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Sample records for anesthetic development part

  1. Development of lidocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon; Yang, Kyu-Ho

    2004-12-09

    In relieving local pains, lidocaine, one of ester type local anesthetics, has been used. To develop the lidocaine gels of enhanced local anesthetic effects, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based bioadhesive polymer gel containing an enhancer was formulated. As the drug concentration in the gels increased up to 3%, the permeation rate of drug linearly increased, thereafter reaching a plateau. As the temperature of surrounding solutions increased, the permeation of drug increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 3.29 kcal/mol for lidocaine. The permeation rate of drug through skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants, and bile salts. Among the enhancers studied, diethylene glycol showed the greatest enhancing effects on drug permeation through skin. The analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. In the area under the efficacy curve (AUEC) of the rat-tail flick tests, lidocaine gel containing diethylene glycol showed about 3.89-fold increase in analgesic activity compared with the control. The addition of vasoconstrictor in the gels prolonged the analgesic effects. The result of this study supports that the bioadhesive gel with efficient anesthetic effect could be developed using HPMC with combination of enhancer and vasoconstrictor.

  2. GABAA Receptors, Anesthetics and Anticonvulsants in Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschel, Oliver; Gipson, Keith E.; Bordey, Angelique

    2008-01-01

    GABA, acting via GABAA receptors, is well-accepted as the main inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mature brain, where it dampens neuronal excitability. The receptor's properties have been studied extensively, yielding important information about its structure, pharmacology, and regulation that are summarized in this review. Several GABAergic drugs have been commonly used as anesthetics, sedatives, and anticonvulsants for decades. However, findings that GABA has critical functions in brain development, in particular during the late embryonic and neonatal period, raise worthwhile questions regarding the side effects of GABAergic drugs that may lead to long-term cognitive deficits. Here, we will review some of these drugs in parallel with the control of CNS development that GABA exerts via activation of GABAA receptors. This review aims to provide a basic science and clinical perspective on the function of GABA and related pharmaceuticals acting at GABAA receptors. PMID:18537647

  3. Pregnancy outcome after in utero exposure to local anesthetics as part of dental treatment: A prospective comparative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagai, Aharon; Diav-Citrin, Orna; Shechtman, Svetlana; Ornoy, Asher

    2015-08-01

    Dental treatment and use of local anesthetics during pregnancy generally are considered harmless because of lack of evidence of adverse pregnancy effects. Data on the safety of dental treatment and local anesthetics during pregnancy are scant. Dental care is often a reason for concern both among women and their health care providers. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of major anomalies after exposure to local anesthetics as part of dental care during pregnancy. The authors performed a prospective, comparative observational study at the Israeli Teratology Information Services between 1999 and 2005. The authors followed 210 pregnancies exposed to dental local anesthetics (112 [53%] in the first trimester) and compared them with 794 pregnancies not exposed to teratogens. The rate of major anomalies was not significantly different between the groups (4.8% versus 3.3%, P = .300). There was no difference in the rate of miscarriages, gestational age at delivery, or birth weight. The most common types of dental treatment were endodontic treatment (43%), tooth extraction (31%), and tooth restoration (21%). Most women (63%) were not exposed to additional medications. Approximately one-half (51%) of the women were not exposed to dental radiography, and 44% were exposed to radiation, mostly bite-wing radiography. This study's results suggest that use of dental local anesthetics, as well as dental treatment during pregnancy, do not represent a major teratogenic risk. There seems to be no reason to prevent pregnant women from receiving dental treatment and local anesthetics during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of bupivacaine decorated reduced graphene oxide and its local anesthetic effect-In vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Xin; Li, Aixiang; Ma, Chuangen

    2018-03-01

    The present works aims to develop bupivacaine modified reduced graphene oxide (BPV/RGO), and comparative evaluation of their anesthetic effect with free bupivacaine (BPV). The prepared BPV/RGO was studied by using various spectroscopic and microscopic characterization studies. In vitro drug release from BPV/RGO was studied using HPLC analysis. The cytotoxicity of BPV/RGO was studied against fibroblast (3T3) cells. In vivo evaluation of anesthetic effects was performed on animal models. BPV/RGO showed a prolonged in vitro release and lower cytotoxicity when compared to free BPV. Also, BPV/RGO showed a significantly prolonged analgesic effect when compared to free BPV. Further, the prepared BPV/RGO drug delivery system demonstrated to function as gifted to overcome the drawbacks of free BPV and other available drug delivery systems by prolonging the anesthetic effect with poor cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Anesthetics rapidly promote synaptogenesis during a critical period of brain development.

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    Mathias De Roo

    Full Text Available Experience-driven activity plays an essential role in the development of brain circuitry during critical periods of early postnatal life, a process that depends upon a dynamic balance between excitatory and inhibitory signals. Since general anesthetics are powerful pharmacological modulators of neuronal activity, an important question is whether and how these drugs can affect the development of synaptic networks. To address this issue, we examined here the impact of anesthetics on synapse growth and dynamics. We show that exposure of young rodents to anesthetics that either enhance GABAergic inhibition or block NMDA receptors rapidly induce a significant increase in dendritic spine density in the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus. This effect is developmentally regulated; it is transient but lasts for several days and is also reproduced by selective antagonists of excitatory receptors. Analyses of spine dynamics in hippocampal slice cultures reveals that this effect is mediated through an increased rate of protrusions formation, a better stabilization of newly formed spines, and leads to the formation of functional synapses. Altogether, these findings point to anesthesia as an important modulator of spine dynamics in the developing brain and suggest the existence of a homeostatic process regulating spine formation as a function of neural activity. Importantly, they also raise concern about the potential impact of these drugs on human practice, when applied during critical periods of development in infants.

  6. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

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    Nidhi M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malviya Nidhi,1 M Nagaraju Patro,1 Somisetty Kusumvalli,2 Vemula Kusumdevi1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Al-Ameen College of Pharmacy, 2Department of Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry, Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India Abstract: Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs of diclofenac (Dic diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP

  8. Sustainable development. First part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, U.; Lanzavecchia, G.; Berrini, M; Zambrini, M.; Bologna, G.; Carraro, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Mastino, G.; Federico, A.; Gaudioso, D.; Luise, A.; Mauro, F.; Padovani, L.; Federico, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes a collective effort and represents the second edition of: Environment, energy, economy: a sustainable future. In this work are reported various interventions on sustainable development problem [it

  9. Development of Aircraft Sandwich Parts

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    J. Křena

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper shows the design and development process of sandwich parts. A spoiler plate and a main landing gear door are developed. Sandwich parts are made of C/E composite facings and a foam core. FE models have been used for optimization of structures. Emphasis has been placed on deformations of parts under a few load cases. Experimental tests have been used for a verification of structure parts loaded by concentrated forces.

  10. The Molecular Mechanisms of Anesthetic Action: Updates and Cutting Edge Developments from the Field of Molecular Modeling

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    Edward J. Bertaccini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available For over 160 years, general anesthetics have been given for the relief of pain and suffering. While many theories of anesthetic action have been purported, it has become increasingly apparent that a significant molecular focus of anesthetic action lies within the family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC’s. These protein channels have a transmembrane region that is composed of a pentamer of four helix bundles, symmetrically arranged around a central pore for ion passage. While initial and some current models suggest a possible cavity for binding within this four helix bundle, newer calculations postulate that the actual cavity for anesthetic binding may exist between four helix bundles. In either scenario, these cavities have a transmembrane mode of access and may be partially bordered by lipid moieties. Their physicochemical nature is amphiphilic. Anesthetic binding may alter the overall motion of a ligand-gated ion channel by a “foot-in-door” motif, resulting in the higher likelihood of and greater time spent in a specific channel state. The overall gating motion of these channels is consistent with that shown in normal mode analyses carried out both in vacuo as well as in explicitly hydrated lipid bilayer models. Molecular docking and large scale molecular dynamics calculations may now begin to show a more exact mode by which anesthetic molecules actually localize themselves and bind to specific protein sites within LGIC’s, making the design of future improvements to anesthetic ligands a more realizable possibility.

  11. Development of a local anesthetic lidocaine-loaded redox-active injectable gel for postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Yukio; Mizukoshi, Yutaro; Gao, Zhenyu; Feliciano, Chitho P; Chang, Kyungho; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-15

    Although local anesthesia is commonly applied for pain relief, there are several issues such as its short duration of action and low effectiveness at the areas of inflammation due to the acidic pH. The presence of excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to induce inflammation and aggravate pain. To resolve these issues, we developed a redox-active injectable gel (RIG) with ROS-scavenging activity. RIG was prepared by mixing polyamine-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyamine with nitroxide radical moieties as side chains on the polyamine segments (PMNT-b-PEG-b-PMNT) with a polyanion, which formed a flower-type micelle via electrostatic complexation. Lidocaine could be stably incorporated in its core. When the temperature of the solution was increased to 37°C, the PIC-type flower micelle transformed to gel. The continuous release of lidocaine from the gel was observed for more than three days, without remarkable initial burst, which is probably owing to the stable entrapment of lidocaine in the PIC core of the gel. We evaluated the analgesic effect of RIG in carrageenan-induced arthritis mouse model. Results showed that lidocaine-loaded RIG has stronger and longer analgesic effect when administered in inflamed areas. In contrast, while the use of non-complexed lidocaine did not show analgesic effect one day after its administration. Note that no effect was observed when PIC-type flower micelle without ROS-scavenging ability was used. These findings suggest that local anesthetic-loaded RIG can effectively reduce the number of injection times and limit the side effects associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management. 1. We have been working on nanomaterials, which effectively eliminate ROS, avoiding dysfunction of mitochondria in healthy cells. 2. We designed redox injectable gel using polyion complexed flower type micelle, which can eliminates ROS locally. 3. We could prepare local anesthesia-loaded redox injectable

  12. Functional and Topological Conditions for Explosive Synchronization Develop in Human Brain Networks with the Onset of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness.

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    Kim, Minkyung; Mashour, George A; Moraes, Stefanie-Blain; Vanini, Giancarlo; Tarnal, Vijay; Janke, Ellen; Hudetz, Anthony G; Lee, Uncheol

    2016-01-01

    Sleep, anesthesia, and coma share a number of neural features but the recovery profiles are radically different. To understand the mechanisms of reversibility of unconsciousness at the network level, we studied the conditions for gradual and abrupt transitions in conscious and anesthetized states. We hypothesized that the conditions for explosive synchronization (ES) in human brain networks would be present in the anesthetized brain just over the threshold of unconsciousness. To test this hypothesis, functional brain networks were constructed from multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings in seven healthy subjects across conscious, unconscious, and recovery states. We analyzed four variables that are involved in facilitating ES in generic, non-biological networks: (1) correlation between node degree and frequency, (2) disassortativity (i.e., the tendency of highly-connected nodes to link with less-connected nodes, or vice versa), (3) frequency difference of coupled nodes, and (4) an inequality relationship between local and global network properties, which is referred to as the suppressive rule. We observed that the four network conditions for ES were satisfied in the unconscious state. Conditions for ES in the human brain suggest a potential mechanism for rapid recovery from the lightly-anesthetized state. This study demonstrates for the first time that the network conditions for ES, formerly shown in generic networks only, are present in empirically-derived functional brain networks. Further investigations with deep anesthesia, sleep, and coma could provide insight into the underlying causes of variability in recovery profiles of these unconscious states.

  13. Operating Room Environment Control. Part A: a Valve Cannister System for Anesthetic Gas Adsorption. Part B: a State-of-the-art Survey of Laminar Flow Operating Rooms. Part C: Three Laminar Flow Experiments

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    Meyer, J. S.; Kosovich, J.

    1973-01-01

    An anesthetic gas flow pop-off valve canister is described that is airtight and permits the patient to breath freely. Once its release mechanism is activated, the exhaust gases are collected at a hose adapter and passed through activated coal for adsorption. A survey of laminar air flow clean rooms is presented and the installation of laminar cross flow air systems in operating rooms is recommended. Laminar flow ventilation experiments determine drying period evaporation rates for chicken intestines, sponges, and sections of pig stomach.

  14. Anesthetic services in Serbia

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    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Due to the development of knowledge and technology our world is becoming a global city where rapidly occur changes in political and economic milieu, such as the introduction of corporate capitalism in the economic crisis, contemporary migrations etc. Health care as a public good on one hand and as the highest individual value of each individual on the other hand, changes and suffers changes. Health care system policy insists on partnership relation of the individual with medical service providers. This refers to the a secure and accessible modern treatment of each individual and to the state as to rationalize and reduce medical costs with effective methods of treatment. Topic position in scientific/professional public: Anesthesiology is evolving along with the surgical disciplines. Highly sophisticated with organized service, anesthesiology is equally important because of the multiplicity of anesthetic services in the surgical treatment of the disease in terms of teamwork and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease. The intention is to provide a description of work, education and our results in the economic, geopolitical and cultural context of the Serbian health system policy as well as to improve safe performance, availability and cost rationalization in anesthesia. The health care system is territorially organized in Serbia. In hospitals, Serbia employs 940 anesthesiologists (1:7,575 inhabitants. According to data from the Regional Medical Chamber of Belgrade,382 anesthesiologists were registered in Belgrade out of total. Anesthesia department network is well organized in all surgical hospitals. Anesthesia services are available depending on the place of residence, type of surgical illness or injury, and the distance to the nearest clinic. Sub-specializations in the field of anesthesiology have not been introduced although pediatric, neurosurgery and cardiosurgical anesthesia have spontaniously singled, as well as

  15. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

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    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  16. Drug interactions: volatile anesthetics and opioids.

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    Glass, P S; Gan, T J; Howell, S; Ginsberg, B

    1997-09-01

    Multiple drugs are used to provide anesthesia. Volatile anesthetics are commonly combined with opioids. Several studies have demonstrated that small doses of opioid (i.e., within the analgesic range) result in a marked reduction in minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of the volatile anesthetic that will prevent purposeful movement in 50% of patients at skin incision). Further increases in opioid dose provide only a further small reduction in MAC. Thus, a ceiling effect of the opioid is observed at a MAC value of the volatile anesthetic equal to its MAC awake. Recovery from anesthesia when an opioid is combined with a volatile anesthetic is dependent on the rate of decrease of both drugs to their respective concentrations that are associated with adequate spontaneous ventilation and awakening. Through an understanding of the pharmacodynamic interaction of volatile anesthetics with opioids and the pharmacokinetic processes responsible for the recovery from drug effect, optimal dosing schemes can thus be developed. A review of these pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic principles that will allow clinicians to administer drugs to provide a more optimal anesthetic is provided.

  17. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    drugs. This has important implications on how to estimate the optimal drug dose. This article offers a review of the literature on definition, prevalence and the pathophysiology of childhood obesity and provides suggestions on preanesthetic evaluation, airway management and dosage of the anesthetic...... drugs in these patients. The authors highlight the need of supplemental studies on various areas of the subject....

  18. Wind energy development as a part of Poland's industrial development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoerring, Dagmara; Hvelplund, Frede Kloster

    2003-01-01

    The paper concludes with recommendations on how to make wind energy development a part of the industrial development in Poland by introducing renewable energy support mechanisms to improve the conditions for companies to develop wind technology in Poland....

  19. Uses and Doses of Local Anesthetics in Fish, Amphibians, and Reptiles.

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    Chatigny, Frederic; Kamunde, Collins; Creighton, Catherine M; Stevens, E Don

    2017-05-01

    Local anesthetics are an integral part of routine pain management in mammals, yet their use is relatively limited in fish, amphibians and reptiles. These animals frequently undergo potentially painful surgical procedures and therefore could possibly benefit from those drugs. Some recommendations are currently available in the literature concerning analgesic use in these animals. However the pharmacological properties, safety and often efficacy of local anesthetic drugs have not been investigated yet in fish, amphibians, or reptiles. This review compiled current information concerning the use of those agents in fish, reptiles and amphibians to help clinicians make an informed decision as to which dose and drug to use. The resulting literature search showed that the literature concerning use of local analgesics in fish and amphibians is very limited while the literature for reptiles is more extensive. We found few experimental studies evaluating the efficacy of local anesthetics. Further studies would provide additional information for developing guidelines to improve the welfare of fish, amphibians and reptiles.

  20. Embryonic skeleton development and neonatal learning and memory ability of rats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium: Differences of administration occasion and time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changling Peng; Yuhua Zhu; Ankang Hu; Xiaorong Zhu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Generally speaking, anesthesia is often used in gravid body and it has been already proved that many kind of medicine can result in malformation.OBJECTIVE: To explore embryonic skeleton development and neonatal learning and memory of rats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium in gravid rats.DESIGN: A randomized control trial.SETTING: Laboratory Animal Center of Xuzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: A total of 80 adult female SD rats, of clean grade and weighing 220-240 g, were selected in this study. The main reagents were detailed as follows: pentobarbital sodium (Shanghai Xingzhi Chemical Plant,batch number: 921019); MG-2 maze test apparatus (Zhangjiagang Biomedical Instrument Factory);somatotype microscope (Beijing Taike Instrument Co., Ltd.).METHODS: ① A total of 160 SD rats of half males and females were selected in this study. All rats were copulated. The day that the plug was checked out in the vagina next day was looked as the first day of pregnancy. Gravid rats were divided randomly into four groups, including early anesthesia group, second anesthesia group, late anesthesia group and control group with 20 in each group. Rats in the early anesthesia group were injected with 25 mg/kg soluble pentobarbitone on the 7th day of pregnancy for once; rats in the second anesthesia group were anesthetized with 25 mg/kg soluble pentobarbitone on the 7th and the 14th days of pregnancy for once; rats in the late anesthesia group were anesthetized with 25 mg/kg soluble pentobarbitone on the 14th day of pregnancy for once; rats in the control group did not treat with anything. The time of anesthetizing was controlled in 3 to 4 hours and ether was absorbed while the time was not enough. ②Half of each group was sacrificed on day 20th of pregnancy and the fetus was taken out to be stained with alizarin red S. After stained, the fetal skeleton was examined. The learning and memorizing of one-month rats that were given birth by the rest gravid rats were tested

  1. Development of non-linear TWB parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Lim, J.D. [Hyundai Motor Company and Kia Motors Corp. (Korea). Advanced Technology Center; Park, H.C. [Hyundai Hysco (Korea). Technical Research Lab.

    2005-07-01

    New manufacturing methods have applied for automotive parts to reduce total weight of car, resulting in improvement of fuel efficiency. TWB technique is applied to auto body parts, especially door inner, side inner and outer panel, and center floor panel to accomplish this goal. We applied non-linear (circular welded) TWB to shock absorber housing (to reduce total weight of shock absorber housing assembly). Welding line and shape of blank were determined by FEM analysis. High formability steel sheet and 440MPa grade high strength steel sheet were laser welded and press formed to final shock absorber housing (S/ABS HSG) panel and assembled with other sub parts. As a result, more than 10% of total weight of shock absorber housing assembly could be reduced compared with the mass of same part manufactured by conventional method. Also circular welding technique made it possible to design optimum welding line of TWB part. This paper is about result of FEM analysis and development procedure of non-linear TWB part (shock absorber housing assembly). (orig.)

  2. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk

  3. Nocebo-induced hyperalgesia during local anesthetic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelmann, Dirk; Pancaro, Carlo; Cappiello, Eric C; Camann, William R

    2010-03-01

    Common practice during local anesthetic injection is to warn the patient using words such as: "You will feel a big bee sting; this is the worst part." Our hypothesis was that using gentler words for administration of the local anesthetic improves pain perception and patient comfort. One hundred forty healthy women at term gestation requesting neuraxial analgesia were randomized to either a "placebo" ("We are going to give you a local anesthetic that will numb the area and you will be comfortable during the procedure") or "nocebo" ("You are going to feel a big bee sting; this is the worst part of the procedure") group. Pain was assessed immediately after the local anesthetic skin injection using verbal analog scale scores of 0 to 10. Median verbal analog scale pain scores were lower when reassuring words were used compared with the harsher nocebo words (3 [2-4] vs 5 [3-6]; P words improves the subjective experience during invasive procedures.

  4. Can anesthetic treatment worsen outcome in status epilepticus?

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    Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-08-01

    Status epilepticus refractory to first-line and second-line antiepileptic treatments challenges neurologists and intensivists as mortality increases with treatment refractoriness and seizure duration. International guidelines advocate anesthetic drugs, such as continuously administered high-dose midazolam, propofol, and barbiturates, for the induction of therapeutic coma in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus. The seizure-suppressing effect of anesthetic drugs is believed to be so strong that some experts recommend using them after benzodiazepines have failed. Although the rationale for the use of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus seems clear, the recommendation of their use in treating status epilepticus is based on expert opinions rather than on strong evidence. Randomized trials in this context are lacking, and recent studies provide disturbing results, as the administration of anesthetics was associated with poor outcome independent of possible confounders. This calls for caution in the straightforward use of anesthetics in treating status epilepticus. However, there are still more questions than answers, and current evidence for the adverse effects of anesthetic drugs in patients with status epilepticus remains too limited to advocate a change of treatment algorithms. In this overview, the rationale and the conflicting clinical implications of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus are discussed, and remaining questions are elaborated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Developing preceptorship through action research: Part 1.

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    Hilli, Yvonne; Melender, Hanna-Leena

    2015-09-01

    Clinical preception in practice plays a significant role in both registered and practical nurse studies. As such, the cooperation between the faculty and working life is important to narrow the theory-practice gap, with emphasis being placed on a student-oriented approach promoting self-direction and lifelong learning. The aim of this project was to develop the preceptorship at five different units within the health-care sector in western Finland by implementing an action research (AR) approach. This article is the first of a two-part article on the project, focusing on a cultural analysis and the development of preception models conducted within the project. The five units participating in the study were the following: a long-term care ward in the community, a ward for people with dementia, a geriatric ward, a medical ward and a surgical ward representing specialised care. The starting point of the study was a cultural analysis, which was made in all the five units to obtain a 'bottom-up' perspective. In each of the five units 3-5 nurses were appointed to become members of the core groups. This meant that all the units would start from the perspective of their own working environment when creating a preception model that would fit into their particular workplace. During this process, the participants received continuous support from the researchers. Several workshops and seminars were also arranged to further support the core groups and staff. The models were implemented and tested during the academic year 2010-2011 followed by an evaluation of the project. The evaluation results will be presented in the second part of the two-part article. The project showed that reflective practice and critical thinking can be improved through an AR approach. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. DESIGNING OF DEVELOPED SURFACES OF COMPLEX PARTS

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    S. S. Tyshchenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper focuses on ensuring the rational choice of parameters of the mating surfaces of parts when designing process equipment based on the methods of artificial intelligence. Methodology. The paper considers the geometric model of a ruled developed surface, the conditions of existence of such a surface and provides a generalized algorithm for surface plotting regardless of the type of the working element or the machine-building product. One of the most common technical surfaces are the ruled ones, among which a special position is occupied by developed surfaces (thanks to their differential-parametric properties: surface tangent plane is n contact along the rectilinear generator and does not change its position in space when changing the point of contact; surfaces can be produced by bending sheet metal. These provisions enable a product manufacturer to save significant material and energy means, therefore, the development of geometric models of such surfaces is an important task. Findings. We analyzed the geometrical model of the developed surface which is incident to two guides. Experimental studies have shown the applicationprospectivity of semi-digger moldboards on moldboard plows, particularly on the double-deck ones. Taking into account the operating speed of the plow 2.8 m/s, the plant residues plowing percentage for plow with semi-digger moldboards is 98.9%, and with the digger ones – 96.1%. Originality. According to results: 1 the approaches to solving the problem of recognition of wear conditions of the tested interface, depicted by its conceptual model, were elaborated; 2 the corresponding algorithms of the computational procedures were built; 3 the mathematical model that determines the effect of the parameters of the contacting surfaces on their performance properties – linear wear rate during the normal wear and tear was developed; 4 for this model the theoretical prerequisite of use for the random mating study were

  7. A Theory of Intellectual Development: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confrey, Jere

    1994-01-01

    Part 1 of a three-part article analyzing radical constructivism (as one interpretation of Piaget) and the socio-cultural perspective (as one interpretation of Vygotsky), including major principles, primary contributions to mathematics education, and potential limitations. Introduces an integration of the two theories through a feminist…

  8. Anesthetic Care in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Camila B; Merchant, Amina I; Schwalbach, Teresa; Pinto, Emilia F V; Jeque, Emilia C; McQueen, K A Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The World Bank and Lancet Commission in 2015 have prioritized surgery in Low-Income Countries (LIC) and Lower-Middle Income Countries (LMICs). This is consistent with the shift in the global burden of disease from communicable to noncommunicable diseases over the past 20 years. Essential surgery must be performed safely, with adequate anesthesia monitoring and intervention. Unfortunately, a huge barrier to providing safe surgery includes the paucity of an anesthesia workforce. In this study, we qualitatively evaluated the anesthesia capacity of Mozambique, a LIC in Africa with limited access to anesthesia and safe surgical care. Country-based solutions are suggested that can expand to other LIC and LMICs. A comprehensive review of the Mozambique anesthesia system was conducted through interviews with personnel in the Ministry of Health (MOH), a school of medicine, a public central referral hospital, a general first referral hospital, a private care hospital, and leaders in the physician anesthesia community. Personnel databases were acquired from the MOH and Maputo Central Hospital. Quantitative results reveal minimal anesthesia capacity (290 anesthesia providers for a population of >25 million or 0.01:10,000). The majority of physician anesthesiologists practice in urban settings, and many work in the private sector. There is minimal capacity for growth given only 1 Mozambique anesthesia residency with inadequate resources. The most commonly perceived barriers to safe anesthesia in this critical shortage are lack of teachers, lack of medical student interest in and exposure to anesthesia, need for more schools, low allocation to anesthesia from the list of available specialist prospects by MOH, and low public payments to anesthesiologists. Qualitative results show assets of a good health system design, a supportive environment for learning in the residency, improvement in anesthetic care in past decades, and a desire for more educational opportunities and teachers

  9. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  10. Occupational exposure to anesthetics leads to genomic instability, cytotoxicity and proliferative changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Kátina M.; Braz, Leandro G.; Nogueira, Flávia R.; Souza, Marajane B.; Bincoleto, Lahis F.; Aun, Aline G.; Corrente, José E.; Carvalho, Lídia R.; Braz, José Reinaldo C.; Braz, Mariana G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Anesthesiologists exposed to the most commonly used anesthetic gases were evaluated. • No alterations were detected for lymphocyte DNA damage detected by the comet assay. • Decreased frequencies of basal cells were detected in exfoliated buccal cells (BMCyt). • Increased frequencies of micronucleus and cytotoxicity were observed in BMCyt assay. • Anesthesiologists have genomic instability due to occupational exposure. - Abstract: Data on the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of occupational exposure to the most frequently used volatile anesthetics are limited and controversial. The current study is the first to evaluate genomic instability, cell death and proliferative index in exfoliated buccal cells (EBC) from anesthesiologists. We also evaluated DNA damage and determined the concentrations of the anesthetic gases most commonly used in operating rooms. This study was conducted on physicians who were allocated into two groups: the exposed group, which consisted of anesthesiologists who had been exposed to waste anesthetic gases (isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane and nitrous oxide − N 2 O) for at least two years; and the control group, which consisted of non-exposed physicians matched for age, sex and lifestyle with the exposed group. Venous blood and EBC samples were collected from all participants. Basal DNA damage was evaluated in lymphocytes by the comet assay, whereas the buccal micronucleus (MN) cytome (BMCyt) assay was applied to evaluate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects. The concentrations of N 2 O and anesthetics were measured via a portable infrared spectrophotometer. The average concentration of waste gases was greater than 5 parts per million (ppm) for all of the halogenated anesthetics and was more than 170 ppm for N 2 O, expressed as a time-weighted average. There was no significant difference between the groups in relation to lymphocyte DNA damage. The exposed group had higher frequencies of MN, karyorrhexis and pyknosis, and

  11. Occupational exposure to anesthetics leads to genomic instability, cytotoxicity and proliferative changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Kátina M.; Braz, Leandro G.; Nogueira, Flávia R.; Souza, Marajane B.; Bincoleto, Lahis F.; Aun, Aline G. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, UNESP − Univ Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Anestesiologia, Botucatu (Brazil); Corrente, José E.; Carvalho, Lídia R. [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, UNESP − Univ Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Bioestatística, Botucatu (Brazil); Braz, José Reinaldo C. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, UNESP − Univ Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Anestesiologia, Botucatu (Brazil); Braz, Mariana G., E-mail: mgbraz@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, UNESP − Univ Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Anestesiologia, Botucatu (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Anesthesiologists exposed to the most commonly used anesthetic gases were evaluated. • No alterations were detected for lymphocyte DNA damage detected by the comet assay. • Decreased frequencies of basal cells were detected in exfoliated buccal cells (BMCyt). • Increased frequencies of micronucleus and cytotoxicity were observed in BMCyt assay. • Anesthesiologists have genomic instability due to occupational exposure. - Abstract: Data on the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of occupational exposure to the most frequently used volatile anesthetics are limited and controversial. The current study is the first to evaluate genomic instability, cell death and proliferative index in exfoliated buccal cells (EBC) from anesthesiologists. We also evaluated DNA damage and determined the concentrations of the anesthetic gases most commonly used in operating rooms. This study was conducted on physicians who were allocated into two groups: the exposed group, which consisted of anesthesiologists who had been exposed to waste anesthetic gases (isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane and nitrous oxide − N{sub 2}O) for at least two years; and the control group, which consisted of non-exposed physicians matched for age, sex and lifestyle with the exposed group. Venous blood and EBC samples were collected from all participants. Basal DNA damage was evaluated in lymphocytes by the comet assay, whereas the buccal micronucleus (MN) cytome (BMCyt) assay was applied to evaluate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects. The concentrations of N{sub 2}O and anesthetics were measured via a portable infrared spectrophotometer. The average concentration of waste gases was greater than 5 parts per million (ppm) for all of the halogenated anesthetics and was more than 170 ppm for N{sub 2}O, expressed as a time-weighted average. There was no significant difference between the groups in relation to lymphocyte DNA damage. The exposed group had higher frequencies of MN, karyorrhexis and

  12. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  13. 12 CFR Appendix 1 to Part 24 - CD-1-National Bank Community Development (Part 24) Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CD-1-National Bank Community Development (Part 24) Investments 1 Appendix 1 To Part 24 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTMENTS Pt. 24, App. 1 Appendix 1 To Part 24—CD-1—National Bank Community Development...

  14. Recent Developments in Radioastronomy--Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Described are recent developments and discoveries in radioastronomy. Topics discussed include galactic structures, stellar evolution, the binary pulsar and general relativity, extragalactic radioastronomy, model of the source of radioactive emission and quasars. (DS)

  15. [Conceptual Development in Cognitive Science. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Cognitive science has become the most influential paradigm on mental health in the late 20(th) and the early 21(st) centuries. In few years, the concepts, problem approaches and solutions proper to this science have significantly changed. Introduction and discussion of the fundamental concepts of cognitive science divided in four stages: Start, Classic Cognitivism, Connectionism, and Embodying / Enacting. The 2(nd) Part of the paper discusses the above mentioned fourth stage and explores the clinical setting, especially in terms of cognitive psychotherapy. The embodying/enacting stage highlights the role of the body including a set of determined evolutionary movements which provide a way of thinking and exploring the world. The performance of cognitive tasks is considered as a process that uses environmental resources that enhances mental skills and deploys them beyond the domestic sphere of the brain. On the other hand, body and mind are embedded in the world, thus giving rise to cognition when interacting, a process known as enacting. There is a close connection between perception and action, hence the interest in real-time interactions with the world rather than abstract reasoning. Regarding clinics, specifically the cognitive therapy, there is little conceptual discussion maybe due to good results from practice that may led us to consider that theoretical foundations are firm and not problem-raising. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between potency and boiling point of general anesthetics: a thermodynamic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastmalchi, S; Barzegar-Jalali, M

    2000-07-20

    The most important group of nonspecific drugs is that of the general anesthetics. These nonspecific compounds vary greatly in structure, from noble gases such as Ar or Xe to complex steroids. Since the development of clinical anesthesia over a century ago, there has been a vast amount of research and speculation concerning the mechanism of action of general anesthetics. Despite these efforts, the exact mechanism remains unknown. Many theories of narcosis do not explain how unconsciousness is produced at a molecular level, but instead relate some physicochemical property of anesthetic agents to their anesthetic potencies. In this paper, we address some of those physicochemical properties, with more emphasis on correlating the anesthetic potency of volatile anesthetics to their boiling points based on thermodynamic principles.

  17. Multibarrier waste forms. Part I. Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.; Lokken, R.O.; Lukacs, J.M.; Sump, K.R.; Browning, M.F.; McCarthy, G.J.

    1978-09-01

    The multibarrier concept produces a composite waste form with enhanced inertness through improvements in thermal stability, mechanical strength, and leachability by the use of coatings and metal matrices. This report describes research and development activities resulting in the demonstration of the multibarrier concept for nonradioactive simulated waste compositions. The multibarrier concept is to utilize up to three barriers to isolate radionuclides from the environment: a solid waste inner core, an impervious coating, and a metal matrix. Two inner core materials, sintered supercalcine and glass marbles, have been demonstrated. The coating barrier provides enhanced leach, impact, and oxidation resistance as well as thermal protection during encapsulation in the metal matrix. Py/Al 2 O 3 coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and glass coatings have been applied to supercalcine cores to improve inertness. The purpose of the metal matrix is to improve impact resistance, protect the inner core rom any adverse environments, provide radiation shielding, and increase thermal conductivity, yielding lower internal temperatures. The development of gravity sintering and vacuum casting techniques for matrix encapsulation are discussed. Four multibarrier products were demonstrated: (1) Glass marbles encapsulated in vacuum-cast Pb-10Sn; (2) uncoated, sintered supercalcine pellets encapsulated in vacuum-cast Al-12Si; (3) glass-coated, sintered supercalcine pellets encapsulated in vacuum-cast Al-12Si; and (4) PyC/Al 2 O 3 -coated supercalcine encapsulated in gravity-sintered Cu. 23 figs., 20 tables

  18. Radiographic assessment of laryngeal reflexes in ketamine-anesthetized cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, E.P.; Johnston, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The competence of the laryngeal closure reflexes of cats anesthetized with ketamine was assessed. Radiographic evaluations of the respiratory and digestive tracts were made after colloidal barium suspension was instilled into the pharynges of conscious and ketamine-anesthetized cats. There was a significant ketamine dose-related response of spread of contrast medium into the supraglottic laryngeal area and into the stomach 2 minutes after contrast medium was instilled into the pharynx (P less than 0.05). Cats did not aspirate contrast medium into the lower respiratory tract. Three ketamine-anesthetized cats aspirated contrast medium into the subglottic area of the larynx, and 2 of these cats also aspirated the material into the cranial part of the trachea. This material was coughed up and swallowed within 5 minutes. Transit time of contrast medium into the stomach seemed to be increased in 11 of the 15 cats given the larger dosages of ketamine (24, 36, 48 mg/kg of body weight), compared with that in conscious cats and those given ketamine at 12 mg/kg. Competent laryngeal protective reflexes in cats can be maintained with ketamine anesthesia. Contrast radiography could be used as a diagnostic aid in ketamine-anesthetized cats suspected of laryngeal reflex abnormalities

  19. Development of a population pharmacokinetic model to predict brain distribution and dopamine D2 receptor occupancy of raclopride in non-anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yin Cheong; Ilkova, Trayana; van Wijk, Rob C; Hartman, Robin; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2018-01-01

    the quantitative in vivo relationship between dose, PK and D2 RO of raclopride in non-anesthetized rat was established. The PK-RO model could facilitate the selection of optimal dose and dosing time when raclopride is used as tracer or as pharmacological blocker in various rat studies. The LC-MS based approach, which doses and quantifies a non-radiolabeled tracer, could be useful in evaluating the systemic disposition and brain kinetics of tracers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Anesthetic action of volatile anesthetics by using Paramecium as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Xia, Huimin; Xu, Younian; Xin, Naixing; Liu, Jiao; Zhang, Shihai

    2012-06-01

    Although empirically well understood in their clinical administration, volatile anesthetics are not yet well comprehended in their mechanism studies. A major conundrum emerging from these studies is that there is no validated model to assess the presumed candidate sites of the anesthetics. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized and served as a model organism in the study of anesthetics. We assessed the motion of Paramecium cells with Expert Vision system and the chemoresponse of Paramecium cells with T-maze assays in the presence of four different volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and ether. Each of those volatiles was dissolved in buffers to give drug concentrations equal to 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 EC50, respectively, in clinical practice. We could see that after application of volatile anesthetics, the swimming of the Paramecium cells was accelerated and then suppressed, or even stopped eventually, and the index of the chemoresponse of the Paramecium cells (denoted as I ( che )) was decreased. All of the above impacts were found in a concentration-dependent fashion. The biphasic effects of the clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics on Paramecium simulated the situation of high species in anesthesia, and the inhibition of the chemoresponse also indicated anesthetized. In conclusion, the findings in our studies suggested that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized with clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics and therefore be utilized as a model organism to study the mechanisms of volatile anesthetics.

  1. Sodium channels as targets for volatile anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl F. Herold

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of modern inhaled anesthetics although widely used in clinical settings are still poorly understood. Considerable evidence supports effects on membrane proteins such as ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels of excitable cells. Na+ channels are crucial to action potential initiation and propagation, and represent potential targets for volatile anesthetics. Inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels leads to reduced neurotransmitter release at the synapse and could therefore contribute to the mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics produce their characteristic effects: amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. Early studies on crayfish and squid giant axon showed inhibition of Na+ currents by volatile anesthetics. Subsequent studies using native neuronal preparations and heterologous expression systems with various mammalian Na+ channel isoforms implicated inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels in anesthetic actions. Volatile anesthetics reduce peak Na+ current and shift the voltage of half-maximal steady-state inactivation towards more negative potentials, thus stabilizing the fast-inactivated state. Furthermore recovery from fast-inactivation is slowed together with an enhanced use-dependent block during pulse train protocols. These effects can reduce neurotransmitter release by depressing presynaptic excitability, depolarization and Ca entry, and ultimately transmitter release. This reduction in transmitter release is more portent for glutamatergic vs. GABAergic terminals. Involvement of Na+ channel inhibition in mediating the immobility caused by volatile anesthetics has been demonstrated in animal studies, in which intrathecal infusion of the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin increases volatile anesthetic potency, whereas infusion of the Na+ channels agonist veratridine reduces anesthetic potency. These studies indicate that inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels by volatile anesthetics is involved in mediating some of

  2. Anesthetic keratopathy presenting as bilateral Mooren-like ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khakshoor H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Khakshoor,1 Majid Moshirfar,2 Rachel G Simpson,3 Hamid Gharaee,1 Amir H Vejdani,1 Steven M Christiansen,2 Jason N Edmonds,2 Nicholas L Behunin21Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Mashad, Iran; 2John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 3The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: This observational case report describes the development of bilateral Mooren-like ulcers in a patient with anesthetic keratopathy. A 42-year-old man with a recent history of minor eye trauma and pain self-treated with tetracaine eye drops presented with complaints of acutely worsening vision and severe pain bilaterally. His visual acuity at presentation was limited to hand motion. Slit-lamp examination revealed bilateral epithelial defects at the center of the cornea, and an area of stromal infiltration and thinning with an undermining leading edge resembling a Mooren's ulcer in both eyes. Corneal haze and hypopyon were visible. Anesthetic use was halted immediately and the patient was started on prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®, after which visual acuity gradually improved and pain decreased. Despite improvement of symptoms, residual epithelial defects remained, and the patient was ultimately treated with keratoplasty for recovery of vision. We suggest that anesthetic keratopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis for any patient presenting with ring-shaped stromal infiltrates or nonhealing epithelial defects.Keywords: anesthetic abuse, corneal damage, corneal ulceration

  3. General anesthetics in children: neurotoxic or neuroprotective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Farias Rebouças

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: general anesthetics are involved in neuroprotection in adults after ischemic events and cognitive impairment, thus, they also may be associated with learning disorders in children exposed to them before three years of age. Objective: Describe about the neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics in experimental animals and children. Method: This is a systematic review, performed from search in databases and on PubMed using the keywords "neurotoxicity" and "general anesthetics," and "general anesthetics," "neurotoxicity", "children", "young child "and" pediatric ". Results: The search resulted in 185 articles. Out of these, 78 met our inclusion criteria. We found that there was a significant evidence of neurotoxicity induced by general anesthetics in experimental animals that were just born, resulting in late and permanent cognitive deficits. This effect was associated with multiple exposures, exposure length of time and combination of drugs. However, some studies found cognitive impairment after a single exposure to anesthetic. Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to state that general anesthetics are neurotoxic and have the potential to trigger learning and behavior disabilities in children. However, we suggest caution in indicating surgery in children under three years old, analyzing risk-benefit and inserting the family in the decision process.   Keywords: Neurotoxicity; Neuroprotection; Cognitive Impairment; Children; General Anesthesics

  4. Contingent and Marginalised? Academic Development and Part-Time Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Academics employed on non-standard contracts are a numerically significant part of the labour market in higher education. Concerns about access to formal academic development for this staff group have been articulated in many countries in the context of increasing emphasis on teaching quality assessment and employment regulation of…

  5. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstead Valerie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections.

