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Sample records for anesthetics intravenous

  1. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  2. Comparison of Intravenous Anesthetic Agents for the Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus

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    Michael E. Reznik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus that cannot be controlled with first- and second-line agents is called refractory status epilepticus (RSE, a condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most experts agree that treatment of RSE necessitates the use of continuous infusion intravenous anesthetic drugs such as midazolam, propofol, pentobarbital, thiopental, and ketamine, each of which has its own unique characteristics. This review compares the various anesthetic agents while providing an approach to their use in adult patients, along with possible associated complications.

  3. Postoperative infections traced to contamination of an intravenous anesthetic, propofol.

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    Bennett, S N; McNeil, M M; Bland, L A; Arduino, M J; Villarino, M E; Perrotta, D M; Burwen, D R; Welbel, S F; Pegues, D A; Stroud, L

    1995-07-20

    Between June 1990 and February 1993, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted investigations at seven hospitals because of unusual outbreaks of bloodstream infections, surgical-site infections, and acute febrile episodes after surgical procedures. We conducted case-control or cohort studies, or both, to identify risk factors. A case patient was defined as any patient who had an organism-specific infection or acute febrile episode after a surgical procedure during the study period in that hospital. The investigations also included reviews of procedures, cultures, and microbiologic studies of infecting, contaminating, and colonizing strains. Sixty-two case patients were identified, 49 (79 percent) of whom underwent surgery during an epidemic period. Postoperative complications were more frequent during the epidemic period than before it. Only exposure to propofol, a lipid-based anesthetic agent, was significantly associated with the postoperative complications at all seven hospitals. In six of the outbreaks, an etiologic agent (Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Moraxella osloensis, Enterobacter agglomerans, or Serratia marcescens) was identified, and the same strains were isolated from the case patients. Although cultures of unopened containers of propofol were negative, at two hospitals cultures of propofol from syringes currently in use were positive. At one hospital, the recovered organism was identical to the organism isolated from the case patients. Interviews with and observation of anesthesiology personnel documented a wide variety of lapses in aseptic techniques. With the increasing use of lipid-based medications, which support rapid bacterial growth at room temperature, strict aseptic techniques are essential during the handling of these agents to prevent extrinsic contamination and dangerous infectious complications.

  4. Factors prompting sneezing in intravenously sedated patients receiving local anesthetic injections to the eyelids.

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    Morley, Ana M S; Jazayeri, Fiona; Ali, Syed; Malhotra, Raman

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the frequency of sneezing among patients receiving intravenous sedation and periocular local anesthetic for oculoplastic procedures in a single center. To identify potential risk factors involved. Prospective, consecutive, interventional case series in a single tertiary-referral oculoplastic unit. A total of 294 patients undergoing 314 isolated oculoplastic procedures, performed under intravenous sedation with periocular local anesthetic from November 2007 to November 2008. Prospective data collection on patient demographics, history of photic sneezing, intravenous sedative, depth of sedation, nasal oxygen, and periocular infiltration site. Standard local anesthetic was used in all cases, but the intravenous sedation was at the discretion of the attending anesthesiologist (7 in total). Sneezing or attempted sneezing within 5 minutes of injection of the local anesthetic, as determined by agreed observation between attending staff. Sneezing was observed in 16% of cases. No association was found between sneezing and patient age or presence of nasal oxygen. A weakly positive association was observed with male gender (55% sneezers vs. 37% non-sneezers, P = 0.03, relative risk [RR] = 1.5, confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.0), bilateral infiltration (65% vs. 40%, P = 0.005, RR = 1.6, CI, 1.2-2.1), and upper eyelid infiltration (73% vs. 54%, P = 0.01, RR = 1.4, CI, 1.1-1.7). Photic sneezing was described in 47% of sneezers and 19% of non-sneezers (P = 0.0004, RR = 2.6, CI, 1.6-4.0). Because propofol was given to 95% of patients, no association with sneezing could be ascertained. However, opioid derivatives were found to be protective (12% vs. 43%, Plocal anesthetic injections, induces sneezing in approximately one sixth of general oculoplastic cases. Male gender, a history of photic sneezing, bilateral or upper eyelid infiltration, deep sedation, and the concurrent administration of midazolam all increased the risk, whereas adjunctive opioid use reduced the

  5. [Intravenous regional anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics. An update].

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    Atanassoff, P G; Lobato, A; Aguilar, J L

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia is a widely used technique for brief surgical interventions, primarily on the upper limbs and less frequently, on the lower limbs. It began being used at the beginning of the 20th century, when Bier injected procaine as a local anesthetic. The technique to accomplish anesthesia has not changed much since then, although different drugs, particularly long-acting local anesthetics, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in low concentrations, were introduced. Additionally, drugs like opioids, muscle relaxants, paracetamol, neostigmine, magnesium, ketamine, clonidine, and ketorolac, have all been investigated as adjuncts to intravenous regional anesthesia, and were found to be fairly useful in terms of an increased onset of operative anesthesia and longer lasting perioperative analgesia. The present article provides an overview of current knowledge with emphasis on long-acting local anesthetic drugs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Topical amethocaine (Ametop) is superior to EMLA for intravenous cannulation. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: A eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) is commonly used to provide topical anesthesia for intravenous (i.v.) cannulation. One of its side effects is vasoconstriction, which may render cannulation more difficult. A gel formulation of amethocaine (Ametop) is now commercially available. The aim of this study was to compare EMLA and Ametop with regard to the degree of topical anesthesia afforded, the incidence of vasoconstriction and the ease of i.v. cannulation. METHODS: Thirty two ASA I adult volunteers had a #16 gauge i.v. cannula inserted on two separate occasions using EMLA and Ametop applied in a double blind fashion for topical anesthesia. Parameters that were recorded after each cannulation included visual analogue pain scores (VAPS), the presence of vasoconstriction and the ease of cannulation, graded as: 1 = easy, 2 = moderately difficult, 3 = difficult and 4 = failed. RESULTS: The mean VAPS +\\/- SD after cannulation with Ametop M was 12+\\/-9.9 and with EMLA was 25.3+\\/-16.6 (P = 0.002). Vasoconstriction occurred after EMLA application on 17 occasions and twice after Ametop (P = 0.001). The grade of difficulty of cannulation was 1.44+\\/-0.88 following EMLA and 1.06+\\/-0.25 with Ametop (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous cannulation was less painful following application of Ametop than EMLA. In addition, Ametop caused less vasoconstriction and facilitated easier cannulation. Its use as a topical anesthetic agent is recommended, especially when i.v. access may be problematic.

  7. Intravenous Thiamylal and Local Anesthetic Infiltration for Pediatric Facial Repair Procedures Performed in Emergency Departments

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    Ching-Kuo Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Thiamylal is widely used for procedural sedation in emergency departments (ED; however, there are limited safety data for doses of thiamylal > 5 mg/kg in children. We investigated whether intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetics is safe and effective for pediatric procedural sedation in the ED and to identify the association between increasing doses thiamylal and adverse events. Between July 2004 and June 2008, 227 children who underwent procedural sedation met the inclusion criteria, including 105 males (46.3% and 122 females (53.7%. Facial laceration was the most common indication for procedural sedation. All children received an intravenous injection of thiamylal, with a loading dose of 5 mg/kg. Eighty-one children (35.7% received a supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg thiamylal because of inadequate sedation. Of these, 27 (11.9% received a second supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg because of inadequate sedation. Sixty-six patients (29.1% experienced 75 mild and self-resolving adverse events, and most of which (15/75; 20% were drowsiness. Four (1.8% patients experienced oxygen saturation below 96%, which was related to the supplemental dose of thiamylal (p = 0.002. No children suffered from any lasting or potentially serious complications. Our results indicate that intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetic infiltration is a well tolerated for therapeutic procedures in the ED. Thiamylal offers rapid onset of sedation without compromising the patient's cardiorespiratory function during pediatric procedural sedation.

  8. Intravenous thiamylal and local anesthetic infiltration for pediatric facial repair procedures performed in emergency departments.

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    Lin, Ching-Kuo; Lau, Yu-Wa; Chan, Hon-Man; Wang, Fu-Yuan; Lin, Tzeng-Jih; Cheng, Kuang-I; Feng, Yu-Tung; Hung, Chung-Long

    2010-04-01

    Thiamylal is widely used for procedural sedation in emergency departments (ED); however, there are limited safety data for doses of thiamylal > 5 mg/kg in children. We investigated whether intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetics is safe and effective for pediatric procedural sedation in the ED and to identify the association between increasing doses thiamylal and adverse events. Between July 2004 and June 2008, 227 children who underwent procedural sedation met the inclusion criteria, including 105 males (46.3%) and 122 females (53.7%). Facial laceration was the most common indication for procedural sedation. All children received an intravenous injection of thiamylal, with a loading dose of 5 mg/kg. Eighty-one children (35.7%) received a supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg thiamylal because of inadequate sedation. Of these, 27 (11.9%) received a second supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg because of inadequate sedation. Sixty-six patients (29.1%) experienced 75 mild and self-resolving adverse events, and most of which (15/75; 20%) were drowsiness. Four (1.8%) patients experienced oxygen saturation below 96%, which was related to the supplemental dose of thiamylal (p = 0.002). No children suffered from any lasting or potentially serious complications. Our results indicate that intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetic infiltration is a well tolerated for therapeutic procedures in the ED. Thiamylal offers rapid onset of sedation without compromising the patient's cardiorespiratory function during pediatric procedural sedation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Systematic review of the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for local anesthetic toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Bania, Theodore C; Lavergne, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following national and regional recommendations, intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) has become established in clinical practice as a treatment for acute local anesthetic (LA) toxicity, although evidence of efficacy is limited to animal studies and human case reports. A collaborative lipid......-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Pre-treatment experiments, pharmacokinetic studies not involving toxicity and studies that did not address antidotal use of ILE were excluded. RESULTS: We included 113 studies and reports. Of these, 76 were human and 38 animal studies. One publication included both a human...... case report and an animal study. Human studies included one randomized controlled crossover trial involving 16 healthy volunteers. The subclinical LA toxicity design did not show a difference in the effects of ILE versus saline. There was one case series and 73 case reports of ILE use in the context...

  10. Study on the effects of six intravenous anesthetic agents on regional ventricular function in dogs (thiopental, etomidate, propofol, fentanyl, sufentanil, alfentanil)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of 30 min increasing doses infusions of six intravenous anesthetic agents (thiopental, etomidate, propofol, fentanyl, sufentanil and alfentanil) on regional ventricular function in a normal and an acute ischemic heart segment in dogs. Part 1 discusses the methodology

  11. Acute diuretic effect of continuous intravenous infusion of an aqueous extract of Coriandrum sativum L. in anesthetized rats.

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    Aissaoui, Abderahim; El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2008-01-04

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the acute diuretic activity of continuous intravenous infusion of an aqueous extract of the seed of Coriandrum sativum L. Apiaceae (coriander) in rats. The aqueous extract of coriander seed was administered by continuous intravenous infusion (120 min) at two doses (40 and 100mg/kg) to anesthetized Wistar rats. Furosemide (10mg/kg), a standard diuretic was used as the reference drug. Excretion of water and electrolytes (sodium, potassium and chloride) in urine was measured, and glomerular filtration rate (equal to creatinine clearance) was determined. The crude aqueous extract of coriander seeds increased diuresis, excretion of electrolytes, and glomerular filtration rate in a dose-dependent way; furosemide was more potent as a diuretic and saluretic. The mechanism of action of the plant extract appears to be similar to that of furosemide. The aqueous extract of coriander seed possesses diuretic and saluretic activity, thus, validating the use of coriander as a diuretic plant in Moroccan pharmacopoeia.

  12. Intravenous infusion of hyperosmotic NaCl solution induces acute cor pulmonale in anesthetized rats.

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    Abe, Chikara; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Chihiro; Ogihara, Ryosuke; Morita, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous hyperosmotic NaCl infusion is an effective treatment for circulatory shock. However, a fast infusion rate (2 mL/kg at the rate of 1 mL/s) induces transient hypotension. This response has been reported to be due to decreased total peripheral resistance and/or decreased cardiac performance. Although the hypotension is transient and recovers within 2 min without detrimental consequences, it is important to understand the associated hemodynamics and mechanisms. We found that the hypotensive effect was larger with intravenous NaCl infusion than with intra-aortic infusion, indicating that change in cardiac performance played a more significant role than change in peripheral resistance. NaCl infusion induced an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and central venous pressure and a decrease in right ventricular dP/dt max, suggesting acute cor pulmonale. Diastolic ventricular crosstalk-induced left ventricular failure was also observed. Hyperosmotic NaCl-induced hypotension was therefore mainly due to a combination of acute cor pulmonale and left ventricular failure.

  13. The Knowledge of Eye Physicians on Local Anesthetic Toxicity and Intravenous Lipid Treatment: Questionnaire Study

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    Aykut Urfalıoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the knowledge of ophthalmologists regarding local anesthesia toxicity syndrome (LATS and intravenous lipid emulsion used in treatment, and to raise awareness of this issue. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire comprising 14 questions about demographics, local anesthesia (LA use, toxicity, and treatment methods was administered to ophthalmologists at different hospitals. Results: The study included 104 ophthalmologists (25% residents, 67.3% specialists, 7.7% faculty members with a mean age of 35.71±6.53 years. The highest number of participants was from state hospitals (65.4%, and 34.6% of the physicians had been working in ophthalmology for more than 10 years. Seventy-six percent of the participants reported using LA every day or more than twice a week, but 56.7% had received no specific training on this subject. No statistically significant difference was observed between different education levels and the rates of training (p=0.419. Bupivacaine was the most preferred LA and the majority of respondents (97.1% did not use a test dose. Allergy (76% and hypotension (68.3% were the most common responses for early findings of LATS, while cardiac arrest (57.4% and hepatotoxicity (56.4% were given for late findings. The most common responses concerning the prevention of LATS included monitorization (72.4% and use of appropriate doses (58.2%. Symptomatic treatment was selected by 72.4% of respondents and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and antihistamine treatment by 58.8%. Of the ophthalmologists in the study, 62.5% had never encountered LATS. The use of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for toxicity was known by 65% of the physicians, but only 1 participant stated having used it previously. Conclusion: The importance of using 20% lipid emulsion in LATS treatment and having it available where LA is administered must be emphasized, and there should be compulsory training programs for ophthalmologists on this subject.

  14. Functional sites involved in modulation of the GABAA receptor channel by the intravenous anesthetics propofol, etomidate and pentobarbital.

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    Maldifassi, Maria C; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the target for many clinically important drugs. Among the many modulatory compounds are also the intravenous anesthetics propofol and etomidate, and barbiturates. The mechanism of receptor modulation by these compounds is of mayor relevance. The site of action of these compounds has been located to subunit interfaces in the intra-membrane region of the receptor. In α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors there are five such interfaces, two β+/α- and one each of α+/β-, α+/γ- and γ+/β- subunit interfaces. We have used reporter mutations located in the second trans-membrane region in different subunits to probe the effects of changes at these subunit interfaces on modulation by propofol, etomidate and pentobarbital. We provide evidence for the fact that each of these compounds either modulates through a different set of subunit interfaces or through the same set of subunit interfaces to a different degree. As a GABAA receptor pentamer harbors two β+/α- subunit interfaces, we used concatenated receptors to dissect the contribution of individual interfaces and show that only one of these interfaces is important for receptor modulation by etomidate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of intravenous lipid emulsion to reverse central nervous system toxicity of an iatrogenic local anesthetic overdose in a patient on peritoneal dialysis.

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    Lange, D Bruce; Schwartz, Daniel; DaRoza, Gerald; Gair, Robert

    2012-12-01

    To describe a case of severe central nervous system toxicity after an overdose of lidocaine by local infiltration in a peritoneal dialysis patient and subsequent treatment of the toxicity with lipid emulsion. A 31-year-old male received an iatrogenic overdose of 1600 mg of lidocaine 2% by infiltration during an attempt to remove and replace a peritoneal dialysis catheter. Within 10 minutes after the last lidocaine injection, the patient exhibited features of local anesthetic toxicity, which included tachycardia, hypertension, shortness of breath, dizziness, and a choking sensation that progressed to hallucinations, dysarthria, and uncoordinated, weak limb movement. Within 10 minutes after administration of a single 1.5-mg/kg intravenous bolus of 1.5 mL/kg [corrected], the patient improved dramatically. After observation overnight in a monitored care setting, the patient was discharged home with no apparent neurologic sequelae. Systemic toxicity due to regional anesthesia with local anesthetic agents such as lidocaine has been well described in the medical literature. The use of lipid emulsion as an antidote to the toxicity of local anesthetics and other lipophilic drugs has been suggested as a valuable intervention in both early, rapidly progressive toxicity, as well as toxicity that is refractory to standard treatment. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease may be more susceptible to systemic effects of lidocaine due to decreased drug elimination. Central nervous system toxicity due to an overdose of lidocaine was quickly reversed by intravenous lipid emulsion in our patient.

  16. A randomized controlled trial comparing the AccuVein AV300 device to standard insertion technique for intravenous cannulation of anesthetized children.

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    Kaddoum, Roland N; Anghelescu, Doralina L; Parish, Mary E; Wright, Becky B; Trujillo, Luis; Wu, Jianrong; Wu, Yanan; Burgoyne, Laura L

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the AccuVein AV300 device in improving the first-time success rate of intravenous cannulation of anesthetized pediatric patients. The AccuVein AV300 device was developed to assist venepuncture and intravenous cannulation by enhancing the visibility of superficial veins. It uses infrared light to highlight hemoglobin so that blood vessels are darkly delineated against a red background. Patients were randomized to cannulation with the AccuVein AV300 device or standard insertion by experienced pediatric anesthesiologists. An observer recorded the number of skin punctures and cannulation attempts required, and the time between tourniquet application and successful cannulation or four skin punctures, whichever came first. There were 146 patients with a median age of 4.6 years (range, 0.18-17.1 years), 46.6% were male, 80.8% were light skin colored, and 15.7% were younger than 2 years. The first-attempt success rates were 75% (95% CI, 63.8-84.2%) using AV300 and 73% (95% CI, 61.9-81.9%) using the standard method (P = 0.85). Patients with dark or medium skin color were 0.38 times less likely to have a successful first attempt than patients with light skin color. The difference between the two treatment groups in number of skin punctures and the time to insertion was not significant. Although the AV300 was easy to use and improved visualization of the veins, we found no evidence that it was superior to the standard method of intravenous cannulation in unselected pediatric patients under anesthesia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Effects of intravenous administration of lactated Ringer's solution on hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal measurements in healthy isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

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    Muir, William W; Kijtawornrat, Anusak; Ueyama, Yukie; Radecki, Steven V; Hamlin, Robert L

    2011-09-01

    To determine the hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal effects of IV administration of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) to healthy anesthetized dogs. 4-period, 4-treatment cross-over study. 8 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Each dog was anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, instrumented, and randomly assigned to receive LRS (0, 10, 20, or 30 mL/kg/h [0, 4.5, 9.1, or 13.6 mL/lb/h]), IV, on 4 occasions separated by at least 7 days. Blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein, albumin, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations; PCV; colloid osmotic pressure; arterial and venous pH and blood gases (Po2; Pco2); whole blood and plasma viscosity; arterial and venous blood pressures; cardiac output; results of urinalysis; urine production; glomerular filtration rate; and anesthetic recovery times were monitored. Oxygen delivery, vascular resistance, stroke volume, pulse pressure, and blood and plasma volume were calculated. Increasing rates of LRS administration resulted in dose-dependent decreases in PCV; blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein and albumin concentrations; colloid osmotic pressure; and whole blood viscosity. Plasma viscosity; serum electrolyte concentrations; data from arterial and venous blood gas analysis; glomerular filtration rate; urine production; heart rate; pulse, central venous, and arterial blood pressures; pulmonary vascular resistance; and oxygen delivery did not change. Pulmonary artery pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output increased, and systemic vascular resistance decreased. Conventional IV infusion rates of LRS to isoflurane-anesthetized dogs decreased colligative blood components; increased plasma volume, pulmonary artery pressure, and cardiac output; and did not change urine production or oxygen delivery to tissues.

  18. Anesthetic death.

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    Lauwers, P

    1978-01-01

    Death due to anesthesia is a tragic paradox. The numbers about the frequency of anesthesia-related-death published in many reports have a relative value, as it is impossible to compare them one to another. A synoptic table of 20 important studies made on this subject, shows a great variation in figures concerning the incidence of death related to anesthesia. The most common causes of "anesthetic-death" are mentioned and some suggestions are made to decrease the frequency of death due to anesthesia.

  19. Addition of lacal anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1988-01-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity (i.v. LD 50 ) of solutions of the ratio 1.5 contrast media metrizoate or diatrizoate and the ratio 3.0 contrast medium metrizamide was determined in mice with and without the addition of local anesthetics to the solutions. The two local anesthetics mepivacaine or lidocaine were added to final concentrations up to 2.0 mg/ml of the contrast medium solutions. This corresponds to clinically used concentrations. All additions of local anesthetics to the solutions increased the mortalities caused by the contrast medium solutions. Addition of local anesthetics to a final concentration of 2 mg/ml approximately doubled the acute intravenous toxicity of the contrast media. The ratio 3 contrast media produce less hypertonic solutions than the ratio 1.5 contrast media and should be preferred for angiography because they cause less pain and do not require the addition of local anesthetics which increase the acute toxicity of the solutions. (orig.)

  20. Unusual presentation of local anesthetic toxicity.

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    Hayaran, Nitin; Sardana, Rashi; Nandinie, Hamse; Jain, Aruna

    2017-02-01

    The local anesthetic systemic toxicity can be due to increased blood lignocaine levels or due to increased sensitivity to lignocaine. Several cases of lignocaine-induced central nervous system toxicity have been noted, but none have reported only loss of consciousness without any seizure-like activity. Intravenous lipid emulsion administration for the treatment of local anesthetic systemic toxicity is an emerging topic of discussion, and there are case reports where they had successfully been used. However, majority of them were used in the treatment of cardiovascular manifestations of local anesthetic toxicity. We report a case of a 19-year-old man who had unconsciousness on 2 separate occasions after local lignocaine infiltration to undergo surgery for dental malocclusion and the use of lipid emulsion in its management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity: Continuing Professional Development.

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    El-Boghdadly, Kariem; Chin, Ki Jinn

    2016-03-01

    Regional anesthesia is enjoying a renaissance due in part to the advent of ultrasound guidance and the development of new techniques such as tissue plane blocks and local infiltration analgesia. The purpose of this Continuing Professional Development module is to provide practitioners with an understanding of the current state of knowledge surrounding local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) in order to help them prevent and manage this complication more effectively. The causes of LAST are multifactorial, but recognized risks include patient factors, drug doses, pharmacokinetics, and choice of regional anesthetic technique. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity produces a biphasic course of clinical events that generally begin with central nervous system excitation followed by inhibition. At the same time, it causes cardiovascular compromise due to dysrhythmias, myocardial depression, and reduced systemic vascular resistance. Clinical presentation can be highly variable, however, and atypical presentations are not uncommon. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity is prevented by careful choice and dosing of drugs, aspiration before injection, dose fractionation, use of intravascular markers and ultrasound guidance. The management of LAST includes adequate oxygenation and ventilation, seizure termination, maintenance of circulation, and intravenous lipid emulsion therapy. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity is a potentially lethal condition with protean manifestations, and anesthesiologists must understand its risks, prevention, and safe management.

  2. Bilateral Fetal Hydrothorax Requiring Intrauterine Fetal Thoracoamniotic Shunts: Anesthetic Considerations and Management

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    John J. Hache

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed.

  3. Bilateral Fetal Hydrothorax Requiring Intrauterine Fetal Thoracoamniotic Shunts: Anesthetic Considerations and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hache, John J.; Emery, Stephen P.; Vallejo, Manuel C.

    2009-01-01

    After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed.

  4. Bilateral Fetal Hydrothorax Requiring Intrauterine Fetal Thoracoamniotic Shunts: Anesthetic Considerations and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hache, John J.; Emery, Stephen P.; Vallejo, Manuel C.

    2009-01-01

    After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed. PMID:19526182

  5. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based.

  6. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

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    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered.

  7. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. The focus of this review is the special anesthetic considerations regarding the perioperative management of obese children. With obesity the risk of comorbidity such as asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and diabetes increases...... drugs. This has important implications on how to estimate the optimal drug dose. This article offers a review of the literature on definition, prevalence and the pathophysiology of childhood obesity and provides suggestions on preanesthetic evaluation, airway management and dosage of the anesthetic...

  8. Intravenous Leiomyomatosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hemostasis was well achieved. The tumor weighed 6.7 kg. The postoperative course. Intravenous Leiomyomatosis. Narayanaswamy Mariyappa, Uday Kumar Manikyam1, Dinesh Krishnamurthy2, Preeti K,. Yamini Agarwal, Prakar U. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 1Pathology and 2Anaesthesia, Sri Devaraj ...

  9. Total intravenous anesthesia: advantages for intracranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Chad D; Gottfried, Oren N; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Couldwell, William T

    2007-11-01

    Although volatile anesthetics have been widely accepted in anesthetic management for neurosurgery, they reduce vascular resistance, resulting in increased cerebral blood flow and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). In patients with elevated ICP who undergo craniotomy, the increase in ICP during surgery from inhaled anesthetics can make the surgery more difficult, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic cerebral insults. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and analgesic drugs (remifentanil or fentanyl) and excluding simultaneous administration of any inhaled drugs is being used in patients undergoing craniotomy because of its potential to reduce ICP and ease access to the operative site. We reviewed the literature and describe our experience with TIVA, with emphasis on hemodynamic stability, effects on ICP, emergence from anesthesia, extubation times, and return of cognitive function in patients undergoing craniotomy for space-occupying lesions. TIVA with propofol is similar to inhaled anesthetics with regard to hemodynamic stability, emergence times, extubation times, early cognitive function, and adverse events. In several prospective, randomized clinical trials, evidence suggests that ICP is decreased and cerebral perfusion pressure is increased in patients receiving TIVA when compared with those receiving volatile anesthetics during elective craniotomy procedures. The impact of TIVA on ICP, brain swelling, and access to the operative site in patients with severely elevated ICP has yet to be evaluated and is the subject of a future study at our institution.

  10. Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng MR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R Eng,1 Paul F White1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2White Mountain Institute, The Sea Ranch, CA, USA Summary statement: Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia has become important for the anesthesiologist as the key perioperative physician in outpatient surgery. Key techniques and choices of anesthetics are important in accomplishing fast track goals of ambulatory surgery. Purpose of review: The anesthesiologist in the outpatient environment must focus on improving perioperative efficiency and reducing recovery times while accounting for patients' well-being and safety. This review article focuses on recent intravenous anesthetic techniques to accomplish these goals. Recent findings: This review is an overview of techniques in intravenous anesthesia for ambulatory anesthesia. Intravenous techniques may be tailored to accomplish outpatient surgery goals for the type of surgical procedure and individual patient needs. Careful anesthetic planning and the application of the plans are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Conclusion: Careful planning and application of intravenous techniques are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Keywords: intravenous anesthesia, outpatient anesthesia, fast-track surgery

  11. Dexmedetomidine as the primary anesthetic agent during cardiac surgery in an infant with a family history of malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Naguib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant hyperthermia (MH is an acute hypermetabolic crisis triggered in susceptible patients by the administration of succinylcholine or a volatile anesthetic agent. When providing anesthetic care for MH-susceptible agents, a total intravenous anesthetic (TIVA technique is frequently chosen. When choosing the components for TIVA, several options exist including the combination of propofol or dexmedetomidine with an opioid. We present our experience with the use of dexmedetomidine as a key component of the anesthetic regimen in a 5-month-old infant with a family history of MH. Previous reports of the use of dexmedetomidine in MH-susceptible patients are reviewed and its benefits in such patients discussed.

  12. Anesthetic management of a parturient with Guillain-Barre syndrome posted for emergency caesarian section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the anesthetic management of a case of Guillain-Barre syndrome in the 34 th week of gestation coming for an emergency Cesarean section. The perioperative anesthetic challenges have been discussed with emphasis on the medical and anesthetic management which includes the use of plasma-pheresis, intravenous gamma-globulin, and the safety of preservative free 0.75% isobaric ropivacaine, which was administered intrathecally in this difficult medical condition with excellent hemodynamic, maternal, and fetal outcome. The sensory and motor blocks achieved were well suited to the clinical risks and conditions.

  13. Survey of thoracic anesthetic practice in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Giorgio; Langiano, Nicola; Baroselli, Antonio; Granzotti, Saskia; Pravisani, Chiara

    2013-12-01

    The object of this study was to conduct and analyze the output of a survey involving a cohort of all Italian hospitals performing thoracic surgery to gather data on anesthetic management, one-lung ventilation (OLV) management, and post-thoracotomy pain relief in thoracic anesthesia. Survey. Italy. An invitation to participate in the survey was e-mailed to all the members of the Italian Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. None. A total of 62 responses were received from 47 centers. The key findings were: Double-lumen tube is still the first choice lung separation technique in current use; pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation modes are homogenously distributed across the sample and, a tidal volumes (VT) of 4-6 mL/kg during OLV was preferred to all others; moderate or restrictive fluid management were the most used strategies of fluid administration in thoracic anesthesia; thoracic epidural analgesia represented the "gold standard" for post-thoracotomy pain relief in combination with intravenous analgesia. The results of this survey showed that Italian anesthesiologist follow the recommended standard of care for anesthetic management during OLV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk

  15. Anesthetic services in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Due to the development of knowledge and technology our world is becoming a global city where rapidly occur changes in political and economic milieu, such as the introduction of corporate capitalism in the economic crisis, contemporary migrations etc. Health care as a public good on one hand and as the highest individual value of each individual on the other hand, changes and suffers changes. Health care system policy insists on partnership relation of the individual with medical service providers. This refers to the a secure and accessible modern treatment of each individual and to the state as to rationalize and reduce medical costs with effective methods of treatment. Topic position in scientific/professional public: Anesthesiology is evolving along with the surgical disciplines. Highly sophisticated with organized service, anesthesiology is equally important because of the multiplicity of anesthetic services in the surgical treatment of the disease in terms of teamwork and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease. The intention is to provide a description of work, education and our results in the economic, geopolitical and cultural context of the Serbian health system policy as well as to improve safe performance, availability and cost rationalization in anesthesia. The health care system is territorially organized in Serbia. In hospitals, Serbia employs 940 anesthesiologists (1:7,575 inhabitants. According to data from the Regional Medical Chamber of Belgrade,382 anesthesiologists were registered in Belgrade out of total. Anesthesia department network is well organized in all surgical hospitals. Anesthesia services are available depending on the place of residence, type of surgical illness or injury, and the distance to the nearest clinic. Sub-specializations in the field of anesthesiology have not been introduced although pediatric, neurosurgery and cardiosurgical anesthesia have spontaniously singled, as well as

  16. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Natriuretic effect of rilmenidine in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, R L; van der Mark, J; Cechetto, D F

    1994-12-22

    Rilmenidine binds to alpha 2-adrenoceptors and imidazoline receptors in the central nervous system and the kidney. To test the hypothesis that rilmenidine would increase sodium excretion, renal function was studied in rats with innervated and denervated kidneys to distinguish between indirect (via renal sympathetic nerves) and direct effects of rilmenidine on the kidney. Standard clearance techniques were used in Wistar rats anesthetized with thiobutabarbital to measure renal function during 80 minutes of infusion of 0.9% NaCl or rilmenidine (20 or 50 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 intravenously). Snares on abdominal arteries were used to offset hypotension induced by rilmenidine. Heart rate decreased by 80-120 beats/min with either dose of rilmenidine. At 20 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, rilmenidine increased total and fractional excretion of sodium and clearance of osmoles while decreasing free water clearance from innervated kidneys. There were no changes in these variables in chronically denervated kidneys. Direct recording of renal sympathetic nerve activity showed a progressive, marked decrease in nerve activity during the low-dose infusion of rilmenidine. At 50 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, rilmenidine produced a differential effect on the clearance of osmoles by innervated and denervated kidneys but both kidneys had an increase in free water clearance. The data indicate that rilmenidine increases sodium excretion indirectly in anesthetized rats by decreasing renal sympathetic nerve activity. At doses and infusion periods used in these studies, there was no evidence for a direct effect of rilmenidine on sodium excretion. The increase in free water clearance seen with the high dose of rilmenidine suggests that the inhibitory effect of alpha 2-adrenoceptor activation on vasopressin is involved at this dose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Molecular interactions between general anesthetics and the 5HT2B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Felipe; Gao, Lu; Huang, Xi-Ping; Saven, Jeffery G; Roth, Bryan L; Liu, Renyu

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin modulates many processes through a family of seven serotonin receptors. However, no studies have screened for interactions between general anesthetics currently in clinical use and serotonergic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Given that both intravenous and inhalational anesthetics have been shown to target other classes of GPCRs, we hypothesized that general anesthetics might interact directly with some serotonin receptors and thus modify their function. Radioligand binding assays were performed to screen serotonin receptors for interactions with propofol and isoflurane as well as for affinity determinations. Docking calculations using the crystal structure of 5-HT2B were performed to computationally confirm the binding assay results and locate anesthetic binding sites. The 5-HT2B class of receptors interacted significantly with both propofol and isoflurane in the primary screen. The affinities for isoflurane and propofol were determined to be 7.78 and .95 μM, respectively, which were at or below the clinical concentrations for both anesthetics. The estimated free energy derived from docking calculations for propofol (-6.70 kcal/mol) and isoflurane (-5.10 kcal/mol) correlated with affinities from the binding assay. The anesthetics were predicted to dock at a pharmacologically relevant binding site of 5HT2B. The molecular interactions between propofol and isoflurane with the 5-HT2B class of receptors were discovered and characterized. This finding implicates the serotonergic GPCRs as potential anesthetic targets.

  19. Influence of Ventilation Strategies and Anesthetic Techniques on Regional Cerebral Oximetry in the Beach Chair Position: A Prospective Interventional Study with a Randomized Comparison of Two Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Alexander, Amir; Neff, Mary; Miller, Bruce S; Shanks, Amy; Housey, Michelle; Mashour, George A

    2015-10-01

    Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with cerebral oxygen desaturation. Changes in cerebral oxygenation resulting from the interaction of inspired oxygen fraction (FIO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2), and anesthetic choice have not been fully evaluated in anesthetized patients in the beach chair position. This is a prospective interventional within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position that incorporated a randomized comparison between two anesthetics. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive desflurane or total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Following induction of anesthesia and positioning, FIO2 and minute ventilation were sequentially adjusted for all patients. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) was the primary outcome and was recorded at each of five set points. While maintaining FIO2 at 0.3 and PETCO2 at 30 mmHg, there was a decrease in rSO2 from 68% (SD, 12) to 61% (SD, 12) (P chair positioning. The combined interventions of increasing FIO2 to 1.0 and increasing PETCO2 to 45 mmHg resulted in a 14% point improvement in rSO2 to 75% (SD, 12) (P chair position. There was no significant interaction effect of the anesthetic at the study intervention points. Increasing FIO2 and PETCO2 resulted in a significant increase in rSO2 that overcomes desaturation in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position and that appears independent of anesthetic choice.

  20. Neurogenesis and developmental anesthetic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunchai; Berg, Daniel A; Furmanski, Orion; Jackson, William M; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Gray, Christy D; Mintz, C David

    The mechanism by which anesthetics might act on the developing brain in order to cause long term deficits remains incompletely understood. The hippocampus has been identified as a structure that is likely to be involved, as rodent models show numerous deficits in behavioral tasks of learning that are hippocampal-dependent. The hippocampus is an unusual structure in that it is the site of large amounts of neurogenesis postnatally, particularly in the first year of life in humans, and these newly generated neurons are critical to the function of this structure. Intriguingly, neurogenesis is a major developmental event that occurs during postulated windows of vulnerability to developmental anesthetic neurotoxicity across the different species in which it has been studied. In this review, we examine the evidence for anesthetic effects on neurogenesis in the early postnatal period and ask whether neurogenesis should be studied further as a putative mechanism of injury. Multiple anesthetics are considered, and both in vivo and in vitro work is presented. While there is abundant evidence that anesthetics act to suppress neurogenesis at several different phases, evidence of a causal link between these effects and any change in learning behavior remains elusive. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  2. Recent trends in the anesthetic management of craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Meng, Lingzhong; Bilotta, Federico

    2016-10-01

    The article reviews the recent evidence on the anesthetic management of patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection. A rapid recovery of neurological function after craniotomy for supratentorial tumor allows for the prompt diagnosis of intracranial complications and possibly an early hospital discharge. Intraoperative esmolol infusion was shown to reduce the anesthetic requirements, and may facilitate a more rapid recovery of neurological function. Outpatient craniotomy for supratentorial tumor resection has been associated with several clinical and economic benefits, but has not gained widespread use because of skepticism and medical-legal concerns. Awake craniotomy is associated with advantageous outcomes compared with surgery under general anesthesia, and is regarded as the standard of care for tumors that reside in or in close proximity to the eloquent brain. Recent studies have demonstrated that intraoperative electroacupuncture, dexmedetomidine, pregabalin, and lidocaine may facilitate postcraniotomy pain management. The use of volatile anesthetic agents in cancer surgery is associated with a worse survival compared with intravenous anesthetics, possibly by hindering immunologic defenses against cancer cells. Recent evidence has yielded valuable information regarding anesthetic management of patients undergoing supratentorial tumor craniotomy. Despite a plethora of studies that compare short-term outcomes using different anesthetic and analgesic regimens, randomized controlled trials that examine the long-term outcomes (i.e., neurocognitive function, quality of life, tumor recurrence, and survival) that are of particular interest to patients are needed.

  3. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this case report, intravenous complications, treatment strategies and possible ... Mercury toxicity is commonly associated with vapour inhalation or oral ingestion, for which there exist definite treatment options. Intravenous mercury ... personality, anxiousness, irritability, insomnia, depression and drowsi- ness.[1] However ...

  4. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  5. Anesthetic management of a white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) undergoing an emergency exploratory celiotomy for colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Alexander; Crawshaw, Graham J; Cribb, Nicola; Bellei, Maria; Gianotti, Giacomo; Arroyo, Luis; Koenig, Judith; Kummrow, Maya; Costa, Maria Carolina

    2010-05-01

    A 26-year-old male white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum), weighing approximately 2000 kg was anesthetized for an exploratory celiotomy. Sedation was achieved with intramuscular butorphanol (0.04 mg kg(-1)) and detomidine (0.025 mg kg(-1)) and induction of anesthesia with intravenous glyceryl guaiacolate (50 g) and three intravenous boluses of ketamine (200 mg, each); the trachea was then intubated and anesthesia maintained with isoflurane in oxygen using a circle breathing system. Positioning in dorsal recumbency for the surgery and later in sternal recumbency for the recovery represented challenges that added to the prolonged anesthesia time and surgical approach to partially correct an impaction. The rhinoceros recovered uneventfully after 10.4 hours of recumbency. Anesthetic management for an exploratory celiotomy with a midline approach is possible in rhinoceroses, although planning and extensive staff support is necessary to adequately position the patient.

  6. [Anesthetic effect of preemptive analgesia of frequency acupoint electrical stimulation on painless-induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Hong; Zhu, Hong-Xia; Su, Xin-Jing; Hao, Wen-Bin

    2014-07-01

    To explore the anesthetic effect of preemptive analgesia of frequency acupoint electrical stimulation on painless-induced abortion as well as its effect on anesthetics dosage. Ninety cases of early pregnancy who selected painless-induced abortion were randomly divided into two groups, 45 cases in each group. Frequency acupoint electrical stimulation at Ciliao (BL 32) and Shenshu (BL 23), disperse-densewave, 2 Hz/100 Hz in frequency for 15 to 20 min, was applied in the group A, which was followed by intravenous anesthesia of propofol. The intravenous anesthesia of propofol was applied in the group B. The blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and SpO2 before, during and after surgery, anesthetic effect and dosage, waking time and adverse events were observed in the two groups. The BP and HR during and after the surgery in the group A were not statistically different from those before the surgery (all P > 0.05). The BP was reduced and HR was slowed down during the surgery in the group B, which was significantly different from those before the surgery as well as those in the group A (all P effect, the incidence of Grade I in the group A was more than the group B (P effect of painless-induced abortion, reduce dosage of anesthetics, shorten waking time of surgery and guarantee the safety of surgery.

  7. Effect of intraoperative esmolol infusion on anesthetic, analgesic requirements and postoperative nausea-vomitting in a group of laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dereli, Necla; Tutal, Zehra Baykal; Babayigit, Munire; Kurtay, Aysun; Sahap, Mehmet; Horasanli, Eyup

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Postoperative pain and nausea/vomitting (PNV) are common in laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients. Sympatholytic agents might decrease requirements for intravenous or inhalation anesthetics and opioids. In this study we aimed to analyze effects of esmolol on intraoperative anesthetic-postoperative analgesic requirements, postoperative pain and PNV. METHODS: Sixty patients have been included. Propofol, remifentanil and vecuronium were used for induction. Study groups were as follows;...

  8. Intravenous and inhalation toxicokinetics of sarin stereoisomers in atropinized guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, W.E.T.; Langenberg, J.P.; Trap, H.C.; Wiel, H.J. van der; Helmich, R.B.; Helden, H.P.M. van; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first toxicokinetic studies of (±)-sarin. The toxicokinetics of the stereoisomers of this nerve agent were studied in anesthetized, atropinized, and restrained guinea pigs after intravenous bolus administration of a dose corresponding to 0.8 LD50 and after nose-only exposure to vapor

  9. Regional cerebral energy metabolism during intravenous anesthesia with etomidate, ketamine or thiopental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose utilization (rCMRglc) was measured in rats during steady-state levels of intravenous anesthesia to determine if alterations in brain function due to anesthesia could provide information on the mechanisms of anesthesia. Intravenous anesthetics from three different chemical classes were studied: etomidate, ketamine and thiopental. All rCMRglc experiments were conducted in freely moving rats in isolation chambers, with the use of [6- 14 C] glucose and guantitative autoradiography. Etomidate caused a rostral-to-caudal gradient of depression of rCMRglc. The four doses of etomidate did not differ in their effects on energy metabolism. Sub-anesthetic (5 mg kg -1 ) and anesthetic (30 mg kg -1 ) doses of ketamine produced markedly different patterns of behavior. Brain energy metabolism during the sub-anesthetic dose was stimulated in most regions, while the anesthetic dose selectively stimulated the hippocampus, leaving most brain regions unaffected. Thiopental produced a dose-dependent reduction of rCMRglc in all gray matter regions. No brain region was selectively affected. Comparison of the drug-specific alterations of cerebral energy metabolism suggests these anesthetics do not act through a common mechanism. The hypothesis that each acts by binding to specific cell membrane receptors is consistent with these observations

  10. Anesthetic Related Advances with Cyclodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Welliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent advances have been described as novel and revolutionary. A review of current research coupled with an understanding of cyclodextrin properties is necessary to fully appreciate the current uses and future potentials of these unique molecules.

  11. The influence of ventilation strategies and anesthetic techniques on regional cerebral oximetry in the beach chair position: a prospective interventional study with a randomized comparison of two anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Alexander, Amir; Neff, Mary; Miller, Bruce S.; Shanks, Amy; Housey, Michelle; Mashour, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with cerebral oxygen desaturation. Changes in cerebral oxygenation resulting from the interaction of inspired oxygen fraction, end-tidal carbon dioxide and anesthetic choice have not been fully evaluated in anesthetized patients in the beach chair position. Methods This was a prospective interventional within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position that incorporated a randomized comparison between two anesthetics. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive desflurane or total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Following induction of anesthesia and positioning, inspired oxygen fraction (Fio2) and minute ventilation were sequentially adjusted for all patients. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) was the primary outcome and was recorded at each of five set points. Results While maintaining Fio2 at 0.3 and end tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) at 30mmHg there was a decrease in rSO2 from 68%, SD 12 to 61%, SD 12 (pchair positioning. The combined interventions of increasing Fio2 to 1.0 and increasing Petco2 to 45mmHg resulted in a 14% point improvement in rSO2 to 75%, SD 12 (p chair position. There was no significant interaction effect of the anesthetic at the study intervention points. Conclusions Increasing Fio2 and Petco2 resulted in a significant increase in rSO2 that overcomes desaturation in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position and that appears independent of anesthetic choice. PMID:26244887

  12. Anesthetic consideration for neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffery A; Murphy, Glenn S

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this review is to examine data relating to perioperative management of the patient with neuromuscular disorders RECENT FINDINGS: Patients with pre-existing neuromuscular disorders are at risk for a number of postoperative complications that are related to anesthetic drugs that are administered intraoperatively. Careful preoperative assessment is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. In particular, the risk of postoperative respiratory failure and need for long-term ventilation should be reviewed with patients. The use of succinylcholine should be avoided in muscular dystrophies, motor neuron diseases, and intrinsic muscle disease due to a risk of malignant hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiac arrest. The use of quantitative neuromuscular monitoring should be strongly considered whenever nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents are administered. A number of case series and reports have been recently published demonstrating that sugammadex can be safely used in patients with neuromuscular disease; the risk of residual neuromuscular is nearly eliminated when this agent is administered intraoperatively. Careful assessment and management of patients with underlying neuromuscular diseases is required to reduce postoperative complications. This article reviews the anesthetic implications of patients undergoing surgery with neuromuscular disorder.

  13. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potters, Jan-Willem

    2018-01-01

    This review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local anesthesia or under local anesthesia only. Literature shows a large variation in the postoperative pain intensity ranging from no postoperative analgesia requirement in two-thirds of the patients up to a rate of 96% of the patients suffering from severe postoperative pain. The only identified causative factor predicting higher postoperative pain scores is infratentorial surgery. Postoperative analgesia can be achieved with multimodal pain management where local anesthesia is associated with lower postoperative pain intensity, reduction in opioid requirement and prevention of development of chronic pain. In awake craniotomy patients, sufficient local anesthesia is a cornerstone of the procedure. An awake craniotomy and brain tumor resection can be carried out completely under local anesthesia only. However, the use of sedative drugs is common to improve patient comfort during craniotomy and closure. Local anesthesia for craniotomy can be performed by directly blocking the six different nerves that provide the sensory innervation of the scalp, or by local infiltration of the surgical site and the placement of the pins of the Mayfield clamp. Direct nerve block has potential complications and pitfalls and is technically more challenging, but mostly requires lower total doses of the local anesthetics than the doses required in surgical-site infiltration. Due to a lack of comparative studies, there is no evidence showing superiority of one technique versus the other. Besides the use of other local anesthetics for analgesia, intravenous lidocaine administration has proven to be a safe and effective method in the prevention of coughing during emergence from general anesthesia and extubation, which

  14. Anesthetic management of a labouring parturient with urticaria pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Valérie; Kaufman, Ian; Weeks, Sally; Deschamps, Alain

    2006-04-01

    To report the anesthetic management of labour pain and Cesarean section in a patient with urticaria pigmentosa at risk for systemic mastocytosis. CLINICAL: A 37-yr-old patient with a history of urticaria pigmentosa and an allergic reaction to a local anesthetic agent was seen in consultation at 36 weeks gestation. She previously tested negative for an allergy test to lidocaine. Recommendations to avoid systemic mastocytosis included: avoidance of histamine-releasing drugs, using lidocaine for labour epidural, and regional anesthesia in case of a Cesarean section. The patient presented at term in labour. Intravenous fentanyl was used for early labour, followed by a combined spinal-epidural. The spinal contained lidocaine and fentanyl, but because of pruritus, the epidural infusion contained lidocaine only. Most likely because of tachyphylaxis to lidocaine, an epidural bolus of lidocaine with epinephrine failed to provide adequate anesthesia for a Cesarean section. The block was supplemented with nitrous oxide by mask, with fentanyl postdelivery. Postoperative pain control was managed with an epidural infusion of lidocaine and fentanyl for three days. The patient was discharged without complications four days postsurgery. Proper allergy testing prior to pregnancy is important to help the management of labour pain and anesthesia for Cesarean section in a patient at risk for systemic mastocytosis.

  15. Anesthetic action of volatile anesthetics by using Paramecium as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Xia, Huimin; Xu, Younian; Xin, Naixing; Liu, Jiao; Zhang, Shihai

    2012-06-01

    Although empirically well understood in their clinical administration, volatile anesthetics are not yet well comprehended in their mechanism studies. A major conundrum emerging from these studies is that there is no validated model to assess the presumed candidate sites of the anesthetics. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized and served as a model organism in the study of anesthetics. We assessed the motion of Paramecium cells with Expert Vision system and the chemoresponse of Paramecium cells with T-maze assays in the presence of four different volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and ether. Each of those volatiles was dissolved in buffers to give drug concentrations equal to 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 EC50, respectively, in clinical practice. We could see that after application of volatile anesthetics, the swimming of the Paramecium cells was accelerated and then suppressed, or even stopped eventually, and the index of the chemoresponse of the Paramecium cells (denoted as I ( che )) was decreased. All of the above impacts were found in a concentration-dependent fashion. The biphasic effects of the clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics on Paramecium simulated the situation of high species in anesthesia, and the inhibition of the chemoresponse also indicated anesthetized. In conclusion, the findings in our studies suggested that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized with clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics and therefore be utilized as a model organism to study the mechanisms of volatile anesthetics.

  16. Gum chewing during pre-anesthetic fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Thomas J

    2012-03-01

    Many ad hoc fasting guidelines for pre-anesthetic patients prohibit gum chewing. We find no evidence that gum chewing during pre-anesthetic fasting increases the volume or acidity of gastric juice in a manner that increases risk, nor that the occasional associated unreported swallowing of gum risks subsequent aspiration. On the contrary, there is evidence that gum chewing promotes gastrointestinal motility and physiologic gastric emptying. Recommendations against pre-anesthetic gum chewing do not withstand scrutiny and miss an opportunity to enhance comfort and sense of wellbeing for patients awaiting anesthesia. Gum chewing during the pre-anesthetic nil per os (NPO) period would also permit the development of gum-delivered premedications and should be permitted in children old enough to chew gum safely. Gum chewing should cease when sedatives are given and all patients should be instructed to remove any chewing gum from the mouth immediately prior to anesthetic induction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...... anesthesia with 20 ml. 1% lidocaine with epinephrine. All patients received an intravenous dose of morphine just before ESWL. The patients were comparable with regard to age, sex, weight, morphine dosage, number of shock waves given and duration of treatment. Median pain score and the amount of supplementary...

  18. Pain management in emergency department: intravenous morphine vs. intravenous acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Talebi Doluee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the most common complaint in emergency department and there are several methods for its control. Among them, pharmaceutical methods are the most effective. Although intravenous morphine has been the most common choice for several years, it has some adverse effects. There are many researches about intravenous acetaminophen as an analgesic agent and it appears that it has good analgesic effects for various types of pain. We searched some electronic resources for clinical trials comparing analgesic effects of intravenous acetaminophen vs. intravenous morphine for acute pain treatment in emergency setting.In two clinical trials, the analgesic effect of intravenous acetaminophen has been compared with intravenous morphine for renal colic. The results revealed no significant difference between analgesic effects of two medications. Another clinical trial revealed that intravenous acetaminophen has acceptable analgesic effects on the post-cesarean section pain when combined with other analgesic medications. One study revealed that administration of intravenous acetaminophen compared to placebo before hysterectomy decreased consumption of morphine via patient-controlled analgesia pump and decreased the side effects. Similarly, another study revealed that the infusion of intravenous acetaminophen vs. placebo after orthopedic surgery decreased the consumption of morphine after the surgery. A clinical trial revealed intravenous acetaminophen provided a level of analgesia comparable to intravenous morphine in isolated limb trauma, while causing less side effects than morphine.It appears that intravenous acetaminophen has good analgesic effects for visceral, traumatic and postoperative pains compare with intravenous morphine.

