traits of these two species, their F1 hybrids, and reciprocal backcrosses were analyzed. Morinda fruit is highly toxic to Drosophila species, except D. sechellia. The toxicity is expressed in adults, embryos, and larvae. In emb...

  7. Two Faces of Drosophila suzukii Invasion: Effects on Invaders and Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Stemberger, Tanya LoreLei Maria

    2015-01-01

    The spotted wing drosophila (SWD, Drosophila suzukii) has quickly spread since its introduction in 2008 to North America and Europe. Most Drosophila oviposit in rotting fruit, but SWD puncture the skin of fresh fruit to lay eggs inside, leading to premature fruit rot. I used SWD to study how new selective pressures shape invasive populations, and how invaders impact communities in their invaded ranges. I hypothesized that flies that were unable survive the winter conditions in Agassiz, BC wou...

  8. The Little Fly that Could: Wizardry and Artistry of Drosophila Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Ejsmont, Radoslaw K.; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 100 years now, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been at the forefront of our endeavors to unlock the secrets of the genome. From the pioneering studies of chromosomes and heredity by Morgan and his colleagues, to the generation of fly models for human disease, Drosophila research has been at the forefront of genetics and genomics. We present a broad overview of some of the most powerful genomics tools that keep Drosophila research at the cutting edge of modern biomedica...

  9. Enhanced second harmonic generation of MoS2 layers on a thin gold film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Yuan, Maohui; Yuan, Weiguang; Dai, Qiaofeng; Fan, Haihua; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2015-08-28

    The linear and nonlinear optical properties of thin MoS2 layers exfoliated on an Au/SiO2 substrate were investigated both numerically and experimentally. It was found that the MoS2 layers with different thicknesses exhibited different colors on the gold film. The reflection spectra of the MoS2 layers with different thicknesses were calculated by using the finite-difference time-domain technique and the corresponding chromaticity coordinates were derived. The electric field enhancement factors at both the fundamental light and the second harmonic were calculated and the enhancement factors for second harmonic generation (SHG) were estimated for the MoS2 layers with different thicknesses. Different from the MoS2 layers on a SiO2/Si substrate where the maximum SHG was observed in the single-layer MoS2, the maximum SHG was achieved in the 17 nm-thick MoS2 layer on the Au/SiO2 substrate. As compared with the MoS2 layers on the SiO2/Si substrate, a significant enhancement in SHG was found for the MoS2 layers on the Au/SiO2 substrate due to the strong localization of the electric field. More interestingly, it was demonstrated experimentally that optical data storage can be realized by modifying the SHG intensity of a MoS2 layer through thinning its thickness. PMID:26204257

  10. Quantitative profiling of Drosophila melanogaster Dscam1 isoforms reveals no changes in splicing after bacterial exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A O Armitage

    Full Text Available The hypervariable Dscam1 (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 gene can produce thousands of different ectodomain isoforms via mutually exclusive alternative splicing. Dscam1 appears to be involved in the immune response of some insects and crustaceans. It has been proposed that the diverse isoforms may be involved in the recognition of, or the defence against, diverse parasite epitopes, although evidence to support this is sparse. A prediction that can be generated from this hypothesis is that the gene expression of specific exons and/or isoforms is influenced by exposure to an immune elicitor. To test this hypothesis, we for the first time, use a long read RNA sequencing method to directly investigate the Dscam1 splicing pattern after exposing adult Drosophila melanogaster and a S2 cell line to live Escherichia coli. After bacterial exposure both models showed increased expression of immune-related genes, indicating that the immune system had been activated. However there were no changes in total Dscam1 mRNA expression. RNA sequencing further showed that there were no significant changes in individual exon expression and no changes in isoform splicing patterns in response to bacterial exposure. Therefore our studies do not support a change of D. melanogaster Dscam1 isoform diversity in response to live E. coli. Nevertheless, in future this approach could be used to identify potentially immune-related Dscam1 splicing regulation in other host species or in response to other pathogens.