  6. WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 1: Parameter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howarth, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program; the parameters were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probabilistic codes frequently require input values that define a statistical distribution for each parameter. Developing parameter distributions begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. The development of the parameter distribution values may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling of lab or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformation. Parameter development and documentation of the development process were very complicated, especially for those parameters based on empirical data; they required the integration of information from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) code sponsors, parameter task leaders (PTLs), performance assessment analysts (PAAs), and experimental principal investigators (PIs). This paper, Part 1 of two parts, contains a discussion of the parameter development process, roles and responsibilities, and lessons learned. Part 2 will discuss parameter documentation, traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews

  7. An improved method for lifting and transporting anesthetized pigs within an animal facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher-Petersen, Camilla; Hammelev, Karsten Pharao; Flescher, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Transporting anesthetized pigs in a laboratory setting often requires strenuous manual lifting, posing a hazard to the safety of animal care personnel and to the welfare of the pigs. The authors developed an improved approach to lifting and transporting anesthetized pigs weighing up to 350 kg using...... mechanical lifts. Different equipment was used to accommodate pigs of different sizes as well as the building designs of three animal facilities. Using the lifts, anesthetized pigs are carried on sheets to maintain their comfort while being transported. The approach refines previous methods for handling...

  8. Titration calorimetry of anesthetic-protein interaction: negative enthalpy of binding and anesthetic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, I; Yamanaka, M

    1997-04-01

    Anesthetic potency increases at lower temperatures. In contrast, the transfer enthalpy of volatile anesthetics from water to macromolecules is usually positive. The transfer decreases at lower temperature. It was proposed that a few selective proteins bind volatile anesthetics with negative delta H, and these proteins are involved in signal transduction. There has been no report on direct estimation of binding delta H of anesthetics to proteins. This study used isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze chloroform binding to bovine serum albumin. The calorimetrically measured delta H cal was -10.37 kJ.mol-1. Thus the negative delta H of anesthetic binding is not limited to signal transduction proteins. The binding was saturable following Fermi-Dirac statistics and is characterized by the Langmuir adsorption isotherms, which is interfacial. The high-affinity association constant, K, was 2150 +/- 132 M-1 (KD = 0.47 mM) with the maximum binding number, Bmax = 3.7 +/- 0.2. The low-affinity K was 189 +/- 3.8 M-1 (KD = 5.29 mM), with a Bmax of 13.2 +/- 0.3. Anesthetic potency is a function of the activity of anesthetic molecules, not the concentration. Because the sign of delta H determines the temperature dependence of distribution of anesthetic molecules, it is irrelevant to the temperature dependence of anesthetic potency.

  9. Local Anesthetics: Review of Pharmacological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel E; Reed, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics have an impressive history of efficacy and safety in medical and dental practice. Their use is so routine, and adverse effects are so infrequent, that providers may understandably overlook many of their pharmacotherapeutic principles. The purpose of this continuing education article is to provide a review and update of essential pharmacology for the various local anesthetic formulations in current use. Technical considerations will be addressed in a subsequent article. PMID:22822998

  10. Development of an enhanced loose parts monitoring system (LPMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y. C.; Park, J. H.; Yoon, D. B.; Choi, K. S.; Sohn, C. H.

    2006-01-01

    LPMS (loose parts monitoring system) is one of the most important structural integrity monitoring systems. It is operated for a early detection of the impacts by loosened or detached metallic, objects on the primary pressure boundary in a nuclear power plant. The impacted parts might cause flow blockage in the fuel channel, prevent the control rod from moving properly, damage the pump impeller, and give rise to cracks on the steam generator tube sheet, etc. In Korea, The LPMS is currently operating in all of the nuclear power plants as a subsystem in the NIMS (NSSS Integrity Monitoring System), However the performances are being deteriorated in both the hardware and software since it was designed in 1980's. In particular the system is not capable of promptly responding to the continuously triggered impacts in a short period failing to monitor the real loose parts. Also the diagnostic tools to estimate the location and the mass or energy of the impact source have not been reflected. Therefore, a new loose parts monitoring system has been developed to improve the capabilities of the current one and ultimately to replace it. An enhanced Loose Parts Monitoring System(LPMS) has been developed by KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.), not only to improve the performance of an on-line signal processing for a monitoring system but also to enhance the evaluation technique of the true impact signals by loose parts. This new system has taken into account the state-of-the-art technology to cover the problems with the conventional system. (authors)

  11. Anesthetic-Induced Oxidative Stress and Potential Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure of developing mammals to general anesthetics affects the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA–type glutamate or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor systems and enhances neuronal toxicity. Stimulation of immature neurons by NMDA antagonists or GABA agonists is thought to increase overall nervous system excitability and may contribute to abnormal neuronal cell death during development. Although the precise mechanisms by which NMDA antagonists or GABA agonists cause neuronal cell death are still not completely understood, up-regulation of the NMDA receptor subunit NR1 may be an initiative factor in neuronal cell death. It is increasingly apparent that mitochondria lie at the center of the cell death regulation process. Evidence for the role of oxidative stress in anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity has been generated in studies that apply oxidative stress blockers. Prevention of neuronal death by catalase and superoxide dismutase in vitro, or by M40403 (superoxide dismutase mimetic in vivo, supports the contention that the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the nature of neuronal cell death in rodents is mainly apoptotic. However, more evidence is necessary to in order verify the role of the NMDA receptor subunit NR1 and ROS in anesthetic-induced neurodegeneration.

  12. Assessment of patient satisfaction with the preoperative anesthetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhn EG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Endale Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn, Vidhya Nagaratnam Department of Anesthesia, School of Medicine, Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: The evaluation of patient satisfaction is a core aspect of the continuous quality improvement in anesthesia service that can be affected by the preoperative anesthetist visit. This visit enables the anesthetist to know about the patient's general health status and the nature of surgery, to choose the type of anesthesia, and to discuss perioperative complications and their management with the patient. Patients have sometimes complained about the information given during the preoperative anesthetic evaluation in the University of Gondar teaching and referral hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the level of patient satisfaction with the preoperative anesthetist visit. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 15 to April 15, 2013. All consecutive elective patients who were operated upon under anesthesia during the study period were interviewed 24 hours after operation. A pretested questionnaire and checklists, which were developed based on the hospital's anesthetic evaluation sheet, were used for data collection. Results: A total of 116 elective patients were operated upon under anesthesia during the study period. Of these, 102 patients were included in our study, with a response rate of 87.9%. Anesthetists introduced themselves to ~24% patients; provided information about anesthesia to ~32%, postoperative complications to ~21%, postoperative analgesia to ~18, and postoperative nausea and vomiting to ~21%; and spent adequate time with ~74%. Patients' questions were answered by the anesthetist in ~65% of cases, and ~65% of patients had reduced anxiety after the anesthetist visit. The patients' overall satisfaction with the preoperative anesthetist visit was ~65%. Conclusion and recommendation: Patient satisfaction with the

  13. Part 1: characterization of beam synthesized catalytic materials. Part 2: further development of molecular SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheifers, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Part I of this thesis concerns characterization of catalyst materials prepared by an ion beam implanter and by a multiple expansion cluster source. Ion beam synthesis was carried out on a 250-kev ion implanter. After assembling a special reaction chamber, zeolites were implanted with phosphorous and iron. This work contributed to development of a sputter reactor for ion beam synthesis. Silver catalysts were examined in a reactor designed, built and evaluated for catalysts produced by the sputter reactor and by a multiple expansion cluster source. Small surface area silver foil catalysts and silver cluster catalysts showed kinetic activity for epoxidation of ethylene. Positive results for the small surface area silver cluster catalyst demonstrate the feasibility of studying these catalysts with the special reactor. Part 2 concerns fundamentals and applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry. A data system was implemented for a secondary ion mass spectrometer that involved design and construction of a computer interface. Software routines for the interface were written in assembly language for increased operation efficiency

  14. World Development Report, 1980. Part I: Adjustment and Growth in the 1980s. Part II: Poverty and Human Development. Annex: World Development Indicators. With Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenman, Paul; And Others

    The report, third in a series of annual publications, examines some of the difficulties and prospects in areas of social and economic progress and human development which developing countries face during the next decade. Distinguishing oil-importing from oil-exporting developing countries, the first part of the report presents global and regional…

  15. Exploring microsolvation of the anesthetic propofol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon, I.; Cocinero, E. J.; Millan, J.; Jaeqx, S.; Rijs, A. M.; Lesarri, A.; Castano, F.; Fernandez, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a broadly used general anesthetic. By combining spectroscopic techniques such as 1- and 2-color REMPI, UV/UV hole burning, infrared ion-dip spectroscopy (IRIDS) obtained under cooled and isolated conditions with high-level ab initio calculations, detailed

  16. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  17. Cell shape changes induced by cationic anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The effects of local anesthetics on cultivated macrophages were studied in living preparations and recorded in still pictures and time-lapse cine-micrographs. Exposure to 12mM lidocaine or 1.5 mM tetracaine resulted in rounding in 10-15 min. Rounding was characterized by cell contraction, marked increase in retraction fibrils, withdrawal of cell processes, and, in late stages, pulsation-like activity and zeiosis. Cells showed appreciable membrane activity as they rounded. Respreading was complete within 15 min of perfusion in drug-free medium and entailed a marked increase in surface motility over control periods. As many as eight successive cycles of rounding and spreading were obtained with lidocaine without evidence of cell damage. The effects of anesthetics were similar to those observed with EDTA, but ethylene- glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N'-tetraacetic acid-Mg was ineffective. Rounding was also induced by benzocaine, an anesthetic nearly uncharged at pH 7.0. Quaternary (nondischargeable) compounds were of low activity, presumably because they are slow permeants. Lidocaine induced rounding at 10 degrees C and above but was less effective at 5 degrees C and ineffective at 0 degrees C. Rounding by the anesthetic was also obtained in media depleted or Na or enriched with 10 mM Ca or Mg. The latter finding, together with the failure of tetrodotoxin to induce rounding, suggests that the anesthetic effect is unrelated to inhibition of sodium conductance. It is possible that the drugs influence divalent ion fluxes or some component of the contractile cells' machinery, but a metabolic target of action cannot yet be excluded. PMID:814194

  18. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-09

    Apr 9, 2011 ... standards and increased use of disposable anesthetic equipment. An audit of equipment and facilities for anesthetic care in pediatric patients is important and should be carried out periodically to appraise the situation for upgrading of essential anesthetic facilities and equipment. Appendix A. 18th March, ...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over a...

  20. Cyclopentane combustion chemistry. Part I: Mechanism development and computational kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2017-06-23

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, in which they are one of the main contributors to soot formation, but also significantly influence the ignition characteristics below ∼900K. This paper discusses the development of a detailed high- and low-temperature oxidation mechanism for cyclopentane, which is an important archetypical cycloalkane. The differences between cyclic and non-cyclic alkane chemistry, and thus the inapplicability of acyclic alkane analogies, required the detailed theoretical investigation of the kinetics of important cyclopentane oxidation reactions as part of the mechanism development. The cyclopentyl+O reaction was investigated at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in a time-dependent master equation framework. Comparisons with analogous cyclohexane or non-cyclic alkane reactions are presented. Our study suggests that beyond accurate quantum chemistry the inclusion of pressure dependence and especially that of formally direct kinetics is crucial even at pressures relevant for practical application.

  1. Cyclopentane combustion chemistry. Part I: Mechanism development and computational kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El; Mehl, Marco; Pitz, William J.; Mohamed, Samah; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, in which they are one of the main contributors to soot formation, but also significantly influence the ignition characteristics below ∼900K. This paper discusses the development of a detailed high- and low-temperature oxidation mechanism for cyclopentane, which is an important archetypical cycloalkane. The differences between cyclic and non-cyclic alkane chemistry, and thus the inapplicability of acyclic alkane analogies, required the detailed theoretical investigation of the kinetics of important cyclopentane oxidation reactions as part of the mechanism development. The cyclopentyl+O reaction was investigated at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in a time-dependent master equation framework. Comparisons with analogous cyclohexane or non-cyclic alkane reactions are presented. Our study suggests that beyond accurate quantum chemistry the inclusion of pressure dependence and especially that of formally direct kinetics is crucial even at pressures relevant for practical application.

  2. Drama workshops as part of a personal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vidrih

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The here presented Performance method of drama workshops was developed on basis of professional staging (actress, singer, working with people (mentor, trainer, permanent learning, research and analyses of the use of voice and body language on the exposed stage in interpersonal communication and exploration of positive effects of an individual being part of such a creative process. It has been tested working with people of diverse backgrounds and mixed interest groups. The experience and knowledge acquired from drama workshops serve an individual as an aid of overcoming obstacles, developing survival strategies, better understanding and accepting of oneself and surroundings and designing the desired interaction patterns. This enables the participants to take over the responsibility to improve their quality of life. On the area of education (where motivation and interaction are crucial elements of knowledge transmission  as well as working with vulnerable groups, we have come to a conclusion that the way these workshops work helps participants recognizing their own and unfamiliar behavior patterns – seeing themselves and other from a different perspective, neutralizing tension in interpersonal and professional relationships. Participants experience own expressive and creative potential. Believing in their own possibilities and creativity, it increases faith in life, which offers the feeling of personal fulfillment. Findings have been collected on basis of evaluations, questionnaires, discussions, in-depth discussions, diary entries, work in groups and video footages (with permission of the participants.

  3. Local anesthetics and nuclear medical bone images of the equine fore limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaughan, E.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Kallfelz, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of two local anesthetic agents on the diagnostic quality of nuclear medical bone images (NMBIs) of distal parts of the equine fore limb were investigated. Local effects on bone uptake of technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) 4 and 24 hours after perineural and intraarticular injection of mepivacaine hydrochloride and bupivacaine hydrochloride were evaluated in the carpal and metacarpophalangeal regions of 12 horses and ponies. Neither mepivacaine hydrochloride nor bupivacaine hydrochloride significantly altered the diagnostic quality of the NMBIs. The injection and subsequent action of local anesthetics do not appear to influence local bone uptake of 99mTc-MDP significantly

  4. Local anesthetic-induced myotoxicity as a cause of severe trismus after inferior alveolar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Wenko; Knoesel, Thomas; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich

    2018-01-01

    A case of a 60-year-old man with severe trismus after inferior alveolar nerve block is presented. MRI scans as well as histologic examination revealed muscle fibrosis and degeneration of the medial part of the left temporal muscle due to myotoxicity of a local anesthetic agent.

  5. Combined use of intravenous anesthetics and hypothermia in treating refractory status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-ping REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary choice of treating refractory status epilepticus (RSE is intravenous anesthetics, but the seizures of some patients can not get a good control. Thus, other therapies must be combined. Hypothermia not only can terminate seizures, but also play a part in brain protection. Though combined use of intravenous anesthetics and hypothermia is not a regular clinical scheme, the favorable effect has been proved by a lot of clinical research. This paper mainly focuses on the dose of intravenous anesthetics, the time, temperature and procedure of hypothermia, the indications and contraindications of combined therapy, and so on. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.006

  6. Development of the spare parts program at Shearon Harris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout construction, testing, and commercial operation of a nuclear power plant, utilities have a need for spare parts and consumables that must meet a wide range of technical and quality assurance (QA) requirements. The applications for which parts and consumables may be used need to be identified prior to procurement to ensure that the design basis of the plant is not compromised. The spare parts program at Shearon Harris nuclear power plant supported the maintenance department with the proper parts when needed for all but 5% of the maintenance work requests

  7. Bohunice NPPs - Part of the Slovak's economy (sustainable) development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobak, Dobroslav

    2001-01-01

    Of the total consumption of electricity in Slovakia, 42% was generated in nuclear power plant units in 1999. Slovakia operates 6 units with a WWER 440 nuclear reactors, 4 of them are at Bohunice site and 2 at Mochovce. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of SR is not the only regulatory body controlling nuclear activity. Both - the system of nuclear activities regulation in Slovakia as well as the approach to Nuclear Safety enhancement of the operator were positively judged by IAEA and WENRA. In 1993 -Slovakia has accepted the commitments of the UN Convention on Climate Changes, including a reduction of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. Moreover, as an internal target Slovakia has set the reaching of the ,'Toronto Objective', i.e. 20% reduction in CO x emissions through the year 2005 as compared to 1988. Taking into account the actual situation as well as natural conditions for some renewable sources utilisation, the target won't be reached without nuclear energy. The nuclear energy is free of emissions, does not burn oxygen, and with the share of production in Slovakia will remain significant contributor. To the environment protection it contributes also by replacing fossil heat plants with heat delivery for the region. In case of radiological wastes the environment protection is ensured by very strict system of control, evidence, treatment and repository. To conclude, Bohunice NPPs were, are and will remain very important part of the Slovak's economy, creating conditions for its (sustainable) development

  8. Anesthesia and Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy: review of 117 anesthetic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Leal G; Lorenz, Jessica D; Weingarten, Toby N; Scavonetto, Federica; Bojanić, Katarina; Selcen, Duygu; Sprung, Juraj

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are associated with life-threatening perioperative complications, including rhabdomyolysis, hyperkalemia, and hyperthermia. Current recommendations contraindicate use of succinylcholine and volatile anesthetics; however, the latter recommendation remains controversial. To review the perioperative outcomes of patients with DMD and BMD. We reviewed records of patients with DMD or BMD who underwent anesthetic management at our institution from January 1990 through December 2011. We identified 47 patients (DMD, 37; BMD, 10) who underwent 117 anesthetic exposures (DMD, 101; BMD, 16). Volatile anesthetic agents were used 66 times (DMD, 59; BMD, 7). One patient with undiagnosed BMD received succinylcholine and developed acute rhabdomyolysis and hyperkalemic cardiac arrest. All other major complications were attributed to the procedure (i.e., large bleeding), to preexisting comorbidities (i.e., respiratory failure, cardiac disease), or to both. Use of succinylcholine in children with dystrophinopathy is contraindicated. These patients have significant comorbidities and are frequently undergoing extensive operations; complications related to these factors can develop, as evidenced by our series. These complications may occur with use of volatile and nonvolatile anesthetics. However, because most of our patients were older than 8 years at the time of surgery, our observation cannot be generalized to younger dystrophin-deficient children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Anesthetic management of external cephalic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalifoux, Laurie A; Sullivan, John T

    2013-09-01

    Breech presentation is common at term and its reduction through external cephalic version represents a noninvasive opportunity to avoid cesarean delivery and the associated maternal morbidity. In addition to uterine relaxants, neuraxial anesthesia is associated with increased success of version procedures when surgical anesthetic dosing is used. The intervention is likely cost effective given the effect size and the avoided high costs of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increasing topical anesthetic efficacy with microneedle application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhsem, Ömer; Aksoy, Alper; Kececi, Yavuz; Sir, Emin; Güngör, Melike

    2016-10-01

    Since topical anesthetics alone seldom provide adequate analgesia for laser resurfacing procedures, injectable forms of anesthesia are often required. However, their application is uncomfortable for the patient. In this study, it is investigated whether microneedle application would enhance the efficacy of topical anesthetics. Forty-seven patients participated in the study. Topical anesthetic agent EMLA was applied to the whole face of the patients. Microneedle treatment was applied to one side of the face with a roller-type device. Whole-face carbon dioxide laser resurfacing therapy was carried out then. The pain that patients experienced was assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) method. VAS scores of two sides of the face were compared by using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean of VAS score of the microneedle treated side was 2.1 ± 1.1 while that of the untreated side was 5.9 ± 0.9 and this difference was statistically significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the Z-value is - 5.9683 and the p-value is < 0.001). This study revealed that microneedle application, with a roller-type device, is a safe and easy procedure in providing sufficient anesthesia for facial laser resurfacing without the need for supplementary nerve blocks or injections.

  11. Model Development for Auto Spare Parts Inventory Control and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... essential motivating factors for providing control in manufacturing companies has never showed any sign ... The management of these parts can only be done with the aid of a computer; ... perform a discrete event simulation of.

  12. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potters JW

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Jan-Willem Potters, Markus Klimek Department of Anesthesiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Abstract: This review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local anesthesia or under local anesthesia only. Literature shows a large variation in the postoperative pain intensity ranging from no postoperative analgesia requirement in two-thirds of the patients up to a rate of 96% of the patients suffering from severe postoperative pain. The only identified causative factor predicting higher postoperative pain scores is infratentorial surgery. Postoperative analgesia can be achieved with multimodal pain management where local anesthesia is associated with lower postoperative pain intensity, reduction in opioid requirement and prevention of development of chronic pain. In awake craniotomy patients, sufficient local anesthesia is a cornerstone of the procedure. An awake craniotomy and brain tumor resection can be carried out completely under local anesthesia only. However, the use of sedative drugs is common to improve patient comfort during craniotomy and closure. Local anesthesia for craniotomy can be performed by directly blocking the six different nerves that provide the sensory innervation of the scalp, or by local infiltration of the surgical site and the placement of the pins of the Mayfield clamp. Direct nerve block has potential complications and pitfalls and is technically more challenging, but mostly requires lower total doses of the local anesthetics than the doses required in surgical-site infiltration. Due to a lack of comparative studies, there is no evidence showing superiority of one technique versus the other. Besides the use of other local anesthetics for analgesia, intravenous lidocaine administration has

  13. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  14. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  15. The scavenging of volatile anesthetic agents in the cardiovascular intensive care unit environment: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickworth, Thomas; Jerath, Angela; DeVine, Rita; Kherani, Nazmin; Wąsowicz, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    The use of volatile-based sedation within critical care environments has been limited by difficulties of drug administration and safety concerns over environment pollution and staff exposure in an intensive care unit (ICU) with no scavenging. The aim of this study was to develop a simple scavenging system to be used with the Anesthesia Conserving Device (AnaConDa(®)) and to determine whether or not ambient concentrations of residual anesthetic are within current acceptable limits. The scavenging system consists of two Deltasorb(®) canisters attached to the ICU ventilator in series. AnaConDa is a miniature vaporizer designed to provide volatile-based sedation within an ICU. The first ten patients recruited into a larger randomized trial assessing outcomes after elective coronary graft bypass surgery were sedated within the cardiac ICU using either isoflurane or sevoflurane. Sedation was guided by the Sedation Agitation Scale, resulting in an end-tidal minimum anesthetic concentration of volatile agent ranging from 0.1-0.3. At one hour post ICU admission, infrared photometric analysis was used to assess environmental contamination at four points along the ventilator circuit and scavenging system and around the patient's head. All measurements taken within the patient's room were below 1 part per million, which satisfies criteria for occupational exposure. This study shows that volatile agents can be administered safely within critical care settings using a simple scavenging system. Our scavenging system used in conjunction with the AnaConDa device reduced the concentration of environmental contamination to a level that is acceptable to Canadian standards and standards in most Western countries and thus conforms to international safety standards. The related clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01151254).

  16. Role of Network Science in the Study of Anesthetic State Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, UnCheol; Mashour, George A

    2018-04-23

    The heterogeneity of molecular mechanisms, target neural circuits, and neurophysiologic effects of general anesthetics makes it difficult to develop a reliable and drug-invariant index of general anesthesia. No single brain region or mechanism has been identified as the neural correlate of consciousness, suggesting that consciousness might emerge through complex interactions of spatially and temporally distributed brain functions. The goal of this review article is to introduce the basic concepts of networks and explain why the application of network science to general anesthesia could be a pathway to discover a fundamental mechanism of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. This article reviews data suggesting that reduced network efficiency, constrained network repertoires, and changes in cortical dynamics create inhospitable conditions for information processing and transfer, which lead to unconsciousness. This review proposes that network science is not just a useful tool but a necessary theoretical framework and method to uncover common principles of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness.

  17. A systematic review of methodology applied during preclinical anesthetic neurotoxicity studies : important issues and lessons relevant to the design of future clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disma, Nicola; Mondardini, Maria C.; Terrando, Niccolo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Bilotta, Federico

    Preclinical evidence suggests that anesthetic agents harm the developing brain thereby causing long-term neurocognitive impairments. It is not clear if these findings apply to humans, and retrospective epidemiological studies thus far have failed to show definitive evidence that anesthetic agents

  18. Halogenated Anesthetics Determination in Urine by SPME/GC/MS and Urine Levels Relationship Evaluation with Surgical Theatres Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Indelicato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a new sensitive analytical method has been developed and evaluated for the determination of the most commonly used gaseous anesthetics, desflurane, sevoflurane, and this latter’s hepatic metabolite hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP in the urine. In addition, an evaluation of anesthetics exposition on the urine levels of a small population of surgical operators has been performed and results are briefly discussed.

  19. Perioperative pulmonary aspiration is infrequent and low risk in pediatric anesthetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher J; Walker, Robert W M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported perioperative pulmonary aspiration in pediatric practice to be an uncommon problem associated with low morbidity and mortality. This paper examines the recent publications in both the adult and pediatric literature and looks at some of the potential risk factors involved, both patient and anesthetic, in the development of aspiration of gastric contents. We also look at the risk of severe morbidity following pulmonary aspiration and speculate on possible reasons behind the assertion that pulmonary aspiration in pediatric anesthetic practice is rare and a low-risk event. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Scientific Research, Technological Development and Innovation as Parts of Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Timuş; Laura Afteni; Stela Rînja

    2007-01-01

    This article is an integrate part of individual scientific project „Studies regarding improvement of investigation methodologies, techniques and proceedings in economic science”, and it was made in accordance with conditions which were stipulated in the contract for financing Nr.28/ind from 26.01.07. Scientific research and technological development are the main activities which create and generate economic and social progress in the modern world. In our days the science on the whole become a...

  1. The cardiac anesthetic index of isoflurane in green iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Craig A E; Dyson, Doris; Smith, Dale A

    2003-06-01

    To determine the cardiac anesthetic index (CAI) of isoflurane in green iguanas and whether butorphanol affected the CAI. Prospective randomized controlled trial. 7 healthy mature iguanas. In 5 iguanas, CAI was determined after induction of anesthesia with isoflurane alone, and in 5 iguanas, CAI was determined after induction of anesthesia with isoflurane and IM administration of butorphanol (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb]). Three iguanas underwent both treatments. Animals were equilibrated for 20 minutes at 1.5 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and observed for evidence of cardiovascular arrest. If there was no evidence of cardiovascular arrest, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased by 20%, and animals were allowed to equilibrate for another 20 minutes. This process was repeated until cardiovascular arrest occurred or vaporizer output could no longer be consistently increased. The CAI was calculated by dividing the highest end-tidal isoflurane concentration by the MAC. None of the iguanas developed cardiovascular arrest and all survived. Mean +/- SD highest end-tidal isoflurane concentration during anesthesia with isoflurane alone (9.2 +/- 0.60%) was not significantly different from mean concentration during anesthesia with isoflurane and butorphanol (9.0 +/- 0.43%). The CAI was > 4.32. Results suggest that the CAI of isoflurane in green iguanas is > 4.32 and not affected by administration of butorphanol. Isoflurane appears to be a safe anesthetic in green iguanas.

  2. Part 2: Conserving and Planting Trees at Development Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Cappiella; Tom Schueler; Tiffany Wright

    2006-01-01

    This manual presents specific ways to enable developers, engineers or landscape architects to incorporate more trees into a development site. The proposed approach focuses on protecting existing trees, planting trees in storm water treatment practices, and planting trees in other open spaces at the development site. This manual introduces conceptual designs for storm...

  3. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  4. Anesthetic salts used in dentistry: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Klein Parise

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetics allow a better and suitable control of pain in patients that submit to dental treatments. The pharmacology of local anesthetics is too complex, therefore it is important to know how to select the correct drug to each procedure to be accomplished. Thus, it is concluded that the production of a literary review material is of great relevance in order to gather current and important information about the local anesthetics most used in dentistry.

  5. Gestational trophoblastic disease with hyperthyroidism: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of hyperthyroidism with gestational trophoblastic disease is a known albeit rare clinical condition. We herein report the successful anesthetic management of such a case in our institute. There are only few case reports in literature of this association. Often, the diagnosis of hyperthyroid state is retrospective one, as it can be missed in the emergency scenario of patient requiring molar evacuation. This case report highlights the perioperative management and optimization of hyperthyroid state prior to surgical evacuation of the invasive hydatidiform mole.

  6. Development of Hot Isostatically Pressed Rene 95 Turbine Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Jull 17 ,. " 1ENE’ 95 TURBINE PARTS~ 7. AUTHOR(e) CO(A RRNNME P.)Mathur aWJ. Bartos AJ-3C0V hae1 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM...200 mesh coff .,acts prepared in the autoclave at 20500F and the -60 mesh compact prepared by *1650 0F14 hours, 2000°1/1 hour/OQ, + 1400°F/16 hours/AC...Product Acceptance plans (Appendix- Ill); the Quality Control of General Elctric Company was-extended to establish procedures and- organization , to

  7. Pharmacovigilance in developing countries (part I): importance and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafie, Shaimaa; Zaghloul, Iman; Roberti, Anne Marie

    2017-12-16

    The thalidomide disaster was the significant historical event that acted as a catalyst for pharmacovigilance activity. Following this event developed countries initiated drug monitoring systems that evolved and now extend their scope to broader drug-related safety issues; however, this was not the case in developing countries. Pharmacovigilance is still a relatively new concept with low priority in developing countries although various issues are raising concerns that magnify the need for systems to monitor post marketing drug safety in these countries. This article analyzes the barriers to introducing robust pharmacovigilance systems in developing countries.

  8. Pharmacoeconomics of inhaled anesthetic agents: considerations for the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, Eric L

    2004-10-15

    Types of economic analyses used for inhaled anesthetic agents, factors to consider in calculating the cost of inhaled anesthetics, limitations of pharmacoeconomic studies of these agents, and strategies for controlling inhaled anesthetic costs are discussed. Inhaled anesthetic agents comprise a substantial component of drug budgets. Calculation of the cost of administering an inhaled anesthetic should take into consideration the cost per mL, potency, waste, concentration and duration of gas delivery, fresh gas flow rate, molecular weight, and density. The use of newer inhaled anesthetic agents with low solubility in blood and tissue provides a more rapid recovery from anesthesia than older, more soluble agents, and also provides the same level of control of depth of anesthesia at a lower fresh gas flow rate and possibly a lower cost than older agents at a higher fresh gas flow rate. A more rapid recovery may facilitate fast-track recovery and yield cost savings if it allows the completion of additional surgical cases or allows a reduction in personnel overtime expenses. Interpretation of pharmacoeconomic studies of inhaled anesthetics requires an appreciation of the limitations in methodology and ability to extrapolate results from one setting to another. Pharmacists' efforts to reduce anesthetic waste and collaborate with anesthesiologists to improve the use of these agents can help contain costs, but improving scheduling and efficiency in the operating room has a greater potential to reduce operating room costs. Much can be done to control costs of anesthetic agents without compromising availability of these agents and patient care.

  9. 105 Developing a Cadastral Information System for Part of Fadaman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arc. Usman A. Jalam

    1Department of Surveying & Geoinformatics, Faculty of Environmental Technology,. Federal University of ... management in Fadaman-Mada area of. Bauchi metropolis, against rapid socio- economic development. The study specifically examined the cadastral information ... Development of applications for managing the ...

  10. Technology assessment HTR. Part 8. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkenburg, W.C.

    1996-06-01

    The small social acceptance of nuclear power for power generation suggests that in the present situation nuclear technology does not meet certain sustainable criteria. First, the concept of sustainable development is explained and which dimensions can be distinguished. Next, the sustainable development with regard to the development of the energy supply is outlined and the energy policy to obtain this situation is discussed. Subsequently, the impact of the sustainable development and the policy used to realize this on the nuclear technology are dealt with. As a result, criteria are formulated that can be used to verify how nuclear technology will meet this criteria and which demands should be used to fit this technology so it can be used in a sustainable development of the society. 55 refs

  11. Optimum Design of Heat Exchangers Networks Part -I: Software Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabr, E.M.A.; EI-Temtamy, S.A.; Deriasl, S.F.; Moustafa, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed a computerized framework for Heat Exchanger Network Synthesis (HENS) with optimality conditions of achieving the least operating and capital cost. The framework of HEN design involves the development three-computer programs, which applied sequentially to design an optimum HEN. The first program Automatic Minimum Utilities [AMU] developed for automatic formulation of LP equations, these equations can be solved by the optimization software [LINDO] to predict minimum hot and cold utilities. The second program based on Vertical Heat Transfer Method [VHTM] for predicting minimum overall heat transfer area and defining the optimum δbT m in. The third program [Mod.RESHEX] developed for targeting of heat transfer area and automatic synthesis of HEN. This program represents the modifications and development of RESHEX method to overcome the design defects, which appeared on original RESHEX applications

  12. Anesthetic management of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambi, Uday S.; Adarsh, E. S.; Hatti, Ramesh; Samalad, Vijaymahantesh

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases. PMID:22754447

  13. Anesthetic management of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday S Ambi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases.

  14. Innovation through developing consumers’ community. Part I: Innovation in action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gălăţanu (Avram, E.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    Technological changes and need for innovation represents the main concerns for organizational growth and profitability. However the main priority is still about achieving high performance through product development and consumers' engagement activities. As implementation of open innovation applications increased and value co — creation became well known and major process, companies were engaged into value co — innovation activities. From this point of view the need for joint efforts with consumers in product development arose. Thus the primary condition for an organization to be consumer centric is to define clear the vision and mission which reflects the common efforts for co — creation and diffusion of innovation. As Research & Development processes evolved and interest for innovative concepts and products arose, companies started to implement the specific instruments for consumers' attraction and engagement into design and product development. The digitalized innovation became the main source for establishing the direct communication with the consumers. In order to achieve organization growth, profitability and recognition, the companies should be aware of the innovation importance and the need for internal change. From this point of view, there is necessary to assess the organizational structures, to implement new policies and to establish strategic targets. Basically it is justified the need for platform occurrence and development. Based on case study of BMW Group, recognised leader in automotive industry for innovative concepts, there will be analysed main features within organizational context which promotes the innovation implementation. There will be provided the review of the BMW Group experience of innovation activities, main consumers' engagement strategies, the values which promote the consumer — centric product development, new opportunities assessment, major policies and concerns. The foreseen result is to understand how companies are

  15. Methods to produce calibration mixtures for anesthetic gas monitors and how to perform volumetric calculations on anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P L; Nielsen, J; Kann, T

    1992-10-01

    A simple procedure for making calibration mixtures of oxygen and the anesthetic gases isoflurane, enflurane, and halothane is described. One to ten grams of the anesthetic substance is evaporated in a closed, 11,361-cc glass bottle filled with oxygen gas at atmospheric pressure. The carefully mixed gas is used to calibrate anesthetic gas monitors. By comparison of calculated and measured volumetric results it is shown that at atmospheric conditions the volumetric behavior of anesthetic gas mixtures can be described with reasonable accuracy using the ideal gas law. A procedure is described for calculating the deviation from ideal gas behavior in cases in which this is needed.

  16. Fatigue Tests – Important Part of Development of New Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepka Miloslav

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In city of Pilsen (Czech Republic modern transport engineering is developed. The Skoda Transportation (production company has successfully been producing rail and road vehicles for many years (electric locomotives, trams, metro cars, trolleybuses, battery buses. This producer cooperates in developing these vehicles with the Research and Testing Institute (commercial research institute and with the University of West Bohemia (public university. Fatigue tests are carried out by the Dynamic Testing Laboratory at the Research and Testing Institute and by the Regional Technological Institute, the research center of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the university. The paper describes various fatigue tests and presents their practical realization in the mentioned laboratories.

  17. Medical students' perceptions of their development of 'soft skills' Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the aims of the reform was to provide more teaching and learning opportunities for the development of soft skills. Soft skills include professional interpersonal and social skills, communication skills, and professional and ethical attitudes. Methods As symbolic interactionism was used as the theoretical framework to ...

  18. 105 Developing a Cadastral Information System for Part of Fadaman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arc. Usman A. Jalam

    Cadastral Information System (CIS) has been made more effective for the monitoring, evaluation and management of ... from air and water pollution, environmental degradation .... method to prepare the land use land cover map. ... research was ended by developing a decision support system created to supply information ...

  19. Professional Development Considerations for Makerspace Leaders, Part Two: Addressing "How?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    As makerspaces begin to move into school libraries and classrooms, there is a growing need for professional development to help K-12 educators answer common questions such as "what is a makerspace," "why should I bother with a makerspace," "how do I run a makerspace," and "how do I teach from a makerspace?"…

  20. Research and development - an integral part of the business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerehugh, G

    1987-02-01

    The overall objectives of British Gas Research and Development Division are outlined together with the customer-contractor relationship between the operating divisions and R and D division which integrates the R and D programme with the needs of the business. Implementation of the results of the R and D programme may be in-house, by a joint venture with a manufacturer or by licensing one or more manufacturers. These methods of implementation are illustrated by description of the development of equipment for on-line inspection of pipelines, the Pegasus computer program for analysis of gas distribution networks and the regenerative burner for recovery of high temperature heat from furnace flue gases.

  1. Research, Development and Fabrication of Lithium Solar Cells, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development and fabrication of lithium solar cells are discussed. Several single-step, lithium diffusion schedules using lower temperatures and times are described. A comparison was made using evaporated lithium metal as the lithium source, and greatly improved consistency in lithium concentrations was obtained. It was possible to combine all processing steps to obtain lithium doped cells of high output which also contained adequate lithium to ensure good recoverability.

  2. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of an aqueous extract of Cinchona officinalis (C. officinalis) in experimental animal models. Methods: Various doses of the aqueous extract was tested for its local anesthetic activity in guinea pigs and frogs using intracutaneous and plexus anesthesia, ...

  3. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Facilities and equipment are known to contribute to improved patient care and outcome. Hospitals for sub‑specialized pediatric anesthetic service are routinely available worldwide. In Nigeria, such hospitals now exist. It is therefore relevant to study the facilities and equipment available for pediatric anesthetic ...

  4. [Anesthetic management of four patients with Fournier syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Rui; Tomioka, Toshiya; Orii, Ryo; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2008-03-01

    We experienced anesthetic managements of four patients with Fournier syndrome. In the anesthetic management of the patients with Fournier syndrome the following three points should be kept in mind; (a) the necessity of careful preoperative examination, (b) the better anesthesia, and (c) the careful postoperative care.

  5. THE EFFECT OF LOCAL ANESTHETICS ON TEAR PRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that local anesthetics measure only basic secretion thus reducing normal tear production/secretion, which is both reflex and basic. This could be attributed to the fact that local anesthetics have an adrenergic potentiating effects and because lacrimal fluid receive a preganglionic parasympathetic supply from lacrimal muscles ...

  6. Tolerance to acute isovolemic hemodilution. Effect of anesthetic depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Philippe; de Hert, Stefan; Mathieu, Nathalie; Degroote, Françoise; Schmartz, Denis; Zhang, Haibo; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acceptance of a lower transfusion trigger in the perioperative period requires study of the effects of anesthetic depth on the tolerance to acute isovolemic anemia. Anesthetic agents with negative effects on the cardiovascular system may exert proportionately greater depressant effects

  7. [Occupational hazards, DNA damage, and oxidative stress on exposure to waste anesthetic gases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio, Lorena M C; Braz, Mariana G; do Nascimento Junior, Paulo; Braz, José Reinaldo C; Braz, Leandro G

    The waste anesthetic gases (WAGs) present in the ambient air of operating rooms (OR), are associated with various occupational hazards. This paper intends to discuss occupational exposure to WAGs and its impact on exposed professionals, with emphasis on genetic damage and oxidative stress. Despite the emergence of safer inhaled anesthetics, occupational exposure to WAGs remains a current concern. Factors related to anesthetic techniques and anesthesia workstations, in addition to the absence of a scavenging system in the OR, contribute to anesthetic pollution. In order to minimize the health risks of exposed professionals, several countries have recommended legislation with maximum exposure limits. However, developing countries still require measurement of WAGs and regulation for occupational exposure to WAGs. WAGs are capable of inducing damage to the genetic material, such as DNA damage assessed using the comet assay and increased frequency of micronucleus in professionals with long-term exposure. Oxidative stress is also associated with WAGs exposure, as it induces lipid peroxidation, oxidative damage in DNA, and impairment of the antioxidant defense system in exposed professionals. The occupational hazards related to WAGs including genotoxicity, mutagenicity and oxidative stress, stand as a public health issue and must be acknowledged by exposed personnel and responsible authorities, especially in developing countries. Thus, it is urgent to stablish maximum safe limits of concentration of WAGs in ORs and educational practices and protocols for exposed professionals. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Surface anesthetic action of Aqueous Extract of Piper Betel leaf On Rabbit Cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.T.Jayasree; Dr.Shaikh Ubedulla; Dr.Harini K; Dr.Shankar.J

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Piper betel Linn. (Piperaceae) commonly known as betel leaf and the habit of betel chewing is widely prevalent in most parts of India. It is claimed to have aphrodisiac, laxative, antimicrobial, mucolytic, antiinflammatory and euphoric properties and proven antimutagenic and anti-carcinogenic effect. It is commonly observed that chewing of betel leaf produces numbness in the mouth, suggesting a possible local anesthetic effect. This observation prompted us to take this study . The aim...

  9. The active phasing experiment: Part II. Design and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Araujo, C.; Brast, R.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Noethe, L.; Sedghi, B.; Surdej, I.; Wilhelm, R.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Langlois, M.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of the Active Phasing Experiment, designed under the lead of ESO, is to validate wavefront control concepts for ELT class telescopes. This instrument includes an Active Segmented Mirror, located in a pupil image. It will be mounted at a Nasmyth focus of one of the Unit Telescopes of the ESO VLT. APE contains four different types of phasing sensors, which are developed by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Arcetri, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. These phasing sensors can be compared simultaneously under identical optical and environmental conditions. All sensors receive telecentric F/15 beams with identical optical quality and intensity. Each phasing sensor can measure segmentation errors of the active segmented mirror and correct them in closed loop. The phasing process is supervised by an Internal Metrology system developed by FOGALE Nanotech and capable of measuring piston steps with an accuracy of a few nanometers. The Active Phasing Experiment is equipped with a turbulence generator to simulate atmospheric seeing between 0.45 and 0.85 arcsec in the laboratory. In addition, the Active Phasing Experiment is designed to control simultaneously with the phasing corrections the guiding and the active optics of one of the VLT Unit Telescopes. This activity is supported by the European Community (Framework Programme 6, ELT Design Study, contract No 011863).