  19. General anesthetics in children: neurotoxic or neuroprotective?

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    Jéssica Farias Rebouças

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: general anesthetics are involved in neuroprotection in adults after ischemic events and cognitive impairment, thus, they also may be associated with learning disorders in children exposed to them before three years of age. Objective: Describe about the neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics in experimental animals and children. Method: This is a systematic review, performed from search in databases and on PubMed using the keywords "neurotoxicity" and "general anesthetics," and "general anesthetics," "neurotoxicity", "children", "young child "and" pediatric ". Results: The search resulted in 185 articles. Out of these, 78 met our inclusion criteria. We found that there was a significant evidence of neurotoxicity induced by general anesthetics in experimental animals that were just born, resulting in late and permanent cognitive deficits. This effect was associated with multiple exposures, exposure length of time and combination of drugs. However, some studies found cognitive impairment after a single exposure to anesthetic. Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to state that general anesthetics are neurotoxic and have the potential to trigger learning and behavior disabilities in children. However, we suggest caution in indicating surgery in children under three years old, analyzing risk-benefit and inserting the family in the decision process.   Keywords: Neurotoxicity; Neuroprotection; Cognitive Impairment; Children; General Anesthesics

  20. Infusão intravenosa de vasopressina causa efeitos cardiovasculares adversos dose-dependentes em cães anestesiados Infusión intravenosa de vasopresina causa efectos cardiovasculares adversos dependientes de la dosis en canes anestesiados Vasopressin intravenous infusion causes dose dependent adverse cardiovascular effects in anesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Martins

    2010-02-01

    hemodinámico en la práctica clínica, especialmente cuando son necesarias dosis mayores a 0,01 U/kg/min.BACKGROUND: Arginine vasopressin (AVP has been broadly used in the management of vasodilatory shock. However, there are many concerns regarding its clinical use, especially in high doses, as it can be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cardiovascular effects of AVP in continuous IV infusion on hemodynamic parameters in dogs. METHODS: Sixteen healthy mongrel dogs, anesthetized with pentobarbital were intravascularly catheterized, and randomly assigned to: control (saline-placebo; n=8 and AVP (n=8 groups. The study group was infused with AVP for three consecutive 10-minute periods at logarithmically increasing doses (0.01; 0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min, at them 20-min intervals. Heart rate (HR and intravascular pressures were continuously recorded. Cardiac output was measured by the thermodilution method. RESULTS: No significant hemodynamic effects were observed during 0.01U/kg/min of AVP infusion, but at higher doses (0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min a progressive increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI were observed, with a significant decrease in HR and the cardiac index (CI. A significant increase in the pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI was also observed with the 1.0U/kg/min dose, mainly due to the decrease in the CI. CONCLUSION: AVP, when administered at doses between 0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min, induced significant increases in MAP and SVRI, with negative inotropic and chronotropic effects in healthy animals. Although these doses are ten to thousand times greater than those routinely used for the management of vasodilatory shock, our data confirm that AVP might be used carefully and under strict hemodynamic monitoring in clinical practice, especially if doses higher than 0.01 U/kg/min are needed.

  1. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  2. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Peculiarities of anesthetic aid in myasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupriyanova E.D.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data on comparative analysis of two medical cases of myasthenia patients, analysis of general anesthetization and post-surgical process. The influence of previous therapy, overall condition and accompanied pathology is stated

  4. Anesthetic management of patients receiving calculus therapy with a third-generation extracorporeal lithotripsy machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, M P; Morris, S A; Klein, F A; Dobmeyer-Dittrich, C

    1997-10-01

    We reviewed the anesthetic requirements for satisfactory use of a third-generation electromagnetic-source design for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Medical records were reviewed for a period of 9 months on all patients receiving anesthesia care for SWL with and without other urologic procedures. The Modulith SL20 was used on 56 ASA Class I-III patients having 87 SWL treatments. Demographic and anesthetic variables were recorded. Complications documented included dysrhythmias, nausea necessitating treatment, and conversion from sedation to regional or general anesthesia. The majority of procedures (83%) were performed on an outpatient basis. Patients were classified as ASA physical status I (27%), II (63%), or III (10%). Monitored anesthesia care with intravenous sedation was utilized in 93% of cases. Of these cases, 78 involved a combination of intravenous propofol, fentanyl, and midazolam; the remaining 3 involved propofol, alfentanil, and/or midazolam. The mean treatment duration was 36 minutes. Patients were discharged within 1 hour after procedure completion in 77 cases (89%). Nausea necessitating treatment was rare (3%). The mean dose of propofol administered with SWL as the only procedure was 272 +/- 112 mg. When SWL was combined with other urologic procedures, the mean dose of propofol was 334 +/- 121 mg. Continuous intravenous propofol infusion provides excellent procedural conditions for SWL on the Modulith SL120, a third-generation lithotripter.

  5. Anesthetic Considerations for Patients Undergoing Bronchial Thermoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Jagroop S; Kreso, Melissa; Khurana, Sandhya; Nead, Michael; Larj, Michael; Karan, Suzanne

    2017-08-30

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a novel, Food and Drug Administration-approved nondrug treatment for patients whose asthma remains uncontrolled despite traditional pharmacotherapy. BT involves application of controlled radiofrequency energy to reduce airway smooth muscle in large- and medium-sized airways. Although BT is often performed under general anesthesia, anesthetic management strategies for BT are poorly described. We describe the anesthetic management of 7 patients who underwent 19 BT treatments in a tertiary academic medical center.

  6. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors)

  7. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P. [Pittwater Radiology, Dee Why, NSW, (Australia)

    1997-08-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors). 11 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Anesthetic and Airways Management of a Dog with Severe Tracheal Collapse during Intraluminal Stent Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Argano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the anesthetic and airways management of a dog affected by 4th degree tracheal collapse and undergoing endoscope-guided intraluminal stent placement. After premedication with acepromazine and butorphanol, general anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with intravenous propofol and butorphanol in constant rate infusion. During intraluminal stent placement, oxygen was supplemented by means of a simple and inexpensive handmade device, namely, a ureteral catheter inserted into the trachea and connected to an oxygen source, which allowed for the maintenance of airways’ patency and adequate patient’s oxygenation, without decreasing visibility in the surgical field or interfering with the procedure. The use of the technique described in the present paper was the main determinant of the successful anesthetic management and may be proposed for similar critical cases in which surgical manipulation of the tracheal lumen, which may potentially result in hypoxia by compromising airways patency, is required.

  9. An overview of anesthetic procedures, tools, and techniques in ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messieha Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zakaria Messieha Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care (ASAC, also known as Same Day Surgery or Day Care in some countries, is the fastest growing segment of ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care. Over 50 million ambulatory surgical procedures are conducted annually comprising over 60% of all anesthesia care with an impressive track record of safety and efficiency. Advances in ambulatory anesthesia care have been due to newer generation of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics as well as airway management technology and techniques. Successful ambulatory anesthesia care relies on patient selection, adequate facilities, highly trained personnel and quality improvement policies and procedures. Favoring one anesthetic technique over the other should be patient and procedure-specific. Effective management of post-operative pain as well as nausea and vomiting are the final pieces in assuring success in ambulatory anesthesia care. Keywords: ambulatory anesthesia, out-patient anesthesia, Day-Care anesthesia

  10. Anesthetic Approach to a Patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin KOKSAL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB is characterized by fragility and formation of blisters in the skin and mucosal membranes. Due to blisters on the airway and occurring new blisters as a result of anesthetic or surgical procedures may complicate anesthesia management. In this case report, we present the anesthetic approach of a 6 years old case with EB who underwent reconstructive surgery. After premedication and optimal monitorization, intravenous (IV anesthesia and analgesia was administered. Associated with the oropharyngeal lesions and limitation to reach an adequate mouth opening, we preferred the facemask to maintain ventilation. Neither new lesions nor complications were detected during or after surgery. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 192-195

  11. Total Intravenous Anesthesia for Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Te Hsu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a cardiopulmonary anomaly that causes severe respiratory disorder. Traditionally, inhalational anesthetics with mechanical hyperventilation, opioids, and muscle relaxants are used in anesthesia for repair surgery. In this case, we used total intravenous anesthesia combined with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide for surgical repair of the diaphragm. After surgery, the patient recovered well and was discharged from hospital 1 month later.

  12. Intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, G; Naranjo González, M; Calero, F

    2018-02-26

    Systemic lidocaine used in continuous infusion during the peri-operative period has analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic, as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This makes it capable of reducing the use of opioids and inhalational anaesthetics, and the early return of bowel function, and patient hospital stay. The aim of this narrative review was to highlight the pharmacology and indications for clinical application, along with new and interesting research areas. The clinical applications of peri-operative lidocaine infusion have been reviewed in several recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses in patients undergoing open and laparoscopic abdominal procedures, ambulatory procedures, and other types of surgery. Peri-operative lidocaine infusion may be a useful analgesic adjunct in enhanced recovery protocols. Potential benefits of intravenous lidocaine in chronic post-surgical pain, post-operative cognitive dysfunction, and cancer recurrence are under investigation. Due to its immunomodulation properties over surgical stress, current evidence suggests that intravenous lidocaine could be used in the context of multimodal analgesia. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Knowledge about local anesthetics in odontology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Alvarez, Rodrigo; Campos Sepúlveda, Alfonso Efraín; Martínez González, Adrian Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of knowledge of local anesthetics frequently used in the surgical clinic by third and fourth year dental students in daily practice. The importance of pharmacology in dental practice in underscored by potential drug toxicity. The study was performed with 244 third and fourth grade career dental students (CDS). Eleven items regarding the knowledge over local anesthetics at the clinic; i.e., the appropriate doses, possible toxic effects and side effects were examined. The reference questionnaire which is in a validation process, is a way to evaluate student knowledge about most drugs used in odontology practice such as: NSAIDs, antibiotics and local anesthetics. The results were found to be unsatisfactory with a high percentage of students failing (less than six of eleven items correct). We conclude that determination of practice knowledge is an essential step in informing the institution about cognitive deficiencies identified in order to plan learning solutions.

  14. Intravenous fluids: balancing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, Ewout J

    2017-08-01

    The topic of intravenous (IV) fluids may be regarded as "reverse nephrology", because nephrologists usually treat to remove fluids rather than to infuse them. However, because nephrology is deeply rooted in fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance, IV fluids belong in the realm of our specialty. The field of IV fluid therapy is in motion due to the increasing use of balanced crystalloids, partly fueled by the advent of new solutions. This review aims to capture these recent developments by critically evaluating the current evidence base. It will review both indications and complications of IV fluid therapy, including the characteristics of the currently available solutions. It will also cover the use of IV fluids in specific settings such as kidney transplantation and pediatrics. Finally, this review will address the pathogenesis of saline-induced hyperchloremic acidosis, its potential effect on outcomes, and the question if this should lead to a definitive switch to balanced solutions.

  15. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  16. Differential regional metabolism of glucagon in anesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Kelstrup, Mette; Trebbien, Ramona

    2003-01-01

    -RIA, respectively). Hindlimb extraction of endogenous (17.4 +/- 3.7%, C-RIA) and exogenous (29.1 +/- 4.8 and 19.8 +/- 5.1%, C- and M-RIA) glucagon was detected, indicating M and C cleavage of the molecule. Renal extraction of glucagon was detected by all assays under endogenous (19.4 +/- 6.7, 33.9 +/- 7.1, 29......Glucagon metabolism under basal (endogenous) conditions and during intravenous glucagon infusion was studied in anesthetized pigs by use of midregion (M), COOH-terminal (C), and NH2-terminal (N)-RIAs. Arteriovenous concentration differences revealed a negative extraction of endogenous glucagon...... immunoreactivity across the portal bed (-35.4 +/- 11.0, -40.3 +/- 9.6, -35.6 +/- 16.9%, M-, C-, N-RIA, respectively), reflecting net secretion of pancreatic glucagon and intestinal glicentin and oxyntomodulin, but under exogenous conditions, a net extraction occurred (11.6 +/- 3.6 and 18.6 +/- 5.7%, C- and N...

  17. Differential regional metabolism of glucagon in anesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Kelstrup, Mette; Trebbien, Ramona

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon metabolism under basal (endogenous) conditions and during intravenous glucagon infusion was studied in anesthetized pigs by use of midregion (M), COOH-terminal (C), and NH2-terminal (N)-RIAs. Arteriovenous concentration differences revealed a negative extraction of endogenous glucagon.......5 +/- 6.7%, M-, C-, N-RIA) and exogenous conditions (46.9 +/- 4.8, 46.4 +/- 6.0, 47.0 +/- 7.7%; M-, C-, N-RIA), indicating substantial elimination of the peptide. Hepatic glucagon extraction was undetectable under basal conditions and detected only by M-RIA (10.0 +/- 3.8%) during glucagon infusion......, indicating limited midregional cleavage of the molecule. The plasma half-life determined by C- and N-RIAs (2.7 +/- 0.2 and 2.3 +/- 0.2 min) were similar, but both were shorter than when determined by M-RIA (3.2 +/- 0.2 min, P Metabolic clearance rates were similar regardless of assay (14.4 +/- 1...

  18. Antimicrobial Properties of Topical Anesthetic Liquids Containing Lidocaine or Benzocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Mark E.; Berry, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    Six species of microorganisms commonly found within the oral cavity were exposed for either one minute or two hours to 5% lidocaine liquid topical anesthetic and benzocaine liquid topical anesthetic. Mixtures of microorganisms and anesthetics were diluted and plated onto a brain heart infusion medium. Reduction in cell viability was 73-100% after exposure to the anesthetic agents when compared with the saline/buffer controls. A significant reduction (p < .005) in cell growth by Streptococcus ...

  19. A History of Intravenous Anesthesia in War (1656-1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Matthew; Jagdish, S

    2016-01-01

    The practice of anesthesia in war places significant restraints on the choice of anesthetic technique used; these include, but are not limited to, safety, simplicity, and portability. Ever since intravenous anesthesia became a practical alternative, there have been military doctors who felt that this technique was particularly suited to this environment. The challenge, as in civilian practice, has been to find the appropriate drugs as well as simple and safe delivery systems. The urgency of war has always stimulated innovation in medicine to counteract the ongoing development of weapons of war and their effects on the human body and to achieve improved survival as public expectations rise. This article traces the development of and the use of intravenous anesthesia by military physicians for battle casualties. The story starts long before the era of modern anesthesia, and the discussion concludes in the dog days of the cold war. The rapidly increasing interest in intravenous anesthesia in both civilian and military practice since the early 1990s is left for other authors to examine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. THE EFFECT OF LOCAL ANESTHETICS ON TEAR PRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Anesthetics are drugs which bring about the state of anesthesia and anesthesia is a measure, which produces insensitivity to external expression or a reversible lack of awareness which can be general or local . General anesthetics act on all parts of the body while local anesthetics act on some parts of the ...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over a...

  2. Anesthetic complications in a rehabilitation hospital: is the incidence related to the pre-anesthetic visit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Prieto y Schwartzman

    Full Text Available Introduction:Approximately 234 million surgeries are done annually worldwide. There is a growing concern for the safety of the anesthetic act, and the pre-anesthetic consultation emerges as an important and widely recommended activity, used as a preventive measure for the emergence of a complication.Objectives:To describe the complications related to anesthesia, to identify the factors that contribute to its appearance and to reflect on ways to improve clinical practice.Methods:700 patients, 175 cases and 525 controls, were evaluated over a period of 21 months. The data obtained through the pre-anesthetic consultation were evaluated descriptively and then tested with conditional univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis.Results:175 cases of anesthesia-related complications (2.74% out of 6365 anesthetic acts were evaluated. Hypotension was the most common complication (40 patients, 22.8%, followed by vomiting (24 patients, 13.7% and arrhythmia (24 patients, 13.7%. Among the complications, 55% were due to patient conditions, 26% accidental, 10% predictable and 9% iatrogenic. The complications were classified as mild in 106 (61%, moderate in 63 (36% and severe in six (3% patients.Conclusion:Patients with more impaired physical status (American Society of Anaesthesiology 3 and 4, with airway disease, tumor or parenchymal disease, diabetes or disorder of lipid metabolism, thyroid disease, former smokers and very prolonged anesthetic acts present a higher risk of anesthesia-related complications. Therefore, they should be actively investigated in the pre-anesthetic evaluation consultation.

  3. Ultrasonography versus intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaksen, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present study was performed to compare the clinical value of urography and ultrasonography in a non-selected group of patients referred for urography to a university hospital. The conslusions and clinical implications of the study are as follows: Intravenous urography remains the cornerstone imaging examination in the evaluation of ureteral calculi. Ultrasonography is a valuable adjunct in cases of non- visualization of the kidneys, in distal obstruction and known contrast media allergy. When women with recurrent urinary tract infection are referred for imaging of the urinary tract, ultrasonography should be used. Ultrasonography should replace urography for screening of non-acute hydronephrosis like in female genital cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia. There is good correlation between urography and ultrasonography in assessing the degree of hydronephrosis. However, more researh on the relationship between hydronephrosis and obstruction is necessary. Ultrasonography should be used as the only imaging method of the upper urinary tract in patients with microscopic hematuria. In patients less than 50 years with macroscopic hematuria, ultrasonography should be used as the only imaging of the upper urinary tract, and an examination of the urinary bladder should be included. In patients over 50 years, urography supplied with ultrasonography should be used, but more research is necessary on the subject of imaging method and age. 158 refs

  4. The influence of basic ventilation strategies and anesthetic techniques on cerebral oxygenation in the beach chair position: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Miller, Bruce; Shanks, Amy; Mashour, George A

    2012-09-20

    Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with a high incidence of cerebral desaturation; poor neurological outcome is a growing concern. There are no published data pertaining to changes in cerebral oxygenation seen with increases in the inspired oxygen fraction or end-tidal carbon dioxide in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position. Furthermore, the effect anesthetic agents have has not been thoroughly investigated in this context. We plan to test the hypothesis that changes in inspired oxygen fraction or end-tidal carbon dioxide correlate to a significant change in regional cerebral oxygenation in anesthetized patients in beach chair position. We will also compare the effects that inhaled and intravenous anesthetics have on this process. This is a prospective within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair position which incorporates a randomized comparison between two anesthetics, approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. The primary outcome measure is the change in regional cerebral oxygenation due to sequential changes in oxygenation and ventilation. A sample size of 48 will have greater than 80% power to detect an absolute 4-5% difference in regional cerebral oxygenation caused by changes in ventilation strategy. The secondary outcome is the effect of anesthetic choice on cerebral desaturation in the beach chair position or response to changes in ventilation strategy. Fifty-four patients will be recruited, allowing for drop out, targeting 24 patients in each group randomized to an anesthetic. Regional cerebral oxygenation will be measured using the INVOS 5100C monitor (Covidien, Boulder, CO). Following induction of anesthesia, intubation and positioning, inspired oxygen fraction and minute ventilation will be sequentially adjusted. At each set point, regional cerebral oxygenation will be recorded and venous blood gas analysis performed. The overall

  5. Continuous total intravenous anesthesia, using propofol and fentanyl in an open-thorax rabbit model: evaluation of cardiac contractile function and biochemical assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mulder, P. A.; van Kerckhoven, R. J.; Adriaensen, H. F.; Gillebert, T. C.; de Hert, S. G.

    1997-01-01

    Effects are reported of an anesthetic protocol involving use of predetermined intravenous (i.v.)-administered drug doses during acute experimental procedures in vagotomized, New Zealand White rabbits with open thorax (n = 20) in a nonsurvival study. After induction of anesthesia by intramuscular

  6. Anesthetics Impact the Resolution of Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Kasuga, Kie; Gelman, Simon; Serhan, Charles N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine) and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane) impact the active process of resolution of inflammation. Methods and Findings Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4, prostaglandin E2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri) ∼50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1). The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite actions in resolution of inflammation

  7. Anesthetics impact the resolution of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chiang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane impact the active process of resolution of inflammation.Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B(4, prostaglandin E(2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A(4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A(4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri approximately 50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1. The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite actions in resolution of inflammation

  8. [Preemptive local anesthetic infiltration in hallux valgus one-day surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gądek, Artur; Liszka, Henryk

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of hallux valgus deformity is connected with significant postoperative pain. Spinal and general anesthesia as well as peripheral blocks are successfully used in foot surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of local anesthetic infiltration before hallux valgus one-day surgery on postoperative pain and the need for analgesics. 134 patients underwent chevron or miniinvasive Mitchell-Kramer osteotomy of the first distal metatarsal. After general anesthesia each patient randomly received an infiltration of 7ml of local anesthetic (4 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and 3 ml of 2% lidocaine) or the same amount of normal saline 15 minutes before the skin incision. Both the patient and the surgeon were blinded. The patient was discharged after approximately 2 hours of observation. 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 72 hours after the release of the tourniquet the level of pain was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). Rescue analgesia, side effects and the use of painkillers were noted. Preemptive local anesthetic infiltration significantly decreased pain during the first 24 hours after the surgery. None of the patients from the injected group and 38 from the placebo group received 100 mg of ketoprofen intravenously for rescue analgesia in the first 2 hours after the release of the tourniquet. During the first 24 hours we noted significantly decreased use of 1000 mg of paracetamol and 100 mg mg of ketoprofen orally in the injected group. No systemic adverse effects were noted. One patient from placebo group had allergic rush after use of 100 mg ketoprofen. Preemptive local anesthetic infiltration in one-day hallux valgus surgery significantly decreases postoperative pain. It is safe, efficient and allows fast discharge.

  9. Analysis on the factors associated with treatment failure of using anesthetics in refractory status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-ying SU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the related factors associated with immediate treatment failure of using anesthetics in refractory status epilepticus (RSE.  Methods Thirty patients derived from Neurocritical Care Unit of Xuanwu Hospital from January 2004 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups (acute treatment failure group and acute treatment success group based on the treatment outcome 6 h after intravenous injection of anesthetics. Univariate and multivariate forward Logistic regression analyses were used to analyze and screen the risk factors associated with immediate treatment failure, and calculate the failure rate of final outcome.  Results According to the results of univariate and multivariate Logistic regression analyses, among influencing factors such as sex, age, etiology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health EvaluationⅡ (APACHEⅡ, type of status epilepticus (SE, type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, total duration of primary treatment, duration of prehospital primary treatment, duration of posthospital primary treatment, type of RSE and primary choice of anesthetics, only total duration of primary treatment was the independent risk factor for immediate treatment failure (OR = 1.007, 95%CI: 1.000-1.014; P = 0.047. The rate of immediate treatment failure of RSE by using anesthetics was 50% (15/30, and the rate of final treatment failure was 43.33% (13/30. The ratio of final treatment failure was much higher in acute treatment failure group than that in acute treatment success group (10/15 vs 3/15, P = 0.025.  Conclusions The acute treatment result of RSE depends on the total duration of primary treatment, and determinates the final result of treatment. On the basis of treating primary disease, the therapy to terminate SE or RSE should be started as early as possible. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.008

  10. The State of Anesthetic Services in Korea: A National Survey of the Status of Anesthesia Provider in the 2011-2013 Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Active involvement of anesthesiologists in perioperative management is important to ensure the patients' safety. This study aimed to investigate the state of anesthetic services in Korea by identifying anesthetic service providers. From the insurance claims data of National Health Insurance for 3 yr, the Korean state of anesthetic services was analyzed. The claims for anesthesia from the medical institutions which hire their own anesthesiologist or with an anesthesiologist invitation fee are assumed to be the anesthesia performed by anesthesiologists. The annual anesthetic data were similar during the study period. In 2013, total counts of 2,129,871 were composed with general anesthesia (55%), regional anesthesia (36%) and procedural sedation with intravenous anesthetics (9%). About 80% of total cases of general anesthesia were performed in general hospitals, while more than 60% of the regional anesthesia and sedation were performed in the clinics and hospitals under 100 beds. Non-anesthesiologists performed 273,006 cases of anesthesia (13% of total) including 36,008 of general anesthesia, 143,134 of regional anesthesia, and 93,864 of sedation, mainly in the clinics and hospitals under 100 beds. All procedural sedations in the institutions without direct employed anesthesiologist were performed by non-anesthesiologists. Significant numbers of anesthesia are performed by non-anesthesiologist in Korea. To promote anesthetic services that prioritize the safety of patients, the standard to qualify anesthetic service is required. Surgeons and patients need to enhance their perception of anesthesia, and the payment system should be revised in a way that advocates anesthesiologist-performed anesthetic services. PMID:26770049

  11. Anesthetic considerations for interventional pulmonary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, John

    2013-02-01

    To discuss the anesthetic considerations of various procedures now performed by the interventional pulmonologist. With recent technological advances, many of these procedures represent acceptable alternatives to the invasive surgical procedures. For example, the placement of endobronchial valves can substitute for lung reduction surgery and can greatly reduce the postoperative recovery period. However, many of these complex procedures require anesthesia services. The nature and indication for the procedure as well as the patient's overall health will have an impact on the anesthetic choice. New studies have documented common complications from interventional pulmonology procedures and recent ways to avoid these complications have been suggested. Strategies to avoid obstruction, bleeding, pneumothorax and air embolism are discussed in this article. Potential benefits of high frequency jet ventilation in reducing airway pressures and, perhaps, barotraumas are cited. Novel interventional pulmonary procedures are described. As the array of diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary interventions is expanding, the types of anesthetic techniques and ventilatory modes are varying to fit the procedural requirements. Some pulmonary procedures are best accomplished in the lightly sedated patient, who is breathing spontaneously, whereas procedures that use the working channel of a rigid bronchoscope are better performed in the patient under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation that often use jet ventilation to minimize respiratory movements.

  12. Increasing topical anesthetic efficacy with microneedle application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhsem, Ömer; Aksoy, Alper; Kececi, Yavuz; Sir, Emin; Güngör, Melike

    2016-10-01

    Since topical anesthetics alone seldom provide adequate analgesia for laser resurfacing procedures, injectable forms of anesthesia are often required. However, their application is uncomfortable for the patient. In this study, it is investigated whether microneedle application would enhance the efficacy of topical anesthetics. Forty-seven patients participated in the study. Topical anesthetic agent EMLA was applied to the whole face of the patients. Microneedle treatment was applied to one side of the face with a roller-type device. Whole-face carbon dioxide laser resurfacing therapy was carried out then. The pain that patients experienced was assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) method. VAS scores of two sides of the face were compared by using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean of VAS score of the microneedle treated side was 2.1 ± 1.1 while that of the untreated side was 5.9 ± 0.9 and this difference was statistically significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the Z-value is - 5.9683 and the p-value is microneedle application, with a roller-type device, is a safe and easy procedure in providing sufficient anesthesia for facial laser resurfacing without the need for supplementary nerve blocks or injections.

  13. [Anesthetic complications in a rehabilitation hospital: is the incidence related to the pre-anesthetic visit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Ulises Prieto Y; Batista, Kátia Torres; Duarte, Leonardo Teixeira D; Saraiva, Renato Ângelo; Fernandes, Maria do Carmo Barreto de C; da Costa, Verônica Vieira; Ferreira, Luciana Souto

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 234 million surgeries are done annually worldwide. There is a growing concern for the safety of the anesthetic act, and the pre-anesthetic consultation emerges as an important and widely recommended activity, used as a preventive measure for the emergence of a complication. To describe the complications related to anesthesia, to identify the factors that contribute to its appearance and to reflect on ways to improve clinical practice. 700 patients, 175 cases and 525 controls, were evaluated over a period of 21 months. The data obtained through the pre-anesthetic consultation were evaluated descriptively and then tested with conditional univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. 175 cases of anesthesia-related complications (2.74%) out of 6365 anesthetic acts were evaluated. Hypotension was the most common complication (40 patients, 22.8%), followed by vomiting (24 patients, 13.7%) and arrhythmia (24 patients, 13.7%). Among the complications, 55% were due to patient conditions, 26% accidental, 10% predictable and 9% iatrogenic. The complications were classified as mild in 106 (61%), moderate in 63 (36%) and severe in six (3%) patients. Patients with more impaired physical status (American Society of Anaesthesiology 3 and 4), with airway disease, tumor or parenchymal disease, diabetes or disorder of lipid metabolism, thyroid disease, former smokers and very prolonged anesthetic acts present a higher risk of anesthesia-related complications. Therefore, they should be actively investigated in the pre-anesthetic evaluation consultation. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravenous pyogenic granuloma or intravenous lobular capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghekiere, Olivier; Galant, Christine; Berg, Bruno Vande [Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-06-01

    Lobular capillary hemangioma is a vascular neoplasm that commonly occurs as a cutaneous tumor. When it involves the skin and mucosal surfaces, ulceration and suppuration may occur, hence the classic term of pyogenic granuloma. Intravenous pyogenic granuloma is a rare solitary form of lobular capillary hemangioma that usually occurs in the veins of the neck and upper extremities. We report the ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a pyogenic intravenous granuloma localized in the right cephalic vein. The imaging and pathological findings and the differential diagnoses are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  16. Effect of clenbuterol on cardiopulmonary parameters and intramuscular blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized ponies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong H.; Clarke, Kathleen W.; Alibhai, Hatim I. K.

    1994-09-01

    The cardiopulmonary affects and the affects on muscular microperfusion of the beta adrenergic agonist, clenbuterol (0.8 mcg/kg intravenously), were investigated in dorsally recumbent anesthetized ponies. Muscle microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry, utilizing fine optical fiber probes. Other measurements included heart rate, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and arterial blood gas tensions. Clenbuterol injection caused a regular, but transitory rise in muscle microcirculation, an increase in heart rate, and cardiac output and a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure. Clenbuterol did appear to prevent the continuing fall in arterial blood oxygen tensions seen in the treatment groups, but had only minimal affects in reversing the hypoxia already present.

  17. Orthostatic stability with intravenous levodopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan H. Siddiqi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous levodopa has been used in a multitude of research studies due to its more predictable pharmacokinetics compared to the oral form, which is used frequently as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD. Levodopa is the precursor for dopamine, and intravenous dopamine would strongly affect vascular tone, but peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors are intended to block such effects. Pulse and blood pressure, with orthostatic changes, were recorded before and after intravenous levodopa or placebo—after oral carbidopa—in 13 adults with a chronic tic disorder and 16 tic-free adult control subjects. Levodopa caused no statistically or clinically significant changes in blood pressure or pulse. These data add to previous data that support the safety of i.v. levodopa when given with adequate peripheral inhibition of DOPA decarboxylase.

  18. Local and general anesthetics immediate hypersensitivity reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcheck, Gerald W; Mertes, Paul Michel

    2014-08-01

    Intraoperative anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions in the setting of anesthesia contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of surgeries and surgical procedures. Because multiple medications and products are given in a short period of time, identifying the specific cause can be difficult. Neuromuscular blocking agents, antibiotics, and latex are the most common causes of anesthesia-related reactions, though other medications or exposures could be involved. Careful review of anesthetic charts and allergy testing can help identify the underlying cause. The identification of the cause and subsequent prevention of reactions are critical to reduce overall mortality and morbidity related to anesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gestational trophoblastic disease with hyperthyroidism: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of hyperthyroidism with gestational trophoblastic disease is a known albeit rare clinical condition. We herein report the successful anesthetic management of such a case in our institute. There are only few case reports in literature of this association. Often, the diagnosis of hyperthyroid state is retrospective one, as it can be missed in the emergency scenario of patient requiring molar evacuation. This case report highlights the perioperative management and optimization of hyperthyroid state prior to surgical evacuation of the invasive hydatidiform mole.

  20. Evidence-based recommendations on the use of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosselin, Sophie; Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Hoffman, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) was first used to treat life-threatening local anesthetic (LA) toxicity, its use has expanded to include both non-local anesthetic (non-LA) poisoning and less severe manifestations of toxicity. A collaborative workgroup appraised the literature...... recommend ILE for bupivacaine toxicity and we suggest using ILE for toxicity due to other LAs, amitriptyline, and bupropion, but our recommendations are neutral for all other toxins. In the treatment of non-life-threatening toxicity, recommendations are variable according to the balance of expected risks...... to insufficient data for non-LAs. All recommendations were based on very low quality of evidence. CONCLUSION: Clinical recommendations regarding the use of ILE in poisoning were only possible in a small number of scenarios and were based mainly on very low quality of evidence, balance of expected risks...

  1. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  2. Balanced anestesia versus total intravenous anestesia for kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesti, C; Sacco, T; Morelli, G; Bocci, M G; Ciocchetti, P; Vitale, F; Perilli, V; Sollazzi, L

    2006-01-01

    An ideal anesthetic regimen for kidney transplantation should be able to assure haemodynamic stability to obtain an optimal graft reperfusion. The aim of this study was to compare 2 regimens of anesthesia for patients submitted to kidney transplantation. We studied 40 patients: 20 subjects (Group A) received balanced anesthesia with thiopental, fentanyl and isoflurane, to the others 20 (Group B), a total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanyl was given. In both groups muscle relaxation was obtained with a bolus of cisatracurium followed by a continuous infusion. We performed standard clinical, invasive blood pressure and central venous pressure monitoring. Hemodyna-mic data have been collected at standard times. During the postoperative period we evaluated the recovery (Aldrete Score) in the recovery room and the analgesia (VAS) at 1, 6, 24 h after the end of surgery. The trend of hemodynamic parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the 2 groups. We observed statistically significant differences concerning the quality of the recovery and the postoperative analgesia. The recovery in group B was faster than in group A, but in group A the pain control was better than in group B at least during the first postoperative hour. For their pharmacokinetic properties, propofol, remifentanyl and cisatracurium allow to obtain a good control of the hemodynamic parameters and a fast and safe recovery of consciousness. Total intravenous anesthesia regimen seems to be an alternative to the balanced anesthesia for patients undergoing kidney transplantation.

  3. Direct activation of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons by volatile anesthetics contributes to anesthetic hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason T; Chen, Jingqiu; Han, Bo; Meng, Qing Cheng; Veasey, Sigrid C; Beck, Sheryl G; Kelz, Max B

    2012-11-06

    Despite seventeen decades of continuous clinical use, the neuronal mechanisms through which volatile anesthetics act to produce unconsciousness remain obscure. One emerging possibility is that anesthetics exert their hypnotic effects by hijacking endogenous arousal circuits. A key sleep-promoting component of this circuitry is the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), a hypothalamic region containing both state-independent neurons and neurons that preferentially fire during natural sleep. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a biomarker for antecedent neuronal activity, we show that isoflurane and halothane increase the number of active neurons in the VLPO, but only when mice are sedated or unconscious. Destroying VLPO neurons produces an acute resistance to isoflurane-induced hypnosis. Electrophysiological studies prove that the neurons depolarized by isoflurane belong to the subpopulation of VLPO neurons responsible for promoting natural sleep, whereas neighboring non-sleep-active VLPO neurons are unaffected by isoflurane. Finally, we show that this anesthetic-induced depolarization is not solely due to a presynaptic inhibition of wake-active neurons as previously hypothesized but rather is due to a direct postsynaptic effect on VLPO neurons themselves arising from the closing of a background potassium conductance. Cumulatively, this work demonstrates that anesthetics are capable of directly activating endogenous sleep-promoting networks and that such actions contribute to their hypnotic properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Uso de dexmedetomidina em pacientes obesos mórbidos submetidos a gastroplastia: estabilidade cardiovascular e consumo de anestésicos venosos. Estudo retrospectivo Uso de dexmedetomidina en pacientes obesos mórbidos sometidos a gastroplastia: estabilidad cardiovascular y consumo de anestésicos venosos. Estudio retrospectivo Dexmedetomidine in morbid obese patients undergoing gastroplasty: cardiovascular stability and consumption of intravenous anesthetics. A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Piccinini Filho

    2006-04-01

    anestésicos venosos, estabilidad cardiovascular y tiempo de despertar semejante a la técnica sin añadidura de la dexmedetomidina. No hubo efectos colaterales imputables al uso de la dexmedetomidina.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The administration of powerful and short duration anesthetic agents is essential for patients undergoing bariatric surgical procedure. The dexmedetomidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, has appeared as an adjuvant option of the venous anesthesia technique. This study aimed at assessing the efficacy of dexmedetomidine associated with the venous anesthesia in morbid obese patients undergoing gastroplasty procedures. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of morbid obese patients undergone open bariatric surgical intervention under anesthesia with propofol and alfentanil, with or without dexmedetomidine. Patients were allocated into two groups: Control (propofol and alfentanil and Dexmedetomidine (propofol, alfentanil and dexmedetomidine. For both groups, the anesthetic maintenance was as follows: propofol = 0.075 to 0.1 mg.kg-1.min-1 and alfentanil = 0.75 to 1 µg.kg-1.min-1; in the dexmedetomidine (DMD group, initial dose of 1 µg.kg-1 in 10 min and maintenance with 0.4 to 0.7 µg.kg-1.h-1. The variables studied were: age, gender, body mass index (BMI, surgical time and recovery time, heart rate (HR, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, hemoglobin peripheral saturation (SpO-2, propofol and alfentanil consumption and side effects. RESULTS: The dexmedetomidine group has shown a significant reduction in propofol and alfentanil consumption. The heart rate presented a significant variation only in the dexmedetomidine group. Both SPB and DBP presented a statistically significant reduction in both groups for the first 20 minutes, and subsequent stabilization. No side effects were observed in both groups of patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown the efficacy of dexmedetomidine administration in combination with venous anesthesia with

  5. [Infant boy with propionic acidemia: anesthetic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ródenas, L; Hernández-Palazón, J; Burguillos-López, S; Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Castaño-Collado, I; García-Ferreira, J

    2005-01-01

    A 12-month-old boy diagnosed with propionic acidemia underwent gastrostomy. The patient's general state was good and he was alert, but with reduced muscular tone (unstable when seated with support, floppy head) and with dystonic movements in all extremities. An electroencephalogram showed slightly slowed brain activity. The patient was being treated with a low protein diet, phenobarbital, L-carnitine, L-isoleucine, and biotin. Surgery was carried out in satisfactory conditions with general anesthesia without opioids combined with infiltration of the surgical wound with local anesthetic. Recovery from anesthesia was rapid and free of complications. Propionic acidemia is caused by mitochondrial propionyl coenzyme carboxylase deficiency. Most patients have episodes of severe metabolic ketoacidosis as a result of excessive protein intake, delayed development, vomiting, gastroesophageal reflux, lethargy, hypotonia, and convulsions. The anesthetic approach involves avoiding triggers of metabolic acidosis (such as fasting, dehydration, hypoxemia, and hypotension) and preventing airway complications. Agents that metabolize propionic acid (such as succinylcholine, benzylisoquinoline neuromuscular blocking agents, and propofol) are not used, as they can exacerbate acidemia. We also believe that using local or regional anesthesia in combination with general anesthesia without opiates is safe and effective for controlling pain during surgery and postoperative recovery, as that combination avoids respiratory depression in these patients, who are highly sensitive to opiates.

  6. Intravenous urography and childhood trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Okorie, N. M.; MacKinnon, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Results of intravenous urography (IVU) in 33 patients suspected of suffering from renal trauma were reviewed. It was concluded that when haematuria is only detected microscopically and clears within 24 hr then an IVU is not necessary, in the absence of other evidence of significant urinary tract injury.

  7. Blood flow and tissue oxygen pressures of liver and pancreas in rats: effects of volatile anesthetics and of hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmar, B; Conzen, P F; Kerner, T; Habazettl, H; Vierl, M; Waldner, H; Peter, K

    1992-09-01

    The object of this investigation was to compare the effects of volatile anesthetics and of hemorrhage at comparable arterial blood pressures on splanchnic blood flow (radioactive microspheres) and tissue oxygenation of the liver and pancreas (surface PO2 [PSO2] electrodes). In contrast to earlier studies, we did not use identical minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration multiples as a reference to compare volatile anesthetics; rather, we used the splanchnic perfusion pressure. Under general anesthesia (intravenous chloralose) and controlled ventilation, 12 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent laparotomy to allow access to abdominal organs. Mean arterial pressure was decreased from 84 +/- 3 mm Hg (mean +/- SEM) at control to 50 mm Hg by 1.0 +/- 0.1 vol% halothane, 2.2 +/- 0.2 vol% enflurane, and 2.3 +/- 0.1 vol% isoflurane in a randomized sequence. For hemorrhagic hypotension, blood was withdrawn gradually until a mean arterial pressure of 50 mm Hg was attained. Volatile anesthetics and hemorrhage reduced cardiac output, and hepatic arterial, portal venous, and total hepatic blood flows by comparable degrees. Mean hepatic PSO2 decreased significantly from 30.7 +/- 2.6 mm Hg at control to 17.4 +/- 2 and 17.5 +/- 2 mm Hg during enflurane and isoflurane (each P less than 0.05) anesthesia, respectively. The decrease to 11.5 +/- 2.5 mm Hg was more pronounced during halothane anesthesia. Hemorrhagic hypotension was associated with the lowest hepatic PSO2 (3.4 +/- 1.3 mm Hg) and the highest number of hypoxic (0-5 mm Hg 86%) and anoxic PSO2 values (0 mm Hg 46%). Pancreatic blood flow and oxygenation remained unchanged from control during halothane and enflurane administration, whereas isoflurane increased both variables. Hemorrhagic hypotension slightly reduced pancreatic flow (-8%) but significantly decreased PSO2 from 58 +/- 5 mm Hg at control to 36 +/- 3 mm Hg, with 7% of all measured values in the hypoxic range. Thus, volatile anesthetics preserved pancreatic but not hepatic

  8. Anesthetic management of a patient with Cri Du Chat syndrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Klaus Morales; de Rezende, Daniel Câmara; Borges, Ziltomar Donizetti de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Cri Du Chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder with peculiar clinical characteristics including airways abnormalities that require special care by anesthesiologists when handling those patients. To present a case of outpatient anesthesia in a patient with Cri Du Chat syndrome and discuss the anesthetic aspects related to this disorder. Male patient, 14 years old, 25 kg, with Cri Du Chat syndrome, physical status ASA P2, was admitted for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and esophageal dilation. The patient had mental retardation, a few episodes of seizures, and marked hypertonia of the limbs. Airways exam showed limited cervical mobility and thyromental distance less than six centimeters. The patient was unable to comprehend verbal commands, making it difficult to undertake a complete assessment of the airways. Other findings on physical exam included microcephaly, micrognathism, subtle strabismus, limb hypertonia with flexion, and protrusion of the tip of the tongue. Intravenous fentanyl 50 μg, midazolam 1 mg, and propofol 60 mg were administered. The patient was maintained on spontaneous ventilation. The procedure lasted 5 minutes, without intercurrences. Patients with Cri Du Chat syndrome have clinical characteristics that are very important for their anesthetic management, being the responsibility of the anesthesiologist to consider carefully the structural particularities of each patient. © 2010 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiorespiratory and anesthetic effects of combined alfaxalone, butorphanol, and medetomidine in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Hajime; Okano, Atsushi; Mukai, Kazutaka; Fukuda, Kentaro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated induction of anesthesia and cardiorespiratory and anesthetic effects during maintained anesthesia with the combination of alfaxalone, medetomidine, and butorphanol. Alfaxalone (1.0 mg/kg) was administered to induce anesthesia after premedication with medetomidine (7.0 µg/kg), butorphanol (25 µg/kg), and midazolam (50 µg/kg) in six Thoroughbred horses. Intravenous general anesthesia was maintained with alfaxalone (2.0 mg/(kg∙hr)), medetomidine (5.0 µg/(kg∙hr)), and butorphanol (30 µg/(kg∙hr)) for 60 min. Electrical stimulation of the upper oral mucosa was used to assess anesthetic depth at 10 min intervals during anesthesia. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured. All horses became recumbent within 1 min after alfaxalone administration. Induction scores were 5 (best) in five horses and 4 in one horse. During the 60-min anesthesia, average HR, RR, and MAP were 35.8 ± 2.6 beat/min, 4.7 ± 0.6 breath/min, and 129 ± 3 mmHg, respectively. No horse moved with electrical stimulation; however, two horses experienced apnea (no respiration for 1 to 3 min). Recovery scores were 5 (best) in two horses and 3 in four horses. These results suggest that alfaxalone is effective for induction and maintenance of anesthesia and analgesia when combined with butorphanol and medetomidine for 60 min in Thoroughbreds. However, respiratory depression might require support.

  10. Coupling of albumin flux to volume flow in skin and muscles of anesthetized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renkin, E.M.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Sibley, L.

    1988-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with 131 I or 125 I was injected intravenously in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats, and tracer clearances into leg skin and muscles were measured over 30, 60, and 120 min. BSA labeled with the alternate tracer was used as vascular volume reference. Two minutes before injection of the tracer, a ligature was tied around one femoral vein to occlude outflow partially and raise capillary pressure in that leg. The unoccluded leg served as control. Skin and muscles of the occluded leg had variably and substantially higher water contents (delta W) than paired control tissues and slightly but consistently increased albumin clearances (CA). The delta CA/delta W, equivalent to the albumin concentration of capillary filtrate relative to plasma determined by linear regression, were as follows: leg skin 0.004 (95% confidence limits -0.001 to +0.009), muscle biceps femoris 0.005 (0.001-0.010), muscle gastrocnemius 0.011 (0.004-0.019), muscle tibialis anterior 0.016 (0.012-0.021). All these values are significantly less than 0.10, which corresponds to a reflection coefficient for serum albumin (sigma A) of 0.90. Convective coupling of albumin flux to volume flux in skin and muscles of intact, anesthetized rats is low, with sigma AS in the range 0.98 to greater than 0.99

  11. Improved intravenous regional anesthesia for surgery of the hand, wrist, and forearm. The second wrap technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, L M; Lendeen, F H

    1978-03-01

    In 330 consecutive anesthetics administered over a period of 24 months, an improved method of upper extremity intravenous regional anesthesia, entitled "the second wrap technique," included wrapping the extremity a second time with a Martin rubber bandage after the extremity was prepared and draped. In addition, a Penrose drain tourniquet often was applied during injection of the 0.5% lidocaine. No complications occurred. The technique provides a nearly bloodless operative field, improves the anesthesia, diminishes tourniquet pain, lessens the contraindications, and requires no premedication. The only contraindications are allergy to lidocaine, infection, operating time over 2 hours, and severe hypertension.

  12. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of an aqueous extract of Cinchona officinalis (C. officinalis) in experimental animal models. Methods: Various doses of the aqueous extract was tested for its local anesthetic activity in guinea pigs and frogs using intracutaneous and plexus anesthesia, ...

  13. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Facilities and equipment are known to contribute to improved patient care and outcome. Hospitals for sub‑specialized pediatric anesthetic service are routinely available worldwide. In Nigeria, such hospitals now exist. It is therefore relevant to study the facilities and equipment available for pediatric anesthetic ...

  14. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced pyrexia in rats, using aspirin (300 mg/kg) as reference. Results: C. officinalis extract, at concentrations of 10 and 20 %, produced significant anesthetic effects, of 72.12 and 88.08 %, respectively, compared with 96.86 % anesthetic ...

  15. Tolerance to acute isovolemic hemodilution. Effect of anesthetic depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Philippe; de Hert, Stefan; Mathieu, Nathalie; Degroote, Françoise; Schmartz, Denis; Zhang, Haibo; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acceptance of a lower transfusion trigger in the perioperative period requires study of the effects of anesthetic depth on the tolerance to acute isovolemic anemia. Anesthetic agents with negative effects on the cardiovascular system may exert proportionately greater depressant effects

  16. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance with...

  17. Local anesthetic resistance in a pregnant patient with lumbosacral plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Paul H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a case of a patient with apparent resistance to local anesthetics. While similar cases of failure of regional anesthetics are often attributed to technical failure, the overall clinical presentation and history of this patient suggests a true resistance to local anesthetics. Case Presentation This patient presented for elective cesarean section and the decision for regional anesthesia was made. While attempting to place an epidural, the patient failed to achieve adequate skin analgesia despite multiple attempts at local infiltration. When a spinal was ultimately placed, sensory or motor blockade was not obtained despite no evidence of technical problems with technique. Further questioning revealed multiple prior episodes of local anesthetic failure in this patient. Conclusions While the failure rate of spinal anesthesia has been shown range from 4–13% and is often attributed to technical failure, elements of this particular case suggest a true resistance to local anesthetics.

  18. Identifying and Managing Local Anesthetic Allergy in Dermatologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Ramin; Serota, Marc; Brown, Mariah

    2016-02-01

    Local anesthetic (LA) allergy is a concern for dermatologic surgeons given the large number of procedures performed yearly with LAs. Many patients also have anxiety about past or potential anesthesia allergy. This article will review the symptoms of IgE-mediated allergic reactions, the prevalence of IgE-mediated LA allergy, discuss common mimics of LA, and propose a practical approach for diagnostic and therapeutic options for LA allergy for the dermatologic surgeon in practice. A literature search of Pubmed using keywords "lidocaine," "local anesthetic," "hypersensitivity," and "allergy" was performed. Amide anesthetics result in the most reports of true local anesthetic immediate hypersensitivity. True IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to local anesthesia is very rare. Dermatologic surgeons should be aware of the symptoms of anesthetic allergy and its mimickers, as well as how to manage allergic reactions in their clinical practice.

  19. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    Full Text Available During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group: (1 non-sensitized, (2 anaphylaxis, (3 anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS and (4 anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP, heart rate (HR, central venous pressure (CVP, FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

  20. Glucose-induced time-dependent potentiation of insulin release, but not islet blood perfusion, in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Leif; Bodin, Birgitta; Källskog, Orjan

    2008-01-01

    Repeated administration of glucose in vivo leads to a time-dependent potentiation of insulin release. Glucose is also known to stimulate pancreatic islet blood flow, but whether this is associated with a time-dependent potentiation is unknown. We therefore repeatedly administered glucose to anesthetized rats and evaluated effects on insulin release and islet blood flow. Male Wistar-Furth rats, anesthetized with thiobutabarbital, were injected intravenously with 1 ml of saline or glucose at times 0, 30 and 60 min. The combinations used were saline + saline + saline (SSS), glucose + saline + saline (GSS), saline + saline + glucose (SSG) and glucose + glucose + glucose (GGG). Regional organ blood flow values were measured 3 min after the final injection with a microsphere technique, and at this time also serum insulin concentrations were determined with ELISA. Serum insulin concentrations as well as total pancreatic, pancreatic islet and duodenal blood flow were higher in SSG and GGG-treated rats when compared to those given SSS and GSS. However, only insulin concentrations, not blood flow values, were higher in GGG rats when compared to SSG animals. Glucose-induced time-dependent potentiation of insulin release occurs in vivo in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats, but is not associated with a further increase in islet blood flow.

  1. Intravenous Antiepileptic Drugs in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Launching four intravenous antiepileptic drugs: valproate (Depakene and Convulex, lacosamide (Vimpat, and levetiracetam (Keppra – into the Russian market has significantly broadened the possibilities of rendering care to patients in seizure emergency situations. The chemi- cal structure, mechanisms of action, indications/contraindications, clinical effectiveness and tolerability, advantages/disadvantages, and adverse events of using these drugs in urgent and elective neurology are discussed. 

  2. Muscle power during intravenous sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Matsuura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous sedation is effective to reduce fear and anxiety in dental treatment. It also has been used for behavior modification technique in dental patients with special needs. Midazolam and propofol are commonly used for intravenous sedation. Although there have been many researches on the effects of midazolam and propofol on vital function and the recovery profile, little is known about muscle power. This review discusses the effects of intravenous sedation using midazolam and propofol on both grip strength and bite force. During light propofol sedation, grip strength increases slightly and bite force increases in a dose-dependent manner. Grip strength decreases while bite force increases during light midazolam sedation, and also during light sedation using a combination of midazolam and propofol. Flumazenil did not antagonise the increase in bite force by midazolam. These results may suggest following possibilities; (1 Activation of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors located within the temporomandibular joint region and masticatory muscles may be the cause of increasing bite force. (2 Propofol limited the long-latency exteroceptive suppression (ES2 period during jaw-opening reflex. Thus, control of masticatory muscle contraction, which is thought to have a negative feedback effect on excessive bite force, may be depressed by propofol.

  3. Effect of intravenous versus epidural fentanyl on the minimum local analgesic concentration of epidural bupivacaine in labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, L S; Columb, M O; Naughton, N N; Wagner, D S; Dorantes, D M; van de Ven, C J

    2000-07-01

    The minimum local analgesic concentration (MLAC) has been defined as the median effective local analgesic concentration (EC50) in a 20-ml volume for epidural analgesia in the first stage of labor. The aim of this study was to determine the relative local anesthetic sparing efficacies of intravenous and epidural fentanyl by comparison of their effects on the MLAC of bupivacaine. In this double-blind, randomized, prospective study, 84 parturients at < or = 7-cm cervical dilation who requested epidural analgesia were allocated to one of two groups. After lumbar epidural catheter placement, 20 ml bupivacaine (n = 44) or bupivacaine with 3 microg/ml (60 microg) fentanyl (n = 40) was administered. The plain bupivacaine group then received 60 microg intravenous fentanyl. The bupivacaine-fentanyl group received intravenous saline. The concentration of bupivacaine was determined by the response of the previous patient in that group to a higher or lower concentration using up-down sequential allocation. Analgesic efficacy was assessed using 100-mm visual analog pain scores, with < or = 10 mm within 30 min define as effective. The MLAC of bupivacaine-intravenous fentanyl was 0.064% wt/vol (95% confidence interval, 0.049-0.080), and the MLAC of bupivacaine-epidural fentanyl was 0.034% wt/vol (95% confidence interval, 0.017-0.050). Epidural fentanyl significantly increased the analgesic potency of bupivacaine by a factor of 1.88 (95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.67) compared with intravenous fentanyl. The epidural fentanyl group demonstrated significantly higher dermatomal spread (P = 0.0064) and increased pruritus (P = 0. 01). Epidural fentanyl significantly reduced the MLAC of bupivacaine when compared with intravenous fentanyl for the parturients in this study. The significantly enhanced local anesthetic sparing, dermatomal level, and pruritus with epidural fentanyl suggest a primarily spinal site of action.