  11. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of a second probable allatostatin receptor from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    belonging to the insect allatostatin neuropeptide family. In the present paper, we screened the Berkeley "Drosophila Genome Project" database with "electronic probes" corresponding to the conserved regions of the four rat (delta, kappa, mu, nociceptin/orphanin FQ) opioid receptors. This yielded alignment...... with a Drosophila genomic database clone that contained a DNA sequence coding for a protein having, again, structural similarities with the rat galanin receptors. Using PCR with primers coding for the presumed exons of this second Drosophila receptor gene, 5'- and 3'-RACE, and Drosophila cDNA as...

  12. Recurrent evolution of DNA-binding motifs in the Drosophila centromeric histone

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Harmit S.; Vermaak, Danielle; Henikoff, Steven

    2002-01-01

    All eukaryotes contain centromere-specific histone H3 variants (CenH3s), which replace H3 in centromeric chromatin. We have previously documented the adaptive evolution of the Drosophila CenH3 (Cid) in comparisons of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans, a divergence of ≈2.5 million years. We have proposed that rapidly changing centromeric DNA may be driving CenH3's altered DNA-binding specificity. Here, we compare Cid sequences from a phylogenetically broader group of Drosophila s...

  13. Molecular Cloning of a Novel Bovine Homologue of the Drosophila Tumor Suppressor Gene, Lats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pervious studies demonstrate that lats, also known as warts, is a tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila[1,2]. Mutations of lats lead to an increase in cell number and organ size in Drosophila, indicating lats may be involved in organ size control. Furthermore, the high conservation of sequence and tumor suppression function of lats between Drosophila and human suggests that it may be also involved in organ size control of higher animals[3]. So here we isolated the bovine homologue of Drosophila lats. Sequence analysis indicates the bovine LATS1 to be very similar to other lats proteins.

  14. Prognostic significance of cytosolic pS2 content in ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: pS2 is an estrogen regulated peptide which has been associated with a good prognosis an with a more favorable response to treatment in breast cancer patients. In ovarian tumors, the expression of pS2 was demonstrated at both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, it has been showed significant association of pS2 with mucinous differentiation or well differentiation grade of the tumors. However, it is little know about the prognostic significance of the pS2 content in ovarian carcinomas. The aims of the present work were to analyze the cytosolic pS2 content in benign and malignant ovarian tumors, its relationship with clinico-pathologic parameters, steroid receptor status, and prognostic significance. Material and Methods: We analysed the cytosolic concentrations of pS2 in 91 specimen ovarian tissues by an immunoradiometric assay (ELSA-pS2, CIS, France). The tissues were 8 normal ovaries, 43 benign tumors and 40 malignant ovarian tumors. The same ovarian tissues processed to pS2 were analyzed to Estrogen (ER) and Progesterone (PgR) Receptor status. These steroid receptors were quantified biochemically following commercial ELISA method (ABBOTT Diagnostics, Germany). The relationship between cytosolic content and clinico-pathologic factors was examined by the Mann-Whitney or Kruskall-Wallis test. Correlation between steroid receptors and pS2 content was calculated with the Spearman test. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log-rank test. Differences were considered significant at 5% probability level. Results: pS2 could be detected in 30 cases (32.9%) with values ranged from 0.04 to 89 ng/mg prt. Only one normal ovary showed detectable levels of pS2 and there were not differences in cytosolic content between benign and malignant ovarian tumors. The pS2 levels were only associated to mucinous differentiation in both benign and malignant ovarian tumors (p=0.029 and p=0.015, respectively). Significantly higher

  15. Superconductivity and single crystal growth of Ni0:05TaS2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, X. D.; Y. P. Sun; Zhang, S. B.; Lei, H. C.; Zhu, X. B.; Li, Lijun; Yang, Z. R.; Song, W. H.; Dai, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Superconductivity was discovered in a Ni0:05TaS2 single crystal. A Ni0:05TaS2 single crystal was successfully grown via the NaCl/KCl flux method. The obtained lattice constant c of Ni0:05TaS2 is 1.1999 nm, which is significantly smaller than that of 2H-TaS2 (1.208 nm). Electrical resistivity and magnetization measurements reveal that the superconductivity transition temperature of Ni0:05TaS2 is enhanced from 0.8 K (2H-TaS2) to 3.9 K. The charge-density-wave transition of the matrix compound 2...