  10. Carcinoid tumors: Challenges and considerations during anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neoplasms of neuroendocrine tissues from enterochromaffin or kulchitsky cells, which have the potential to metastasize. The mediators released from these tumors when bypass the hepatic metabolism, can lead to the possible development of carcinoid syndrome. This is a life-threatening complication, which can lead to profound hemodynamic instability, especially in a peri-operative period, when the patient is exposed to various types of noxious stimuli. Off late, use of octreotide, a synthetic analog of somatostatin, has significantly reduced the peri-operative morbidity and mortality. The current review discusses the various anesthetic challenges and considerations during peri-operative management of carcinoid tumors.

  11. Neurotoxicity of general anesthetics: A modern view of the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ovezov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All general anesthetics routinely used in clinical practice are noted to have a neurotoxic effect on the brain in different animal species including primates. The negative effects observed both in young and sexually mature animals include apoptotic neuronal cell death, suppression of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, neuroinflammation, as well as learning and memory impairments. A number of epidemiologic surveys have established an association between anesthesia in patients younger than 3 to 4 years and subsequent learning disabilities and language disorders whereas others have not found this link. In middle-aged and elderly patients, anesthesia is frequently associated with the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. The key component of its pathogenesis (general anesthesia itself or other factors, such as operative injury, an inflammatory response, pain syndrome, intraoperative complications, underlying disease in a patient remains unelucidated. It is concluded that there is a need for additional experimental and clinical studies of the pathogenesis of these undesirable phenomena to be prevented and corrected.

  12. GSTARS computer models and their applications, part I: theoretical development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.T.; Simoes, F.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    GSTARS is a series of computer models developed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation for alluvial river and reservoir sedimentation studies while the authors were employed by that agency. The first version of GSTARS was released in 1986 using Fortran IV for mainframe computers. GSTARS 2.0 was released in 1998 for personal computer application with most of the code in the original GSTARS revised, improved, and expanded using Fortran IV/77. GSTARS 2.1 is an improved and revised GSTARS 2.0 with graphical user interface. The unique features of all GSTARS models are the conjunctive use of the stream tube concept and of the minimum stream power theory. The application of minimum stream power theory allows the determination of optimum channel geometry with variable channel width and cross-sectional shape. The use of the stream tube concept enables the simulation of river hydraulics using one-dimensional numerical solutions to obtain a semi-two- dimensional presentation of the hydraulic conditions along and across an alluvial channel. According to the stream tube concept, no water or sediment particles can cross the walls of stream tubes, which is valid for many natural rivers. At and near sharp bends, however, sediment particles may cross the boundaries of stream tubes. GSTARS3, based on FORTRAN 90/95, addresses this phenomenon and further expands the capabilities of GSTARS 2.1 for cohesive and non-cohesive sediment transport in rivers and reservoirs. This paper presents the concepts, methods, and techniques used to develop the GSTARS series of computer models, especially GSTARS3. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  13. Addition of lacal anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1988-01-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity (i.v. LD 50 ) of solutions of the ratio 1.5 contrast media metrizoate or diatrizoate and the ratio 3.0 contrast medium metrizamide was determined in mice with and without the addition of local anesthetics to the solutions. The two local anesthetics mepivacaine or lidocaine were added to final concentrations up to 2.0 mg/ml of the contrast medium solutions. This corresponds to clinically used concentrations. All additions of local anesthetics to the solutions increased the mortalities caused by the contrast medium solutions. Addition of local anesthetics to a final concentration of 2 mg/ml approximately doubled the acute intravenous toxicity of the contrast media. The ratio 3 contrast media produce less hypertonic solutions than the ratio 1.5 contrast media and should be preferred for angiography because they cause less pain and do not require the addition of local anesthetics which increase the acute toxicity of the solutions. (orig.)

  14. Anesthetic Management of Narcolepsy Patients During Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sally; Singh, Mandeep; Wong, Jean; Auckley, Dennis; Hershner, Shelley; Kakkar, Rahul; Thorpy, Michael J; Chung, Frances

    2018-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, and/or hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and in some cases cataplexy. The response to anesthetic medications and possible interactions in narcolepsy patients is unclear in the perioperative period. In this systematic review, we aim to evaluate the current evidence on the perioperative outcomes and anesthetic considerations in narcolepsy patients. Electronic literature search of Medline, Medline in-process, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews databases, international conference proceedings, and abstracts was conducted in November 2015 according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocols guideline. A total of 3757 articles were screened using a 2-stage strategy (title-abstract followed by full text). We included case studies/series, cohort studies, and randomized controlled trials of narcolepsy patients undergoing surgical procedures under anesthesia or sedation. Preoperative narcolepsy symptoms and sleep study data, anesthetic technique, and perioperative complications were extracted. Screening of articles, data extraction, and compilation were conducted by 2 independent reviewers and any conflict was resolved by the senior author. A total of 19 studies including 16 case reports and 3 case series were included and evaluated. The majority of these patients received general anesthesia, whereas a small percentage of patients received regional anesthesia. Reported complications of narcolepsy patients undergoing surgeries were mainly related to autonomic dysregulation, or worsening of narcolepsy symptoms intra/postoperatively. Narcolepsy symptoms worsened only in those patient populations where the preoperative medications were either discontinued or reduced (mainly in obstetric patients). In narcolepsy patients, use of depth of anesthesia monitoring and total intravenous technique may have some advantage in terms

  15. The fractional scaling methodology (FSM) Part 1. methodology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak Zuber; Ivan Catton; Upendra S Rohatgi; Wolfgang Wulff

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: a quantitative methodology is developed, based on the concepts of hierarchy and synthesis, to integrate and organize information and data. The methodology uses scaling to synthesize experimental data and analytical results, and to provide quantitative criteria for evaluating the effects of various design and operating parameters that influence processes in a complex system such as a nuclear power plant or a related test facility. Synthesis and scaling are performed on three hierarchical levels: the process, component and system levels. Scaling on the process level determines the effect of a selected process on a particular state variable during a selected scenario. At the component level this scaling determines the effects various processes have on a state variable, and it ranks the processes according to their importance by the magnitude of the fractional change they cause on that state variable. At the system level the scaling determines the governing processes and corresponding components, ranking these in the order of importance according to their effect on the fractional change of system-wide state variables. The scaling methodology reveals on all levels the fractional change of state variables and is called therefore the Fractional Scaling Methodology (FSM). FSM synthesizes process parameters and assigns to each thermohydraulic process a dimensionless effect metric Ω = ωt, that is the product of the specific rate of fractional change ω and the characteristic time t. The rate of fractional change ω is the ratio of process transport rate over content of a preserved quantity in a component. The effect metric Ω quantifies the contribution of the process to the fractional change of a state variable in a given component. Ordering of a component effect metrics provides the hierarchy of processes in a component, then in all components and the system. FSM separates quantitatively dominant from minor processes and components and

  16. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  17. [Eye development in children. Part I. Eyeball dimensions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz, Ewelina; Czepita, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of an article is to introduce and elaborate on the available literature concerning eyeball development. The information content in the article comes from studies performed on groups of children of different ages. In some analysis study groups were chosen depending on sex. Axial length of the eye, depth of anterior chamber, lens's thickness and vitreous's dimension was defined. Intensive changes of eyeball dimensions progress with age. A period of fast and slow growth of the eye can be discerned. Axial length of the eye, depth of anterior chamber, lens's thickness and vitreous's dimension increase over time. Growth of the axial length is mainly caused by increasing axial length of vitreous cavity. The increase in depth of the anterior chamber plays a lesser role. Girls tend to have shorter eyes compared with boys. Both age and male gender are associated with deeper anterior chambers and larger vitreous cavity. Lens thickness decreases with the growth of the eyeball. However gender does not play a role. Based on current literature, it is difficult exactly indicate what are the standards of eyeball growth in children and youths. To establish these parameters, further studies on the another examination in representative group of children and teenagers are necessary.

  18. Development of a radiochemical sensor. Part I: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@apolo.qui.ub.es; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-05-04

    The evolution of nuclear activities and criteria for radiation protection have led to a continuous increase in measures to monitor and control the environment and therefore in the number of determinations required for such purposes. Classical analytical procedures are time-consuming, labor-intense and generate a large amount of waste. The alternative use of sensors for such determinations has seen very limited development. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the behavior of a prototype radiochemical sensor for liquid effluents. The sensor is based on a receptor made of a plastic scintillator and is capable of continuous, on-time and accurate remote quantification of the activity of alpha, beta and beta-gamma emitters. Low-level active solutions of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co in matrices of groundwater, seawater and drinking water were quantified with prediction errors lower than 10% in most cases. The study also yields information about light generation and transmission and transductor configuration that will be useful in the design of future versions of this sensor.

  19. Understanding stakeholder participation in research as part of sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Simon; Morse, Stephen; Shah, Rupesh A

    2012-06-30

    Participation is often presented as a 'good' thing and a fairer way to represent views and opinions outside narrow confines of interest and expertise. However, the roots of participatory approaches within research contexts are deep and numerous twists and turns demonstrate a confused and possibly confusing morphology with significant gaps and weaknesses. In this paper 'via the medium' of the POINT (Policy Influence of Indicators) research project we trace elements of the recent history of group participation in sustainable development and the emergence of focus on four areas, most significantly how participatory methods are used. In the absence of strong evidence to contrary we suggest that the issue of how participants engage in participation remains a significant weakness for the field. In order to counter the apparent gap we suggest that a certain degree of structure and process can provide the oeuvre of participatory approaches with a higher degree of transparency in the research process and, by focus on the use of a method called Triple Task, group participatory events can be encouraged to yield greater insights into the workings of groups of all kinds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Obstetric use of nitroglycerin: Anesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Saroa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitroglycerin has been used in anesthetic practice for induced hypotension and managing perioperative hypertension and myocardial ischemia. Contrary to the continuous low dose infusions (5-20 mcg/min used for the same, intravenous bolus dosages are sometimes administered at the behest of obstetricians for removal of retained placenta. Use of nitroglycerine in managing retained placenta is undertaken as a last resort when other measures fail to relax the uterine smooth muscles. Intravenous nitroglycerine relaxes smooth muscle cells by releasing nitric oxide thus causing prompt cervico-uterine relaxation. However, administration of nitroglycerine in this manner is not without risks which should be kept in mind while using it for obstetric purposes. We hereby report a case of 22-year-old female scheduled for manual removal of placenta where unpredictable and unexpected hypoxemia was observed following nitroglycerine administration.

  1. Warmed local anesthetic reduces pain of infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; McDougall, E P

    1996-01-01

    The effect of warming local anesthetic on the amount of pain experienced during local infiltration was tested by comparing equal volumes of 40 degrees C- and 21 degrees C-infiltrates in each of 26 subjects. Six subjects were patients undergoing excision of two benign asymptomatic nevi in separate locations, and 20 subjects were healthy adult volunteers who were injected in bilateral antebrachial sites. The warmed and room temperature solutions were randomized to each side, so that each subject received both temperature injections in random order. All subjects and the injector were blinded. The rate of injection was time-controlled (0.05 ml/sec). Following both injections, subjects were asked to rate the pain experienced at each site. In addition, the subject was asked if there was no difference, a slight difference, or a substantial difference between the two sites. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to analyze the mean difference in pain scores for all subjects. Paired analysis of the pain scores for each subject eliminated intersubject variance of pain tolerance. The mean difference in pain score between the room temperature and warmed solutions was +1.5 (p < 0.0001). Of the 21 subjects (81%) who found the warmed solution less painful, 11 (52%) found the difference to be significant, while 10 (48%) found the difference to be slight. Two subjects (8%) found no difference between the two, while 3 subjects (11%) found the colder solution slightly less painful. We conclude that warming local anesthetic to 40 degrees C prior to subcutaneous injection is a simple, inexpensive means of reducing the pain of local infiltration.

  2. Comparative analysis of assessment methods for operational and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to conduct a comparative analysis of methods of evaluation of surgical and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis ofthe extent of the surgical and anesthetic risks and results of treatment of 71 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding has been conducted in the study. To evaluate the surgical and anesthetic risks classification trees are used, scale ТА. Rockall and prognosis System of rebleeding (SPRK, proposed by N. V. Lebedev et al. in 2009, enabling to evaluate the probability of a fatal outcome. To compare the efficacy ofthe methods the following indicators are used: sensitivity, specificity and prediction of positive result. Results. The study compared the results ofthe risk assessment emergency operation by using these methods with the outcome ofthe operation. The comparison ofthe prognosis results in sensitivity leads to the conclusion that the scales ТА. Rockall and SPRK are worse than the developed method of classification trees in recognizing patients with poor outcome of surgery. Conclusion. The method of classification trees can be considered as the most accurate method of evaluation of surgical and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding.

  3. Increased Total Anesthetic Time Leads to Higher Rates of Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Murphy, Meghan; Maloney, Patrick; Kor, Daryl; Nassr, Ahmad; Freedman, Brett; Fogelson, Jeremy; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive series of spinal fusions comparing patient and procedural characteristics of patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal fusion. It is known that increased surgical time (incision to closure) is associated with a higher rate of postoperative SSIs. We sought to determine whether increased total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) is a factor in the development of SSIs as well. In spine surgery for deformity and degenerative disease, SSI has been associated with operative time, revealing a nearly 10-fold increase in SSI rates in prolonged surgery. Surgical time is associated with infections in other surgical disciplines as well. No studies have reported whether total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) has an association with SSIs. Surgical records were searched in a retrospective fashion to identify all spine fusion procedures performed between January 2010 and July 2012. All SSIs during that timeframe were recorded and compared with the list of cases performed between 2010 and 2012 in a case-control design. There were 20 (1.7%) SSIs in this fusion cohort. On univariate analyses of operative factors, there was a significant association between total anesthetic time (Infection 7.6 ± 0.5 hrs vs. no infection -6.0 ± 0.1 hrs, P operative time (infection 5.5 ± 0.4 hrs vs. no infection - 4.4 ± 0.06 hrs, P infections, whereas level of pathology and emergent surgery were not significant. On multivariate logistic analysis, BMI and total anesthetic time remained independent predictors of SSI whereas ASA status and operative time did not. Increasing BMI and total anesthetic time were independent predictors of SSIs in this cohort of over 1000 consecutive spinal fusions. 3.

  4. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  5. Technology Professional Development and Instructional Technology Integration among Part-Time Faculty at Illinois Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohani, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Illinois community college faculty development coordinators' perceptions about how they are implementing faculty technology professional development programs and providing technical support for part-time faculty in the Illinois community college systems. Also examined were part-time faculty perceptions of the degree…

  6. Comparison of anesthetic agents in the sea otter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.D.; Kocher, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Five anesthetic agents (CI744, etorphine, fentanyl, ketamine hydrochloride, and halothane) were tested to establish the dosage of a safe, effective, short-acting anesthetic for use in the sea otter. Etorphine, at a dosage of 0.75 mg per adult otter and used in conjunction with diazepam, at a dosage of 1.25 mg per adult otter, met most of the requirements for use under field conditions. Halothane, administered through an anesthetic machine, proved to be effective for use in a veterinary hospital.

  7. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  8. Interaction of Local Anesthetics with Biomembranes Consisting of Phospholipids and Cholesterol: Mechanistic and Clinical Implications for Anesthetic and Cardiotoxic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Tsuchiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a long history in medical and dental application, the molecular mechanism and precise site of action are still arguable for local anesthetics. Their effects are considered to be induced by acting on functional proteins, on membrane lipids, or on both. Local anesthetics primarily interact with sodium channels embedded in cell membranes to reduce the excitability of nerve cells and cardiomyocytes or produce a malfunction of the cardiovascular system. However, the membrane protein-interacting theory cannot explain all of the pharmacological and toxicological features of local anesthetics. The administered drug molecules must diffuse through the lipid barriers of nerve sheaths and penetrate into or across the lipid bilayers of cell membranes to reach the acting site on transmembrane proteins. Amphiphilic local anesthetics interact hydrophobically and electrostatically with lipid bilayers and modify their physicochemical property, with the direct inhibition of membrane functions, and with the resultant alteration of the membrane lipid environments surrounding transmembrane proteins and the subsequent protein conformational change, leading to the inhibition of channel functions. We review recent studies on the interaction of local anesthetics with biomembranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol. Understanding the membrane interactivity of local anesthetics would provide novel insights into their anesthetic and cardiotoxic effects.

  9. Marfan Syndrome: Clinical, Surgical, and Anesthetic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Silvay, George; Castillo, Javier G

    2014-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder, with primary involvement of the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. This autosomal heritable disease is mainly attributable to a defect in the FBN1 gene. Clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome has been based on the Ghent criteria since 1996. In 2010, these criteria were updated, and the revised guidelines place more emphasis on aortic root dilation, ectopia lentis, and FBN1 mutation testing in the diagnostic assessment of Marfan syndrome. Among its many different clinical manifestations, cardiovascular involvement deserves special consideration, owing to its impact on prognosis. Recent molecular, surgical, and clinical research has yielded profound new insights into the pathological mechanisms that ultimately lead to tissue degradation and weakening of the aortic wall, which has led to exciting new treatment strategies. Furthermore, with the increasing life expectancy of patients with Marfan syndrome, there has been a subtle shift in the spectrum of medical problems. Consequently, this article focuses on recent advances to highlight their potential impact on future concepts of patient care from a clinical, surgical, and anesthetic perspective. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Anesthetic considerations for awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Hamacek de Freitas

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The conscious patient cooperation during neurological procedures has become necessary for the delimitation of areas to be managed by a neurosurgeon, with better results in the treatment of tumor lesions, vascular or epileptic foci, and lesser sequelae. The need for perioperative awareness (responsiveness to commands challenges anesthesiologists to further ensure patient safety during the procedure. Several techniques have been described for this purpose. Case report: In this case, interaction with the patient during brain tumor resection enabled a broad approach of the tumor lesion, limited by deficits in speech and naming observed during surgical manipulation, avoiding major consequences. The chosen technique was deepening of general anesthesia during surgical times of most painful stimulus with intraoperative awakening of the patient. Conclusions: Patient selection, an exhaustive explanation of the procedure to him, and the selection of drugs are crucial for a successful procedure. Laryngeal mask is useful in times requiring greater depth and anesthetic ventilation control, primarily in situations where endotracheal intubation may be hindered by the position. The continuous infusion of remifentanil and adjuncts in the awake period associated adequate analgesia and full consciousness.

  11. Anesthetic considerations for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Sobey, Jenna H; Stickles, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is being used more frequently in the treatment of many chronic and acute psychiatric illnesses in children. The most common psychiatric indications for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy are refractory depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, catatonia, and autism. In addition, a relatively new indication is the treatment of pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The anesthesiologist may be called upon to assist in the care of this challenging and vulnerable patient population. Unique factors for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy include the potential need for preoperative anxiolytic and inhalational induction of anesthesia, which must be weighed against the detrimental effects of anesthetic agents on the evoked seizure quality required for a successful treatment. Dexmedetomidine is likely the most appropriate preoperative anxiolytic as oral benzodiazepines are relatively contraindicated. Methohexital, though becoming less available at many institutions, remains the gold standard for induction of anesthesia for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy though ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane are becoming increasingly viable options. Proper planning and communication between the multidisciplinary teams involved in the care of children presenting for electroconvulsive therapy treatments is vital to mitigating risks and achieving the greatest therapeutic benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topical anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniad, Baris; Canturk, Serife; Esin Ozdemir, Fatma; Alparslan, Nilufer; Akarcay, Koray

    2010-06-01

    To describe 8 cases of toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topical anesthetic drugs. Clinical findings from patients with toxic keratopathy were investigated retrospectively. Two patients had toxic keratopathy bilaterally. Five of 8 patients had an ocular history of a corneal foreign body, 1 had basal membrane dystrophy, 1 had ultraviolet radiation, and 1 had chemical burn. All patients had undergone psychiatric consultation. Four patients had anxiety disorder and 1 had bipolar disease. Clinical signs were improved in all patients with discontinuation of topical anesthetic drug use along with adjunctive psychiatric treatment. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in 2 patients. Toxic keratopathy due to topical anesthetic abuse is a curable disease. Early diagnosis and prevention of topical anesthetic drug use are the most important steps in the treatment of this condition. As these patients commonly exhibit psychiatric disorders, adjunctive psychiatric treatment may help to break the chemical addiction.

  13. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  14. Seeking Structural Specificity: Direct Modulation of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels by Alcohols and General Anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2014-01-01

    Alcohols and other anesthetic agents dramatically alter neurologic function in a wide range of organisms, yet their molecular sites of action remain poorly characterized. Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, long implicated in important direct effects of alcohol and anesthetic binding, have recently been illuminated in renewed detail thanks to the determination of atomic-resolution structures of several family members from lower organisms. These structures provide valuable models for understanding and developing anesthetic agents and for allosteric modulation in general. This review surveys progress in this field from function to structure and back again, outlining early evidence for relevant modulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and the development of early structural models for ion channel function and modulation. We highlight insights and challenges provided by recent crystal structures and resulting simulations, as well as opportunities for translation of these newly detailed models back to behavior and therapy. PMID:24515646

  15. Anesthetic and adjunctive drugs for fast-track surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, G; Carli, F

    2009-08-01

    With the changes in health care dictated by economic pressure, there has been a realization that hospital stay could be shortened without compromising quality of care. Advances in surgical technology and anesthetic drugs have made an impact in the way perioperative care is delivered with some emphasis on multidisciplinary approach. From the expansion of ambulatory care, lessons were learnt how to apply same concepts to major surgery with the understanding that interventions to attenuate the surgical stress would facilitate the return to "baseline". Beside minimal invasive approach to surgery, anesthesia interventions are arranged with the intent to decrease the negative effects of surgical stress and pain, to minimize the side effects of drugs and at the same time to facilitate the recuperation which follows after surgery. Fast-track or accelerated care encompasses many aspects of anesthesia care, not only preoperative preparation and prehabilitation, but intraoperative attenuation of surgical stress and postoperative rehabilitation. The anesthesiologist is part of this team with the specific mission to use medications and techniques which have the least side effects on organ functions, provide analgesia which in turn facilitates the intake of food and mobilization out of bed. This chapter has been conceived with the intention to direct the clinician towards procedure-specific protocols where the choice of medications and techniques is based on published evidence. The success of implementing fast-track depends more on dynamic harmony amongst the various participants (surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, nutrtionists, physiotherapists) than on reaching an optimum level of excellence at each separate organization level.

  16. Anesthetic Approach to a Child with Noonan's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is characterized by fascial and physical features along with congenital heart disease. In these patients, fascial features include short webbed neck, micrognathia, limited mouth opening and high arched palate. Pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are highly prevalent in Noonan's syndrome. The anesthetic management is important because of difficult airway and severe cardiac abnormalities. We reported that anesthetic management of a child with Noonan's syndrome. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 47-50

  17. Functional connectivity structure of cortical calcium dynamics in anesthetized and awake mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Patrick W; Brier, Lindsey M; Bauer, Adam Q; Baxter, Grant A; Kraft, Andrew W; Reisman, Matthew D; Bice, Annie R; Snyder, Abraham Z; Lee, Jin-Moo; Culver, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    The interplay between hemodynamic-based markers of cortical activity (e.g. fMRI and optical intrinsic signal imaging), which are an indirect and relatively slow report of neural activity, and underlying synaptic electrical and metabolic activity through neurovascular coupling is a topic of ongoing research and debate. As application of resting state functional connectivity measures is extended further into topics such as brain development, aging and disease, the importance of understanding the fundamental physiological basis for functional connectivity will grow. Here we extend functional connectivity analysis from hemodynamic- to calcium-based imaging. Transgenic mice (n = 7) expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator (GCaMP6) driven by the Thy1 promoter in glutamatergic neurons were imaged transcranially in both anesthetized (using ketamine/xylazine) and awake states. Sequential LED illumination (λ = 454, 523, 595, 640nm) enabled concurrent imaging of both GCaMP6 fluorescence emission (corrected for hemoglobin absorption) and hemodynamics. Functional connectivity network maps were constructed for infraslow (0.009-0.08Hz), intermediate (0.08-0.4Hz), and high (0.4-4.0Hz) frequency bands. At infraslow and intermediate frequencies, commonly used in BOLD fMRI and fcOIS studies of functional connectivity and implicated in neurovascular coupling mechanisms, GCaMP6 and HbO2 functional connectivity structures were in high agreement, both qualitatively and also quantitatively through a measure of spatial similarity. The spontaneous dynamics of both contrasts had the highest correlation when the GCaMP6 signal was delayed with a ~0.6-1.5s temporal offset. Within the higher-frequency delta band, sensitive to slow wave sleep oscillations in non-REM sleep and anesthesia, we evaluate the speed with which the connectivity analysis stabilized and found that the functional connectivity maps captured putative network structure within time window lengths as short as 30 seconds

  18. Development of loose part signal location estimating technique in high pressured structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Ill Keun; Choi, Jae Won; Kim, Yong Up; Kim, Taek Hwan; Song, Young Joong [Hannam University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The main purpose of this project is to develop the metallic loose parts monitoring and diagnosis technology. This will contribute to the development of the domestic technology, and, at the some time, to the development of related domestic industries. This study has been performed as 3-year-project,= to provide to basic requirements in developing the integrated and intelligent loose part monitoring and diagnosis system for Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The results from this project is expected to be applied to the development of the integrated and intelligent loose part monitoring and diagnosis system which can be used to analyze the main cause of the malfunctioning of the system under the worst circumstance - high temperature, high pressure and high speed of the flow of reactor coolant, with the efficient software package that could classify the characteristics of the metallic loose parts occurred inside the RPV of the nuclear steam supply system. (Author) 39 refs., 7 tabs., 74 figs.

  19. The use of compound topical anesthetics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Neal D

    2007-10-01

    The author reviewed the history of, federal regulations regarding, risks of and adverse drug reactions of five compound topical anesthetics: tetracaine, adrenaline/epinephrine and cocaine (TAC); lidocaine, adrenaline/epinephrine and tetracaine (LET); lidocaine, tetracaine and phenylephrine (TAC 20 percent Alternate); lidocaine, prilocaine and tetracaine (Profound); and lidocaine, prilocaine, tetracaine and phenylephrine with thickeners (Profound PET). The author reviewed clinical trials, case reports, descriptive articles, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations and recent public advisory warnings regarding the federal approval of and risks associated with the use of compound topical anesthetics. Compound topical anesthetics are neither FDA-regulated nor -unregulated. Some compounding pharmacies bypass the new FDA drug approval process, which is based on reliable scientific data and ensures that a marketed drug is safe, effective, properly manufactured and accurately labeled. Two deaths have been attributed to the lay use of compound topical anesthetics. In response, the FDA has announced the strengthening of its efforts against unapproved drug products. Compound topical anesthetics may be an effective alternative to local infiltration for some minimally invasive dental procedures; however, legitimate concerns exist in regard to their safety. Until they become federally regulated, compound topical anesthetics remain unapproved drug products whose benefits may not outweigh their risks for dental patients.

  20. Integrating Environmental Decisions into the Product Development Process: Part 2 - The Later Stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poole, S.; Simon, M; Sweatman, A.

    1999-01-01

    , Central Europe, and the USA are carrying out ecodesign. The survey also investigated the successes and failures that compnies have experienced and the lessons learned along the way. Part 1 of this two-part paper focuses on the early stages of the product development process. It shows how products can...

  1. Formation and development of a breaker bar under regular waves. Part 2: Sediment transport and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In Part 2 of this work, the hydrodynamic model described in Part 1 is applied for the simulation of sediment transport and the associated morphological development of breaker bars. The sediment description is split into bed load and suspended load, and like the hydrodynamics the sediment transport...

  2. Fostering Professional Nursing Careers in Hospitals: The Role of Staff Development, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovie, Margaret D.

    1983-01-01

    Building on the model of professional nursing careers presented in Part 1, the author discusses the aspects of professional maturation and professional mastery, focusing on the vital role of staff development for career advancement. (SK)

  3. Winter University 2017. Urban rivers as a part of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Nuyanzina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents proposals worked out by the international teams that took part in the 18th session of International Baikal Winter University of Urban Planning. The session focused on small rivers rehabilitation as a part of sustainable development. Through the case study of the Ushakovka River in Irkutsk, the teams proposed new ideas of riverfront development, which can be also applied to other small rivers.

  4. Thrombotic stroke in the anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta): characterization by MRI - A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauberti, Maxime; Gakuba, Clement; Orset, Cyrille; Obiang, Pauline; Guedin, Pierre; Balossier, Anne; Diependaele, Anne-Sophie; Young, Alan R.; Agin, Veronique; Chazalviel, Laurent; Vivien, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The lack of a relevant stroke model in large nonhuman primates hinders the development of innovative diagnostic/therapeutic approaches concerned with this cerebrovascular disease. Our objective was to develop a novel and clinically relevant model of embolic stroke in the anesthetized monkey that incorporates readily available clinical imaging techniques and that would allow the possibility of drug delivery including strategies of reperfusion. Thrombin was injected into the lumen of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in 12 anesthetized (sevoflurane) male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Sequential MRI studies (including angiography, FLAIR, PWI, DWI, and gadolinium-enhanced T1W imaging) were performed in a 3 T clinical MRI. Physiological and biochemical parameters were monitored throughout the investigations. Once standardized, the surgical procedure induced transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in all operated animals. All animals studied showed spontaneous reperfusion, which occurred some time between 2 h and 7 days post-ictus. Eighty percent of the studied animals showed diffusion/perfusion mismatch. The ischemic lesions at 24 h spared both superficial and profound territories of the MCA. Some animals presented hemorrhagic transformation at 7 days post-ictus. In this study, we developed a pre-clinically relevant model of embolic stroke in the anesthetized nonhuman primate. (authors)

  5. Market Size and Innovation: Effects of Medicare Part D on Pharmaceutical Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E; Sood, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that Medicare Part D increased prescription drug use among seniors, and increased pharmaceutical firms' revenues from sales. Previous studies also indicate that increases in market size induce pharmaceutical innovation. This paper assesses the impact of the Medicare Part D legislation on pharmaceutical research and development (R&D), using time-series data on the number of drugs entering preclinical and clinical development by therapeutic class and phase. We find that the passage and implementation of Medicare Part D is associated with significant increases in pharmaceutical R&D for therapeutic classes with higher Medicare market share.

  6. Early exposure to volatile anesthetics impairs long-term associative learning and recognition memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley H Lee

    Full Text Available Anesthetic exposure early in life affects neural development and long-term cognitive function, but our understanding of the types of memory that are altered is incomplete. Specific cognitive tests in rodents that isolate different memory processes provide a useful approach for gaining insight into this issue.Postnatal day 7 (P7 rats were exposed to either desflurane or isoflurane at 1 Minimum Alveolar Concentration for 4 h. Acute neuronal death was assessed 12 h later in the thalamus, CA1-3 regions of hippocampus, and dentate gyrus. In separate behavioral experiments, beginning at P48, subjects were evaluated in a series of object recognition tests relying on associative learning, as well as social recognition.Exposure to either anesthetic led to a significant increase in neuroapoptosis in each brain region. The extent of neuronal death did not differ between groups. Subjects were unaffected in simple tasks of novel object and object-location recognition. However, anesthetized animals from both groups were impaired in allocentric object-location memory and a more complex task requiring subjects to associate an object with its location and contextual setting. Isoflurane exposure led to additional impairment in object-context association and social memory.Isoflurane and desflurane exposure during development result in deficits in tasks relying on associative learning and recognition memory. Isoflurane may potentially cause worse impairment than desflurane.

  7. ACCURACY OF NONINVASIVE ANESTHETIC MONITORING IN THE ANESTHETIZED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Stegmann, George F

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure during general anesthesia in giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). Thirty-two giraffes anesthetized for physiologic experiments were instrumented with a pulse oximeter transmittance probe positioned...... on the tongue and a capnograph sampling line placed at the oral end of the endotracheal tube. A human size 10 blood pressure cuff was placed around the base of the tail, and an indwelling arterial catheter in the auricular artery continuously measured blood pressure. Giraffes were intermittently ventilated...... using a Hudson demand valve throughout the procedures. Arterial blood for blood gas analysis was collected at multiple time points. Relationships between oxygen saturation as determined by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation, between arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and end...

  8. A novel approach to scavenging anesthetic gases in rodent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jeffrey C; Krageschmidt, Dale A; Blanco, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory animal procedures using gas anesthetics may amass elevated waste gas concentrations in operating rooms if controls are not implemented for capturing and removing the vapors. Area sampling using an infrared analyzer indicated isoflurane concentrations likely to exceed occupational exposure guidelines. Our study showed environmental concentrations of oxygen as high as 40% and isoflurane concentrations >100 ppm when no controls or merely passive controls were utilized. These extraneous isoflurane emissions were determined to be originating from the pre-procedural induction process as well as the gas delivery nose cone. A novel waste gas collection cylinder was designed to enclose the gas delivery nose cone and animal head during the administration of anesthetic gases. The vented cylinder utilized a house vacuum to remove the waste anesthetic gases from the surgical field. A commercially available induction chamber designed to be actively and externally exhausted was used to lower concentrations during the induction process. With implementation of local exhaust ventilation controls, waste anesthetic gas concentrations decreased to below recommended occupational exposure levels. In vitro (sham) testing compared favorably to in vivo measurements validating the reduction capability of active ventilation during rodent anesthetic administration. In vivo isoflurane reductions for the induction chamber emissions, the operating room, and the surgeon's breathing zone were 95%, 60%, and 53%, respectively. The same measurements for an in vitro procedure were 98%, 84%, and 87%, respectively.

  9. Economic considerations in the use of inhaled anesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golembiewski, Julie

    2010-04-15

    To describe the components of and factors contributing to the costs of inhaled anesthesia, basis for quantifying and comparing these costs, and practical strategies for performing pharmacoeconomic analyses and reducing the costs of inhaled anesthetic agents. Inhaled anesthesia can be costly, and some of the variable costs, including fresh gas flow rates and vaporizer settings, are potential targets for cost savings. The use of a low fresh gas flow rate maximizes rebreathing of exhaled anesthetic gas and is less costly than a high flow rate, but it provides less control of the level of anesthesia. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) hour is a measure that can be used to compare the cost of inhaled anesthetic agents at various fresh gas flow rates. Anesthesia records provide a sense of patterns of inhaled anesthetic agent use, but the amount of detail can be limited. Cost savings have resulted from efforts to reduce the direct costs of inhaled anesthetic agents, but reductions in indirect costs through shortened times to patient recovery and discharge following the judicious use of these agents are more difficult to demonstrate. The patient case mix, fresh gas flow rates typically used during inhaled anesthesia, availability and location of vaporizers, and anesthesia care provider preferences and practices should be taken into consideration in pharmacoeconomic evaluations and recommendations for controlling the costs of inhaled anesthesia. Understanding factors that contribute to the costs of inhaled anesthesia and considering those factors in pharmacoeconomic analyses and recommendations for use of these agents can result in cost savings.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE LASER SCANNER FOR GEOMETRICAL VERIFICATION OF METALLIC AND PLASTIC PARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Fisker, Rune

    2008-01-01

    and plastic parts. A first prototype of the novel measuring system has been developed, using laser triangulation. The system, besides ensuring the automatic reconstruction of complete surface models, has been designed to guarantee user-friendliness, versatility, reliability and speed. The paper focuses mainly...... on the metrological aspects of the system development. Details are given on procedures and artefacts developed for metrological performance verification and traceability establishment. Experimental results from measurements on metallic and plastic parts show that the system prototype is capable of performing...

  11. Use of configuration management to reduce development costs in metal parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsoom, T.; Ahmad, S.

    2005-01-01

    In development and manufacturing phases of metal parts, design efforts are converted in set of engineering data pack under the given guidelines of Configuration Management (CM). These engineering documents define Configuration Management of metal parts production in a local industry. The development phase is normally less structured and open to Engineering Change Proposals. In our local engineering organizations most of the work done is normally not well documented for future revisions and modernization. This leads to delays in development and increase in production costs of metal parts. This becomes more pronounced if any member of the design team disassociates and leaves the organization. The Configuration Management helps to reduce development costs by providing infrastructure for product identification, documentation, change control, interface control and technical reviews and product audits. Automated or Computer-Assisted CM activities can also be used to shorten response time and increase accuracy and reliability of the produced metal components. (author)

  12. Developing and Using Ada Parts in Real-Time Embedded Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-27

    ARCHTECTURAL DESIGN Guideline #3-a: Avoid duplication of data types packages. Guideline #3-b: Minimize variant proliferation. Concentrate on developing a...of SOFTWARE REUSE DEVELOPING and USING ADA PARTS in RTE APPUCATIONS ARCHTECTURAL DESIGN Table 5-10 illustrates the use of this more strongly data typed

  13. Exploring Part-Time Teacher Professional Development and Best Practices on Adult Learners' Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sandra K.

    2017-01-01

    The issue of limited part-time teacher professional development and its effect on adult learners' success at an adult education center in the northeast United States was addressed in this study. At the research site, almost 50% of the teaching staff are adjuncts. Professional development opportunities have been limited, with only 1 opportunity…

  14. [Comparison of waste anesthetic gases in operating rooms with or without an scavenging system in a Brazilian University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Cavalcante, Guilherme Aparecido Silva; Souza, Kátina Meneghetti; Lucio, Lorena Mendes de Carvalho; Braz, Mariana Gobbo

    Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gases in operating room (OR) without active scavenging system has been associated with adverse health effects. Thus, this study aimed to compare the trace concentrations of the inhaled anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane in OR with and without central scavenging system. Waste concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane were measured by infrared analyzer at different locations (near the respiratory area of the assistant nurse and anesthesiologist and near the anesthesia station) and at two times (30 and 120minutes after the start of surgery) in both OR types. All isoflurane and sevoflurane concentrations in unscavenged OR were higher than the US recommended limit (2 parts per million), regardless of the location and time evaluated. In scavenged OR, the average concentrations of isoflurane were within the limit of exposure, except for the measurements near the anesthesia station, regardless of the measurement times. For sevoflurane, concentrations exceeded the limit value at all measurement locations and at both times. The exposure to both anesthetics exceeded the international limit in unscavenged OR. In scavenged OR, the concentrations of sevoflurane, and to a lesser extent those of isoflurane, exceeded the recommended limit value. Thus, the OR scavenging system analyzed in the present study decreased the anesthetic concentrations, although not to the internationally recommended values. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, Deborah P.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Allemano, Justin; Bossi, Paolo; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; Rao, Nikhil G.; Potting, Carin; Cheng, Karis K.; Freidank, Annette; Brennan, Michael T.; Bowen, Joanne; Dennis, Kristopher; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted. The body

  16. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was

  17. Assessment of occupational exposure of medical personnel to inhalatory anesthetics in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kucharska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Despite common use of inhalatory anesthetics, such as nitrous oxide (N2O, halothane, sevoflurane, and the like, occupational exposure to these substances in operating theatres was not monitored in Poland until 2006. The situation changed when maximum admissible concentration (MAC values for anesthetics used in Poland were established in 2005 for N2O, and in 2007 for sevoflurane, desflurane and isoflurane. The aim of this work was to assess occupational exposure in operating rooms on the basis of reliable and uniform analytical procedures. Material and Methods: The method for the determination of all anesthetics used in Poland, i.e. nitrous oxide, sevoflurane, isoflurane, desflurane, and halothane, was developed and validated. The measurements were performed in 2006-2010 in 31 hospitals countrywide. The study covered 117 operating rooms; air samples were collected from the breathing zone of 146 anesthesiologists, and 154 nurses, mostly anaesthetic. The measurements were carried out during various surgical operations, mostly on adult patients but also in hospitals for children. Results: Time weighted average concentrations of the anesthetics varied considerably, and the greatest differences were noted for N2O (0.1-1438.5 mg/m3; 40% of the results exceeded the MAC value. Only 3% of halothane, and 2% of sevoflurane concentrations exceeded the respective MAC values. Conclusions: Working in operating theatres is dangerous to the health of the operating staff. The coefficient of combined exposure to anesthesiologists under study exceeded the admissible value in 130 cases, which makes over 40% of the whole study population. Most of the excessive exposure values were noted for nitrous oxide. Med Pr 2014;65(1:43–54

  18. Qualitative evaluation of coronary flow during anesthetic induction using thallium-201 perfusion scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, B.; Henkin, R.E.; Glisson, S.N.; el-Etr, A.A.; Bakhos, M.; Sullivan, H.J.; Montoya, A.; Pifarre, R.