  4. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  5. Electroporation-delivered transdermal neostigmine in rats: equivalent action to intravenous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkó, Szilvia; Szűcs, Kálmán F; Balázs, Boglárka; Csányi, Erzsébet; Varju, Gábor; Sztojkov-Ivanov, Anita; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Bóta, Judit; Gáspár, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal electroporation has become one of the most promising noninvasive methods for drug administration, with greatly increased transport of macromolecules through the skin. The cecal-contracting effects of repeated transdermal electroporation delivery and intravenous administration of neostigmine were compared in anesthetized rats. The cecal contractions were detected with implantable strain gauge sensors, and the plasma levels of neostigmine were followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both intravenously and EP-administered neostigmine (0.2-66.7 μg/kg) increased the cecal contractions in a dose-dependent manner. For both the low doses and the highest dose, the neostigmine plasma concentrations were the same after the two modes of administration, while an insignificantly higher level was observed at a dose of 20 μg/kg after intravenous administration as compared with the electroporation route. The contractile responses did not differ significantly after the two administration routes. The results suggest that electroporation-delivered neostigmine elicits action equivalent to that observed after intravenous administration as concerning both time and intensity. Electroporation permits the delivery of even lower doses of water-soluble compounds through the skin, which is very promising for clinical practice.

  6. Clinical evaluation of total intravenous anesthesia using a combination of propofol and medetomidine following anesthesia induction with medetomidine, guaifenesin and propofol for castration in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Kazuomi; Kakizaki, Masashi; Ono, Keiichi; Ohta, Minoru

    2011-12-01

    Seven Thoroughbred horses were castrated under total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and medetomidine. After premedication with medetomidine (5.0 µg/kg, intravenously), anesthesia was induced with guaifenesin (100 mg/kg, intravenously) and propofol (3.0 mg/kg, intravenously) and maintained with constant rate infusions of medetomidine (0.05 µg/kg/min) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min). Quality of induction was judged excellent to good. Three horses showed insufficient anesthesia and received additional anesthetic. Arterial blood pressure changed within an acceptable range in all horses. Decreases in respiratory rate and hypercapnia were observed in all horses. Three horses showed apnea within a short period of time. Recovery from anesthesia was calm and smooth in all horses. The TIVA-regimen used in this study provides clinically effective anesthesia for castration in horses. However, assisted ventilation should be considered to minimize respiratory depression.

  7. Anesthetic management of adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy assisted by low-temperature plasma technology in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-meng LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the anesthetic management strategy in children undergoing adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy using low-temperature plasma technology. Methods Sixty ASA status I children scheduled for adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy with plasma technology in the First Affiliated Hospital of General Hospital of PLA from September to December of 2013 were enrolled in this study. After induction with propofol, sufentanil and cisatracurium, the children were randomly divided into combined inhalation and intravenous anesthesia group (CIIA group, n=30 and total intravenous anesthesia group (TIVA group, n=30. In CIIA group, anesthesia was maintained with continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil combined with sevoflurane inhalation during the surgery. In TIVA group, anesthesia was maintained only with continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil. The hemodynamic changes and time for extubation and leaving operating room were recorded, and the emergence agitation was assessed using Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium (PAED scale. Results There was no significant difference in hemodynamic changes between the two groups (P>0.05. The total dosages of propofol and remifentanil in TIVA group [10.5±3.4 mg/(kg.h and 16.1±5.3μg/(kg.h, respectively] were significantly higher than those of CIIA group [6.6±2.8 mg/(kg.h, 10.4±4.2 μg/(kg.h, P<0.05]. The times for extubation and leaving operating room were significantly shorter in TIVA group (8.8±3.7min, 6.2±2.9min than in CIIA group (19.8±4.3 min, 13.7±5.2 min, P<0.05, and the rate of emergence agitation during the recovery period in TIVA group (1/30 was significantly less than that in CIIA group (9/30, P<0.05. Conclusion  Total intravenous anesthesia with tracheal intubation could shorten the recovery time and lessen the emergence agitation during the recovery period, and it may be used as a safe, feasible and convenient anesthetic strategy for adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy with

  8. Comparison of anesthetic agents in the sea otter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.D.; Kocher, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Five anesthetic agents (CI744, etorphine, fentanyl, ketamine hydrochloride, and halothane) were tested to establish the dosage of a safe, effective, short-acting anesthetic for use in the sea otter. Etorphine, at a dosage of 0.75 mg per adult otter and used in conjunction with diazepam, at a dosage of 1.25 mg per adult otter, met most of the requirements for use under field conditions. Halothane, administered through an anesthetic machine, proved to be effective for use in a veterinary hospital.

  9. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  10. Pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of brain tissue extracts from rats anesthetized with propofol or isoflurane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: General anesthesia is routinely used as a surgical procedure and its safety has been endorsed by clinical outcomes; however, its effects at the molecular level have not been elucidated. General anesthetics influence glucose metabolism in the brain. However, the effects of anesthetics on brain metabolites other than those related to glucose have not been well characterized. We used a pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to visualize the changes in holistic brain metabolic phenotypes in response to the widely used intravenous anesthetic propofol and the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were randomized into five groups (n = 7 each group. Propofol and isoflurane were administered to two groups each, for 2 or 6 h. The control group received no anesthesia. Brains were removed directly after anesthesia. Hydrophilic compounds were extracted from excised whole brains and measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All spectral data were processed and analyzed by principal component analysis for comparison of the metabolite profiles. Data were visualized by plotting principal component (PC scores. In the plots, each point represents an individual sample. The propofol and isoflurane groups were clustered separately on the plots, and this separation was especially pronounced when comparing the 6-h groups. The PC scores of the propofol group were clearly distinct from those of the control group, particularly in the 6-h group, whereas the difference in PC scores was more subtle in the isoflurane group and control groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study showed that propofol and isoflurane exerted differential effects on holistic brain metabolism under anesthesia.

  11. Marfan Syndrome: Clinical, Surgical, and Anesthetic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Silvay, George; Castillo, Javier G

    2014-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder, with primary involvement of the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. This autosomal heritable disease is mainly attributable to a defect in the FBN1 gene. Clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome has been based on the Ghent criteria since 1996. In 2010, these criteria were updated, and the revised guidelines place more emphasis on aortic root dilation, ectopia lentis, and FBN1 mutation testing in the diagnostic assessment of Marfan syndrome. Among its many different clinical manifestations, cardiovascular involvement deserves special consideration, owing to its impact on prognosis. Recent molecular, surgical, and clinical research has yielded profound new insights into the pathological mechanisms that ultimately lead to tissue degradation and weakening of the aortic wall, which has led to exciting new treatment strategies. Furthermore, with the increasing life expectancy of patients with Marfan syndrome, there has been a subtle shift in the spectrum of medical problems. Consequently, this article focuses on recent advances to highlight their potential impact on future concepts of patient care from a clinical, surgical, and anesthetic perspective. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Anesthetic considerations for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Sobey, Jenna H; Stickles, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is being used more frequently in the treatment of many chronic and acute psychiatric illnesses in children. The most common psychiatric indications for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy are refractory depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, catatonia, and autism. In addition, a relatively new indication is the treatment of pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The anesthesiologist may be called upon to assist in the care of this challenging and vulnerable patient population. Unique factors for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy include the potential need for preoperative anxiolytic and inhalational induction of anesthesia, which must be weighed against the detrimental effects of anesthetic agents on the evoked seizure quality required for a successful treatment. Dexmedetomidine is likely the most appropriate preoperative anxiolytic as oral benzodiazepines are relatively contraindicated. Methohexital, though becoming less available at many institutions, remains the gold standard for induction of anesthesia for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy though ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane are becoming increasingly viable options. Proper planning and communication between the multidisciplinary teams involved in the care of children presenting for electroconvulsive therapy treatments is vital to mitigating risks and achieving the greatest therapeutic benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  14. Toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topical anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniad, Baris; Canturk, Serife; Esin Ozdemir, Fatma; Alparslan, Nilufer; Akarcay, Koray

    2010-06-01

    To describe 8 cases of toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topical anesthetic drugs. Clinical findings from patients with toxic keratopathy were investigated retrospectively. Two patients had toxic keratopathy bilaterally. Five of 8 patients had an ocular history of a corneal foreign body, 1 had basal membrane dystrophy, 1 had ultraviolet radiation, and 1 had chemical burn. All patients had undergone psychiatric consultation. Four patients had anxiety disorder and 1 had bipolar disease. Clinical signs were improved in all patients with discontinuation of topical anesthetic drug use along with adjunctive psychiatric treatment. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in 2 patients. Toxic keratopathy due to topical anesthetic abuse is a curable disease. Early diagnosis and prevention of topical anesthetic drug use are the most important steps in the treatment of this condition. As these patients commonly exhibit psychiatric disorders, adjunctive psychiatric treatment may help to break the chemical addiction.

  15. Anesthetic Approach to a Child with Noonan's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is characterized by fascial and physical features along with congenital heart disease. In these patients, fascial features include short webbed neck, micrognathia, limited mouth opening and high arched palate. Pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are highly prevalent in Noonan's syndrome. The anesthetic management is important because of difficult airway and severe cardiac abnormalities. We reported that anesthetic management of a child with Noonan's syndrome. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 47-50

  16. ACCURACY OF NONINVASIVE ANESTHETIC MONITORING IN THE ANESTHETIZED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Stegmann, George F; Sauer, Cathrine; Secher, Niels H; Hasenkam, J Michael; Damkjær, Mads; Aalkjær, Christian; Wang, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure during general anesthesia in giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). Thirty-two giraffes anesthetized for physiologic experiments were instrumented with a pulse oximeter transmittance probe positioned on the tongue and a capnograph sampling line placed at the oral end of the endotracheal tube. A human size 10 blood pressure cuff was placed around the base of the tail, and an indwelling arterial catheter in the auricular artery continuously measured blood pressure. Giraffes were intermittently ventilated using a Hudson demand valve throughout the procedures. Arterial blood for blood gas analysis was collected at multiple time points. Relationships between oxygen saturation as determined by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation, between arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide, and between oscillometric pressure and invasive arterial blood pressure were assessed, and the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure monitoring evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. All three noninvasive methods provided relatively poor estimates of the reference values. Receiver operating characteristic curve fitting was used to determine cut-off values for hypoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and hypotension for dichotomous decision-making. Applying these cut-off values, there was reasonable sensitivity for detection of hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and hypotension, but not for hypoxemia. Noninvasive anesthetic monitoring should be interpreted with caution in giraffes and, ideally, invasive monitoring should be employed.

  17. Intraoperative awareness risk, anesthetic sensitivity, and anesthetic management for patients with natural red hair: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradwohl, Stephen C; Aranake, Amrita; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; McNair, Paul; Lin, Nan; Fritz, Bradley A; Villafranca, Alex; Glick, David; Jacobsohn, Eric; Mashour, George A; Avidan, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    The red-hair phenotype, which is often produced by mutations in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene, has been associated with an increase in sedative, anesthetic, and analgesic requirements in both animal and human studies. Nevertheless, the clinical implications of this phenomenon in red-haired patients undergoing surgery are currently unknown. In a secondary analysis of a prospective trial of intraoperative awareness, red-haired patients were identified and matched with five control patients, and the relative risk for intraoperative awareness was determined. Overall anesthetic management between groups was compared using Hotelling's T(2) statistic. Inhaled anesthetic requirements were compared between cohorts by evaluating the relationship between end-tidal anesthetic concentration and the bispectral index with a linear mixed-effects model. Time to recovery was compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and differences in postoperative pain and nausea/vomiting were evaluated with Chi square tests. A cohort of 319 red-haired patients was matched with 1,595 control patients for a sample size of 1,914. There were no significant differences in the relative risk of intraoperative awareness (relative risk = 1.67; 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 8.22), anesthetic management, recovery times, or postoperative pain between red-haired patients and control patients. The relationship between pharmacokinetically stable volatile anesthetic concentrations and bispectral index values differed significantly between red-haired patients and controls (P red-haired patients and controls in response to anesthetic and analgesic agents or in recovery parameters. These findings suggest that perioperative anesthetic and analgesic management should not be altered based on self-reported red-hair phenotype.

  18. Comparison of local anesthetic effect of lidocaine by jet injection vs needle infiltration in lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Vahidi, Elnaz; Momeni, Mehdi; Arabinejhad, Abbas; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-07-01

    Usual routes of drug administration are often painful and invasive. Nowadays, using jet injection has been introduced successfully, as a noninvasive and painless method of anesthetic delivery in performing different procedures. The objective of the study is to compare the local anesthetic effect of lidocaine by jet injection vs needle infiltration in performing lumbar puncture in the emergency department (ED). A randomized single-blind controlled study was performed in 65 patients needing lumbar puncture recruited from the ED from July to November 2014. We enrolled 44 patients and excluded 21 patients by the exclusion criteria. Local lidocaine was delivered in 1 group by jet injector (group B), whereas in the other group conventional method, needle infiltration was used (group A). In both groups, intravenous midazolam 1 mg was administered as an anxiolytic drug before the procedure. Patients' pain score (visual analog scale [VAS]) from 0 to 10 was recorded both during drug delivery and performing the procedure itself. The observer who collected patients' data and fulfill the questionnaire was blinded to the study. During lidocaine injection, the mean ± SD VAS score was 5.27 ± 1.77 in group A and 2.95 ± 1.81 in group B (mean difference, 2.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-3.41) (P= .000). During performing the procedure, the mean ± SD VAS score in groups A and B was 3.77 ± 1.77 vs 2.18 ± 1.50 (mean difference, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-2.58) (P= .003). Injecting lidocaine by jet injector is less painful than infiltrating it by needle and syringe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anesthetic management of patients undergoing extra-anatomic renal bypass surgery for renovascular hypertension

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    Kumar Bhupesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal artery disease is the most common cause for surgically curable form of hypertension. In a small subset of patients with severe aortic disease where the aorta is not suitable for endovascular technique and to provide an arterial inflow, an extra-anatomic renal bypass surgery (EARBS is an option. Anesthetic management of such procedures has not been described so far in the literature. We retrospectively analyzed the anesthetic techniques used in all patients who underwent EARBS between February 1998 and June 2008 at this institute. We also further analyzed data concerning blood pressure (BP control and renal function response following surgery as outcome variable measures. A total of 11 patients underwent EARBS during this period. Five received oral clonidine with premedication. During laryngoscopy, esmolol was used in 4 patients, while lignocaine was used in remaining 7 patients. Of 11 patients, 7 showed significant hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation; among these, one had oral clonidine with premedicant, and 6 received lignocaine just before laryngoscopy. Intravenous vasodilators were used to maintain target BP within 20% of baseline during perioperative period. All patients received renal protective measures. During follow-up, 10% were considered cured, 70% had improved BP response, while 20% failed to show improvement in BP response. Renal functions improved in 54.5%, remain unchanged in 36.5%, and worsened in 9% of patients. Use of clonidine during premedication and esmolol before laryngoscopy were beneficial in attenuating hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy, while use of vasodilators to maintain target BP within 20% of baseline, and routine use of renal protective measures appear to be promising in patients undergoing EARBS.

  20. Intravenous Therapy: Hazards, Complications and Their Prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review article, the local and systemic complications of intravenous therapy are highlighted and their preventive measures are discussed. Intravenous therapy exposes the patient to numerous hazards and many of them are avoidable, if the health care provider understands the risks involved and acts appropriately and ...

  1. Intentional intravenous mercury injection | Yudelowitz | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous mercury injection is rarely seen, with few documented cases. Treatment strategies are not clearly defined for such cases, although a few options do show benefit. This case report describes a 29-year-old man suffering from bipolar disorder, who presented following self-inflicted intravenous injection of mercury.

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin prophylaxis in neonates on artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of the prophylactic use of intravenous immunoglobulin (Ig) was evaluated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 21 pairs of ventilated neonates weighing more than 1 500 g, Each infant received 0.4 g/kglday of intravenous Ig or a similar volume of placebo daily for 5 days. Criteria used to assess the ...

  3. Femoral nerve blockade using various concentrations of local anesthetic for knee arthroscopy in the pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneziano G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Veneziano,1,2 Jennifer Tripi,1 Dmitry Tumin,1 Mumin Hakim,1 David Martin,1,2 Ralph Beltran,1,2 Kevin Klingele,3,4 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 Joseph D Tobias1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Femoral nerve blockade (FNB provides effective postoperative analgesia in children undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery as evidenced by their opioid-sparing effects and decreased postoperative pain scores. Increasing the local anesthetic concentration in peripheral nerve blockade for adults undergoing orthopedic surgery has been shown to be beneficial, increasing block success rate, and providing a longer duration of analgesia. The effect of increasing the concentration of local anesthetic in extremity blocks in children remains largely unexplored.Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of FNB using three concentrations of local anesthetic (ropivacaine 0.2%, bupivacaine 0.25%, and ropivacaine 0.5% in children and adolescents undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. The primary outcome evaluated was postoperative opioid consumption before discharge. Secondary outcomes included post-anesthesia care unit (PACU and hospital discharge times, first pain score in PACU, and the incidence of adverse events.Results: Two hundred and sixty-nine children and adolescents who received a FNB for arthroscopic knee surgery from January 2010 to December 2013 were included for analysis. Local anesthetic used in FNB was ropivacaine 0.2% in 116 (43% cases, ropivacaine 0.5% in 75 (28% cases, and bupivacaine 0.25% in 78 (29% cases. Median postoperative opioid consumption (mg/kg intravenous morphine equivalents in the ropivacaine 0.5% group was 0

  4. True resistance to local anesthetics, a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noyan Ashraf M.A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case with apparent resistance to local anesthetics. While regional anesthetics failure are often attributed to technical failure, the clinical presentation and medical history of this patient suggests a true resistance to local anesthetics. Case report: A 28 years old man was scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery for right sided tibial bone fracture, and decision of spinal anesthesia was made. There was a questionable history of multiple prior episodes of local anesthetic unresponsiveness (Interscalan block, local infiltration for lipoma resection and dental surgery. Spinal anesthesia was performed and sensory or motor blockade was not obtained despite any evidence of technical problems. The surgical procedure performed under general anesthesia and skin analgesia (local infiltration of lidocaine 2% and bupivacaine 0.5% to forearm, did not achieve, the day after surgery. Conclusion: While the failure rate of spinal anesthesia has been shown range from 4 to 13% and is often attributed to technical failure, this particular case showed a true resistance to local anesthetics.

  5. The analgesic efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion after laparoscopic fundoplication: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale GJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gregory J Dale,1 Stephanie Phillips,2 Gregory L Falk3 1Westmead Hospital Clinical School, The University of Sydney, 2Sydney Adventist Hospital Clinical School, The University of Sydney, 3Concord Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Abstract: This study aimed to determine if intravenous lidocaine infusion reduces postoperative pain intensity following laparoscopic fundoplication surgery and to also validate the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. This was an equally randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single center trial. Adult patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication were recruited. The intervention group received 1 mg/kg intravenous lidocaine bolus prior to induction of anesthesia, then an intravenous infusion at 2 mg/kg/h for 24 hours. The primary outcome was pain, measured using a numeric rating scale for 30 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were nausea and vomiting, opioid requirements, adverse events, serum lidocaine concentration, and length of hospital stay. The study was terminated after an interim analysis of 24 patients showed evidence of futility. There was no difference in postoperative pain scores (lidocaine versus control, mean ± standard deviation at rest (2.0 ± 2.7 vs 2.1 ± 2.4, P=0.286 or with movement (2.0 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.7, P=0.487. Three adverse events occurred in the lidocaine group (25% of patients. Intravenous lidocaine did not provide clinically significant analgesia to patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication. The serum lidocaine concentration of patients who experienced adverse events were within the therapeutic range. This trial cannot confirm the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. Keywords: analgesia, local anesthetics, intravenous infusions, pharmacokinetics

  6. [The effects of intravenous dexketoprofen on postoperative analgesia and morphine consumption in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Sema; Reisli, Ruhiye; Keçecioğlu, Melahat; Erol, Atilla

    2010-07-01

    Dexketoprofen trometamol is a water-soluble salt of the dextrorotatory enantiomer of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intravenous dexketoprofen on postoperative pain. This study was performed on 50 (ASA I-II) patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy. Fifty patients were randomized into two equal groups. Patients received saline solution (Group I) or 50 mg intravenous dexketoprofen (Group II) 1 hour (h) before surgery and 8-16 h after surgery. All patients received a standard anesthetic protocol. At the end of surgery, all patients received intravenous (IV) morphine via a PCA (patient- controlled analgesia) device. Pain scores were assessed at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after surgery. Morphine consumption and adverse effects were noted during the first 24 h after the surgery. The pain scores were significantly lower in the dexketoprofen group compared with the control group (pdexketoprofen group than the control group (p0.05). We conclude that the administration of IV dexketoprofen provided a significant analgesic benefit and decreased the morphine requirements in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy.

  7. [Application of flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia combined with intravenous propofol anesthesia in induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-xing; Zhang, Yong-fu; Tan, Shu-xia; Lao, Jian-xin

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the effect of flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia combined with intravenous propofol anesthesia in induced abortion. Totally 175 women (ASA class I) undergoing induced abortion were randomized into 5 groups. In K10, K5, and K1 groups, the patients were given 50 mg flurbiprofen 10, 5 and 1 min before the operation, respectively, and in F group, 1 microg/kg of fentanyl was administered 10 min before the operation. All the 4 groups had intravenous induction with 2 mg/kg propofo1. The patients in P group received propofol at 2 mg/kg as the control group. The heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and SpO2 were monitored during the operation, and the induction time, recovery time, propofol dosage and adverse effect were recorded. The anesthetic effect of the protocols was assessed according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the overall patient satisfaction. HR, MAP, propofol consumption and the incidences of adverse effects during the operation were significantly higher in P group than in the other groups. F group had the highest incidence of respiratory depression among the 5 groups. The VAS in K10 group was significantly lower than that in K5 and K1 groups (P0.05). The overall patients' satisfaction was significantly higher than that in the other 4 groups. Flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia combined with intravenous propofol is safe and effective for anesthesia during induced abortion.

  8. The Effects of Spinal, Inhalation, and Total Intravenous Anesthetic Techniques on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Koşucu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the effects of different anesthesia techniques on tourniquet-related ischemia-reperfusion by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA and neuromuscular side effects. Methods. Sixty ASAI-II patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery were randomised to three groups. In Group S, intrathecal anesthesia was administered using levobupivacaine. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane in Group I and TIVA with propofol in Group T. Blood samples were obtained before the induction of anesthesia (t1, 30 min after tourniquet inflation (t2, immediately before (t3, and 5 min (t4, 15 min (t5, 30 min (t6, 1 h (t7, 2 h (t8, and 6 h (t9 after tourniquet release. Results. MDA and IMA levels increased significantly compared with baseline values in Group S at t2–t9 and t2–t7. MDA levels in Group T and Group I were significantly lower than those in Group S at t2–t8 and t2–t9. IMA levels in Group T were significantly lower than those in Group S at t2–t7. Postoperatively, a temporary 1/5 loss of strength in dorsiflexion of the ankle was observed in 3 patients in Group S and 1 in Group I. Conclusions. TIVA with propofol can make a positive contribution in tourniquet-related ischemia-reperfusion.

  9. Anesthetic Preconditioning as Endogenous Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

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    Tsung-Han Chou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blindness in glaucoma is the result of death of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs and their axons. RGC death is generally preceded by a stage of reversible dysfunction and structural remodeling. Current treatments aimed at reducing intraocular pressure (IOP are ineffective or incompletely effective in management of the disease. IOP-independent neuroprotection or neuroprotection as adjuvant to IOP lowering in glaucoma remains a challenge as effective agents without side effects have not been identified yet. We show in DBA/2J mice with spontaneous IOP elevation and glaucoma that the lifespan of functional RGCs can be extended by preconditioning RGCs with retrobulbar lidocaine in one eye at four months of age that temporary blocks RGC axonal transport. The contralateral, PBS-injected eye served as control. Lidocaine-induced impairment of axonal transport to superior colliculi was assessed by intravitreal injection of cholera toxin B. Long-term (nine months effect of lidocaine were assessed on RGC electrical responsiveness (PERG, IOP, expression of relevant protein (BDNF, TrkB, PSD95, GFAP, Synaptophysin, and GAPDH and RGC density. While lidocaine treatment did not alter the age-related increase of IOP, TrkB expression was elevated, GFAP expression was decreased, RGC survival was improved by 35%, and PERG function was preserved. Results suggest that the lifespan of functional RGCs in mouse glaucoma can be extended by preconditioning RGCs in early stages of the disease using a minimally invasive treatment with retrobulbar lidocaine, a common ophthalmologic procedure. Lidocaine is inexpensive, safe and is approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA to be administered intravenously.

  10. Anesthetic management of patients with Melkersson Rosenthal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Murat; Kati, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome (MRS) is a rare disorder characterized by relapsing facial paralysis, persistent or recurrent orofacial edema, and lingua plicata. It may cause difficult airway, drug allergy, and angioedema. In our anesthetic management of two patients with MRS, preanesthetic immunological blood examination and skin tests for hypersensitivity to anesthetic drugs were applied. Because the principal goal is to avoid all factors that may stimulate, an allergic reaction, anesthetic drugs known to trigger urticaria were avoided. Body and operating room temperatures, changes of which may trigger allergic reactions, were kept constant during the perioperative period. Emergency precautions were taken for probable angioedema. MRS is a rare syndrome, and if its manifestations are misunderstood as simple facial paralysis, it may be overlooked by anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists must be careful of several problems in patients with MRS.

  11. Disconnecting Consciousness: Is There a Common Anesthetic End-Point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Anthony G.; Mashour, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A quest for a systems-level neuroscientific basis of anesthetic-induced loss and return of consciousness has been in the forefront of research of the last two decades. Recent advances toward the discovery of underlying mechanisms have been achieved using experimental electrophysiology, multichannel electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. By the careful dosing of various volatile and IV anesthetic agents to the level of behavioral unresponsiveness, both specific and common changes in functional and effective connectivity across large-scale brain networks have been discovered and interpreted in the context of how the synthesis of neural information might be affected during anesthesia. The results of most investigations to date converge toward the conclusion that a common neural correlate of anesthetic-induced unresponsiveness is a consistent depression or functional disconnection of lateral frontoparietal networks, which are thought to be critical for consciousness of the environment. A reduction in the repertoire of brain states may contribute to the anesthetic disruption of large-scale information integration leading to unconsciousness. In future investigations, a systematic delineation of connectivity changes with multiple anesthetics using the same experimental design and the same analytical method will be desirable. The critical neural events that account for the transition between responsive and unresponsive states should be assessed at similar anesthetic doses just below and above the loss or return of responsiveness. There will also be a need to identify a robust, sensitive, and reliable measure of information transfer. Ultimately, finding a behavior-independent measure of subjective experience that can track covert cognition in unresponsive subjects and a delineation of causal factors vs. correlated events will be essential to understand the neuronal basis of human consciousness and unconsciousness. PMID

  12. Disconnecting Consciousness: Is There a Common Anesthetic End Point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Anthony G; Mashour, George A

    2016-11-01

    A quest for a systems-level neuroscientific basis of anesthetic-induced loss and return of consciousness has been in the forefront of research for the past 2 decades. Recent advances toward the discovery of underlying mechanisms have been achieved using experimental electrophysiology, multichannel electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. By the careful dosing of various volatile and IV anesthetic agents to the level of behavioral unresponsiveness, both specific and common changes in functional and effective connectivity across large-scale brain networks have been discovered and interpreted in the context of how the synthesis of neural information might be affected during anesthesia. The results of most investigations to date converge toward the conclusion that a common neural correlate of anesthetic-induced unresponsiveness is a consistent depression or functional disconnection of lateral frontoparietal networks, which are thought to be critical for consciousness of the environment. A reduction in the repertoire of brain states may contribute to the anesthetic disruption of large-scale information integration leading to unconsciousness. In future investigations, a systematic delineation of connectivity changes with multiple anesthetics using the same experimental design, and the same analytical method will be desirable. The critical neural events that account for the transition between responsive and unresponsive states should be assessed at similar anesthetic doses just below and above the loss or return of responsiveness. There will also be a need to identify a robust, sensitive, and reliable measure of information transfer. Ultimately, finding a behavior-independent measure of subjective experience that can track covert cognition in unresponsive subjects and a delineation of causal factors versus correlated events will be essential to understand the neuronal basis of human consciousness and unconsciousness.

  13. Topical anesthetic versus lidocaine infiltration in arteriovenous fistula cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: End stage renal disease (ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergo arterio-venous fistula (AVF cannulation prior to each hemodialysis session for blood access. Prior to cannulation lidocaine infiltration is done, which is often perceived as painful. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA has been found to significantly reduce pain associated with radial artery cannulation compared with lidocaine infiltration. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of EMLA compared to infiltration of lidocaine in hemodialysis patients for AVF cannulation. Materials and Methods: A single-centre, crossover study of patients with an AVF on regular maintenance hemodialysis was performed in the dialysis unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. The site of AVF, number of attempts for AVF cannulation and cannula insertion time were recorded. The patients were asked about the acceptability of application of the anesthetic, delay between anesthetic and cannulation and to score the pain on cannulation. Results: Fifty patients were included in the study. With the visual analog scale, pain score on infiltration was 4.8. Pain score on cannulation after topical application was 2.9 and after infiltration, 2.0. The number of attempts for cannulation and the cannula insertion time were similar. Anesthesia was more stressful in the injectable group rather than the topical group (P < 0.001. Delay between anesthetic and cannulation was unacceptable in the topical group (P < 0.001. Patient compliance was better during infiltration compared to topical (P < 0.005. Mean pain score during infiltration of anesthetic was significantly higher than cannulation pain after either anesthetic, although pain on cannulation was higher in the topical group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: EMLA offers a suitable alternative to lidocaine infiltration for patients using AVF for blood access.

  14. Intravenous adenosine SPECT thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, J.M.; Grossman, S.J.; Garrett, J.S.; Sharma, B.; Geller, M.; Sweeney, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper determines the safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) adenosine in females for the evaluation of coronary artery disease, since only limited data are available. Eighty consecutive studies of 78 female subjects (aged 43-83 years) using IV adenosine (0.14 mg/kg per minute) with T1-201 SPECT imaging were reviewed. Fifty-eight (73%) had mild symptoms; mild dyspnea (24%), flushing (23%), chest pain (23%), headache (11%), dizziness (11%), weakness (9%), nausea (8%), abdominal pain (8%), arm pain (6%), chest tightness (4%), neck tightness (4%), dry mouth (4%), and dropped P waves (4%). Four had moderate symptoms: dyspnea requiring Proventil or aminophylline (2%), significant hypotension (1%), and third-degree atrioventicular heart block (1%). Two had severe symptoms (ventricular tachycardia requiring cardioversion (1%) and severe dyspnea requiring epinephrine (1%). Twenty-two (28%) underwent cardiac catheterization that demonstrated coronary artery disease or postangioplasty results. The thallium SPECT images were 94% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting significant disease. The one false-negative result was in a subject who experienced no symptoms for ECG changes during adenosine infusion. Ischemic ECG changes were 35% sensitive and 100% specific. Chest pain was 53% sensitive and 60% specific

  15. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jodi; Le, Cathy; Lamers, Vanessa; Eckelman, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Anesthesiologists must consider the entire life cycle of drugs in order to include environmental impacts into clinical decisions. In the present study we used life cycle assessment to examine the climate change impacts of 5 anesthetic drugs: sevoflurane, desflurane, isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and propofol. A full cradle-to-grave approach was used, encompassing resource extraction, drug manufacturing, transport to health care facilities, drug delivery to the patient, and disposal or emission to the environment. At each stage of the life cycle, energy, material inputs, and emissions were considered, as well as use-specific impacts of each drug. The 4 inhalation anesthetics are greenhouse gases (GHGs), and so life cycle GHG emissions include waste anesthetic gases vented to the atmosphere and emissions (largely carbon dioxide) that arise from other life cycle stages. Desflurane accounts for the largest life cycle GHG impact among the anesthetic drugs considered here: 15 times that of isoflurane and 20 times that of sevoflurane on a per MAC-hour basis when administered in an O(2)/air admixture. GHG emissions increase significantly for all drugs when administered in an N(2)O/O(2) admixture. For all of the inhalation anesthetics, GHG impacts are dominated by uncontrolled emissions of waste anesthetic gases. GHG impacts of propofol are comparatively quite small, nearly 4 orders of magnitude lower than those of desflurane or nitrous oxide. Unlike the inhaled drugs, the GHG impacts of propofol primarily stem from the electricity required for the syringe pump and not from drug production or direct release to the environment. Our results reiterate previous published data on the GHG effects of these inhaled drugs, while providing a life cycle context. There are several practical environmental impact mitigation strategies. Desflurane and nitrous oxide should be restricted to cases where they may reduce morbidity and mortality over alternative drugs. Clinicians should avoid

  16. Chitosan glutamate hydrogels with local anesthetic activity for buccal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R; Basile, L; Puglisi, G

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogels for the buccal application of the anesthetic drug lidocaine hydrochloride (LDC) were prepared using chitosan glutamate (CHG), a soluble salt of chitosan, or a binary mixture of CHG and glycerin, at different weight ratios. The in vitro drug release was studied at the pH value of saliva to assess the effect of the different formulations on drug delivery. The anesthetic activity of mucoadhesive LDC-CHG hydrogels was assessed in vivo after application on the buccal mucosa, compared to commercial semisolid formulations containing the same drug. LDC-loaded hydrogels can be proposed for the symptom relief of aphthosis or other painful mouth diseases.

  17. Prophylactic Low-Dose Ketamine to Prevent Post Anesthetic Shivering in Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petskul, Suttasinee; Kitsiripant, Chanatthee; Rujirojindakul, Panthila; Chantarokorn, Amphan; Jullabunyasit, Arporn; Thinchana, Sarunyoo

    2016-04-01

    Post anesthetic shivering is one of the most common anesthesia complications. We compared the efficacy of low-dose ketamine with normal saline in preventing post anesthetic shivering in orthopedic surgery. The present study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial involving 183 ASA I-II patients, aged 18 to 65 years whom underwent orthopedic surgery with general anesthesia. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either ketamine 0.25 mg/kg (Group K, n = 91) or normal saline (Group P n = 92) 20 minutes before the completion of surgery. The tympanic temperature was measured before the induction of anesthesia, 30 minutes after induction, and before administration of the study drugs. An investigator, blinded to the patients' group affiliation, graded post anesthetic shivering using the Crossley and Mahajan scale. The primary outcome was to compare incidence of shivering on each group in recovery room. The secondary outcome was side effect of ketamine. Statistical analyses were performed using program R version 3.1.0. A p-value of shivering in both groups was not statistically significantly different (Group K = 13 (14.28%) and Group P = 15 (16.30%), p = 0.42). Furthermore, in both groups, no patient suffered from hallucination, and the other complications were not statistically different. At the recovery room, no significant efficacy difference between low-dose ketamine (0.25 mg/kg) and placebo in the prevention of post operative shivering in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery was observed. Other factors such as preload warm intravenous fluid, using active warming during surgery and control of the room temperature may help prevent shivering.

  18. Validation of the bispectral index as an indicator of anesthetic depth in Thoroughbred horses anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokushige, Hirotaka; Kakizaki, Masashi; Ode, Hirotaka; Okano, Atsushi; Okada, Jun; Kuroda, Taisuke; Wakuno, Ai; Ohta, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the bispectral index (BIS) as an indicator of anesthetic depth in Thoroughbred horses, BIS values were measured at multiple stages of sevoflurane anesthesia in five horses anesthetized with guaifenesin and thiopental following premedication with xylazine. There was no significant difference between the BIS values recorded at end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations of 2.8% (median 60 ranging from 47 to 68) and 3.5% (median 71 ranging from 49 to 82) in anesthetized horses. These BIS values during anesthesia were significantly lower (Phorses (median 98 ranging from 98 to 98) or sedated horses (median 92 ranging from 80 to 93). During the recovery phase, the BIS values gradually increased over time but did not significantly increase until the horses showed movement. In conclusion, the BIS value could be useful as an indicator of awakening during the recovery period in horses, as previous reported.

  19. Carbon dioxide mediates duodenal mucosal alkaline secretion in response to luminal acidity in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, M; Johansson, B; Pettersson, A; Fändriks, L

    1998-09-01

    Acid exposure of the duodenum elicits various functional responses, e.g., an increased mucosal alkaline secretion. Despite low pH in luminal contents, the mucosal secretion of bicarbonate-rich fluid results in pH neutrality at the surface epithelium. It follows that it is probably not luminal pH that triggers the secretory response. The present study was undertaken to investigate if CO2 could serve as an intermediate messenger between luminal acid and the mucosal secretory response. Experiments were performed on chloralose-anesthetized rats. The duodenal mucosal alkaline secretion was measured by in situ pH-stat titration. Exposure of the duodenal mucosa to CO2, administered either as a pregassed solution (pH 4, PCO2 700 mm Hg) or as an acidified bicarbonate solution (pH 6.4, PCO2 240 mm Hg), raised the alkaline output by approximately 65%. This response was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (0.3 mmol/L intraluminally) but not by indomethacin (5 mg/kg intravenously). Exposure of the duodenal mucosa to solutions with high concentrations of CO2 increases the mucosal alkaline secretion despite an almost neutral pH. Data indicate that the L-arginine/NO pathway is involved in the mediation of this response.

  20. Analysis of proarrhythmic potential of an atypical antipsychotic drug paliperidone in the halothane-anesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Chiba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fatal cases with the use of atypical antipsychotic drug paliperidone have been reported; however, there was no clinical report describing paliperidone-induced torsade de pointes. In this study we assessed its electropharmacological effects together with its proarrhythmic potential in intravenous doses of 0.03, 0.3 and 3 mg/kg using the halothane-anesthetized dogs (n = 5, which could provide approximately 2, 20 and 200 times higher peak plasma drug concentrations than its therapeutic level, respectively. Paliperidone exerted potent vasodilator effect resulting in hypotension, which may be largely explained by its α1-adrenoceptor blocking action. In vivo electrophysiological results suggest that paliperidone may inhibit human ether-à-go-go-related gene K+ channel in a dose-related manner and modestly suppress Na+ channel in the in situ heart. The high dose of paliperidone may have some potential to induce early afterdepolarization that can trigger lethal ventricular arrhythmias, whereas the low and middle doses lack such proarrhythmic possibility, indicating that at least 20 times higher plasma concentration may be considered to be safe.

  1. Sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine attenuate nicotine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Amir H; Tizabi, Yousef; Slade, Susan; Getachew, Bruk; Levin, Edward D

    2018-03-06

    Smoking cessation strategies are of prime medical importance. Despite availability of various pharmacological agents in combating addiction to nicotine, more effective medications are needed. Based on recent findings, the glutamatergic system in the brain may provide novel targets. Here, we evaluated the effects of acute administration of sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats trained to self-administer nicotine. Animals were injected subcutaneously with 5, 7.5 and 10 mg/kg ketamine or saline and the effects on the number of intravenous nicotine infusions during a 45 min session was measured. Ketamine treatment significantly reduced nicotine self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, a differential sensitivity between the sexes was observed as male rats responded to a lower dose of ketamine and with higher magnitude of effect than female rats. It is concluded that glutamatergic receptor manipulations may offer a novel and potentially sex-dependent intervention in nicotine addiction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vasodilator effects of ibudilast on retinal blood vessels in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masahiro; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-11-01

    Ibudilast (3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo[1,5-alpha]pyridine) is clinically used as a cerebral vasodilator in Japan. However, the effects of ibudilast on retinal blood vessels have not been fully examined. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of ibudilast on retinal blood vessels in rats in vivo. Male Wistar rats (8 to 10 weeks old) were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)). Retinal vascular images were captured with a fundus camera system for small animals, and the diameter of retinal blood vessels was measured. Ibudilast (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, intravenously (i.v.)) elicited a sustained increase in the diameter of retinal blood vessels and heart rate without altering systemic blood pressure. The effects of ibudilast were significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that ibudilast dilates retinal blood vessels through cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms in rats in vivo.

  3. Possible mechanism of the vasodepressor effect of endokinin a/b in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Aly Mohamed; Syyong, Harley; Tjahjadi, Anindita; Pang, Catherine Cheuk Ying

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism of the vasodepressor effect of endokinin A/B. An intravenous (IV) bolus of endokinin A/B (0.05-0.3 nmol/kg) dose-dependently decreased mean arterial pressure in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats. The magnitude of the response was unaffected by IV pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase), methylene blue (inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase), indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), or tetraethylammonium (TEA, nonspecific K+ channel blocker). L-NAME reduced the half-recovery time of the vasodepressor effect of endokinin A/B relative to responses in rats pretreated with either saline or norepinephrine, which caused a similar pressor effect as did L-NAME. Methylene blue, but not TEA or indomethacin, reduced the recovery time of the vasodepressor effect of endokinin A/B. Therefore, the vasodepressor effect of endokinin A/B is mediated via the nitric oxide/L-arginine pathway and activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase but not by production of prostanoids or opening of TEA-sensitive K+ channels.

  4. Electrocardiographic and hemato-biochemical effects of two balanced anesthetic protocols in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Khurana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the electrocardiographic (ECG, hematological and clinico-biochemical effects of two balanced anesthetic protocols in dogs. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 clinical cases of dogs, randomly divided into two groups of 10 animals each were made part of study. All dogs were premedicated with injection atropine sulfate @ 0.04 mg/kg body weight (b. wt. subcutaneously followed 15 min later with injection butorphanol tartarate @ 0.2 mg/kg b. wt. intravenous (IV. Subsequently after 10 min premedicated with injection diazepam @ 0.5 mg/kg b. wt. IV (Group DP or injection acepromazine maleate @ 0.015 mg/kg b. wt. IV (Group AP followed by injection propofol “till effect” IV for induction of surgical anesthesia. The animals were immediately transferred to halothane in oxygen. Observations recorded in dogs included ECG recordings, hematological and clinico-biochemical observations at various time intervals. Results: No arrhythmia was observed in any animal pre-operatively and intra-operatively in any of the groups. Significant fall in packed cell volume (PCV and total erythrocyte count occurred in DP group in early phase, whereas only PCV decreased significantly in AP group. Biochemical parameters were non-significant in both the groups. Conclusion: Both diazepam-butorphanol-propofol-halothane and acepromazine-butorphanol-propofol-halothane are safe with respect to their ECG, hematological and biochemical effects in clinical cases.

  5. Anesthetic Considerations of Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis in an Elderly Man With Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Dominik T; Choi, Christine; Gollapudy, Suneeta; Pagel, Paul S

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an inflammatory myopathy characterized by progressive asymmetric extremity weakness, oropharyngeal dysphagia, and the potential for exaggerated sensitivity to neuromuscular blockers and respiratory compromise. The authors describe their management of a patient with IBM undergoing urgent orthopedic surgery. An 81-year-old man with IBM suffered a left intertrochanteric femoral fracture after falling down stairs. His IBM caused progressive left proximal lower extremity, bilateral distal upper extremity weakness (left > right), and oropharyngeal dysphagia (solid food, pills). He denied dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and a history of aspiration. Because respiratory insufficiency resulting from diaphragmatic dysfunction and prolonged duration of action of neuromuscular blockers may occur in IBM, the authors avoided using a neuromuscular blocker. After applying cricoid pressure, anesthesia was induced using intravenous lidocaine, propofol, remifentanil followed by manual ventilation with inhaled sevoflurane in oxygen. Endotracheal intubation was accomplished without difficulty; anesthesia was then maintained using remifentanil and sevoflurane. The fracture was repaired with a trochanteric femoral nail. The patient was extubated without difficulty and made an uneventful recovery. In summary, there is a lack of consensus about the use of neuromuscular blockers in patients with IBM. The authors avoided these drugs and were able to easily secure the patient's airway and maintain adequate muscle relaxation using a balanced sevoflurane-remifentanil anesthetic. Clinical trials are necessary to define the pharmacology of neuromuscular blockers in patients with IBM and determine whether use of these drugs contributes to postoperative respiratory insufficiency in these vulnerable patients.

  6. Dose-Dependent Protective Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics Against Postoperative Respiratory Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabitz, Stephanie D; Farhan, Hassan N; Ruscic, Katarina J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalational anesthetics are bronchodilators with immunomodulatory effects. We sought to determine the effect of inhalational anesthetic dose on risk of severe postoperative respiratory complications. DESIGN: Prospective analysis of data on file in surgical cases between January 2007 ...

  7. Impact of Anesthetic Regimen on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Rat Heart In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behmenburg, Friederike; van Caster, Patrick; Bunte, Sebastian; Brandenburger, Timo; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W.; Huhn, Ragnar

    2017-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) seems to be a promising cardioprotective strategy with contradictive clinical data suggesting the anesthetic regimen influencing the favorable impact of RIPC. This study aimed to investigate whether cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by anesthetic regimens.

  8. The inhibitory potency of local anesthetics on NMDA receptor signalling depends on their structural features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gronwald, Carsten; Vegh, Vladimir; Hollmann, Markus W.; Hahnenkamp, Anke; Garaj, Vladimir; Hahnenkamp, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Development of postoperative hyperalgesia depends on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. Local anesthetics protect against those hyperalgesic pain states and inhibit NMDA receptor activation. To outline what structural features of local anesthetics are responsible for NMDA receptor

  9. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  10. INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS IN INTRAVENOUS DRUGS ABUSED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-year observation of acute tricuspid infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abused patient: diagnosis, clinical features, visceral lesions, the possibility of cardiac surgery and conservative treatment, outcome.

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B.; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. This review was first published in 2002 and has since

  12. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B.; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. Objectives To review systematically the

  13. Radiographic assessment of laryngeal reflexes in ketamine-anesthetized cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, E.P.; Johnston, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The competence of the laryngeal closure reflexes of cats anesthetized with ketamine was assessed. Radiographic evaluations of the respiratory and digestive tracts were made after colloidal barium suspension was instilled into the pharynges of conscious and ketamine-anesthetized cats. There was a significant ketamine dose-related response of spread of contrast medium into the supraglottic laryngeal area and into the stomach 2 minutes after contrast medium was instilled into the pharynx (P less than 0.05). Cats did not aspirate contrast medium into the lower respiratory tract. Three ketamine-anesthetized cats aspirated contrast medium into the subglottic area of the larynx, and 2 of these cats also aspirated the material into the cranial part of the trachea. This material was coughed up and swallowed within 5 minutes. Transit time of contrast medium into the stomach seemed to be increased in 11 of the 15 cats given the larger dosages of ketamine (24, 36, 48 mg/kg of body weight), compared with that in conscious cats and those given ketamine at 12 mg/kg. Competent laryngeal protective reflexes in cats can be maintained with ketamine anesthesia. Contrast radiography could be used as a diagnostic aid in ketamine-anesthetized cats suspected of laryngeal reflex abnormalities

  14. A noninvasive monitoring device for anesthetics in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Deborah M.; Fuentes, Juan; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    A noninvasive device capable of recording both gill and lateral fin movements was assembled and used to analyze initial and post-treatment activity frequency (Hz) in fish exposed to anesthetics. Exposure of platy fish (Xiphosphorus maculatus) to saponins from quillaja bark (0.185 mM and 0.555 mM)...

  15. The Anesthetic Efficacy of the Intraosseous Injection in Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of an intraosseous injection in teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis . Fifty...one healthy human subjects with symptomatic maxillary or mandibular posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis were used in this study. The

  16. Anesthetic Challenges in an Adult with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Jacqueline; Jansen, Nicholas

    2014-06-15

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of lysosomal storage diseases with many skeletal and airway features that pose a challenge to anesthetists. We present the anesthetic management of a woman with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI undergoing cervical spine surgery and review the perioperative issues that may arise with this disease.

  17. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... stay of the patients. Therefore, reducing the side effects associated with intrathecal anesthesia is quite helpful to support better postoperative management. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use of LA for transurethral urological surgery: A meta‑analysis. Y Ding, M Li, L Chen1, ...

  18. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    of three of the four drugs in both national registry data and clinical data. These findings indicate that the main cause of injury was neurotoxicity resulting from administration of the local anesthetic rather than the needle penetration. Clinical Implications. Clinicians may consider avoiding use of high...

  19. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The combination of reduced dose of local anesthetics (LA) and highly lipid‑soluble synthetic opioids for patients undergoing transurethral surgery could reduce block duration and side‑effects. However, it remains unclear what are the most appropriate levels of low dose and the extent to which the side‑effects ...

  20. Anesthetic management of a horse with traumatic pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Chesnel, Maud-Aline; Aprea, Francesco; Clutton, R. Eddie

    2012-01-01

    A traumatic pneumothorax and severe hemorrhage were present in a mare with a large thoracic wall defect, lung perforation, and multiple rib fractures. General anesthesia was induced to allow surgical exploration. We describe the anesthetic technique, and discuss the management of the ventilatory, hemodynamic, and metabolic disturbances encountered.

  1. Anesthetic management of cardiac patient for cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, F.B.; Sultan, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    We are reporting the successful anesthetic management of a 6 years old child, who had cyanotic congenital heart disease and underwent an operation for cataract extraction. Ketamine was used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Ventilation was assisted manually by using laryngeal masks. (author)

  2. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: Current perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); M. Klimek (Markus)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThis review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local

  3. Activated charcoal effectively removes inhaled anesthetics from modern anesthesia machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgenheier, Nathaniel; Stoker, Robert; Westenskow, Dwayne; Orr, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    If a malignant hyperthermia-susceptible patient is to receive an anesthetic, an anesthesia machine that has been used previously to deliver volatile anesthetics should be flushed with a high fresh gas flow. Conflicting results from previous studies recommend flush times that vary from 10 to 104 minutes. In a previously proposed alternative decontamination technique, other investigators placed an activated charcoal filter in the inspired limb of the breathing circuit. We placed activated charcoal filters on both the inspired and expired limbs of several contaminated anesthesia machines and measured the time needed to flush the machine so that the delivered concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane would be activated charcoal filters limit further exposure. Activated charcoal filters decrease the concentration of volatile anesthetic delivered by a contaminated machine to an acceptable level in charcoal filters in place, the current anesthesia machine may be used for at least 67 minutes before the inspired concentration exceeds 5 ppm. Activated charcoal filters provide an alternative approach to the 10 to 104 minutes of flushing that are normally required to prepare a machine that has been used previously to deliver a volatile anesthetic.

  4. Anesthetic keratopathy presenting as bilateral Mooren-like ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khakshoor H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Khakshoor,1 Majid Moshirfar,2 Rachel G Simpson,3 Hamid Gharaee,1 Amir H Vejdani,1 Steven M Christiansen,2 Jason N Edmonds,2 Nicholas L Behunin21Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Mashad, Iran; 2John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 3The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: This observational case report describes the development of bilateral Mooren-like ulcers in a patient with anesthetic keratopathy. A 42-year-old man with a recent history of minor eye trauma and pain self-treated with tetracaine eye drops presented with complaints of acutely worsening vision and severe pain bilaterally. His visual acuity at presentation was limited to hand motion. Slit-lamp examination revealed bilateral epithelial defects at the center of the cornea, and an area of stromal infiltration and thinning with an undermining leading edge resembling a Mooren's ulcer in both eyes. Corneal haze and hypopyon were visible. Anesthetic use was halted immediately and the patient was started on prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®, after which visual acuity gradually improved and pain decreased. Despite improvement of symptoms, residual epithelial defects remained, and the patient was ultimately treated with keratoplasty for recovery of vision. We suggest that anesthetic keratopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis for any patient presenting with ring-shaped stromal infiltrates or nonhealing epithelial defects.Keywords: anesthetic abuse, corneal damage, corneal ulceration

  5. 'Butamben, a specific local anesthetic and aspecific ion channel modulator'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, Jeroen Petrus

    2008-01-01

    Butamben is a local anesthetic with some unusual characteristics. Epidural application in the form of a suspension leads to long-term selective pain suppression, leaving the motor system intact. The mechanism behind this selective behavior is not understood. In order to see whether this selectivity

  6. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose.

  7. Contrast medium extravasation in intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Hahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Aetiology and diagnostic procedure of calyceal fornix rupture during intravenous urography are discussed. In the literature the fornix rupture is discribed as a spontaneous event - not so in the four cases presented. In two cases a sudden increase in intrapelvic pressure was due to an ureteric calculus, in the other cases an obstruction of the ureter was secondary to neoplasm. It is recommended to perform a CT as soon as a contrastmedium extravasation in intravenous urography is diagnosed. (orig.) [de

  8. Contrast medium extravasation in intravenous urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosch, U.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Hahn, D.

    1984-09-01

    Aetiology and diagnostic procedure of calyceal fornix rupture during intravenous urography are discussed. In the literature the fornix rupture is discribed as a spontaneous event - not so in the four cases presented. In two cases a sudden increase in intrapelvic pressure was due to an ureteric calculus, in the other cases an obstruction of the ureter was secondary to neoplasm. It is recommended to perform a CT as soon as a contrast medium extravasation in intravenous urography is diagnosed.

  9. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L.; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D.; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D.; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to in...

  10. Concentrations of anesthetics across the water-membrane interface; the Meyer-Overton hypothesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; New, M. H.; Chipot, C.