  16. Atomic-layer soft plasma etching of MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shaoqing; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Xuecheng; Yan, Dawei; Gu, Xiaofeng; Qin, Fang; Ni, Zhenhua; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2016-01-01

    Transition from multi-layer to monolayer and sub-monolayer thickness leads to the many exotic properties and distinctive applications of two-dimensional (2D) MoS2. This transition requires atomic-layer-precision thinning of bulk MoS2 without damaging the remaining layers, which presently remains elusive. Here we report a soft, selective and high-throughput atomic-layer-precision etching of MoS2 in SF6 + N2 plasmas with low-energy (etching rates can be tuned to achieve complete MoS2 removal and any desired number of MoS2 layers including monolayer. Layer-dependent vibrational and photoluminescence spectra of the etched MoS2 are also demonstrated. This soft plasma etching technique is versatile, scalable, compatible with the semiconductor manufacturing processes, and may be applicable for a broader range of 2D materials and intended device applications.

  17. First-principle study of hydrogenation on monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Li, Yin; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Ru; Lu, Pengfei

    2016-07-01

    The structural and electronic properties of hydrogenation on 1H-MoS2 and 1T-MoS2 have been systematically explored by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our calculated results indicate an energetically favorable chemical interaction between H and MoS2 monolayer for H adsorption when increasing concentration of H atoms. For 1H-MoS2, single H atom adsorption creates midgap approaching the fermi level which increases the n-type carrier concentration effectively. As a consequence, its electrical conductivity is expected to increase significantly. For 1T-MoS2, H atoms adsorption can lead to the opening of a direct gap of 0.13eV compared to the metallic pristine 1T-MoS2.

  18. Broadband ultra-high transmission of terahertz radiation through monolayer MoS$_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Xue-Yong; Su, Fu-Hai; Liu, Nian-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, terahertz (THz) absorption and transmission of monolayer MoS$_{2}$ was calculated under different carrier concentrations. Results showed that the THz absorption of monolayer MoS$_{2}$ is very small even under high carrier concentrations and large incident angle. Equivalent loss of the THz absorption is the total sum of reflection and absorption that is one to three grades lower than that of graphene. The monolayer MoS$_{2}$ transmission is much larger than that of the traditional GaAs and InAs two-dimensional electron gas. The field-effect tubular structure formed by the monolayer MoS$_{2}$-insulation-layer-graphene is investigated. In this structure the THz absorption of graphene to reach saturation under low voltage. Meantime, the maximum THz absorption of monolayer MoS$_{2}$ was limited to approximately 5\\%. Thus, monolayer MoS$_{2}$ is a kind of ideal THz Transparent Electrodes.

  19. Spin transport properties of partially edge-hydrogenated MoS2 nanoribbon heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; Yao, Kailun; Zhu, Sicong; Ni, Yun; Zu, Fengxia; Wang, Shuling; Guo, Bin; Tian, Yong

    2014-06-01

    We report ab initio calculations of electronic transport properties of heterostructure based on MoS2 nanoribbons. The heterostructure consists of edge hydrogen-passivated and non-passivated zigzag MoS2 nanoribbons (ZMoS2NR-H/ZMoS2NR). Our calculations show that the heterostructure has half-metallic behavior which is independent of the nanoribbon width. The opening of spin channels of the heterostructure depends on the matching of particular electronic orbitals in the Mo-dominated edges of ZMoS2NR-H and ZMoS2NR. Perfect spin filter effect appears at small bias voltages, and large negative differential resistance and rectifying effects are also observed in the heterostructure.

  20. Dosage Compensation of an Aneuploid Genome in Mouse Spermatogenic Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jansa, Petr; Homolka, David; Blatný, Radek; Mistrik, M.; Bartek, Jiří; Forejt, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 6 (2014), 124/1-124/9. ISSN 0006-3363 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08078S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gene dosage * male sterility * segmental trisomy * meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin * DOWN-SYNDROME * MAMMALIAN MEIOSIS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2014