    1986-02-01

    Qualitative distribution of coronary flow using thallium-201 perfusion scans immediately postintubation was studied in 22 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Ten patients received a thiopental (4 mg/kg) and halothane induction. Twelve patients received a fentanyl (100 micrograms/kg) induction. Baseline thallium-201 perfusion scans were performed 24 h prior to surgery. These scans were compared with the scans performed postintubation. A thallium-positive scan was accepted as evidence of relative hypoperfusion. Baseline hemodynamic and ECG data were obtained prior to induction of anesthesia. These data were compared with the data obtained postintubation. Ten patients developed postintubation thallium-perfusion scan defects (thallium-positive scan), even though there was no statistical difference between their baseline hemodynamics and hemodynamics at the time of intubation. There was no difference in the incidence of thallium-positive scans between those patients anesthetized by fentanyl and those patients anesthetized with thiopental-halothane. The authors conclude that relative hypoperfusion, and possibly ischemia, occurred in 45% of patients studied, despite stable hemodynamics, and that the incidence of these events was the same with two different anesthetic techniques.

  19. Qualitative evaluation of coronary flow during anesthetic induction using thallium-201 perfusion scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinman, B.; Henkin, R.E.; Glisson, S.N.; el-Etr, A.A.; Bakhos, M.; Sullivan, H.J.; Montoya, A.; Pifarre, R.

    1986-01-01

    Qualitative distribution of coronary flow using thallium-201 perfusion scans immediately postintubation was studied in 22 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Ten patients received a thiopental (4 mg/kg) and halothane induction. Twelve patients received a fentanyl (100 micrograms/kg) induction. Baseline thallium-201 perfusion scans were performed 24 h prior to surgery. These scans were compared with the scans performed postintubation. A thallium-positive scan was accepted as evidence of relative hypoperfusion. Baseline hemodynamic and ECG data were obtained prior to induction of anesthesia. These data were compared with the data obtained postintubation. Ten patients developed postintubation thallium-perfusion scan defects (thallium-positive scan), even though there was no statistical difference between their baseline hemodynamics and hemodynamics at the time of intubation. There was no difference in the incidence of thallium-positive scans between those patients anesthetized by fentanyl and those patients anesthetized with thiopental-halothane. The authors conclude that relative hypoperfusion, and possibly ischemia, occurred in 45% of patients studied, despite stable hemodynamics, and that the incidence of these events was the same with two different anesthetic techniques

  20. Preparation and evaluation of bioadhesive benzocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Lee, Jin-Woo; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Chi H

    2003-07-09

    This study was performed to develop new enhanced anesthetic benzocaine gels with a suitable bioadhesive property for local anesthetic effects. As the concentration of benzocaine in the HPMC gels increased up to 15%, the permeation of drug increased, thereafter slightly increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 11.29 kcal/mol. Bioadhesive forces were also measured. The permeation rate of drug through the skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants or fatty acids. Among the enhancers used, diethylene glycol showed the most enhancing effects. Analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. According to the rat tail-flick test, the value of AUEC (0 - 360min) of 15% benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol was 4662 +/- 200 s min, while that of gels without diethylene glycol was 3353 +/- 132 s min, showing about 1.39-fold increase in analgesic activity. Fifteen percentage of benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol showed the most enhanced, prolonged analgesic effects, showing the maximum anesthetic effects at 240 min, while the gels without diethylene glycol showed maximum effect at 180 min.

  1. Photoacoustic microscopy of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic responses to anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Li, Jun; Ning, Bo; Sun, Naidi; Wang, Tianxiong; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    General anesthetics are known to have profound effects on cerebral hemodynamics and neuronal activities. However, it remains a challenge to directly assess anesthetics-induced hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic changes from the true baseline under wakefulness at the microscopic level, due to the lack of an enabling technology for high-resolution functional imaging of the awake mouse brain. To address this challenge, we have developed head-restrained photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which enables simultaneous imaging of the cerebrovascular anatomy, total concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (CHb and sO2), and blood flow in awake mice. From these hemodynamic measurements, two important metabolic parameters, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), can be derived. Side-by-side comparison of the mouse brain under wakefulness and anesthesia revealed multifaceted cerebral responses to isoflurane, a volatile anesthetic widely used in preclinical research and clinical practice. Key observations include elevated cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduced oxygen extraction and metabolism.

  2. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Gorlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine′s metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain.

  3. Long-term athletic development- part 1: a pathway for all youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Howard, Rick; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Williams, Craig A; Best, Thomas M; Alvar, Brent A; Micheli, Lyle J; Thomas, D Phillip; Hatfield, Disa L; Cronin, John B; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-05-01

    The concept of developing talent and athleticism in youth is the goal of many coaches and sports systems. Consequently, an increasing number of sporting organizations have adopted long-term athletic development models in an attempt to provide a structured approach to the training of youth. It is clear that maximizing sporting talent is an important goal of long-term athletic development models. However, ensuring that youth of all ages and abilities are provided with a strategic plan for the development of their health and physical fitness is also important to maximize physical activity participation rates, reduce the risk of sport- and activity-related injury, and to ensure long-term health and well-being. Critical reviews of independent models of long-term athletic development are already present within the literature; however, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive examination and review of the most prominent models does not exist. Additionally, considerations of modern day issues that may impact on the success of any long-term athletic development model are lacking, as are proposed solutions to address such issues. Therefore, within this 2-part commentary, Part 1 provides a critical review of existing models of practice for long-term athletic development and introduces a composite youth development model that includes the integration of talent, psychosocial and physical development across maturation. Part 2 identifies limiting factors that may restrict the success of such models and offers potential solutions.

  4. Topical anesthetic versus lidocaine infiltration in arteriovenous fistula cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: End stage renal disease (ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergo arterio-venous fistula (AVF cannulation prior to each hemodialysis session for blood access. Prior to cannulation lidocaine infiltration is done, which is often perceived as painful. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA has been found to significantly reduce pain associated with radial artery cannulation compared with lidocaine infiltration. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of EMLA compared to infiltration of lidocaine in hemodialysis patients for AVF cannulation. Materials and Methods: A single-centre, crossover study of patients with an AVF on regular maintenance hemodialysis was performed in the dialysis unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. The site of AVF, number of attempts for AVF cannulation and cannula insertion time were recorded. The patients were asked about the acceptability of application of the anesthetic, delay between anesthetic and cannulation and to score the pain on cannulation. Results: Fifty patients were included in the study. With the visual analog scale, pain score on infiltration was 4.8. Pain score on cannulation after topical application was 2.9 and after infiltration, 2.0. The number of attempts for cannulation and the cannula insertion time were similar. Anesthesia was more stressful in the injectable group rather than the topical group (P < 0.001. Delay between anesthetic and cannulation was unacceptable in the topical group (P < 0.001. Patient compliance was better during infiltration compared to topical (P < 0.005. Mean pain score during infiltration of anesthetic was significantly higher than cannulation pain after either anesthetic, although pain on cannulation was higher in the topical group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: EMLA offers a suitable alternative to lidocaine infiltration for patients using AVF for blood access.

  5. Detomidine reduces isoflurane anesthetic requirement (MAC) in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffey, Eugene P; Pascoe, Peter J

    2002-10-01

    To quantitate the dose- and time-related magnitude of the anesthetic sparing effect of, and selected physiological responses to detomidine during isoflurane anesthesia in horses. Randomized cross-over study. Three, healthy, young adult horses weighing 485 ± 14 kg. Horses were anesthetized on two occasions to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in O 2 and then to measure the anesthetic sparing effect (time-related MAC reduction) following IV detomidine (0.03 and 0.06 mg kg -1 ). Selected common measures of cardiopulmonary function, blood glucose and urinary output were also recorded. Isoflurane MAC was 1.44 ± 0.07% (mean ± SEM). This was reduced by 42.8 ± 5.4% and 44.8 ± 3.0% at 83 ± 23 and 125 ± 36 minutes, respectively, following 0.03 and 0.06 mg kg -1 , detomidine. The MAC reduction was detomidine dose- and time-dependent. There was a tendency for mild cardiovascular and respiratory depression, especially following the higher detomidine dose. Detomidine increased both blood glucose and urine flow; the magnitude of these changes was time- and dose-dependent CONCLUSIONS: Detomidine reduces anesthetic requirement for isoflurane and increases blood glucose concentration and urine flow in horses. These changes were dose- and time-related. The results imply potent anesthetic sparing actions by detomidine. The detomidine-related increased urine flow should be considered in designing anesthetic protocols for individual horses. Copyright © 2002 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anesthetic considerations for awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Hamacek de Freitas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The conscious patient cooperation during neurological procedures has become necessary for the delimitation of areas to be managed by a neurosurgeon, with better results in the treatment of tumor lesions, vascular or epileptic foci, and lesser sequelae. The need for perioperative awareness (responsiveness to commands challenges anesthesiologists to further ensure patient safety during the procedure. Several techniques have been described for this purpose. Case report: In this case, interaction with the patient during brain tumor resection enabled a broad approach of the tumor lesion, limited by deficits in speech and naming observed during surgical manipulation, avoiding major consequences. The chosen technique was deepening of general anesthesia during surgical times of most painful stimulus with intraoperative awakening of the patient. Conclusions: Patient selection, an exhaustive explanation of the procedure to him, and the selection of drugs are crucial for a successful procedure. Laryngeal mask is useful in times requiring greater depth and anesthetic ventilation control, primarily in situations where endotracheal intubation may be hindered by the position. The continuous infusion of remifentanil and adjuncts in the awake period associated adequate analgesia and full consciousness. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: A colaboração consciente do paciente durante procedimentos neurológicos tem se tornado necessária para delimitar áreas a serem abordadas pelo neurocirurgião, com melhores resultados no tratamento de lesões tumorais, vasculares ou focos epiléticos e minimização de sequelas. A necessidade de consciência perioperatória e responsividade a comandos desafia o anestesiologista a garantir ainda a segurança do paciente durante o procedimento. Várias técnicas têm sido descritas para esse fim. Relato de caso: No presente caso, a interação com paciente durante ressecção de tumor cerebral

  7. Differential effects of gaseous versus injectable anesthetics on changes in regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by l-DOPA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpisidis, Zisis; Öberg, Carl M; Maslava, Natallia; Cenci, M Angela; Lundblad, Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of brain activity requires the use of anesthesia. In this study, we have compared the effects of two widely used anesthetics, inhaled isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine cocktail, on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Specific tracers were used to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF - [ 14 C]-iodoantipyrine) and regional cerebral metabolic rate (rCMR - [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose) with a highly sensitive autoradiographic method. The two types of anesthetics had quite distinct effects on l-DOPA-induced changes in rCBF and rCMR. Isoflurane did not affect either the absolute rCBF values or the increases in rCBF in the basal ganglia after l-DOPA administration. On the contrary, rats anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine showed lower absolute rCBF values, and the rCBF increases induced by l-DOPA were masked. We developed a novel improved model to calculate rCMR, and found lower metabolic activities in rats anesthetized with isoflurane compared to animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Both anesthetics prevented changes in rCMR upon l-DOPA administration. Pharmacological challenges in isoflurane-anesthetized rats indicated that drugs mimicking the actions of ketamine/xylazine on adrenergic or glutamate receptors reproduced distinct effects of the injectable anesthetics on rCBF and rCMR. Our results highlight the importance of anesthesia in studies of cerebral flow and metabolism, and provide novel insights into mechanisms mediating abnormal neurovascular responses to l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jodi; Le, Cathy; Lamers, Vanessa; Eckelman, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Anesthesiologists must consider the entire life cycle of drugs in order to include environmental impacts into clinical decisions. In the present study we used life cycle assessment to examine the climate change impacts of 5 anesthetic drugs: sevoflurane, desflurane, isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and propofol. A full cradle-to-grave approach was used, encompassing resource extraction, drug manufacturing, transport to health care facilities, drug delivery to the patient, and disposal or emission to the environment. At each stage of the life cycle, energy, material inputs, and emissions were considered, as well as use-specific impacts of each drug. The 4 inhalation anesthetics are greenhouse gases (GHGs), and so life cycle GHG emissions include waste anesthetic gases vented to the atmosphere and emissions (largely carbon dioxide) that arise from other life cycle stages. Desflurane accounts for the largest life cycle GHG impact among the anesthetic drugs considered here: 15 times that of isoflurane and 20 times that of sevoflurane on a per MAC-hour basis when administered in an O(2)/air admixture. GHG emissions increase significantly for all drugs when administered in an N(2)O/O(2) admixture. For all of the inhalation anesthetics, GHG impacts are dominated by uncontrolled emissions of waste anesthetic gases. GHG impacts of propofol are comparatively quite small, nearly 4 orders of magnitude lower than those of desflurane or nitrous oxide. Unlike the inhaled drugs, the GHG impacts of propofol primarily stem from the electricity required for the syringe pump and not from drug production or direct release to the environment. Our results reiterate previous published data on the GHG effects of these inhaled drugs, while providing a life cycle context. There are several practical environmental impact mitigation strategies. Desflurane and nitrous oxide should be restricted to cases where they may reduce morbidity and mortality over alternative drugs. Clinicians should avoid

  9. Development of estimation algorithm of loose parts and analysis of impact test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Soo; Ham, Chang Sik; Jung, Chul Hwan; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Tak Hwane; Kim, Tae Hwane; Park, Jin Ho

    1999-11-01

    Loose parts are produced by being parted from the structure of the reactor coolant system or by coming into RCS from the outside during test operation, refueling, and overhaul time. These loose parts are mixed with reactor coolant fluid and collide with RCS components. When loose parts are occurred within RCS, it is necessary to estimate the impact point and the mass of loose parts. In this report an analysis algorithm for the estimation of the impact point and mass of loose part is developed. The developed algorithm was tested with the impact test data of Yonggwang-3. The estimated impact point using the proposed algorithm in this report had 5 percent error to the real test data. The estimated mass was analyzed within 28 percent error bound using the same unit's data. We analyzed the characteristic frequency of each sensor because this frequency effected the estimation of impact point and mass. The characteristic frequency of the background noise during normal operation was compared with that of the impact test data. The result of the comparison illustrated that the characteristic frequency bandwidth of the impact test data was lower than that of the background noise during normal operation. by the comparison, the integrity of sensor and monitoring system could be checked, too. (author)

  10. Application of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the development of space flight parts approval model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Govindarajapuram Subramaniam

    1997-12-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) missions involve the performance of scientific experiments in Space. Instruments used in such experiments are fabricated using electronic parts such as microcircuits, inductors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, etc. For instruments to perform reliably the selection of commercial parts must be monitored and strictly controlled. The process used to achieve this goal is by a manual review and approval of every part used to build the instrument. The present system to select and approve parts for space applications is manual, inefficient, inconsistent, slow and tedious, and very costly. In this dissertation a computer based decision support model is developed for implementing this process using artificial intelligence concepts based on the current information (expert sources). Such a model would result in a greater consistency, accuracy, and timeliness of evaluation. This study presents the methodology of development and features of the model, and the analysis of the data pertaining to the performance of the model in the field. The model was evaluated for three different part types by experts from three different space agencies. The results show that the model was more consistent than the manual evaluation for all part types considered. The study concludes with the cost and benefits analysis of implementing the models and shows that implementation of the model will result in significant cost savings. Other implementation details are highlighted.

  11. Validation of the bispectral index as an indicator of anesthetic depth in Thoroughbred horses anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokushige, Hirotaka; Kakizaki, Masashi; Ode, Hirotaka; Okano, Atsushi; Okada, Jun; Kuroda, Taisuke; Wakuno, Ai; Ohta, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the bispectral index (BIS) as an indicator of anesthetic depth in Thoroughbred horses, BIS values were measured at multiple stages of sevoflurane anesthesia in five horses anesthetized with guaifenesin and thiopental following premedication with xylazine. There was no significant difference between the BIS values recorded at end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations of 2.8% (median 60 ranging from 47 to 68) and 3.5% (median 71 ranging from 49 to 82) in anesthetized horses. These BIS values during anesthesia were significantly lower (Phorses (median 98 ranging from 98 to 98) or sedated horses (median 92 ranging from 80 to 93). During the recovery phase, the BIS values gradually increased over time but did not significantly increase until the horses showed movement. In conclusion, the BIS value could be useful as an indicator of awakening during the recovery period in horses, as previous reported.

  12. Development of remote sensing technology in New Zealand, part 1. Mapping land use and environmental studies in New Zealand, part 2. Indigenous forest assessment, part 3. Seismotectonic, structural, volcanologic and geomorphic study of New Zealand, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probine, M. C.; Suggate, R. P.; Stirling, I. F.; Mcgreevy, M. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. As part of the tape reformatting process, a simple coded picture output program was developed. This represents Pixel's radiance level by one of a 47 character set on a nonoverprinting line printer. It not only has aided in locating areas for the reformatting process, but has also formed the foundation for a supervised clustering package. This in turn has led to a simplistic but effective thematic mapping package.

  13. The Tyndall decarbonisation scenarios-Part I: Development of a backcasting methodology with stakeholder participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mander, Sarah L.; Bows, Alice; Anderson, Kevin L.; Shackley, Simon; Agnolucci, Paolo; Ekins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The Tyndall decarbonisation scenarios project has outlined alternative pathways whereby a 60% reduction in CO 2 emissions from 1990 levels by 2050, a goal adopted by the UK Government, can be achieved. This paper, Part I of a two part paper, describes the methodology used to develop the scenarios and outlines the motivations for the project. The study utilised a backcasting approach, applied in three phases. In phase one, a set of credible and consistent end-points that described a substantially decarbonised energy system in 2050 were generated and reviewed by stakeholders. In phase two, pathways were developed to achieve the transition to the desired end-point. The impacts of the scenarios were assessed in phase three, by means of a deliberative multi-criteria assessment framework. The scenarios to emerge from this process are elaborated in Part II, and conclusions drawn in relation to the feasibility of achieving the 60% target

  14. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2003-01-01

    The paper is the forth part of a short history of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The activities concerning the radioactive waste management are reviewed as well as the research and development programs in the sciences related to nuclear energy. (author)

  15. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2003-01-01

    The paper is the fifth part of a short history of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The activities concerning the development of the institutional infrastructure and the education and training activities are reviewed as well as the legal and regulatory aspects of nuclear energy in Argentina. (author)

  16. "Scaffolding" of Action Learning within a Part-Time Management Development Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesbury, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This Account of Practice describes the introduction and development of action learning within a level 5 module of "Communications at Work" delivered as part of a Business & Technology Education Council (BTEC) Professional Certificate in Management (CMS) between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. This will commence with a personal narrative and…

  17. Development of contour scanning parameters to improve surface finishing of additive manufactured parts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hoosain, Shaik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire or sheets in a process that proceeds layer by layer. Many techniques have been developed to accomplish this via melting...

  18. Peer coaching as part of a professional development program for science teachers in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Annette; van den Berg, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a study into the potentials of peer coaching as part of a professional development program, consisting of an in-service course and exemplary curriculum materials, in supporting the implementation of learner-centred teaching in senior secondary science and

  19. Sustainable energy development as an integral part of hydroelectric business management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.; Yu, M.; Young, C.

    1996-01-01

    Elements of Ontario Hydro's strategy for sustainable energy development were discussed, highlighting key developments in the business management practices in Ontario Hydro's Hydroelectric Business Unit. Sustainable development considerations are now integral part of any business case analysis; management of the environment also has been integrated into the Utilities' business management process. Several environmental management practices intended to enhance sustainability have been introduced, including a full-fledged environmental management system based on ISO 14001 standards. Energy efficiency opportunities are aggressively pursued, including turbine upgrades, and energy efficient lighting. Experience to date indicates that business performance and progress towards sustainable energy development need not be mutually exclusive

  20. Process development for green part printing using binder jetting additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Orth, Morgan; Akbar, Junaid Muhammad; Yang, Li

    2018-05-01

    Originally developed decades ago, the binder jetting additive manufacturing (BJ-AM) process possesses various advantages compared to other additive manufacturing (AM) technologies such as broad material compatibility and technological expandability. However, the adoption of BJ-AM has been limited by the lack of knowledge with the fundamental understanding of the process principles and characteristics, as well as the relatively few systematic design guideline that are available. In this work, the process design considerations for BJ-AM in green part fabrication were discussed in detail in order to provide a comprehensive perspective of the design for additive manufacturing for the process. Various process factors, including binder saturation, in-process drying, powder spreading, powder feedstock characteristics, binder characteristics and post-process curing, could significantly affect the printing quality of the green parts such as geometrical accuracy and part integrity. For powder feedstock with low flowability, even though process parameters could be optimized to partially offset the printing feasibility issue, the qualities of the green parts will be intrinsically limited due to the existence of large internal voids that are inaccessible to the binder. In addition, during the process development, the balanced combination between the saturation level and in-process drying is of critical importance in the quality control of the green parts.

  1. Making mental health an integral part of sustainable development: the contribution of a social determinants framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, M J

    2015-04-01

    There have been repeated calls to include mental health in the sustainable development goals (SDGs), arguing that progress in development will not be made without improvements in mental health. Although these calls are starting to gain political traction, currently only a tiny fraction of international development work includes mental health. A social determinants framework may be useful in incorporating mental health into sustainable development because it promotes a multi-sectorial and multi-disciplinary approach which is the corner stone of good development practice. Two approaches are suggested to make mental health a part of sustainable development: (1) integrate mental health into existing development programmes to promote social and economic environments that prevent mental health problems developing; (2) ensure that mental health programmes are better at promoting sustainable development by preventing the negative social and economic consequences of mental illness. Real-world examples of these approaches are provided. To achieve this, the mental health impact of wider development programmes, and the social and economic consequences of mental health interventions, must be evaluated. Development agencies should ensure that they have equity for mental health in all their policies, and investment must be increased for those mental health prevention, promotion and treatment programmes which have the greatest impact on sustainable development. The SDGs bring the promise of a more holistic approach to development. It is now the task of global mental health to demonstrate not just that mental health is an integral part of sustainable development, but that affordable and effective solutions exist which can improve mental health and development more broadly.

  2. Anesthetic management of cardiac patient for cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, F.B.; Sultan, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    We are reporting the successful anesthetic management of a 6 years old child, who had cyanotic congenital heart disease and underwent an operation for cataract extraction. Ketamine was used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Ventilation was assisted manually by using laryngeal masks. (author)

  3. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... ingredient: (a) Benzocaine 5 to 20 percent. (b) Benzyl alcohol 1 to 4 percent. (c) Dibucaine 0.25 to 1...

  4. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    Background. The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry. Methods. The study included data sets of annual sales of local...

  5. A noninvasive monitoring device for anesthetics in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Deborah M.; Fuentes, Juan; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    A noninvasive device capable of recording both gill and lateral fin movements was assembled and used to analyze initial and post-treatment activity frequency (Hz) in fish exposed to anesthetics. Exposure of platy fish (Xiphosphorus maculatus) to saponins from quillaja bark (0.185 mM and 0.555 m...

  6. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: Current perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); M. Klimek (Markus)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThis review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local

  7. Assessing the impact on global climate from general anesthetic gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads P. Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate, as measured relative to the start of the industrial era (approximately 1750). The family of anesthetic gases includes several halogenated organic compounds that are strong greenhouse gases. In this short report, we provide an overview of the state of knowledge...

  8. Local anesthetics: New insights into risks and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional local anesthetics in contemporary use block the voltage-gated sodium channel by binding to a specific site on the inner facet of the channel pore. Only little fractions of local anaesthetic are thought to participate in nerve blockade, the rest is absorbed into surrounding tissues or

  9. Anesthetic management of a horse with traumatic pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Chesnel, Maud-Aline; Aprea, Francesco; Clutton, R. Eddie

    2012-01-01

    A traumatic pneumothorax and severe hemorrhage were present in a mare with a large thoracic wall defect, lung perforation, and multiple rib fractures. General anesthesia was induced to allow surgical exploration. We describe the anesthetic technique, and discuss the management of the ventilatory, hemodynamic, and metabolic disturbances encountered.

  10. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of local anesthetics'(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic's hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured 1 H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T 1 ) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T 1 in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T 1 values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author)

  11. Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

    1988-03-01

    The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  12. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzetto L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Zorzetto,1 Paola Brambilla,1 Elena Marcello,1 Nora Bloise,2 Manuela De Gregori,3 Lorenzo Cobianchi,4,5 Andrea Peloso,4,5 Massimo Allegri,6 Livia Visai,2,7 Paola Petrini1 1Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering ‘G. Natta’, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Health Technologies (CHT, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, 3Pain Therapy Service, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo Pavia, Pavia, 4General Surgery Department, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, 5Departments of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 6Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, 7Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Lab of Nanotechnology, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured

  13. Local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pengju; Li, Ting; Xing, Huaixin; Wang, Suzhen; Sun, Yingui; Sheng, Xiugui; Wang, Kaiguo

    2017-05-01

    There is a compelling need for prolonged local anesthetic that would be used for analgesia with a single administration. However, due to the low molecular weight of local anesthetics (LA) (lidocaine, bupivacaine, procaine, dibucaine, etc), they present fast systemic absorption. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate bupivacaine lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (BVC LPNs), and compared with BVC loaded PLGA nanoparticles (BVC NPs). Their morphology, particle size, zeta potential and drug loading capacity were evaluated. In vitro release study, stability and cytotoxicity were studied. In vivo evaluation of anesthetic effects was performed on animal models. A facile nanoprecipitation and self-assembly method was optimized to obtain BVC LPNs, composed of PLGA, lecithin and DSPE-PEG 2000 , of ∼175nm particle size. Compared to BVC NPs, BVC LPNs exhibited prolonged in vitro release in phosphate-buffered saline (pH=7.4). Further, BVC LPNs displayed enhanced in vitro stability in 10% FBS and lower cytotoxicity (the concentration of BVC ranging from 1.0μM to 20μM). In addition, BVC LPNs exhibited significantly prolonged analgesic duration. These results demonstrate that the LPNs could function as promising drug delivery system for overcoming the drawbacks of poor stability and rapid drug leakage, and prolonging the anesthetic effect with slight toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Study on the effects of six intravenous anesthetic agents on regional ventricular function in dogs (thiopental, etomidate, propofol, fentanyl, sufentanil, alfentanil)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of 30 min increasing doses infusions of six intravenous anesthetic agents (thiopental, etomidate, propofol, fentanyl, sufentanil and alfentanil) on regional ventricular function in a normal and an acute ischemic heart segment in dogs. Part 1 discusses the methodology

  15. Knowledge and skills needed to improve as preceptor: development of a continuous professional development course - a qualitative study part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Mariette; Carlson, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Preceptors are expected to have the skills to be able to form an effective learning environment and facilitate a constructive clinical learning experience for students and new employees. Internationally, access to education for preceptors varies, with preceptors worldwide requesting more education in preceptorship. This article is based on a two-part study focusing on both the development and evaluation of a continuous, credit-bearing professional development course. The aim of this part of the study was to investigate and include preceptors' requests and educational needs when developing a continuous professional development course on an advanced level. This study used a qualitative research approach. In total, 64 preceptors (62 women and two men) answered one single written, self-administered global question online. The participants were all interested in teaching and had completed an undergraduate training in preceptorship. The collected data was analysed by content analysis inspired by Burnard's description of the method. The participating preceptors illuminated two main themes: 'Tools for effective precepting of students and healthcare professionals' and 'in-depth knowledge and understanding of preceptorship in an academic setting'. The results suggest that vital components for preceptor preparation could be a) teaching and learning strategies, b) reflective and critical reasoning, c) communication models, d) the role of the preceptor, and e) preceptorship. Using the results from this study as a guide, a continuous professional development course was designed to assist preceptors in deepening their knowledge of preceptorship in regard to planning, leading and implementing educational activities directed at students, healthcare professionals, patients and their families. The course content focuses on skills needed for preceptorship and is based on adult learning principles. A continuous, credit-bearing professional development course must include an exam by

  16. Part of the functional imagery in the development of new medicines. Press conference 30 september 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    today the functional imagery plays an increasing part in the discovery and the development of new medicines. This paper is a presentation of the aims of the colloquium and the subjects proposed. It takes stock on the functional imagery methods: positron emission tomography, monophonic emission tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance (imaging and spectroscopy). The research programs of the CEA in this domain and in particular the activities of the Frederic Joliot hospital center are presented. (A.L.B.)

  17. Extract from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine - Part 2. - Human Resources Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency is now engaged in finalizing a reference manual in nuclear medicine, entitled, 'Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine'. Several renowned professionals from all over the world, from virtually all fields of nuclear medicine have contributed to this manual. The World Journal of Nuclear Medicine will publish a series of extracts from this manual as previews. This is the second extract from the Resources Manual, Part-2 of the chapter on Human Resources Development. (author)

  18. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use.

  19. Relationship of pleural effusions to increased permeability pulmonary edema in anesthetized sheep.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiener-Kronish, J P; Broaddus, V C; Albertine, K H; Gropper, M A; Matthay, M A; Staub, N C

    1988-01-01

    We studied anesthetized sheep to determine the relationship between increased permeability pulmonary edema and the development and mechanism of pleural effusion formation. In 12 sheep with intact, closed thoraces, we studied the time course of pleural liquid formation after 0.12 ml/kg i.v. oleic acid. After 1 h, there were no pleural effusions, even though extravascular lung water increased 50% to 6.0 +/- 0.7 g/g dry lung. By 3 h pleural effusions had formed, they reached a maximum at 5 h (48...

  20. Anesthetic Considerations for an Adult Patient with Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome Undergoing Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Viehmeyer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS or “whistling face” syndrome is a rare congenital disorder complicated by characteristic facial deformities and muscular contractures. We report on a 64-year-old male patient presenting for surgical replacement of his aortic valve and review the available literature on anesthetic considerations and perioperative management principles. FSS frequently poses a significant challenge to airway management and gaining vascular access. Moreover, these patients are reportedly at risk for developing malignant hyperthermia (MH or neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

  1. Verification and validation as an integral part of the development of digital systems for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straker, E.A.; Thomas, N.C.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear industry's current attitude toward verification and validation (V and V) is realized through the experiences gained to date. On the basis of these experiences, V and V can effectively be applied as an integral part of digital system development for nuclear electric power applications. An overview of a typical approach for integrating V and V with system development is presented. This approach represents a balance between V and V as applied in the aerospace industry and the standard practice commonly applied within the nuclear industry today

  2. STOCK AND STOCK EXCHANGE AS A PART OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Petrović

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have tried to present the term, meaning and importance of stocks and stock exchange as a part of the financial system of developed countries. By observing the financial system growth, especially in financial institutions, it can be noticed that there are changes in relative positions of various types of financial agents in developed market industries. What determines financial markets, and by that the stocks and stock exchange is the permanent movement of financial instruments and neglecting the national market boundaries.

  3. Hydrodynamics of piston-driven laminar pulsating flow: Part 2. Fully developed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aygun, Cemalettin; Aydin, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The piston-driven laminar pulsating flow in a pipe is studied. • Fully developed flow is examined analytically, numerically and experimentally. • An increase in F results an increase in the amplitude of the centerline velocity. • The characters of the radial velocity profiles critically depend on both the frequency and the phase angle. • The near/off-wall flow reversals are observed for F = 105, 226 and 402. - Abstract: Piston-driven pulsating flow is a specific type of pressure-driven pulsating flows. In this study, piston-driven laminar pulsating flow in a pipe is studied. This study mainly exists of two parts: developing flow and fully developed flow. In this part, hydrodynamically fully developed flow is examined analytically, numerically and experimentally. A constant value of the time-averaged Reynolds number is considered, Re = 1000. In the theoretical studies, both analytical and numerical, an inlet velocity profile representing the experimental case, i.e., the piston driven flow, is assumed. In the experiments, in the hydrodynamically fully developed region, radial velocity distribution and pressure drop are obtained using hot-wire anemometer and pressure transmitter, respectively. The effect pulsation frequency on the friction coefficient as well as velocity profiles are obtained. A good agreement is observed among analytical, numerical and experimental results

  4. Use of reliability engineering in development and manufacturing of metal parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Iqbal, M.A.; Asif, M.

    2005-01-01

    The reliability engineering predicts modes of failures and weak links before the system is built instead of failure case study. The reliability engineering analysis will help in the manufacturing economy, assembly accuracy and qualification by testing, leading to production of metal parts in an aerospace industry. This methodology will also minimize the performance constraints in any requirement for the application of metal components in aerospace systems. The reliability engineering predicts the life of the parts under loading conditions whether dynamic or static. Reliability predictions can help engineers in making decisions about design of components, materials selection and qualification under applied stress levels. Two methods of reliability prediction i.e. Part Stress Analysis and Part Count have been used in this study. In this paper we will discuss how these two methods can be used to measure reliability of a system during development phases, which includes the measuring effect of environmental and operational variables. The equations are used to measure the reliability of each type of component, as well as, integration for measuring system applied for the reliability analysis. (author)

  5. Antagonism of morphine-induced central respiratory depression by donepezil in the anesthetized rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIKI TSUJITA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is often used in cancer pain and postoperative analgesic management but induces respiratory depression. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for drug candidates that can antagonize morphine-induced respiratory depression but have no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. Acetylcholine is an excitatory neurotransmitter in central respiratory control and physostigmine antagonizes morphine-induced respiratory depression. However, physostigmine has not been applied in clinical practice because it has a short action time, among other characteristics. We therefore asked whether donepezil (a long-acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease can antagonize morphine-induced respiratory depression. Using the anesthetized rabbit as our model, we measured phrenic nerve discharge as an index of respiratory rate and amplitude. We compared control indices with discharges after the injection of morphine and after the injection of donepezil. Morphine-induced depression of respiratory rate and respiratory amplitude was partly antagonized by donepezil without any effect on blood pressure and end-tidal C0(2. In the other experiment, apneic threshold PaC0(2 was also compared. Morphine increased the phrenic nerve apnea threshold but this was antagonized by donepezil. These findings indicate that systemically administered donepezil partially restores morphine-induced respiratory depression and morphine-deteriorated phrenic nerve apnea threshold in the anesthetized rabbit

  6. Dissociative anesthetic combination reduces intraocular pressure (IOP in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewaldo de Mattos-Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of three anesthetic combinations, ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam, on IOP in rabbits. In a experimental, blind, randomized, crossover study, six rabbits were anesthetized with each of 3 treatments in random order. Groups KM (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + midazolam, 1 mg/kg; KX (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + xylazine, 3 mg/kg; and TZ (tiletamine + zolazepam, 20 mg/kg. The drugs were mixed in the same syringe injected intramuscularly (IM into the quadriceps muscle. IOP was measured before drug administration (baseline and at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes. The data were analyzed by a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. All groups had significant decreases in IOP compared to baseline (p 0.05. Administration of either ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine, or tiletamine-zolazepam similarly decrease IOP in rabbits within 30 minutes of injection.

  7. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  8. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients' neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic-sedative medication is increasing. Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used.

  9. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  10. The development of daily monitoring tool in a service part manufacturing company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marpaung, Seamus Tadeo; Rosyidi, Cucuk Nur

    2018-02-01

    Production lead time is one of the key measures to assess whether a production system is running well or not. A short lead time will lead to higher customer satisfaction and will be a solid proof that a system is well-organized. To shorten the production lead time, a good production planning and control are required. There are many obstacles which can occur at any time, for instance shortage of material and worker, or poor production scheduling. Service Parts Planning Department works with many parties from the beginning of service parts production until it is delivered to the customer. This research was conducted to find an appropriate production monitoring tool for Service Parts Planning Department, which is a control method that make problems appears to the surface and can be overcome quickly so that the production process can run normally. The tool development started with a field study to find out the production flow from start to finish, a literature review and a interview with some employees who will later use the production control tool, and the creation of a daily control that went through several modifications until finally meet the needs of the department. In this research, a production monitoring tool which is developed can be used to monitor the entire order status, the production lead time, and also serves as the records and reports for presentation.

  11. Development Algorithm of the Technological Process of Manufacturing Gas Turbine Parts by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotov, A. V.; Agapovichev, A. V.; Smelov, V. G.; Kyarimov, R. R.

    2018-01-01

    The technology of the selective laser melting (SLM) allows making products from powders of aluminum, titanium, heat-resistant alloys and stainless steels. Today the use of SLM technology develops at manufacture of the functional parts. This in turn requires development of a methodology projection of technological processes (TP) for manufacturing parts including databases of standard TP. Use of a technique will allow to exclude influence of technologist’s qualification on made products quality, and also to reduce labor input and energy consumption by development of TP due to use of the databases of standard TP integrated into a methodology. As approbation of the developed methodology the research of influence of the modes of a laser emission on a roughness of a surface of synthesized material was presented. It is established that the best values of a roughness of exemplars in the longitudinal and transversal directions make 1.98 μm and 3.59 μm respectively. These values of a roughness were received at specific density of energy 6.25 J/mm2 that corresponds to power and the speed of scanning of 200 W and 400 mm/s, respectively, and a hatch distance of 0.08 mm.

  12. Formal Development of the HRP Prover - Part 1: Syntax and Semantics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the formal development of a new version of the HRP Prover. The new version of the tool will have functionality almost identical to the current version, but is developed in accordance to established principles for applying algebraic specification in formal software development. The development project provides results of relevance to the formal development of a wide range of language-oriented tools, including programming language compilers, as well as to the automatic generation of code from specifications. Since the overall scope of this report is the analysis of algebraic specifications, emphasis is given to topics related to what is usually understood as the ''front end'' of compilers. This includes lexical and syntax analysis of the specifications, static semantics through type checking, and dynamic semantics through evaluation. All the different phases are specified in algebraic specification and supported by the current version of the HRP Prover. In subsequent work, the completed parts of the new version will complement the tool support in the development. The work presented will be followed up by formal specification of theorem proving and transformation, as well as code generation into conventional programming languages. The new version of the HRP Prover is incrementally developed in coherence with the specifications produced in these activities. At the same time, the development of the tool demonstrates the efficient use of the methodology through real application on an increasingly important class of software. (author)

  13. ANESTHETIC CONSIDERATION S IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMON ARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a spectrum of diseases that includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway disease. It i s characterized by progressive increased resistance to breathing. Patients with marked obstructive pulmonary disease are at increased risk for both intraoperative and Postoperative pulmonary complications. These patients require thorough preoperative prepa ration, meticulous intraoperative management & postoperative care. This article describes anesthetic considerations in a patient with COPD.

  14. Anesthetic Management in a Gravida with Type IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Vue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited disorder of the connective tissues caused by abnormalities in collagen formation. OI may present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. A literature review reveals a wide range of implications, from basic positioning to management of the difficult airway. We present the anesthetic management of a 25-year-old gravid woman with OI, fetal demise, and possible uterine rupture, admitted for an exploratory laparotomy.

  15. Development of natural gas in the French-speaking part of Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defago, E.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas has known a rapid development in the French-speaking part of Switzerland and this trend is still continuing. Natural gas represents 13% of the overall energy consumption, which lies significantly above the Swiss average and, in the year 2000, it should reach about 20%. In order to meet the expected growth of consumption, Gaznat has already contracted, under long term agreements, large quantities of natural gas from diversified sources. Underground storage capacities in nearby France have been considerably increased and new gas-pipelines are being built. These pipelines will enable to double the supply capacity of the French-speaking part of Switzerland within the next three years. (orig.) [de

  16. The Development of Statewide Policies and Procedures to Implement Telehealth for Part C Service Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Cole

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of telehealth has been discussed nationally as an option to address provider shortages for children, birth through two, enrolled in Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA Early Intervention (EI programs. Telehealth is an evidence-based service delivery model which can be used to remove barriers in providing EI services to children and their families. In 2016, Colorado’s Part C Early Intervention (EI program began allowing the use of telehealth as an option for providers to conduct sessions with children and their caregivers. This article outlines the process taken to develop the necessary requirements and supports for telehealth to be incorporated into EI current practice.

  17. DBMS Development of Irradiated Materials and Spare parts on master-slave manipulator in IMEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Y. S.; Kim, D. S.; Jung, Y. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Hong, K. P.; Ahn, S. B.; Ryu, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The data of irradiated specimens(include nuclear fuel) which are transported from research reactor and commercial power reactor and the spare parts of the master-slave manipulator for the IMEF facility, which is operated since 1996, were controlled and managed through the Hangul and Excel software. But it is recommended to use a special program, which is developed for DBMS, for the beneficial control and systematic management of all irradiated specimens, especially assuming the increase of specimen's kind and amount by increasing customers in the near future. This report summarized the whole logical and physical processes and results about following items : - Management System of Irradiated Materials including nuclear fuel - Management System of spare parts for the master-slave manipulator.

  18. Cardiac evaluation of anesthetized Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Darcy B; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Ojeda, Nyurka; Fiorello, Christine V; Estrada, Amara H; Prosek, Robert; Citino, Scott B

    2007-02-01

    To determine ECG and echocardiographic measurements in healthy anesthetized Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi). 20 healthy zebras. Auscultation, base-apex ECG, and echocardiography were performed on anesthetized zebras. Low-grade systolic murmurs were detected in the left basilar region in 4 of 20 zebras. Evaluation of ECGs from 19 zebras revealed sinus rhythm with a predominantly negative QRS complex and a mean +/- SD heart rate of 67 +/- 10 beats/min. Echocardiograms of sufficient image quality were obtained for 16 zebras. Interventricular septal thickness in diastole, left ventricular chamber in diastole and systole, left atrial diameter, and left ventricular mass were significantly and moderately correlated with estimated body weight (r values ranged from 0.650 to 0.884). Detectable swirling of blood in the right and sometimes the left ventricles was detected in 9 of 16 zebras, whereas physiologic regurgitation of blood was detected for the aortic valve in 3 zebras, pulmonary valve in 2 zebras, mitral valve in 2 zebras, and tricuspid valve in 1 zebra. Results of this study provide reference information for use in the cardiac evaluation of anesthetized Grevy's zebras.