    1998-01-01

    The free energies of transferring a variety of anesthetic and nonanesthetic compounds across water-oil and water-membrane interfaces were obtained using computer simulations. Anesthetics exhibit greatly enhanced concentrations at these interfaces, compared to nonanesthetics. The substitution of the interfacial solubilites of the anesthetics for their bulk lipid solubilities in the Meyer-Overton relation, was found to give a better correlation, indicating that the potency of an anesthetic is directly proportional to its solubility at the interface.

  11. Intravenous lidocaine for postmastectomy pain treatment: randomized, blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cursino de Menezes Couceiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Postoperative pain treatment in mastectomy remains a major challenge despite the multimodal approach. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effect of intravenous lidocaine in patients undergoing mastectomy, as well as the postoperative consumption of opioids. METHODS: After approval by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira in Recife, Pernambuco, a randomized, blind, controlled trial was conducted with intravenous lidocaine at a dose of 3 mg/kg infused over 1 h in 45 women undergoing mastectomy under general anesthesia. One patient from placebo group was. RESULTS: Groups were similar in age, body mass index, type of surgery, and postoperative need for opioids. Two of 22 patients in lidocaine group and three of 22 patients in placebo group requested opioid (p = 0.50. Pain on awakening was identified in 4/22 of lidocaine group and 5/22 of placebo group (p = 0.50; in the post-anesthetic recovery room in 14/22 and 12/22 (p = 0.37 of lidocaine and placebo groups, respectively. Pain evaluation 24 h after surgery showed that 2/22 and 3/22 patients (p = 0.50 of lidocaine and placebo groups, respectively, complained of pain. CONCLUSION: Intravenous lidocaine at a dose of 3 mg/kg administered over a period of an hour during mastectomy did not promote additional analgesia compared to placebo in the first 24 h, and has not decreased opioid consumption. However, a beneficial effect of intravenous lidocaine in selected and/or other therapeutic regimens patients cannot be ruled out.

  12. Optimum time for intravenous cannulation after induction with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide in children without any premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Abm Kamrul; Sivasankar, Raman; Nair, Salil G; Hasan, Wamia U; Latif, Zulaidi

    2018-02-01

    Intravenous cannulation is usually done in children after inhalational induction with volatile anesthetic agents. The optimum time for safe intravenous cannulation after induction with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide has been studied in premedicated children, but there is no information for the optimum time for cannulation with inhalational induction in children without premedication. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum time for intravenous cannulation after the induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide in children without any premedication. This is a prospective, observer-blinded, up-and-down sequential allocation study in unpremedicated ASA grade 1 children aged 2-6 years undergoing elective dental surgery. Intravenous cannulation was attempted after inhalational induction with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide. The timing of cannulation was considered adequate if there was no movement, coughing, or laryngospasm. The cannulation attempt for the first child was set at 4 minutes after the loss of eyelash reflex and the time for intravenous cannulation was determined by the up-and-down method using 15 seconds as step size. Probit test was used to analyze the up-down sequences for the study. The adequate time for effective cannulation after induction with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide in 50% and 95% of patients was 53.02 seconds (95% confidence limits, 20.23-67.76 seconds) and 87.21 seconds (95% confidence limits, 70.77-248.03 seconds), respectively. We recommend waiting for 1 minute 45 seconds (105 seconds) after the loss of eyelash reflex before attempting intravenous cannulation in pediatric patients induced with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide without any premedication. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Intravenous fluids in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Strait, Kelly M; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Li, Shu-Xia; Mody, Purav; Partovian, Chohreh; Coca, Steven G; Kim, Nancy; Horwitz, Leora I; Testani, Jeffrey M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to determine the use of intravenous fluids in the early care of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF) who are treated with loop diuretics. Intravenous fluids are routinely provided to many hospitalized patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with HF to 346 hospitals from 2009 to 2010. We assessed the use of intravenous fluids during the first 2 days of hospitalization. We determined the frequency of adverse in-hospital outcomes. We assessed variation in the use of intravenous fluids across hospitals and patient groups. Among 131,430 hospitalizations for HF, 13,806 (11%) were in patients treated with intravenous fluids during the first 2 days. The median volume of administered fluid was 1,000 ml (interquartile range: 1,000 to 2,000 ml), and the most commonly used fluids were normal saline (80%) and half-normal saline (12%). Demographic characteristics and comorbidities were similar in hospitalizations in which patients did and did not receive fluids. Patients who were treated with intravenous fluids had higher rates of subsequent critical care admission (5.7% vs. 3.8%; p fluid treatment varied widely across hospitals (range: 0% to 71%; median: 12.5%). Many patients who are hospitalized with HF and receive diuretics also receive intravenous fluids during their early inpatient care, and the proportion varies among hospitals. Such practice is associated with worse outcomes and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jin Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia.Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods havebeen introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. Inparticular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI system maintains a relatively accurate level ofplasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conductedthis study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol andremifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation.Methods This study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgeryfrom February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mLpropofol and 50 μg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modulesof a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at2 μg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinicaleffect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status werecontinuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals.Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered duringsurgery, memory about surgery, and side effects.Results Intraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in threecases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratorydifficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotrachealintubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on theday of surgery and able to ambulate normally.Conclusions Our results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol andremifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breastaugmentation surgery.

  15. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jin Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPatients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol and remifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation.MethodsThis study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mL propofol and 50 µg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modules of a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at 2 µg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinical effect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status were continuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals. Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered during surgery, memory about surgery, and side effects.ResultsIntraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in three cases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratory difficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotracheal intubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on the day of surgery and able to ambulate normally.ConclusionsOur results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol and remifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breast

  16. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu-Jin; Cha, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Yong-Ha; Kim, Tae-Gon; Kim, Il-Guk

    2012-09-01

    Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI) system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol and remifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation. This study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mL propofol and 50 µg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modules of a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at 2 µg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinical effect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status were continuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals. Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered during surgery, memory about surgery, and side effects. Intraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in three cases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratory difficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotracheal intubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on the day of surgery and able to ambulate normally. Our results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol and remifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breast augmentation surgery.

  17. Intralipid Therapy for Inadvertent Peripheral Nervous System Blockade Resulting from Local Anesthetic Overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although local anesthetics have an acceptable safety profile, significant morbidity and mortality have been associated with their use. Inadvertent intravascular injection of local anesthetics and/or the use of excessive doses have been the most frequent causes of local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST. Furthermore, excessive doses of local anesthetics injected locally into the tissues may lead to inadvertent peripheral nerve infiltration and blockade. Successful treatment of LAST with intralipid has been reported. We describe a case of local anesthetic overdose that resulted in LAST and in unintentional blockade of peripheral nerves of the lower extremity; both effects completely resolved with administration of intralipid.

  18. What´s cheapest, intravenous iron sucrose- or intravenous iron carboxymaltose treatment in IBD patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

      What´s cheapest, intravenous iron sucrose- or intravenous iron carboxymaltose treatment in IBD patients? It dependent on the economic evaluation perspective!   Aim: To evaluate the health care cost for intravenous iron sucrose (Venofer®, Vifor) and intravenous iron carboxymaltose (Ferinject......-cost per mg iron is for iron carboxymaltose approximately double the cost of iron sucrose.   Patients and Methods: Data related to 111 IBD-patients treated with intravenous iron at Aarhus University Hospital from August 2005 until October 2009 was used for the economic evaluation. Analysis included......, utensils and ½ hour spend by a nurse per visit; showed approximately 150€ extra cost per 1000 mg Fe++ administrated, if iron carboxymaltose was chosen. In contrast the CEA including both BIA-values and patient-related costs (transportation and lost income) showed iron carboxymaltose to be more cost...

  19. Comparison of Iontophoretic Lidocaine to EMLA Cream for Pain Reduction Prior to Intravenous Fannulation in Adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spence, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    .... Topically administered EMLA (Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics) cream is frequently used, but it takes one hour for it to effectively anesthetize venipuncture sites, which limits its usefulness...

  20. Effect of certain anesthetic agents on mallard ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D.R.; Greenwood, R.J.

    1972-01-01

    Four anesthetic agents used in human or veterinary medicine and 3 experimental anesthetic preparations were evaluated for effectiveness in inducing narcosis when administered orally to game-farm mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).Tribromoethanol was the only compound to satisfy criteria of initial tests. Mean duration of the induction, immobilization, and recovery periods was 2.4 minutes, 8.7 minutes, and 1.3 hours, respectively, at the median effective dosage for immobilization (ED50; 100 mg./kg. of body weight). The median lethal dosage (LD50) was 400 mg./kg. of body weight.Tribromoethanol was also tested on mallards during the reproductive season. Effects on the hatchability of eggs or the survival of young were not detected.

  1. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  2. Dissociative anesthetic combination reduces intraocular pressure (IOP in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewaldo de Mattos-Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of three anesthetic combinations, ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam, on IOP in rabbits. In a experimental, blind, randomized, crossover study, six rabbits were anesthetized with each of 3 treatments in random order. Groups KM (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + midazolam, 1 mg/kg; KX (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + xylazine, 3 mg/kg; and TZ (tiletamine + zolazepam, 20 mg/kg. The drugs were mixed in the same syringe injected intramuscularly (IM into the quadriceps muscle. IOP was measured before drug administration (baseline and at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes. The data were analyzed by a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. All groups had significant decreases in IOP compared to baseline (p 0.05. Administration of either ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine, or tiletamine-zolazepam similarly decrease IOP in rabbits within 30 minutes of injection.

  3. [Anesthetic management of a patient with Ludwig's angina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinohana, M; Saitoh, T; Fukuzato, Y; Kawamoto, K; Inamura, T

    1999-07-01

    A 71-year-old woman with cellulitis of the floor of the mouth, referred to as "Ludwig's angina", underwent emergency tracheostomy under general anesthesia, for the control of airway narrowing caused by sublingual and submandibular swelling with tongue elevation. Because difficult airway had been suspected by preoperative assessment, feasible options of intubation in our hospital, including laryngeal mask, fiberoptic intubation and transtracheal jet ventilation, were prepared prior to induction of anesthesia. Anesthetic induction was carried out with propofol and suxamethonium, and subsequently tracheal intubation could be performed with difficulty under condition of partial visualization of vocal cord. Anesthetic maintenance with local anesthesia and continuous infusion of propofol 6 mg.kg-1.hr-1 was carried out during tracheostomy procedure, and this procedure was done uneventfully. Because airway control still remains a top priority in Ludwig's angina, feasible options of airway control should be prepared before induction of anesthesia if tracheostomy was required in a patient with this disease.

  4. The influence of volatile anesthetics on alveolar epithelial permeability measured by noninvasive radionuclide lung scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chih-Jen; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Kao, Albert; Tsai, Jeffrey J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Many volatile anesthetics have long been thought to affect pulmonary functions including lung ventilation (LV) and alveolar epithelial permeability (AEP). The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of volatile anesthetics on LV and AEP by noninvasive radionuclide lung imaging of technetium-99m labeled diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid radioaerosol inhalation lung scan (DTPA lung scan). Twenty patients undergoing surgery and receiving volatile anesthesia with 1% halothane were enrolled as the study group 1. The other 20 patients undergoing surgery and receiving volatile anesthesia with 1.5% isoflurane were enrolled as the study group 2. At the same time, 20 patients undergoing surgery with intravenous anesthesia drugs were included as a control group. Before surgery, 1 hour after surgery, and 1 week after surgery, we investigated the 3 groups of patients with DTPA lung scan to evaluate LV and AEP by 99m Tc DTPA clearance halftime (T1/2). No significant change or abnormality of LV before surgery, 1 hour after surgery, or 1 week after surgery was found among the 3 groups of patients. In the control group, the 99m Tc DTPA clearance T1/2 was 63.5±16.4, 63.1±18.4, and 62.8±17.0 minutes, before surgery, 1 hour after surgery, and 1 week after surgery, respectively. In group 1, it was 65.9±9.3, 62.5±9.1, and 65.8±10.3 minutes, respectively. No significant change in AEP before surgery, 1 hour after surgery, or 1 week after surgery was found. However, in group 2, the 99m Tc DTPA clearance T1/2 was 65.5±13.2, 44.9±10.5, and 66.1±14.0 minutes, respectively. A significant transient change in AEP was found 1 hour after surgery, but it recovered 1 week after surgery. We conclude that volatile anesthesia is safe for LV and AEP, and only isoflurane can induce transient change of AEP. (author)

  5. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and ...

  6. Anesthetic Management in a Gravida with Type IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Vue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited disorder of the connective tissues caused by abnormalities in collagen formation. OI may present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. A literature review reveals a wide range of implications, from basic positioning to management of the difficult airway. We present the anesthetic management of a 25-year-old gravid woman with OI, fetal demise, and possible uterine rupture, admitted for an exploratory laparotomy.

  7. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Bech, Rune D; Ovesen, Ole; Lindholm, Peter; Overgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. Patients and methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effec...

  8. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G.; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G.; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, c...

  9. Cardiac evaluation of anesthetized Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Darcy B; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Ojeda, Nyurka; Fiorello, Christine V; Estrada, Amara H; Prosek, Robert; Citino, Scott B

    2007-02-01

    To determine ECG and echocardiographic measurements in healthy anesthetized Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi). 20 healthy zebras. Auscultation, base-apex ECG, and echocardiography were performed on anesthetized zebras. Low-grade systolic murmurs were detected in the left basilar region in 4 of 20 zebras. Evaluation of ECGs from 19 zebras revealed sinus rhythm with a predominantly negative QRS complex and a mean +/- SD heart rate of 67 +/- 10 beats/min. Echocardiograms of sufficient image quality were obtained for 16 zebras. Interventricular septal thickness in diastole, left ventricular chamber in diastole and systole, left atrial diameter, and left ventricular mass were significantly and moderately correlated with estimated body weight (r values ranged from 0.650 to 0.884). Detectable swirling of blood in the right and sometimes the left ventricles was detected in 9 of 16 zebras, whereas physiologic regurgitation of blood was detected for the aortic valve in 3 zebras, pulmonary valve in 2 zebras, mitral valve in 2 zebras, and tricuspid valve in 1 zebra. Results of this study provide reference information for use in the cardiac evaluation of anesthetized Grevy's zebras.

  10. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  11. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for the Evaluation of Anesthetic Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hernandez-Meza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard-of-care guidelines published by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA recommend monitoring of pulse oximetry, blood pressure, heart rate, and end tidal CO2 during the use of anesthesia and sedation. This information can help to identify adverse events that may occur during procedures. However, these parameters are not specific to the effects of anesthetics or sedatives, and therefore they offer little, to no, real time information regarding the effects of those agents and do not give the clinician the lead-time necessary to prevent patient “awareness.” Since no “gold-standard” method is available to continuously, reliably, and effectively monitor the effects of sedatives and anesthetics, such a method is greatly needed. Investigation of the use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS as a method for anesthesia or sedation monitoring and for the assessment of the effects of various anesthetic drugs on cerebral oxygenation has started to be conducted. The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the currently available published scientific studies regarding the use of fNIRS in the fields of anesthesia and sedation monitoring, comment on their findings, and discuss the future work required for the translation of this technology to the clinical setting.

  12. Development of lidocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon; Yang, Kyu-Ho

    2004-12-09

    In relieving local pains, lidocaine, one of ester type local anesthetics, has been used. To develop the lidocaine gels of enhanced local anesthetic effects, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based bioadhesive polymer gel containing an enhancer was formulated. As the drug concentration in the gels increased up to 3%, the permeation rate of drug linearly increased, thereafter reaching a plateau. As the temperature of surrounding solutions increased, the permeation of drug increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 3.29 kcal/mol for lidocaine. The permeation rate of drug through skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants, and bile salts. Among the enhancers studied, diethylene glycol showed the greatest enhancing effects on drug permeation through skin. The analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. In the area under the efficacy curve (AUEC) of the rat-tail flick tests, lidocaine gel containing diethylene glycol showed about 3.89-fold increase in analgesic activity compared with the control. The addition of vasoconstrictor in the gels prolonged the analgesic effects. The result of this study supports that the bioadhesive gel with efficient anesthetic effect could be developed using HPMC with combination of enhancer and vasoconstrictor.

  13. A phase I trial of intravenous catumaxomab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mau-Sørensen, Morten; Dittrich, Christian; Dienstmann, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    design in epithelial cancers with known EpCAM expression. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) period consisted of 4 weeks, with weekly intravenous administration of catumaxomab. Key DLTs were ≥grade 3 optimally treated non-hematological toxicity; ≥grade 3 infusion-related reactions refractory to supportive....... A reversible decrease in liver function test (prothrombin time) at the 7-µg dose level was considered a DLT. The first patient at 10 µg experienced a fatal hepatic failure related to catumaxomab that led to the termination of the study. CONCLUSIONS: The MTD of weekly intravenous catumaxomab was 7 µg. Major...

  14. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta...

  15. Intravenous and inhalation toxicokinetics of sarin stereoisomers in atropinized guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, H E; Langenberg, J P; Trap, H C; van der Wiel, H J; Helmich, R B; van Helden, H P; Benschop, H P

    2000-12-15

    We report the first toxicokinetic studies of (+/-)-sarin. The toxicokinetics of the stereoisomers of this nerve agent were studied in anesthetized, atropinized, and restrained guinea pigs after intravenous bolus administration of a dose corresponding to 0.8 LD50 and after nose-only exposure to vapor concentrations yielding 0.4 and 0.8 LCt50 in an 8-min exposure time. During exposure the respiratory minute volume and frequency were monitored. Blood samples were taken for gas chromatographic analysis of the nerve agent stereoisomers and for measurement of the activity of blood acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In all experiments, the concentration of (+)-sarin was below the detection limit (sarin, after an intravenous bolus was adequately described with a two-exponential equation. (-)-Sarin is distributed ca. 10-fold faster than C(-)P(-)-soman, whereas its elimination proceeds almost 10-fold slower. During nose-only exposure to 0.4 and 0.8 LCt50 of (+/-)-sarin in 8 min, (-)-sarin appeared to be rapidly absorbed. The blood AChE activity decreased during the exposure period to ca. 15 and 70% of control activity, respectively. There were no effects on the respiratory parameters. A significant nonlinearity of the toxicokinetics with dose was observed for the respiratory experiments. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Comparison of use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor and refractometry for measurement of anesthetic agent concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, Tamas D; Klide, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    To assess agreement between anesthetic agent concentrations measured by use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor (IAGM) and refractometry. SAMPLE-4 IAGMs of the same type and 1 refractometer. Mixtures of oxygen and isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, or N(2)O were used. Agent volume percent was measured simultaneously with 4 IAGMs and a refractometer at the common gas outlet. Measurements obtained with each of the 4 IAGMs were compared with the corresponding refractometer measurements via the Bland-Altman method. Similarly, Bland-Altman plots were also created with either IAGM or refractometer measurements and desflurane vaporizer dial settings. Bias ± 2 SD for comparisons of IAGM and refractometer measurements was as follows: isoflurane, -0.03 ± 0.18 volume percent; sevoflurane, -0.19 ± 0.23 volume percent; desflurane, 0.43 ± 1.22 volume percent; and N(2)O, -0.21 ± 1.88 volume percent. Bland-Altman plots comparing IAGM and refractometer measurements revealed nonlinear relationships for sevoflurane, desflurane, and N(2)O. Desflurane measurements were notably affected; bias ± limits of agreement (2 SD) were small (0.1 ± 0.22 volume percent) at < 12 volume percent, but both bias and limits of agreement increased at higher concentrations. Because IAGM measurements did not but refractometer measurements did agree with the desflurane vaporizer dial settings, infrared measurement technology was a suspected cause of the nonlinear relationships. Given that the assumption of linearity is a cornerstone of anesthetic monitor calibration, this assumption should be confirmed before anesthetic monitors are used in experiments.

  17. Cardiovascular responses to microinjections of GABA or anesthetics into the rostral ventrolateral medulla of conscious and anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacerda J.E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM contains neurons involved in tonic and reflex control of arterial pressure. We describe the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and anesthetics injected into the RVLM of conscious and urethane (1.2 g/kg, iv anesthetized Wistar rats (300-350 g. In conscious rats, bilateral microinjection of GABA (50 nmol/200 nl induced a small but significant decrease in blood pressure (from 130 ± 3.6 to 110 ± 5.6 mmHg, N = 7. A similar response was observed with sodium pentobarbital microinjection (24 nmol/200 nl. However, in the same animals, the fall in blood pressure induced by GABA (from 121 ± 8.9 to 76 ± 8.8 mmHg, N = 7 or pentobarbital (from 118 ± 4.5 to 57 ± 11.3 mmHg, N = 6 was significantly increased after urethane anesthesia. In contrast, there was no difference between conscious (from 117 ± 4.1 to 92 ± 5.9 mmHg, N = 7 and anesthetized rats (from 123 ± 6.9 to 87 ± 8.7 mmHg, N = 7 when lidocaine (34 nmol/200 nl was microinjected into the RVLM. The heart rate variations were not consistent and only eventually reached significance in conscious or anesthetized rats. The right position of pipettes was confirmed by histology and glutamate microinjection into the RVLM. These findings suggest that in conscious animals the RVLM, in association with the other sympathetic premotor neurons, is responsible for the maintenance of sympathetic vasomotor tone during bilateral RVLM inhibition. Activity of one or more of these premotor neurons outside the RVLM can compensate for the effects of RVLM inhibition. In addition, the effects of lidocaine suggest that fibers passing through the RVLM are involved in the maintenance of blood pressure in conscious animals during RVLM inhibition.

  18. Anesthetic neuroprotection: antecedents and an appraisal of preclinical and clinical data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Berger, Miles; Nadler, Jacob; Warner, David S

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics have been studied for nearly fifty years as potential neuroprotective compounds in both perioperative and resuscitation medicine. Although anesthetics present pharmacologic properties consistent with preservation of brain viability in the context of an ischemic insult, no anesthetic has been proven efficacious for neuroprotection in humans. After such effort, it could be concluded that anesthetics are simply not neuroprotective in humans. Moreover, pharmacologic neuroprotection with non-anesthetic drugs has also repeatedly failed to be demonstrated in human acute brain injury. Recent focus has been on rectification of promising preclinical neuroprotection data and subsequent failed clinical trials. This has led to consensus guidelines for the process of transferring purported therapeutics from bench to bedside. In this review we first examined the history of anesthetic neuroprotection research. Then, a systematic review was performed to identify major clinical trials of anesthetic neuroprotection. Both the preclinical neuroprotection portfolio cited to justify a clinical trial and the design and conduct of that clinical trial were evaluated using modern standards that include the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines. In publications intended to define anesthetic neuroprotection, we found overall poor quality of both preclinical efficacy analysis portfolios and clinical trial designs and conduct. Hence, using current translational research standards, it was not possible to conclude from existing data whether anesthetics ameliorate perioperative ischemic brain injury. Incorporation of advances in translational neuroprotection research conduct may provide a basis for more definitive and potentially successful clinical trials of anesthetics as neuroprotectants.

  19. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  20. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for secondary recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Larsen, E C; Egerup, P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether infusions with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) during early pregnancy increase live birth rate in women with secondary recurrent miscarriage compared with placebo. DESIGN: A single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: A tertiary...

  1. Intravenous iron supplementation in children on hemodialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijn, E.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) are often absolute or functional iron deficient. There is little experience in treating these children with intravenous (i.v.) iron-sucrose. In this prospective study, different i.v. iron-sucrose doses were tested in

  2. Intravenous and intramuscular magnesium sulphate regimens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-03

    Sep 3, 1993 ... parenterally, usually according to one of two popular regimens: the intramuscular (IM) regimen introduced by. Pritchard' and a continuous intravenous (IV) infusion described by Zuspan! Sibai et a/.3 have reported that lower serum magnesium values are achieved with Zuspan's regimen (maintenance dose ...

  3. Clinical Evaluation of Ciprofloxacin Intravenous Preparation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common site of bacteria infection in humans is the urinary tract. For nosocomial infections it is the catheterized urinary tract. Compromised immune responses in hospitalized patients contribute to the difficulties encountered in treating their infections. In these patients, administration of intravenous antibiotic is ...

  4. A Comparison of Prophylactic Intravenous Glycopyrrolate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ephedrine is gradually falling out of favour because of the associated tachyarrhythmia and foetal acidosis. This study compared the effect of preoperative administration of intravenous glycopyrrolate and ephedrine on spinal induced maternal hypotension. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients scheduled for elective C/S were ...

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrasonography and Intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Renal ultrasonography an easily available procedure was compared to intravenous urogram (IVU) to determine its suitability as an alternative to the latter, which is a relatively invasive test for demonstrating hydronephrosis/ or ureteric obstruction in cervical cancer staging. Study design: Thirty five histologically ...

  6. Intravenous voriconazole after toxic oral administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alffenaar, J.W.C.; Van Assen, S.; De Monchy, J.G.R.; Uges, D.R.A.; Kosterink, J.G.W.; Van Der Werf, T.S.

    In a male patient with rhinocerebral invasive aspergillosis, prolonged high-dosage oral administration of voriconazole led to hepatotoxicity combined with a severe cutaneous reaction while intravenous administration in the same patient did not. High concentrations in the portal blood precipitate

  7. Intravenous paracetamol overdose in a paediatric patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, Ilse J.; Van Roon, Eric N.; Van Pinxteren-Nagler, Evelyn; De Vries, Tjalling W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paracetamol is a widely used drug in children. In therapeutic doses, paracetamol has an excellent safety profile. Since the introduction of the intravenous form in 2004, only three reports of accidental overdose in children have been published. The low number probably is due to

  8. Intramuscular compared to intravenous midazolam for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sedation in children remains a controversial issue in emergency departments (ED). Midazolam, as a benzodiazepine is widely used for procedural sedation among paediatrics. We compared the effectiveness and safety of two forms of midazolam prescription; intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV). Patients ...

  9. Intravenous platelet blockade with cangrelor during PCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, Deepak L.; Lincoff, A. Michael; Gibson, C. Michael; Stone, Gregg W.; McNulty, Steven; Montalescot, Gilles; Kleiman, Neal S.; Goodman, Shaun G.; White, Harvey D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Pollack, Charles V.; Manoukian, Steven V.; Widimsky, Petr; Chew, Derek P.; Cura, Fernando; Manukov, Ivan; Tousek, Frantisek; Jafar, M. Zubair; Arneja, Jaspal; Skerjanec, Simona; Harrington, Robert A.; Bhatt, D. L.; Harrington, R. A.; Lincoff, A. M.; Pollack, C. V.; Gibson, C. M.; Stone, G. W.; Mahaffey, K. W.; Kleiman, N. S.; Montalescot, G.; White, H. D.; Goodman, S. G.; Greenbaum, A.; Simon, D.; Lee, D.; Feit, F.; Dauerman, H.; Gurbel, P.; Berger, P.; Makkar, R.; Becker, R. C.; Manoukian, S.; Jorgova, J.; Chew, D. P.; Storey, R.; Desmet, W.; Cura, F.; Herrmann, H.; Rizik, D.; DeServi, S.; Huber, K.; Jukema, W. J.; Knopf, W.; Steg, P. G.; Schunkert, H.; Widimsky, P.; Betriu, A.; Aylward, P.; Polonestsky, L.; Lima, V.; Kobulia, B.; Navickas, R.; Gasior, Z.; Vasilieva, E.; Bennett, J. M.; Kraiz, I.; Van de Werf, F.; Faxon, D.; Ohman, E. M.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Verheugt, F.; Weaver, W. D.; Califf, R. M.; Mehta, C.; Hamm, C. W.; Pepine, C. J.; Ware, J.; Wilson, M.; Gorham, C.; Maran, A.; McNulty, S.; Fasteson, D.; Ryan, G.; Bradsher, J.; Connolly, P.; Mehta, R.; Leonardi, S.; Brennan, M.; Patel, M.; Petersen, J.; Bushnel, C.; Jolicoeur, M.; Chan, M.; Dowd, L.; Skinner, P.; Lawrence, G.; Jordon, M.; Dickerson, S.; Meyer, M.; Hartford, S.; Garcia Escudero, Alejandro; Poy, Carlos; Miceli, Miguel; Pocovi, Antonio; Londero, Hugo; Baccaro, Jorge; Polonetsky, Leonid; Karotkin, Aliaksey; Shubau, Leanid; Maffini, Eduardo; Machado, Bruno; Airton, José; Lima, Valter; Martinez Filho, Eulogio; Herdy, Arthur; Tumelero, Rogerio; Precoma, Dalton; Botelho, Roberto; Saad, Jamil; Jatene, Jose; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Godinho, Antonio; Perin, Marco; Caramori, Paulo; Castro, Iran; Grigorov, Mladen; Milkov, Plamen; Jorgova, Julia; Georgiev, Svetoslav; Rifai, Nizar; Doganov, Alexander; Petrov, Ivo; Hui, William; Lazzam, Charles; Reeves, Francois; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Richter, Marek; Klimsa, Zdenek; Padour, Michal; Mrozek, Jan; Branny, Marian; Coufal, Zdenek; Simek, Stanislav; Rozsival, Vladimir; Pleva, Leos; Stasek, Josef; Kala, Petr; Groch, Ladislav; Kocka, Viktor; Shaburishvili, Tamaz; Khintibidze, Irakli; Chapidze, Gulnara; Mamatsashvili, Merab; Mohanan, Padinhare; Jain, Rajesh; Parikh, Keyur; Patel, Tejas; Kumar, Sampath; Mehta, Ashwani; Banker, Darshan; Krishna, Lanka; Gadkari, Milind; Joshi, Hasit; Hiremath, Shirish; Grinius, Virgilijus; Norkiene, Sigute; Petrauskiene, Birute; Michels, Rolf; Tjon, Melvin; de Swart, Hans; de Winter, Robbert; White, Harvey; Devlin, Gerard; Abernethey, Malcolm; Osiev, Alexander; Linev, Kirill; Kalinina, Svetlana; Baum, Svetlana; Kosmachova, Elena; Shogenov, Zaur; Markov, Valentin; Boldueva, Svetlana; Barbarash, Olga; Kostenko, Victor; Vasilieva, Elena; Gruzdev, Aleksey; Lusov, Victor; Dovgalevsky, Pavel; Azarin, Oleg; Chernov, Sergey; Smolenskaya, Olga; Duda, Alexey; Fridrich, Viliam; Hranai, Marian; Studencan, Martin; Kurray, Peter; Bennett, John; Blomerus, Pieter; Disler, Laurence; Engelbrecht, Johannes; Klug, Eric; Routier, Robert; Venter, Tjaart; van der Merwe, Nico; Becker, Anthony; Cha, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Han, Sang-Jin; Youn, Tae Jin; Hur, Seung-Ho; Seo, Hong Seog; Park, Hun-Sik; Rhim, Chong-Yun; Pyun, Wook-Bum; Choe, Hyunmin; Jeong, Myung-Ho; Park, Jong-Seon; Shin, Eak-Kyun; Hernández, Felipe; Figueras, Jaume; Hernández, Rosana; López-Minguez, José Ramón; González Juanatey, José Ramón; Palop, Ramón López; Galeote, Guillermo; Chamnarnphol, Noppadol; Buddhari, Wacin; Sansanayudh, Nakarin; Kuanprasert, Srun; Penny, William; Lui, Charles; Grimmett, Garfield; Srinivasan, Venkatraman; Ariani, Kevin; Khan, Waqor; Blankenship, James; Cannon, Louis; Eisenberg, Steven; McLaurin, Brent; Mahoney, Paul; Greenberg, Jerry; Breall, Jeffrey; Chandna, Harish; Hockstad, Eric; Tolerico, Paul; Kao, John; Shroff, Adhir; Nseir, Georges; Greenbaum, Adam; Cohn, Joel; Gogia, Harinder; Nahhas, Ahed; Istfan, Pierre; Orlow, Steve; Spriggs, Douglas; Sklar, Joel; Paulus, Richard; Cochran, David; Smith, Robert; Ferrier, L. Norman; Scott, J. Christopher; Xenopoulos, Nicholaos; Mulumudi, Mahesh; Hoback, James; Ginete, Wilson; Ballard, William; Stella, Joseph; Voeltz, Michele; Staniloae, Cezar; Eaton, Gregory; Griffin, John; Kumar, Krishna; Ebrahimi, Ramin; O'Shaughnessy, Charles; Lundstrom, Lundstrom; Temizer, Dogan; Tam, Kenneth; Suarez, Jose; Raval, Amish; Kaufman, Jay; Brilakis, Emmanouil; Stillabower, Michael; Quealy, Kathleen; Nunez, Boris; Pow, Thomas; Samuels, Bruce; Argenal, Agustin; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Rosenthal, Andrew; Tummala, Pradyumna; Myers, Paul; LaMarche, Nelson; Chan, Michael; Bach, Richard; Simon, Daniel; Kettelkamp, Richard; Helmy, Tarek; Schaer, Gary; Kosinski, Edward; Buchbinder, Maurice; Sharma, Mukesh; Goodwin, Mark; Horwitz, Phillip; Mann, J. Tift; Holmes, David; Angiolillo, Dominick; Rao, Sunil; Azrin, Michael; Gammon, Roger; Mavromatis, Kreton; Ahmed, Abdel; Kent, Kenneth; Zughaib, Marcel; Westcott, R. Jeffrey; Jain, Ash; Gruberg, Luis; LeGalley, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous cangrelor, a rapid-acting, reversible adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonist, might reduce ischemic events during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly assigned 5362 patients who had not been

  10. Effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion on some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery on stress response markers as plasma interleukin-6, cortisol and blood glucose level. It also assessed its effect on recovery profile and postoperative pain. Methods: Thirty ...

  11. Efficacy of low dose intravenous dexamethasone for prolongation of analgesia in supraclavicular block: Randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Dhanger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dexamethasone, a long-acting glucocorticoid is used as an additive along with local anesthetics perineurally to prolong the duration of neuraxial blocks. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose intravenous (IV dexamethasone (2 mg along with bupivacaine for prolongation of supraclavicular block in patients undergoing upper limb surgeries. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologists 1 and 2 patients, aged between 18 and 60 years were included in this study and randomized into two groups: Group D (dexamethasone group and Group C (control group. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block was performed and patients belonging to Group D received 25 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and 2 mg (1 ml dexamethasone intravenously while patients belonging to Group C received 25 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and 1 ml of normal saline intravenously. Duration of analgesia, motor blockade, and requirement of rescue analgesic were recorded. Results were analyzed using unpaired Student′s t-test and Chi-squared test. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Duration of analgesia in Group D was 11.88 ± 1.31 h as compared to 6.47 ± 0.93 in Group C (P < 0.05. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly less in Group D (38.00 ± 20.51 as compared to Group C (173.33 ± 34.07. Patient satisfaction and quality of sleep was better in patients belonging to Group D. Conclusion: We conclude that low dose IV dexamethasone significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia and reduces analgesic requirements without producing any significant side effects.

  12. Effectiveness of continuous wound infusion of local anesthetics after abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, Baskaran; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Badhe, Ashok Shankar; Ali, Sheikh Manwar; Ravichandran, Niranjan T; Galidevara, Indira

    2017-05-15

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous preperitoneal wound infusion of local anesthetic drug bupivacaine in providing pain relief, reducing opioid consumption, and enhancing postoperative recovery. Eligible patients were randomly allocated to two groups (study group: bupivacaine and control group: normal saline). There were 47 patients in each group. The patients received continuous infusion of either 0.25% bupivacaine or 0.9% normal saline at 6 mL/h, for 48 h, based on their group allocation, through a multiholed wound infiltration catheter placed preperitoneally. All patients also received intravenous morphine through patient-controlled analgesia pump. Pain scores at rest and on cough, morphine consumption, and peak expiratory flow rate were assessed at 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively. The time to first perception of bowel sounds and first passage of flatus was noted. All patients were assessed for postoperative nausea and vomiting and any local or systemic complications. Chi-square test was used to compare categorical variables. The morphine consumption was compared using Student t-test, the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance. The mean total morphine consumption in the study group was significantly lower than the control group (18.8 ± 2.21 versus 30.8 ± 2.58 mg, P = 0.001). The median VAS scores were significantly lower in the study group than those in the control group both at rest (3 [1-4] versus 4 [2-5], P = 0.04) and during cough (4 [3-6] versus 6 [4-6] P = 0.03), except at 48 h, when the median VAS score at rest was similar (3 [1-4] versus 3 [2-4], P = 0.56). Bowel function returned earlier in study group (67.34 ± 2.61 versus 76.34 ± 5.29 h, P = 0.03). Postoperative nausea and vomiting was less in study group. Respiratory function, assessed by peak expiratory flow rate, was better in the study group (192.55 ± 12.93 versus 165.31 ± 9.32 mL, P = 0.03). The

  13. A randomized trial of anesthetic induction agents in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Raveen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious effects of anesthetic agents in patients suffering from coronary artery disease are well known. The risk increases when a patient has compromised ventricular function. There is a paucity of literature regarding the choice of the suitable agent to avoid deleterious effects in such patients. The use of etomidate and propofol has been considered superior to other intravenous anesthetic agents in these groups of patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the hemodynamic effects of anesthesia induction with etomidate, thiopentone, propofol, and midazolam in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. This randomized clinical trail was conducted at the All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Sixty patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < 45% scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery participated in this study. After stabilization baseline hemodynamic data stroke volume variation and systemic vascular resistance index were recorded for all patients (Flo Trac TM sensor with Vigileo cardiac output monitor used for hemodynamic monitoring. The patients were randomly alloted to one of the four groups and the intravenous induction agent was administered for over 60 - 90 seconds (Group E - Etomidate 0.2 mg/Kg; Group M - Midazolam 0.15 mg/Kg; Group T - Thiopentone 5 mg/Kg; Group P - Propofol 1.5 mg/Kg. Hemodynamic data were recorded at one minute intervals starting from induction till seven minutes after intubation, - the end point of the present study. There was a significant decrease in the heart rate in comparison to the baseline(-7 to -15%, P = 0.001, mean arterial pressure (-27 to -32%, P = 0.001, cardiac index (-36 to -38%, P = 0.001, and stroke volume index (-27 to -34%, P = 0.001 after induction in all four groups. The hemodynamic response was similar in all the four groups. There was no significant change in central

  14. Axillary nerve block in comparison with intravenous midazolam/fentanyl for painless reduction of upper extremity fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Alimohammadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The painful nature of fractures has made it inevitable to use various anesthetic techniques to reduce or immobilize fractured parts. In the present study, axillary nerve block was compared with intravenous midazolam/fentanyl to induce anesthesia for Painless Reduction of Upper Extremity Fractures. The subjects in the present clinical trial consisted of 60 patients with upper extremity fractures. They were randomly divided into two equal groups of intravenous sedation (IVS with midazolam/fentanyl and axillary nerve block (ANB. Rate of anesthesia induction, recovery time, and pain intensities at baseline, during the procedure and at the end of the procedure were recorded in both groups. Data was analyzed and compared between the two groups with SPSS 18 statistical software using appropriate tests. Demographic data, vital signs and means of pain intensities at the beginning of the procedure were equal in the two groups. In the IVS group, the overall duration of the procedure was shorter with more rapid onset of anesthesia (P<0.05. In contrast, the recovery time was much shorter in the ANB group (P<0.001. No life or organ threatening complications were observed in the two groups. Axillary nerve block can be considered an appropriate substitute for intravenous sedation in painful procedures of the upper extremity.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of oral phenytoin, intravenous phenytoin, and intravenous fosphenytoin in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudis, Maria I; Touchette, Daniel R; Swadron, Stuart P; Chiu, Amy P; Orlinsky, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Oral phenytoin, intravenous phenytoin, and intravenous fosphenytoin are all commonly used for loading phenytoin in the emergency department (ED). The cost-effectiveness of each was compared for patients presenting with seizures and subtherapeutic phenytoin concentrations. A simple decision tree was developed to determine the treatment costs associated with each of 3 loading techniques. We determined effectiveness by comparing adverse event rates and by calculating the time to safe ED discharge. Time to safe ED discharge was defined as the time at which therapeutic concentrations of phenytoin (>or=10 mg/L) were achieved with an absence of any adverse events that precluded discharge. The comparative cost-effectiveness of alternatives to oral phenytoin was determined by combining net costs and number of adverse events, expressed as cost per adverse events avoided. Cost-effectiveness was also determined by comparing the net costs of each loading technique required to achieve the time to safe ED discharge, expressed as cost per hour of ED time saved. The outcomes and costs were primarily derived from a prospective, randomized controlled trial, augmented by time-motion studies and alternate-cost sources. Costs included the cost of drugs, supplies, and personnel. Analyses were also performed in scenarios incorporating labor costs and savings from using a lower-urgency area of the ED. The mean number of adverse events per patient for oral phenytoin, intravenous phenytoin, and intravenous fosphenytoin was 1.06, 1.93, and 2.13, respectively. Mean time to safe ED discharge in the 3 groups was 6.4 hours, 1.7 hours, and 1.3 hours. Cost per patient was 2.83 dollars, 21.16 dollars, and 175.19 dollars, respectively, and did not differ substantially in the Labor and Triage (lower-urgency area of ED) scenarios. When the measure of effectiveness was adverse events, oral phenytoin dominated intravenous phenytoin and intravenous fosphenytoin, with a lower cost and number of adverse

  16. Randomized comparison of the feasibility of three anesthetic techniques for day-case open inguinal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pere, Pertti; Harju, Jukka; Kairaluoma, Pekka; Remes, Veikko; Turunen, Päivi; Rosenberg, Per H

    2016-11-01

    Comparison of local anesthetic infiltration (LAI), spinal anesthesia (SPIN) and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) for open inguinal herniorrhaphy. We hypothesized that patients receiving LAI could be discharged faster than SPIN and TIVA patients. Randomized, prospective trial. University hospital day-surgery center. 156 adult male patients (ASA 1-3) undergoing day-case open inguinal herniorrhaphy. Patients were randomized to either LAI (lidocaine+ropivacaine), SPIN (bupivacaine+fentanyl) or TIVA (propofol+remifentanil). Perioperative Ringer infusion was 1.5mL/h. Urinary bladder was scanned before and after surgery. Interviews were performed on postoperative days 1, 7 and 90. Duration of surgery, duration of the patients' stay in the operating room and time until their readiness for discharge home. Patient satisfaction and adverse effects were registered. Surgery lasted longer in LAI group (median 40min) than in SPIN group (35min) (P=.003) and TIVA group (33min) (Pinfiltration was given to 32 LAI patients, and IV fentanyl to 29 LAI and 4 SPIN patients. Ephedrine was required in 34 TIVA, 5 LAI and 5 SPIN patients. One SPIN and three LAI patients had to be given TIVA and another SPIN patient LAI to complete the operations. Urinary retention was absent. Discomfort in the scar (26%) three months postoperatively was not anesthesia-related. Logistically, LAI was superior because of the fastest recovery postoperatively. The anesthetic techniques were adequate for surgery in all but a few LAI and SPIN patients. Lack of urinary retention was probably related to the small IV infusion volumes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. EFFECT OF ACTIVE COOLING AND α-2 ADRENOCEPTOR ANTAGONISM ON CORE TEMPERATURE IN ANESTHETIZED BROWN BEARS (URSUS ARCTOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Larissa Mourad; Caulkett, Nigel; Stenhouse, Gordon; Arnemo, Jon M; Fahlman, Åsa

    2015-06-01

    Hyperthermia is a common complication during anesthesia of bears, and it can be life threatening. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of active cooling on core body temperature for treatment of hyperthermia in anesthetized brown bears (Ursus arctos). In addition, body temperature after reversal with atipamezole was also evaluated. Twenty-five adult and subadult brown bears were captured with a combination of zolazepam-tiletamine and xylazine or medetomidine. A core temperature capsule was inserted into the bears' stomach or 15 cm into their rectum or a combination of both. In six bears with gastric temperatures≥40.0°C, an active cooling protocol was performed, and the temperature change over 30 min was analyzed. The cooling protocol consisted of enemas with 2 L of water at approximately 5°C/100 kg of body weight every 10 min, 1 L of intravenous fluids at ambient temperature, water or snow on the paws or the inguinal area, intranasal oxygen supplementation, and removing the bear from direct sunlight or providing shade. Nine bears with body temperature>39.0°C that were not cooled served as control for the treated animals. Their body temperatures were recorded for 30 min, prior to administration of reversal. At the end of the anesthetic procedure, all bears received an intramuscular dose of atipamezole. In 10 bears, deep rectal temperature change over 30 min after administration of atipamezole was evaluated. The active cooling protocol used in hyperthermic bears significantly decreased their body temperatures within 10 min, and it produced a significantly greater decrease in their temperature than that recorded in the control group.

  18. Intravenous/oral ciprofloxacin therapy versus intravenous ceftazidime therapy for selected bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, P L; Carron, W C; Ching, W T; Meyer, R D

    1989-11-30

    The efficacy and toxicity of sequential intravenous and oral ciprofloxacin therapy was compared with intravenously administered ceftazidime in a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-blinded trial. Thirty-two patients (16 patients receiving ciprofloxacin and 16 patients receiving ceftazidime) with 38 infections caused by susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric gram-negative rods, Salmonella group B, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Xanthomonas maltophilia at various sites were evaluable for determination of efficacy. Length of therapy varied from seven to 25 days. Concomitant antimicrobials included intravenously administered beta-lactams for gram-positive organisms, intravenous/oral metronidazole and clindamycin for anaerobes, and intravenous/local amphotericin B for Candida albicans. Intravenous administration of 200 mg ciprofloxacin every 12 hours to 11 patients produced peak serum levels between 1.15 and 3.12 micrograms/ml; trough levels ranged between 0.08 and 0.86 micrograms/ml. Overall response rates were similar for patients receiving ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. Emergence of resistance was similar in both groups--one Enterobacter cloacae and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ciprofloxacin therapy and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ceftazidime therapy. The frequency of superinfection with a variety of organisms was also similar in both groups. Adverse events related to ciprofloxacin included transient pruritus at the infusion site and generalized rash leading to drug discontinuation (one patient each), and with ceftazidime adverse effects included pain at the site of infusion and the development of allergic interstitial nephritis (one patient each). Overall, intravenous/oral ciprofloxin therapy appears to be as safe and effective as intravenous ceftazidime therapy in the treatment of a variety of infections due to susceptible aerobic gram-negative organisms.

  19. Sedation with volatile anesthetics in cardiothoracic intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hellström, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Volatile anaesthetics have been reported to provide protection against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. This effect has been demonstrated in experimental studies when the volatile anaesthetics were provided either before (preconditioning) or after the ischemic period (postconditioning). Clinical trials of volatile anaesthetics versus intravenous anaesthesia for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have reported reduced postoperative release of troponin, a biomarker...

  20. Impetigo herpetiformis and pregnancy: Anesthetic management for caesarean delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case report presented here is of a primigravida who was admitted with impetigo herpetiformis and was planned for an emergency caesarean section due to fetal distress. General anesthesia was administered. Immediately after extubation, she developed severe laryngospasm, which was relieved by administration of intravenous calcium gluconate. Rest of the postoperative period was uneventful.

  1. Evaluation of the effects of intravenous anaesthesia using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medetomidine for total intravenous anaesthesia were evaluated in six sahel goats. The goats were administered a combination of ketamine (5mg/kg) and medetomidine (0.01mg/kg) intravenously. Baseline measurements of heart rate, respiratory ...

  2. Efficacy of bicarbonate in decreasing pain on intradermal injection of local anesthetics: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Marie N; Elhassan, Amir; Veloso, Patricia M; Lesley, Maggie; Lissauer, Jon; Richman, Jeffrey M; Wu, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    Intradermal injection of local anesthetic often results in pain on injection due in part to the acidic pH of commercially prepared solutions, which are optimized to prolong shelf life. Although there are other possible explanations (eg, noxious properties of local anesthetics, pressure effect of infiltration), the etiology is most likely multifactorial. Although addition of bicarbonate to local anesthetics may decrease pain on intradermal injection, the extent of this analgesic effect is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis of available trials investigating pain during intradermal injection of buffered local anesthetic preparations. We searched the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database for all relevant articles published on the topic through November 2006. Inclusion criteria included double-blind, randomized controlled trials and use of a visual analog scale to measure pain on infiltration of local anesthetic buffered with sodium bicarbonate compared with that of unbuffered local anesthetic. Meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager 4.2.7 (The Cochrane Collaboration, 2004). A random-effects model was used. Our search resulted in 86 abstracts, of which 12 articles met all inclusion criteria. Overall, there were 609 observations for buffered local anesthetic and 615 for unbuffered local anesthetic. Use of buffered local anesthetic resulted in a statistically lower weighted mean difference in visual analog scale of -1.17 (95% confidence interval, -1.68 to -0.67) compared with unbuffered local anesthetic. Our systematic review suggests that the use of buffered local anesthetics seems to be associated with a statistical decrease in pain of infiltration when compared with unbuffered local anesthetic.

  3. Development of a novel training model for dental infiltration anesthetic injections

    OpenAIRE

    クドウ, マサル; シンヤ, ノボル; Masaru, KUDO; Noboru, SHINYA

    2005-01-01

    A new dental training model (M2004IA) for infiltration local anesthetic injection was developed. In this new training model silicon gingival mucosa was designed to expand upon insertion of a needle, his to be followed by introduction of a local anesthetic solution into the silicon gum and silicon gingival mucosa (SGM). This study measured the injection pressure during injection under the SGM. The model M2004IA-HP was designed for hard palate infiltration anesthetic injection training involvin...

  4. Interaction of alcohols and anesthetics with protein kinase Calpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Kelly, M B; Larkin, J D; Ho, C; Mazurek, A; Taddeo, F J; Yeager, M D; Stubbs, C D

    1997-03-07

    The key signal transduction enzyme protein kinase C (PKC) contains a hydrophobic binding site for alcohols and anesthetics (Slater, S. J., Cox, K. J. A., Lombardi, J. V., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Rubin, E., and Stubbs, C. D. (1993) Nature 364, 82-84). In this study, we show that interaction of n-alkanols and general anesthetics with PKCalpha results in dramatically different effects on membrane-associated compared with lipid-independent enzyme activity. Furthermore, the effects on membrane-associated PKCalpha differ markedly depending on whether activity is induced by diacylglycerol or phorbol ester and also on n-alkanol chain length. PKCalpha contains two distinct phorbol ester binding regions of low and high affinity for the activator, respectively (Slater, S. J., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Larkin, J. D., Taddeo, F. J., Yeager, M. D., and Stubbs, C. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 4627-4631). Short chain n-alkanols competed for low affinity phorbol ester binding to the enzyme, resulting in reduced enzyme activity, whereas high affinity phorbol ester binding was unaffected. Long chain n-alkanols not only competed for low affinity phorbol ester binding but also enhanced high affinity phorbol ester binding. Furthermore, long chain n-alkanols enhanced phorbol ester induced PKCalpha activity. This effect of long chain n-alkanols was similar to that of diacylglycerol, although the n-alkanols alone were weak activators of the enzyme. The cellular effects of n-alkanols and general anesthetics on PKC-mediated processes will therefore depend in a complex manner on the locality of the enzyme (e.g. cytoskeletal or membrane-associated) and activator type, apart from any isoform-specific differences. Furthermore, effects mediated by interaction with the region on the enzyme possessing low affinity for phorbol esters represent a novel mechanism for the regulation of PKC activity.

  5. Optimal timing for intravenous administration set replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D; O'Riordan, L; Wallen, M; Morrison, A; Rankin, K; Nagy, S

    2005-10-19

    Administration of intravenous therapy is a common occurrence within the hospital setting. Routine replacement of administration sets has been advocated to reduce intravenous infusion contamination. If decreasing the frequency of changing intravenous administration sets does not increase infection rates, a change in practice could result in considerable cost savings. The objective of this review was to identify the optimal interval for the routine replacement of intravenous administration sets when infusate or parenteral nutrition (lipid and non-lipid) solutions are administered to people in hospital via central or peripheral venous catheters. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE: all from inception to February 2004; reference lists of identified trials, and bibliographies of published reviews. We also contacted researchers in the field. We did not have a language restriction. We included all randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials addressing the frequency of replacing intravenous administration sets when parenteral nutrition (lipid and non-lipid containing solutions) or infusions (excluding blood) were administered to people in hospital via a central or peripheral catheter. Two authors assessed all potentially relevant studies. We resolved disagreements between the two authors by discussion with a third author. We collected data for the outcomes; infusate contamination; infusate-related bloodstream infection; catheter contamination; catheter-related bloodstream infection; all-cause bloodstream infection and all-cause mortality. We identified 23 references for review. We excluded eight of these studies; five because they did not fit the inclusion criteria and three because of inadequate data. We extracted data from the remaining 15 references (13 studies) with 4783 participants. We conclude that there is no evidence that changing intravenous administration sets more often than every 96 hours

  6. In Vivo Quantitation of Local Anesthetic Suppression of Leukocyte Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddon, D. B.; Lindhe, J.