  19. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  20. Physiological responses of cacharas Pseudoplatystoma reticulatum submitted to natural anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Souza dos Santos Sanchez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study the aimed to evaluate the induction time, recovery time and physiological responses of cacharas, Pseudoplatystoma reticulatum, submitted to eugenol and menthol. 42 cacharas were exposed to eugenol 100 mgL-1 (n=14 and menthol 150 mgL-1 (n=14 and the control group (n=14 which were not exposed to any anesthetics. At the time 0 and 24 hours after induction, the bloods of 7 fishes per treatment were collected to measure the hematologic parameters and plasma glucose evaluation. The recovery was conducted in aquariums free of anesthetic, and induction and recovery times were monitored. The results were submitted to analysis of variance (P0.05 for induction time, however the recovery time had a significant reduction (P<0.05 for the menthol 150 mgL-1. There was no treatment effects on hematologic parameters, except for mean corpuscular volume (VCM, which was observed an interaction effect between factors, once fish anesthetized with eugenol showed significant reduction (P<0.05 on VCM 24 hours after anesthesia. Plasma glucose values did not differ at 0 hour after induction. 24 hours after induction, both control group and fishes exposed to eugenol and menthol were significantly reduce in VCM. Eugenol at 100 mgL-1 and menthol at 150 mgL-1 may be safely induced in cachara during biometrics procedures.

  1. Methylparaben concentration in commercial Brazilian local anesthetics solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Rodriguez da Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To detect the presence and concentration of methylparaben in cartridges of commercial Brazilian local anesthetics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twelve commercial brands (4 in glass and 8 in plastic cartridges of local anesthetic solutions for use in dentistry were purchased from the Brazilian market and analyzed. Different lots of the commercial brands were obtained in different Brazilian cities (Piracicaba, Campinas and São Paulo. Separation was performed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with UV-Vis detector. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile:water (75:25 - v/v, pH 4.5, adjusted with acetic acid at a flow rate of 1.0 ml.min-1. RESULTS: When detected in the solutions, the methylparaben concentration ranged from 0.01% (m/v to 0.16% (m/v. One glass and all plastic cartridges presented methylparaben. CONCLUSION: 1. Methylparaben concentration varied among solutions from different manufacturers, and it was not indicated in the drug package inserts; 2. Since the presence of methylparaben in dental anesthetics is not regulated by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA and this substance could cause allergic reactions, it is important to alert dentists about its possible presence.

  2. Oral Topical Doxepin Rinse: Anesthetic Effect in Normal Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B Epstein

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral doxepin rinse has been reported to provide pain relief in patients with oral mucosal lesions due to cancer or cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess the anesthetic effect of doxepin oral rinse in normal subjects to identify the duration of effect and to contrast the anesthetic effect with reported pain relief in patients with oral mucosal lesions. Normal volunteers were provided a solution of doxepin (5 mg/mL for oral rinsing. Oral numbness and adverse effects were recorded for a period of 4 h after rinsing. Doxepin rinse resulted in mucosal anesthesia in all subjects. Sedation/fatigue was reported in four of seven subjects. There were no taste complaints and no nausea reported. The limited duration of numbness/anesthesia in normal subjects compared with prior studies showing pain relief for more than 3 h in patients with mucosal lesions, suggests that the extended duration of pain relief in patients was due to analgesic effects rather than anesthetic effects. The majority of normal subjects reported sedation after use, but this was less common in patients with mucosal lesions.

  3. Anesthetic Management and Complications of Percutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tailur Alberto Grando

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Aortic stenosis is a highly prevalent and life-threatening disease. In elderly patients with comorbidities, percutaneous valve implantation is an option. The aim of the study was to describe the anesthetic management and complications of general anesthesia Method: Case series with 30-day and 24-month follow-ups after implantation of the CoreValve device performed at the Institute of Cardiology/University Foundation of Cardiology between December 2008 and January 2012. The patients underwent general anesthesia monitored with mean arterial pressure (PAM, electrocardiogram (ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, transesophageal echocardiography, thermometry, and transvenous pacemaker. Results: Twenty-eight patients, mean age 82.46 years, 20.98% mean EuroSCORE, functional class III/IV, successfully underwent valve implantation. Nine patients required permanent pacemaker implantation. During follow-up, two patients died: one during surgery due to LV perforation and the other on the third day of unknown causes. At 24 months, one patient diagnosed with multiple myeloma died. This anesthetic technique proved to be safe. Conclusion: The initial experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation under general anesthesia has proven to be safe and effective, with no significant anesthetic complications during this procedure. Keywords: Aesthesia, General, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Aortic Valve Stenosis, Aged.

  4. Anesthetic propofol attenuates the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ are the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase activation and increase Aβ accumulation. In addition, recent studies suggest that isoflurane may directly promote the formation of cytotoxic soluble Aβ oligomers, which are thought to be the key pathological species in AD. In contrast, propofol, the most commonly used intravenous anesthetic, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to compare the effects of isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination on caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. Naïve and stably-transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express human amyloid precursor protein, the precursor for Aβ; neonatal mice; and conditioned cell culture media containing secreted human Aβ40 or Aβ42 were treated with isoflurane and/or propofol. Here we show for the first time that propofol can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in cultured cells and in the brain tissues of neonatal mice. Furthermore, propofol-mediated caspase inhibition occurred when there were elevated levels of Aβ. Finally, isoflurane alone induces Aβ42, but not Aβ40, oligomerization, and propofol can inhibit the isoflurane-mediated oligomerization of Aβ42. These data suggest that propofol may mitigate the caspase-3 activation by attenuating the isoflurane-induced Aβ42 oligomerization. Our findings provide novel insights into the possible mechanisms of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity that may aid in the development of strategies to minimize potential adverse effects associated with the administration of anesthetics to patients.

  5. From Lunar Regolith to Fabricated Parts: Technology Developments and the Utilization of Moon Dirt

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, C. A.; Fikes, J. C.; McCarley, K. S.; Good, J. E.; Gilley, S. D.; Kennedy, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration Policy has as a cornerstone the establishment of an outpost on the moon. This lunar outpost wil1 eventually provide the necessary planning, technology development, testbed, and training for manned missions in the future beyond the Moon. As part of the overall activity, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating how the in situ resources can be utilized to improve mission success by reducing up-mass, improving safety, reducing risk, and bringing down costs for the overall mission. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), along with other NASA centers, is supporting this endeavor by exploring how lunar regolith can be mined for uses such as construction, life support, propulsion, power, and fabrication. An infrastructure capable of fabrication and nondestructive evaluation will be needed to support habitat structure development and maintenance, tools and mechanical parts fabrication, as well as repair and replacement of space-mission hardware such as life-support items, vehicle components, and crew systems, This infrastructure will utilize the technologies being developed under the In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) element, which is working in conjunction with the technologies being developed under the In Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) element, to live off the land. The ISFR Element supports the Space Exploration Initiative by reducing downtime due to failed components; decreasing risk to crew by recovering quickly from degraded operation of equipment; improving system functionality with advanced geometry capabilities; and enhancing mission safety by reducing assembly part counts of original designs where possible. This paper addresses the need and plan for understanding the properties of the lunar regolith to determine the applicability of using this material in a fabrication process. This effort includes the development of high fidelity simulants that will be used in fabrication processes on the ground to

  6. Analysing and Developing TQM Strategies - An Important Part of Company Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartz, Ove

    2000-01-01

    activities and employee behaviour in industrial company cultures. The paper outlines and discusses some results of total quality management research projects and case study research in industrial companies carried out at the Technical University of Denmark. The background of the viewpoints and experience......This paper discusses strategies for development of total quality management as an integrated part of company innovation taking the size and other particular characteristics of the specific company into consideration, with the focus on issues related to the development of appropriate total quality...... outlined is based on a combination of theoretical work, case study research and involvement in the practical development of total quality management in industrial companies of very different sizes....

  7. The importance of scenario development in meeting 40 CFR part 191

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Scenario development and screening is a fundamental part of performance assessment, but its importance in satisfying 40 CFR Part 191 (the standard) is sometimes underestimated. The first step in scenario development in support of performance assessment for the standard's containment requirements is to identify a set of potentially disruptive events and processes. This set must be broad enough to allow the identification, as required by the standard, of those processes and events that might affect the disposal system; data can then be collected on the scenarios identified in this step. The standard also requires that releases be estimated for all significant processes and events; thus the final step in scenario development is systematically screening the scenarios, on the basis of their probabilities and consequences, to select those that are important enough to be modeled in detail. In general, a few hundred scenarios for the release of radionuclides from a nuclear-waste repository can be identified, but only a few of these can or should be modeled in detail

  8. Detection of volatile and soluble general anesthetics using a fluorescence-based fiber optic sensor: recent progress in chemical sensitivity and noise sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Paul; Abrams, Susan B.

    1992-04-01

    A fiber optic sensor for general anesthetics based on the phase transition of immobilized phospholipid vesicles is under development. Current work centers on evaluating the sensor response to different anesthetics and instrumentation design. The fluorescence of laurdan- doped liposomes is found to respond linearly to the infusible anesthetics thiopental sodium and Propofol. Preliminary experiments have been performed to determine sources of noise in the optical and electronic components of the sensor as it is now configured. One potential noise source is the liposome sample at the fiber tip; photobleaching and thermal fluctuations due to heating by the illuminating 360 nm radiation can affect measurement of the anesthetic level. Heating of the sample is a factor at high illumination levels, but photobleaching, which reduces the signal intensity, does not alter the intensity ratio upon which the anesthetic concentration measurement is based. Optical microscopy of fiber tips embedded in liposomes allows direct observation of the light intensity near the tip of the fiber despite the extreme turbidity of the suspension. Light intensity drops to less than 10% of its maximum intensity at the fiber tip within 300 micrometers . Further use of this technique should allow monitoring the effects of photobleaching on the spatial distribution of the liposomes responsible for the measured optical signal.

  9. Anesthetic activity and bio-guided fractionation of the essential oil of Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook.) Tronc. in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benovit, Simone C; Silva, Lenise L; Salbego, Joseânia; Loro, Vania L; Mallmann, Carlos A; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Flores, Erico M M; Heinzmann, Berta M

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to determine the efficacy of the essential oil of A. gratissima as anesthetic for silver catfish, and to perform the bio-guided fractionation of essential oil aiming to isolate compounds responsible for the noted effects. Fish were submitted to anesthesia bath with essential oil, its fractions and isolated compounds to determine time of anesthetic induction and recovery. Eugenol (50 mg L(-1)) was used as positive control. Essential oil of A. gratissima was effective as an anesthetic at concentrations of 300 to 900 mg L(-1). Fish presented involuntary muscle contractions during induction and recovery. The bio-guided fractionation of essential oil furnished E-(-)-pinocamphone, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol. E-(-)-pinocamphone caused the same side effects observed for essential oil. (-)-Caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol showed only sedative effects at proportional concentrations to those of the constituents in essential oil. (+)-Spathulenol (51.2 mg L(-1)) promoted deep anesthesia without side effects. A higher concentration of (+)-spathulenol, and lower or absent amounts ofE-(-)-pinocamphone could contribute to increase the activity and safety of the essential oil of A. gratissima. (+)-Spathulenol showed potent sedative and anesthetic activities in silver catfish, and could be considered as a viable compound for the development of a new anesthetic.

  10. Coil End Parts Development Using BEND and Design for MQXF by LARP

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Miao; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Bossert, R; Ferracin, P; Krave, S

    2016-01-01

    End parts are critical components for saddle-shaped coils. They have a structural function where the cables are deformed in order to cross over the magnet aperture. Based on the previous design of the US LARP program for 90 mm aperture quadrupoles (TQ/LQ) and 120 mm aperture quadrupoles (HQ/LHQ) using BEND, the coil ends of the low-β quadruples (MQXF) for the HiLumi LHC upgrade were developed. This paper shows the design of the MQXF coil ends, the analysis of the coil ends during the coil fabrication, the autopsy analysis of the coil ends and the feedback to BEND parameters.

  11. Development and pilot production of three ingot-source beryllium sheet metal parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an extensive development program aimed at making three, separate, structural components from beryllium, using sheet-metal fabrication methods, are presented. Ingot-source beryllium sheet at thicknesses of 0.100, 0.125, and 0.170 inch is formed in a fully-recrystallized and in a partially-recrystallized condition. The tensile yield strength is 26,000 psi after full recrystallization. After partial recrystallization, tensile yield strength is between 35,000 and 45,000 psi, depending upon sheet thickness, heat treat temperature, and time at temperature. The high yield strength is retained in the parts after forming. (U.S.)

  12. Coil End Parts Development Using BEND and Design for MQXF by LARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Miao [Fermilab; Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Bermudez, S. Izquierdo [CERN; Bossert, R. [Fermilab; Ferracin, P. [CERN; Krave, S. [Fermilab

    2016-09-06

    End parts are critical components for saddle-shaped coils. They have a structural function where the cables are deformed in order to cross over the magnet aperture. Based on the previous design of the US LARP program for 90 mm aperture quadrupoles (TQ/LQ) and 120 mm aperture quadrupoles (HQ/LHQ) using BEND, the coil ends of the low-β quadruples (MQXF) for the HiLumi LHC upgrade were developed. This paper shows the design of the MQXF coil ends, the analysis of the coil ends during the coil fabrication, the autopsy analysis of the coil ends and the feedback to BEND parameters.

  13. Comparison of use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor and refractometry for measurement of anesthetic agent concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, Tamas D; Klide, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    To assess agreement between anesthetic agent concentrations measured by use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor (IAGM) and refractometry. SAMPLE-4 IAGMs of the same type and 1 refractometer. Mixtures of oxygen and isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, or N(2)O were used. Agent volume percent was measured simultaneously with 4 IAGMs and a refractometer at the common gas outlet. Measurements obtained with each of the 4 IAGMs were compared with the corresponding refractometer measurements via the Bland-Altman method. Similarly, Bland-Altman plots were also created with either IAGM or refractometer measurements and desflurane vaporizer dial settings. Bias ± 2 SD for comparisons of IAGM and refractometer measurements was as follows: isoflurane, -0.03 ± 0.18 volume percent; sevoflurane, -0.19 ± 0.23 volume percent; desflurane, 0.43 ± 1.22 volume percent; and N(2)O, -0.21 ± 1.88 volume percent. Bland-Altman plots comparing IAGM and refractometer measurements revealed nonlinear relationships for sevoflurane, desflurane, and N(2)O. Desflurane measurements were notably affected; bias ± limits of agreement (2 SD) were small (0.1 ± 0.22 volume percent) at < 12 volume percent, but both bias and limits of agreement increased at higher concentrations. Because IAGM measurements did not but refractometer measurements did agree with the desflurane vaporizer dial settings, infrared measurement technology was a suspected cause of the nonlinear relationships. Given that the assumption of linearity is a cornerstone of anesthetic monitor calibration, this assumption should be confirmed before anesthetic monitors are used in experiments.

  14. Cardiovascular responses to microinjections of GABA or anesthetics into the rostral ventrolateral medulla of conscious and anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacerda J.E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM contains neurons involved in tonic and reflex control of arterial pressure. We describe the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and anesthetics injected into the RVLM of conscious and urethane (1.2 g/kg, iv anesthetized Wistar rats (300-350 g. In conscious rats, bilateral microinjection of GABA (50 nmol/200 nl induced a small but significant decrease in blood pressure (from 130 ± 3.6 to 110 ± 5.6 mmHg, N = 7. A similar response was observed with sodium pentobarbital microinjection (24 nmol/200 nl. However, in the same animals, the fall in blood pressure induced by GABA (from 121 ± 8.9 to 76 ± 8.8 mmHg, N = 7 or pentobarbital (from 118 ± 4.5 to 57 ± 11.3 mmHg, N = 6 was significantly increased after urethane anesthesia. In contrast, there was no difference between conscious (from 117 ± 4.1 to 92 ± 5.9 mmHg, N = 7 and anesthetized rats (from 123 ± 6.9 to 87 ± 8.7 mmHg, N = 7 when lidocaine (34 nmol/200 nl was microinjected into the RVLM. The heart rate variations were not consistent and only eventually reached significance in conscious or anesthetized rats. The right position of pipettes was confirmed by histology and glutamate microinjection into the RVLM. These findings suggest that in conscious animals the RVLM, in association with the other sympathetic premotor neurons, is responsible for the maintenance of sympathetic vasomotor tone during bilateral RVLM inhibition. Activity of one or more of these premotor neurons outside the RVLM can compensate for the effects of RVLM inhibition. In addition, the effects of lidocaine suggest that fibers passing through the RVLM are involved in the maintenance of blood pressure in conscious animals during RVLM inhibition.

  15. Development of uniform eddy current multi-probe for flaw detection on complex shape part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Katsuhiro; Hashimoto, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of the technology that inspects plant structures nondestructive is requested, because the occurrence of cracks is reported in the structures of nuclear power plants. In this research, a uniform eddy current multi-probe that is able to be applied to the complex structure and inspected the cracks at the high speed was developed. Exciting coils of the uniform eddy current multi-probe were designed the shape that agreed with the complex shape part, and so that the eddy current flows uniformly in the part of pick-up coils. The pick-up coils were arranged on a flexible printed circuit board as it was possible to correspond to the complex shape. The detection characteristics of EDM (electro-discharge machining) slits provided on the complex shape part were evaluated. The clear signals for the EDM slits provided on the curvature surface of 25 mm in radius were obtained by this probe. We confirmed that the crack shape was able to be estimated by the detection signals. (author)

  16. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    Full Text Available During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group: (1 non-sensitized, (2 anaphylaxis, (3 anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS and (4 anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP, heart rate (HR, central venous pressure (CVP, FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

  17. A HACCP-based approach to mastitis control in dairy herds. Part 1: Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekhuis-Gibbon Lies

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP systems are a risk based preventive approach developed to increase levels of food safety assurance. This is part 1 of a pilot study on the development, implementation and evaluation of a HACCP-based approach for the control of good udder health in dairy cows. The paper describes the use of a novel approach based on a deconstruction of the infectious process in mastitis to identify Critical Control Points (CCPs and develop a HACCP-based system to prevent and control mastitis in dairy herds. The approach involved the creation of an Infectious Process Flow Diagram, which was then cross-referenced to two production process flow diagrams of the milking process and cow management cycle. The HACCP plan developed, may be suitable for customisation and implementation on dairy farms. This is a logical, systematic approach to the development of a mastitis control programme that could be used as a template for the development of control programmes for other infectious diseases in the dairy herd.

  18. A HACCP-based approach to mastitis control in dairy herds. Part 1: Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekhuis-Gibbon, Lies; Whyte, Paul; O'Grady, Luke; More, Simon J; Doherty, Michael L

    2011-03-31

    Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) systems are a risk based preventive approach developed to increase levels of food safety assurance. This is part 1 of a pilot study on the development, implementation and evaluation of a HACCP-based approach for the control of good udder health in dairy cows. The paper describes the use of a novel approach based on a deconstruction of the infectious process in mastitis to identify Critical Control Points (CCPs) and develop a HACCP-based system to prevent and control mastitis in dairy herds. The approach involved the creation of an Infectious Process Flow Diagram, which was then cross-referenced to two production process flow diagrams of the milking process and cow management cycle. The HACCP plan developed, may be suitable for customisation and implementation on dairy farms. This is a logical, systematic approach to the development of a mastitis control programme that could be used as a template for the development of control programmes for other infectious diseases in the dairy herd.

  19. General anesthetic and the risk of dementia in elderly patients: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria Hussain,1 Miles Berger,2 Roderic G Eckenhoff,3 Dallas P Seitz1 1Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University; 2Anesthesiology Department, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: In this review, we aim to provide clinical insights into the relationship between surgery, general anesthesia (GA, and dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The pathogenesis of AD is complex, involving specific disease-linked proteins (amyloid-beta [Aß] and tau, inflammation, and neurotransmitter dysregulation. Many points in this complex pathogenesis can potentially be influenced by both surgery and anesthetics. It has been demonstrated in some in vitro, animal, and human studies that some anesthetics are associated with increased aggregation and oligomerization of Aß peptide and enhanced accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Two neurocognitive syndromes that have been studied in relation to surgery and anesthesia are postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, both of which occur more commonly in older adults after surgery and anesthesia. Neither the route of anesthesia nor the type of anesthetic appears to be significantly associated with the development of postoperative delirium or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. A meta-analysis of case-control studies found no association between prior exposure to surgery utilizing GA and incident AD (pooled odds ratio =1.05, P=0.43. The few cohort studies on this topic have shown varying associations between surgery, GA, and AD, with one showing an increased risk, and another demonstrating a decreased risk. A recent randomized trial has shown that patients who received sevoflurane during spinal surgery were more likely to have progression of preexisting mild cognitive impairment compared to

  20. Mathematical Optimal Sequence Model Development to Process Planes and Other Interconnected Surfaces of Complex Body Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Kravchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience in application of multi-operational machines CNC (MOM CNC shows that they are efficient only in case of significantly increasing productivity and dramatically reducing time-to-market cycle of new products. Most full technological MOM capabilities are revealed when processing the complex body parts. The more complex is a part design and the more is its number of machined surfaces, the more tools are necessary for its processing and positioning, the more is an efficiency of their application. At the same time, the case history of using these machines in industry shows that MOM CNC are, virtually, used mostly for technological processes of universal equipment, which is absolutely unacceptable. One way to improve the processing performance on MOM CNC is to reduce nonproductive machine time through reducing the mutual idle movements of the working machine. This problem is solved using dynamic programming methods, one of which is the solution of the traveling salesman problem (Bellman's method. With a known plan for treatment of all elementary surfaces of the body part, i.e. the known number of performed transitions, each transition is represented as a vertex of some graph, while technological links between the vertices are its edges. A mathematical model is developed on the Bellman principle, which is adapted to technological tasks to minimize the idle time of mutual idle movements of the working machine to perform all transitions in the optimal sequence. The initial data to fill matrix of time expenditures are time consumed by the hardware after executing the i-th transition, and necessary to complete the j-transition. The programmer fills in matrix cells according to known routing body part taking into account the time for part and table positioning, tool exchange, spindle and table approach to the working zone, and the time of table rotation, etc. The mathematical model was tested when machining the body part with 36 transitions on the

  1. MANAGING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF MEAT PROCESSING PLANTS AS PART OF THE MECHANISM OF STRATEGIC PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Gusev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have proven that, at present one of the priority research areas as part of the Development Strategy of the Food Processing Industry of the Russian Federation until 2020 is to develop effective mechanisms for sustainable socio-economic development of industrial enterprises. This article investigated the logic of strategic planning within the framework of sustainable economic growth, analyzed the structure of strategic planning, study the subject of strategic planning in the management of sustainable development of enterprises, justified the basic principles of strategic planning for the effective management of sustainable development of industrial enterprises, as well as the complex of organizational tactical activities of operational management strategy for sustainable development of the enterprise. The observation revealed that currently there was a high need for the framework of the branch, departmental and state programs implemented in industrial management of scientific and methodological approaches of strategic planning. Studies have shown that these approaches in its conceptual entity should be based on the growth potential of the sustainable development of meat processing plants in space and time in order to achieve high competitive advantages. Conducted a systematic analysis of industry conditions proved that the problem of sustainable operation and development of meat processing enterprises as a problem of management and control is relatively new, unexplored and highly relevant. On the contrary, it is the basis of modern management strategy and management is a concept and methodology of the so-called adaptive enterprise development under the action of various external and internal factors, risks that may threaten its economic stability and sustainability.

  2. Anesthetic neuroprotection: antecedents and an appraisal of preclinical and clinical data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Berger, Miles; Nadler, Jacob; Warner, David S

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics have been studied for nearly fifty years as potential neuroprotective compounds in both perioperative and resuscitation medicine. Although anesthetics present pharmacologic properties consistent with preservation of brain viability in the context of an ischemic insult, no anesthetic has been proven efficacious for neuroprotection in humans. After such effort, it could be concluded that anesthetics are simply not neuroprotective in humans. Moreover, pharmacologic neuroprotection with non-anesthetic drugs has also repeatedly failed to be demonstrated in human acute brain injury. Recent focus has been on rectification of promising preclinical neuroprotection data and subsequent failed clinical trials. This has led to consensus guidelines for the process of transferring purported therapeutics from bench to bedside. In this review we first examined the history of anesthetic neuroprotection research. Then, a systematic review was performed to identify major clinical trials of anesthetic neuroprotection. Both the preclinical neuroprotection portfolio cited to justify a clinical trial and the design and conduct of that clinical trial were evaluated using modern standards that include the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines. In publications intended to define anesthetic neuroprotection, we found overall poor quality of both preclinical efficacy analysis portfolios and clinical trial designs and conduct. Hence, using current translational research standards, it was not possible to conclude from existing data whether anesthetics ameliorate perioperative ischemic brain injury. Incorporation of advances in translational neuroprotection research conduct may provide a basis for more definitive and potentially successful clinical trials of anesthetics as neuroprotectants.

  3. Development of multicomponent parts-per-billion-level gas standards of volatile toxic organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoderick, G.C.; Zielinski, W.L. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the demand for stable, low-concentration multicomponent standards of volatile toxic organic compounds for quantifying national and state measurement of ambient air quality and hazardous waste incineration emissions has markedly increased in recent years. In response to this demand, a microgravimetric technique was developed and validated for preparing such standards; these standards ranged in concentration from several parts per million (ppm) down to one part per billion (ppb) and in complexity from one organic up to 17. Studies using the gravimetric procedure to prepare mixtures of different groups of organics. including multi-components mixtures in the 5 to 20 ppb range, revealed a very low imprecision. This procedure is based on the separate gravimetric introduction of individual organics into an evacuated gas cylinder, followed by the pressurized addition of a precalculated amount of pure nitrogen. Additional studies confirmed the long-term stability of these mixtures. The uncertainty of the concentrations of the individual organics at the 95% confidence level ranged from less than 1% relative at 1 ppm to less than 10% relative at 1 ppb. Over 100 primary gravimetric standards have been developed, validated, and used for certifying the concentrations of a variety of mixtures for monitoring studies

  4. Influence of injector technology on injection and combustion development - Part 1: Hydraulic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payri, R.; Salvador, F.J.; Gimeno, J.; Morena, J. de la [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    An experimental study of two real multi-hole Diesel injectors is performed under current DI Diesel engine operating conditions. The aim of the investigation is to study the influence of injector technology on the flow at the nozzle exit and to analyse its effect on the spray in evaporative conditions and combustion development. The injectors used are two of the most common technologies used nowadays: solenoid and piezoelectric. The nozzles for both injectors are very similar since the objective of the work is the understanding of the influence of the injector technology on spray characteristics for a given nozzle geometry. In the first part of the study, experimental measurements of hydraulic characterization have been analyzed for both systems. Analysis of spray behaviour in evaporative conditions and combustion development will be carried out in the second part of the work. Important differences between both injectors have been observed, especially in their transient opening and closing of the needle, leading to a more efficient air-fuel mixing and combustion processes for the piezoelectric actuated injector. (author)

  5. Developing Human-Computer Interface Models and Representation Techniques(Dialogue Management as an Integral Part of Software Engineering)

    OpenAIRE

    Hartson, H. Rex; Hix, Deborah; Kraly, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    The Dialogue Management Project at Virginia Tech is studying the poorly understood problem of human-computer dialogue development. This problem often leads to low usability in human-computer dialogues. The Dialogue Management Project approaches solutions to low usability in interfaces by addressing human-computer dialogue development as an integral and equal part of the total system development process. This project consists of two rather distinct, but dependent, parts. One is development of ...

  6. Application of unfolding transformation in the random matrix theory to analyze in vivo neuronal spike firing during awake and anesthetized conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available General anesthetics decrease the frequency and density of spike firing. This effect makes it difficult to detect spike regularity. To overcome this problem, we developed a method utilizing the unfolding transformation which analyzes the energy level statistics in the random matrix theory. We regarded the energy axis as time axis of neuron spike and analyzed the time series of cortical neural firing in vivo. Unfolding transformation detected regularities of neural firing while changes in firing densities were associated with pentobarbital. We found that unfolding transformation enables us to compare firing regularity between awake and anesthetic conditions on a universal scale. Keywords: Unfolding transformation, Spike-timing, Regularity

  7. Developing a software for removable partial denture design: Part II: Introduction of RPD graph software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejatidanesh F

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Designing removable partial dentures is one of the most important phases of prosthetic treatments. Computer can be used to facilitate and increase accuracy of removable partial denture design. The aim of this study was to develop a software for removable partial denture design.Materials and Methods: A questionnaire (discussed in part I and major textbooks, were used to determine the design rules.  The software (RPD Graph was developed using Visual C++ and Maryam program. The RPD Graph can determine the classification of partial edentulous arch. With defining the missing teeth and providing data about prognosis and conditions of abutment teeth, the removable partial design will be developed by RPD Graph. This software is a knowledge-based system which has specific characteristics. It can be used as an educational tool for teaching RPD design and as a clinical tool for supporting clinician's decision. In addition it can be developed to more complete softwares.

  8. Geography and trends of developing ethnic festival tourism in the Ukrainian Part of the Carpathian Euroregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jaroslavivna Topornytska

    2015-07-01

    41, Doroshenko St., UA – 79000 L’viv, Ukraine, Topornytska_Maria@i.ua   Abstract   Ethnic festivals are the motive basis as well as a resource of tourism, hence they are the object of studying the geography of tourism. Their development is of great importance for the region, results in new tourist destinations and growth of income in the countryside. The statistics proves that more and more tourists are coming to the region due to ethnic festivals. The number of ethnic festivals is increasing and their geography is expanding. Over 2000 - 2011 (in the pre-crises period of the state’s development the number of ethnic festivals in the Ukrainian part of the Carpathian Euroregion grew from 55 to 228. About 100 new popular tourist destinations appeared in the tourist map. The article describes geographic, ethno-cultural and organizational principles of ethnic festival tourism development in the Carpathian region of Ukraine.   Key words: ethnic tourism, festival, ethnic festival tourism, regional development, geography of ethnic festivals.

  9. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: Part 1--biological basis of maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-01-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances, the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1 focuses on the factors that affect maximal power production, while part 2, which will follow in a forthcoming edition of Sports Medicine, explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability of the neuromuscular system to generate maximal power is affected by a range of interrelated factors. Maximal muscular power is defined and limited by the force-velocity relationship and affected by the length-tension relationship. The ability to generate maximal power is influenced by the type of muscle action involved and, in particular, the time available to develop force, storage and utilization of elastic energy, interactions of contractile and elastic elements, potentiation of contractile and elastic filaments as well as stretch reflexes. Furthermore, maximal power production is influenced by morphological factors including fibre type contribution to whole muscle area, muscle architectural features and tendon properties as well as neural factors including motor unit recruitment, firing frequency, synchronization and inter-muscular coordination. In addition, acute changes in the muscle environment (i.e. alterations resulting from fatigue, changes in hormone milieu and muscle temperature) impact the ability to generate maximal power. Resistance training has been shown to impact each of these neuromuscular factors in quite specific ways. Therefore, an understanding of the biological basis of maximal power production is essential for developing training programmes that effectively enhance maximal power production in the human.

  10. Risk-based Process Development of Biosimilars as Part of the Quality by Design Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalai, Dénes; Dietzsch, Christian; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    design (QbD) is a concept that is currently struggling for more acceptance from the side of the pharmaceutical industry. To achieve this, the major goals of QbD have to be revisited and QbD tools have to be subsequently developed. This contribution offers an example as to how implement risk management in early-stage biosimilar development as part of the QbD concept. The main goal was to go beyond the conventional QbD workflow and to adjust risk management to the challenges of biosimilar products. Accordingly, instead of using methods like failure mode and effects analysis, recommendations of the ICH Q9 guideline were reviewed and put into practice by creating tailored risk assessment tools. The novelty of this contribution is to report those tailored tools ready-to-use for early bioprocess development of biosimilars along QbD principles.

  11. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  12. Improvement of high resolution borehole seismics. Part 1: Development of processing methods for VSP surveys. Part 2: Piezoelectric signal transmitter for seismic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.; Heikkinen, P.; Pekonen, S.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the high resolution borehole seismics project has been to improve the reliability and resolution of seismic methods in the particular environment of nuclear waste repository sites. The results obtained, especially the data processing and interpretation methods developed, are applicable also to other geophysical methods (e.g. Georadar). The goals of the seismic development project have been: the development of processing and interpretation techniques for mapping fractured zones, and the design and construction of a seismic source complying with the requirements of repository site characterization programs. Because these two aspects of the work are very different in nature, we have structured the report as two self contained parts. Part 1 describes the development of interpretive techniques. We have used for demonstrating the effect of different methods a VSP data set collected at the SCV site during Stage 1 of the project. Five techniques have been studied: FK-filtering, three versions of Tau-p filtering and a new technique that we have developed lately, Image Space filtering. Part 2 refers to the construction of the piezoelectric source. Earlier results obtained over short distances with low energy piezoelectric transmitters let us believe that the same principle could be applied for seismic signal transmitters, if solutions for higher energy and lower frequency output were found. The instrument which we have constructed is a cylindrical unit which can be placed in a borehole and is able to produce a radial strain when excited axially. The minimum borehole diameter is 56 mm. (au)

  13. Economy of conservation options in industry and developed environment. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    To determine the optimal situation for the energy supply in the working area of the IJsselmij and Sep the study on the title subject was carried out. To influence the energy demand demand-side management (DSM) as part of integrated resource planning (IRP) is applied. Several scenarios to determine whether new production capacity must be installed or conservation options and activities should be realized are elaborated and calculated by means of the COMPASS model. E3T compiled input data for the demand-side of the model: energy consumption and energy conservation, investment cost and operational cost per user, number of installations and the development of the penetration of the conservation options between 1990 and 2010, and required subsidies and promotional costs of the IJsselmij to introduce such options. Six of the options were selected and elaborated in detail. The results are presented in this report for the options: coverage of cooling and freezing equipment at night, frequency control of electric motors, decentralized heat production by means of advanced burners, indoor climate control in the built environment, reflectors for TL-lighting systems in the built environment, and behavioral change in industrial companies. In part 1 an overview is given of the economics, the selection and elaboration of the energy conservation options. 9 figs., 53 tabs., 71 refs., 1 appendix

  14. EGNOS Based APV Procedures Development Possibilities In The South-Eastern Part Of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleta Wojciech Z.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available On 14th and 15th March 2011 for the first time approach with vertical guidance (APV-I was conducted on Polish territory in Katowice, Kraków and Mielec. This was the milestone for GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System and Area Navigation (RNAV use as a new instrument approach chance for NPA (Non-Precision Approach and PA (Precision Approach in Poland. The paper presents the experiment study of EGNOS SIS (Signal in Space due to APV (Approach with Vertical Guidance procedures development possibilities in the south-eastern part of Poland. Researches were conducted from January 2014 till June 2014 in three Polish cities: Warszawa, Kraków and Rzeszów. EGNOS as SBAS (Satellite Based Augmentation System in according with ICAO's Annex 10 has to meet restrictive requirements for three dimensional accuracy, system integrity, availability and continuity of SIS. Because of ECAC (European Civil Aviation Conference states to EGNOS coverage in the eastern part of Europe, location of mention above stations, shows real usefulness for SIS tests and evaluation of the results [EUROCONTROL, 2008].

  15. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Geller Palti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 13-29% of cases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side, and the second following the oclusal plane (left side, a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. RESULTS: The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. CONCLUSION: This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry.

  16. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  17. Central bronchial carcinoid: Management of a case and anesthetic perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Goswami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructing lesions of the central airways present with a variety of symptoms and are often associated with pneumonia or asthma-like states. Anesthesia to these patients often presents challenges right from the preoperative stabilization of underlying lung condition, mask ventilation in the supine position to maintaining oxygenation and ventilation in the intraoperative and postoperative period. We present here a case of a young woman with a central bronchial tumor with significant airway obstruction with potential for major bleeding and subsequent anesthetic management without lung sacrificing measures and cardiopulmonary bypass assistance.

  18. [Anesthetic considerations in sickle cell anemia: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Meré, L A; Sopena-Zubiría, L A; Alvarez-Blanco, M

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common hemoglobinopathy. Advances in therapeutic techniques and anesthetic procedures have led to a considerable increase in the success of surgical procedures in these patients. We report the case of a 16-year-old black boy diagnosed with sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia who presented with chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia. He was scheduled for debridement of the lesion and musculocutaneous flap repair. We emphasize the importance of communication between anesthesiologists, surgeons, and hematologists in the perioperative period in order to determine the risk of complications and anticipate them.

  19. Anesthetic management of schwannoma of the base of the tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upma B Batra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma arising from the base of the tongue are very rare and only a few cases have been reported so far. Definitive diagnosis is always made after a histological examination. Apart from an anticipated difficult airway with a risk of airway obstruction upon induction of general anesthesia, anesthetic concerns also include possibility of trauma to the growth and bleeding with attendant risks. We discuss the awake fiberoptic technique used for endotracheal intubation in such a case. This case report highlights the importance of detailed history taking and clinical examination, with emphasis on airway assessment and preoperative planning.

  20. Cimetidine as pre-anesthetic agent for cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K; Holmskov, A

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study of 39 consecutive cesarean sections, 20 patients received cimetidine 400 mg intramuscularly as a pre-anesthetic, an 19 control patients were given NaCl. No perinatal effects on the infants were observed by cardiotocography before delivery, and K, Na, pH, PCO2, HC...... with uncomplicated pregnancies, cimetidine was found to cross the placenta at a maternal/cord blood ratio of 3:1. The drug could not be detected in any of the infants 2 hours after delivery....

  1. Anesthetic management in thyroid crisis triggered by molar pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Aydoğan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical thyrotoxicosis is one of the rare complications of molar pregnancy. The cause of the symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism in mol hydatiform is the thyrotrophic effects of high levels of β-hCG. The hCG molecule consists of α and β subunits; the α subunit is identical to TSH and the β subunit has a similar structure to TSH. In this case report it was aimed to discuss the anesthetic management of a dilatation and curettage case in a patient with mol hydatiform and thyroid crisis. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 433-434Key words: Hydatidiform mole, hyperthyroidism, anesthesia

  2. Sustainable housing as part of sustainable development - visions and experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses different approaches to sustainable development with main focus on sustainable housing, but also local climate activities with focus on transportation, food and local businesses are discussed. The focus in the paper is mainly on experiences from Denmark. The paper starts out...... with a short introduction to theoretical approaches to analyses of sustainable housing and other sustainability initiatives as innovation processes. Afterwards some social and political characteristics of Denmark are presented and one of the recent sustainability initiatives in Denmark, the climate plan from...... the Danish Society of Engineers is described. The second part of the paper discusses Danish sustainable housing strategies focusing on new houses and refurbishment of existing houses. Finally some recent experiences from a local climate cooperation between a technical university, a municipal administration...

  3. Part 2 of the summary for the electronics, DAQ, and computing working group: Technological developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The attraction of hadron machines as B factories is the copious production of B particles. However, the interesting physics lies in specific rare final states. The challenge is selecting and recording the interesting ones. Part 1 of the summary for this working group, open-quote Comparison of Trigger and Data Acquisition Parameters for Future B Physics Experiments close-quote summarizes and compares the different proposals. In parallel with this activity, the working group also looked at a number of the technological developments being proposed to meet the trigger and DAQ requirements. The presentations covered a wide variety of topics, which are grouped into three categories: (1) front-end electronics, (2) level 0 fast triggers, and (3) trigger and vertex processors. The group did not discuss on-line farms or offine data storage and computing due to lack of time

  4. Development of computer program for simulation of an ice bank system operation, Part I: Mathematical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Boris; Grozdek, Marino; Soldo, Vladimir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Ivana Lucica 5, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-09-15

    Since the use of standard engineering methods in the process of an ice bank performance evaluation offers neither adequate flexibility nor accuracy, the aim of this research was to provide a powerful tool for an industrial design of an ice storage system allowing to account for the various design parameters and system arrangements over a wide range of time varying operating conditions. In this paper the development of a computer application for the prediction of an ice bank system operation is presented. Static, indirect, cool thermal storage systems with external ice on coil building/melting were considered. The mathematical model was developed by means of energy and mass balance relations for each component of the system and is basically divided into two parts, the model of an ice storage system and the model of a refrigeration unit. Heat transfer processes in an ice silo were modelled by use of empirical correlations while the performance of refrigeration unit components were based on manufacturers data. Programming and application design were made in Fortran 95 language standard. Input of data is enabled through drop down menus and dialog boxes, while the results are presented via figures, diagrams and data (ASCII) files. In addition, to demonstrate the necessity for development of simulation program a case study was performed. Simulation results clearly indicate that no simple engineering methods or rule of thumb principles could be utilised in order to validate performance of an ice bank system properly. (author)

  5. The development of GRTgaz - A vital part of the European energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.Ph.

    2011-01-01

    The energy future has become one of the major stakes of the next presidential election in France. After the Fukushima disaster, the debates on our own energy future mainly cover the closing down, or not, in full or in part, of nuclear power stations. Natural gas is, most of the time, absent from the debate. Yet it has many advantages and should be viewed as a solution that favours renewable energy development, while being essential to achieving a more diversified and more environment-friendly energy mix. In addition, our country is at the crossroads of different European as networks. Given this situation, GRTGaz is doing its utmost to develop an attractive and dynamic wholesale market. With the prospect of increased European market integration and in spite of an uncertain economic environment, investments must be made to develop infrastructure. In 2011, with the financial backing of the European Union, GRTGaz has launched two major gas transport grid reinforcement projects in the South and North of France. These will allow us to strengthen our position as one the major gas hubs in Europe. This is good news for our industry and for employment too. (author)

  6. Development of Spray on Bag for manufacturing of large composites parts: Diffusivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempah, Maxime Joseph

    Bagging materials are utilized in many composites manufacturing processes. The selection is mainly driven by cost, temperature requirements, chemical compatibility and tear properties of the bag. The air barrier properties of the bag are assumed to be adequate or in many cases are not considered at all. However, the gas barrier property of a bag is the most critical parameter, as it can negatively affect the quality of the final laminate. The barrier property is a function of the bag material, uniformity, thickness and temperature. Improved barrier properties are needed for large parts, high pressure consolidated components and structures where air stays entrapped on the part surface. The air resistance property of the film is defined as permeability and is investigated in this thesis. A model was developed to evaluate the gas transport through the film and an experimental cell was implemented to characterize various commercial films. Understanding and characterizing the transport phenomena through the film allows optimization of the bagging material for various manufacturing processes. Spray-on-Bag is a scalable alternative bagging method compared to standard films. The approach allows in-situ fabrication of the bag on large and complex geometry structures where optimization of the bag properties can be varied on a local level. An experimental setup was developed and implemented using a six axis robot and an automated spraying system. Experiments were performed on a flat surface and specimens were characterized and compared to conventional films. Air barrier properties were within range of standard film approaches showing the potential to fabricate net shape bagging structures in an automated process.

  7. Operator models for delivering municipal solid waste management services in developing countries: Part B: Decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Reka; Whiteman, Andrew D; Wilson, David C; Briciu, Cosmin; Nürnberger, Sofia; Oelz, Barbara; Gunsilius, Ellen; Schwehn, Ekkehard

    2017-08-01

    This is the second of two papers reporting the results of a major study considering 'operator models' for municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in emerging and developing countries. Part A documents the evidence base, while Part B presents a four-step decision support system for selecting an appropriate operator model in a particular local situation. Step 1 focuses on understanding local problems and framework conditions; Step 2 on formulating and prioritising local objectives; and Step 3 on assessing capacities and conditions, and thus identifying strengths and weaknesses, which underpin selection of the operator model. Step 4A addresses three generic questions, including public versus private operation, inter-municipal co-operation and integration of services. For steps 1-4A, checklists have been developed as decision support tools. Step 4B helps choose locally appropriate models from an evidence-based set of 42 common operator models ( coms); decision support tools here are a detailed catalogue of the coms, setting out advantages and disadvantages of each, and a decision-making flowchart. The decision-making process is iterative, repeating steps 2-4 as required. The advantages of a more formal process include avoiding pre-selection of a particular com known to and favoured by one decision maker, and also its assistance in identifying the possible weaknesses and aspects to consider in the selection and design of operator models. To make the best of whichever operator models are selected, key issues which need to be addressed include the capacity of the public authority as 'client', management in general and financial management in particular.

  8. Multivariable analysis of anesthetic factors associated with time to extubation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Stephanie; Hofmeister, Erik; Egan, Katrina

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that prolong the time to extubation in dogs. Anesthetic records of 900 dogs at a university teaching hospital were searched. Multiple linear regression was used to compare independent predictors (patient demographics, anesthetic and intraoperative variables) with the dependent variable (time to extubation). Induction with propofol (P temperature (P = 0.0000), and by 0.096 minutes for every 1 minute increase in anesthetic duration (P = 0.000). Anesthetic variables, which can be manipulated by the anesthetist, include choice of premedication and induction drugs, hypothermia, and duration of anesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Twitter and Public Health (Part 1): How Individual Public Health Professionals Use Twitter for Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Mark; Stetten, Nichole E; Islam, Sabrina; Pizarro, Katherine

    2017-09-20

    The use of social networking sites is increasingly being adopted in public health, in part, because of the barriers to funding and reduced resources. Public health professionals are using social media platforms, specifically Twitter, as a way to facilitate professional development. The objective of this study was to identify public health professionals using Twitter and to analyze how they use this platform to enhance their formal and informal professional development within the context of public health. Keyword searches were conducted to identify and invite potential participants to complete a survey related to their use of Twitter for public health and professional experiences. Data regarding demographic attributes, Twitter usage, and qualitative information were obtained through an anonymous Web-based survey. Open-response survey questions were analyzed using the constant comparison method. "Using Twitter makes it easier to expand my networking opportunities" and "I find Twitter useful for professional development" scored highest, with a mean score of 4.57 (standard deviation [SD] 0.74) and 4.43 (SD 0.76) on a 5-point Likert scale. Analysis of the qualitative data shows the emergence of the following themes for why public health professionals mostly use Twitter: (1) geography, (2) continuing education, (3) professional gain, and (4) communication. For public health professionals in this study, Twitter is a platform best used for their networking and professional development. Furthermore, the use of Twitter allows public health professionals to overcome a series of barriers and enhances opportunities for growth. ©Mark Hart, Nichole E Stetten, Sabrina Islam, Katherine Pizarro. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 20.09.2017.

  10. Data-Mining Toolset Developed for Determining Turbine Engine Part Life Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    The current practice in aerospace turbine engine maintenance is to remove components defined as life-limited parts after a fixed time, on the basis of a predetermined number of flight cycles. Under this schedule-based maintenance practice, the worst-case usage scenario is used to determine the usable life of the component. As shown, this practice often requires removing a part before its useful life is fully consumed, thus leading to higher maintenance cost. To address this issue, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in a collaborative effort with Pratt & Whitney, has developed a generic modular toolset that uses data-mining technology to parameterize life usage models for maintenance purposes. The toolset enables a "condition-based" maintenance approach, where parts are removed on the basis of the cumulative history of the severity of operation they have experienced. The toolset uses data-mining technology to tune life-consumption models on the basis of operating and maintenance histories. The flight operating conditions, represented by measured variables within the engine, are correlated with repair records for the engines, generating a relationship between the operating condition of the part and its service life. As shown, with the condition-based maintenance approach, the lifelimited part is in service until its usable life is fully consumed. This approach will lower maintenance costs while maintaining the safety of the propulsion system. The toolset is a modular program that is easily customizable by users. First, appropriate parametric damage accumulation models, which will be functions of engine variables, must be defined. The tool then optimizes the models to match the historical data by computing an effective-cycle metric that reduces the unexplained variability in component life due to each damage mode by accounting for the variability in operational severity. The damage increment due to operating conditions experienced during each flight is used to compute

  11. History of internal fixation (part 1): early developments with wires and plates before World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Pariat, Jacques

    2017-06-01

    Though the date at which an orthopaedic implant was first used cannot be ascertained with any certainty, the fixation of bone fracture using an iron wire was reported for the first time in a French manuscript in 1775. The first techniques of operative fracture treatment were developed at the end of the 18th and in the beginning of the 19th centuries. The use of cerclage wires to fix fractures was the most frequent fixation at this time. The French Berenger-Feraud (1832-1900) had written the first book on internal fixation. However internal fixation of fractures could not become a practical method before Lister had ensured the safety of open reduction and internal fixation in the treatment of fractures. Lister is not only the father of asepsis; he also used metal wires to fix even closed fractures. The first internal fixation by means of a plate and screws was described by Carl Hansmann in 1858 in Hamburg. Nevertheless, Arbuthnot Lane (1892) and Albin Lambotte (1905) are considered to be the founders of this method, which was further developed by Sherman in the first part of the 20th century.

  12. Questioning the "big assumptions". Part I: addressing personal contradictions that impede professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Constance M; Lahey, Lisa; Armstrong, Elizabeth; Kegan, Robert

    2003-08-01

    The ultimate success of recent medical curriculum reforms is, in large part, dependent upon the faculty's ability to adopt and sustain new attitudes and behaviors. However, like many New Year's resolutions, sincere intent to change may be short lived and followed by a discouraging return to old behaviors. Failure to sustain the initial resolve to change can be misinterpreted as a lack of commitment to one's original goals and eventually lead to greater effort expended in rationalizing the status quo rather than changing it. The present article outlines how a transformative process that has proven to be effective in managing personal change, Questioning the Big Assumptions, was successfully used in an international faculty development program for medical educators to enhance individual personal satisfaction and professional effectiveness. This process systematically encouraged participants to explore and proactively address currently operative mechanisms that could stall their attempts to change at the professional level. The applications of the Big Assumptions process in faculty development helped individuals to recognize and subsequently utilize unchallenged and deep rooted personal beliefs to overcome unconscious resistance to change. This approach systematically led participants away from circular griping about what was not right in their current situation to identifying the actions that they needed to take to realize their individual goals. By thoughtful testing of personal Big Assumptions, participants designed behavioral changes that could be broadly supported and, most importantly, sustained.

  13. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part I—Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Roque; D’Amato, Roberto; Gómez, Emilio; Domingo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    The development of an error compensation model for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) and its integration into feature measurement is presented. CMMs are widespread and dependable instruments in industry and laboratories for dimensional measurement. From the tip probe sensor to the machine display, there is a complex transformation of probed point coordinates through the geometrical feature model that makes the assessment of accuracy and uncertainty measurement results difficult. Therefore, error compensation is not standardized, conversely to other simpler instruments. Detailed coordinate error compensation models are generally based on CMM as a rigid-body and it requires a detailed mapping of the CMM’s behavior. In this paper a new model type of error compensation is proposed. It evaluates the error from the vectorial composition of length error by axis and its integration into the geometrical measurement model. The non-explained variability by the model is incorporated into the uncertainty budget. Model parameters are analyzed and linked to the geometrical errors and uncertainty of CMM response. Next, the outstanding measurement models of flatness, angle, and roundness are developed. The proposed models are useful for measurement improvement with easy integration into CMM signal processing, in particular in industrial environments where built-in solutions are sought. A battery of implementation tests are presented in Part II, where the experimental endorsement of the model is included. PMID:27690052

  14. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part I—Model Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Calvo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of an error compensation model for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs and its integration into feature measurement is presented. CMMs are widespread and dependable instruments in industry and laboratories for dimensional measurement. From the tip probe sensor to the machine display, there is a complex transformation of probed point coordinates through the geometrical feature model that makes the assessment of accuracy and uncertainty measurement results difficult. Therefore, error compensation is not standardized, conversely to other simpler instruments. Detailed coordinate error compensation models are generally based on CMM as a rigid-body and it requires a detailed mapping of the CMM’s behavior. In this paper a new model type of error compensation is proposed. It evaluates the error from the vectorial composition of length error by axis and its integration into the geometrical measurement model. The non-explained variability by the model is incorporated into the uncertainty budget. Model parameters are analyzed and linked to the geometrical errors and uncertainty of CMM response. Next, the outstanding measurement models of flatness, angle, and roundness are developed. The proposed models are useful for measurement improvement with easy integration into CMM signal processing, in particular in industrial environments where built-in solutions are sought. A battery of implementation tests are presented in Part II, where the experimental endorsement of the model is included.

  15. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  16. The effect of different anesthetics on neurovascular coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Maria Angela; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Thakur, Kiran; Wu, Weicheng; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Carp, Stefan; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    To date, the majority of neurovascular coupling studies focused on the thalamic afferents' activity in layer IV and the corresponding large spiking activity as responsible for functional hyperemia. This paper highlights the role of the secondary and late cortico-cortical transmission in neurovascular coupling. Simultaneous scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) measurements were obtained during multiple conditions of event-related electrical forepaw stimulation in 33 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 6 groups depending on the maintaining anesthetic - alpha-chloralose, pentobarbital, ketamine-xylazine, fentanyl-droperidol, isoflurane, or propofol. The somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) were decomposed into four components and the question of which best predicts the hemodynamic responses was investigated. Results of the linear regression analysis show that the hemodynamic response is best correlated with the secondary and late cortico-cortical transmissions and not with the initial thalamic input activity in layer IV. Baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF) interacts with neural activity and influences the evoked hemodynamic responses. Finally, neurovascular coupling appears to be the same across all anesthetics used. PMID:20350606

  17. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  18. The anesthetic management of button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Richard J; Hoagland, Monica; Mayes, Lena; Twite, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Injuries related to button battery ingestion are common in children. This review provides an outline of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and anesthetic implications in children who have ingested a button battery. A literature search was conducted in the United States National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the terms "button battery ingestion" and "children' and "removal" and "surgery" and "anesthesia". Ninety-six articles published in English were found from 1983-2017, and 62 of these articles were incorporated into this review. Additionally, the Internet was searched with the terms "button battery ingestion and children" to identify further entities, organizations, and resources affiliated with button battery ingestion in children. These additional sources were studied and included in this review. Button batteries are ubiquitous in homes and electronic devices. Since 2006, larger-diameter and higher-voltage batteries have become available. These are more likely to become impacted in the esophagus after ingestion and lead to an increase in severe morbidity and mortality due to caustic tissue injury. Children at the highest risk for complications are those under six years of age who have ingested batteries > 20 mm in diameter and sustain prolonged esophageal impaction at the level of the aortic arch with the negative pole oriented anteriorly. Anesthesiologists need to know about the epidemiology, pathophysiology, complications, and anesthetic management of children who have ingested button batteries.

  19. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prontera A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Prontera,1 Stefano Baroni,2 Andrea Marudi,2 Franco Valzania,3 Alberto Feletti,1 Francesca Benuzzi,4 Elisabetta Bertellini,2 Giacomo Pavesi1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Nuovo Ospedale Civile SAgostino-Estense, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Nuovo Ospedale Civile SAgostino-Estense, 3Department of Neurology, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S Agostino-Estense, 4Department of Neuroscience, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy Introduction: Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients’ neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic–sedative medication is increasing.Methods: Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management.Results: The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure.Conclusion: In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used. Keywords: dexmedetomidine, awake surgery, anesthesia

  20. Anesthetic and Perioperative Management of Patients With Brugada Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Sgarito, Giuseppe; Giordano, Umberto; Verlato, Roberto; Baranchuk, Adrian; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-09-15

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an arrhythmogenic disease reported to be one among the leading causes of cardiac death in subjects under the age of 40 years. In these patients, episodes of lethal arrhythmias may be induced by several factors or situations, and for this reason, management during anesthesia and surgery must provide some precautions and drugs restrictions. To date, it is difficult to formulate guidelines for anesthetic management of patients with BrS because of the absence of prospective studies, and there is not a definite recommendation for neither general nor regional anesthesia, and there are no large studies in merit. For this reason, in the anesthesia management of patients with BrS, the decision of using each drug must be made after careful consideration and always in controlled conditions, avoiding other factors that are known to have the potential to induce arrhythmias and with a close cooperation between anesthetists and cardiologists, which is essential before and after surgery. In conclusion, given the absence of large studies in literature, we want to focus on some general rules, which resulted from case series and clinical practice, to be followed during the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with BrS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam

  2. Comparison between newer local anesthetics for myofascial pain syndrome management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaralidou, A Th; Amaniti, E N; Maidatsi, P G; Gorgias, N K; Vasilakos, D F

    2007-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes are characterized by the presence of painful loci within muscles, tendons or ligaments, called trigger points. Infiltration of these points with local anesthetics is often used as a treatment modality. The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate 0.25% levobupivacaine and 0.25% ropivacaine for trigger point injection regarding pain on injection, treatment efficacy and duration of symptoms remission. Sixty-eight patients, suffering from myofascial pain syndromes, were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for trigger-point injection. After completion of the procedure, patients were asked to rate pain during injection and efficacy of the treatment, based on immediate relief. Two weeks later, they were asked about the duration of this relief. Statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups with respect to pain during injection, efficacy of the treatment and duration of pain relief. The two local anesthetics seem to be equally effective for trigger point infiltration. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy in the elderly: Anesthetic considerations and Psychotropic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Garekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been found to be a rapid and effective treatment strategy for psychiatric and neurological conditions in the elderly, but the administration of ECT in the elderly can be challenging due to a high risk of adverse events. The increased risk can be attributed to a declined physiological reserve, the presence of physical comorbidities, and the use of multiple drugs, which interact with the electrical stimulus and the anesthetic medications used during the ECT procedure. The selection of appropriate induction agents and muscle relaxants should be guided by patient's clinical status and the psychotropic drugs being used. Modifications in the doses of psychotropic drugs also need to be carried out before ECT to reduce cardiovascular and neurological side effects. Modification in the conduct of anesthesia can also aid in augmenting seizures and in preventing common side effects of ECT. A vital step in preventing adverse events in the elderly is carrying out a thorough pre.ECT evaluation. Despite these challenges, ECT can be carried out safely in elderly patients with severe comorbidities, provided clinical ECT, and anesthetic parameters are adequately optimized.

  4. Modification of GABA-mediated inhibition by various injectable anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F; Joy, R M

    1992-09-01

    Increasing doses of the injectable anesthetics etomidate, Saffan, thiopental, ketamine, and xylazine and the vehicles saline and propylene glycol were administered to urethane-anesthetized rats. Their effects in vivo on perforant pathway-evoked field excitatory post-synaptic potentials and population spikes in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were determined. The primary purpose was to ascertain whether these compounds affect hippocampal excitability in a manner consistent with their proposed mechanisms of action. Compared with their respective vehicles, thiopental, etomidate, and xylazine reduced the amplitude of population spikes to single perforant pathway stimulation by 20-30% at the highest doses tested. Xylazine also increased the latency to onset of the population spike. No other effects were observed. Using paired pulse paradigms, it was determined that etomidate produced a dramatic, prolonged reduction in granule cell excitability at interpulse intervals of 10-100 ms. The magnitude of the effect was dose related and was reversible with the discontinuance of administration of the drug. Similar changes occurred with Saffan (althesin) and thiopental. Ketamine produced a small but significant depression in granule cell excitability during intervals of 10-200 ms. Xylazine had no effect. These data corroborate the importance of a prolongation of gamma-aminobutyric acid A-mediated inhibition to the mechanism of actions of etomidate, thiopental, and Saffan at relevant exposure concentrations in vivo.

  5. Timing ambition: How organisational actors engage with the institutionalised norms that affect the career development of part-time workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Gremmen, C.C.M.; Peters, P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the debate on the career development of part-time workers. First, it shows how institutionalised norms concerning working hours and ambition can be considered as temporal structures that are both dynamic and contextual, and may both hinder and enable part-time workers'

  6. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: part 2 - training considerations for improving maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances: the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1, published in an earlier issue of Sports Medicine, focused on the factors that affect maximal power production while part 2 explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability to generate maximal power during complex motor skills is of paramount importance to successful athletic performance across many sports. A crucial issue faced by scientists and coaches is the development of effective and efficient training programmes that improve maximal power production in dynamic, multi-joint movements. Such training is referred to as 'power training' for the purposes of this review. Although further research is required in order to gain a deeper understanding of the optimal training techniques for maximizing power in complex, sports-specific movements and the precise mechanisms underlying adaptation, several key conclusions can be drawn from this review. First, a fundamental relationship exists between strength and power, which dictates that an individual cannot possess a high level of power without first being relatively strong. Thus, enhancing and maintaining maximal strength is essential when considering the long-term development of power. Second, consideration of movement pattern, load and velocity specificity is essential when designing power training programmes. Ballistic, plyometric and weightlifting exercises can be used effectively as primary exercises within a power training programme that enhances maximal power. The loads applied to these exercises will depend on the specific requirements of each particular sport and the type of movement being trained. The use of ballistic exercises with loads ranging from 0% to 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and

  7. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassakov KV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific, representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index; index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0, only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1. Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100 and a high index of expectations (25.0, reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. Keywords: anesthetics, anesthetic adjuvants, mortality, safety margins, therapeutic indices

  8. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  9. Application of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the development of space flight parts approval model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    A cost effective model which uses the artificial intelligence techniques in the selection and approval of parts is presented. The knowledge which is acquired from the specialists for different part types are represented in a knowledge base in the form of rules and objects. The parts information is stored separately in a data base and is isolated from the knowledge base. Validation, verification and performance issues are highlighted.

  10. Development of a standardized Intranet database of formulation records for nonsterile compounding, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Michael; Anderson, Kim; Evans, Alex; Crawford, Angela

    2012-01-01

    In part 1 of this series, we outlined the rationale behind the development of a centralized electronic database used to maintain nonsterile compounding formulation records in the Mission Health System, which is a union of several independent hospitals and satellite and regional pharmacies that form the cornerstone of advanced medical care in several areas of western North Carolina. Hospital providers in many healthcare systems require compounded formulations to meet the needs of their patients (in particular, pediatric patients). Before a centralized electronic compounding database was implemented in the Mission Health System, each satellite or regional pharmacy affiliated with that system had a specific set of formulation records, but no standardized format for those records existed. In this article, we describe the quality control, database platform selection, description, implementation, and execution of our intranet database system, which is designed to maintain, manage, and disseminate nonsterile compounding formulation records in the hospitals and affiliated pharmacies of the Mission Health System. The objectives of that project were to standardize nonsterile compounding formulation records, create a centralized computerized database that would increase healthcare staff members' access to formulation records, establish beyond-use dates based on published stability studies, improve quality control, reduce the potential for medication errors related to compounding medications, and (ultimately) improve patient safety.

  11. Spent catalyst waste management. A review. Part 1. Developments in hydroprocessing catalyst waste reduction and use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, M.; Stanislaus, A. [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109-Safat (Kuwait)

    2008-04-15

    Solid catalysts containing metals, metal oxides or sulfides, which play a key role in the refining of petroleum to clean fuels and many other valuable products, become solid wastes after use. In many refineries, the spent catalysts discarded from hydroprocessing units form a major part of these solid wastes. Disposal of spent hydroprocessing catalysts requires compliance with stringent environmental regulations because of their hazardous nature and toxic chemicals content. Various options such as minimizing spent catalyst waste generation by regeneration and reuse, metals recovery, utilization to produce useful materials and treatment for safe disposal, could be considered to deal with the spent catalyst environmental problem. In this paper, information available in the literature on spent hydroprocessing catalyst waste reduction at source by using improved more active and more stable catalysts, regeneration, rejuvenation and reuse of deactivated catalysts in many cycles, and reusing in other processes are reviewed in detail with focus on recent developments. Available methods for recycling of spent hydroprocessing catalysts by using them as raw materials for the preparation of active new catalysts and many other valuable products are also reviewed. (author)

  12. Demonstrating Starshade Performance as Part of NASA's Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Spergel, D. N.; Vanderbei, R. J.; Lisman, D.; Shaklan, S.; Thomson, M. W.; Walkemeyer, P. E.; Bach, V. M.; Oakes, E.; Cady, E. J.; Martin, S. R.; Marchen, L. F.; Macintosh, B.; Rudd, R.; Mikula, J. A.; Lynch, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    In this poster we describe the results of our project to design, manufacture, and measure a prototype starshade petal as part of the Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions program. An external occult is a satellite employing a large screen, or starshade,that flies in formation with a spaceborne telescope to provide the starlight suppression needed for detecting and characterizing exoplanets. Among the advantages of using an occulter are the broadband allowed for characterization and the removal of light for the observatory, greatly relaxing the requirements on the telescope and instrument. In this first two-year phase we focused on the key requirement of manufacturing a precision petal with the precise tolerances needed to meet the overall error budget. These tolerances are established by modeling the effect that various mechanical and thermal errors have on scatter in the telescope image plane and by suballocating the allowable contrast degradation between these error sources. We show the results of this analysis and a representative error budget. We also present the final manufactured occulter petal and the metrology on its shape that demonstrates it meets requirements. We show that a space occulter built of petals with the same measured shape would achieve better than 1e-9 contrast. We also show our progress in building and testing sample edges with the sharp radius of curvature needed for limiting solar glint. Finally, we describe our plans for the second TDEM phase.

  13. Development of spraying methods for high density bentonite barriers. Part 3. Field investigation of spraying methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Toida, Masaru; Fukuda, Katsumi; Sato, Tatsuro; Nonaka, Katsumi; Gozu, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    The authors have developed a new method of constructing high density bentonite barriers by means of a wet spraying method. Using this method, backfill material can be placed in narrow upper and side parts in a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Using a new supplying machine for bentonite, spraying tests were conducted to investigate the conditions during construction. On the basis of the test results, the various parameters for the spraying method were investigated. The test results are summarized as follows: 1. The new machine supplied about twice the weight of material supplied by a screw conveyor. A dry density of spraying bentonite 0.05 Mg/m 3 higher than that of a screw conveyor with the same water content could be achieved. 2. The dry density of sprayed bentonite at a boundary with concrete was the same as that at the center of the cross section. 3. The variation in densities of bentonite sprayed in the vertical downward and horizontal directions was small. Also, density reduction due to rebound during spraying was not seen. 4. Bentonite controlled by water content could be sprayed smoothly in the horizontal direction by a small machine. Also rebound could be collected by a machine conveying air. (author)

  14. Multisource inverse-geometry CT. Part I. System concept and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Man, Bruno, E-mail: deman@ge.com; Harrison, Dan; Yin, Zhye [CT Systems and Applications Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Uribe, Jorge [Functional Imaging Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Baek, Jongduk [School of Integrated Technology, Yonsei University, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Longtin, Randy; Roy, Jaydeep; Frutschy, Kristopher [Mechanical Systems Technologies, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Waters, Bill [Design and Development Shops, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Wilson, Colin; Inzinna, Lou; Neculaes, V. Bogdan [High Energy Physics Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Short, Jonathan [Detector Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Reynolds, Joseph [High Frequency Power Electronics Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Senzig, Bob [Molecular Imaging and Computed Tomography, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This paper presents an overview of multisource inverse-geometry computed tomography (IGCT) as well as the development of a gantry-based research prototype system. The development of the distributed x-ray source is covered in a companion paper [V. B. Neculaes et al., “Multisource inverse-geometry CT. Part II. X-ray source design and prototype,” Med. Phys. 43, 4617–4627 (2016)]. While progress updates of this development have been presented at conferences and in journal papers, this paper is the first comprehensive overview of the multisource inverse-geometry CT concept and prototype. The authors also provide a review of all previous IGCT related publications. Methods: The authors designed and implemented a gantry-based 32-source IGCT scanner with 22 cm field-of-view, 16 cm z-coverage, 1 s rotation time, 1.09 × 1.024 mm detector cell size, as low as 0.4 × 0.8 mm focal spot size and 80–140 kVp x-ray source voltage. The system is built using commercially available CT components and a custom made distributed x-ray source. The authors developed dedicated controls, calibrations, and reconstruction algorithms and evaluated the system performance using phantoms and small animals. Results: The authors performed IGCT system experiments and demonstrated tube current up to 125 mA with up to 32 focal spots. The authors measured a spatial resolution of 13 lp/cm at 5% cutoff. The scatter-to-primary ratio is estimated 62% for a 32 cm water phantom at 140 kVp. The authors scanned several phantoms and small animals. The initial images have relatively high noise due to the low x-ray flux levels but minimal artifacts. Conclusions: IGCT has unique benefits in terms of dose-efficiency and cone-beam artifacts, but comes with challenges in terms of scattered radiation and x-ray flux limits. To the authors’ knowledge, their prototype is the first gantry-based IGCT scanner. The authors summarized the design and implementation of the scanner and the authors presented

  15. Monitoring Anesthetic Depth Modification, Evaluation and Application of the Correlation Dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.L.C. van den

    2003-01-01

    Anesthesia is administered to patients to facilitate surgical and diagnostic procedures. The anesthesiologist generally determines the amount of anesthetics needed on the basis of body weight. However, the inter-individual variation in sensitivity to anesthetics is wide and the needed level of

  16. Local anesthetics disrupt energetic coupling between the voltage-sensing segments of a sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Chanda, Baron

    2009-01-01

    Local anesthetics block sodium channels in a state-dependent fashion, binding with higher affinity to open and/or inactivated states. Gating current measurements show that local anesthetics immobilize a fraction of the gating charge, suggesting that the movement of voltage sensors is modified when a local anesthetic binds to the pore of the sodium channel. Here, using voltage clamp fluorescence measurements, we provide a quantitative description of the effect of local anesthetics on the steady-state behavior of the voltage-sensing segments of a sodium channel. Lidocaine and QX-314 shifted the midpoints of the fluorescence-voltage (F-V) curves of S4 domain III in the hyperpolarizing direction by 57 and 65 mV, respectively. A single mutation in the S6 of domain IV (F1579A), a site critical for local anesthetic block, abolished the effect of QX-314 on the voltage sensor of domain III. Both local anesthetics modestly shifted the F-V relationships of S4 domain IV toward hyperpolarized potentials. In contrast, the F-V curve of the S4 domain I was shifted by 11 mV in the depolarizing direction upon QX-314 binding. These antagonistic effects of the local anesthetic indicate that the drug modifies the coupling between the voltage-sensing domains of the sodium channel. Our findings suggest a novel role of local anesthetics in modulating the gating apparatus of the sodium channel.

  17. Bupivacaine Lozenge Compared with Lidocaine Spray as Topical Pharyngeal Anesthetic before Unsedated Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salale, Nesrin; Treldal, Charlotte; Mogensen, Stine

    2014-01-01

    Unsedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) can induce patient discomfort, mainly due to a strong gag reflex. The aim was to assess the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge as topical pharyngeal anesthetic compared with standard treatment with a lidocaine spray before UGE. Ninety-nine adult...... with a lidocaine spray proved to be a superior option as topical pharyngeal anesthetic before an UGE....

  18. Anesthetic success of 1.8ml lidocaine 2% for mandibular tooth extraction. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the anesthetic effect of a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthetic lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000 in inferior alveolar nerve block (NAI for the extraction in mandibular teeth. Material and methods: A pilot study with analitic design. Participating patients of Dental Emergency Service volunteers from Valdivia-Chile for mandibular teeth extractions attending between May and July of 2010. The anesthetic technique was performed by a dentist using only one cartridge of anesthetic to the NAI. After 15 minutes, the effect was considered effective when anesthetic not require reinforcement with additional anesthesia during extraction of teeth. We analyzed the relationship between success anesthetic effect with sex, age, diagnosis of tooth and type and level of pain observed (chi-square and logistic regression, p<0.05. Results: 62 patients were selected, of which only 47(75.8% was achieved anesthetic success. There was no statistical association with sex, age, type or dental diagnosis and perceived pain. Conclusion: Using a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthesia was effective in three of four patients treated by extraction of mandibular teeth. It suggests further research in relation to the clinical effectiveness of other anesthetics with the same dose in NAI.

  19. Influence of Ventilation Strategies and Anesthetic Techniques on Regional Cerebral Oximetry in the Beach Chair Position: A Prospective Interventional Study with a Randomized Comparison of Two Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Alexander, Amir; Neff, Mary; Miller, Bruce S; Shanks, Amy; Housey, Michelle; Mashour, George A

    2015-10-01

    Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with cerebral oxygen desaturation. Changes in cerebral oxygenation resulting from the interaction of inspired oxygen fraction (FIO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2), and anesthetic choice have not been fully evaluated in anesthetized patients in the beach chair position. This is a prospective interventional within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position that incorporated a randomized comparison between two anesthetics. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive desflurane or total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Following induction of anesthesia and positioning, FIO2 and minute ventilation were sequentially adjusted for all patients. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) was the primary outcome and was recorded at each of five set points. While maintaining FIO2 at 0.3 and PETCO2 at 30 mmHg, there was a decrease in rSO2 from 68% (SD, 12) to 61% (SD, 12) (P positioning. The combined interventions of increasing FIO2 to 1.0 and increasing PETCO2 to 45 mmHg resulted in a 14% point improvement in rSO2 to 75% (SD, 12) (P position. There was no significant interaction effect of the anesthetic at the study intervention points. Increasing FIO2 and PETCO2 resulted in a significant increase in rSO2 that overcomes desaturation in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position and that appears independent of anesthetic choice.

  20. Binding of long-lasting local anesthetics to lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoit, Jean-Xavier; Le Guen, Régine; Beloeil, Hélène; Benhamou, Dan

    2009-02-01

    Rapid infusion of lipid emulsion has been proposed to treat local anesthetic toxicity. The authors wanted to test the buffering properties of two commercially available emulsions made of long- and of long- and medium-chain triglycerides. Using the shake-flask method, the authors measured the solubility and binding of racemic bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine to diluted Intralipid (Fresenius Kabi, Paris, France) and Medialipide (B-Braun, Boulogne, France). The apparent distribution coefficient expressed as the ratio of mole fraction was 823 +/- 198 and 320 +/- 65 for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively, at 500 mg in the Medialipide/buffer emulsion; and 1,870 +/- 92 and 1,240 +/- 14 for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively, in the Intralipid/buffer emulsion. Decreasing the pH from 7.40 to 7.00 of the Medialipide/buffer emulsion led to a decrease in ratio of molar concentration from 121 +/- 3.8 to 46 +/- 2.8 for bupivacaine, and to a lesser extent from 51 +/- 4.0 to 31 +/- 1.6 for ropivacaine. The capacity of the 1% emulsions was 871 and 2,200 microM for the 1% Medialipide and Intralipid emulsions, respectively. The dissociation constant was 818 and 2,120 microM for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively. Increasing the temperature from 20 to 37 degrees C led to a greater increase in affinity for ropivacaine (55%) than for bupivacaine (27%). When the pH of the buffer was decreased from 7.40 to 7.00, the affinity was decreased by a factor of 1.68, similar for both anesthetics. The solubility of long-acting local anesthetics in lipid emulsions and the high capacity of binding of these emulsions most probably explain their clinical efficacy in case of toxicity. The long-chain triglyceride emulsion Intralipid appears to be about 2.5 times more efficacious than the 50/50 medium-chain/long-chain Medialipide emulsion. Also, because of their higher hydrophobicity

  1. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part II: Becoming an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Developing the Business Plan. Research and Development Series No. 194 B-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the seven instructional units in Part II is establishing a business. Unit A focuses on developing a business…

  2. Dose-Dependent Protective Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics Against Postoperative Respiratory Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabitz, Stephanie D; Farhan, Hassan N; Ruscic, Katarina J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalational anesthetics are bronchodilators with immunomodulatory effects. We sought to determine the effect of inhalational anesthetic dose on risk of severe postoperative respiratory complications. DESIGN: Prospective analysis of data on file in surgical cases between January 2007...... with endotracheal intubation. INTERVENTIONS: Median effective dose equivalent of inhalational anesthetics during surgery (derived from mean end-tidal inhalational anesthetic concentrations). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Postoperative respiratory complications occurred in 6,979 of 124,497 cases (5.61%). High...... inhalational anesthetic dose of 1.20 (1.13-1.30) (median [interquartile range])-fold median effective dose equivalent versus 0.57 (0.45-0.64)-fold median effective dose equivalent was associated with lower odds of postoperative respiratory complications (odds ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.53-0.65; p

  3. Increased inspiratory pressure for reduction of atelectasis in children anesthetized for CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, Michael A.; Jamieson, Douglas H.; McEachern, Anita M.; Blackstock, Derek

    2002-01-01

    Background: Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children anesthetized for CT scan than it is in children sedated for CT scan.Objective: To determine the effect of increased inspiratory pressure on atelectasis during chest CT in anesthetized children. Materials and methods: Atelectasis on chest CT was assessed by two observers in three groups of patients. Group A comprised 13 children (26 lungs) anesthetized at inspiratory pressures up to and including 25 cm H 2 O. Group B included 11 children anesthetized at inspiratory pressures ≥30 cm H 2 O. Group C included 8 children under deep sedation. Results: Atelectasis was significantly more severe in group A than in groups B and C. There was no significant difference between groups B and C. Conclusion: An inspiratory pressure of 30 cm H 2 O is recommended for children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  4. A Framework for Developing and Sustaining a Part C Finance System. NECTAC Notes. Issue No. 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Maureen; Taylor, Anne; Andrews, Susan D. Mackey

    2007-01-01

    Typically, Federal entitlement statutes reflect a traditional program approach, with separate program funds attached to the legislative intent. The Part C provisions of Public Law (PL) 99-457, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), however, were envisioned by Congress in an unprecedented manner. Part C legislation was designed to…

  5. Development of Body-Part Vocabulary in Toddlers in Relation to Self-Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Whitney E.; Brownell, Celia A.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand young children's ability to communicate about their bodies, toddlers' comprehension and production of 27 common body-part words was assessed using parental report at 20 and 30 months (n?=?64), and self-awareness was assessed using mirror self-recognition. Children at both ages comprehended more body-part words that referred to…

  6. Developmental Neurotoxicity of Alcohol and Anesthetic Drugs Is Augmented by Co-Exposure to Caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Creeley

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic and anti-epileptic drugs used in pediatric and obstetric medicine and several drugs, including alcohol, that are abused by pregnant women, trigger widespread neuroapoptosis in the developing brain of several animal species, including non-human primates. Caffeine (CAF is often administered to premature infants to stimulate respiration, and these infants are also exposed simultaneously to anesthetic drugs for procedural sedation and/or surgical procedures. Pregnant women who abuse alcohol or other apoptogenic drugs also may heavily consume CAF. We administered CAF to infant mice alone or in combination with alcohol, phencyclidine, diazepam, midazolam, ketamine, or isoflurane, which are drugs of abuse and/or drugs frequently used in pediatric medicine, and found that CAF weakly triggers neuroapoptosis by itself and markedly potentiates the neuroapoptogenic action of each of these other drugs. Exposure of infant mice to CAF + phencyclidine resulted in long-term impairment in behavioral domains relevant to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, whereas exposure to CAF + diazepam resulted in long-term learning/memory impairment. At doses used in these experiments, these behavioral impairments either did not occur or were substantially less pronounced in mice exposed to CAF alone or to phencyclidine or diazepam alone. CAF currently enjoys the reputation of being highly beneficial and safe for use in neonatal medicine. Our data suggest the need to consider whether CAF may have harmful as well as beneficial effects on the developing brain, and the need for research aimed at understanding the full advantage of its beneficial effects while avoiding its potentially harmful effects.

  7. Application of a three-microneedle device for the delivery of local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kayoko Ishikawa,1 Hidekazu Fukamizu,1 Tetsuya Takiguchi,1 Yusuke Ohta,1 Yoshiki Tokura2 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan; 2Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan Purpose: We investigated the effectiveness of a newly developed device for the delivery of local anesthetics in the treatment of axillary osmidrosis and hyperhidrosis. We developed a device with three fine, stainless steel needles fabricated with a bevel angle facing outside (“three-microneedle device” [TMD] to release a drug broadly and homogeneously into tissue in the horizontal plane. Use of this device could reduce the risk of complications when transcutaneous injections are undertaken.Patients and methods: Sixteen Japanese patients were enrolled. The mean volume of lidocaine hydrochloride per unit area needed to elicit anesthesia when using a TMD was compared with that the volume required when using a conventional 27-gauge needle. The visual analog scale (VAS score of needlestick pain and injection-associated pain was also compared.Results: The mean volume of lidocaine hydrochloride per unit area to elicit anesthesia using the TMD was significantly lower than that the volume required when using the conventional 27-gauge needle. The VAS score of needlestick pain for the TMD was significantly lower than that the VAS score for the 27-gauge needle.Conclusion: These data suggest that the TMD could be useful for the delivery of local anesthetics in terms of clinical efficacy and avoidance of adverse effects. Keywords: three-microneedle device, transcutaneous drug delivery, local anesthesia, lidocaine, pain

  8. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  9. Electrocardiographic evaluation of two anesthetic combinations in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tárraga K.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate electrocardiographic changes in dogs aged 5 years or more submitted to two anesthetic combinations: atropine, levomeprazine, thiopental and halothane (ALTH, and atropine, tiletamine and zolazepam (ATZ. Forty dogs (24 males/16 females weighing 5-24kg, were used. Dogs had no cardiac problems and were submitted to tartarectomy. All animals were submitted to two electrocardiograms (ECG, one before anesthesia and other immediately before surgery. The dogs were divided into two groups: group 1 received ALTH and group 2 received ATZ. Alterations in the ST segment, T wave, cardiac rhythm and a significant reduction of vagal tonus index were observed in both groups, but in group 2 a significant reduction of the PR and QT intervals and an increase in heart rate were also observed. These data suggest that the ALTH combination caused fewer changes in the ECG than the ATZ combination.

  10. Use of lipid emulsion therapy in local anesthetic overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Karcioglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE therapy as antidote in systemic toxicity of certain agents has gained widespread support. There are increasing data suggesting use of ILE in reversing from local anesthetic-induced systemic toxicity severe, life-threatening cardiotoxicity, although findings are contradictory. Efficiency of ILE was demonstrated in animal studies in the treatment of severe impairment of cardiac functions, via a mechanism for trapping lipophilic drugs in an expanded plasma lipid compartment (“lipid sink”. In patients with hemodynamic compromise and/or cardiovascular collapse due to lipid-soluble agents, ILE may be considered for resuscitation in the acute setting by emergency physicians. The most common adverse effects from standard ILE include hypertriglyceridemia, fat embolism, infection, vein irritation, pancreatitis, electrolyte disturbances and allergic reactions. The advantages of ILE include an apparent wide margin of safety, relatively low cost, long shelf-life, and ease of administration.

  11. Anesthetic management of robot-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Karlekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a rare disorder involving neuromuscular junction. In conjunction with medical therapy, thymectomy is a known modality of treatment of MG and has shown to increase the probability of remission and overall symptomatic improvement. For minimally invasive thymectomy, video-.assisted thoracoscopic surgery has been the preferred surgical approach till recently. The robotic surgical procedure must necessarily bring new challenges to the anesthesiologists to effectively meet the specific requirements of the technique. At present, there is a paucity of literature regarding the anesthetic concerns of robotic assisted thymectomy, patient in question specifically posed a challenge since different maneuvers and techniques had to be tried to obtain optimum surgical conditions with stable ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters. Concerns of patient positioning and hemodynamic monitoring have also been discussed.