    1972-01-01

    Using intravital microscopy, topically applied amide-type local anesthetics suppressed the adherence of leukocytes to the venular endothelium within surgical defects in the hamster cheek pouch. The response was reversible with physiologic saline and was localized to venules within the defect. Quantitation in terms of the percent of initially adhering leukocytes remaining in place on the venule wall at each minute following application of lidocaine and physiologic saline, respectively, revealed the suppression to be reliably related to the concentration, viz: 20.0 >10.0 >5.0 >0.0 mg ml of commercially available Xylocaine® (lidocaine) HCl. ImagesFig 1Fig 1 PMID:5049429

  7. The environmental impact of the Glostavent® anesthetic machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltringham, Roger J; Neighbour, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Because anesthetic machines have become more complex and more expensive, they have become less suitable for use in the many isolated hospitals in the poorest countries in the world. In these situations, they are frequently unable to function at all because of interruptions in the supply of oxygen or electricity and the absence of skilled technicians for maintenance and servicing. Despite these disadvantages, these machines are still delivered in large numbers, thereby expending precious resources without any benefit to patients. The Glostavent was introduced primarily to enable an anesthetic service to be delivered in these difficult circumstances. It is smaller and less complex than standard anesthetic machines and much less expensive to produce. It combines a drawover anesthetic system with an oxygen concentrator and a gas-driven ventilator. It greatly reduces the need for the purchase and transport of cylinders of compressed gases, reduces the impact on the environment, and enables considerable savings. Cylinder oxygen is expensive to produce and difficult to transport over long distances on poor roads. Consequently, the supply may run out. However, when using the Glostavent, oxygen is normally produced at a fraction of the cost of cylinders by the oxygen concentrator, which is an integral part of the Glostavent. This enables great savings in the purchase and transport cost of oxygen cylinders. If the electricity fails and the oxygen concentrator ceases to function, oxygen from a reserve cylinder automatically provides the pressure to drive the ventilator and oxygen for the breathing circuit. Consequently, economy is achieved because the ventilator has been designed to minimize the amount of driving gas required to one-seventh of the patient's tidal volume. Additional economies are achieved by completely eliminating spillage of oxygen from the breathing system and by recycling the driving gas into the breathing system to increase the Fraction of Inspired Oxygen

  8. Anesthetic Management of Pediatric Liver and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Nicholas R; Deer, Jeremy D; Suresh, Santhanam

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric patients with liver dysfunction and renal failure may exhibit many comorbidities. There are often associated congenital syndromes to be taken into account. Liver and renal transplantation offer a solution and substantial improvement in quality of life. Anesthetic management of pediatric liver and renal transplantation has not been well described. There are key differences between adults and children undergoing these procedures, and acknowledgment of some key principles provide a solid foundation to optimize perioperative outcomes. This article provides an overview of the perioperative management and considerations in pediatric patients undergoing liver and renal transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anesthetic considerations in Leigh disease: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh disease is an extremely rare disorder, characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative course, with subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. It usually presents in infancy with developmental delay, seizures, dysarthria, and ataxia. These patients may also develop episodes of lactic acidosis that usually lead to respiratory failure and death. Due to the rarity of the condition, the most appropriate anesthetic plan remains unclear. We present a patient with Leigh disease, who required general anesthesia. The pathogenesis of the disease is discussed and previous reports of perioperative care from the literature are reviewed.

  10. Cimetidine as pre-anesthetic agent for cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K; Holmskov, A

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study of 39 consecutive cesarean sections, 20 patients received cimetidine 400 mg intramuscularly as a pre-anesthetic, an 19 control patients were given NaCl. No perinatal effects on the infants were observed by cardiotocography before delivery, and K, Na, pH, PCO2, HCO......-3 and glucose values in capillary blood were nearly identical in the two groups 2 hours after birth, the difference being non-significant (p greater than 0.05). No respiratory effects or arrhythmias were observed. In another study comprising 8 elective cesarean sections in patients...

  11. Osteopathic musculoskeletal examination and subarachnoid anesthetic administration in a patient with severe scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, James J; Adhikary, Sanjib D; McFadden, Andrew T

    2014-07-01

    Physicians primarily use palpation of anatomical landmarks to guide the placement of needles when administering neuraxial anesthetics. For patients with anatomical abnormalities such as scoliosis, it is also important for physicians to understand Fryette mechanics and spinal curvature anatomy, as well as preprocedural radiography and ultrasonography, to ensure accuracy in neuraxial anesthetic procedures. The authors report the case of a patient with severe scoliosis who required neuraxial anesthesia for total hip arthroplasty. Using palpation and imaging, his physicians were able to successfully administer a subarachnoid anesthetic injection on the first attempt. The authors discuss considerations for improving success rates of neuraxial anesthetic administration in these patients. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  12. Anesthetic-Induced Myocardial Preconditioning and Some Biochemical Markers for Cardiac and Coronary Failures after Aortocoronary Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to provide a rationale for the efficiency of sevoflurane-induced cardiac preconditioning (CPC, by assessing the pattern of recovery of heart rate and by estimating troponin I levels and changes in NT-proBNP concentrations in patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass surgery (ACBS under extracorporeal circulation (EC. Subjects and methods. Sixty patients aged 60.6±8 years (M±& were examined after elective ACBS using EC and divided into two groups of 30 patients each: 1 inhalation induction and maintenance of anesthesia (IIMA with sevoflurane and fentanyl, with CPC being simulated; 2 total intravenous anesthesia (TIA with propofol and fentanyl. Inhalation induction of sevoflurane anesthesia was performed in the IIMA group. Ten minutes before aortic ligation, the dose of the anesthetic was increased up to 2 MAC for CPC. Inhaled anesthetics were not used in the TIA group. The authors assessed the pattern of cardiac performance recovery and estimated the level of NT-proBNP 24 and 48 hours after tracheal intubation and that of troponin I following 24 hours of the intubation. Results. Defibrillation was required in one patient from the TIA group who developed ventricular fibrillation. The baseline levels of NT-proBNP were comparable in both groups. Following 24 hours, its level was more than thrice higher in the TIA group than that in the IIMA one (p<0.05. By the end of 2 days, the concentration of NT-proBNP continued to rise (up to 480% of the baseline level in the TIA group and returned to the preoperative values in the IIMA group (p=0.05. Twenty-four hours after tracheal intubation the level of troponin I was insignificantly higher in the TIA group than that in the IIMA group (p=0.1. Conclusion. Sevoflurane has cardioprotective properties in preventing and/or reducing the degree of heart failure after ACBS using EC. There is a need to continue the study in increased cohort to provide evidence that sevoflurane-induced CPC can lower

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for refractory recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Fresno, M Rosa; Peralta, Julio E; Granados, Miguel Ángel; Enríquez, Eugenia; Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; de Inocencio, Jaime

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a troublesome complication of idiopathic acute pericarditis and occurs more frequently in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery (postpericardiotomy syndrome). Conventional treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and colchicine is not always effective or may cause serious adverse effects. There is no consensus, however, on how to proceed in those patients whose disease is refractory to conventional therapy. In such cases, human intravenous immunoglobulin, immunosuppressive drugs, and biological agents have been used. In this report we describe 2 patients with refractory recurrent pericarditis after cardiac surgery who were successfully treated with 3 and 5 monthly high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin until resolution of the effusion. Our experience supports the effectiveness and safety of this therapy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Retroperitoneal fibrosis with normal intravenous urogram.

    OpenAIRE

    Creagh, F. M.; Stone, T.; Stephenson, T. P.; Lazarus, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 58 year old male presented with a two week history of low back pain and malaise. The intravenous urogram (IVU) at presentation was normal but within three months he had developed renal failure with bilateral ureteric obstruction on repeat IVU. Primary retroperitoneal fibrosis was confirmed at operation. This case demonstrates that retroperitoneal fibrosis may progress rapidly to renal failure within a few months of the first symptoms. In addition, the IVU may be normal in the early stages o...

  15. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a t...

  16. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, H.D.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-rays and an iodine containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic x-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the x-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation x-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contains a contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth

  17. Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan S. A. Salama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science.

  18. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam

  19. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  20. The anesthetic management of button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Richard J; Hoagland, Monica; Mayes, Lena; Twite, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Injuries related to button battery ingestion are common in children. This review provides an outline of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and anesthetic implications in children who have ingested a button battery. A literature search was conducted in the United States National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the terms "button battery ingestion" and "children' and "removal" and "surgery" and "anesthesia". Ninety-six articles published in English were found from 1983-2017, and 62 of these articles were incorporated into this review. Additionally, the Internet was searched with the terms "button battery ingestion and children" to identify further entities, organizations, and resources affiliated with button battery ingestion in children. These additional sources were studied and included in this review. Button batteries are ubiquitous in homes and electronic devices. Since 2006, larger-diameter and higher-voltage batteries have become available. These are more likely to become impacted in the esophagus after ingestion and lead to an increase in severe morbidity and mortality due to caustic tissue injury. Children at the highest risk for complications are those under six years of age who have ingested batteries > 20 mm in diameter and sustain prolonged esophageal impaction at the level of the aortic arch with the negative pole oriented anteriorly. Anesthesiologists need to know about the epidemiology, pathophysiology, complications, and anesthetic management of children who have ingested button batteries.

  1. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Anesthetized Dogs with Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Stephanie L; Barbur, Laura A; Jimenez, David A; Brainard, Benjamin M; Cornell, Karen K; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Schmiedt, Chad W

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) because of the high negative intrathoracic pressures required to overcome conformational partial upper airway obstruction. To investigate this, 20 dogs presenting for elective correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (cases) and 20 non-brachycephalic dogs (controls) undergoing other elective surgeries were prospectively enrolled. Dogs underwent a standardized anesthetic protocol, and esophageal pH was monitored. Signalment, body weight, historical gastrointestinal and respiratory disease, complete blood count, serum biochemical values, radiographic findings, and anesthetic and surgical time were compared between cases and controls, and dogs that did and did not have basic (pH > 7.5), acidic (pH dogs were evaluated, dogs with GER had increased creatinine (P = .01), % positive for esophageal fluid on radiographs (P = .05), and body weight (P = .04) compared to those without GER. GER was common in both cases and controls, and cases had lower esophageal pH; however, greater numbers are required to determine if a true difference exists in % GER.

  2. Pathophysiologic and anesthetic correlations of the prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J P

    1989-04-01

    "Prune-Belly" is the name given to the disease which is characterized by a congenital wrinkled appearance of the abdomen. Usually, a triad of congenital anomalies highlights the components of the prune-belly syndrome. This triad consists of undescended testicles, abdominal musculature deficiency and urinary tract abnormalities. The previously described triad of the syndrome is by no means the total spectrum of the disease. Prune-belly syndrome is also associated with diseases of the respiratory, cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. Associated diseases of major body systems which are caused by renal and cardiopulmonary anomalies, as well as the surgical procedure to be performed, influence the plan for the administration of anesthesia. The nature of the genitourinary diseases in the prune-belly baby may obviate the need for surgical intervention as early as the neonatal period of life. Although this congenital disease occurs with some rarity, the gravity of the syndrome demands an in-depth knowledge of its pathophysiology in order to assure uncomplicated anesthetic care. Astute surveillance during preanesthetic, anesthetic, and postanesthetic management is germane to the prevention of mishaps.

  3. The cardiac anesthetic index of isoflurane in green iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Craig A E; Dyson, Doris; Smith, Dale A

    2003-06-01

    To determine the cardiac anesthetic index (CAI) of isoflurane in green iguanas and whether butorphanol affected the CAI. Prospective randomized controlled trial. 7 healthy mature iguanas. In 5 iguanas, CAI was determined after induction of anesthesia with isoflurane alone, and in 5 iguanas, CAI was determined after induction of anesthesia with isoflurane and IM administration of butorphanol (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb]). Three iguanas underwent both treatments. Animals were equilibrated for 20 minutes at 1.5 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and observed for evidence of cardiovascular arrest. If there was no evidence of cardiovascular arrest, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased by 20%, and animals were allowed to equilibrate for another 20 minutes. This process was repeated until cardiovascular arrest occurred or vaporizer output could no longer be consistently increased. The CAI was calculated by dividing the highest end-tidal isoflurane concentration by the MAC. None of the iguanas developed cardiovascular arrest and all survived. Mean +/- SD highest end-tidal isoflurane concentration during anesthesia with isoflurane alone (9.2 +/- 0.60%) was not significantly different from mean concentration during anesthesia with isoflurane and butorphanol (9.0 +/- 0.43%). The CAI was > 4.32. Results suggest that the CAI of isoflurane in green iguanas is > 4.32 and not affected by administration of butorphanol. Isoflurane appears to be a safe anesthetic in green iguanas.

  4. Electrocardiographic effects of toluene in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H; Magos, G A; Lorenzana-Jimenez, M

    1986-01-01

    The influence of inhalation of near lethal quantities of toluene on some ECG parameters, as well as the possible cardiac sensitizing effect of the solvent, were determined in chloralose-anesthetized rats. These actions were compared with those of its close analogue benzene. Both solvents produced tachycardia; toluene increased the duration of QRS and specially PR, while benzene decreased P wave duration. No other systematic changes in ECG morphology or evidence of arrhythmia were observed. Toluene appeared to decrease the number of ectopic beats induced by epinephrine, in contrast to benzene, which increased it markedly. These results suggest that toluene administered by inhalation up to near lethal doses is devoid of untoward ECG effect in the chloralose-anesthetized rat, its only action being a decrease in intraventricular and particularly AV conduction. It does not share the myocardial sensitizing properties of benzene and in fact appears to elicit some protection from the arrhythmogenic effects of epinephrine, although no definite conclusions as to this action can be derived due to limitations in the experimental model used.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in the elderly: Anesthetic considerations and Psychotropic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Garekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been found to be a rapid and effective treatment strategy for psychiatric and neurological conditions in the elderly, but the administration of ECT in the elderly can be challenging due to a high risk of adverse events. The increased risk can be attributed to a declined physiological reserve, the presence of physical comorbidities, and the use of multiple drugs, which interact with the electrical stimulus and the anesthetic medications used during the ECT procedure. The selection of appropriate induction agents and muscle relaxants should be guided by patient's clinical status and the psychotropic drugs being used. Modifications in the doses of psychotropic drugs also need to be carried out before ECT to reduce cardiovascular and neurological side effects. Modification in the conduct of anesthesia can also aid in augmenting seizures and in preventing common side effects of ECT. A vital step in preventing adverse events in the elderly is carrying out a thorough pre.ECT evaluation. Despite these challenges, ECT can be carried out safely in elderly patients with severe comorbidities, provided clinical ECT, and anesthetic parameters are adequately optimized.

  6. Volume of Anesthetic Agents and IANB Success: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Amin Salem; Froughreyhani, Mohammad; Rahimi, Saeed; Zand, Vahid; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based answer to the question: "Is 3.6-mL volume of an anesthetic agent more effective than 1.8-mL volume in providing anesthesia for mandibular molars?" Following formulation of research question and keyword selection, a comprehensive search of the following databases was conducted: Cochrane library, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, ProQuest, and Clinicaltrials.gov. Three-phase eligibility appraisal and quality assessment of the studies were carried out by 2 independent reviewers. To reduce clinical heterogeneity, the included studies were divided into 2 groups: studies on healthy teeth and studies on teeth with pulpitis. The data of included studies were statistically combined through meta-analysis using a fixed-effects model. A total of 20,778 records were initially retrieved from the search. Following screening and eligibility assessment, 8 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included for qualitative synthesis. Of those, 5 studies were qualified for meta-analysis. In the irreversible pulpitis group, increasing the volume of anesthetic agent from 1.8 to 3.6 mL significantly increased the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (risk ratio = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.67-3.59, p < .001). However, there was insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion regarding healthy teeth.

  7. Characterizing Awake and Anesthetized States Using a Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsadeghi, M; Behnam, H; Shalbaf, R; Jelveh Moghadam, H

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing between awake and anesthetized states is one of the important problems in surgery. Vital signals contain valuable information that can be used in prediction of different levels of anesthesia. Some monitors based on electroencephalogram (EEG) such as the Bispectral (BIS) index have been proposed in recent years. This study proposes a new method for characterizing between awake and anesthetized states. We validated our method by obtaining data from 25 patients during the cardiac surgery that requires cardiopulmonary bypass. At first, some linear and non-linear features are extracted from EEG signals. Then a method called "LLE"(Locally Linear Embedding) is used to map high-dimensional features in a three-dimensional output space. Finally, low dimensional data are used as an input to a quadratic discriminant analyzer (QDA). The experimental results indicate that an overall accuracy of 88.4 % can be obtained using this method for classifying the EEG signal into conscious and unconscious states for all patients. Considering the reliability of this method, we can develop a new EEG monitoring system that could assist the anesthesiologists to estimate the depth of anesthesia accurately.

  8. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients’ neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic–sedative medication is increasing. Methods Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. Results The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. Conclusion In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used. PMID:28424537

  9. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  10. Anesthetic and Perioperative Management of Patients With Brugada Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Sgarito, Giuseppe; Giordano, Umberto; Verlato, Roberto; Baranchuk, Adrian; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-09-15

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an arrhythmogenic disease reported to be one among the leading causes of cardiac death in subjects under the age of 40 years. In these patients, episodes of lethal arrhythmias may be induced by several factors or situations, and for this reason, management during anesthesia and surgery must provide some precautions and drugs restrictions. To date, it is difficult to formulate guidelines for anesthetic management of patients with BrS because of the absence of prospective studies, and there is not a definite recommendation for neither general nor regional anesthesia, and there are no large studies in merit. For this reason, in the anesthesia management of patients with BrS, the decision of using each drug must be made after careful consideration and always in controlled conditions, avoiding other factors that are known to have the potential to induce arrhythmias and with a close cooperation between anesthetists and cardiologists, which is essential before and after surgery. In conclusion, given the absence of large studies in literature, we want to focus on some general rules, which resulted from case series and clinical practice, to be followed during the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with BrS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison between newer local anesthetics for myofascial pain syndrome management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaralidou, A Th; Amaniti, E N; Maidatsi, P G; Gorgias, N K; Vasilakos, D F

    2007-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes are characterized by the presence of painful loci within muscles, tendons or ligaments, called trigger points. Infiltration of these points with local anesthetics is often used as a treatment modality. The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate 0.25% levobupivacaine and 0.25% ropivacaine for trigger point injection regarding pain on injection, treatment efficacy and duration of symptoms remission. Sixty-eight patients, suffering from myofascial pain syndromes, were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for trigger-point injection. After completion of the procedure, patients were asked to rate pain during injection and efficacy of the treatment, based on immediate relief. Two weeks later, they were asked about the duration of this relief. Statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups with respect to pain during injection, efficacy of the treatment and duration of pain relief. The two local anesthetics seem to be equally effective for trigger point infiltration. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  12. A prospective, double-blinded, randomized comparison of ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block with lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block versus standard anesthetic management for pain control during and after traumatic femur fracture repair in the pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsey NM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Elsey,1 Joseph D Tobias,1–3 Kevin E Klingele,4 Ralph J Beltran,1,2 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 David Martin,1,2 Giorgio Veneziano,1,2 Julie Rice,1,2 Dmitry Tumin1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2The Ohio State University, 3Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Traumatic injury of the femur resulting in femoral fracture may result in significant postoperative pain. As with other causes of acute pain, regional anesthesia may offer a benefit over conventional therapy with intravenous opioids. This study prospectively assesses the effects of femoral nerve blockade with a lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block (FN-LFCN on intraoperative anesthetic requirements, postoperative pain scores, and opioid requirements.Materials and methods: Seventeen pediatric patients (age 2–18 years undergoing surgical repair of a traumatic femur fracture fulfilled the study criteria and were randomly assigned to general anesthesia with either an FN-LFCN block (n = 10 or intravenous opioids (n = 7. All patients received a general anesthetic with isoflurane for maintenance anesthesia during the surgical repair of the femur fracture. Patients randomized to the FN-LFCN block group received ultrasound-guided nerve blockade using ropivacaine (0.2%/0.5% based on patient weight. At the conclusion of surgery, the airway device was removed once tracheal extubation criteria were achieved, and patients were transported to the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU for recovery and assessment of pain by a blinded study nurse.Results: The final study cohort included 17 patients (n = 10 for FN-LFCN block group; n = 7 for the intravenous opioid group. Although the median of the maximum postoperative pain scores in the

  13. Comparison of 0.5% articaine and 0.5% prilocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia of the arm: a cross-over study in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, M T; Xu, M; Haasio, J; Rosenberg, P H

    1999-01-01

    Earlier studies of the use of articaine in intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) are conflicting. In fact, despite similar physicochemical properties and regional anesthetic action, significant differences between articaine and prilocaine in IVRA have been reported. Articaine, being a potent local anesthetic with low degree of toxicity and being rapidly metabolized by esterases, could be a useful local anesthetic particularly in IVRA and, perhaps, could challenge prilocaine, the present local anesthetic of choice for this technique. A double-blind, cross-over study of IVRA of the upper extremity in 10 healthy volunteers was performed. There was at least a 1-week interval between the use of the two anesthetics in each volunteer. After exsanguination with an Esmarch bandage, IVRA was induced either with preservative-free 0.5% articaine (5% Ultracaine, Hoechst, Germany, diluted with 0.9% NaCl) or 0.5% prilocaine (Citanest, Astra, Södertälje, Sweden) (35-50 mL, according to weight), injected in 2 minutes. Sensation at defined skin spots that were innervated by the median, musculocutaneous, radial, and ulnar nerves was tested by pinprick; motor function was tested by the movements of the wrist. After 20 minutes, the tourniquet cuff was deflated in one step. Circulatory, toxic, and skin reactions were registered. At least 1 week after the second IVRA intracutaneous allergy testing with 0.5% articaine, 0.5% prilocaine, histamine, and saline was performed. There were no significant differences between the two local anesthetics in the onset of analgesia or anesthesia, degree of motor block, and recovery of IVRA. Onset of analgesia occurred 4.2-5.6 minutes, on average, after the injection. One volunteer had short-lasting tinnitus after tourniquet cuff deflation when prilocaine was used. Erythematous nonitching skin rashes developed in 8 of 10 volunteers when articaine was used, and two volunteers had rashes when prilocaine was used. These rashes disappeared within an hour

  14. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  15. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassakov KV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific, representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index; index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0, only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1. Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100 and a high index of expectations (25.0, reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. Keywords: anesthetics, anesthetic adjuvants, mortality, safety margins, therapeutic indices

  16. Does the Type of Anesthetic Technique Affect In-Hospital and One-Year Outcomes after Off-Pump Coronary Arterial Bypass Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Jin Min

    Full Text Available Despite numerous previous studies, there is little data on the effects of anesthetics on clinical outcome after off-pump coronary arterial bypass grafting (OPCAB. Therefore, we retrospectively compared the effects of anesthetic choice on in-hospital major adverse events (MAEs and one-year major adverse cardiovascular and cerebral events (MACCEs in patients undergoing OPCAB. Electronic medical records were reviewed in 192 patients who received propofol-remifenanil total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA and propensity score-matched 662 patients who received isoflurane anesthesia. The primary endpoints were in-hospital MAEs and one-year MACCEs. The components of in-hospital MAEs were in-hospital death, myocardial infarction (MI, coronary revascularization, stroke, renal failure, prolonged mechanical ventilation longer than 72 h, and postoperative new cardiac arrhythmia requiring treatment. One-year MACCEs was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, MI, coronary revascularization, and stroke. There was no significant difference in risk of in-hospital MAEs (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 0.88-1.88, P = 0.20 or one-year MACCEs (OR = 0.81; 95% CI = 0.46-1.42, P = 0.46 between the groups. The risk of postoperative new arrhythmia including new atrial fibrillation significantly increased in the TIVA group compared to the isoflurane anesthesia group (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.12-2.63, P = 0.01. In conclusion, the choice between propofol-remifentanil TIVA and isoflurane anesthesia did not show differences in incidence of in-hospital MAEs or one-year MACCEs in patients undergoing OPCAB. However, further studies on the effects of anesthetics on development of in-hospital new arrhythmia will be needed.

  17. Electroporation-delivered transdermal neostigmine in rats: equivalent action to intravenous administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkó S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Szilvia Berkó,1,* Kálmán F Szűcs,2,* Boglárka Balázs,1,3 Erzsébet Csányi,1 Gábor Varju,4 Anita Sztojkov-Ivanov,2 Mária Budai-Szűcs,1 Judit Bóta,2 Róbert Gáspár2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; 2Department of Pharmacodynamics and Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; 3Gedeon Richter Plc., Budapest, 4Dr Derm Clinic of Anti-Aging Dermatology, Aesthetic Laser and Plastic Surgery, Budapest, Hungary *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Transdermal electroporation has become one of the most promising noninvasive methods for drug administration, with greatly increased transport of macromolecules through the skin. The cecal-contracting effects of repeated transdermal electroporation delivery and intravenous administration of neostigmine were compared in anesthetized rats. Methods: The cecal contractions were detected with implantable strain gauge sensors, and the plasma levels of neostigmine were followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Both intravenously and EP-administered neostigmine (0.2–66.7 µg/kg increased the cecal contractions in a dose-dependent manner. For both the low doses and the highest dose, the neostigmine plasma concentrations were the same after the two modes of administration, while an insignificantly higher level was observed at a dose of 20 µg/kg after intravenous administration as compared with the electroporation route. The contractile responses did not differ significantly after the two administration routes. Conclusion: The results suggest that electroporation-delivered neostigmine elicits action equivalent to that observed after intravenous administration as concerning both time and intensity. Electroporation permits the delivery of even lower doses of water-soluble compounds through the skin, which is very promising for clinical practice. Keywords: transdermal

  18. Involvement of nitric oxide in 5-HT(3) receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeresh, B; Patil, Basanagouda M; Veeresh Babu, S V; Jeedi, Neelakanth M; Unger, Banappa S

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of nitric oxide in 5-HT(3) receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats. Fluid movement in jejunum and colon were determined simultaneously in the same rat, by modifying the Beubler method. Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 20 mg/kg, s.c) alone and in combination with L-arginine (L-Arg, 150 mg/kg s.c) or D-arginine (D-Arg, 150 mg/kg, s.c) were administered 30 min before administration of 1-PBG (18.5 mug/kg, i.v). Intravenous administration of 1-phenylbiguanide (1-PBG) induced a net secretion of fluid in both jejunum and colon. 1-PBG had a more prominent secretory effect in the colon, causing a three-fold increase in volume of fluid secreted/g of colon than in the jejunum. Pretreatment with (L-NNA) prevented the 1-PBG-induced fluid accumulation in both jejunum and colon. The inhibitory effect of L-NNA on 1-PBG-induced fluid accumulation was reversed by L-Arg but not by D-Arg. These results provide evidence that nitric oxide plays an important role in 5-HT(3) receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats.

  19. Lipid emulsion injection-induced reversal of cardiac toxicity and acceleration of emergence from general anesthesia after scalp infiltration of a local anesthetic: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Rintaro; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Fujii, Yuka; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa

    2017-01-01

    A scalp block or wound infiltration of local anesthetic is thought to effectively control post-craniotomy pain. However, it can result in local anesthetic toxicity (LAST), which is difficult to distinguish from brain damage due to the surgical procedure when emergence from general anesthesia is delayed. Lipid rescue (infusion of a lipid emulsion) is a widely accepted treatment for LAST. A 64-year-old man underwent surgical resection of a glioma in the brainstem. While still under general anesthesia, and before suturing of the wound, he received a 20-mL scalp infusion of ropivacaine 0.75%. His emergence from anesthesia was delayed, his respiration was suppressed, and premature ventricular contractions occurred; all of which are symptoms of LAST. Injection of a 20% lipid emulsion rapidly alleviated these symptoms. Interestingly, the blood concentration of ropivacaine increased after lipid rescue. The increase in ropivacaine concentration in the blood after lipid rescue suggests that the intravenously administered lipid emulsion absorbed the ropivacaine from the intoxicated brain and heart tissue. This finding is consistent with the lipid sink theory as a mechanistic explanation of lipid rescue.

  20. Influence of different anesthetics on skin oxygenation studied by electron paramagnetic resonance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovic, Z; Sentjurc, M; Kristl, J; Khan, N; Hou, H; Swartz, H M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of two general anesthetics on skin oxygenation in mice are evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Up to now no data on the effects of different anesthetics on skin oxygenation could be found. In this study animals were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine or isoflurane, and partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) in the skin, heart rate and hemoglobin oxygen saturation were followed as a function of time and inhaled oxygen concentration. The skin pO(2) significantly increased continuously for about 60 min in mice anesthetized with isoflurane and remained constant after that. During ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, the pO(2) in the skin only slightly decreased. The skin pO(2) increased with higher inspired oxygen concentrations for both anesthetics groups. When breathing 21% oxygen, mice anesthetized with isoflurane had two-fold higher pO(2) in the skin compared to mice anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. The heart rate was significantly lower in animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine, while hemoglobin saturation was almost the same in both groups at all inhaled oxygen concentrations. These results show that the type of anesthesia is an important parameter that needs to be considered in experiments where skin pO(2) is followed. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Frequency of Use and Cost of Selected Anesthetic Induction and Neuromuscular Blocking Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-15

    have attempted to look at anesthetic choice. Katz ( 1973) and Broadman , Mesrobian, and McGill ( 1987) researched anesthetic choice among...1994). Adverse effects of depolarising neuromuscular blocking agents : Incidence, prevention and management. Drug Safety, lQ(S), 331-349. Broadman

  2. Monitoring Anesthetic Depth Modification, Evaluation and Application of the Correlation Dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.L.C. van den

    2003-01-01

    Anesthesia is administered to patients to facilitate surgical and diagnostic procedures. The anesthesiologist generally determines the amount of anesthetics needed on the basis of body weight. However, the inter-individual variation in sensitivity to anesthetics is wide and the needed level of

  3. Identification of anesthetic binding sites on human serum albumin using a novel etomidate photolabel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bright, Damian P.; Adham, Sara D.; Lemaire, Lucienne C. J. M.; Benavides, Rodrigo; Gruss, Marco; Taylor, Graham W.; Smith, Edward H.; Franks, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized a novel analog of the general anesthetic etomidate in which the ethoxy group has been replaced by an azide group, and which can be used as a photolabel to identify etomidate binding sites. This acyl azide analog is a potent general anesthetic in both rats and tadpoles and, as

  4. An improved method for lifting and transporting anesthetized pigs within an animal facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher-Petersen, Camilla; Hammelev, Karsten Pharao; Flescher, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Transporting anesthetized pigs in a laboratory setting often requires strenuous manual lifting, posing a hazard to the safety of animal care personnel and to the welfare of the pigs. The authors developed an improved approach to lifting and transporting anesthetized pigs weighing up to 350 kg using...

  5. Anesthetic success of 1.8ml lidocaine 2% for mandibular tooth extraction. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the anesthetic effect of a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthetic lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000 in inferior alveolar nerve block (NAI for the extraction in mandibular teeth. Material and methods: A pilot study with analitic design. Participating patients of Dental Emergency Service volunteers from Valdivia-Chile for mandibular teeth extractions attending between May and July of 2010. The anesthetic technique was performed by a dentist using only one cartridge of anesthetic to the NAI. After 15 minutes, the effect was considered effective when anesthetic not require reinforcement with additional anesthesia during extraction of teeth. We analyzed the relationship between success anesthetic effect with sex, age, diagnosis of tooth and type and level of pain observed (chi-square and logistic regression, p<0.05. Results: 62 patients were selected, of which only 47(75.8% was achieved anesthetic success. There was no statistical association with sex, age, type or dental diagnosis and perceived pain. Conclusion: Using a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthesia was effective in three of four patients treated by extraction of mandibular teeth. It suggests further research in relation to the clinical effectiveness of other anesthetics with the same dose in NAI.

  6. Management of a parturient with a history of local anesthetic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrieri, Philip J; Ferguson, J E

    2003-05-01

    The management of parturients with a strong history of allergy to local anesthetics poses significant challenges to the obstetric anesthesiologist. We recommend that when such patients have a strong desire to receive labor analgesia with local anesthetics, they undergo provocative challenge testing with preservative-free bupivacaine performed in labor and delivery with preparations for emergent cesarean delivery after 24-wk gestation.

  7. Evaluation of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol-guaifenesin-medetomidine and alfaxalone-guaifenesin-medetomidine in Thoroughbred horses undergoing castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Motoki; Wakuno, Ai; Kushiro, Asuka; Mae, Naomi; Kakizaki, Masashi; Nagata, Shun-Ichi; Ohta, Minoru

    2017-12-22

    Anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) technique using propofol-guaifenesin-medetomidine (PGM) and alfaxalone-guaifenesin-medetomidine (AGM) were preliminarily evaluated in Thoroughbred horses undergoing castration. Twelve male Thoroughbred horses were assigned randomly into two groups. After premedication with intravenous (IV) administrations of medetomidine (5.0 µg/kg) and butorphanol (0.02 mg/kg), anesthesia was induced with guaifenesin (10 mg/kg IV), followed by either propofol (2.0 mg/kg IV) (group PGM: n=6) or alfaxalone (1.0 mg/kg IV) (group AGM: n=6). Surgical anesthesia was maintained for 60 min at a constant infusion of either propofol (3.0 mg/kg/hr) (group PGM) or alfaxalone (1.5 mg/kg/hr) (group AGM), in combination with guaifenesin (80 mg/kg/hr) and medetomidine (3.0 µg/kg/hr). Responses to surgical stimuli, cardiorespiratory values, and induction and recovery characteristics were recorded throughout anesthesia. During anesthesia induction, one horse paddled in group PGM. All horses from group AGM were maintained at adequate anesthetic depth for castration. In group PGM, 3 horses showed increased cremaster muscle tension and one showed slight movement requiring additional IV propofol to maintain surgical anesthesia. No horse exhibited apnea, although arterial oxygen tension decreased in group AGM to less than 60 mmHg. Recovery quality was good to excellent in both groups. In conclusion, TIVA using PGM and AGM infusion was available for 60 min anesthesia in Thoroughbred horses. TIVA techniques using PGM and AGM infusion provided clinically acceptable general anesthesia with mild cardiorespiratory depression. However, inspired air should be supplemented with oxygen to prevent hypoxemia during anesthesia.

  8. Increased inspiratory pressure for reduction of atelectasis in children anesthetized for CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, Michael A.; Jamieson, Douglas H.; McEachern, Anita M.; Blackstock, Derek

    2002-01-01

    Background: Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children anesthetized for CT scan than it is in children sedated for CT scan.Objective: To determine the effect of increased inspiratory pressure on atelectasis during chest CT in anesthetized children. Materials and methods: Atelectasis on chest CT was assessed by two observers in three groups of patients. Group A comprised 13 children (26 lungs) anesthetized at inspiratory pressures up to and including 25 cm H 2 O. Group B included 11 children anesthetized at inspiratory pressures ≥30 cm H 2 O. Group C included 8 children under deep sedation. Results: Atelectasis was significantly more severe in group A than in groups B and C. There was no significant difference between groups B and C. Conclusion: An inspiratory pressure of 30 cm H 2 O is recommended for children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  9. Nonpreserved amniotic membrane transplantation for bilateral toxic keratopathy caused by topical anesthetic abuse: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altinok Ayse

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Corneal damage associated with abuse of topical anesthetics is a rare clinic entity. Topical anesthetic abuse is one of the causes of ring keratitis. Ring keratitis is easily overlooked because it can mimic acanthamoeba keratitis or other infectious keratitis. The outcome is often poor, leading to persistent epithelial defects, corneal scarring, and perforations. Case presentation We report the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of a 65-year-old Caucasian man, who worked as a health care worker, with bilateral toxic keratopathy caused by topical anesthetic abuse. Nonpreserved amniotic membrane transplantation was performed for both eyes of the patient. Conclusion It is important to identify and treat patients who abuse topical anesthetics before permanent vision loss ensues. Nonpreserved amniotic membrane transplantation may be useful in relieving pain and improving corneal surface in anesthetic agent abusers.

  10. Mycotic aneurysms in intravenous drug abusers: the utility of intravenous digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.C.; Krasicky, G.A.; Sharma, R.P.; Vemuri, B.R.; Burke, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Two-hundred thirteen intravenous digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) examinations were performed on 195 intravenous drug abusers to rule out the possibility of a mycotic aneurysm in a groin, neck, or upper extremity infection. Twenty-three surgically proved cases of mycotic aneurysm were correctly identified with no false positive results. In addition, six cases of major venous occlusion were documented. The authors present the results of their experience and conclude that DSA is an effective and cost-efficient method of examining this high risk patient population

  11. Inhalational Induction and Maintenance of Sevoflurane-Based Anesthesia or Total Intravenous Anesthesia Using Propofol and Fentanyl in Patients with Concomitant Dyscirculatory Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the results of treatment in patients with concomitant cerebrovascular diseases, by reducing the incidence of postoperative delirium due to neuroprotective properties of sevoflurane. Subjects and methods. Eighty2two patients with concomitant dyscirculatory encephalopathy were examined. The goals of the study included evaluating (a efficiency and safety of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA using propofol versus inhalational induction and (b maintenance of anesthesia (IIMA using sevoflurane in patients with atherosclerotic and hypertensive encephalopathy undergoing noncardiac surgery. Results. The patients from both groups were susceptible to episodes of unintentional cerebral desaturation (rSO2; however, only the TIVA group showed a high correlation between a decrease in rSO2 and increases in the blood levels of S100beta protein, a marker of neuronal damage, and in the incidence of postoperative delirium (r=0.7321; p=0.0000001 diagnosed in accordance to comprehensive clinical examination and MMSE scores. The IIMA group lacked a relationship of MMSE scores to the episodes of cerebral desaturation (r=0.1609; p=0.4860, which is regarded as a manifestation of the neuroprotective effect resulted from anesthetic preconditioning. Conclusion. sevafluran2based inhalational induction and maintenance of anesthesia in patients with atherosclerotic and hypertensive encephalopathy is preferable over intravenous anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl in patients with concomitatnt disregulatory enc encephalopathy. Key words: cerebral desaturation, postoperative delirium, anesthetic preconditioning, europrotection, sevoflurane.

  12. Mechanism of the hypotensive effect of a new beta-adrenergic blocking drug, arotinolol (S-596) in anesthetized rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, H; Nakazawa, M; Tsukada, T; Imai, S

    1985-10-01

    The mechanism of the hypotensive effect of arotinolol (dl-2-(3'-t-butylamino-2'-hydroxypropylthio)-4-(5'-carbamoyl-2'-th ienyl) thiazole hydrochloride, S-596), a new beta-adrenergic blocking drug with a weak alpha-adrenergic blocking activity, was studied in anesthetized rabbits. Intravenously administered arotinolol produced hypotension at doses above 3 micrograms/kg. Postganglionic renal nerve impulses (RNI) were effect-dependently at doses of 3 and 30 micrograms/kg but augmented after 300 micrograms/kg of arotinolol. The effects of the lower doses of arotinolol were similar to those of clonidine or propranolol, while the effects of the higher doses were similar to those of nitroprusside or phentolamine. The regression line representing the relation between the per cent change of the resting blood pressure and that of the numbers of RNI produced by the lower doses of arotinolol coincided with that of propranolol. Arotinolol blocked the pressor response to phenylephrine but not that to noradrenaline. Administration of arotinolol via the carotid artery produced a hypotension and a concomitant decrease of the numbers of RNI at doses of 3 to 30 micrograms/kg. The above results suggest that the hypotension produced by lower doses of arotinolol was attributable to a decreased sympathetic nervous activity, as is the case with propranolol, while the hypotension by higher doses was peripheral in origin, occurring as a consequence of the blocking effect on the alpha 1-adrenoceptor.

  13. Intravenous drugs infusion safety through smart pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gómez-Baraza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the role of smart infusion pumps in reducing errors related with the administration of intravenous medications. Method: Retrospective, observational study analyzing the implementation of a system with smart intravenous infusion pumps (Hospira MedNetTM and the role of the safety system for the detection of errors during the administration of drugs, sera, and blood. We included infusions administered at the day-care hospitals of hematology, oncology, rheumatology, and oncopediatrics. We analyzed adherence to the safety system, the number of programming errors detected, the commonly implicated drugs in these errors, and improvement actions. Results: During the study period, 120 smart pumps were implemented and data on 70,028 infusions were gathered. The rate of adherence to the safety program was 62.30% in hematology (6,887 infusions, 60,30% in oncology (28,127 infusions, 46,50% in rheumatology (1,950 infusions and 1.8% in oncopediatrics (139 infusions. 3,481 out of the established limits programming alerts were generated by the pumps: 2,716 of relative limit and 765 of absolute limit. En 807 infusions (2.17%, errors that could have had consequences for the patients could be prevented. These findings allowed implementing a series of strategies aimed at minimizing these errors in the future. Conclusions: The Hospira MedNetTM system detects deviations from the established protocols of intravenous infusion, preventing in this way potential adverse events for the patients. It also allows establishing correction measures and implementing the improvement strategies.

  14. Effect of intravenous lipid on human pancreatic secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, K; Valenzuela, J E

    1983-11-01

    Parenteral alimentation, including intravenous fat, is sometimes used in the treatment of patients with pancreatitis, although the effect of intravenous fat on human pancreatic secretion has not been systematically studied. Intravenous fat, however, has been shown to stimulate pancreatic protein secretion in the dog. The purpose of these studies was to clarify the effect of intravenous fat on human pancreatic secretion. Pancreatic secretion was assessed by measurement of enzymes and bicarbonate in duodenal aspirate collected via a double-lumen tube from 6 healthy volunteers. Four studies were randomly conducted on different days. On day 1, graded concentrations of Intralipid (5%, 10%, and 20%) were given intravenously for 1 h each, while secretin (8.2 pmol . kg-1 . h-1) was given as a background. On day 2, the same doses of Intralipid were infused intravenously without secretin. On day 3, the same doses of Intralipid were perfused into the intestine, and, finally, on day 4, 20% Intralipid was given by intestinal infusion for 2 h while 10% Intralipid was infused intravenously during the second hour. Significant stimulation of enzyme secretion was observed only during the infusion of fat into the intestine, not after intravenous infusion at any concentration. Pancreatic enzyme secretion, stimulated by intraintestinal fat, was not significantly modified by simultaneous intravenous lipid infusion. We conclude that since intravenous fat does not stimulate pancreatic secretion, its use in conditions where pancreatic stimulation is undesirable appears safe.

  15. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and hematological surveillance coupled with prompt correction of all abnormalities was responsible for good outcome. The patient's inguinal swellings turned out to be extensions of a large peritoneal mesothelioma, necessitating a large abdominal incision and blood loss. Analgesia was provided by bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks, which helped to reduce opioid use and rapid extubation.

  16. Eugenol as an anesthetic for juvenile common snook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Joaquim Bernardes Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of eugenol as an anesthetic for juvenile common snook, and to determine the minimum effective concentration for use in handling procedures. In the first trial, juvenile common snook were subjected to immersion baths at 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, and 150 mg L-1 eugenol concentrations, after which induction and recovery times were evaluated. In the second experiment, the lethal exposure time (LT50 at 75 mg L-1 was estimated. Minimum effective eugenol concentration was 50 mg L-1, andthe stage of deep anesthesia and recovery were, respectively, reached at 126.3 and 208.8 s. At 75 mg L-1, LT50 was 1,314 s, and induction time and recovery were also satisfactory; however, fish cannot tolerate over 229 s exposure.

  17. Electrocardiographic evaluation of two anesthetic combinations in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tárraga K.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate electrocardiographic changes in dogs aged 5 years or more submitted to two anesthetic combinations: atropine, levomeprazine, thiopental and halothane (ALTH, and atropine, tiletamine and zolazepam (ATZ. Forty dogs (24 males/16 females weighing 5-24kg, were used. Dogs had no cardiac problems and were submitted to tartarectomy. All animals were submitted to two electrocardiograms (ECG, one before anesthesia and other immediately before surgery. The dogs were divided into two groups: group 1 received ALTH and group 2 received ATZ. Alterations in the ST segment, T wave, cardiac rhythm and a significant reduction of vagal tonus index were observed in both groups, but in group 2 a significant reduction of the PR and QT intervals and an increase in heart rate were also observed. These data suggest that the ALTH combination caused fewer changes in the ECG than the ATZ combination.

  18. [Feasibility assessment of skin permeation for the local anesthetic lidocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y H; Sugibayashi, K; Morimoto, Y; Liao, G T; Hou, S X

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of skin permeation for lidocaine and pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape formulation containing lidocaine for skin local anesthetic were assessed. Firstly, in vitro skin permeation of the molecular and ionic forms of lidocaine from water and silicone fluid suspensions was measured using a side-by-side two diffusion cells and excised hairless rat skin. Secondly, PSA tape containing lidocaine was prepared by a general casting method using styrene-isoprene-styrene block copolymer. The in vitro release and skin permeation were evaluated and compared with that of Japan marketed xylocaine jelly. The effect of lidocaine concentration on the steady-state flux of skin permeation from 10% to 60% lidocaine PSA tapes was also evaluated.

  19. Anesthetic management of robot-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Karlekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a rare disorder involving neuromuscular junction. In conjunction with medical therapy, thymectomy is a known modality of treatment of MG and has shown to increase the probability of remission and overall symptomatic improvement. For minimally invasive thymectomy, video-.assisted thoracoscopic surgery has been the preferred surgical approach till recently. The robotic surgical procedure must necessarily bring new challenges to the anesthesiologists to effectively meet the specific requirements of the technique. At present, there is a paucity of literature regarding the anesthetic concerns of robotic assisted thymectomy, patient in question specifically posed a challenge since different maneuvers and techniques had to be tried to obtain optimum surgical conditions with stable ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters. Concerns of patient positioning and hemodynamic monitoring have also been discussed.

  20. [Anesthetic management for caesarean delivery in a parturient with achondroplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Hishinuma, Norimasa; Shirotori, Toru; Sasao, Junichi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kawamata, Mikito

    2014-06-01

    A 27-year-old parturient (height, 130 cm; weight, 43 kg) with achondroplasia, which is characterized by rhizomeric short stature, large head and frontal bossing, was scheduled for elective caesarean section (C/S) because of her contracted pelvis. Her first delivery had been performed by C/S under general anesthesia at a regional hospital 6 years before. Preoperative airway assessment showed normal mouth opening and mobile cervical spine. Since she had anxiety about needle puncture and refused neuraxial blockade and since we considered the trachea could be intubated, we decided to perform C/S under general anesthesia at 37 weeks of gestation. The patient and baby had an uneventful perioperative course. Underdevelopment of bone formation results in characteristic craniofacial and vertebral abnormalities in patients with achondroplasia. Anesthetic management of achondroplastic parturients should be specified to individual basis based on careful preoperative assessment of craniofacial and vertebral deformities.

  1. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  2. Anaphylactic reaction to hydroxyzine in an anesthetized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, A; Lavaud, F; Gallet, A; Boulay-Malinovsky, C; Mertes, P M; Malinovsky, J M

    2009-08-01

    A case of anaphylaxis occurring during a general anesthesia is presented. The reaction was severe with bronchospasm and hypotension (grade 2 in the severity of per-operative anaphylactic shock). The responsibility of hydroxyzine, administered for premedication was suspected by intradermal testing with the molecule, which was twice positive at a 10(-2) dilution of the commercial solution. The same test remained negative in 5 control subjects. All the other drugs received during anesthesia gave negative results. Using the same protocol excepted for the use of hydroxyzine a new general anesthesia could be performed under a premedication with dexchlorpheniramine without any allergic reaction. Anaphylactic reactions are very rare with hydroxyzine used in premedication for anesthesia in regard to the large prescription of the drug. Only two previous cases were reported but attention of the allergist must be also pointed towards the medications received in the perioperative period as for the anesthetic drugs.

  3. [Anesthetic management of a patient with latex allergy diagnosed preoperatively].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N; Yamada, T; Sekiguchi, M; Kotani, T; Ochiai, R; Takeda, J

    2000-07-01

    Since the first report in 1979, the number of patients with latex allergy has progressively increased. We experienced an anesthetic management of a 3 year-old child who underwent the repair of anal atresia. The first operation was performed in newborn period. After the surgery, the patient developed skin rash and the loss of consciousness every time anal irrigation was made with latex-containing catheter. Latex-allergy was diagnosed at the age of 3 years, with the positive skin test by latex extract. It took enormous time and efforts to find out the possibility of latex-contamination in a wide variety of medical equipments and supplies to prevent allergic reaction during perioperative period. In this patient, perioperative cause was uneventful. It is suggested that preoperative preparation is essential and caution should be also paid to prevent allergic reaction in daily life.

  4. Carcinoid tumors: Challenges and considerations during anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neoplasms of neuroendocrine tissues from enterochromaffin or kulchitsky cells, which have the potential to metastasize. The mediators released from these tumors when bypass the hepatic metabolism, can lead to the possible development of carcinoid syndrome. This is a life-threatening complication, which can lead to profound hemodynamic instability, especially in a peri-operative period, when the patient is exposed to various types of noxious stimuli. Off late, use of octreotide, a synthetic analog of somatostatin, has significantly reduced the peri-operative morbidity and mortality. The current review discusses the various anesthetic challenges and considerations during peri-operative management of carcinoid tumors.

  5. Retroperitoneal fibrosis with normal intravenous urogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, F. M.; Stone, T.; Stephenson, T. P.; Lazarus, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 58 year old male presented with a two week history of low back pain and malaise. The intravenous urogram (IVU) at presentation was normal but within three months he had developed renal failure with bilateral ureteric obstruction on repeat IVU. Primary retroperitoneal fibrosis was confirmed at operation. This case demonstrates that retroperitoneal fibrosis may progress rapidly to renal failure within a few months of the first symptoms. In addition, the IVU may be normal in the early stages of the illness. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3983053

  6. Pyeloureteral visualization using glucagon during intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepper-Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, P.H.; Kruse, V.

    1983-01-01

    194 adult patients were subjected to intravenous urography. In order to study the effect of glucagon on the visualization of the pyeloureteral system, IVU's were performed in four different ways: I. with abdominal compression, II. with glucagon 1 mg.i.v., III. without abdominal compression and without glucagon, and IV. with abdominal compression and glucagon 1 mg.i.v. Coded objective and subjective analyses showed significant worsened visualization of the pyelocalyceal systems, when IVU was performed with glucagon alone. Ureteral visualization was equal in all four groups. Glucagon fails as a pharmacological alternative to abdominal compression in adult human subjects. (orig.) [de

  7. Switching between intravenous and subcutaneous trastuzumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Müller, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and tolerability of switching between subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) trastuzumab in the PrefHer study (NCT01401166). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer completed (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and were randomised to receive four....... Rates of clinically important events, including grade ≥3 AEs, serious AEs, AEs leading to study drug discontinuation and cardiac AEs, were low and similar between treatment arms (safety signals for trastuzumab were observed. CONCLUSIONS: PrefHer revealed...... that switching from IV to SC trastuzumab (hand-held syringe or SID) or vice versa did not impact the known safety profile of trastuzumab....

  8. Under Utilization of Local Anesthetics in Infant Lumbar Punctures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorchynski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar Puncture (LP is an invasive procedure frequently used to diagnose meningitis among the pediatric population. Neonates and infants have not routinely received local anesthesia prior to LP. Study Objective: To determine whether emergency medicine physicians and pediatricians use local analgesics on neonates and infants prior to performing an LP and to identify which local anesthetics, if any, were used. Methods: Prospective, cohort study of all infants, six months of age or less, that received an LP in the emergency department (ED or inpatient pediatric units for suspected meningitis during a period of year at a university tertiary care hospital. Results: A total sample population of 111 infants that received an LP within the study period. A control population of 42 adults received an LP. Only 40.4% (45/111 of the infants received local analgesia prior to LP: either 1% lidocaine, EMLA or a combination of the two. Infants were less likely to receive lidocaine or EMLA prior to LP compared to adult subjects (OR= 0.27; 95% CI0.12 to 0.62. No neonates that were less than one month of age received local procedural anesthesia by emergency medicine or pediatric physicians. ED physicians’ use of local anesthesia prior to LP increased with increasing age of the infant. The pediatricians in this study used local anesthesia prior to LP when the infant was at least five months of age. Discussion: The data objectively support recent literature regarding the under use or lack of use of analgesia prior to LP among neonates and infants. Local anesthetics should be used routinely without exception prior to performing an LP in the pediatric population.

  9. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Anesthetic Care of Patient With Heroin Addiction: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Shu-Yu

    2018-04-01

    The use of illegal drugs in Taiwan is on the rise. Drug addicts often have complex physical, psychological, and social problems. In addition, they often avoid disclosing their illicit drug use by deceit, concealment, or under-reporting. Building and maintaining relationships of trust with drug-addict patients has become a critical issue in achieving better care quality. In this case report, we report on an anesthesia care process for a heroin addict who was admitted for open reduction and internal fixation surgery for the femur and patella fractures after a car accident. During the six-hour perioperative care period, starting from 11pm on November 30th to 5am on December 1st, 2015, the patient was not willing to disclose his illicit drug use before the surgery. However, the nurse anesthetist noticed signs and symptoms of drug use. The nurse empathized with the patient's worries, provided him with a safe communication environment, and gained trust from the patient in a timely manner, which then enabled the patient to fully disclose his illicit drug use with the nurse anesthetist. The anesthesia-care strategy was then modified according to client's condition. The nurse anesthetist played an important role of bridging communications between the patient and medical care staffs and of modifying the care strategies in a timely manner. During the care period, the blood-borne disease contamination was successfully prevented, the client received uneventful pain management, there was a lack of withdrawal symptoms, and the staffs and patient safety was maintained. The literature on the anesthetic care of heroin patients undergoing surgery is relatively limited in Taiwan. The findings in the current case report add information on providing anesthetic care to patients with drug addiction. Publishing additional case reports, research, and clinical recommendations is essential for improving care quality for this vulnerable population.

  11. Adding metoclopramide to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Safavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metoclopromide have local anesthetic properties. The main object of performing the present study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of metoclopromide 10 mg when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA of upper extremities in trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients undergoing upper limb producer were randomly allocated to the three groups to receive 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 ml (Group L, n = 30 or 10 mg metoclopromide plus 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 ml (group LM, n = 30 or 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 ml plus 10 mg metoclopromide intravenously (Group IM, n = 30. Results: Our study showed that the onset times for sensory and motor block were significantly shorter in Group LM compared with Group L and Group IM (4.5 ± 0.7 vs. 5.0 ± 0.7 and 5.0 ± 0.6, respectively, P = 0.006 for sensory block; 6.3 ± 0.7 vs. 5.1 ± 0.9 and 5.9 ± 0.6 respectively, P = 0.000 for motor block. The postoperative VAS scores were significantly less at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after tourniquet release in Group LM compared with Group L and Group IM ( P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that adding 10 mg metoclopromide to lidocaine for IVRG in trauma patients reduced intraoperative and postoperative analgesic use till 24 hours and improve quality of anesthesia.

  12. Ultrasonography-guided peripheral intravenous access versus traditional approaches in patients with difficult intravenous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Thomas G; Parikh, Aman K; Satz, Wayne A; Fojtik, John P

    2005-11-01

    We assess the success rate of emergency physicians in placing peripheral intravenous catheters in difficult-access patients who were unsuccessfully cannulated by emergency nurses. A technique using real-time ultrasonographic guidance by 2 physicians was compared with traditional approaches using palpation and landmark guidance. This was a prospective, systematically allocated study of all patients requiring intravenous access who presented to 2 university hospitals between October 2003 and March 2004. Inclusion criterion was the inability of any available nurse to obtain intravenous access after at least 3 attempts on a subgroup of patients who had a history of difficult intravenous access because of obesity, history of intravenous drug abuse, or chronic medical problems. Exclusion criterion was the need for central venous access. Patients presenting on odd days were allocated to the ultrasonographic-guided group, and those presenting on even days were allocated to the traditional-approach group. Endpoints were successful cannulation, number of sticks, time, and patient satisfaction. Sixty patients were enrolled, 39 on odd days and 21 on even days. Success rate was greater for the ultrasonographic group (97%) versus control (33%), difference in proportions of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI] 39% to 71%). The ultrasonographic group required less overall time (13 minutes versus 30 minutes, for a difference of 17 [95% CI 0.8 to 25.6]), less time to successful cannulation from first percutaneous puncture (4 minutes versus 15 minutes, for a difference of 11 [95% CI 8.2 to 19.4]), and fewer percutaneous punctures (1.7 versus 3.7, for a difference of 2.0 [95% CI 1.27 to 2.82]) and had greater patient satisfaction (8.7 versus 5.7, for a difference of 3.0 [95% CI 1.82 to 4.29]) than the traditional landmark approach. Ultrasonographic-guided peripheral intravenous access is more successful than traditional "blind" techniques, requires less time, decreases the number of

  13. Intravenous Carbamazepine for Adults With Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, P Brittany; Tillery, Erika E; DeFalco, Alicia Potter

    2018-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, dosage and administration, potential drug-drug interactions, and place in therapy of the intravenous (IV) formulation of carbamazepine (Carnexiv) for the treatment of seizures in adult patients. A comprehensive PubMed and EBSCOhost search (1945 to August 2017) was performed utilizing the keywords carbamazepine, Carnexiv, carbamazepine intravenous, IV carbamazepine, seizures, epilepsy, and seizure disorder. Additional data were obtained from literature review citations, manufacturer's product labeling, and Lundbeck website as well as Clinicaltrials.gov and governmental sources. All English-language trials evaluating IV carbamazepine were analyzed for this review. IV carbamazepine is FDA approved as temporary replacement therapy for treatment of adult seizures. Based on a phase I trial and pooled data from 2 open-label bioavailability studies comparing oral with IV dosing, there was no noted indication of loss of seizure control in patients switched to short-term replacement antiepileptic drug therapy with IV carbamazepine. The recommended dose of IV carbamazepine is 70% of the patient's oral dose, given every 6 hours via 30-minute infusions. The adverse effect profile of IV carbamazepine is similar to that of the oral formulation, with the exception of added infusion-site reactions. IV carbamazepine is a reasonable option for adults with generalized tonic-clonic or focal seizures, previously stabilized on oral carbamazepine, who are unable to tolerate oral medications for up to 7 days. Unknown acquisition cost and lack of availability in the United States limit its use currently.

  14. The human experience with intravenous levodopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan H Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies.Background: While safe intravenous (IV use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data.Methods: Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit and side effects.Results: We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959-1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. Over 2750 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson’s disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis.Conclusion: Over 2750 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration.

  15. Flank pain: is Intravenous Urogram necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, H S; Lin, M B; Khoo, T K

    2001-09-01

    To determine the diagnostic yield of Intravenous Urogram (IVU) and the values of plain radiograph of kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) and urinalysis as screening tests, with the objective to improve the cost effectiveness, in the management of patients presenting with flank pain due to urinary lithiasis. All Intravenous Urogram (IVU) request forms and reports for the month of February 1998 were audited. The case notes, urinalysis, KUB and IVU films were traced and reviewed. There were 110 patients investigated, 61.8% (68) had normal IVU, 38.2% (42) had abnormal IVU. The sensitivity and specificity of KUB alone was 79.4% and 90%. The sensitivity using urinalysis alone was 90.9% and its specificity 33.8%. The sensitivity of combined KUB and urinalysis was 100% and its specificity 26%, with a negative predictive value of 100%. All the patients with both negative KUB and urinalysis in our study were found to have negative IVU. Our study shows that in patients with both negative KUB and urinalysis, the yield of IVU is very low and may not be necessary. This is important, as an IVU examination is not without risk. A combination of KUB with urinary analysis and careful evaluation of clinical symptoms will improve the cost-effectiveness of patient management.

  16. Intravenous dynamic nucleography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthall, L.

    1972-01-01

    The advent of stationary imaging devices has created interest in studying cerebral blood flows and transits with diffusible and nondiffusible radioactive indicators. Much of this has disclosed interesting pathophysiology, but not necessarily of significant diagnostic import to include in routine patient workup. The conventional static brain scan is one of the more useful tests in the nuclear medicine armamentarium for uncovering and localizing intracranial disease. Unfortunately, it does not as a rule clearly distinguish cerebral vascular accidents, neoplasms, arteriovenous malformations, and so forth, which is important from the standpoint of patient management. Aside from clinical impressions a diagnosis is often based on the appearance of the radiocontrast angiogram, which is not always desirable because of the implicit hazards. Thus it is incumbent upon investigators to search for innocuous intravenous methods of identifying the various intracranial afflictions. Intravenous 99 /sup m/Tc-pertechnetate comparisons of brain hemisphere perfusion as a routine complement to static brain imaging are useful. Estimations of disparate radioactive transits are made qualitatively from serial 4 to 5 sec exposure scintiphotographs. (U.S.)

  17. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta......-analysis of the four trials has shown that IVIG reduces the relapse rate and, possibly, disease progression. In patients with a first episode of demyelinating disease, IVIG delays the time to the second relapse and thereby to the diagnosis of definite MS. In patients with an acute MS relapse, IVIG as add-on therapy...... to methylprednisolone does not make remission of symptoms faster or more complete. IVIG does not seem to be of any benefit to chronic visual or motor symptoms in MS. In secondary progressive MS, IVIG has not shown any effect on disease progression, relapses or new magnetic resonance imaging lesions. Experimental...

  18. Adverse reactions to iotroxate at intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, U.

    1987-01-01

    The number and type of adverse reactions to meglumine iotroxate at intravenous infusion cholangiography, performed one day prior to elective cholecystectomy, were recorded in a prospective investigation of 196 asymptomatic, anicteric patients. One hundred ml (50 mg I/ml) of contrast medium was infused over a period of 30 minutes. Only 2 minor (1%) and no severe or fatal reactions were noted. A review of the literature on the use of iotroxate in 2492 patients, including those in the present investigation, revealed a complication rate of 3.5% (3.0% minor, 0.3% moderate and 0.2% severe reactions) at infusion of iotroxate (5.0-8.0 g I) over a period of 30 to 120 minutes. This compared favourably with the 5% complication rate (4% minor, 0.5% moderate and 0.5% severe reactions) at infusion of iodoxamate and the 9% complication rate (5% minor, 1% moderate and 3% severe reactions) at infusion of ioglycamide. Irrespective of the contrast agent used, the frequency of adverse reactions at infusion was found to be 3 times lower than when equal amounts (5.0-5.6 g I) of the same medium were injected. It is concluded that, at present, infusion of iotroxate in an amount which approximates to the transportation maximum of the liver is the least toxic way of performing intravenous cholangiography with an optimum filling of the bile ducts. (orig.)

  19. A tomographic approach to intravenous coronary arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritman, E.L.; Bove, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Coronary artery anatomy can be visualized using high speed, volume scanning X-ray CT. A single scan during a bolus injection of contrast medium provides image data for display of all angles of view of the opacified coronary arterial tree. Due to the tomographic nature of volume image data the superposition of contrast filled cardiac chambers, such as would occur in the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent, can be eliminated. Data are presented which support these statements. The Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) was used to scan a life-like radiologic phantom of an adult human thorax in which the left atrial and ventricular chambers and the major epicardial coronary arteries were opacified so as to simulate the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent. A catheter filled with diluted contrast agent and with regions of luminal narrowing (i.e. 'stenoses') was advanced along a tract equivalent to a right ventricular catheterization. Ease of visualization of the catheter 'stenoses' and the accuracy with which they can be measured are presented. (Auth.)

  20. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.A.; Glenny, R.W.; Godwin, J.D.; Hampson, N.B.; Cantino, M.E.; Reichenbach, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  2. Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery at Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: A prospective, randomized, double blind controlled trial.

  3. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  4. Anesthetic Agents and Neuronal Autophagy. What We Know and What We Don't.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Shen, Jianjun; McQuillan, Patrick M; Hu, Zhiyong

    2018-01-01

    Ethanol is known to have both γ-Aminobutyric acid agonist and Nmethyl- D-aspartate antagonist characteristics similar to commonly used volatile anesthetic agents. Recent evidence demonstrates that autophagy can reduce the development of ethanol induced neurotoxicity. Recent studies have found that general anesthesia can cause longterm impairment of both mitochondrial morphogenesis and synaptic transmission in the developing rat brain, both of which are accompanied by enhanced autophagy activity. Autophagy may play an important role in general anesthetic mediated neurotoxicity. This review outlines the role of autophagy in the development of anesthetic related neurotoxicity and includes an explanation of the role of autophagy in neuronal cell survival and death, the relationship between anesthetic agents and neuronal autophagy, possible molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying general anesthetic agent induced activation of neuronal autophagy in the developing brain, and potential therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating autophagic pathways. In a time- and concentration-dependent pattern, general anesthetic agents can disrupt intracellular calcium homeostasis which enhances both autophagy and apoptosis activation. The degree of neural cell injury may be ultimately determined by the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis. It appears likely that the increase in calcium flux associated with some anesthetic agents disrupts lysosomal function. This results in an over-activation of endosomal- lysosomal trafficking causing mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species upregulation, and lipid peroxidation. Autophagy may play a role in the development of anesthetic related neurotoxicity. Understanding this may lead to strategies or therapies aimed at preventing or ameliorating general anesthetic agent mediated neurotoxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Factors associated with anesthetic-related death in dogs and cats in primary care veterinary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Nora S; Mohn, Thomas J; Yang, Mingyin; Spofford, Nathaniel; Marsh, Alison; Faunt, Karen; Lund, Elizabeth M; Lefebvre, Sandra L

    2017-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors for anesthetic-related death in pet dogs and cats. DESIGN Matched case-control study. ANIMALS 237 dogs and 181 cats. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records from 822 hospitals were examined to identify dogs and cats that underwent general anesthesia (including sedation) or sedation alone and had death attributable to the anesthetic episode ≤ 7 days later (case animals; 115 dogs and 89 cats) or survived > 7 days afterward (control animals [matched by species and hospital]; 122 dogs and 92 cats). Information on patient characteristics and data related to the anesthesia session were extracted. Conditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with anesthetic-related death for each species. RESULTS The anesthetic-related death rate was higher for cats (11/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.11%]) than for dogs (5/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.05%]). Increasing age was associated with increased odds of death for both species, as was undergoing nonelective (vs elective) procedures. Odds of death for dogs were significantly greater when preanesthetic physical examination results were not recorded (vs recorded) or when preanesthetic Hct was outside (vs within) the reference range. Odds of death for cats were greater when intra-anesthesia records for oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were absent. Underweight dogs had almost 15 times the odds of death as nonunderweight dogs; for cats, odds of death increased with increasing body weight (but not with overweight body condition). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Several factors were associated with anesthetic-related death in cats and dogs. This information may be useful for development of strategies to reduce anesthetic-related risks when possible and for education of pet owners about anesthetic risks.

  6. The effect of IV dexamethasone versus local anesthetic infiltration technique in postoperative nausea and vomiting after tonsillectomy in children: A randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, Zoher; Kanawati, Saleh; Al Khatib, Rania; Ziade, Fouad; Naja, Zeina Z; Naja, Ahmad Salah; Rajab, Mariam

    2017-01-01

    Local anesthetic infiltration and corticosteroids had shown effectiveness in reducing post tonsillectomy nausea, vomiting and pain. To compare the effect of intravenous dexamethasone versus pre-incision infiltration of local anesthesia in pediatric tonsillectomy on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The secondary objective was postoperative pain. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Children admitted to undergo tonsillectomy aged between 4 and 13 years from January 2015 to August 2015 were enrolled and divided into two groups. Both groups had general anesthesia. Group I received intravenous dexamethasone 0.5 mg/kg (maximum dose 16 mg) with placebo pre-incision infiltration. Group II received pre-incision infiltration a total of 2-4 ml local anesthesia mixture with saline and an equivalent volume of intravenous saline. Group I consisted of 64 patients while group II had 65 patients. In the PACU, 15.6% of patients in group I experienced vomiting compared to 3.1% in group II (p-value = 0.032). After 24 h, the incidence of PONV was significantly higher in group I compared to group II (26.6% vs. 9.2% respectively, p-value = 0.019). At 48 h postoperatively, PONV was significantly higher in group I (p-value = 0.013). The incidence was similar in both groups after three, four and five postoperative days. Baseline pain and pain during swallowing were significantly different at 6, 12 and 24 h as well as days 1 through 5. Pain upon jaw opening was significantly different at 6, 12 and 24 h between the two groups. Pain while eating soft food was significantly different at 24 h and days 2 through 5. In the PACU, 20.3% of patients in group I received diclofenac compared to 3.1% in group II (p-value = 0.005). From day 1 till day 5, analgesic consumption was significantly higher in group I. Local anesthetic infiltration in addition to NSAIDS and paracetamol could serve as a multimodal analgesia and

  7. Anesthetic management of a large mediastinal mass for tracheal stent placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The anesthetic management of patients with large mediastinal masses can be complicated due to the pressure effects of the mass on the airway or major vessels. We present the successful anesthetic management of a 64-year-old female with a large mediastinal mass that encroached on the great vessels and compressed the trachea. A tracheal stent was placed to relieve the tracheal compression under general anesthesia. Spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the perioperative period with the use of a classic laryngeal mask airway. We discuss the utility of laryngeal mask airway for anesthetic management of tracheal stenting in patients with mediastinal masses.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel 2,6-Disubstituted Phenol Derivatives as General Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Linlin; Ren, Lei; Wan, Songlin; Liu, Guoliang; Luo, Xinfeng; Liu, Zhenhong; Li, Fangqiong; Yu, Yan; Liu, Jianyu; Wei, Yonggang

    2017-05-11

    A novel series of optically active 2,6-disubstituted alkylphenols with improved anesthetic profiles compared to widely used propofol were synthesized. The incorporation of the cyclopropyl group not only increased the steric effect but also introduced stereoselective effects over their anesthetic properties. Compounds 1, 2, and 6 were selected as potential candidates for further preclinical development including studies of their water-soluble prodrugs. Clinical studies of candidate compound 6 (Haisco HSK3486) as a general anesthetic are being performed in Australia and China.

  9. Anesthetic constituents of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim.: A pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Rong; Cui, Mei-Yu; Zhang, Qi-Li; Zhang, Mei-Yan; Yu, Yu-Ming; Zhou, Xian-Ying; Yu, Zhi-Guo; Zhao, Yun-Li

    2016-07-01

    A sensitive and selective ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was established and validated for the simultaneous determination of hydroxy-α-sanshool, hydroxy-β-sanshool, and hydroxy-γ-sanshool in rat plasma after the subcutaneous and intravenous administration of an extract of the pericarp of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim. Piperine was used as the internal standard. The analytes were extracted from rat plasma by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and separated on a Thermo Hypersil GOLD C18 column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 1.9 μm) with a gradient elution system at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile/0.05% formic acid in water and the total analysis time was 4 min. Positive electrospray ionization was performed using multiple reaction monitoring mode for the analytes. The calibration curves of the three analytes were linear over the tested concentration range. The intra- and interday precision was no more than 13.6%. Extraction recovery, matrix effect, and stability were satisfactory in rat plasma. The developed and validated method was suitable for the quantification of hydroxy-α-sanshool, hydroxy-β-sanshool, and hydroxy-γ-sanshool and successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of these analytes after subcutaneous and intravenous administration to rats. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Liposomal Bupivacaine Use in Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks Reduces Pain and Postoperative Intravenous Opioid Requirement After Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Audrey L; Adhikary, Sanjib D; Quintili, Ashley; Puleo, Frances J; Choi, Christine S; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Messaris, Evangelos

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced recovery protocols frequently use multimodal postoperative analgesia to improve postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liposomal bupivacaine use in transversus abdominis plane blocks on postoperative pain scores and opioid use after colorectal surgery. This was a retrospective cohort study comparing outcomes between patients receiving nonliposomal anesthetic (n = 104) and liposomal bupivacaine (n = 303) blocks. The study was conducted at a single tertiary care center. Patients included those identified within an institutional database as inpatients undergoing colorectal procedures between 2013 and 2015 who underwent transversus abdominis plane block for perioperative analgesia. The study measured postoperative pain scores and opioid requirements. Patients receiving liposomal bupivacaine had significantly lower pain scores for the first 24 to 36 postoperative hours. Pain scores were similar after 36 hours. The use of intravenous opioids among the liposomal bupivacaine group decreased by more than one third during the hospitalization (99.1 vs 64.5 mg; p = 0.040). The use of ketorolac was also decreased (49.0 vs 18.3 mg; p bupivacaine group but did not achieve statistical significance. The study was limited by its retrospective, single-center design and heterogeneity of block administration. Attenuated pain scores observed with liposomal bupivacaine use were associated with significantly lower intravenous opioid and ketorolac use, suggesting that liposomal bupivacaine-containing transversus abdominis plane blocks are well aligned with the opioid-reducing goals of many enhanced recovery protocols.

  11. Prospective, double blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing vapocoolant spray versus placebo spray in adults undergoing intravenous cannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Sharon E

    2017-10-01

    Painful diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are common in the health care setting. Eliminating, or at least, minimizing the pain associated with various procedures should be a priority. Although there are many benefits of providing local/topical anesthesia prior to performing painful procedures, ranging from greater patient/family satisfaction to increased procedural success rates; local/topical anesthetics are frequently not used. Reasons include the need for a needlestick to administer local anesthetics such as lidocaine and the long onset for topical anesthetics. Vapocoolants eliminate the risks associated with needlesticks, avoids the tissue distortion with intradermal local anesthetics, eliminates needlestick pain, have a quick almost instantaneous onset, are easy to apply, require no skills or devices to apply, are convenient, and inexpensive. The aims of this study were to ascertain if peripheral intravenous (PIV) cannulation pain would be significantly decreased by using a vapocoolant (V) versus sterile water placebo (S) spray, as determined by a reduction of at least ≥1.8 points on numerical rating scale (NRS) after vapocoolant versus placebo spray, the side effects and incidence of side effects from a vapocoolant spray; and whether there were any long term visible skin abnormalities associated with the use of a vapocoolant spray. Prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of 300 adults (ages 18-80) requiring PIV placement in a hospital ED, randomized to S (N=150) or V (N=150) prior to PIV. Efficacy outcome was the difference in PIV pain: NRS from 0 (none) to worst (10). Safety outcomes included a skin checklist for local adverse effects (i.e., redness, blanching, edema, ecchymosis, itching, changes in skin pigmentation), vital sign (VS) changes, and before/after photographs of the PIV site. Patient demographics (age, gender, race), comorbidity, medications, and vital signs; and PIV procedure variables (e.g., IV needle size, location

  12. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Veerappa, Muralimanohar; Jawali, Vivek; Pandya, Nischal; Krishnamoorthy, Jayaprakash; Muniraju, Geetha; George, Antony; Baishya, Jitumoni

    2016-01-01

    Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females) coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day '0' was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to 'lift' up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access) for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any anesthesiologist wishing to start this technique must be aware of

  13. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. Aim: This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. Results: We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day ′0′ was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to ′lift′ up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any

  14. Anaphylaxis after intravenous infusion of dexketoprofen trometamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Guler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dexketoprofen trometamol (DT, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is a highly water-soluble salt and active enantiomer of rac-ketoprofen. Its parenteral form is commonly used for acute pain management in emergency departments of our country. Side effects such as diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, stomach pain, and vomiting may be seen after the use of DT. Anaphylactic shock (AS secondary to infusion of DT is very rare and, to our knowledge, it is the first case report describing this side effect. This case report was presented to emphasize that AS may be seen after the use of DT. Keywords: Anaphylactic shock, Dexketoprofen trometamol, Intravenous infusion (MeSH database

  15. Intravenous urography in children and youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H.K.; Gudmundsen, T.E.; Oestensen, H.; Pape, J.F.

    1987-10-01

    This report derives from Tromsoe in northern Norway. In a retrospective study of the indications for intravenous urography (IU) and the findings at IU in 740 patients (451 girls and 289 boys) aged 0-19 years, we found that urinary tract infections accounted for 69.4% of the IU in females and 30.1% of the IU in males, most often seen in the youngest patients. The pathological findings most frequently seen were anomalies (17 females and 10 males) and urinary tract obstruction (3 females and 15 males). The present study indicates the following: first, that the yield of IU in the primary investigation of children and youth suffering from enuresis and non-specific abdominal disturbancies is small; and second, that the use of IU in children and youth with urinary tract infection and haematuria should be questioned and reconsidered.

  16. Renal trauma and the intravenous urogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, C D; Britton, J M; Charlton, C A

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of all patients with blunt abdominal trauma associated with haematuria admitted to one hospital (Royal United, Bath) in a 10-year period was conducted to establish the contribution of the intravenous urogram (IVU) in their management. Eighty-one case records were analysed. Of 35 IVUs performed in patients with microscopic (reagentstrip positive) haematuria, only one was abnormal. In contrast, 27 IVUs performed in patients with macroscopic (naked eye) haematuria revealed 17 major injuries and 5 previously unrecognized congenital abnormalities. It is concluded that an IVU is an unnecessary and non-contributory investigation in patients with microscopic haematuria and guidelines are suggested for the role of IVU in patients with blunt abdominal trauma associated with haematuria. PMID:3560121

  17. Retrocaval ureter: the importance of intravenous urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Radhiana; Aziz, Azian Abd; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2011-10-01

    Retrocaval ureter is a rare cause of hydronephrosis. Its rarity and non-specific presentation pose a challenge to surgeons and radiologists in making the correct diagnosis. Differentiation from other causes of urinary tract obstruction, especially the more common urolithiasis, is important for successful surgical management. Current practice has seen multislice computed tomography (MSCT) rapidly replaces intravenous urography (IVU) in the assessment of patients with hydronephrosis due to suspected urolithiasis, especially ureterolithiasis. However, MSCT, without adequate opacification of the entire ureter, may allow the physician to overlook a retrocaval ureter as the cause of hydronephrosis. High-resolution IVU images can demonstrate the typical appearance that leads to the accurate diagnosis of a retrocaval ureter. We reported a case that illustrates this scenario and highlights the importance of IVU in the assessment of a complex congenital disorder involving the urinary tract.

  18. Intravenous immunoglobulin, pharmacogenomics, and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wu, Mei-Shin; Chien, Shu-Chen; Liu, Shih-Feng; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2016-02-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology and it is therefore worth examining the multifactorial interaction of genes and environmental factors. Targeted genetic association and genome-wide association studies have helped to provide a better understanding of KD from infection to the immune-related response. Findings in the past decade have contributed to a major breakthrough in the genetics of KD, with the identification of several genomic regions linked to the pathogenesis of KD, including ITPKC, CD40, BLK, and FCGR2A. This review focuses on the factors associated with the genetic polymorphisms of KD and the pharmacogenomics of the response to treatment in patients with intravenous immunoglobulin resistance. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. [Use of intravenous immunoglobulins in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duse, M; Plebani, A; Crispino, P; Ugazio, A G

    1991-01-01

    Intramuscular Immunoglobulin (IMIG) have been used for 40 years in substitution therapy for antibody deficiencies and as prophylaxis for and treatment of several infectious diseases. Modified and intact intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIG) have now been available for more than 10 years: only the intact product express full Fc- mediated functions with a biological half-life of IgG (3-4 weeks). These preparations have constituted an important achievement in the treatment of humoral immunodeficiencies also resulting in a dramatic improvement of the prognosis. The use of IVIG has also modified the therapeutic approach to several secondary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Treatment with IVIG for immune modulation in several diseases is investigated: substantial data indicate a useful role in selected cases of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, Kawasaky disease and in some neurologic diseases. IVIG are substantially safe and severe side effects have been rarely reported.

  20. Intravenous urography in children and youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H.K.; Gudmundsen, T.E.; Oestensen, H.; Pape, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    This report derives from Tromsoe in northern Norway. In a retrospective study of the indications for intravenous urography (IU) and the findings at IU in 740 patients (451 girls and 289 boys) aged 0-19 years, we found that urinary tract infections accounted for 69.4% of the IU in females and 30.1% of the IU in males, most often seen in the youngest patients. The pathological findings most frequently seen were anomalies (17 females and 10 males) and urinary tract obstruction (3 females and 15 males). The present study indicates the following: first, that the yield of IU in the primary investigation of children and youth suffering from enuresis and non-specific abdominal disturbancies is small; and second, that the use of IU in children and youth with urinary tract infection and haematuria should be questioned and reconsidered. (orig.)

  1. Solar urticaria successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Idiopathic solar urticaria (SU) is a rare, debilitating photodermatosis, which may be difficult to treat. First-line treatment with antihistamines is effective in mild cases, but remission after phototherapeutic induction of tolerance is often short-lived. Other treatment options include plasma exchange, photopheresis and cyclosporin. We present two cases of severe, idiopathic SU, which were resistant to conventional treatment. Both patients achieved remission after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and have remained in remission at 13 months and 4 years, respectively. There are only two case reports of successful treatment of solar urticaria with IVIg. In our experience IVIg given at a total dose of 2 g\\/kg over several 5-day courses about a month apart is an effective treatment option for severe idiopathic SU. It is also generally safe, even if certainly subject to significant theoretical risks, such as induction of viral infection or anaphylaxis.

  2. Ceftaroline fosamil: just another intravenous antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Various antibiotics, especially cephalosporins, are used for empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalisation and intravenous treatment, and for serious infections of the skin and soft tissues. When the infection is caused by bacteria that are resistant to common antibiotics, some antibiotics such as vancomycin are available. Ceftaroline (Zinforo, AstraZeneca) is a new cephalosporin intended for intravenous administration (as ceftaroline fosamil). It is authorised for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and for serious infections of the skin and soft tissues. In two double-blind, randomised trials of ceftaroline versus ceftriaxone (a cephalosporin), ceftaroline showed no advantage in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Note that the results of these trials are undermined by the use of a suboptimal dose of ceftriaxone. Ceftaroline has not been evaluated versus a first-line treatment for serious skin infections. It has been compared with second-line antibiotics in patients with serious skin infections in four randomised trials. None of these trials showed that ceftaroline has superior efficacy. The known adverse effect profile of ceftaroline is similar to that of all cephalosporins, and comprises hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and gastrointestinal disorders (including rare cases of pseudomembranous colitis). A possible excess of haematological and renal adverse effects has also been raised. Given the absence of relevant data, it is best to avoid using ceftaroline during pregnancy. In practice, there is no proof that ceftaroline represents a therapeutic advance for patients with community-acquired pneumonia warranting hospitalisation or with serious skin or soft-tissue infections. It is best to stick with better-known antibiotics.

  3. Phytonadione Content in Branded Intravenous Fat Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchielli, Maria Luisa; Conti, Matteo; Motta, Roberto; Puggioli, Cristina; Bersani, Germana

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions (IVFE) with different fatty acid compositions contain vitamin E as a by-product of vegetable and animal oil during the refining processes. Likewise, other lipid-soluble vitamins may be present in IVFE. No data, however, exist about phytonadione (vitamin K1) concentration in IVFE information leaflets. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the phytonadione content in different IVFE. Analyses were carried out in triplicate on 6 branded IVFE as follows: 30% soybean oil (100%), 20% olive-soybean oil (80%-20%), 20% soybean-medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) coconut oil (50%-50%), 20% soybean-olive-MCT-fish oil (30%-25%-30%-15%), 20% soybean-MCT-fish oil (40%-50%-10%), and 10% pure fish oil (100%). Phytonadione was analyzed and quantified by a quali-quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method after its extraction from the IVFE by an isopropyl alcohol-hexane mixture, reverse phase-liquid chromatography, and specific multiple-reaction monitoring for phytonadione and vitamin d3 (as internal standard). This method was validated through specificity, linearity, and accuracy. Average vitamin K1 content was 500, 100, 90, 100, 95, and 70 µg/L in soybean oil, olive-soybean oil, soybean-MCT coconut oil, soybean-olive-MCT-fish oil, soybean-MCT-fish oil, and pure fish oil intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs), respectively. The analytical LC-MS method was extremely effective in terms of specificity, linearity ( r = 0.99), and accuracy (coefficient of variation <5%). Phytonadione is present in IVFE, and its intake varies according to IVFE type and the volume administered. It can contribute to daily requirements and become clinically relevant when simultaneously infused with multivitamins during long-term parenteral nutrition. LC-MS seems adequate in assessing vitamin K1 intake in IVFE.

  4. Intravenous volume tomographic pulmonary angiography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ruola; Strang, John G.; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-05-01

    This study presents a new intravenous (IV) tomographic angiography imaging technique, called intravenous volume tomographic digital angiography (VTDA) for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. While the advantages of IV-VTDA over spiral CT in terms of volume scanning time and resolution have been validated and reported in our previous papers for head and neck vascular imaging, the superiority of IV-VTDA over spiral CT for cross sectional pulmonary angiography has not been explored yet. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantage of isotropic resolution of IV-VTDA in the x, y and z directions through phantom and animal studies, and to explore its clinical application for detecting clots in pulmonary angiography. A prototype image intensifier-based VTDA imaging system has been designed and constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system was used for a series of phantom and dog studies. A pulmonary vascular phantom was designed and constructed. The phantom was scanned using the prototype VTDA system for direct 3D reconstruction. Then the same phantom was scanned using a GE CT/i spiral CT scanner using the routine pulmonary CT angiography protocols. IV contrast injection and volume scanning protocols were developed during the dog studies. Both VTDA reconstructed images and spiral CT images of the specially designed phantom were analyzed and compared. The detectability of simulated vessels and clots was assessed as the function of iodine concentration levels, oriented angles, and diameters of the vessels and clots. A set of 3D VTDA reconstruction images of dog pulmonary arteries was obtained with different IV injection rates and isotropic resolution in the x, y and z directions. The results of clot detection studies in dog pulmonary arteries have also been shown. This study presents a new tomographic IV angiography imaging technique for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. The results of phantom and animal studies indicate that IV-VTDA is

  5. [Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating Autonomic Nervous System pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Manoel G. Carstens

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Results: Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. Conclusions: The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value.

  7. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Early presentation of postintubation tracheoesophageal fistula: Perioperative anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depinder Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF in adults occurs as a result of trauma, malignancy, cuff-induced tracheal necrosis from prolonged mechanical ventilation, traumatic endotracheal intubation, foreign body ingestion, prolonged presence of rigid nasogastric tube, and surgical complication. Anesthetic management for repair of TEF is a challenge. Challenges include difficulties in oxygenation or ventilation resulting from placement of endotracheal tube in or above the fistula; large fistula defect causing loss of tidal volume with subsequent gastric dilatation, atelactasis, and maintenance of one lung ventilation. The most common cause of acquired nonmalignant TEF is postintubation fistula, which develops after prolonged intubation for ventilatory support. Acquired TEF, which occurs after prolonged intubation, usually develops after 12-200 days of mechanical ventilation, with a mean of 42 days. We present a rare case of TEF that developed after 7 days of intubation. It was a difficult case to be diagnosed as patient had a history of polytrauma, followed by emergency intubation and both these conditions can contribute to tracheobronchial injury.

  9. Interactions of local anesthetics with voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, C; Wang, G K

    2004-09-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are dynamic transmembrane proteins responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in excitable membranes. Local anesthetics (LAs) and structurally related antiarrhythmic and anticonvulsant compounds target specific sites in voltage-gated Na+ channels to block Na+ currents, thus reducing excitability in neuronal, cardiac, or central nervous tissue. A high-affinity LA block is produced by binding to open and inactivated states of Na+ channels rather than to resting states and suggests a binding site that converts from a low- to a high-affinity conformation during gating. Recent findings using site-directed mutagenesis suggest that multiple S6 segments together form an LA binding site within the Na+ channel. While the selectivity filter may form the more extracellular-located part of this binding site, the role of the fast inactivation gate in LA binding has not yet been resolved. The receptor of the neurotoxin batrachotoxin (BTX) is adjacent to or even overlaps with the LA binding site. The close proximity of the LA and BTX binding sites to residues critical for inactivation, together with gating transitions through S6 segments, might explain the strong impact of LAs and BTX on inactivation of voltage-gated Na+ channels and might help elucidate the mechanisms underlying voltage- and frequency-dependent LA block.

  10. Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Arginase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Atım

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle in which a defect in conversion of arginine to urea and ornithine leads to hyperammonemia. Patients with urea cycle disorders may show increased protein catabolism due to inadequate intake of energy, protein and essential amino acids; infections, fever and surgery. A 12-year-old girl with arginase deficiency, ASA II who weighed 40 kg was scheduled for bilateral adductor, quadriceps and gastrocnemius tenotomies. She had mental retardation, spasticity and flexion posture of thelower limbs. Metabolic homeostasis was restored with appropriate diet. Successful anesthetic management allowed the patient to be discharged 48 hours after surgery. Increased levels of arginine and ammonia during or after surgery may lead to serious complications such as hypotension, cerebral edema, convulsions, hypothermia and spasticity. Thus special attention must be given to metabolic homeostasis and nutrition of the patients with arginase deficiency in the perioperative period. Primary goals should be to minimize stress levels by effective anxiolysis, provide an adequate amount of protein-free energy with proper fluid management and to obtain an effective preemptive and postoperative analgesia. In addition to a high level of knowledge, successful anesthesia requires professional communication among nursing staff, dietitians, pediatric metabolism specialist, surgeon and anesthesiologist.

  11. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  12. Anesthetic and adjunctive drugs for fast-track surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, G; Carli, F

    2009-08-01

    With the changes in health care dictated by economic pressure, there has been a realization that hospital stay could be shortened without compromising quality of care. Advances in surgical technology and anesthetic drugs have made an impact in the way perioperative care is delivered with some emphasis on multidisciplinary approach. From the expansion of ambulatory care, lessons were learnt how to apply same concepts to major surgery with the understanding that interventions to attenuate the surgical stress would facilitate the return to "baseline". Beside minimal invasive approach to surgery, anesthesia interventions are arranged with the intent to decrease the negative effects of surgical stress and pain, to minimize the side effects of drugs and at the same time to facilitate the recuperation which follows after surgery. Fast-track or accelerated care encompasses many aspects of anesthesia care, not only preoperative preparation and prehabilitation, but intraoperative attenuation of surgical stress and postoperative rehabilitation. The anesthesiologist is part of this team with the specific mission to use medications and techniques which have the least side effects on organ functions, provide analgesia which in turn facilitates the intake of food and mobilization out of bed. This chapter has been conceived with the intention to direct the clinician towards procedure-specific protocols where the choice of medications and techniques is based on published evidence. The success of implementing fast-track depends more on dynamic harmony amongst the various participants (surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, nutrtionists, physiotherapists) than on reaching an optimum level of excellence at each separate organization level.

  13. Radiological contrast media and pancreatic blood perfusion in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G; Carlsson, P O; Källskog, Ö; Hansell, P; Jansson, L; Riesenfeld Källskog, V

    2007-12-01

    Radiological contrast media (CM) have been suggested to be able to impair pancreatic microcirculation. To evaluate the effects of an iso-osmolar (iodixanol, 290 mOsm/kg H2O) and a low-osmolar (iopromide, 660 mOsm/kg H2O) CM on total pancreatic and islet blood perfusion. Thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats were injected with iodine equivalent doses (600 mg I/kg body weight) of iodixanol or iopromide. Saline or low-osmolar mannitol (660 mOsm/kg H2O) solutions served as control substances. Blood perfusion measurements were then carried out with a microsphere technique. Iso-osmolar iodixanol had no effects on blood perfusion. Low-osmolar iopromide increased total pancreatic blood perfusion, whereas islet blood perfusion was unchanged. No differences were seen when mannitol solutions were given. Neither an iso-osmolar nor a low-osmolar CM affected pancreatic islet blood perfusion, whereas the low-osmolar CM increased total pancreatic blood perfusion. The absence of hemodynamic effect of low-osmolar mannitol suggests that the hyperosmolality per se of iopromide versus iodixanol does not induce the hemodynamic effect. The consequences of the effect of iopromide for pancreatic function remain to be established.

  14. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  15. Subcellular distribution of an inhalational anesthetic in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckenhoff, R.G.; Shuman, H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms and sites of anesthetic action, we determined the subcellular partitioning of halothane in a tissue model. A method was found to fix the in vivo distribution of halothane in rat atrial tissue for subsequent electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis. Atrial strips were exposed to various concentrations of halothane, rapidly frozen, cryo-sectioned, and cryo-transferred into an electron microscope. Irradiation of the hydrated cryosections with the electron beam caused halothane radiolysis, which allowed retention of the halogen-containing fragments after dehydration of the sections. The bromine from halothane was detected and quantified with x-ray microanalysis in various microregions of atrial myocytes. Halothane (bromine) partitioned largely to mitochondria, with progressively lower concentrations in sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, cytoplasm, sarcomere, and nucleus. Partitioning could not be explained solely by distribution of cellular lipid, suggesting significant and differential physicochemical solubility in protein. However, we found no saturable compartment in atrial myocytes within the clinical concentration range, which implies little specific protein binding.

  16. Abdominal expiratory muscle activity in anesthetized vagotomized neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Makito

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of respiratory activity in abdominal muscles was studied in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing, vagotomized neonatal rats at postnatal days 0-3. Anesthesia (2.0% isoflurane, 50% O(2)) depressed breathing and resulted in hypercapnia. Under this condition, abdominal muscles showed discharge late in the expiratory phase (E2 activity) in most rats. As the depth of anesthesia decreased, the amplitude of discharges in the diaphragm and abdominal muscles increased. A small additional burst frequently occurred in abdominal muscles just after the termination of diaphragmatic inspiratory activity (E1 or postinspiratory activity). Since this E1 activity is not often observed in adult rats, the abdominal respiratory pattern likely changes during postnatal development. Anoxia-induced gasping after periodic expiratory activity without inspiratory activity, and in most rats, abdominal expiratory activity disappeared before terminal apnea. These results suggest that a biphasic abdominal motor pattern (a combination of E2 and E1 activity) is a characteristic of vagotomized neonatal rats during normal respiration.

  17. Severe preeclampsia: anesthetic implications of the disease and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a significant, multifactorial, multiorgan disease affecting 6%-8% of all pregnancies in the United States and is the third leading cause of maternal mortality. As such, it is incumbent upon any anesthesia provider involved in obstetric cases to be familiar with the varied manifestations of the disease, management goals from an obstetric standpoint, and the implications for provision of anesthesia in this patient group. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and management of preeclampsia, severe complications can occur in both the mother and the fetus. A systematic approach to the anesthetic evaluation is therefore necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve outcomes. The potential pitfalls of general anesthesia, including failed intubation, in these complicated patients make regional anesthesia the preferred choice in many cases. Recent studies have shown that spinal anesthesia is often appropriate for preeclamptic patients, even in severe cases. Nevertheless, it is important to be aware of the potential contraindications to neuraxial anesthesia and to prepare for the possibility of encountering a difficult airway.

  18. Corneal neurotization: a novel technique for the anesthetic cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Dryer, Marylou M; Bodner, Bruce I

    2010-07-01

    This report describes and evaluates the efficacy of a novel procedure, direct corneal neurotization using contralateral, supraorbital, and supratrochlear nerves in patients with unilateral facial palsy and corneal anesthesia. The charts of 6 patients were thoroughly reviewed. Evaluated outcome parameters included corneal sensibility, improvement in best-corrected visual acuity, blink reflex, donor deficit, synesthesia, long-term corneal health, several psychosocial measures, and overall patient satisfaction. The mean age at time of surgery in our study was 41.7 +/- 9.07 years. Average time from denervation to surgery was 7.00 +/- 8.56 years with an average follow-up time of 16.3 +/- 2.42 years. After surgery, all 6 eyes showed improvement of corneal sensibility, visual acuity, and corneal health and remained free of ulcers without adjunctive surgical treatment. Average time to sensibility was 2.80 +/- 2.17 years, and average corneal sensibility improved from 2.00 +/- 4.47 mm before surgery to 27.8 +/- 22.6 mm after corneal neurotization (P corneal sensibility in patients with unilateral facial palsy and anesthetic cornea. This procedure preserves ocular anatomy and cosmesis while restoring function by improving corneal health and visual acuity and by reestablishing the blink reflex.

  19. Hydrothorax, hydromediastinum and pericardial effusion: a complication of intravenous alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtew, B; Lewandowski, B

    1984-01-01

    Complications secondary to intravenous alimentation are rare but potentially lethal. Massive bilateral pleural effusions and a pericardial effusion developed in a patient receiving prolonged intravenous alimentation. Severe respiratory distress and renal failure ensued. He recovered with appropriate treatment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6428731

  20. Intravenous lipid emulsion and dexmedetomidine for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All cats presented in this study, were treated with intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) at variable dosages, and dexmedetomidine was also administered by intravenous way. No adverse reaction such as thrombophlebitis, overload circulation or others was noticed during and after administration of ILE. Dexmedetomidine was ...

  1. Clinical effect of intravenous thrombolysis combined with nicorandil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous thrombolysis in combination with nicorandil in the treatment of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods: Patients who developed acute STEMI and underwent intravenous thrombolysis in the hospital were selected and divided into observation ...

  2. Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intravenous diclofenac sodium on the occurrence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Methods: ... Conclusion: Intravenous diclofenac sodium does not reduce the occurrence or severity of postoperative sore throat. .... 8.4% sodium bicarbonate-also a colourless liquid- was added to ...

  3. Cost-minimization of mabthera intravenous versus subcutaneous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, P.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and compare all costs related to preparing and administrating MabThera for the intravenous and subcutaneous formulations in Dutch hematological patients. The a priori notion is that the costs of subcutaneous MabThera injections are lower compared to intravenous infusion due

  4. Microbiological quality of some brands of intravenous fluids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbiological quality of some brands of intravenous fluids produced by some pharmaceutical companies in Nigeria was investigated. Membrane filtration method was used for concentration of contaminating organisms in the intravenous fluids. Thioglycollate medium, Tryptone Soya broth, Brilliant Green Agar ...

  5. Impact of Anesthetic Regimen on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Rat Heart In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmenburg, Friederike; van Caster, Patrick; Bunte, Sebastian; Brandenburger, Timo; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W; Huhn, Ragnar

    2018-04-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) seems to be a promising cardioprotective strategy with contradictive clinical data suggesting the anesthetic regimen influencing the favorable impact of RIPC. This study aimed to investigate whether cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by anesthetic regimens. Male Wistar rats were randomized to 6 groups. Anesthesia was either maintained by pentobarbital (Pento) alone or a combination of sevoflurane (Sevo) and remifentanil or propofol (Prop) and remifentanil in combination with and without RIPC. RIPC reduced infarct size in Pento- and Sevo-anesthetized rats (Pento-RIPC: 30% ± 9% versus Pento-control [Con]: 65% ± 6%, P < .001; Sevo-RIPC: 31% ± 6% versus Sevo-Con: 61% ± 8%, P < .001), but RIPC did not initiate cardio protection in Prop-anesthetized animals (Prop-RIPC: 59% ± 6% versus Prop-Con: 59% ± 8%, P = 1.000). Cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by Prop.

  6. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy: A case report and review of anesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo Anillo Lombana

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the anesthetic implications of this rare disease, particularly the use of a regional technique that removes the restrictive effect of the hip pain, and therefore increases the risk of a fracture.

  7. Doxepin Has a Potent and Long-Acting Spinal Anesthetic Effect in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Chin Cheng

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Doxepin, a tricyclic antidepressant, was recently found to be effective in the treatment of various acute and chronic painful conditions. However, the mechanism of its actions was not clear, especially when involving the spine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the spinal anesthetic effect of doxepin. Two commonly used traditional local anesthetics, bupivacaine and lidocaine, were used as controls. The potencies and durations of the drugs' action were evaluated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that intrathecally administered doxepin, like bupivacaine and lidocaine, produced dose-related spinal anesthetic effects on motor activity, proprioception, and nociception. Among the three drugs, doxepin produced spinal anesthetic effects in rats more potent than that of lidocaine (p < 0.001, in each comparison and longer than that of bupivacaine and lidocaine (p < 0.001, in each comparison. The spinal activity of doxepin may provide some explanation of its clinical effect in pain management.

  8. Local anesthetic-induced inhibition of human neutrophil priming: the influence of structure, lipophilicity, and charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picardi, Susanne; Cartellieri, Sibylle; Groves, Danja; Hahnenekamp, Klaus; Gerner, Peter; Durieux, Marcel E.; Stevens, Markus F.; Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are widely known for inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels underlying their antiarrhythmic and antinociceptive effects. However, LAs have significant immunomodulatory properties and were shown to affect human neutrophil functions independent of sodium-channel blockade.

  9. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  10. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth's temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia.

  11. Fast kinetic studies on the allosteric interactions between acetylcholine receptor and local anesthetic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, T; Changeux, J P

    1979-02-15

    Preincubation of receptor-rich membrane fragments from Torpedo marmorata with tertiary amine local anesthetics and several toxins such as histrionicotoxin, crotoxin and cerulotoxin, modifies the amplitude and time course of the relaxation processes monitored upon rapid mixing of the membrane fragments with the fluorescent agonist, Dns-C6-Cho. In particular, the amplitude of the rapid relaxation process, which is proportional to the fraction of acetylcholine receptor sites in a high-affinity state, increases; accordingly, the rate constant of the 'slow' and 'intermediate' relaxation processes also increases up to ten times (except with histrionicotoxin) whereas in a higher range of local anesthetic concentrations the rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process decreases. The data are accounted for by a two-state model of the acetylcholine regulator, assuming distinct binding sites for cholinergic agonists and local anesthetics and allosteric interactions between these two classes of sites; local anesthetics stabilize the regulator in a high-affinity state for agonists even in the absence of agonist, and modify the rate constants for th interconversions between the low-affinity and high-affinity states. The model accounts for the 'slow' fluorescence increase monitored upon addition of local anesthetics to a suspension of receptor-rich membranes supplemented with trace amounts of Dns-C6-Cho. The effect of local anesthetics on the apparent rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process can be accounted for on the basis of an additional low-affinity binding of local anesthetics to the acetylcholine receptor site. Finally the increase of the apparent rate constant of the 'intermediate' relaxation process can be simply accounted for by assuming the existence of a third state, corresponding to the 'active' state, to which local anesthetics bind and block ionic transport.

  12. Anesthetic management of a child with autistic spectrum disorder and homocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD is a developmental disability of the central nervous system with rapid worsening. A subset of patients also has mitochondrial dysfunction leading to increased sensitivity to various anesthetic agents. Rarely, gene mutation in these patients results in homocysteinemia which causes higher incidences of thromboembolism, hypoglycemia, and seizures. Anesthetic management of ASD with homocysteinemia and refractory seizures has not been previously reported.

  13. The anesthetics influence (ethilic-eter and urethane) on renal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramoto, E.; Achando, S.S.; Araujo, E.B. de; Hamada, H.S.; Silva Valente Goncalves, R. da; Pereira, N.P.S. de; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study was done using anesthetics like ether ethilic and urethane, in rats (Wistar). A significative variation was observed in the results obtained when renal radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. Using urethane, the renal uptake increase progressivelly due to the inhibition of the renal filtration and it starts to recuperate when the anesthetic effect was eliminated. Using ether ethilic the radiopharmaceuticals are quickly eliminated from the kidneys (tubular or glomerular filtration), showing that the renal function was protected. (author) [pt

  14. Cimethidine pre-anesthetic. A prophylactic method against Mendelson's syndrome in cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K

    1983-01-01

    Twenty patients undergoing cesarean section received cimethidine 400 mg intramuscularly as pre-anesthetic approximately 70 minutes prior to gastric aspiration. The average pH was 5.05, as against 2.97 in the control group (p less than 0.01). No significant reduction in the aspirated volumes...... in the infants. Hence, cimethidine is a safe and useful pre-anesthetic for patients undergoing cesarean section, irrespective of indication and, consequently, much to be preferred to oral antacids....

  15. Anesthetic activity of Brazilian native plants in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Lenise de Lima; Silva,Daniela Thomas da; Garlet,Quelen Iane; Cunha,Mauro Alves; Mallmann,Carlos Augusto; Baldisserotto,Bernardo; Longhi,Solon Jonas; Pereira,Ana Maria Soares; Heinzmann,Berta Maria

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for inexpensive and safe anesthetics that can reduce fish stress caused by some procedures such as capture and handling. In this context, the present study evaluated the potential of essential oils (EO) of three Brazilian native plants (Hesperozygis ringens, Lippia sidoides and Ocotea acutifolia) as anesthetics for the silver catfish - Rhamdia quelen. Moreover, an analysis was made of the chemical composition of these oils and their influence on stress parameter....

  16. Ring Keratitis Associated With Topical Abuse of a Dilute Anesthetic After Refractive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Hou

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic toxic keratitis is rare and presents as a ring keratitis, which is often misdiagnosed as Acanthamoeba keratitis. Here, we report an unusual case of toxic keratitis caused by topical abuse of a dilute anesthetic. A 26-year-old woman presented with bilateral corneal edema, ring infiltrates, pigmented keratic precipitate, Descemet's membrane folding, and strong anterior chamber reactions 2 weeks after laser subepithelial keratomileusis surgery. Tracing back her medical history, topical dilute 0.1% proparacaine was prescribed and frequently used for 1 month. Toxic keratitis was suspected. After discontinuation of the topical anesthetic and initiation of treatment with topical 20% autologous serum, complete corneal epithelialization was achieved within 1 week. Corneal infiltrates and anterior chamber reaction gradually subsided. Vision improved from finger counting to 20/20 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye, but confocal microscopy showed decreased corneal endothelial cells. Topical abuse of a dilute topical anesthetic can cause severe toxic keratitis and endothelial cell loss. The physician must be aware of the signs of topical anesthetic abuse and should not prescribe even a dilute anesthetic for long-term use. Autologous serum can help in the recovery of toxic keratitis.