  12. Eugenol as an anesthetic for juvenile common snook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Joaquim Bernardes Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of eugenol as an anesthetic for juvenile common snook, and to determine the minimum effective concentration for use in handling procedures. In the first trial, juvenile common snook were subjected to immersion baths at 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, and 150 mg L-1 eugenol concentrations, after which induction and recovery times were evaluated. In the second experiment, the lethal exposure time (LT50 at 75 mg L-1 was estimated. Minimum effective eugenol concentration was 50 mg L-1, andthe stage of deep anesthesia and recovery were, respectively, reached at 126.3 and 208.8 s. At 75 mg L-1, LT50 was 1,314 s, and induction time and recovery were also satisfactory; however, fish cannot tolerate over 229 s exposure.

  13. Buffered lidocaine and bupivacaine mixture - the ideal local anesthetic solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Corliss A; Best, Alyssa A; Best, Timothy J; Hamilton, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    The use of injectable local anesthetic solutions to facilitate pain-free surgery is an integral component of many procedures performed by the plastic surgeon. In many instances, a solution that has both rapid onset and prolonged duration of analgesia is optimal. A combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine, plain or with epinephrine, is readily available in most Canadian health care settings where such procedures are performed, and fulfills these criteria. However, commercially available solutions of both medications are acidic and cause a burning sensation on injection. Buffering to neutral pH with sodium bicarbonate is a practical method to mitigate the burning sensation, and has the added benefit of increasing the fraction of nonionized lipid soluble drug available. The authors report on the proportions of the three drugs to yield a neutral pH, and the results of an initial survey regarding the use of the combined solution with epinephrine in hand surgery.

  14. Epidermolysis bullosa, dental and anesthetic management: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahanizade, Katayoun; Mahdavi, Ali Reza; Ansari, Ghassem; Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Esfahanizadeh, Abdolreza

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of rare inherited skin and mucous membrane disorders in which blister formation may arise spontaneously or following a minor friction. Various patterns of inheritance are explicated for the disease. The disease has a profound effect on oral mucosa and may result in high prevalence of dental caries. General anesthesia is sometimes the only choice for dental treatments in patients with EB. The following case report describes the dental and anesthetic management of an 12.5 -year-old girl with dystrophic type of EB. The patient was followed up every 6 months. New carious lesions were detected one year after the treatment, on the last visit. Presenting a perfect dental care to children with this disorder can be challenging for the in charge specialist, both pediatric dentist and anesthesiologist.

  15. Under Utilization of Local Anesthetics in Infant Lumbar Punctures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorchynski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar Puncture (LP is an invasive procedure frequently used to diagnose meningitis among the pediatric population. Neonates and infants have not routinely received local anesthesia prior to LP. Study Objective: To determine whether emergency medicine physicians and pediatricians use local analgesics on neonates and infants prior to performing an LP and to identify which local anesthetics, if any, were used. Methods: Prospective, cohort study of all infants, six months of age or less, that received an LP in the emergency department (ED or inpatient pediatric units for suspected meningitis during a period of year at a university tertiary care hospital. Results: A total sample population of 111 infants that received an LP within the study period. A control population of 42 adults received an LP. Only 40.4% (45/111 of the infants received local analgesia prior to LP: either 1% lidocaine, EMLA or a combination of the two. Infants were less likely to receive lidocaine or EMLA prior to LP compared to adult subjects (OR= 0.27; 95% CI0.12 to 0.62. No neonates that were less than one month of age received local procedural anesthesia by emergency medicine or pediatric physicians. ED physicians’ use of local anesthesia prior to LP increased with increasing age of the infant. The pediatricians in this study used local anesthesia prior to LP when the infant was at least five months of age. Discussion: The data objectively support recent literature regarding the under use or lack of use of analgesia prior to LP among neonates and infants. Local anesthetics should be used routinely without exception prior to performing an LP in the pediatric population.

  16. [Anesthetic Care of Patient With Heroin Addiction: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Shu-Yu

    2018-04-01

    The use of illegal drugs in Taiwan is on the rise. Drug addicts often have complex physical, psychological, and social problems. In addition, they often avoid disclosing their illicit drug use by deceit, concealment, or under-reporting. Building and maintaining relationships of trust with drug-addict patients has become a critical issue in achieving better care quality. In this case report, we report on an anesthesia care process for a heroin addict who was admitted for open reduction and internal fixation surgery for the femur and patella fractures after a car accident. During the six-hour perioperative care period, starting from 11pm on November 30th to 5am on December 1st, 2015, the patient was not willing to disclose his illicit drug use before the surgery. However, the nurse anesthetist noticed signs and symptoms of drug use. The nurse empathized with the patient's worries, provided him with a safe communication environment, and gained trust from the patient in a timely manner, which then enabled the patient to fully disclose his illicit drug use with the nurse anesthetist. The anesthesia-care strategy was then modified according to client's condition. The nurse anesthetist played an important role of bridging communications between the patient and medical care staffs and of modifying the care strategies in a timely manner. During the care period, the blood-borne disease contamination was successfully prevented, the client received uneventful pain management, there was a lack of withdrawal symptoms, and the staffs and patient safety was maintained. The literature on the anesthetic care of heroin patients undergoing surgery is relatively limited in Taiwan. The findings in the current case report add information on providing anesthetic care to patients with drug addiction. Publishing additional case reports, research, and clinical recommendations is essential for improving care quality for this vulnerable population.

  17. Anesthetic drugs in status epilepticus: Risk or rescue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Stephan; Fuhr, Peter; Kaplan, Peter W.; Rüegg, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the risks of continuously administered IV anesthetic drugs (IVADs) on the outcome of adult patients with status epilepticus (SE). Methods: All intensive care unit patients with SE from 2005 to 2011 at a tertiary academic medical care center were included. Relative risks were calculated for the primary outcome measures of seizure control, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge, and death. Poisson regression models were used to control for possible confounders and to assess effect modification. Results: Of 171 patients, 37% were treated with IVADs. Mortality was 18%. Patients with anesthetic drugs had more infections during SE (43% vs 11%; p < 0.0001) and a 2.9-fold relative risk for death (2.88; 95% confidence interval 1.45–5.73), independent of possible confounders (i.e., duration and severity of SE, nonanesthetic third-line antiepileptic drugs, and critical medical conditions) and without significant effect modification by different grades of SE severity and etiologies. As IVADs were used after first- and second-line drugs failed, there was a correlation between treatment-refractory SE and the use of IVADs, leading to insignificant results regarding the risk of IVADs and outcome after additional adjustment for refractory SE. Conclusion: Our findings heighten awareness regarding adverse effects of IVADs. Randomized controlled trials are needed to further clarify the association of IVADs with outcome in patients with SE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that patients with SE receiving IVADs have a higher proportion of infection and an increased risk of death as compared to patients not receiving IVADs. PMID:24319039

  18. Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 3. Testing of model plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irek P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is the continuation of the previous ones entitled „Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 1. Material factors“ and „Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 2. Investigation programme and preliminary tests“ in which material factors influencing essentially the development time in penetrant testing as well as the range of their values have been specified. These factors are: material kind, surface roughness and imperfection width.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodology for the Development of Wildlife Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Methodology for the Development of Wildlife Criteria D Appendix D to Part 132 Protection of Environment... Development of Wildlife Criteria Great Lakes States and Tribes shall adopt provisions consistent with (as protective as) this appendix. I. Introduction A. A Great Lakes Water Quality Wildlife Criterion (GLWC) is the...

  20. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2001-01-01

    This paper is the third part of a short history of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The activities concerning the radioisotope and radiation applications are reviewed as well as the radiation protection program

  1. Cost-Effective CNC Part Program Verification Development for Laboratory Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph C.; Chang, Ted C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a computer numerical control program verification system that checks a part program before its execution. The system includes character recognition, word recognition, a fuzzy-nets system, and a tool path viewer. (SK)

  2. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  3. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part II. Science, research, development, higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  4. Two-Year Institution Part-Time Nurse Faculty Experiences During Role Transition and Identity Development: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rhoda A

    This study explored two-year institution part-time nurse faculty's perceptions of their experiences during their role transitions from nurses in clinical practice to part-time clinical instructors. Part-time nurse faculty enter academia as expert clinicians, but most have little or no training in the pedagogy of effective student learning. A phenomenological study was used to explore the faculty role transition experiences. Findings support the proposition that six participants transitioned from their expert clinician to instructor identities; however, two continue in the process. Critical to this process are relationships with individuals in their environments, past and present experiences, the incentive to learn to be better instructors, and the importance of support and training. A model emerged, Process of Role Transition and Professional Identity Formation for Part-Time Clinical Instructors at Two-Year Institutions, that is potentially useful for administrators in developing individualized orientation and professional development programs.

  5. Effects of anesthetic agents on cellular 123I-MIBG transport and in vivo 123I-MIBG biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Bong-Ho; Paik, Jin-Young; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Jun-Sang; Lee, Eun Jung; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2008-01-01

    Small animal imaging with meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) allows characterization of animal models, optimization of tumor treatment strategies, and monitoring of gene expression. Anesthetic agents, however, can affect norepinephrine (NE) transport and systemic sympathetic activity. We thus elucidated the effects of anesthetic agents on MIBG transport and biodistribution. SK-N-SH neuroblastoma and PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells were measured for 123 I-MIBG uptake after treatment with ketamine (Ke), xylazine (Xy), Ke/Xy, or pentobarbital (Pb). NE transporters were assessed by Western blots. Normal ICR mice and PC-12 tumor-bearing mice were injected with 123 I-MIBG 10 min after anesthesia with Ke/Xy, Ke, Xy, or Pb. Plasma NE levels and MIBG biodistribution were assessed. Cellular 123 I-MIBG uptake was dose-dependently inhibited by Ke and Xy but not by Pb. Treatment for 2 h with 300 μM Ke, Xy, and Ke/Xy decreased uptake to 46.0 ± 1.6, 24.8 ± 1.5, and 18.3 ± 1.6% of controls. This effect was completely reversed by fresh media, and there was no change in NE transporter levels. In contrast, mice anesthetized with Ke/Xy showed no decrease of MIBG uptake in target organs. Instead, uptakes and organ-to-blood ratios were increased in the heart, lung, liver, and adrenals. Plasma NE was notably reduced in the animals with corresponding decreases in blood MIBG, which partly contributed to the increase in target organ uptake. In spite of their inhibitory effect at the transporter level, Ke/Xy anesthesia is a satisfactory method for MIBG imaging that allows favorable target tissue uptake and contrast by reducing circulating NE and MIBG. (orig.)

  6. Postoperative environmental anesthetic vapour concentrations following removal of the airway device in the operating room versus the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sara K; Özelsel, Timur; Rashiq, Saifee; Tsui, Ban C

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to compare waste anesthetic gas (WAG) concentrations within patients' breathing zones after removal of the patient's airway device in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) vs in the operating room (OR). Following Research Ethics Board approval and patient consent, we recruited patients undergoing surgery who received volatile anesthesia via an endotracheal tube or supraglottic airway. Patients had their airway device removed in the OR or in the PACU depending on the attending anesthesiologist's preference. Upon the patient's arrival in the PACU, concentrations of exhaled sevoflurane and desflurane were measured at their breathing zone (i.e., 15 cm from the patient's mouth and nose) using a single-beam infrared spectrophotometer. Seventy patients were recruited during the five-month study period. The median [interquartile range] WAG levels in the patients' breathing zones were higher when their airway devices were removed in the PACU vs in the OR. The WAG levels for sevoflurane were 0.7 [0.4-1.1] parts per million (ppm) vs 0.5 [0.4-0.7] ppm, respectively; median difference, 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1 to 0.6; P = 0.04. The WAG levels for desflurane were 2.4 [1.2-3.4] ppm vs 4.1 [2.5-5.2] ppm, respectively; median difference, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.7; P = 0.04. After a volatile-based anesthetic, our results suggest that removal of the airway device in the PACU vs in the OR increases the amount of waste anesthetic gas in a patient's breathing zone and thus potentially in the PACU nurse's working zone.

  7. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part III): Method transfer from small countercurrent chromatography column to preparative centrifugal partition chromatography ones as a part of method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves Costa, Fernanda; Hubert, Jane; Borie, Nicolas; Kotland, Alexis; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2017-03-03

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) are support free liquid-liquid chromatography techniques sharing the same basic principles and features. Method transfer has previously been demonstrated for both techniques but never from one to another. This study aimed to show such a feasibility using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. Heptane - ethyl acetate - methanol -water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds. The optimized separation methodology previously described in Part I and II, was scaled up from an analytical hydrodynamic CCC column (17.4mL) to preparative hydrostatic CPC instruments (250mL and 303mL) as a part of method development. Flow-rate and sample loading were further optimized on CPC. Mobile phase linear velocity is suggested as a transfer invariant parameter if the CPC column contains sufficient number of partition cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. NUCLEAR 2010 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education.Part 2/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcu, Ilie

    2010-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 'NUCLEAR 2010 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education' held at INR-Pitesti on May, 26 - 28 2010 contain communications published in two parts. The second part contains 34 talks adressing themes of nuclear energy, in the following three sections: Section 2.1 - Radioactive waste management (13 papers); Section 2.2 and 3 - Radioprotection and air, water and soil protection (12 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation, and knowledge transfer (1 paper); Section 3. - International Partnership for a sustainable development (2 papers); Section 3.4 - Research infrastructure (3 papers)

  9. Anesthetic management of a parturient with Guillain-Barre syndrome posted for emergency caesarian section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the anesthetic management of a case of Guillain-Barre syndrome in the 34 th week of gestation coming for an emergency Cesarean section. The perioperative anesthetic challenges have been discussed with emphasis on the medical and anesthetic management which includes the use of plasma-pheresis, intravenous gamma-globulin, and the safety of preservative free 0.75% isobaric ropivacaine, which was administered intrathecally in this difficult medical condition with excellent hemodynamic, maternal, and fetal outcome. The sensory and motor blocks achieved were well suited to the clinical risks and conditions.

  10. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2004-01-01

    The paper is the seventh part of a short history of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The future of the nuclear activities in the country is outlined, mainly of those related to the energy generation. The completion of the Atucha II nuclear power plant now under construction is supported. (author)

  11. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2001-01-01

    The paper is the first part of a short history of the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The activities concerning the fuel cycle are reviewed. The uranium production as well as the manufacturing of nuclear fuel elements is described. (author)

  12. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2004-01-01

    The paper is the sixth part of a short history of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The international relations and the nuclear technology exports of the CNEA are reviewed. A short description of the Argentine nuclear centers and nuclear enterprises is also given. The present structure of the CNEA is briefly outlined. (author)

  13. Fifty years contribution to research and technological development of Argentina. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Fernando; Boselli, Alfredo; Colangelo, Luis J.; Coll, Jorge A.; Espejo, Hector; Mattei, Clara E.; Ornstein, Roberto M.; Palacios, Tulio A.; Radicella, Renato; Rodrigo, Felix

    2002-01-01

    The paper is the second part of a short history of the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The activities concerning research reactors are reviewed as well as the nuclear power program. The heavy water program is also is described. (author)

  14. The flipped classroom for professional development: part I. Benefits and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katie; Smith, Charlene M

    2013-10-01

    Individualizing the educational encounter is supported by flipping the classroom experience. This column offers an overview and describes the benefits of flipping the classroom. Part II will explore the practicalities and pedagogy of lecture capture using podcasts and videos, a technology strategy used in flipping the classroom. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Analytical support for SAMG development as a part of accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honcarenko, R.

    1999-01-01

    The decision to built up and implement a comprehensive Accident Management Program applying best world-wide knowledge made during last year at Temelin. A small group of engineers dedicated to Accident Management was formed at Temelin NPP as a part of the plant organisation scheme. A short summary of these activities performed by this group is presented. (author)

  16. 76 FR 58778 - U.S. Automotive Parts and Components Business Development Mission to Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... became a valuable barter commodity. As the Russian market opened to imports, the few wealthy Russians.... Petersburg Johnson Controls and Tenneco make, respectively, car seats and exhaust systems. Given the current..., electric and electronic components, trim, exhaust systems, plastic parts and instrumentation. In addition...

  17. 76 FR 77974 - U.S. Automotive Parts and Components Business Development Mission to Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... became a valuable barter commodity. As the Russian market opened to imports, the few wealthy Russians... Tenneco make, respectively, car seats and exhaust systems. Given the current dynamics in this automotive... electronic components, trim, exhaust systems, plastic parts and instrumentation. In addition, there are...

  18. 76 FR 71313 - U.S. Automotive Parts and Components Business Development Mission to Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... became a valuable barter commodity. As the Russian market opened to imports, the few wealthy Russians.... Petersburg, Johnson Controls and Tenneco make, respectively, car seats and exhaust systems. Given the current..., electric and electronic components, trim, exhaust systems, plastic parts and instrumentation. In addition...

  19. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS : Part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Bob; Paalanen, Mikko

    2009-03-01

    Below you find part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly, October 2008, by the present and previous Chairmen of C5. It provides an overview of the most important and recent developments in low temperature physics, much in line with the program of LT25. For the field of experimental low temperature physics, the ability to conduct research has been damaged by the dramatic increase in the price of liquid helium. In the United States for example, the price of liquid helium has approximately doubled over the past two years. This has led to a reduction in activity in many laboratories as the funding agencies have not quickly increased support in proportion. The increase in price of liquid helium has accelerated interest in the development and use of alternative cooling systems. In particular, pulse tube coolers are now available that will allow cryostats with modest cooling needs to operate dilution refrigerators without the need for repeated refills of liquid helium from external supply sources. Solid helium research has seen a dramatic resurgence. Torsional oscillator experiments have been interpreted to show that solid helium may undergo a transition to a state in which some of the atoms in the container do not follow the motion of the container, e.g. may be 'supersolid'. The observation is robust, but the interpretation is controversial. The shear modulus of solid helium undergoes a similar signature with respect to temperature. Experiments that should be expected to cause helium to flow give conflicting results. Theory predicts that a perfect solid cannot show supersolid behavior, but novel superfluid-like behavior should be seen in various defects that can exist in the solid, and vorticity may play a significant role. And, recently there have been reports of unusual mass decoupling in films of pure 4He on graphite surfaces as well as 3He-4He mixture films on solid hydrogen surfaces. These may be other examples of unusual superfluid-like behavior

  20. The Development of Proportional Reasoning and the Ratio Concept: Part I - Differentiation of Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noelting, Gerald

    1980-01-01

    This study considers two problems related to cognitive development: "Is development hierarchical?" and "If so, what are the mechanisms involved in the process of development?" Analysis of the results of an experiment lead to differentiation of stages of development, and problem-solving strategies at each level are discussed.…

  1. Development of an internet version of the Lidcombe Program of early stuttering intervention: A trial of Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Sabine; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark; O'brian, Sue; Menzies, Ross

    2018-04-01

    There is evidence that access to treatment for early stuttering is not available for all who need it. An internet version of the Lidcombe Program for early stuttering (Internet-LP) has been developed to deal with this shortfall. The LP is suitable for such development because it is delivered by parents in the child's everyday environment, with training by a speech-language pathologist. A Phase I trial of Internet-LP Part 1, comprising parent training, is reported here. Eight parents of pre-schoolers who stutter were recruited and six completed the trial. Post-trial assessment indicated that the parents scored well for identifying and measuring stuttering and for knowledge about conducting practice sessions, including how to present verbal contingencies during practice sessions. The results prompted minor adjustments to Part 1 and guided the construction of Part 2, which instructs parents during the remainder of the treatment process.

  2. National preceptor development program (PDP) prototype. The third of a 3-part series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Craig D; Mulherin, Katrina; Walter, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    Preceptor development is critical to successful delivery of experiential learning. Although many preceptor development programs exist, a more individualized approach to training is needed. To accomplish this a national preceptor development program should be considered based on the continuing professional development model. A detailed prototype for this program has been described. In this final installment of the series, the twelve evidence-based recommendations from the first installment were utilized to construct a prototype for a preceptor development program. Over a three-month period, investigators experimented with different designs and models before approving the final prototype. The prototype took the form of an electronic learning platform. Several categories were integral to the design and included sections entitled preceptor spotlight, mentorship, global outreach, choose your own adventure, continuing professional development, feedback, virtual online community, highlights/advertisements, what's new, competency assessment, and frequently asked questions. A graphic was developed to depict the process by which a preceptor would navigate through the web-based learning platform. The authors purposefully maintained a creative and unlimited vision for preceptor development. This conceptual model is intended to spark discussion and augment, refine, or develop entirely innovative ideas to meet preceptor needs. Development of a preceptor development platform could foster improved competency performance, enhanced interest in learning, and promote continuing professional development. With a greater focus on experiential education in pharmacy, the need for a national preceptor development resource is only expected to increase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Urban Maglev Technology Development Program : Colorado Maglev Project : part 1 : executive summary of final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    The overall objective of the urban maglev transit technology development program is to develop magnetic levitation technology that is a cost effective, reliable, and environmentally sound transit option for urban mass transportation in the United Sta...

  4. Urban Maglev Technology Development Program : Colorado Maglev Project : part 2 final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    The overall objective of the urban maglev transit technology development program is to develop magnetic levitation technology that is a cost effective, reliable, and environmentally sound transit option for urban mass transportation in the United Sta...

  5. Just in Time and Future-Proofing? Policy, Challenges and Opportunities in the Professional Development of Part-Time Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Part-time teachers form a growing proportion of the global Higher Education (HE) workforce. Their backgrounds can vary from Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) teaching for the first time, to practitioners bringing workplace experience into HE and sessional teachers, all with differing professional development needs. This paper builds on previous…

  6. Moving the Needle: The Effect of Faculty Development on Part-Time Teachers at a Technical College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proeber, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    In the business division of the technical college in which this study occurred, there was a need to change the way part-time faculty prepared course syllabi. The implementation of a professional development workshop that focused on the components and necessity of the syllabus provided the teachers new information they needed to be prepared for the…

  7. Intensification of the Students' Self-Development Process When Performing Design and Settlement Works on the "Machine Parts" Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerbaev, Rais Mingalievich; Muhutdinov, Rafis Habreevich; Danilov, Valeriy Fedorovich

    2015-01-01

    The article addresses issues related to the methodology of intensifying self-development process when performing design and settlement works on the "Machine Parts" course for the students studying in such areas of training as "Technology" and "Vocational Education" with the use of computer technologies. At the same…

  8. 23 CFR 636.119 - How does this part apply to a project developed under a public-private partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public-private partnership? 636.119 Section 636.119 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... does this part apply to a project developed under a public-private partnership? (a) In order for a... Federal-aid procurement procedures will depend on the nature of the public-private agreement. (1) If the...

  9. Development of the micro-architecture and mineralization of the basilar part of the pig occipital bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, R.J.A.; Mulder, L.; Koolstra, J.H.; Eijden, van T.M.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the development of the architecture and the degree and distribution of mineralization in the basilar part of the pig occipital bone, one of the contact points between the spine and skull base, was investigated. Multiple regions of the basiocciput of pig specimens of different

  10. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This first part of a two-part report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. Part 1 of this two-part document discusses three generic models. The second, separate part of the document provides a number of examples demonstrating the models described. This report focuses on the implementation of SHS. However, a considerable amount of the PV market in developing countries is stated as consisting of large systems providing electricity for social services, such as light for schools, mosques, churches, communal centres, refrigeration for health centres and drinking water for communities. It is noted that there are considerable differences between the 'social market' and the 'private market' for SHS. The 'social market' generally consists of large systems but fewer in number. The guide does not cover the detailed technical aspects of a Solar Home System or the issue of recycling old batteries.

  11. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Manoel G. Carstens

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Results: Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. Conclusions: The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value.

  12. Mechanics of anesthetic needle penetration into human sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Maiti, Spandan; Gan, Maria G; Verdecchia, Nicole M; Orebaugh, Steven L; Vorp, David A

    2018-06-06

    Nerve blocks are frequently performed by anesthesiologists to control pain. For sciatic nerve blocks, the optimal placement of the needle tip between its paraneural sheath and epineurial covering is challenging, even under ultrasound guidance, and frequently results in nerve puncture. We performed needle penetration tests on cadaveric isolated paraneural sheath (IPS), isolated nerve (IN), and the nerve with overlying paraneural sheath (NPS), and quantified puncture force requirement and fracture toughness of these specimens to assess their role in determining the clinical risk of nerve puncture. We found that puncture force (123 ± 17 mN) and fracture toughness (45.48 ± 9.72 J m -2 ) of IPS was significantly lower than those for NPS (1440 ± 161 mN and 1317.46 ± 212.45 Jm -2 , respectively), suggesting that it is not possible to push the tip of the block needle through the paraneural sheath only, without pushing it into the nerve directly, when the sheath is lying directly over the nerve. Results of this study provide a physical basis for tangential placement of the needle as the ideal situation for local anesthetic deposition, as it allows for the penetration of the sheath along the edge of the nerve without entering the epineurium. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential regional metabolism of glucagon in anesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Kelstrup, Mette; Trebbien, Ramona

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon metabolism under basal (endogenous) conditions and during intravenous glucagon infusion was studied in anesthetized pigs by use of midregion (M), COOH-terminal (C), and NH2-terminal (N)-RIAs. Arteriovenous concentration differences revealed a negative extraction of endogenous glucagon.......5 +/- 6.7%, M-, C-, N-RIA) and exogenous conditions (46.9 +/- 4.8, 46.4 +/- 6.0, 47.0 +/- 7.7%; M-, C-, N-RIA), indicating substantial elimination of the peptide. Hepatic glucagon extraction was undetectable under basal conditions and detected only by M-RIA (10.0 +/- 3.8%) during glucagon infusion......, indicating limited midregional cleavage of the molecule. The plasma half-life determined by C- and N-RIAs (2.7 +/- 0.2 and 2.3 +/- 0.2 min) were similar, but both were shorter than when determined by M-RIA (3.2 +/- 0.2 min, P Metabolic clearance rates were similar regardless of assay (14.4 +/- 1...

  14. A Comparison of Intramuscular Anesthetic Techniques in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Hajighahramani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Administration of anesthetic substances to chickens requires careful consideration for the safe delivery of the agent to the bird. The research objective was to evaluate several drug combinations for intramuscular anesthesia in chickens for physiologic, nutritional, pharmacological and other investigations. Meterial & Methods: Sixty healthy chickens were randomly assigned in six treatment groups and received Ketamine in combination with Xylazine, Midazolam or Acepromazine. Heart and respiratory rate, induction time, duration of surgical anesthesia and light anesthesia were measured. Results: Induction of anesthesia was significantly longer following Acepromazine- Ketamine and Midazolam- Ketamine compared to other groups (P<0.05. Duration of surgical anesthesia was longest with Xylazine- Midazolam- Ketamine and shortest with Midazolam-Ketamine and Acepromazine- Ketamine (P<0.05. Conclusion: In conclusion, the most effective drug combinations resulting in longer duration of surgical anesthesia, were Xylazine- Acepromazine- Ketamine and Xylazine- Midazolam- Ketamine. Other combinations did not produce appropriate surgical anesthesia, but they make slight changes in physiological data.

  15. The articulo-cardiac sympathetic reflex in spinalized, anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Atsuko; Ito, Ryuzo

    2006-04-01

    Somatic afferent regulation of heart rate by noxious knee joint stimulation has been proven in anesthetized cats to be a reflex response whose reflex center is in the brain and whose efferent arc is a cardiac sympathetic nerve. In the present study we examined whether articular stimulation could influence heart rate by this efferent sympathetic pathway in spinalized rats. In central nervous system (CNS)-intact rats, noxious articular movement of either the knee or elbow joint resulted in an increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate. However, although in acutely spinalized rats a noxious movement of the elbow joint resulted in a significant increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate, a noxious movement of the knee joint had no such effect and resulted in only a marginal increase in heart rate. Because this marginal increase was abolished by adrenalectomy suggests that it was due to the release of adrenal catecholamines. In conclusion, the spinal cord appears to be capable of mediating, by way of cardiac sympathetic nerves, the propriospinally induced reflex increase in heart rate that follows noxious stimulation of the elbow joint, but not the knee joint.

  16. Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Arginase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Atım

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle in which a defect in conversion of arginine to urea and ornithine leads to hyperammonemia. Patients with urea cycle disorders may show increased protein catabolism due to inadequate intake of energy, protein and essential amino acids; infections, fever and surgery. A 12-year-old girl with arginase deficiency, ASA II who weighed 40 kg was scheduled for bilateral adductor, quadriceps and gastrocnemius tenotomies. She had mental retardation, spasticity and flexion posture of thelower limbs. Metabolic homeostasis was restored with appropriate diet. Successful anesthetic management allowed the patient to be discharged 48 hours after surgery. Increased levels of arginine and ammonia during or after surgery may lead to serious complications such as hypotension, cerebral edema, convulsions, hypothermia and spasticity. Thus special attention must be given to metabolic homeostasis and nutrition of the patients with arginase deficiency in the perioperative period. Primary goals should be to minimize stress levels by effective anxiolysis, provide an adequate amount of protein-free energy with proper fluid management and to obtain an effective preemptive and postoperative analgesia. In addition to a high level of knowledge, successful anesthesia requires professional communication among nursing staff, dietitians, pediatric metabolism specialist, surgeon and anesthesiologist.

  17. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  18. Local anesthetic-induced inhibition of human neutrophil priming: the influence of structure, lipophilicity, and charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picardi, Susanne; Cartellieri, Sibylle; Groves, Danja; Hahnenekamp, Klaus; Gerner, Peter; Durieux, Marcel E.; Stevens, Markus F.; Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are widely known for inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels underlying their antiarrhythmic and antinociceptive effects. However, LAs have significant immunomodulatory properties and were shown to affect human neutrophil functions independent of sodium-channel blockade.

  19. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy: A case report and review of anesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo Anillo Lombana

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the anesthetic implications of this rare disease, particularly the use of a regional technique that removes the restrictive effect of the hip pain, and therefore increases the risk of a fracture.

  20. Development of ITER PRM and standard parts catalogues in CATIA V5 for tritium-containing systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, Alin; Brad, Sebastian; Zamfirache, Marius; Soare, Sorin; Sofalca, Nicolae; Vijulie, Mihai

    2006-01-01

    CATIA V5 is a software chosen to perform the design and integration within ITER of both systems: fluid and mechanical systems. The broad range of applications provides the ability to develop the design process from the functional 2D design (P and ID) to the 3D plant layouts and detailed design. The 2D symbols for the equipment and piping components were developed in accordance with EN ISO 10628 standard, ISO 3511 (part I, II and IV) standard and DIN 28401 standard and considering the classification and settings done by FZK-team in the PRM-FZK-TLK in order to ensure compliance with the established design standards. These symbols were inserted in 2D catalogues linked with the main catalogue installed in PRM-FZK-TLK on CATIA SERVER at TLK-FZK and intensively tested in Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams. The 3D part for the equipment, instruments and piping components was developed according to the specifications, industrial conventions, terminology and literature available in library, internet and practice. All parts were parametrically built in order to allow the designer to modify the part geometry according to the design. The 3D parts were typed in accordance with IKARUS-Project Instructions by FZK team, inserted in 3D test catalogues and tested in Equipment and Systems workbench. The elements of P and ID, pipes, piping parts, instruments and equipment carry attribute information such as fluid type, pressure rating, insulation or material. The list of attributes is defined in the PRM and consists of the standard industrial attributes implemented by default in CATIA V5 and project specific attributes defined by Project Administration. 2D logical design and 3D Piping models are logically related through the common functions definition in the PRM. The task, TW5-TTFD-TPI-51, was performed collaboratively by MEdC/ICIT and FZK/TLK. (authors)

  1. Technology Infusion Within Part-Time Professional Development Programmes for Academic Staff and Industry Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McAvinia, Dr. Claire; McDonnell, Dr. Claire; Donnelly, Dr. Roisin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the experiences of programme co-ordinators and includes findings from a two year (2013-15) evaluation pilot study on a key communication technology – audio feedback – conducted across three accredited part-time programmes for a blend of academic staff (faculty) in higher education and eLearning industry practitioners. Key to our decision making with regards to which tools to infuse in our programmes is our aim to help the educators who participate on our programmes to ma...

  2. Electrocardiographic and hemato-biochemical effects of two balanced anesthetic protocols in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Khurana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the electrocardiographic (ECG, hematological and clinico-biochemical effects of two balanced anesthetic protocols in dogs. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 clinical cases of dogs, randomly divided into two groups of 10 animals each were made part of study. All dogs were premedicated with injection atropine sulfate @ 0.04 mg/kg body weight (b. wt. subcutaneously followed 15 min later with injection butorphanol tartarate @ 0.2 mg/kg b. wt. intravenous (IV. Subsequently after 10 min premedicated with injection diazepam @ 0.5 mg/kg b. wt. IV (Group DP or injection acepromazine maleate @ 0.015 mg/kg b. wt. IV (Group AP followed by injection propofol “till effect” IV for induction of surgical anesthesia. The animals were immediately transferred to halothane in oxygen. Observations recorded in dogs included ECG recordings, hematological and clinico-biochemical observations at various time intervals. Results: No arrhythmia was observed in any animal pre-operatively and intra-operatively in any of the groups. Significant fall in packed cell volume (PCV and total erythrocyte count occurred in DP group in early phase, whereas only PCV decreased significantly in AP group. Biochemical parameters were non-significant in both the groups. Conclusion: Both diazepam-butorphanol-propofol-halothane and acepromazine-butorphanol-propofol-halothane are safe with respect to their ECG, hematological and biochemical effects in clinical cases.

  3. Amylase and chymotrypsinogen synthesis and secretion by the anesthetized rat pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovanna, J.; Giorgi, D.; Dagorn, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the origin of nonparallel secretion, pancreatic juice was collected in the anesthetized rat, during infusion of [ 3 H]phenylalanine. In the basal state, the amylase to chymotrypsinogen ratios of activities and of [ 3 H] incorporations were 3.5 and 2.5 times higher than in the homogenate, respectively. Both ratios decreased to the value in the homogenate upon caerulein stimulation (600 ng/kg). Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (15 ng/kg) did not alter enzyme secretion ratios, and depressed basal protein output only partly, suggesting similar secretory pathways for basal and stimulated secretion. Finally, when [ 3 H]phenylalanine was given before anesthesia, the amylase to chymotrypsinogen ratio of incorporations was again higher in basal secretion than in homogenate, even when further protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide before urethane injection. Hence, basal secretion comes from a pancreatic compartment which is functional, although minor, in the conscious animal, and shows a higher rate of amylase synthesis, compared to chymotrypsinogen, than the rest of the gland. It could consist of a subpopulation of acinar cells

  4. Brainstem stimulation increases functional connectivity of basal forebrain-paralimbic network in isoflurane-anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Siveshigan; Liu, Xiping; Baracskay, Péter; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2014-09-01

    Brain states and cognitive-behavioral functions are precisely controlled by subcortical neuromodulatory networks. Manipulating key components of the ascending arousal system (AAS), via deep-brain stimulation, may help facilitate global arousal in anesthetized animals. Here we test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation of the oral part of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) under light isoflurane anesthesia, associated with loss of consciousness, leads to cortical desynchronization and specific changes in blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional connectivity (FC) of the brain. BOLD signals were acquired simultaneously with frontal epidural electroencephalogram before and after PnO stimulation. Whole-brain FC was mapped using correlation analysis with seeds in major centers of the AAS. PnO stimulation produced cortical desynchronization, a decrease in δ- and θ-band power, and an increase in approximate entropy. Significant increases in FC after PnO stimulation occurred between the left nucleus Basalis of Meynert (NBM) as seed and numerous regions of the paralimbic network. Smaller increases in FC were present between the central medial thalamic nucleus and retrosplenium seeds and the left caudate putamen and NBM. The results suggest that, during light anesthesia, PnO stimulation preferentially modulates basal forebrain-paralimbic networks. We speculate that this may be a reflection of disconnected awareness.

  5. Variations in gastric compliance induced by acute blood volume changes in anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça J.R.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of acute volume imbalances on gastric volume (GV was studied in anesthetized rats (250-300 g. After cervical and femoral vessel cannulation, a balloon catheter was positioned in the proximal stomach. The opposite end of the catheter was connected to a barostat with an electronic sensor coupled to a plethysmometer. A standard ionic solution was used to fill the balloon (about 3.0 ml and the communicating vessel system, and to raise the reservoir liquid level 4 cm above the animals' xiphoid appendix. Due to constant barostat pressure, GV values were considered to represent the gastric compliance index. All animals were monitored for 90 min. After a basal interval, they were randomly assigned to normovolemic, hypervolemic, hypovolemic or restored protocols. Data were compared by ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's test. Mean arterial pressure (MAP, central venous pressure (CVP and GV values did not change in normovolemic animals (N = 5. Hypervolemic animals (N = 12 were transfused at 0.5 ml/min with a suspension of red blood cells in Ringer-lactate solution with albumin (12.5 ml/kg, which reduced GV values by 11.3% (P0.05. MAP and CVP values increased (P<0.05 after hypervolemia but decreased (P<0.05 with hypovolemia. In conclusion, blood volume level modulates gastric compliance, turning the stomach into an adjustable reservoir, which could be part of the homeostatic process to balance blood volume.

  6. Availability of anesthetic effect monitoring: utilization, intraoperative management and time to extubation in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R; Hudcova, J; Bonney, I; Cepeda, M S

    2010-12-01

    Titration of volatile anesthetics to anesthetic effect monitoring using the bispectral index (BIS) has been shown to decrease anesthetic requirements and facilitate recovery from anesthesia unrelated to liver transplantation (OLT). To determine whether availability of such monitoring influences its utilization pattern and affect anesthetic care and outcomes in OLT, we conducted a retrospective analysis in recipients with and without such monitoring. We evaluated annual BIS utilization over a period of 7 years, and compared 41 BIS-monitored patients to 42 controls. All received an isoflurane/air/oxygen and opioid-based anesthetic with planned postoperative ventilation. Data collection included age, body mass index (BMI), gender, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and time to extubation (TtE). Mean preanhepatic, anhepatic, and postanhepatic end-tidal isoflurane concentrations were compared, as well as BIS values for each phase of OLT using the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, respectively. The use of anesthetic effect monitoring when available increased steadily from 15% of cases in the first year to almost 93% by year 7. There was no significant difference in age, gender, BMI, MELD, or TtE between groups. The BIS group received less inhalational anesthetic during each phase of OLT compared to the control group. However, this difference was statistically significant only during the anhepatic phase (P = .026), and was clinically not impressive. Within the BIS group, the mean BIS value was 38.74 ± 5.25 (mean ± standard deviation), and there was no difference for the BIS value between different transplant phases. Availability of anesthetic effect monitoring as an optional monitoring tool during OLT results in its increasing utilization by anesthesia care teams over time. However, unless integrated into an intraoperative algorithm and an early extubation protocol for fast tracking of OLT recipients, this utilization does not appear to provide

  7. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  8. Effect of a New Local Anesthetic Buffering Device on Pain Reduction During Nerve Block lnjections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-10

    the anticipation of pain associated with dental care is a significant deterrent in seeking treatment. With the advent of modern local anesthesia ...eliminate pain from dental injection to include: application of topical anesthesia , tissue pressure/vibration, cold application, and buffering of the local ...anesthetic solution. In dentistry , the effect of buffering local anesthetic solutions was first studied by Gros and Laewen in 1910 and then by

  9. Anesthetic considerations for a pediatric patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukamoto, Masanori; Yamanaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a rare hereditary disease that results from a 4p chromosome deletion. Patients with this syndrome are characterized by craniofacial dysgenesis, seizures, growth delay, intellectual disability, and congenital heart disease. Although several cases have been reported, very little information is available on anesthetic management for patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. We encountered a case requiring anesthetic management for a 2-year-old girl with Wolf-Hirschhorn ...

  10. Anesthetic management of a child with autistic spectrum disorder and homocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD is a developmental disability of the central nervous system with rapid worsening. A subset of patients also has mitochondrial dysfunction leading to increased sensitivity to various anesthetic agents. Rarely, gene mutation in these patients results in homocysteinemia which causes higher incidences of thromboembolism, hypoglycemia, and seizures. Anesthetic management of ASD with homocysteinemia and refractory seizures has not been previously reported.

  11. Volume of Anesthetic in 0.5% Marcaine with 1:200,000 Epinephrine Dental Carpule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: "Volume of Anesthetic in 0.5% Marcaine with 1:200,000 Epinephrine Dental Carpule" Is...3. School/DepartmenUCenter: Army Postgraduate Dental School, AEGD-2 Program, Fort Hood, TX 4. Phone: (708) 227-2152 5. Type of clearance...X_Thesis _Article _Book _Poster _Presentation _Other 6. Title: "Volume of Anesthetic in 0.5% Marcaine with 1:200,000 Epinephrine Dental Carpule

  12. The anesthetics influence (ethilic-eter and urethane) on renal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramoto, E.; Achando, S.S.; Araujo, E.B. de; Hamada, H.S.; Silva Valente Goncalves, R. da; Pereira, N.P.S. de; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study was done using anesthetics like ether ethilic and urethane, in rats (Wistar). A significative variation was observed in the results obtained when renal radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. Using urethane, the renal uptake increase progressivelly due to the inhibition of the renal filtration and it starts to recuperate when the anesthetic effect was eliminated. Using ether ethilic the radiopharmaceuticals are quickly eliminated from the kidneys (tubular or glomerular filtration), showing that the renal function was protected. (author) [pt

  13. Anesthetic drugs accelerate the progression of postoperative metastases of mouse tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, J; Jersky, J; Katzav, S; Feldman, M; Segal, S

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were made to investigate the effect of four anesthetic drugs that are commonly used in surgical practice on the postoperative growth of mouse tumors in syngeneic recipients. These experiments revealed that some of the anesthetics when applied for surgical excision of the local tumor, strongly accelerated postoperative progression of spontaneous lung metastases produced by the 3LL Lewis lung carcinoma and by the B16 melanoma. Some of the drugs caused the appearance of metastases in...