  17. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzetto L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Zorzetto,1 Paola Brambilla,1 Elena Marcello,1 Nora Bloise,2 Manuela De Gregori,3 Lorenzo Cobianchi,4,5 Andrea Peloso,4,5 Massimo Allegri,6 Livia Visai,2,7 Paola Petrini1 1Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering ‘G. Natta’, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Health Technologies (CHT, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, 3Pain Therapy Service, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo Pavia, Pavia, 4General Surgery Department, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, 5Departments of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 6Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, 7Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Lab of Nanotechnology, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured

  18. Local anesthetic block of batrachotoxin-resistant muscle Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G K; Quan, C; Wang, S Y

    1998-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are noncompetitive antagonists of batrachotoxin (BTX) in voltage-gated Na+ channels. The putative LA receptor has been delineated within the transmembrane segment S6 in domain IV of voltage-gated Na+ channels, whereas the putative BTX receptor is within segment S6 in domain I. In this study, we created BTX-resistant muscle Na+ channels at segment I-S6 (micro1-N434K, micro1-L437K) to test whether these residues modulate LA binding. These mutant channels were expressed in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293T cells, and their sensitivity to lidocaine, QX-314, etidocaine, and benzocaine was assayed under whole-cell, voltage-clamp conditions. Our results show that LA binding in BTX-resistant micro1 Na+ channels was reduced significantly. At -100 mV holding potential, the reduction in LA affinity was maximal for QX-314 (by 17-fold) and much less for neutral benzocaine (by 2-fold). Furthermore, this reduction was residue specific; substitution of positively charged lysine with negatively charged aspartic acid (micro1-N434D) restored or even enhanced the LA affinity. We conclude that micro1-N434K and micro1-L437K residues located near the middle of the I-S6 segment of Na+ channels can reduce the LA binding affinity without BTX. Thus, this reduction of the LA affinity by point mutations at the BTX binding site is not caused by gating changes induced by BTX alone. We surmise that the BTX receptor and the LA receptor within segments I-S6 and IV-S6, respectively, may align near or within the Na+ permeation pathway.

  19. Anesthetic management in a patient with Kindler′s syndrome

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    Sohan Lal Solanki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male with pan-anterior urethral stricture was scheduled to undergo perineal urethrostomy. He was a known case of Kindler′s syndrome since infancy. He was having a history of blister formation, extensive poikiloderma and progressive cutaneous atrophy since childhood. He had a tendency of trauma-induced blisters with clear or hemorrhagic contents that healed with scarring. The fingers were sclerodermiform with dystrophic nails and inability to completely clench the fist. Airway examination revealed thyromental distance of 7 cm with limited neck extension, limited mouth opening and mallampatti class III with a fixed large tongue. He was reported as grade IV Cormack and Lehane laryngoscopic on previous anesthesia exposure. We described the anesthetic management of such case on guidelines for epidermolysis bullosa. In the operating room, an 18-G cannula was secured in the right upper limb using Coban TM Wrap. The T-piece of the cannula was than inserted into the slit and the tape was wrapped around the extremity. The ECG electrodes were placed on the limbs and fixed with Coban TM . Noninvasive blood pressure cuff was applied over the wrap after wrapping the arm with Webril® cotton. Oral fiberoptic tracheal intubation was done after lubricating the laryngoscope generously with a water-based lubricant with 7-mm endotracheal tube. Surgery proceeded without any complication. After reversing the residual neuromuscular block, trachea was extubated once the patient became awake. He was kept in the postanesthesia care unit for 2 hours and then shifted to urology ward.

  20. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  1. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  2. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Benevides Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. METHOD Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. RESULTS The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole, increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. CONCLUSION A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences.

  3. Intravenous injection of ioxilan, iohexol and diatrizoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Dorph, S.; Mygind, T.; Sovak, M.; Nielsen, H.; Rygaard, H.; Larsen, S.; Skaarup, P.; Hemmingsen, L.; Holm, J.

    Effects of intravenous ioxilan, a new third generation non-ionic contrast medium, diatrizoate, iohexol and saline on urine profiles were compared. Albumin, glucose, sodium, phosphate, and the enzymes NAG, LDH and GGT were followed in 24 normal rats over 7 days. Diatrizoate significantly affected all profile components during the first two hours. Albuminuria was significantly greater after diatrizoate than after iohexol or ioxilan, and excretion of glucose, LDH and GGT was significantly higher than after ioxilan. Both iohexol and ioxilan increased the excretion of albumin, LDH and GGT, while iohexol also significantly increased excretion of glucose and sodium. There was a greater excretion of glucose and GGT after iohexol than after ioxilan. Saline did not induce any changes. At day 7, serum sodium, urea, creatinine, and albumin were normal for all test substances, and kidney histology revealed no difference between the groups of animals. It is thus concluded that both high osmolar ionic and low osmolar non-ionic contrast media may cause temporary glomerular and tubular dysfunction in rats. In this model, the kidney is affected most by diatrizoate, less by iohexol, and least by ioxilan.

  4. Radiation dose measurements in intravenous pyelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeblad, M.; Gottlieb, E.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) and micturition cystourethrography (MCU) are the standard procedures in the radiological examination of children with urinary tract infections and in the control of these children. Gonad protection against radiation is not possible in MCU, but concerning the girls partly possible in IVP. It is of major importance to know the radiation dose in these procedures, especially since the examination is often repeated in the same patients. All IVP were done by means of the usual technique including possible gonad protection. The thermoluminescence dosimeter was placed rectally in the girls and fixed on the scrota in the boys. A total of 50 children was studied. Gonad dose ranged from 140 to 200mR in the girls and from 20 to 70mR in the boys (mean values). The radiation dose in IVP is very low compared to that of MCU, and from this point of view IVP is a dose saving examination in the control of children with urinary tract infections [fr

  5. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  6. Infantile Spasms Treated with Intravenous Methypredinsolone Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Rad, Afagh; Aminzadeh, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Infantile spasms is diagnosed late even by expert pediatricians. Late diagnosis (later than 3 weeks) can have a negative effect on the long-term prognosis. We aimed to investigate infantile spasms treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse. In this case series study, 20 infants with infantile spasms in 17-Shahrivar Hospital, Rasht, Iran were enrolled. Drugs were administered based on Mytinger protocol that included 3 days of methylprednisolone pulse and 56 days of oral prednisolone. The control of spasms and the omission of hypsarrhythmia in infants follow-up were the primary and secondary outcomes, respectively. Remission was indicated if the caregivers mentioned no spasms or >50% decrease regarding drug initiation for at least 5 consecutive days and the electroencephalography during sleep period noted the omission of hypsarrhythmia. Eleven female (55%) and 9 male (45%) patients with the mean age of 4.95±1.39 months were enrolled. Mean rapid remission was noted as 4.41±1.50 days. Twelve patients (60%) noted early remission. seizure was controlled in 3(15%) patients completely after 24 months. Five (25%) occasional seizures were noted controlled by routine anticonvulsant drugs after 24 months and 12 (60%) no response was mentioned. Most of the patients (65%) had cryptogenic etiology for infantile spasms. Uncontrolled seizure was mentioned after initial remission. Methyl prednisolone is an appropriate drug based on easy administering, low cost, and its accessibility.

  7. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Ciğdem; Cakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-10-01

    [corrected] We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12(th) h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn't cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients' comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended.

  8. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Ünal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12 th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml (P < 0.001. Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn′t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients′ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not

  9. [The ozone layer and its modification by N2O and inhalation anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, J; Fabian, P

    1991-08-01

    As a result of human activities the ozone layer in the stratosphere, which is necessary for life on earth, has changed. The main causes of ozone destruction are chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs) 11 and 12. Recently, caring anesthetists have wondered if and to what degree N2O and popular potent inhalation anesthetics may also contribute to ozone loss. Having consulted the literature, we attempt to answer that question. The ozone-destroying N2O is chiefly produced by burning fossil elements and nitrogenous fertilizing used in agriculture; the share of medically used N2O lies below 2%. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane are halogenated anesthetics that contain ozone-destroying halogens (bromine, chlorine, fluorine) to different extents. Complicated experimental calculations for these volatile anesthetics result in a potential for ozone destruction of 0.36 for halothane and 0.02 for enflurane and isoflurane if the potential for ozone destruction by CFCs is set at 1.0. The lifespan of the inhalation anesthetics in the troposphere is with less than 3 years, dramatically less than that of CFCs (70-140 years). The two most important CFCs, 11 and 12, are considered to be currently produced in a quantity of about 800,000 tons per year. On the other hand, the worldwide production of inhalation anesthetics is said to be only 2,000 tons. In view of the experimental calculations and the low worldwide production, the small greenhouse effect, the shorter lifespan in the troposphere, and the low potential for ozone destruction, the negative effects of medically used N2O and inhalation anesthetics on the ozone layer seem negligible. All in all, the inhalation anesthetics are considered to be responsible for only 0.0005% of the ozone destruction at present.

  10. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block, caudal analgesia, or surgical site infiltration for pediatric umbilical herniorrhaphy: a prospective, double-blinded, randomized comparison of three regional anesthetic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relland LM

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lance M Relland,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,1–3 David Martin,1,2 Giorgio Veneziano,1,2 Ralph J Beltran,1,2 Christopher McKee,1,2 Tarun Bhalla1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Umbilical hernia repair is a common pediatric surgical procedure. While opioid analgesics are a feasible option and have long been a mainstay in the pharmacological intervention for pain, the effort to improve care and limit opioid-related adverse effects has led to the use of alternative techniques, including regional anesthesia. The current study prospectively compares the analgesic efficacy of three techniques, including caudal epidural blockade, peripheral nerve blockade, and local wound infiltration, in a double-blinded study.Patients and methods: A total of 39 patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair were randomized to receive a caudal epidural block (CDL, ultrasound-guided bilateral rectus sheath blocks (RSB, or surgical site infiltration (SSI with local anesthetic. Intraoperative anesthetic care was standardized, and treatment groups were otherwise blinded from the intraoperative anesthesiology team and recovery nurses. Postoperatively, the efficacy was evaluated using Hannallah pain scores, Aldrete recovery scores, the need for intravenous fentanyl, and the time to discharge.Results: Each cohort was similar in terms of age, weight, premedication dosing, length of case, intraoperative and postoperative fentanyl requirements, and time to tracheal extubation. Among the three cohorts, there were no significant differences noted in terms of pain scores or time to recovery.Conclusion: All the three techniques provided effective analgesia following umbilical hernia repair. Our findings offer

  11. Cardiorespiratory and electrocardiographic effects of methadone or morphine in the perioperative period in anesthetized dogs with continuous rate infusion of propofol and submitted to ovariohysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Pavini Cintra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were compare the electrocardiogram (ECG and cardiopulmonary effects of methadone or morphine, both injected intravenously (IV in dogs anesthetized with continuous infusion of propofol. Sixteen healthy female mongrel dogs were used in this study for elective ovariohysterectomy. The animals were allocated in random order into two groups assigned GME (methadone 0.3 mg kg-1, IV or GMO (morphine 0.3 mg kg-1, IV. Parameters were evaluated: heart rate (HR, P-wave amplitude (Ps and PmV, interval between Ps and R waves (PR, QRS duration (QRS, R-wave amplitude (R, duration the interval between the Q and T waves (QT, systolic blood pressure (SBP, rectal temperature (RT, respiratory rate (RR, end tidal of carbon dioxide (ETCO2 and periferic oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2. Postoperative analgesia was assessed by mechanical nociceptive stimulus based on the scale proposed by Firth and Haldane (1999 and rescue analgesia based on the visual analogue scale. HR was lower in GME in relation to GMO. The P, PmV, PR, QRS, R and QT values remained within their normality tracks, showing no clinical importance. Apnea and ETCO2 increased in both groups. There was no difference between groups of the analgesic effects. It can be concluded that methadone and morphine promote similar cardiovascular effects after IV injection during surgery in dogs anesthetized with propofol by continuous rate infusion, however, when methadone used, assisted ventilation is required. In addition, both drugs promote postoperative analgesia until six hours.

  12. Design and performance evaluation of the "iTIVA" algorithm for manual infusion of intravenous anesthetics based on effect-site target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Ramírez (David Eduardo); J.A. Calvache (Jose Andrés)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Remifentanil and propofol infusion using TCI pumps has proven to be beneficial for the practice of anesthesia but the availability of these systems is limited. Objective: Designing a pharmacokinetic model-based algorithm for calculating manual infusion regimens to achieve

  13. Toxicokinetics of the nerve agent (±)-VX in anesthetized and atropinized hairless guinea pigs and marmosets after intravenous and percutaneous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, M.J. van der; Lander, B.J.; Wiel, H. van der; Langenberg, J.P.; Benschop, H.P.

    2003-01-01

    In continuation of our investigations on the toxicokinetics of the volatile nerve agents C(±)P(±)-soman and (±)-sarin, we now report on the toxicokinetics of the rather nonvolatile agent (±)-VX. A validated method was developed to determine blood levels of (±)-VX by means of achiral gas

  14. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Checklist for Managing Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity: 2017 Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Joseph M; Woodward, Crystal M; Harrison, T Kyle

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) periodically revises and updates its checklist for the management of local anesthetic systemic toxicity. The 2017 update replaces the 2012 version and reflects new information contained in the third ASRA Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity. Electronic copies of the ASRA checklist can be downloaded from the ASRA Web site (www.asra.com) for inclusion in local anesthetic toxicity rescue kits or perioperative checklist repositories.

  15. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  16. Oesophageal atresia: Are "long gap" patients at greater anesthetic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Laura; Frawley, Jacinta; Crameri, Joe; Teague, Warwick J; Frawley, Geoff P

    2018-03-01

    anesthetic exposures and require multiple procedures in infancy to achieve oesophageal continuity. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Characterization of immunoglobulin G fragments in liquid intravenous immunoglobulin products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemel, Robert V.; ter Hart, Hendricus G. J.; Derksen, Gerardus J. A.; Koenderman, Anky H. L.; Aalberse, Rob C.

    2005-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products formulated as a liquid instead of a powder have become commercially available. Preferably, such liquid products should not alter after storage outside the refrigerator. Therefore, a thorough characterization of immunoglobulin G (IgG) fragmentation at

  18. Outcomes of cancer surgery after inhalational and intravenous anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltanizadeh, Sinor; Degett, Thea H; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative factors are probably essential for different oncological outcomes. This systematic review investigates the literature concerning overall mortality and postoperative complications after cancer surgery with inhalational (INHA) and intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). A search was conducted...

  19. Methods of preparing and using intravenous nutrient compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beigler, M.A.; Koury, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for preparing a stable, dry-packaged, sterile, nutrient composition which upon addition of sterile, pyrogen-free water is suitable for intravenous administration to a mammal, including a human, is described. The method comprises providing the nutrients in a specific dry form and state of physical purity acceptable for intravenous administration, sealing the nutrients in a particular type of container adapted to receive and dispense sterile fluids and subjecting the container and its sealed contents to a sterilizing, nondestructive dose of ionizing radiation. The method results in a packaged, sterile nutrient composition which may be dissolved by the addition of sterile pyrogen-free water. The resulting aqueous intravenous solution may be safely administered to a mammal in need of nutrient therapy. The packaged nutrient compositions of the invention exhibit greatly extended storage life and provide an economical method of providing intravenous solutions which are safe and efficacious for use. (author)

  20. Portable Intravenous Fluid Production Device for Ground Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are several medical conditions require the administration of intravenous (IV) fluids, but limitations of mass, volume, shelf-life, transportation, and local...

  1. Distinct in vitro Complement Activation by Various Intravenous Iron Preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempel, Julia Cordelia; Poppelaars, Felix; da Costa, Mariana Gaya; Franssen, Casper F. M.; de Vlaam, Thomas P G; Daha, Mohamed R.; Berger, Stefan P.; Seelen, Marc A. J.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous (IV) iron preparations are widely used in the treatment of anemia in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). All IV iron preparations carry a risk of causing hypersensitivity reactions. However, the pathophysiological mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesize that a

  2. Intravenous glutathione for skin lightening: Inadequate safety data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    protein thiol that protects mammalian cells from oxidative stress. Intravenous (IV) GSH for skin lightening is advertised by clinics in South Africa and internationally online, yet to date no published review on the subject exists. Methods.

  3. Glucagon in intravenous cholangiography - an experimental study on dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toetterman, S.; Santavirta, S.; Antila, H.

    1980-01-01

    The present study reports on the effect of glucagon on the excretion of ioglycamate in experimental intravenous cholangiography on dogs. Glucagon increased the bile flow rate highly significantly (p [de

  4. Ultrasound Guidance as a Rescue Technique for Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pappas, Nancy L; Michaud, Terese E; Wolbers, Russell M; Steward, James C; Fevurly, Thomas A; Samolitis, Timothy J; Shoneboom, Bruce A; Watts, Dorraine D

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous (W) cannulation can be difficult to perform using the traditional landmark or visual/palpation technique in patients with access difficulties such as deep, sclerotic, small, or fragile veins...

  5. Plasma kinetics of intravenously administered lactose- in-saline in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-17

    ) the rapid sequestration of homologous desialylated erythrocytes from the blood stream of rabbits has been considerably inhibited by intravenously administered lactose (Muller et al., 1981). More recently, infusion of lactose ...

  6. Adding low dose rocuronium to local anesthetic mixture: Effect on quality of peribulbar blockade for vitreoretinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed T. Ghanem

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Adding low dose rocuronium to local anesthetics prolongs duration of peribulbar anesthesia and offers an optimal surgical condition without serious adverse effects for patients undergoing VR surgery.

  7. A conserved behavioral state barrier impedes transitions between anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and wakefulness: evidence for neural inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot B; Sun, Yi; Moore, Jason T; Hung, Hsiao-Tung; Meng, Qing Cheng; Perera, Priyan; Joiner, William J; Thomas, Steven A; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Sehgal, Amita; Kelz, Max B

    2010-07-30

    One major unanswered question in neuroscience is how the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states. General anesthetics offer a controllable means to study these transitions. Induction of anesthesia is commonly attributed to drug-induced global modulation of neuronal function, while emergence from anesthesia has been thought to occur passively, paralleling elimination of the anesthetic from its sites in the central nervous system (CNS). If this were true, then CNS anesthetic concentrations on induction and emergence would be indistinguishable. By generating anesthetic dose-response data in both insects and mammals, we demonstrate that the forward and reverse paths through which anesthetic-induced unconsciousness arises and dissipates are not identical. Instead they exhibit hysteresis that is not fully explained by pharmacokinetics as previously thought. Single gene mutations that affect sleep-wake states are shown to collapse or widen anesthetic hysteresis without obvious confounding effects on volatile anesthetic uptake, distribution, or metabolism. We propose a fundamental and biologically conserved concept of neural inertia, a tendency of the CNS to resist behavioral state transitions between conscious and unconscious states. We demonstrate that such a barrier separates wakeful and anesthetized states for multiple anesthetics in both flies and mice, and argue that it contributes to the hysteresis observed when the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states.

  8. A conserved behavioral state barrier impedes transitions between anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and wakefulness: evidence for neural inertia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot B Friedman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available One major unanswered question in neuroscience is how the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states. General anesthetics offer a controllable means to study these transitions. Induction of anesthesia is commonly attributed to drug-induced global modulation of neuronal function, while emergence from anesthesia has been thought to occur passively, paralleling elimination of the anesthetic from its sites in the central nervous system (CNS. If this were true, then CNS anesthetic concentrations on induction and emergence would be indistinguishable. By generating anesthetic dose-response data in both insects and mammals, we demonstrate that the forward and reverse paths through which anesthetic-induced unconsciousness arises and dissipates are not identical. Instead they exhibit hysteresis that is not fully explained by pharmacokinetics as previously thought. Single gene mutations that affect sleep-wake states are shown to collapse or widen anesthetic hysteresis without obvious confounding effects on volatile anesthetic uptake, distribution, or metabolism. We propose a fundamental and biologically conserved concept of neural inertia, a tendency of the CNS to resist behavioral state transitions between conscious and unconscious states. We demonstrate that such a barrier separates wakeful and anesthetized states for multiple anesthetics in both flies and mice, and argue that it contributes to the hysteresis observed when the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states.

  9. The Amide Local Anesthetic Lidocaine in Cancer Surgery—Potential Antimetastatic Effects and Preservation of Immune Cell Function? A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiên-Nga Chamaraux-Tran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of the primary tumor in solid cancer is an essential component of the treatment. However, the perioperative period can paradoxically lead to an increased risk of cancer recurrence. A bimodal dynamics for early-stage breast cancer recurrence suggests a tumor dormancy-based model with a mastectomy-driven acceleration of the metastatic process and a crucial role of the immunosuppressive state during the perioperative period. Recent evidence suggests that anesthesia could also influence the progress of the disease. Local anesthetics (LAs have long been used for their properties to block nociceptive input. They also exert anti-inflammatory capacities by modulating the liberation or signal propagation of inflammatory mediators. Interestingly, LAs can reduce viability and proliferation of many cancer cells in vitro as well. Additionally, retrospective clinical trials have suggested that regional anesthesia for cancer surgery (either with or without general anesthesia might reduce the risk of recurrence. Lidocaine, a LA, which can be administered intravenously, is widely used in clinical practice for multimodal analgesia. It is associated with a morphine-sparing effect, reduced pain scores, and in major surgery probably also with a reduced incidence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay. Systemic delivery might therefore be efficient to target residual disease or reach cells able to form micrometastasis. Moreover, an in vitro study has shown that lidocaine could enhance the activity of natural killer (NK cells. Due to their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure, NKs are the main actor of the innate immune system. However, several perioperative factors can reduce NK activity, such as stress, pain, opioids, or general anesthetics. Intravenous lidocaine as part of the perioperative anesthesia regimen would be of major interest for clinicians, as it might bear the potential

  10. Cationization of immunoglobulin G results in enhanced organ uptake of the protein after intravenous administration in rats and primate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    Cationization of proteins in general enhances the cellular uptake of these macromolecules, and cationized antibodies are known to retain antigen binding properties. Therefore, cationized antibodies may be therapeutic and allow for intracellular immunization. The present studies test the hypothesis that the tissue uptake of cationized immunoglobulin G (IgG) after intravenous administration may be greatly increased relative to the uptake of native proteins. The pharmacokinetics of cationized immunoglobulin G clearance from blood, and the volume of distribution of the cationized or native protein (albumin, IgG) for 10 organs was measured both in anesthetized rats and in an anesthetized adult Macaca irus cynomologous monkey. Initial studies on brain showed that serum factors inhibited uptake of 125I-cationized IgG, but not 3H-cationized IgG. The blood-brain barrier permeability surface area product for 3H-cationized IgG was 0.57 ± 0.04 microliters min-1 g-1. The ratio of the volume of distribution of the 3-H-cationized IgG compared to 3H-labeled native albumin ranged from 0.9 (testis) to 15.7 (spleen) in the rat at 3 hr after injection, and a similarly enhanced organ uptake was observed in the primate. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that cationization of immunoglobulin greatly increases organ uptake of the plasma protein compared to native immunoglobulins, and suggest that cationization of monoclonal antibodies may represent a potential new strategy for enhancing the intracellular delivery of these proteins

  11. Analgesic efficacy of caudal block versus diclofenac suppository and local anesthetic infiltration following pediatric laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Jyoti; Dave, Nandini

    2005-08-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy of caudal block with diclofenac suppository and local anesthetic infiltration in children undergoing laparoscopy. We studied 50 children undergoing laparoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Their ages ranged from 3 to 13 years, and all belonged to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II. Anesthesia was carried out using the standard procedure. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received caudal block with bupivacaine 1 mL/kg after anesthetic induction. Group 2 received diclofenac suppository 3 mg/kg postinduction and local anesthetic infiltration at the port sites at the end of the procedure. Pain was assessed using the Hannallah objective pain scale at 15, 30, 60, 120, and 360 minutes postextubation. The pain scores were comparable in both groups at all times. Twelve percent of caudal block patients and 20% of diclofenac patients needed rescue analgesic, a statistically insignificant difference. In 2 patients, caudal block was technically difficult and they were excluded from the study. The incidence of side effects was low in our study. We find the analgesic efficacy of diclofenac suppository combined with local anesthetic infiltration at port sites comparable to caudal block. Given the necessarily invasive nature of caudal block, we suggest the combined use of diclofenac suppository with local anesthetic infiltration at port sites as a useful and more economical alternative for analgesia following pediatric laparoscopy.

  12. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  13. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  14. Anesthetic activity of Brazilian native plants in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenise de Lima Silva

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for inexpensive and safe anesthetics that can reduce fish stress caused by some procedures such as capture and handling. In this context, the present study evaluated the potential of essential oils (EO of three Brazilian native plants (Hesperozygis ringens, Lippia sidoides and Ocotea acutifolia as anesthetics for the silver catfish - Rhamdia quelen. Moreover, an analysis was made of the chemical composition of these oils and their influence on stress parameter. EO of H. ringens and O. acutifolia were effective as anesthetics, without behavioral side effects. EO of O. acutifolia (150 µL L-1 promoted an increase in blood glucose level. Regarding to the composition, pulegone accounts for 96.63% of the EO of H. ringens, and caryophyllene oxide amounts to 56.90% of the EO of O. acutifolia. Two chemotypes, thymol and carvacrol (68.40% and 67.89%, respectively were verified for EO of L. sidoides. Both samples of EO of L. sidoides showed anesthetic activity in silver catfish, but exposure also caused loss of mucus and mortality. Thus, only the EO of H. ringens and O. acutifolia are advised for anesthetic use

  15. Hypnosis control based on the minimum concentration of anesthetic drug for maintaining appropriate hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Eiko; Nishigaki, Yuki; Kanda, Chiaki; Takeda, Toshihiro; Shirakami, Gotaro

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypnosis control method using Auditory Evoked Potential Index (aepEX) as a hypnosis index. In order to avoid side effects of an anesthetic drug, it is desirable to reduce the amount of an anesthetic drug during surgery. For this purpose many studies of hypnosis control systems have been done. Most of them use Bispectral Index (BIS), another hypnosis index, but it has problems of dependence on anesthetic drugs and nonsmooth change near some particular values. On the other hand, aepEX has an ability of clear distinction between patient consciousness and unconsciousness and independence of anesthetic drugs. The control method proposed in this paper consists of two elements: estimating the minimum effect-site concentration for maintaining appropriate hypnosis and adjusting infusion rate of an anesthetic drug, propofol, using model predictive control. The minimum effect-site concentration is estimated utilizing the property of aepEX pharmacodynamics. The infusion rate of propofol is adjusted so that effect-site concentration of propofol may be kept near and always above the minimum effect-site concentration. Simulation results of hypnosis control using the proposed method show that the minimum concentration can be estimated appropriately and that the proposed control method can maintain hypnosis adequately and reduce the total infusion amount of propofol.

  16. Impact of Anesthetics on Immune Functions in a Rat Model of Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé A Picq

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS has been successfully performed in animals for the treatment of different experimental models of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of VNS involves the release of acetylcholine by vagus nerve efferent fibers inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α produced by macrophages. Moreover, it has recently been demonstrated that splenic lymphocytic populations may also be involved. As anesthetics can modulate the inflammatory response, the current study evaluated the effect of two different anesthetics, isoflurane and pentobarbital, on splenic cellular and molecular parameters in a VNS rat model. Spleens were collected for the characterization of lymphocytes sub-populations by flow cytometry and quantification of cytokines secretion after in vitro activation. Different results were observed depending on the anesthetic used. The use of isoflurane displayed a non-specific effect of VNS characterized by a decrease of most splenic lymphocytes sub-populations studied, and also led to a significantly lower TNF-α secretion by splenocytes. However, the use of pentobarbital brought to light immune modifications in non-stimulated animals that were not observed with isoflurane, and also revealed a specific effect of VNS, notably at the level of T lymphocytes' activation. These differences between the two anesthetics could be related to the anti-inflammatory properties of isoflurane. In conclusion, pentobarbital is more adapted than isoflurane in the study of the anti-inflammatory effect of VNS on an anesthetized rat model in that it allows more accurate monitoring of subtle immunomodulatory processes.

  17. Anesthesia and Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy: review of 117 anesthetic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Leal G; Lorenz, Jessica D; Weingarten, Toby N; Scavonetto, Federica; Bojanić, Katarina; Selcen, Duygu; Sprung, Juraj

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are associated with life-threatening perioperative complications, including rhabdomyolysis, hyperkalemia, and hyperthermia. Current recommendations contraindicate use of succinylcholine and volatile anesthetics; however, the latter recommendation remains controversial. To review the perioperative outcomes of patients with DMD and BMD. We reviewed records of patients with DMD or BMD who underwent anesthetic management at our institution from January 1990 through December 2011. We identified 47 patients (DMD, 37; BMD, 10) who underwent 117 anesthetic exposures (DMD, 101; BMD, 16). Volatile anesthetic agents were used 66 times (DMD, 59; BMD, 7). One patient with undiagnosed BMD received succinylcholine and developed acute rhabdomyolysis and hyperkalemic cardiac arrest. All other major complications were attributed to the procedure (i.e., large bleeding), to preexisting comorbidities (i.e., respiratory failure, cardiac disease), or to both. Use of succinylcholine in children with dystrophinopathy is contraindicated. These patients have significant comorbidities and are frequently undergoing extensive operations; complications related to these factors can develop, as evidenced by our series. These complications may occur with use of volatile and nonvolatile anesthetics. However, because most of our patients were older than 8 years at the time of surgery, our observation cannot be generalized to younger dystrophin-deficient children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Peribulbar anesthesia: efficacy of a single injection with a limited local anesthetic volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausel, H; Touffet, L; Havaux, M; Lamard, M; Savean, J; Cochener, B; Arvieux, C; Gueret, G

    2008-10-01

    Cataract surgery can be performed with peribulbar anesthesia. The classical technique consists of two injections of local anesthetics. The purpose of our study was to assess peribulbar anesthesia with a single injection and a limited volume of local anesthetics. After local ethics committee agreement and oral consent, patients scheduled for cataract surgery using peribulbar anesthesia were prospectively included. The lower temporal puncture was performed with a peribulbar needle with propofol sedation. The mixture of local anesthetics was administered with tactile control of orbital pressure. The puncture was followed by a 10-min compression of the ocular globe. Akinesia, analgesia, complications, and surgical conditions were noted. A total of 101 successive patients were included. We administered 1.2 mg/kg of propofol. The volume of local anesthetics administered was 5.0 +/- 0.9 ml. Ninety patients had akinesia at 10 min and 6.7% moderate chemosis. No puncture complication occurred. At the end of surgery, the pain noted by the patients was 0.4 +/- 2.1 out of 100 (range, 0-10). Surgical conditions were good for all patients. Peribulbar anesthesia performed with a single injection and a limited volume of local anesthetics allows cataract surgery in good conditions for the surgeon with very good analgesia for the patient.

  19. Intravenous cobinamide versus hydroxocobalamin for acute treatment of severe cyanide poisoning in a swine (Sus scrofa) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Tanen, David A; Boudreau, Susan; Castaneda, Maria; Zarzabal, Lee A; Vargas, Toni; Boss, Gerry R

    2014-12-01

    Hydroxocobalamin is a Food and Drug Administration-approved antidote for cyanide poisoning. Cobinamide is a potential antidote that contains 2 cyanide-binding sites. To our knowledge, no study has directly compared hydroxocobalamin with cobinamide in a severe, cyanide-toxic large-animal model. Our objective is to compare the time to return of spontaneous breathing in swine with acute cyanide-induced apnea treated with intravenous hydroxocobalamin, intravenous cobinamide, or saline solution (control). Thirty-three swine (45 to 55 kg) were intubated, anesthetized, and instrumented (continuous mean arterial pressure and cardiac output monitoring). Anesthesia was adjusted to allow spontaneous breathing with FiO2 of 21% during the experiment. Cyanide was continuously infused intravenously until apnea occurred and lasted for 1 minute (time zero). Animals were then randomly assigned to receive intravenous hydroxocobalamin (65 mg/kg), cobinamide (12.5 mg/kg), or saline solution and monitored for 60 minutes. A sample size of 11 animals per group was selected according to obtaining a power of 80%, an α of .05, and an SD of 0.17 in mean time to detect a 20% difference in time to spontaneous breathing. We assessed differences in time to death among groups, using Kaplan-Meier estimation methods, and compared serum lactate, blood pH, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation time curves with repeated-measures ANOVA. Baseline weights and vital signs were similar among groups. The time to apnea and cyanide dose required to achieve apnea were similar. At time zero, mean cyanide blood and lactate concentrations and reduction in mean arterial pressure from baseline were similar. In the saline solution group, 2 of 11 animals survived compared with 10 of 11 in the hydroxocobalamin and cobinamide groups (Pcyanide concentrations became undetectable at the end of the study in both antidote-treated groups, and no statistically significant differences

  20. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maiara Benevides; Mesquita, Maria Gefé da Rosa; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição; Paes, Graciele Oroski

    2017-07-20

    To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole), increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences. Analisar as potenciais interações medicamentosas intravenosas e seu grau de severidade associadas à administração desses medicamentos a partir das prescrições do Centro de Terapia Intensiva. Estudo quantitativo, tipologia retrospectiva exploratória, com análise estatística descritiva das prescrições medicamentosas do Centro de Terapia Intensiva de um Hospital Universitário, no período de março-junho/2014. A amostra foi composta de 319 prescrições e subamostras de 50 prescrições. Constatou-se que a média de medicamentos por paciente foi de 9,3 registros, e evidenciou-se maior probabilidade para ocorrência de interação medicamentosa inerente à polifarmácia. O estudo identificou interações medicamentosas graves, como a administração concomitante de Tramadol com medicamentos inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina, (exemplo: Metoclopramida e Fluconazol

  1. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With a Giant Right Atrial Myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Michael; Andritsos, Michael; Kilic, Ahmet; Crestanello, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac myxomas account for 50% of all benign primary cardiac tumors. Rarely, these tumors occur in the right atrium (RA; 10% to 20%), with a stalk frequently attached to the interatrial septum. Right atrial myxomas can lead to RA enlargement, arrhythmias, functional tricuspid stenosis, right heart failure, and catastophic pulmonary embolization resulting in sudden cardiac death. Anesthetic management of patients with RA myxomas can be complicated by the mass effect of the myxoma, preload limitations, and the potential for cardiovascular collapse. Multimodal cardiac imaging inclusive of echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging helps with the diagnosis, preoperative optimization, and formulation of anesthetic and surgical plans. We present a case report highlighting the importance of multimodal imaging, adequate preoperative patient optimization, and the anesthetic considerations in the successful management of a patient with a giant 8.3 × 4.7 cm RA myxoma. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Life threatening medullary injury following adenoidectomy and local anesthetic infiltration of the operative bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Eli; Halberthal, Michael; Goldsher, Dorit; Golz, Avishai; Bar-Joseph, Gad

    2009-02-01

    To draw attention to a rare, life threatening complication of a rather common procedure, namely medullary injury following adenoidectomy and local anesthetic infiltration of the operative bed. Case report. A tertiary pediatric critical care unit. A healthy 7-year-old girl underwent adenoidectomy and local anesthetic infiltration of the adenoid bed with lidocaine and adrenaline. In the recovery room, nystagmus, dysarthria, dyspnea, inability to cough and right hemiparesis were noticed. Because of her inability to remove secretions tracheal intubation was performed, followed by severe, life threatening respiratory failure. Tracheal intubation, hemodynamic support, prolonged mechanical ventilation, nitric oxide, and tracheostomy. In children, local anesthetic infiltration of the adenoid bed may cause life-threatening medullary injury and its routine use should be re-considered.

  3. The modifying effect of anesthetic technique on the metabolic and endocrine responses to anesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1988-01-01

    and the widespread use of the term "stress free anesthesia" in surgery is therefore not valid. However, continuous administration of local anesthetic agents in the epidural space is the most effective technique in so far as reduction of the stress response is concerned. The clinical implication of a variable...... reduction in the stress response to surgery by different anesthetic techniques remains largely unsettled, since only few controlled studies have been published on the clinical effects of pain relief and general anesthesia. However, a vast amount of data exist from controlled studies comparing regional...... anesthesia with local anesthetics and general anesthesia. The cumulative experience from these studies have demonstrated an advantageous effect on postoperative morbidity parameters such as blood loss, postoperative thromboembolic complications, pulmonary infective complications, gastrointestinal motility...

  4. A Nomogram for Calculation of Maximum Recommended Dose by Volume of Local Anesthetic in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Splaver, Theodore; Walker, Jason

    2017-03-15

    Calculation of maximum recommended doses for local anesthetic agents and added vasopressors is complex and error-prone with potentially fatal consequences. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a nomogram to calculate the maximum recommended doses, expressed as volumes (number of cartridges or ml) of local anesthetic for healthy U.S. pediatric dental patients based on body weight, and test its accuracy and reproducibility. Standard mathematical techniques were used to draft the nomogram. Validation was performed using simulated patient data, and Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the nomogram. The nomogram was found to have a bias of 0.01 ml, with limits of agreement -0.04ml to 0.06ml and, thus, was considered to be within an acceptable range for clinical use. Our nomogram rapidly calculated the maximum recommended doses by volume of local anesthetic agents in common use to a high degree of accuracy and repeatability.

  5. Uses and Doses of Local Anesthetics in Fish, Amphibians, and Reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatigny, Frederic; Kamunde, Collins; Creighton, Catherine M; Stevens, E Don

    2017-05-01

    Local anesthetics are an integral part of routine pain management in mammals, yet their use is relatively limited in fish, amphibians and reptiles. These animals frequently undergo potentially painful surgical procedures and therefore could possibly benefit from those drugs. Some recommendations are currently available in the literature concerning analgesic use in these animals. However the pharmacological properties, safety and often efficacy of local anesthetic drugs have not been investigated yet in fish, amphibians, or reptiles. This review compiled current information concerning the use of those agents in fish, reptiles and amphibians to help clinicians make an informed decision as to which dose and drug to use. The resulting literature search showed that the literature concerning use of local analgesics in fish and amphibians is very limited while the literature for reptiles is more extensive. We found few experimental studies evaluating the efficacy of local anesthetics. Further studies would provide additional information for developing guidelines to improve the welfare of fish, amphibians and reptiles.

  6. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia and intravenous morphine self-administration on regional glucose metabolism ([18 F]FDG-PET) of male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas Y; Nishida, Kevin S; Wilson, Colin M; Jaiswal, Shalini; Scott, Jessica; Hoy, Andrew R; Selwyn, Reed G; Dardzinski, Bernard J; Choi, Kwang H

    2017-04-01

    Although certain drugs of abuse are known to disrupt brain glucose metabolism (BGluM), the effects of opiates on BGluM are not well characterized. Moreover, preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies anesthetize animals during the scan, which limits clinical applications. We investigated the effects of (i) isoflurane anesthesia and (ii) intravenous morphine self-administration (MSA) on BGluM in rats. Jugular vein cannulated adult male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered either saline (SSA) or morphine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion, 4 h/day for 12 days). All animals were scanned twice with [ 18 F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT at a baseline and at 2-day withdrawal from self-administration. After the IV injection of FDG, one batch of animals (n = 14) was anesthetized with isoflurane and the other batch (n = 16) was kept awake during the FDG uptake (45 min). After FDG uptake, all animals were anesthetized in order to perform a PET/CT scan (30 min). Isoflurane anesthesia, as compared to the awake condition, reduced BGluM in the olfactory, cortex, thalamus, and basal ganglia, while increasing BGluM in the midbrain, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Morphine self-administered animals exhibited withdrawal signs (piloerection and increased defecation), drug seeking, and locomotor stimulation to morphine (0.5 mg/kg) during the 2 day withdrawal. The BGluM in the striatum was increased in the MSA group as compared to the SSA group; this effect was observed only in the isoflurane anesthesia, not the awake condition. These findings suggest that the choice of the FDG uptake condition may be important in preclinical PET studies and increased BGluM in the striatum may be associated with opiate seeking in withdrawal. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Efficacy of diltiazem as an adjunct to lignocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various adjuncts have been used with lignocaine to decrease tourniquet pain and prolong post-operative analgesia during intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA. Calcium-channel blockers potentiate the analgesic effect of local anesthetics. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of diltiazem as an adjunct to lignocaine in IVRA with respect to tourniquet tolerance, perioperative analgesia, and quality of anesthesia. Methods: In this prospective, randomized, and double-blind study, 40 patients (American Society for Anesthesiologists grade I/II undergoing elective hand surgery under IVRA were assigned into two groups of 20 each and administered IVRA either with lignocaine 3 mg/kg (group Lignocaine (L or lignocaine 3 mg/kg plus diltiazem 0.2 mg/kg (group Lignocaine-Diltiazem (LD with normal saline (total volume-40 ml. Hemodynamic parameters, onset of the complete sensory blockade, motor blockade, and intraoperative (tourniquet pain and post-operative Visual Analogue Scale scores, total intraoperative and consumption of post-operative fentanyl intraoperative were recorded. Results: Sensory block was established in 2.5±0.688 min in group LD verses 5.60±0.851 min in group L. Motor blockade was established in 8.65±0.933 min in group LD and 13.46±0.604 min in group L. The mean VAS scores >3 were attained early at 30 min (3.1±0.912 in group L. Patients in group L requested early rescue analgesic at 30±8.633 min compared with 49.64±7.958 min in group LD. Conclusions: Diltiazem as an adjunct to lignocaine provided enhanced intraoperative and post-operative analgesia without any significant side effects.

  8. Clonidine versus ketamine to prevent tourniquet pain during intravenous regional anesthesia with lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgias, N K; Maidatsi, P G; Kyriakidis, A M; Karakoulas, K A; Alvanos, D N; Giala, M M

    2001-01-01

    Both clonidine and ketamine have been found to prolong the action of local anesthetics through a peripheral mechanism. Our study compares the efficacy of a low dose of clonidine or ketamine separately added to intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) with lidocaine to prevent tourniquet pain. We conducted a prospective randomized double-blinded study in 45 patients undergoing hand or forearm surgery, with anticipated duration exceeding 1 hour under IVRA. Proximal cuff inflation of a double tourniquet was followed by administration of 40 mL of lidocaine 0.5% and either saline, 1 microg/kg clonidine, or 0.1 mg/kg ketamine. When anesthesia was established, the inflation of the proximal and distal cuff was interchanged. Thereafter, tourniquet pain was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS) every 10 minutes. Intraoperatively, boluses of 25 microg fentanyl were provided for tourniquet pain treatment when required, and total fentanyl consumption was recorded. Patients receiving plain lidocaine persistently reported the highest pain scores among groups (P <.001) 20 minutes after distal cuff inflation. Differences between the groups with additional treatment were noted 50 minutes after distal cuff inflation and until the end of the observation, with significantly lower VAS ratings (P <.001 to P <.01) in ketamine-treated patients. Total fentanyl consumption was significantly decreased by ketamine (70.00 +/- 25.35 microg) or clonidine (136.67 +/- 39.94 microg) compared with the plain lidocaine group (215.33 +/- 52.33 microg) (P <.001 between all groups). The addition of clonidine 1 microg/kg or ketamine 0.1 mg/kg to lidocaine for IVRA delays the onset of unbearable tourniquet pain and decreases analgesic consumption for tourniquet pain relief, although ketamine has a more potent effect.

  9. New procedure to synthesize silver nanoparticles and their interaction with local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocanu A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora Mocanu,1 Roxana Diana Pasca,1 Gheorghe Tomoaia,2 Corina Garbo,1 Petre T Frangopol,1 Ossi Horovitz,1 Maria Tomoaia-Cotisel11Chemical Engineering Department, Babes-Bolyai University, 2Orthopedic Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were prepared in aqueous colloid dispersions by the reduction of Ag+ with glucose in alkaline medium. Tetraethyl orthosilicate and l-asparagine were added as stabilizers of NPs. The AgNPs were characterized, and their interaction with three local anesthetics (procaine, dibucaine, or tetracaine was investigated. Optical spectra show the characteristic absorption band of AgNPs, due to surface plasmon resonance. Modifications in the position and shape of this band reflect the self-assembly of metal NPs mediated by anesthetic molecules and the progress in time of the aggregation process. Zeta-potential measuring was applied in order to characterize the electrostatic stability of the NPs. The size and shape of the AgNPs, as well as the features of the assemblies formed by their association in the presence of anesthetics, were evidenced by transmission electron microscopy images. Atomic force microscopy images showed the characteristics of the films of AgNPs deposited on glass support. The effect of the anesthetics could be described in terms of electrostatic forces between the negatively charged AgNPs and the anesthetic molecules, existing also in their cationic form at the working pH. But also hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions between the coated nanoparticles and anesthetics molecular species should be considered.Keywords: self-assembled nanostructures, UV-vis spectra, TEM, AFM, zeta potential

  10. Evaluation of cranial tibial and extensor carpi radialis reflexes before and after anesthetic block in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudury, Eduardo Alberto; de Figueiredo, Marcella Luiz; Fernandes, Thaiza Helena Tavares; Araújo, Bruno Martins; Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Silva, Amanda Camilo; Santos, Cássia Regina Oliveira; Rocha, Nadyne Lorrayne Farias Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to test the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats before and after anesthetic block of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, respectively, to determine whether they depend on a myotatic reflex arc. Methods Fifty-five cats with a normal neurologic examination that were referred for elective gonadectomy were divided into group 1 (29 cats) for testing the extensor carpi radialis reflex, and group 2 (26 cats) for testing the cranial tibial reflex. In group 1, the extensor carpi radialis reflex was tested after anesthetic induction and 15 mins after brachial plexus block with lidocaine. In group 2, the cranial tibial, withdrawal and patellar reflexes were elicited in 52 hindlimbs and retested 15 mins after epidural anesthesia. Results In group 1, before the anesthetic block, 55.17% of the cats had a decreased and 44.83% had a normal extensor carpi radialis reflex. After the block, 68.96% showed a decreased and 27.59% a normal reflex. No cat had an increased or absent reflex before anesthetic block. In group 2, prior to the anesthetic block, 15.38% of the cats had a decreased cranial tibial reflex and 84.62% had a normal response, whereas after the block it was decreased in 26.92% and normal in 73.08% of the cats. None of the cats had an increased or absent reflex. Regarding the presence of both reflexes before and after anesthetic block, there was no significant difference at 1% ( P = 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats are not strictly myotatic reflexes, as they are independent of the reflex arc, and may be idiomuscular responses. Therefore, they are not reliable for neurologic examination in this species.

  11. Ascorbic acid reverses the prolonged anesthetic action of pentobarbital in Akr1a-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junitsu; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Zhang, Xuhong; Konno, Tasuku; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Yamato, Mayumi; Matsuoka, Yuta; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2014-01-24

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A), a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, is highly expressed in the liver and is involved in both the detoxification of carbonyl compounds and ascorbic acid biosynthesis. By comparison with wild-type mice, Akr1a-knockout (Akr1a(-/-)) mice and human Akrla-transgenic (Akr1a(tg/+)) mice experience different anesthetic actions from pentobarbital-prolonged in Akr1a-knockout (Akr1a(-/-)) mice and shortened in human Akrla-transgenic (Akr1a(tg/+)) mice. We investigated this alteration in the anesthetic efficacy of pentobarbital in Akr1a genetically modified mice. Neither the cytosolic protein of wild-type mouse liver nor purified rat AKR1A directly reduced pentobarbital. Ascorbic acid administration neutralized the prolonged duration of the loss of the righting reflex (LORR) in Akr1a(-/-) mice, but preincubation of pentobarbital with ascorbic acid prior to administration did not change the anesthetic effect. Those results indicated that ascorbic acid does not directly reduce pentobarbital. Enzymatic activities and levels of the proteins of some cytochrome P450s that make up a potent detoxification system for pentobarbital showed no changes in the genetically modified mice examined. Thus, ascorbic acid also had no effect on the detoxification system in the liver. The prolonged duration of LORR in the Akr1a(-/-) mice caused by pentobarbital and the neutralization of the anesthetic effect by ascorbic acid together with other results imply that ascorbic acid alters the responses of the neuronal system to anesthetics. Pentobarbital action is increased under conditions of ascorbic acid deficiency, and this may have to be taken into account when anesthetizing malnourished patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Anesthetic management of a patient with Kimura′s disease for superficial parotidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalim Kumar Baidya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kimura′s disease is a rare form of chronic eosinophilic inflammatory disease with vascular proliferation involving salivary gland, skin, lymph node, and kidney. Important anesthetic concerns include increased surgical bleeding due to its vascular nature, airway involvement by the mass leading to a possible difficult airway, allergic symptoms associated with high eosinophil count and elevated IgE level and nephrotic syndrome due to involvement of kidney by the inflammatory process. There is paucity of information in the literature on the anesthetic management of Kimura′s disease. We describe the anesthesia technique and review the literature of such a case posted for superficial parotidectomy.

  13. A case of uncorrected adult tetralogy of Fallot for emergency decompressive craniotomy: An anesthetic challenge!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Vinod Hippalgaonkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanotic heart disease (CHD includes those anatomical heart defects that produce a limitation in pulmonary blood flow or result in mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. Both conditions lead to decreased blood oxygen content and cyanosis. The most frequent defects seen in the outpatient adult congenital setting include tetralogy of Fallot (TOF. The cardiovascular anatomy and physiology of adult CHD is complex and requires specific knowledge of the defect and its anesthetic implications. Hence, they should receive care with multidisciplinary collaboration among anesthesiologists, cardiologists, surgeons, and intensivists. We hereby report the anesthetic management of such a case of head injury in an adult uncorrected TOF with a good outcome.

  14. Anesthetic properties of Ocimum gratissimum essential oil for juvenile matrinxã

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Allyson Soares; Batista, Erix dos Santos; Dairiki, Jony Koiji; Chaves, Francisco Célio Maia; Inoue, Luis Antônio Kioshi Aoki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The matrinxã fish is suitable for Amazonian aquaculture, exhibiting positive characteristics such as good growth and feed conversion ratio. However, it is a very active fish and must be anesthetized for handling. The present study evaluated the use of Ocimum gratissimum essential oil (EO) as anesthetic for juvenile matrinxãs. A first experiment assessed the induction time to anesthesia of 7 concentrations (20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 mg L-1 of O. gratissimum (EO). A second experim...

  15. Time-Dependent Decline in Multifocal Electroretinogram Requires Faster Recording Procedures in Anesthetized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Buus; Christiansen, Anders Tolstrup; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The time-dependent effect of anesthetics on the retinal function is debated. We hypothesize that in anesthetized animals there is a time-dependent decline that requires optimized multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) recording procedures. METHODS: Conventional and four-frame global-flash mf...... by determining the necessary time-of-delay from intraocular injection of a drug to full effect. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: General anesthesia is a possible source of error in mfERG recordings. Therefore, it is important to investigate the translational relevance of the results to mfERG recordings in children...

  16. Anesthetic management during the first combined heart-liver transplant performed in Korea: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Park, Jungchan; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Gaabsoo

    2017-10-01

    Herein, we describe the anesthetic management during the first combined heart-liver transplant (CHLT) performed in Korea. Though CHLT is a rare procedure, accumulating evidence suggests that it is a feasible option for patients with coexisting heart and liver failure. A 45-year-old female patient presented with severe cardiac dysfunction requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support and secondary congestive hepatopathy. The patient underwent consecutive heart and liver transplantation using extracorporeal circulatory devices-heart transplant with cardiopulmonary bypass, and liver transplant with peripheral ECMO. In this case report, we focus on the specific anesthetic considerations for CHLT pertaining to the challenges associated with dual pathophysiology.

  17. Cimethidine pre-anesthetic. A prophylactic method against Mendelson's syndrome in cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K

    1983-01-01

    Twenty patients undergoing cesarean section received cimethidine 400 mg intramuscularly as pre-anesthetic approximately 70 minutes prior to gastric aspiration. The average pH was 5.05, as against 2.97 in the control group (p less than 0.01). No significant reduction in the aspirated volumes was o...... in the infants. Hence, cimethidine is a safe and useful pre-anesthetic for patients undergoing cesarean section, irrespective of indication and, consequently, much to be preferred to oral antacids....

  18. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics: needle lesion or neurotoxicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry METHODS: The study included data sets of annual sales of local...... of three of the four drugs in both national registry data and clinical data. These findings indicate that the main cause of injury was neurotoxicity resulting from administration of the local anesthetic rather than the needle penetration. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians may consider avoiding use of high...

  19. Anti-oxidative aspect of inhaled anesthetic gases against acute brain injury

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    Tuo Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a critical and emergent condition in clinical settings, which needs to be addressed urgently. Commonly acute brain injuries include traumatic brain injury, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Oxidative stress is a key contributor to the subsequent injuries and impedes the reparative process after acute brain injury; therefore, facilitating an anti-oxidative approach is important in the care of those diseases. Readiness to deliver and permeability to blood brain barrier are essential for the use of this purpose. Inhaled anesthetic gases are a group of such agents. In this article, we discuss the anti-oxidative roles of anesthetic gases against acute brain injury.

  20. Does the use of a volatile anesthetic regimen attenuate the incidence of cardiac events after vascular surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S. G.; Longrois, D.; Yang, H.; Fleisher, L. A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of a volatile anesthetic to a non-volatile anesthetic regimen on the incidence of postoperative cardiac events, including the postoperative elevation of troponin I values after arterial vascular surgery in high risk patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of data

  1. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse

  2. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...

  3. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

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    Jose Soliz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  4. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  5. Short-lasting systemic and regional benefits of early crystalloid infusion after intravenous inoculation of dogs with live Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the systemic and regional hemodynamic effects of early crystalloid infusion in an experimental model of septic shock induced by intravenous inoculation with live Escherichia coli. Anesthetized dogs received an intravenous infusion of 1.2 x 10(10 cfu/kg live E. coli in 30 min. After 30 min of observation, they were randomized to controls (no fluids; N = 7, or fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution, 16 ml/kg (N = 7 or 32 ml/kg (N = 7 over 30 min and followed for 120 min. Cardiac index, portal blood flow, mean arterial pressure, systemic and regional oxygen-derived variables, blood lactate, and gastric PCO2 were assessed. Rapid and progressive cardiovascular deterioration with reduction in cardiac output, mean arterial pressure and portal blood flow (~50, ~25 and ~70%, respectively was induced by the live bacteria challenge. Systemic and regional territories showed significant increases in oxygen extraction and in lactate levels. Significant increases in venous-arterial (~9.6 mmHg, portal-arterial (~12.1 mmHg and gastric mucosal-arterial (~18.4 mmHg PCO2 gradients were also observed. Early fluid replacement, especially with 32 ml/kg volumes of crystalloids, promoted only partial and transient benefits such as increases of ~76% in cardiac index, of ~50% in portal vein blood flow and decreases in venous-arterial, portal-arterial, gastric mucosal-arterial PCO2 gradients (7.2 ± 1.0, 7.2 ± 1.3 and 9.7 ± 2.5 mmHg, respectively. The fluid infusion promoted only modest and transient benefits, unable to restore the systemic and regional perfusional and metabolic changes in this hypodynamic septic shock model.

  6. Morbimortality associated with intravenous boarding in very ill pediatrics’ patients

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    Darelys Baños Sánchez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The insertion of intravenous catheters has converted itself in an indispensable procedure in Pediatric Intensive Care Units. The objective is caracterizing the morbimortality associated with intravenous boarding in very ill pediatrics’ patients. Descriptive, longitudinal prospective study, during 2016, in the Intensive Care Unit of the Pepe Portilla Pediatric Hospital, Pinar of the Río, The Universe: It got constituted for 182 patients admitted in the period of study and they required intravenous boarding. The information got from patient's charts and the unit's record of continuous morbility itself, and it was processed with SPSS statistical parcel for Windows, the test of hypothesis of proportions and the percentages were utilized. The intravenous boarding was accomplished to the 51.12% of the admitted patients, 31.46% for femoral road and 60.83% to patients under one year old. Principal use was the administration of medications (100%, the 56.59% had the boarding over 10 days, the 12.08% of patients presented complications, infection was more frequent. The conclusions are high incidence of the application of intravenous boarding exists; infection for catheter is the correlated complication more frequent.

  7. Activation of Opioid μ-Receptors, but not δ- or κ-Receptors, Switches Pulmonary C-Fiber-Mediated Rapid Shallow Breathing into An Apnea in Anesthetized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Cancan; Zhou, Moxi; Xu, Fadi

    2012-01-01

    Rapid shallow breathing (RSB) is mainly mediated by bronchopulmonary C-fibers (PCFs). We asked whether this RSB could be modulated by opioid. In anesthetized rats right atrial bolus injection of phenylbiguanide (PBG) to evoke RSB was repeated after: 1) intravenously giving fentanyl (μ-receptor agonist), DPDPE (δ-receptor agonist), or U-50488H (κ-receptor agonist); 2) fentanyl (iv) following naloxone methiodide, a peripheral opioid receptor antagonist; 3) bilateral microinjection of fentanyl into the nodose ganglia; 4) fentanyl (iv) with pre-blocking histamine H1 and H2 receptors by diphenhydramine and ranitidine. Systemic fentanyl challenge, but not DPDPE or U-50488H, switched the PBG-induced RSB to a long lasting apnea. This switch was blocked by naloxone methiodide rather than diphenhydramine and ranitidine. After microinjecting fentanyl into the nodose ganglia, PBG also produced an apnea. Our results suggest that activating μ-receptors is capable of turning the PCF-mediated RSB into an apnea, at least partly, via facilitating PCFs’ activity and this switching effect appears independent of the released histamine. PMID:22796630

  8. Beta-3 adrenergic agonist, BRL-26830A, and alpha/beta blocker, arotinolol, markedly increase regional blood flow in the brown adipose tissue in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Yoshida, T; Nishimura, M; Nakanishi, T; Kondo, M; Yoshimura, M

    1992-09-01

    Regional vascular effects of some adrenergic agents, focussing on brown adipose tissue (BAT), were investigated using tracer microspheres with a reference sample method in the anesthetized rat. Intravenous injections of 0.5 mg/kg BRL-26830A, a beta 3-adrenergic agonist, increased heart rate, but changes in blood pressure and cardiac output were not significant. The drug decreased blood flow in the brain, the spleen and the kidneys, but markedly increased it in BAT. At 2 mg/kg, arotinolol, an alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, decreased blood pressure by 20 mmHg and increased cardiac output by 95 ml/min/kg. It slightly but significantly decreased blood flow in the liver and the spleen, but markedly increased the flow in BAT. Acebutolol, a beta 1-adrenergic blocker, decreased blood flow in the liver, the spleen, the pancreas, the kidneys, the adrenals, the skeletal muscle and the skin. Bunazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic blocker, decreased it in all organs and tissue expect the brain and BAT. The pattern of redistribution of blood flow by arotinolol was very similar to that caused by BRL-26830A. Acebutolol and bunazosin rather decreased the blood flow in the BAT. These results indicate that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors, in BAT results in vasodilation, and that arotinolol may bind to those beta 3-adrenergic receptors.

  9. Randomized crossover study assessing oropharyngeal leak pressure and fiber optic positioning : Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme™ versus Laryngeal Tube LTS II™ size 2 in non-paralyzed anesthetized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, L; Ofner, S; Stögermüller, B; Ziegler, B; Brimacombe, J; Keller, C

    2016-08-01

    As there are currently no data available comparing the practicability of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Supreme™ size 2 versus the laryngeal tube LTS II™ size 2 in children, this trial was conducted to quantify the differences between these two airway devices concerning leak pressure and fiber optic-controlled positioning in non-paralyzed, anesthetized pediatric patients. A total of 56 children aged 1-6 years and weighing between 11 and 23 kg were enrolled in the study. Anesthesia was intravenously induced according to local standards using fentanyl and propofol. After induction of anesthesia both airway devices were inserted consecutively in accordance with the randomization protocol. The mean oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for the LTS II™ (33±8 cmH2O) than for the LMA Supreme™ (21±7 cmH2O, p insertion (55Supreme LMA vs. 43LTSII, p insertion time (25 s Supreme LMA vs. 34 s LTSII, p laryngeal tube LTS II™. We conclude that oropharyngeal leak pressure, fiber optic position, first attempt insertion success rate and bloodstaining differed between the LMA Supreme™ and the LTS II™ in children.

  10. Targets Involved in Cardioprotection by the Non-Anesthetic Noble Gas Helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Smit, Kirsten F.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Research data from the past decade indicate that noble gases like xenon and helium exert profound cardioprotection when applied before, during or after organ ischemia. Of all noble gases, especially helium, has gained interest in the past years because it does not have an anesthetic "side effect"

  11. An Anesthetic Drug Demonstration and an Introductory Antioxidant Activity Experiment with "Eugene, the Sleepy Fish"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcena, Homar; Chen, Peishan

    2016-01-01

    Students are introduced to spectrophotometry in comparing the antioxidant activity of pure eugenol and oil of cloves from a commercial source using a modified ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The extraction of the essential oil from dried cloves is demonstrated to facilitate discussions on green chemistry. The anesthetic properties…

  12. Evaluation of the Aesthetics of Physical Methods of Euthanasia of Anesthetized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Debra L; Johnson, Steven W

    2011-01-01

    Dissection of living brain tissue for in vitro experiments requires the use of a rapid euthanasia method. However, the method must not subject animals to unnecessary pain and must be aesthetically acceptable to experimenters. The purposes of the current study were to assess the aesthetics of 6 euthanasia methods, measure the procedure duration, and evaluate brain for pathology after each procedure. We digitally recorded euthanasia of isoflurane-anesthetized rats by 6 physical methods: anesthetic overdose, cardiac exsanguination, decapitation, closed intrathoracic transection of the great vessels and heart, thoracic percussion, and thoracotomy with rupture of great vessels. Volunteer researchers and animal caretakers watched the video and completed an associated questionnaire. Anesthetic overdose and cardiac exsanguinations were rated most aesthetically pleasing, although these procedures took the longest to complete. In contrast, decapitation and thoracic percussion were the least aesthetically pleasing, but these methods were the quickest. No demographic factor was identified that could predict whether a given euthanasia procedure would be favored for aesthetic reasons, and participants provided a wide variety of rationales for the aesthetic ratings they assigned. Although all of these euthanasia methods meet the criteria of approved methods of euthanasia of anesthetized rats as defined by the AVMA, aesthetic features and the scientific need for rapid euthanasia are both considerations in selecting a method. PMID:22330717

  13. Temporary blindness and ophthalmoplegia due to local anesthetic infiltration of the nasal septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Devrim; Kul, Neslihan; Akyol, Nurettin; Ural, Ahmet; Caylan, Refik

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old man who developed blindness and ophthalmoplegia during local anesthetic infiltration of the nasal septum. The complications were temporary, and the patient had full recovery without treatment. The vascular anatomy of the area and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed, with some suggestions on the prevention of this complication.

  14. Intradermal Infiltration of Local Anesthetic-Rapid and Bloodless Deepithelialization of the Breast Pedicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Katelyn G; Gilman, Robert H

    2017-02-01

    Breast reduction is one of the most commonly performed plastic surgery procedures, and pedicle deepithelialization remains a time-consuming step of the operation. This is especially true when using an inferior pedicle. We present a novel technique of intradermal infiltration of the breast pedicle with local anesthetic to facilitate efficient, bloodless deepithelialization. The senior author uses a 20-ml syringe to inject 0.25% lidocaine and 1:400,000 epinephrine just beneath the epidermis of the breast pedicle to create a series of wheals. Approximately 20 ml of local anesthetic is used per pedicle. After injection of local anesthetic, the breast pedicle is deepithelialized in less than 3 minutes. The plane is bloodless, allowing improved visualization secondary to the epinephrine-induced hemostasis. The senior author has had only one case of nipple necrosis in 20 years of experience. Intradermal infiltration of local anesthetic with epinephrine hydrodissects between the epidermis and dermis and provides hemostasis to facilitate rapid deepithelialization.

  15. [Occupational hazards, DNA damage, and oxidative stress on exposure to waste anesthetic gases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio, Lorena M C; Braz, Mariana G; do Nascimento Junior, Paulo; Braz, José Reinaldo C; Braz, Leandro G

    The waste anesthetic gases (WAGs) present in the ambient air of operating rooms (OR), are associated with various occupational hazards. This paper intends to discuss occupational exposure to WAGs and its impact on exposed professionals, with emphasis on genetic damage and oxidative stress. Despite the emergence of safer inhaled anesthetics, occupational exposure to WAGs remains a current concern. Factors related to anesthetic techniques and anesthesia workstations, in addition to the absence of a scavenging system in the OR, contribute to anesthetic pollution. In order to minimize the health risks of exposed professionals, several countries have recommended legislation with maximum exposure limits. However, developing countries still require measurement of WAGs and regulation for occupational exposure to WAGs. WAGs are capable of inducing damage to the genetic material, such as DNA damage assessed using the comet assay and increased frequency of micronucleus in professionals with long-term exposure. Oxidative stress is also associated with WAGs exposure, as it induces lipid peroxidation, oxidative damage in DNA, and impairment of the antioxidant defense system in exposed professionals. The occupational hazards related to WAGs including genotoxicity, mutagenicity and oxidative stress, stand as a public health issue and must be acknowledged by exposed personnel and responsible authorities, especially in developing countries. Thus, it is urgent to stablish maximum safe limits of concentration of WAGs in ORs and educational practices and protocols for exposed professionals. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital: An Unusually Potent Enantioselective and Photoreactive Barbiturate General Anesthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Zhang, Xi; Chiara, David C.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Ge, Rile; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Raines, Douglas E.; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Forman, Stuart A.; Miller, Keith W.; Bruzik, Karol S. (Harvard-Med); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.); (UIC)

    2012-12-10

    We synthesized 5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (14), a trifluoromethyldiazirine-containing derivative of general anesthetic mephobarbital, separated the racemic mixture into enantiomers by chiral chromatography, and determined the configuration of the (+)-enantiomer as S by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, we obtained the {sup 3}H-labeled ligand with high specific radioactivity. R-(-)-14 is an order of magnitude more potent than the most potent clinically used barbiturate, thiopental, and its general anesthetic EC{sub 50} approaches those for propofol and etomidate, whereas S-(+)-14 is 10-fold less potent. Furthermore, at concentrations close to its anesthetic potency, R-(-)-14 both potentiated GABA-induced currents and increased the affinity for the agonist muscimol in human {alpha}1{beta}2/3{gamma}2L GABA{sub A} receptors. Finally, R-(-)-14 was found to be an exceptionally efficient photolabeling reagent, incorporating into both {alpha}1 and {beta}3 subunits of human {alpha}1{beta}3 GABAA receptors. These results indicate R-(-)-14 is a functional general anesthetic that is well-suited for identifying barbiturate binding sites on Cys-loop receptors.

  17. Comparative analysis of assessment methods for operational and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to conduct a comparative analysis of methods of evaluation of surgical and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis ofthe extent of the surgical and anesthetic risks and results of treatment of 71 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding has been conducted in the study. To evaluate the surgical and anesthetic risks classification trees are used, scale ТА. Rockall and prognosis System of rebleeding (SPRK, proposed by N. V. Lebedev et al. in 2009, enabling to evaluate the probability of a fatal outcome. To compare the efficacy ofthe methods the following indicators are used: sensitivity, specificity and prediction of positive result. Results. The study compared the results ofthe risk assessment emergency operation by using these methods with the outcome ofthe operation. The comparison ofthe prognosis results in sensitivity leads to the conclusion that the scales ТА. Rockall and SPRK are worse than the developed method of classification trees in recognizing patients with poor outcome of surgery. Conclusion. The method of classification trees can be considered as the most accurate method of evaluation of surgical and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding.

  18. Analgesic and adjuvant anesthetic effect of submucosal tramadol after mandibular third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccheti, Marcelo Minharro; Negrato, Giovana Vigário; Peres, Maria Paula Siqueira de Melo; Deboni, Maria Cristina Zindel; Naclério-Homem, Maria da Graça

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess analgesic and adjuvant anesthetic effects of submucosal tramadol after third molar extraction. In this double-blind, split-mouth, placebo-controlled, single-dose, crossover investigation, 52 patients underwent mandibular third molar extraction under local anesthesia. Surgical side was randomly assigned to submucosal 2 mL 100 mg tramadol injection (group T) or normal saline solution (group P) immediately after surgery. Anesthetic blockade duration, time of intake and amount of analgesic rescue drug, and postoperative pain intensity were recorded immediately after anesthesia cessation and 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests. Anesthetic blockade duration between groups was similar. Group T took significantly less rescue drug after 72 hours (P = .008). Time elapsed before first intake of rescue drug was longer (P = .006), and pain intensity was significantly lower (P = .001) in group T. Submucosal tramadol injection after oral surgery improved postoperative analgesia, but did not extend anesthetic action duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Memory-impairing effects of local anesthetics in an elevated plus-maze test in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Blatt

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-training intracerebroventricular administration of procaine (20 µg/µl and dimethocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, local anesthetics of the ester class, prolonged the latency (s in the retention test of male and female 3-month-old Swiss albino mice (25-35 g body weight; N = 140 in the elevated plus-maze (mean ± SEM for 10 male mice: control = 41.2 ± 8.1; procaine = 78.5 ± 10.3; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 58.7 ± 12.3; 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 109.6 ± 5.73; for 10 female mice: control = 34.8 ± 5.8; procaine = 55.3 ± 13.4; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 59.9 ± 12.3 and 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 61.3 ± 11.1. However, lidocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, an amide class type of local anesthetic, failed to influence this parameter. Local anesthetics at the dose range used did not affect the motor coordination of mice exposed to the rota-rod test. These results suggest that procaine and dimethocaine impair some memory process(es in the plus-maze test. These findings are interpreted in terms of non-anesthetic mechanisms of action of these drugs on memory impairment and also confirm the validity of the elevated plus-maze for the evaluation of drugs affecting learning and memory in mice

  20. Probing the dynamics of complexed local anesthetics via neutron scattering spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Eckert, Juergen; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Since potential changes in the dynamics and mobility of drugs upon complexation for delivery may affect their ultimate efficacy, we have investigated the dynamics of two local anesthetic molecules, bupivacaine (BVC, C18H28N2O) and ropivacaine (RVC, C17H26N2O), in both their crystalline forms and ...

  1. Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) with intra-alveolar syngnathia: a discussion of anesthetic and surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahm, Caroline; Kuylenstierna, Richard; Papatziamos, Georgios

    2007-10-01

    Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) is a rare genetic disorder that involves the association of a popliteal web with a combination of craniofacial, genitourinary and extremity malformations. In this article, we describe a patient with PPS complicated with multiple intra-alveolar syngnathia. We discuss the anesthetic and the surgical management of this case and review the literature regarding PPS and intra-alveolar syngnathia.

  2. Comparison of 4 Different Anesthetic Protocols in Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.; Roubos, S.; Arndt, S.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483615X; Kronen, P.; Langermans, J.

    For major invasive procedures in marmosets, such as section cesarean or insertion of telemetric devices into the abdomen, a long-acting, safe and reliable anesthesia is required including sufficient analgesia. Limited data is available on anesthetic protocols in marmosets. Therefore, a crossover

  3. Caregivers f willingness.to.pay for a topical anesthetic cream for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Topical anesthetic cream (TAC) is not in use in pediatric practice in Sub.saharan regions. Knowledge of Caregivers willingness.to.pay (WTP) for the cream is necessary for its deployment. Objective: To determine the WTP for TAC for minor pediatric painful procedures. Materials and Methods: The study was a ...

  4. Non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse among anesthesia care providers: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta-Alarcón, Alix; Coffman, John C; Soghomonyan, Suren; Papadimos, Thomas J; Bergese, Sergio D; Moran, Kenneth R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the problem of non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse among anesthesia care providers (ACPs) and to describe current approaches to screening, therapy, and rehabilitation of ACPs suffering from non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse. We first performed a search of all literature available on PubMed prior to April 11, 2016. The search was limited to articles published in Spanish and English, and the following key words were used: anesthesiology, anesthesia personnel, AND substance-related disorders. We also searched Ovid MEDLINE ® databases from 1946-April 11, 2016 using the following search terms: anesthesiology OR anesthesia, OR nurse anesthetist OR anesthesia care provider OR perioperative nursing AND substance-related disorders. Despite an increased awareness of drug abuse among ACPs and improvements in preventive measures, the problem of non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse remains significant. While opioids are the most commonly abused anesthesia medications among ACPs, the abuse of non-opioid anesthetics is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, and professional demise. Early detection, effective therapy, and long-term follow-up help ACPs cope more effectively with the problem and, when possible, resume their professional activities. There is insufficient evidence to determine the ability of ACPs to return safely to anesthesia practice after rehabilitation, though awareness of the issue and ongoing treatment are necessary to minimize patient risk from potentially related clinical errors.

  5. Trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and fluorodinitrobenzene: probes to study local anesthetic effects in cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, P; Marinetti, G V

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of local anesthetics with intact erythrocytes was studied by monitoring the extent of reaction of phospholipids with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and fluorodinitrobenzene. Incubating erythrocytes with local anesthetics increases the amount of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine available for reaction with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and fluorodinitrobenzene. The order of potency of the local anesthetics corresponded to that reported for blocking nerve conduction: dibucaine greater than tetracaine greater than butacaine greater than lidocaine greater than procaine. Treatment of intact erythrocytes with 1 mM tetracaine at 37 degrees C allows 4-5% more of the phosphatidylethanolamine to react with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid as compared to control cells. Treatment with tetracaine has no effect at 0 degrees C, a temperature at which there is only limited partitioning of the anesthetic into the bilayer. Kinetic analysis of the reaction with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid showed that the increased number of reactive phosphatidylethanolamine molecules are located mainly on the outer half of the erythrocyte membrane. Tetracaine also increases the number of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine molecules in the erythrocyte membrane which are available to react with the penetrating probe fluorodinitrobenzene. The reaction with PE is increased from 67 to 77% and the reaction of PS is increased from 44 to 57%. Thus tetracaine affects both halves of the lipid bilayer.

  6. Anesthetic management of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambi, Uday S.; Adarsh, E. S.; Hatti, Ramesh; Samalad, Vijaymahantesh

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases. PMID:22754447

  7. Anesthetic management of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday S Ambi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases.

  8. Development and Use of a Swine Model for Evaluating Anesthetic Agents and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    anaesthesia in patients with valvular heart disease . Canad. Anaesth. Soc. J., 26: 463-467, 1979. ...341Ketamine has been advocated for the induction of anesthesia in the acutely hypovolemic patient because of its ability to preserve blood pressure which...hypovolemia. The effects of anesthetic induction doses of Ketamine and thiopental were evaluated in a hypovolemic swine model. Sixteen acutely in

  9. Molecular mechanisms transducing the anesthetic, analgesic, and organ-protective actions of xenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C.; Sanders, Robert D.; Maze, Mervyn; Schlack, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The anesthetic properties of xenon have been known for more than 50 yr, and the safety and efficacy of xenon inhalational anesthesia has been demonstrated in several recent clinical studies. In addition, xenon demonstrates many favorable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, which could be

  10. Indomethacin inhibits the natriuretic effects of neuropeptide Y in anesthetized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.; Limmroth, V.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a unique modulator of renal function that enhances urine flow and sodium excretion despite marked reductions in renal blood flow. We investigated whether the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin alters the renal NPY effects in anesthetized rats. Treatment with 5 mg/kg

  11. The effect of anesthetic management during intra-arterial therapy for acute stroke in MR CLEAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhemer, Olvert A.; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Fransen, Puck S. S.; Beumer, Debbie; Yoo, Albert J.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; van den Berg, René; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Boiten, Jelis; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Zwam, Wim H.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Dippel, Diederik; van Oostenbrugge, Robert; Wermer, Marieke; Kappelle, Jaap; van Dijk, Ewoud; Schonewille, Wouter; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Vroomen, Patrick; de Kort, Paul; Keizer, Koos; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan; van den Berg, Peter; Schreuder, Tobien; Aerden, Leo; Visser, Marieke; den Hertog, Heleen; Brouwer, Patrick; van Zwam, Wim; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert; van Walderveen, Marianne; Lo, Rob; de Vries, Joost; Vos, Jan Albert; van Oostayen, Jacques; Eshgi, Omid; Tielbeek, Xander; van Dijk, Lukas; van Hasselt, Boudewijn; Heijboer, Roel; Dallinga, René ; Bot, Joost; Gerrits, Dick; Fransen, Puck; Marquering, Henk; Beenen, Ludo; Lingsma, Hester; Brown, Martin; Stijnen, Theo; Liebig, Thomas; Flach, Zwenneke; Yoo, Albert; Koudstaal, Peter; Steyerberg, Ewout; Andersson, Tommy; Mattle, Heinrich; Wahlgren, Nils; Jenniskens, Sjoerd; van den Berg-Vos, Renske; Karas, Giorgos; Staals, Julie; Emmer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the influence of anesthetic management on the effect of treatment in the Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN). MR CLEAN was a multicenter, randomized, open-label trial of

  12. Synergistic Activities of Abdominal Muscles Are Required for Efficient Micturition in Anesthetized Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Yingchun; Cruz, Yolanda; Boone, Timothy B; Munoz, Alvaro

    2018-03-01

    To characterize the electromyographic activity of abdominal striated muscles during micturition in urethane-anesthetized female mice, and to quantitatively evaluate the contribution of abdominal responses to efficient voiding. Cystometric and multichannel electromyographic recordings were integrated to enable a comprehensive evaluation during micturition in urethane-anesthetized female mice. Four major abdominal muscle domains were evaluated: the external oblique, internal oblique, and superior and inferior rectus abdominis. To further characterize the functionality of the abdominal muscles, pancuronium bromide (25 μg/mL or 50 μg/mL, abdominal surface) was applied as a blocking agent of neuromuscular junctions. We observed a robust activation of the abdominal muscles during voiding, with a consistent onset/offset concomitant with the bladder pressure threshold. Pancuronium was effective, in a dose-dependent fashion, for partial and complete blockage of abdominal activity. Electromyographic discharges during voiding were significantly inhibited by applying pancuronium. Decreased cystometric parameters were recorded, including the peak pressure, pressure threshold, intercontractile interval, and voiding duration, suggesting that the voiding efficiency was significantly compromised by abdominal muscle relaxation. The relevance of the abdominal striated musculature for micturition has remained a topic of debate in human physiology. Although the study was performed on anesthetized mice, these results support the existence of synergistic abdominal electromyographic activity facilitating voiding in anesthetized mice. Further, our study presents a rodent model that can be used for future investigations into micturition-related abdominal activity.

  13. [Performance analysis of a new anesthetic system: the Temel Supra--part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Company, R; García, V; López, F

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of a new anesthetic system that purports to provide novel advantages in ventilating the anesthetized patient. A performance analysis was carried out in our respirator function laboratory using lung simulators to assess the system, its degree of compliance with current regulations, and the degree of compliance with the manufacturer's claims. The system is 100% effective. The internal compliance of the respirator was 0.13 +/- 0.01 mL/cm H2O, inspiratory resistance was 1.9 +/- 0.1 cm H2O/L/s, expiratory resistance was 3.1 +/- 0.3 cm H2O/L/s, and internal volume was 130 mL. The Temel Supra device is versatile and meets the anesthetic requirements of patients undergoing any type of surgery. The possibility of using an open circuit, a low flow, a closed circuit, or a continuous flow without having to change to another system allows the anesthesiologist to make use of the advantages of each circuit without its drawbacks. The efficacy of the circuit is 100%. The low internal volume means that internal compliance is negligible and time constants are low, guaranteeing that the volume programmed is the same as the volume delivered and facilitating alveolar redistribution of gases. The monitoring and warning systems assure safe patient ventilation and accurate dosing of gases and anesthetic agents.

  14. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modification of voltage-dependent sodium channels by local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Muroi, Yukiko; Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2010-11-01

    The hallmark of many intracellular pore blockers such as tetra-alkylammonium compounds and local anesthetics is their ability to allosterically modify the movement of the voltage sensors in voltage-dependent ion channels. For instance, the voltage sensor of domain III is specifically stabilized in the activated state when sodium currents are blocked by local anesthetics. The molecular mechanism underlying this long-range interaction between the blocker-binding site in the pore and voltage sensors remains poorly understood. Here, using scanning mutagenesis in combination with voltage clamp fluorimetry, we systematically evaluate the role of the internal gating interface of domain III of the sodium channel. We find that several mutations in the S4-S5 linker and S5 and S6 helices dramatically reduce the stabilizing effect of lidocaine on the activation of domain III voltage sensor without significantly altering use-dependent block at saturating drug concentrations. In the wild-type skeletal muscle sodium channel, local anesthetic block is accompanied by a 21% reduction in the total gating charge. In contrast, point mutations in this critical intracellular region reduce this charge modification by local anesthetics. Our analysis of a simple model suggests that these mutations in the gating interface are likely to disrupt the various coupling interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore of the sodium channel. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying allosteric interactions between a drug-binding site and voltage sensors.

  15. Risk of acquired methemoglobinemia with different topical anesthetics during endoscopic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallurupalli S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Srikanth Vallurupalli1, Shalini Manchanda21Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Occupational Medicine, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAIntroduction: Methemoglobinemia is a recognized complication of the use of topical anesthetic sprays. The true scope of the problem or the risk with different topical anesthetic sprays and endoscopic procedures is unknown.Methods: We retrospectively identified all cases of methemoglobinemia that occurred in a university affiliated community hospital from 2001 to 2007.Results: Eleven cases of methemoglobinemia were identified over the 6-year period. Nine (82% occurred with use of benzocaine spray during transesophageal echocardiography (TEE. Patients who developed methemoglobinemia secondary to the topical anesthetic spray compared to other causes were more likely to be older, have lower mean hemoglobin levels (10.5 ± 0.5 g/dL vs 11.3 ± 0.0 g/dL, and a higher mean methemoglobin concentration at diagnosis (40.8% ± 5.2% vs 24% ± 10%. However, only age reached statistical significance (P = 0.004.Conclusion: In a university-affiliated community hospital, topical anesthetic sprays account for most of the burden of methemoglobinemia. Benzocaine use in the context of TEE caused more methemoglobinemia compared to lidocaine and other endoscopic procedures. This observation supports previous data and findings deserve further study.Keywords: methemoglobinemia, benzocaine, lidocaine, transesophageal echocardiography, endoscopy

  16. Efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered by ambulance personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesgaard, Kristian Dahl; Nikolajsen, Lone; Giebner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of pain in the pre-hospital setting is often inadequate. In 2011, ambulance personnel were authorized to administer intravenous fentanyl in the Central Denmark Region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered...... by ambulance personnel. METHODS: Pre-hospital medical charts from 2348 adults treated with intravenous fentanyl by ambulance personnel during a 6-month period were reviewed. The primary outcome was the change in pain intensity on a numeric rating scale (NRS) from before fentanyl treatment to hospital arrival....... Secondary outcomes included the number of patients with reduction in pain intensity during transport (NRS ≥ 2), the number of patients with NRS > 3 at hospital arrival, and potential fentanyl-related side effects. RESULTS: Fentanyl reduced pain from before treatment (8, IQR 7-9) to hospital arrival (4, IQR...

  17. Acute Forefoot Phlegmon - A Complication of Intravenous Heroin-Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Torello; Tchernev, Georgi

    2018-01-25

    Infections of the skin and soft tissues (SSTI) are clinical entities with variable presentations, causes, and levels of clinical severity. They are frequent in emergency departments. The most common pathogen in the Western World is Staphylococcus aureus . SSTI may provide a hint to underlying pathologies such as diabetes and other states of immune compromise. Here we present a 41-year-old non-diabetic male patient with pain and swelling of the left forefoot but not any recent trauma. Microbiology identified streptococci. The medical history was positive for intravenous heroin abuse. The diagnosis of forefoot phlegm due to drug addition was confirmed. Treatment was realised by a combination of intravenous antibiosis and drainage. Intravenous drug addiction is a significant risk factor for SSTI.

  18. An ischemic diabetic eye treated with intravenous prostaglandin E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwalt, Robert D; Belcaro, Gianni; Nebbioso, Marcella; Pascarella, Antonella; De Angelis, Mauro; Cesarone, M Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    To present the use of intravenous prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), a powerful vasodilator of the microcirculation, in the treatment of an ischemic diabetic eye. A 27-year-old diabetic man with ischemic diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma had a decreased visual acuity of no light perception in his right eye and hand motions in his left eye. He was started on intravenous PGE1 and has been treated for over 4.5 years. The visual acuity in his right eye remained unchanged and in his left eye improved gradually to 1.5/30. He has been stable for 4.5 years. Intravenous PGE1 may be useful in ischemic diabetic eyes to improve the ocular blood flow and visual acuity. It is safe and tolerated well.

  19. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15-30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (ptreatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  20. Impact of hyaluronidase on anesthetic distribution in retrobulbar region following sub-Tenon anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šurbatović Maja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Sub-Tenon's block is nowadays commonly used in ophthalmic surgery because of its safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of the anesthetic solution with different amounts of hyaluronidase in the retrobulbar space, following an injection into the Sub-Tenon's space. Methods. In this experimental study, 40 pig cadaver heads were used (80 eyeballs. The material was divided into four groups (of 20 eyeballs each. Each group was administered 4.5 ml of a mixture of 2% lignocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, and 0.5 ml of Indian ink, with different amounts of hyaluronidase - 15 IU/ml, 75 IU/ml, 150 IU/ml, except the control one. Samples of retrobulbar tissue were analyzed using the standard histopathological procedure. After that, they were also analyzed using the Adobe Photoshop program® (Windows, USA. The retrobulbar space was divided into eight zones by four perpendicular lines, which crossed in the centre of the optic nerve. The presence of ink in fat and muscle tissues and in the sheath of the optic nerve was observed. Results. The presence of the local anesthetic solution was significantly higher in inferonasal and superonasal quadrants of the fat and muscle tissues (p < 0.01. The distribution in optic nerve sheath is similar in each quadrant. Distribution of local anesthetic in each zone of the muscle tissue (I-VIII was strongly influenced by the amount of hyaluronidase added. In the fat tissue, the distribution of local anesthetic under the influence of hyaluronidase was significantly higher (p < 0.05 in the areas which were distant from the place of injection (I-IV. The distribution in the optic nerve sheath is significantly higher (p < 0.01 in the group with 150 IU/ml of hyaluronidase. Conclusions. Following a sub-Tenon block local anesthetic was present in the retrobulbar space in a high percentage of the cases. The presence of local anesthetic solution in retrobulbar space depends on the amount of

  1. Clinical Applications of Intravenous Immunoglobulins in Child Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogou, Maria; Papadopoulou-Alataki, Efimia; Spilioti, Martha; Alataki, Sofia; Evangeliou, Athanasios

    2017-11-10

    While there are guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulins in children with Guillain-Barre syndrome and myasthenia gravis based on high-level evidence studies, data are scarce for the majority of neurologic disorders in this age group. Neuronal antibodies are detected in children with seizures of autoimmune etiology. Intravenous immunoglobulins with their broad immunomodulatory mechanism of action could be ideally effective in different forms of immunedysregulated intractable epilepsies such as autoimmune epilepsy and autoimmune Rasmussen encephalitis. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for evidence of the use of intravenous immunoglobulins in a variety of neurologic diseases in childhood. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Pubmed as the medical database source without date range. Prospective studies in pediatric groups including objective measures of clinical outcomes were systematically selected. A total of 11 prospective studies were identified in the literature demonstrating a favorable effect of this therapeutic option in children with drug-resistant epilepsy and in cases of encephalitis. No serious adverse effects were reported. No prospective studies about the use of intravenous immunoglobulins in children with demyelinating disorders or neurologic paraneoplasmatic syndromes were found. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the field of intravenous immunoglobulins used in pediatric neurological diseases. Literature data supports a beneficial effect in this age group. Whilst awaiting the results of large scale studies, administration of intravenous immunoglobulins could be justified in refractory child epilepsy. Otherwise, its use should be guided by the individual needs of each child, depending on the underlying neurological disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Subcutaneous versus intravenous immunoglobulin in multifocal motor neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, T; Andersen, Henning; Hess, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: For treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), we hypothesized that (i) infusion of equivalent dosages of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is as effective as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and that (ii) subcutaneous infusion at home is associated with a better...... at the injection sites for a few weeks. All other adverse effects during SCIG were mild and transient. No differences between treatments of health-related quality of life occurred. Conclusion: In MMN, short-term subcutaneous infusion of immunoglobulin is feasible, safe and as effective as intravenous infusion...

  3. Intravenous adenosine for surgical management of penetrating heart wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John; Hountis, Panagiotis; Antonopoulos, Nikolaos; Skouteli, Elian; Athanasiou, Thanos; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2007-01-01

    Accurate suturing of penetrating cardiac injuries is difficult. Heart motion, ongoing blood loss, arrhythmias due to heart manipulation, and the near-death condition of the patient can all affect the outcome. Rapid intravenous injection of adenosine induces temporary asystole that enables placement of sutures in a motionless surgical field. Use of this technique improves surgical conditions, and it is faster than other methods. Herein, we describe our experience with the use of intravenous adenosine to successfully treat 3 patients who had penetrating heart wounds.

  4. Recurrence of Intravenous Talc Granulomatosis following Single Lung Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Cook

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced pulmonary disease is an unusual consequence of the intravenous injection of oral medications, usually developing over a period of several years. A number of patients with this condition have undergone lung transplantation for respiratory failure. However, a history of drug abuse is often considered to be a contraindication to transplantation in the context of limited donor resources. A patient with pulmonary talc granulomatosis secondary to intravenous methylphenidate injection who underwent successful lung transplantation and subsequently presented with recurrence of the underlying disease in the transplanted lung 18 months after transplantation is reported.

  5. Changes in blood glucose and insulin responses to intravenous glucose tolerance tests and blood biochemical values in adult female Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamine, Akari; Shimozuru, Michito; Shibata, Haruki; Tsubota, Toshio

    2012-02-01

    The metabolic mechanisms to circannual changes in body mass of bears have yet to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) has a metabolic mechanism that efficiently converts carbohydrates into body fat by altering insulin sensitivity during the hyperphagic stage before hibernation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the changes in blood biochemical values and glucose and insulin responses to intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) during the active season (August, early and late November). Four, adult, female bears (5-17 years old) were anesthetized with 6 mg/kg TZ (tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl) in combination with 0.1 mg/kg acepromazine maleate. The bears were injected intravenously with glucose (0.5 g/kg of body mass), and blood samples were obtained before, at, and intermittently after glucose injection. The basal triglycerides concentration decreased significantly with increase in body mass from August to November. Basal levels of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations were not significantly different among groups. The results of IVGTT demonstrated the increased peripheral insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in early November. In contrast, peripheral insulin resistance was indicated by the exaggerated insulin response in late November. Our findings suggest that bears shift their glucose and lipid metabolism from the stage of normal activity to the hyperphagic stage in which they show lipogenic-predominant metabolism and accelerate glucose uptake by increasing the peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  6. [Comparison the effects of prilocaine and the addition of dexketoprofen and dexamethasone to prilocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borazan, Hale; Sahin, Osman; Uluer, Mehmet Selçuk; Keçecioğlu, Ahmet; Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Otelcioğlu, Seref

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic and analgesic effects of prilocaine alone, prilocaine added dexketoprofen and dexamethasone during intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Forty five patients undergoing forearm or hand surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups to receive (Group P) 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine; (Group PDK) 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine plus 50 mg dexketoprofen; (Group PDM) 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine plus 8 mg dexamethasone in total 40 ml volume for IVRA. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, hemodynamic datas, duration of analgesia and tourniquet, time to first analgesic requirement, visual analog scale (VAS), total analgesic consumption in 24 hours and patient satisfaction score were assessed and recorded. Time to onset of sensory block was found to be longer in Group P (pdexketoprofen and dexamethasone to prilocaine during IVRA improves the quality of both anesthesia and analgesia moreover dexketoprofen provides beter postoperative analgesia during the first 24 hour after surgery.

  7. Increased Total Anesthetic Time Leads to Higher Rates of Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Murphy, Meghan; Maloney, Patrick; Kor, Daryl; Nassr, Ahmad; Freedman, Brett; Fogelson, Jeremy; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive series of spinal fusions comparing patient and procedural characteristics of patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal fusion. It is known that increased surgical time (incision to closure) is associated with a higher rate of postoperative SSIs. We sought to determine whether increased total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) is a factor in the development of SSIs as well. In spine surgery for deformity and degenerative disease, SSI has been associated with operative time, revealing a nearly 10-fold increase in SSI rates in prolonged surgery. Surgical time is associated with infections in other surgical disciplines as well. No studies have reported whether total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) has an association with SSIs. Surgical records were searched in a retrospective fashion to identify all spine fusion procedures performed between January 2010 and July 2012. All SSIs during that timeframe were recorded and compared with the list of cases performed between 2010 and 2012 in a case-control design. There were 20 (1.7%) SSIs in this fusion cohort. On univariate analyses of operative factors, there was a significant association between total anesthetic time (Infection 7.6 ± 0.5 hrs vs. no infection -6.0 ± 0.1 hrs, P operative time (infection 5.5 ± 0.4 hrs vs. no infection - 4.4 ± 0.06 hrs, P infections, whereas level of pathology and emergent surgery were not significant. On multivariate logistic analysis, BMI and total anesthetic time remained independent predictors of SSI whereas ASA status and operative time did not. Increasing BMI and total anesthetic time were independent predictors of SSIs in this cohort of over 1000 consecutive spinal fusions. 3.

  8. A cyclodextrin formulation to improve use of the anesthetic tribromoethanol (Avertin ®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene McDowell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Efficacy and safety concerns have been raised in the literature with the use of tribromoethanol (TBE (Avertin ® for anesthesia in rats and mice when administered by intraperitoneal (IP injection. Despite the controversy, it remains in common usage as an anesthetic agent in laboratory rodents for short-term surgical procedures. Cyclodextrins have been shown to improve drug solubility and were investigated here as an improved anesthetic formulation for mice. Materials and Methods: The phase solubility of TBE with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD was estimated. The efficacy of two anesthetic regimens was compared in this study; the conventional TBE formulation solubilized in tert-amyl alcohol and a HP-β-CD formulation containing TBE. Mice (n = 6 were administered the formulations by IP injection and the pharmacodynamic parameters of time to induction of anesthesia, duration of anesthesia and recovery time were measured using a combined reflex score (CRS. Results and Discussion: Phase solubility studies showed a linear increase in the solubility of TBE with increasing HP-β-CD concentration and suggested >1:1 binding of the drug in the cyclodextrin complex. At a dose of 260 mg/kg the standard TBE formulation appeared to produce deeper anesthesia than the cyclodextrin formulation, with a minimum average CRS of 1.8 compared with 5.2. No post-mortem pathology was observed in mice that received either the conventional or cyclodextrin formulation. Conclusion: The cyclodextrin TBE formulation did not conclusively provide an improved anesthetic response at a dose of 260 mg/kg compared with the conventional formulation. The improved solubility of TBE with HP-β-CD and the reduced variability in anesthetic response warrants the further investigation of this formulation. This study has also identified the value of using the anticholinergic atropine in association with TBE for anesthesia.

  9. Emergence from anesthesia in children undergoing ambulatory surgery- a comparison between propofol and sevoflurane using single anesthetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, A.K.; Kazi, W.A.; Farhat, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare emergence from anesthesia using total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and volatile induction maintenance anesthesia (VIMA) with sevoflurane, in children undergoing ambulatory inguinal herniorrhaphy. Study Design: Randomized, controlled trials. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa Hospital of Pakistan Navy, from 1st Mar 2005 to 28th Feb 2006. Patients and Methods: Eighty children, aged 5-10 years of ASA physical status I or II were divided into two groups of 40 each using random numbers table. Group P received propofol 3mg/kg for induction and 100-400 micro g/kg/min infusion for maintenance of anesthesia, while group S received sevoflurane 8% (inspired concentration) in 100% oxygen for induction and 2-3% in oxygen for maintenance of anesthesia. No sedative premedication was given. Analgesia was provided with caudal block using 0.25% bupivacaine. Speed of emergence from anesthesia was assessed by time to extubation, time to eye opening, and time to crying / stating name. A modified aldrete score system was used to evaluate recovery while Pain/Discomfort scale to assess the quality of emergence from anesthesia. These were recorded by a separate consultant anesthetist blind to the anesthetic technique. Results: Emergence from anesthesia occurred significantly quicker in the S group as compared to P group, as evident by times in minutes (mean +- SD) to extubation: 8.3+-6.9 versus 4.7+-2.6(p=0.017), eye opening: 9.1 +- 5.3 vs. 5.6 +- 2.6 (p=0.043) and crying / state name: 14.7 +-7.2 vs.11.3 +- 4.6(p=0.039). Similarly, more patients in the S group scored maximum points in the modified aldrete score at 10 min: 17 (42.5%) vs.7 (17.5%) (p=0.015), 20 min: 32 (80%) vs.23 (57.5%) (p=0.030). Although, number of patients in the S group compared to P group scoring max points in Pain-discomfort scale at 10 min: 8 (20%) vs4 (10%), p=0.210; 20 min: 6 (15%) vs.2 (5%), p=0.136 and 30 min: 4 (10%) vs. 0, p=0.130 were more, these results were not

  10. Anesthetic efficacy of articaine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic versus asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argueta-Figueroa, Liliana; Arzate-Sosa, Gabriel; Mendieta-Zeron, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth and if individual patient factors, pulpal disease characteristics, and previous medication are correlated to local anesthetic success. A second objective was to determine the specificity and sensibility of a cold test for prediction of anesthetic success prior to endodontic treatment. Seventy patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth received 1.6 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using a metal guide. The anesthetic solution was injected with a computer-preprogrammed delivery system for local anesthesia. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition; later, patients rated their discomfort using the visual analog scale (VAS). The success rate for the IA NB using articaine was 64.2% in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and 86.9% in patients with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Cold test prior to root canal treatment had a specificity and sensibility of 12.5% and 87.1%, respectively. The anesthetic efficacy of articaine in irreversible pulpitis is moderately acceptable, and anesthetic success increases when the patient has been premedicated with NSAIDs. The cold test appears to be a favorable indicator for predicting anesthetic success.

  11. A Comparative Study between the Effect of Combined Local Anesthetic and Low-dose Ketamine with Local Anesthetic on Postoperative Complications after Impacted Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj; Kale, Tejraj Pundalik

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative pain, swelling and trismus are the most common outcome after third molar surgery. Many methods have been tried to improve postoperative comfort after surgery. Ketamine is a phencyclidine derivative that induces a state of dissociative anesthesia. It is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist and has a distinct suppression effect on central nervous system (CNS) sensitization. Ketamine in a subanesthetic dose is set to produce analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. Sixty patients, between the age group of 18 and 38 years, undergoing the extraction of impacted mandibular third molar, reporting to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery were included in the study. Patients were divided randomly into two groups: local anesthetic alone (LAA) and local anesthetic and ketamine (LAK). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U/unpaired--t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. There was a significant difference in mouth opening in the LAA and LAK group in the immediate postoperative period. There was a significant difference between the two groups after 1 hour (LAA: 2.37; LAK: 1.40), and 4 hours (LAA: 2.37; LAK: 1.40). There was a significant difference in terms of facial swelling in the immediate postoperative period and day 1 between the LAA and LAK group. Use of subanesthetic dose of ketamine is not only safe but also valuable in reducing patient morbidity after third molar surgery. Combination of a local anesthetic and subanesthetic dose of ketamine during surgical extraction of third molars provides good postoperative analgesia with less swelling and significantly less trismus.

  12. Evaluation of novel local anesthetic wound infiltration techniques for postoperative pain following colorectal resection surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventham, Nicholas T; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R; Fearon, Kenneth C H

    2014-02-01

    Novel local anesthetic blocks have become increasingly popular in the multimodal pain management following abdominal surgery, but have not been evaluated in a procedure-specific manner in colorectal surgery. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of novel local anesthetic techniques in colorectal surgery. Electronic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases (date range, January 1990 to February 2013) STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials comparing a novel local anesthetic technique with placebo/routine analgesia in adults undergoing open or laparoscopic colonic or rectal resection were selected. This is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating novel local anesthetic wound infiltration techniques such as wound catheter, transversus abdominis plane block, and intraperitoneal instillation in colorectal surgical procedures. The comparator group was defined as placebo/routine analgesia. The primary outcome was opiate requirement at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included opiate requirements at 48 hours, pain numerical rating score at 24 and 48 hours at rest and on movement, recovery (length of stay, nausea and vomiting, time until bowel movement and diet resumption), and complications. Subgroup analysis was performed to evaluate specific local anesthetic techniques and open and laparoscopic surgery. Twelve randomized controlled trials compared local anesthetic techniques with placebo/routine analgesia. Local anesthetic techniques demonstrated a significant reduction in opiate requirement at 48 hours. Local anesthetic techniques were also associated with lower pain scores on movement at 24 and 48 hours, shorter length of stay, and earlier resumption of diet. The diverse study design led to statistical heterogeneity in several analyses. Novel local anesthetic wound infiltration techniques in colorectal surgery appear to reduce opiate requirements, to reduce pain scores, and to improve recovery in comparison with placebo

  13. Pain perception and procedural tolerance with computer controlled and conventional local anesthetic technique: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Goyal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the Pain Perception and Procedural Tolerance (PPPT by the pediatric patients, while experiencing ′Computer Controlled Local Anesthetic Technique′ (CCLAD, Wand and ′Conventional local anesthetic technique′. Material and Methods: Fifteen subjects, of age 8-10 years requiring local anesthesia on both sides of the dental arch for the purpose of extraction were selected for this study. In this cross-over design study, randomization was done to allocate the type of local anesthetic technique to be used first, children who received CCLAD (Wand during ′First Anesthetic Exposure′ (FAE visit subsequently received ′Conventional anesthetic technique′ during ′Second Anesthetic Exposure′ (SAE visit and vice versa. Behavior assessment using ′Frankel′s Behavior Rating Scale′ (FBRS and anxiety assessment using ′Faces Version of Modified Child′s Dental Anxiety Scale′ (MCDAS f were done prior to the anesthetic exposure. ′Wong Baker′s Facial Pain Scale′ (WBFPS was used to assess the child′s pain perception to each of the two techniques, immediately after the injection. Various physiological parameters like ′Heart Rate′(HR, ′Respiratory Rate′(RR, and ′Oxygen Saturation′ were measured during pre-operative phase, LA-phase, post LA-phase, Extraction phase and post Extraction phase, during FAE and SAE. Results: Paired t-test revealed a very highly significant (P = 0.001 difference between CCLAD (Wand and conventional during SAE. Non-significant difference was observed when physiological parameters were compared at various intervals between the two anesthetic techniques. Conclusion: CCLAD (Wand provides lesser pain perception as compared to conventional local anesthetic technique.

  14. Tolerance of local anesthetic for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: our experience and a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, M.R.E.; Bryant, N.J.; Brown, J.A.; Tiwari, P.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D. [St Paul' s Hospital, Ultrasound Dept., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: twong@providcencehealth.bc.ca

    2006-06-15

    To determine whether local anesthetic injection or gel reduced pain during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies and whether there was significant difference between quadrant and apex-only anesthesia. Between September 2001 and May 2002, 240 male patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen and (or) abnormal digital rectal examination were randomized into 1 of 4 groups: 1) transrectal lidocaine gel, 2) quadrant lidocaine injections, 3) apex-only lidocaine injections, or 4) no local anesthetic. Patients scored their pain on a numerical rating scale where 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain. We analyzed mean and standard deviations of scores, using a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc multiple comparisons with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) studentized range test to determine whether there were significant differences across the groups. There was no significant difference between local anesthetic gel (mean 3.1, SD 1.9) and no anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) or between quadrant (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and apex-only (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) local anesthetic injections. There was significant difference between quadrant injections (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) and between apex-only injections (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9). There was significant pain reduction with local anesthetic injections but not with gel, and since there was no significant difference in efficacy between quadrant and apex-only injections, we recommend apex-only local anesthetic injections for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies because it simplifies the injection procedure. (author)

  15. Postarthroscopy analgesia using intraarticular levobupivacaine and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Sevtap Hekimoglu; Memiş, Dilek; Celik, Erkan; Sut, Necdet

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the efficacy of intraarticular levobupivacaine with and without intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol for postarthroscopy analgesia. Sixty patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. When the surgical procedure was completed, patients received the following treatments: group I (n = 20) patients received 20 mL intraarticular normal saline and 2 mL intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol (50 mg); group II (n = 20) patients received 20 mL intraarticular 0.5 % levobupivacaine (100 mg) and 2 mL intravenous normal saline; and group III (n = 20) patients received 20 mL intraarticular 0.5 % levobupivacaine (100 mg) and 2 mL intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol (50 mg). The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used, and the total analgesic consumption was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h post-operatively. The VAS scores at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h post-operatively were significantly increased in group I and group II compared with group III (p dexketoprofen trometamol administration provided better pain relief and less analgesic requirement after arthroscopic knee surgery during the first 24 h than that induced by dexketoprofen alone or levobupivacaine intraarticular alone. II.

  16. Causes of intravenous medication errors: an ethnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Taxis, K; Barber, N

    2003-01-01

    Background: Intravenous (IV) medication errors are frequent events. They are associated with considerable harm, but little is known about their causes. Human error theory is increasingly used to understand adverse events in medicine, but has not yet been applied to study IV errors. Our aim was to investigate causes of errors in IV drug preparation and administration using a framework of human error theory.

  17. High dose intravenous immunoglobulin in Rh and ABO hemolytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin in Rh and ABO hemolytic disease of Egyptian neonates. INTRODUCTION. Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to red cell alloimmunisation is an important cause of hyperbilirubinemia with significant morbidity in the neonatal period.1,2. Hemolytic disease of the newborn has ...

  18. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  19. Splenic lipidosis after administration of intravenous fat emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, G B

    1978-01-01

    Spleens showing fatty infiltration and necrosis of the pulp were found at necropsy on several patients who had received intravenous fat emulsions during their terminal illnesses. The postmortem findings are described and the clinicopathological correlation is discussed with special reference to the phenomenon of creaming of the emulsion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:690241

  20. Pattern of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) use in a pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations are scarce biological products used for replacement or immunomodulatory effects. Guidelines have been issued by regulatory health authorities to ensure provision of the products for patients who are in severe need. Objectives: The study aimed at ...