  14. Intraosseous injection as an adjunct to conventional local anesthetic techniques: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Idris; Nasil Sakkir; Kishore Gopalakrishna Naik; Nandakishore Kunijal Jayaram

    2014-01-01

    Background: The achievement of successful local anesthesia is a continual challenge in dentistry. Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection (the Stabident system and the X-tip system) have been proposed to be advantageous in cases where the conventional local anesthetic techniques have failed. Aim: A clinical study was undertaken using intraosseous injection system by name X-tip to evaluate its effectiveness in cases where inferior alve...

  15. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth's temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia.

  16. Cimethidine pre-anesthetic. A prophylactic method against Mendelson's syndrome in cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Storm, K

    1983-01-01

    Twenty patients undergoing cesarean section received cimethidine 400 mg intramuscularly as pre-anesthetic approximately 70 minutes prior to gastric aspiration. The average pH was 5.05, as against 2.97 in the control group (p less than 0.01). No significant reduction in the aspirated volumes...... in the infants. Hence, cimethidine is a safe and useful pre-anesthetic for patients undergoing cesarean section, irrespective of indication and, consequently, much to be preferred to oral antacids....

  17. New Developments in Mass Spectrometry for Group-Type Analysis of Petroleum Cuts (First Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fafet A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of petroleum cuts constitutes a necessary stage to perfect understanding of the reaction mechanisms and to the description of the kinetics of certain refining processes such as hydrotreating or catalytic cracking. Mass spectrometry (MS, thanks to group-type quantitative analysis methods, enables to access detailed description of complex hydrocarbon mixtures such as middle distillates or heavy cuts such as vacuum distillates. But these methods are also subject to some drawbacks and we shall expose, thereunder, two examples of improvements. In a first part, the accuracy of MS quantification of thiophenic sulphured compounds in middle distillates is studied by intertechnique comparison with the results obtained by gas phase chromatography coupled to sulphur-specific detection by chemiluminescence (GC/SCD. Improving on the MS method is suggested. In the second part, a new system for introducing the sample in the spectrometer source, dedicated to group-type analysis of heavy cuts is described. Its validation, by comparison of the MS results to those of liquid chromatography (LC as well as its performances, is exposed.

  18. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, M.; Das, S.; Yost, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the second and third phases of a comprehensive mechatronics curriculum development effort. They encompass the development of two advanced mechatronics courses ("Simulation and Modeling of Mechatronic Systems" and "Sensors and Actuators for Mechatronic Systems"), the formulation of a Mechatronics concentration, and offshoot…

  19. Review of Recent Methodological Developments in Group-Randomized Trials: Part 2-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Elizabeth L; Prague, Melanie; Gallis, John A; Li, Fan; Murray, David M

    2017-07-01

    In 2004, Murray et al. reviewed methodological developments in the design and analysis of group-randomized trials (GRTs). We have updated that review with developments in analysis of the past 13 years, with a companion article to focus on developments in design. We discuss developments in the topics of the earlier review (e.g., methods for parallel-arm GRTs, individually randomized group-treatment trials, and missing data) and in new topics, including methods to account for multiple-level clustering and alternative estimation methods (e.g., augmented generalized estimating equations, targeted maximum likelihood, and quadratic inference functions). In addition, we describe developments in analysis of alternative group designs (including stepped-wedge GRTs, network-randomized trials, and pseudocluster randomized trials), which require clustering to be accounted for in their design and analysis.

  20. Track treeing mechanism and plastic zone in solid Part 1: Initial development of plastic zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Boyang

    2008-01-01

    After neutron exposure and chemical etching in advance, latent tracks of recoil nucleon develop into pits on CR39 surface. During electrochemical etching, plastic zone is formed at top of pits. Some pits develop into tree cracks in the initial stage of plastic zone development. Physical and mathematical model of crack and plastic zone is proposed; parameter of development free path of plastic zone is presented. Based on integration of elementary theories the stress analysis is build up; based on analyses of measured parameters, a set of common relations between parameters is obtained. Integrate parameter analysis and stress analysis, depth of plastic zone development, law and phenomenon in experimental data can be interpreted completely

  1. Innovation through developing consumers communities. Part II: Digitalizing the innovation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasilcai, S.; Galateanu (Avram, E.

    2015-11-01

    The current research recognises the concept of innovation as the main driver for organisational growth and profitability. The companies seek to develop new ways to engage consumers and customers into co - creation value through the product design, development and distribution processes. However the main concern is manifested for new and creative ways of customization products based on consumers’ requirements and needs. Thus the need for innovative virtual instruments arose as the demand from social communities for personalised products or services increased. Basically companies should develop own innovative platforms, where consumers can participate, with ideas, concepts or other relevant contributions, and interact with designers or engineers for product development. This paper aims to present the most important features of platform development within BMW Group as a concept and as innovative instrument. From this point of view it is important to enhance past experiences of the company in the field of co - creation projects. There will be highlighted the dual consumers’ character as co - creator and co - evaluator based on their involvement in the proposed and developed projects and platform structure. The significant impact on platform functioning it has the diversity of company's concerns for Research & Development and innovation activities. From this point of view there will be assessed the platform structure, the main proposed themes and the evaluation process. The main outcome is to highlight the significance of platform development as innovative tool for consumers’ communities’ enhancement. Based on the analysis of “BMW Co-Creation Lab”, there will be revealed the main consumers concerns in terms of safety, comfort and appearance of the products. Thus it is important to understand the evaluation process of gathered ideas and intellectual property policy. The importance of platform development and implementation will be highlighted by company

  2. Experimental Products Development Team (EPDT) Supporting New AWIPS . Part 2; Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the Experimental Products Development Team (EPDT) was formed within NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center to create training for development of plug-ins to extend the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) version 2. The broader atmospheric science community had a need for AWIPS II development training being created at SPoRT and EPDT was expanded to include other groups who were looking for training. Since the expansion of the group occurred, EPDT has provided AWIPS II development training to over thirty participants spanning a wide variety of groups such as NWS Systems Engineering Center, NWS Meteorological Development Laboratory, and several NOAA Cooperative Institutes. Participants within EPDT solidify their learning experience through hands-on learning and by participating in a "code-sprint" in which they troubleshoot existing and develop plug-ins. The hands-on learning workshop is instructor lead with participants completing exercises within the AWIPS II Development Environment. During the code sprints EPDT groups work on projects important to the community and have worked on various plug-ins such as an RGB image recipe creation tool, and an mPing (crowd sourced precipitation type reporting system) ingest and display. EPDT has developed a well-defined training regime which prepares participants to fully develop plug-ins for the extendible AWIPS II architecture from ingest to the display of new data. SPoRT has hosted 2 learning workshops and 1 code sprint over the last two years, and continues to build and shape the EPDT group based on feedback from previous workshops. The presentation will provide an overview of EPDT current and future activities, and best practices developed within EPDT.

  3. Ring Keratitis Associated With Topical Abuse of a Dilute Anesthetic After Refractive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Hou

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic toxic keratitis is rare and presents as a ring keratitis, which is often misdiagnosed as Acanthamoeba keratitis. Here, we report an unusual case of toxic keratitis caused by topical abuse of a dilute anesthetic. A 26-year-old woman presented with bilateral corneal edema, ring infiltrates, pigmented keratic precipitate, Descemet's membrane folding, and strong anterior chamber reactions 2 weeks after laser subepithelial keratomileusis surgery. Tracing back her medical history, topical dilute 0.1% proparacaine was prescribed and frequently used for 1 month. Toxic keratitis was suspected. After discontinuation of the topical anesthetic and initiation of treatment with topical 20% autologous serum, complete corneal epithelialization was achieved within 1 week. Corneal infiltrates and anterior chamber reaction gradually subsided. Vision improved from finger counting to 20/20 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye, but confocal microscopy showed decreased corneal endothelial cells. Topical abuse of a dilute topical anesthetic can cause severe toxic keratitis and endothelial cell loss. The physician must be aware of the signs of topical anesthetic abuse and should not prescribe even a dilute anesthetic for long-term use. Autologous serum can help in the recovery of toxic keratitis.

  4. Paradigms and mechanisms of inhalational anesthetics mediated neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailian; Li, Peiying; Xu, Na; Zhu, Ling; Cai, Mengfei; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability and cognitive dysfunction. The high mortality and disability of cerebral ischemic stroke is urging the health providers, including anesthesiologists and other perioperative professioners, to seek effective protective strategies, which are extremely limited, especially for those perioperative patients. Intriguingly, several commonly used inhalational anesthetics are recently suggested to possess neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia. This review introduces multiple paradigms of inhalational anesthetic treatments that have been investigated in the setting of cerebral ischemia, such as preconditioning, proconditioning and postconditioning with a variety of inhalational anesthetics. The pleiotropic mechanisms underlying these inhalational anesthetics-afforded neuroprotection against stroke are also discussed in detail, including the common pathways shared by most of the inhalational anesthetic paradigms, such as anti-excitotoxicity, anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammation. There are also distinct mechanisms involved in specific paradigms, such as preserving blood brain barrier integrity, regulating cerebral blood flow and catecholamine release. The ready availability of these inhalational anesthetics bedside and renders them a potentially translatable stroke therapy attracting great efforts for understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  5. Paradigms and mechanisms of inhalational anesthetics mediated neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemic stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability and cognitive dysfunction. The high mortality and disability of cerebral ischemic stroke is urging the health providers, including anesthesiologists and other perioperative professioners, to seek effective protective strategies, which are extremely limited, especially for those perioperative patients. Intriguingly, several commonly used inhalational anesthetics are recently suggested to possess neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia. This review introduces multiple paradigms of inhalational anesthetic treatments that have been investigated in the setting of cerebral ischemia, such as preconditioning, proconditioning and postconditioning with a variety of inhalational anesthetics. The pleiotropic mechanisms underlying these inhalational anesthetics-afforded neuroprotection against stroke are also discussed in detail, including the common pathways shared by most of the inhalational anesthetic paradigms, such as anti-excitotoxicity, anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammation. There are also distinct mechanisms involved in specific paradigms, such as preserving blood brain barrier integrity, regulating cerebral blood flow and catecholamine release. The ready availability of these inhalational anesthetics bedside and renders them a potentially translatable stroke therapy attracting great efforts for understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  6. Occurrence of paresthesia after dental local anesthetic administration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garisto, Gabriella A; Gaffen, Andrew S; Lawrence, Herenia P; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Haas, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    Several studies have suggested that the likelihood of paresthesia may depend on the local anesthetic used. The purpose of this study was to determine if the type of local anesthetic administered had any effect on reports of paresthesia in dentistry in the United States. The authors obtained reports of paresthesia involving dental local anesthetics during the period from November 1997 through August 2008 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. They used chi(2) analysis to compare expected frequencies, on the basis of U.S. local anesthetic sales data, with observed reports of oral paresthesia. During the study period, 248 cases of paresthesia occurring after dental procedures were reported. Most cases (94.5 percent) involved mandibular nerve block. The lingual nerve was affected in 89.0 percent of cases. Reports involving 4 percent prilocaine and 4 percent articaine were 7.3 and 3.6 times, respectively, greater than expected (chi(2), P paresthesia occurs more commonly after use of 4 percent local anesthetic formulations. These findings are consistent with those reported in a number of studies from other countries. Until further research indicates otherwise, dentists should consider these results when assessing the risks and benefits of using 4 percent local anesthetics for mandibular block anesthesia.

  7. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AREA BASED ON PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Viktorovich Zakharov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Logic of expectations about the effects and benefits of management of development of different forms of PPP with the levels of institutional management tools developed by the state is proved based on the analysis of the theory and practice of public-private partnerships (PPP. It is shown that the implementation of programs and projects the main effects should be expected at the microeconomic and project levels, i.e. where goods and services are produced and sold. However, budgetary and other savings for socio-economic development of regions and municipalities could be achieved at management levels. The prospects, contradictions and problems of development and efficiency of PPP with using of software and project management are analyzed and measures are outlined to accelerate overcoming the negative effects of the economic crisis. A multi-level classification of institutional means of regulating the functioning of the different forms of PPP in the Russian economy are proposed. Disadvantages of institutional regulation of PPP are identified. It proposed to make extensive use of the tools of development and improve the effectiveness of partnerships that are created on the technological basis of electronic and open government. Purpose: to develop and implement new institutional means of PPP regulation for accelerating socio-economic development of the territory. Methodology: methodology of institutional economics; classification, analysis of economic relations and contradictions in the development of different forms of PPP and synthesis of solutions methods; methods of software management; design and systemic, comprehensive approaches. Results: contradictions of PPP development, reducing the importance of partnerships in the Russian economy are identificated; criteria are proposed which allows to identify the facts and PPP projects from the totality of the analyzed material; enlarged model is constructed which allows logically to connect expectations

  8. Cultural landscape in theory. 2nd Part: Development of truth – paths and goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Juvanec

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The city grows from the seed to the core. The historical core is the central part with historical significance, around which other programmes are aligned. Possibilities define growth and density of a city, but this is the source of problems. Growth is influenced by activities moving, changes in social and political life, but also important elements of culture and sports. Visibility, sometimes termed beauty, is only the external layer of the interior, the essence itself. A functioning village cannot be ugly. Fire, the fireplace, house, home, village, city (survival, needs and possibilities are closer to the circle and theory, than can be expected. Growth of architecture from the detail to spatial planning is the fruit of human balancing only in detail. Cities grow according to their own logic. The role of professions is therefore limited only to the establishment of strategies and controlling their growth. Things are much simpler, than we can imagine.

  9. No Fault Found events in maintenance engineering Part 2: Root causes, technical developments and future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Samir; Phillips, Paul; Hockley, Chris; Jennions, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This is the second half of a two paper series covering aspects of the no fault found (NFF) phenomenon, which is highly challenging and is becoming even more important due to increasing complexity and criticality of technical systems. Part 1 introduced the fundamental concept of unknown failures from an organizational, behavioral and cultural stand point. It also reported an industrial outlook to the problem, recent procedural standards, whilst discussing the financial implications and safety concerns. In this issue, the authors examine the technical aspects, reviewing the common causes of NFF failures in electronic, software and mechanical systems. This is followed by a survey on technological techniques actively being used to reduce the consequence of such instances. After discussing improvements in testability, the article identifies gaps in literature and points out the core areas that should be focused in the future. Special attention is paid to the recent trends on knowledge sharing and troubleshooting tools; with potential research on technical diagnosis being enumerated

  10. Y-12 Development Organization technical progress report: Part 3 -- Metal processing, period ending March 1, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the effort to downsize its uranium processing facilities, the Y-12 Plant has supported an investigation to identify extraction solvents that would both work efficiently in centrifugal contactors and be disposed of easily. Various organic ethers, hydroxy ethers, ether ketones, acids, amides, and diketones were studied for their ability to extract uranyl nitrate from aqueous solutions. Although many of these solvents were obtained commercially, others had to be synthesized in-house. The authors found a large range of extraction coefficients for these solvents. Because of steric hindrance or some other factor, certain ethers performed poorly. On the other hand, various mono- and diethers of tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol exhibited excellent extraction and stripping coefficients for uranyl nitrate, justifying purchase of a pilot plant batch of one of this family of solvents. Likewise, the authors determined the extraction coefficient for one of the two amides synthesized in-house to be quite high

  11. Development of the two-part pattern during regeneration of the head in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bode, Matthias; Awad, T A; Koizumi, O

    1988-01-01

    The head of a hydra is composed of two parts, a domed hypostome with a mouth at the top and a ring of tentacles below. When animals are decapitated a new head regenerates. During the process of regeneration the apical tip passes through a transient stage in which it exhibits tentacle......-like characteristics before becoming a hypostome. This was determined from markers which appeared before morphogenesis took place. The first was a monoclonal antibody, TS-19, that specifically binds to the ectodermal epithelial cells of the tentacles. The second was an antiserum against the peptide Arg......-Phe-amide (RFamide), which in the head of hydra is specific to the sensory cells of the hypostomal apex and the ganglion cells of the lower hypostome and tentacles. The TS-19 expression and the ganglion cells with RFamide-like immunoreactivity (RLI) arose first at the apex and spread radially. Once the tentacles...

  12. RT 164: Design and Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator - Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-29

    is a multidisciplinary practice and is much of an art as it is a science. While a waterfall model of education can provide a background of domain...5 Simulation Modeler ...21 Simulation Model Development

  13. Development of a theory of the spectral reflectance of minerals, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    A theory of the spectral reflectance or emittance of particulate minerals was developed. The theory is expected to prove invaluable in the interpretation of the remote infrared spectra of planetary surfaces.

  14. Development project of an automatic sampling system for part time unmanned pipeline terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Gullherme O.; De Almelda, Marcio M. G.; Ramos, Ricardo R. [Petrobas, (Brazil); Potten, Gary [Cameron Measurement Systems, (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The Sao Paulo - Brasilia Pipeline (OSBRA) is a highly automated pipeline using a SCADA system which operates from a control room. A new quality management system standard was established for transportation and storage operations. The products had to be sampled on an automatic basis. This paper reports the development of an automatic sampling system (ASS) in accordance with the new quality control standard. The prototype was developed to be implemented through a human-machine interface (HMI) from the control room SCADA screens. A technical cooperation agreement(TCA) was drawn up for development of this new ASS product. The TCA was a joint cooperation between the Holding, the Operator and the cooperators. The prototype will be on-field tested at Senador Canedo tank farm to SPEC requirements. The current performance of the ASS establishes reasonable expectations for further successful development.

  15. Digital Divide and International Research and Development in Information Technology and Teacher Education, Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laferriere, Therese; Resta, Paul; Davis, Niki; McLaughlin, Robert; Orey, Michael; Shakwa, Geoffrey; Malone, Todd; Wilder, Hilary; Gibson, Ian; Beisser, Sally; FitzGibbon, Ann; Brennan Freeman, Eileen; Castro-Filho, Jose Aires; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald; Hargrave, Connie; Carlsen, Roger; McFerrin, Karen; Price, Jerry; Weber, Roberta; Willis, Dee Anna

    2007-01-01

    The maturing research and development foci of SITE's International Committee have an ethical dimension. Comparative research and international collaboration are a healthy way, facilitated by communication technologies, to increase diversity within teacher education as well as to increase the quality

  16. Digital Divide and International Research and Development in Information Technology and Teacher Education, Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laferriere, Therese; Resta, Paul; Davis, Niki; McLaughlin, Robert; Orey, Michael; Shakwa, Geoffrey; Malone, Todd; Wilder, Hilary; Gibson, Ian; Beisser, Sally; FitzGibbon, Ann; Brennan Freeman, Eileen; Castro-Filho, Jose Aires; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald; Hargrave, Connie; Carlsen, Roger; McFerrin, Karen; Price, Jerry; Weber, Roberta; Willis, Dee Anna

    2007-01-01

    The maturing research and development foci of SITE's International Committee have an ethical dimension. Comparative research and international collaboration are a healthy way, facilitated by communication technologies, to increase diversity within teacher education as well as to increase the quality

  17. Integrated structural analysis tool using the linear matching method part 1 – Software development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ure, James; Chen, Haofeng; Tipping, David

    2014-01-01

    A number of direct methods based upon the Linear Matching Method (LMM) framework have been developed to address structural integrity issues for components subjected to cyclic thermal and mechanical load conditions. This paper presents a new integrated structural analysis tool using the LMM framework for the assessment of load carrying capacity, shakedown limit, ratchet limit and steady state cyclic response of structures. First, the development of the LMM for the evaluation of design limits in plasticity is introduced. Second, preliminary considerations for the development of the LMM into a tool which can be used on a regular basis by engineers are discussed. After the re-structuring of the LMM subroutines for multiple central processing unit (CPU) solution, the LMM software tool for the assessment of design limits in plasticity is implemented by developing an Abaqus CAE plug-in with graphical user interfaces. Further demonstration of this new LMM analysis tool including practical application and verification is presented in an accompanying paper. - Highlights: • A new structural analysis tool using the Linear Matching Method (LMM) is developed. • The software tool is able to evaluate the design limits in plasticity. • Able to assess limit load, shakedown, ratchet limit and steady state cyclic response. • Re-structuring of the LMM subroutines for multiple CPU solution is conducted. • The software tool is implemented by developing an Abaqus CAE plug-in with GUI

  18. Opportunities for role development for medical imaging practitioners in Australia: part 2 - mechanisms for change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tony; Lewis, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    This is the second of two consecutive papers on the topic of radiographer role development. In the first paper, the rationale for role development was put forward and potential pathways for role extension were described and discussed. In this paper, a multi-tiered model of career structure, recently piloted in the United Kingdom, is firstly examined. A similar model, incorporating assistant practitioners, registered practitioners, advanced practitioners and consultant practitioners could be adapted to improve career pathways for Australian radiographers and accommodate future role development opportunities. However, for real benefits to all stakeholders, it would be important that the lower end of the career ladder is not altered without also redeveloping the upper end. The medical imaging professions should strongly resist any redevelopment of the former without the latter. In order for role development to progress successfully a coordinated approach and the involvement of the professional bodies, the educational institutions and government(s), would be essential. The potential contributions of the various stakeholder organisations are discussed and, as a means of promoting communication on the issues, the formation of a Special Interest Group in Radiographer Role Development (SIGRRD) is recommended. SIGRRI) would provide a mechanism for planning, monitoring and evaluating role development initiatives to ensure optimum outcomes Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  19. Development of mechanization of extraction in underground coal mining (part I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strzeminski, J

    1984-01-01

    The history of underground coal mining and history of mechanizing underground operations of cutting, strata control, mine haulage, hoisting and ventilation are discussed. The following development periods are characterized: until 1769 (date of steam engine invention by J. Watt), from 1769 to 1945 (period of partial mechanization of operations in underground coal mining), from 1945 (period of comprehensive mechanization and automation). A general description of mining in the first development period is given. Evaluation of the second development period concentrates on mechanization in underground coal mining. The following equipment types are described: cutting (pneumatic picks and pneumatic drills, coal saws developed by Eickhoff, coal cutters developed after 1870, cutter loaders patented in 1925-1927, coal plows and coal cutter loaders), mine haulage (mine cars, conveyors developed in the United Kingdom, Germany and Russia, Poland), strata control at working faces (timber props, steel friction props, roof bars), strata control in the goaf (room and pillar mining, stowing, minestone utilization for stowing in Upper Silesia, hydraulic stowing in Upper Silesia). 5 references.

  20. Critical elements of supplier development in the Malaysian automobile industry : Parts and components procurement and supplier development Practice at Proton【Article】

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Rashid; Maharjan, Keshav Lall

    2003-01-01

    Supplier development is defined as any effort of a buying firm with regard to its supplier to increasethe performance and/or capabilities of the supplier to meet the buying firm's supply needs. The procure-ment practice of the buyer is critical and acts as a window to nurture the supplier development effort, itis also crucial in determining the type of relationship that the company has with its suppliers. This paperexamines the procurement practice at PROTON for parts and component inputs at ...

  1. Anesthetic management of hypertensive crisis in a three-year-old patient with undiagnosed severe renal artery stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Min, Too Jae; Kim, Woon Young; Kim, Jae Hwan; Park, Young Cheol

    2014-10-01

    Pediatric hypertensive crisis is a potentially life threatening medical emergency, usually secondary to an underlying disease. Hypertension commonly occurs during general anesthesia, and is usually promptly and appropriately treated by anesthesiologists. However in children with severe, unexplained, or refractory hypertension, it has the potential to cause morbidity and even mortality in susceptible patients. We report an anesthetic management of an unexpected hypertensive crisis that developed during general anesthesia in a three-year-old girl with undiagnosed severe left renal artery stenosis.

  2. SEU blending project concept to commercial operation. Part 1: process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, M.S.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Oliver, A.J.; Ozberk, E.

    2004-01-01

    The process development test program for production of Slightly Enriched Uranium (SEU) dioxide powder had started with 100 g Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) dioxide powder samples obtained from different suppliers. Encouraging results obtained in the initial test program established a basis for working with 9.5 kg LEU powder samples and production of larger quantities of SEU powder for characterization to meet the target quality and ensuring development of process design criteria for the commercial scale plant design. Similarly, the process development test program for production of Blended Dysprosium and Uranium (BDU) oxide powders was initiated using different Dy 2 O 3 powder samples from different suppliers. The variability of the quality of Dy 2 O 3 powder samples received from different suppliers resulted in substantial investigation in characterization of Dy 2 O 3 powders. The test program for both products required forming a cross-functional project team from several departments within Cameco with the focus of the development work to be carried out at the Cameco Technology Development. Many aspects of developing two new products were addressed. These included developing design criteria for preparation of SEU and BDU powders for a Demonstration Irradiation (DI) program and commercial scale plant, Quality Assurance program (including specifications for SEU and BDU powder products, SEU and BDU scraps, Cameco Quality Specifications for purchasing LEU and Dy 2 O 3 powders, and Inspection and Test Plan for SEU and BDU powder production), accurate uranium accountability, enhanced safety requirements, bench and laboratory test safety and operability manuals and procedures for analysis. (author)

  3. Cultural Dimensions of Digital Library Development, Part II: The Cultures of Innovation in Five European National Libraries (Narratives of Development)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbello, Marija

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the narrative accounts of the beginnings of digital library programs in five European national libraries: Biblioteca nacional de Portugal, Bibliotheque nationale de France, Die Deutsche Bibliothek, the National Library of Scotland, and the British Library. Based on interviews with policy makers and developers of digital…

  4. Anesthetic management of renal transplant recipients during cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have improved results in organ transplantation which enabled pregnancies following the return of good health and normal endocrine function. Reports about the anesthetic management of renal transplant recipient (RTR during cesarean section (C/S were not found in the literature. The aim of this study is to present our experience in RTRs during C/S. MATERIALS-METHODS: Retrospect ive data regarding RTRs who underwent C/S among 1645 renal transplantations at Baskent Univer sity Hospital in Ankara between January 1977 and Decem ber 2007 have been collected from hospital records. RESULTS: Eleven live births occured from ten RTRs. Two of them from vaginal delivery and 9 from C/S. The mean maternal age was 28 ± 4.6 years. The time from transplantation to conception was 41.1 ± 30.4 months. The mean gestational age was 33.5 ± 3.6 weeks and all recipients were maintained on cyclosporine, azathioprine and corticosteroids before and during pregnancy for immunosuppression. Five C/Ss were performed under general anesthesia whereas spinal anesthesia was used in 4 patients. Renal function tests were stable in all of the patients and we did not observe any acute rejection. The mean birth weight was 1945 ± 689 gr. There were 7 premature and 7 low birth weight among 11 newborns. CONCLUSION: General and regional anesthesia can be safely used during cesarean delivery of the RTRs without increased risk of graft loses. Prematurity and low birth weight was mainly due to the cytotoxic drugs for immunosuppression. Perioperative management of RTRs should be handled by a team including anesthesiologists.

  5. Mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in the anesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katholi, R E; Oparil, S; Urthaler, F; James, T N

    1979-07-01

    The mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction was studied in 28 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg i.v.). Rapid atrial or ventricular pacing or induction of atrial fibrilation were used to produce at least 20% prompt decrease in cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Return to control cardiac output and blood pressure occurred within 3 minutes after cessation of the arrhythmia, but renal blood flow remained significantly decreased (26%) with gradual recovery by 17.7 +/- 6.6 min. Infusion of phentolamine (0.25 mg/min) into the renal artery, intravenous hexamethonium (l mg/kg), adrenal demedullation, or cooling the cervical vagi prevented postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. In contrast, renal denervation, intravenous bretylium (10 mg/kg), intravenous atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or intrarenal SQ 20881 (0.20 mg/min) has no effect on postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. Intravenous propranolol (0.5 mg/kg) intensified postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. These data suggested that the postarrhythmic renal vasoconstrictive response required intact vagi and was due to alpha adrenergic stimulation by adrenal catecholamines. However, femoral arterial catecholamine levels were not elevated above control during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. We therefore sought local vascular pathways by which catecholamines might reach the kidneys. An adrenorenal vascular network was found in each dog. Collection of catecholamines from these vessels during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in six dogs revealed catecholamine concentrations threefold higher than simultaneously collected femoral arterial catecholamines levels. Because ligation of these vessels abolished postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in each dog, we conclude that postarrhythmic renal vasconstriction is due to adrenal catecholamines reaching the kidneys through an adreno-renal vascular network and that the response requires intact vagi.

  6. Responses to negative pressure surrounding the neck in anesthetized animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, A D; Strohl, K P; Acree, B N; Fouke, J M

    1990-01-01

    Continuous positive pressure applied at the nose has been shown to cause a decrease in upper airway resistance. The present study was designed to determine whether a similar positive transmural pressure gradient, generated by applying a negative pressure at the body surface around the neck, altered upper airway patency. Studies were performed in nine spontaneously breathing anesthetized supine dogs. Airflow was measured with a pneumotachograph mounted on an airtight muzzle placed over the nose and mouth of each animal. Upper airway pressure was measured as the differential pressure between the extrathoracic trachea and the inside of the muzzle. Upper airway resistance was monitored as an index of airway patency. Negative pressure (-2 to -20 cmH2O) was applied around the neck by using a cuirass extending from the jaw to the thorax. In each animal, increasingly negative pressures were transmitted to the airway wall in a progressive, although not linear, fashion. Decreasing the pressure produced a progressive fall in upper airway resistance, without causing a significant change in respiratory drive or respiratory timing. At -5 cmH2O pressure, there occurred a significant fall in upper airway resistance, comparable with the response of a single, intravenous injection of sodium cyanide (0.5-3.0 mg), a respiratory stimulant that produces substantial increases in respiratory drive. We conclude that upper airway resistance is influenced by the transmural pressure across the airway wall and that such a gradient can be accomplished by making the extraluminal pressure more negative.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  8. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Preliminary design report, Appendices, Part 1 (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the developed computer models, water system dynamic studies, miscellaneous performance analysis, materials and processes, detailed equipment lists, turbine design studies, tube cleaner design, ammonia leak detection, and heat exchanger design supporting data. (WHK)

  9. Medical and biologic factors of speech and language development in children (part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernov D.N.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent data shows that medico-biological aspects of the study of speech and language development in children should be expanded to include an analysis of various socio-cultural factors as the problem requires an interdisciplinary approach. The review stresses the necessity of methodological approach to study of bio- socio-cultural conditions of emerging speech and language abilities in ontogenesis. Psycho-pedagogical aspect involves: informing parents about the medical and biological aspects of speech and language development in childhood; the active involvement of parents in the remedial and preventive activities carried out by specialists; activities to improve the quality and quantity of child-parent interaction depending on the severity and nature of deviations in child speech and language development.

  10. Integrating Environmental Decisions into the Product Development Process: Part 1 - The Early Stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhamra, T.; Evans, S.; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    1999-01-01

    environmental decisions into their product development process which is very unusual in that ecodesign is significantly different for the pre- and post-specification stages of the design process. This paper explains the findings related to the first phase being the very early stages of the product development...... in the UK, Central Europe and the USA are carrying out Ecodesign. The survey also investigated the successes and failures companies had experienced and the lessons they had learnt along the way. From this survey we identified a number of success factors that enabled companies to successfully integrate...... process prior to the specification being finalised. A second paper, considers the findings from the later phases of the product development process....

  11. Development of an Automatic Combination System of Clothing Parts for Blind People: MyEyes

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Rocha; Vίtor Carvalho; Joaquim Gonçalves; Filipe Azevedo; Eva Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Blind people have been, over time, a reason for motivation in the development of solutions to improve their quality of life. The aim of this work is to propose a solution for one of such problems, namely, the selection and combination of clothing for the blind. Thus, this paper describes the whole project developed, in agreement with the Portuguese Association of the Blind and Amblyopic of Portugal (ACAPO), for the creation of a Web platform to aid the blind in selecting combinations of cloth...

  12. Expression patterns of Wnt genes during development of an anterior part of the chicken eye

    OpenAIRE

    Fokina, Valentina M.; Frolova, Elena I.

    2006-01-01

    To address the roles of Wnts in the development of the anterior eye, we used a chicken model to perform comprehensive expression analysis of all Wnt genes during anterior eye development. In analyzing the available genomic sequences, we found that the chicken genome encodes 18 Wnt proteins that are homologous to corresponding human and mouse proteins. The mRNA sequences for 12 chicken Wnt genes are available in GenBank, and mRNAs for six other Wnt genes (Wnt2, Wnt5b, Wnt7b, Wnt8b, Wnt9b and W...

  13. Material Factors in Relation to Development Time in Liquid-Penetrant Inspection. Part 1. Material Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irek P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In technical publications and European Standards the development time (i.e. time of getting out of penetrant from a discontinuity to the material surface in penetration testing is specified within the range of 10-30 minutes. In practice, however, it is seen , that it is closely connected

  14. Research and Development in Natural Language Understanding as Part of the Strategic Computing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    facilities. BBN is developing a series of increasingly sophisticated natural language understanding systems which will serve as an integrated interface...Haas, A.R. A Syntactic Theory of Belief and Action. Artificial Intelligence. 1986. Forthcoming. [6] Hinrichs, E. Temporale Anaphora im Englischen

  15. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  16. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  17. Characteristics of Place Identity as Part of Professional Identity Development among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michal; Hochberg, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    How do pre-service teachers perceive place identity, and is there a connection between their formative place identity and the development of their professional teaching identity? These questions are probed among pre-service teachers who participated in a course titled "Integrating Nature into Preschool." The design of the course was…

  18. Niger Republic mineral planning (part five): recommendations and suggestions for the developement of mineral resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franconi, A.

    1986-06-01

    The mineral planning present a comprehensive program of prospecting in order to increase mineral industry sector participation to the economc development of the country. Subjects taken in consideration in this volume are: setting up structural and technical means; projects proposal; summary of projects, financial cost estimation and proposals for activities forward looking calendar [fr

  19. Professional Development Considerations for Makerspace Leaders, Part One: Addressing "What?" and "Why?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    As makerspaces begin to move into school libraries and classrooms, there is a growing need for professional development to help K-12 educators answer common questions such as "what is a makerspace," "why should I bother with a makerspace," "how do I run a makerspace," and "how do I teach from a makerspace?"…

  20. Contemporary Views on Development of Excess Body Weight and Obesity in Children. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Khodzhiyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the most widespread chronic diseases around the world and may be considered a non-infectious epidemic. Virtually everywhere around the world the number of obese children doubles every three decades. Increase in the number of children with obesity and excess body weight is observed in Russia as well. Despite the statement that the main cause of obesity is energy expenditure/consumption imbalance, numerous data obtained in recent years indicate early factors of obesity forming, probably, during the period of intrauterine development and/or infancy and early childhood. The most active growth and maximum plasticity of metabolic processes is observed within 1,000 post-conceptual days, which cover the period of intrauterine development and the first 2 years of a child’s life. The number and quality of nutrients received during that period considerably affect cell differentiation and organ development by means of gene expression, determine the nature of metabolism and affect health condition throughout the whole subsequent life. Given significance of the issue of excess body weight in children and adults, we analyzed the current situation, examined 652 younger Moscow schoolchildren and determined parameters of their physical development. We analyzed anamnestic data, profoundly examined children with excess body weight and obesity and formulated diets for them. This article presents the first stage of our work and a literature review.

  1. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Yost, S. A.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort--the design of an "Introduction to Mechatronics" course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers…

  2. Determination of telmisartan in human blood plasma: Part I: Immunoassay development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempen, C.M.; Gläsle-Schwarz, Liane; Kunz, Ulrich; Karst, U.

    2006-01-01

    Telmisartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist and a known drug against high blood pressure. In this report, the development of a new and rapid analytical technique, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of telmisartan in human blood plasma is described. The

  3. Episodic Memory Development: Theory of Mind Is Part of Re-Experiencing Experienced Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Josef; Kloo, Daniela; Gornik, Edith

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments with 3 1/2- to 6 1/2-year-old children showed that theory-of-mind development is associated with the growth of episodic memory. Episodic memory was assessed by manipulating informational conditions such that they permit or prevent the formation of episodic memories in terms of re-experiencing the recalled event. Only experienced…

  4. Home grown hydro, part 1: Hydro development in Canada key to regional, international business expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    Canada has had a long and successful record of hydroelectric power development since the first hydraulic generators were installed at Chaudiere Falls near Ottawa in 1881. Canadian hydro engineers have demonstrated their ability to develop and manage higher voltages, longer transmission networks, larger projects, remote sites, and undersea cable technology. Canada has earned a reputation for excellence in the hydro industry and is successful at exporting its expertise to develop hydro resources in the international market. A prominent example is provided by the Three Gorges Project in China, for which the Chinese Ministry of Energy searched for the best foreign engineers to prepare a feasibility report. A Canadian team that integrated the expertise of hydro consultants, utilities, and major equipment suppliers was chosen to prepare the report, winning over teams from the USA, Brazil, and Europe. Success in this initiative is attributed to Canada's ability to demonstrate the favorable application of new technology at James Bay. Domestic hydro projects are thus seen as crucial in efforts to expand into international markets. However, Canada's new completed hydro capacity has fallen dramatically since 1986, and Canadian hydro contractors have tended to remain domestic operators with little incentive to enter foreign markets. By having the foresight to begin new hydro developments now, Canada would benefit from increased employment and orders for equipment, and would ensure a continuing base of technical expertise and innovation in the electrical industry. 2 figs

  5. A Model for Promoting Poultry Industry Development in Togo: Part 1. Management Practices and Incubation Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tona, K.; Agbonon, A.; Eklu-Gadegbeku, K.; Teteh, A.; Simons, P.; Buyse, J.; Everaert, N.; Kemp, B.; Decuypere, E.; Gbeassor, M.

    2014-01-01

    In commercial poultry husbandry practice, the hatchery takes over the incubation of bird eggs in order to provide as many day-old chicks as needed at any time to farmers. The main bottleneck for poultry industry development in Togo is the lack of day-old chick supply. Indeed, there is no proficient

  6. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors

  7. Medicinal herbs as part of the development of sustainable tourism in Nature park 'Stara Planina'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratknić Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of the concept of sustainable exploitation of medicinal plant resources facilitates the development of tourism offering and the related activities that would enhance the development of rural areas in this region. When managed in a sustainable manner, tourism can bring many advantages to protected areas, tourism industry and a local community. By using high-resolution satellite images and application of GIS technology, a method is developed for monitoring periodic changes in eco-systems. The collected data enable design of models that incorporate in themselves dynamics of changes taking place in natural ecosystems. By means of periodic imaging of characteristic areas, the spatial representation of eco-systems will be monitored, along with the changes in their composition and structure, which may seriously endanger the development of tourism potential in the region. The integral approach to the management of medicinal herb resources in the region of Mt. Stara Planina, based on the results of this study, necessitates the integration of these results with the results of the studies investigating views and needs of the local population, whose quality of life depends on sustainability of the process of collection and valorization of this resource.

  8. Number 13 / Part I. Music. 7. Grounds of Absolute Pitch Development in Yamaha Music School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iușcă Dorina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Absolute pitch is defined as the ability to identify the pitch class of a certain given sound without the aid of an external reference pitch (Takeuchi & Hulse, 1993; Deutsch, 2002. The incidence of absolute pitch is extremely rare among the general population, respectively 1 in 10.000 people and it depends on testing conditions such as the number of identified sounds, pitch Chroma, pitch height, timbre, register or requested reaction time, and also on subjects musical training commencing and Eastern-Asian origins. The way absolute pitch develops is described by three models: the tone language theory, the early training theory and the genetic theory. The early training theory states that absolute pitch appears due to the beginning of musical lessons during a critical development period situated before the age of 6. The educational implications of this theory are revealed in the principles and activities of Yamaha Music School which employs didactic strategies that naturally develop absolute pitch. Yamaha Music School is the largest private music education system from Japan, established by Torakusu Yamaha in 1954. Up to this day it has extended in 40 countries from Europe, Asia and the American continents, as it has about 710 million students and 30.000 teachers. The present study aims to illustrate a detailed analysis of the way the learning experiences offered by Yamaha School lead to the development of absolute pitch.

  9. Development of the pelvis and posterior part of the vertebral column in the Anura

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ročková, H.; Roček, Zbyněk

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 206, č. 1 (2005), s. 35-35 ISSN 0021-8782 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : Anura * development * evolution Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.010, year: 2005

  10. A three-part framework for self-regulated personality development across adulthood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennecke, M.; Bleidorn, W.; Denissen, J.J.A.; Wood, D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, researchers interested in personality development have begun to acknowledge the roles of motivation and self-regulation for why traits change across adulthood. We propose three preconditions under which individuals may change their own levels of a personality trait through self-directed

  11. Home grown hydro, part 1: Hydro development in Canada key to regional, international business expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, P.A

    1994-06-01

    Canada has had a long and successful record of hydroelectric power development since the first hydraulic generators were installed at Chaudiere Falls near Ottawa in 1881. Canadian hydro engineers have demonstrated their ability to develop and manage higher voltages, longer transmission networks, larger projects, remote sites, and undersea cable technology. Canada has earned a reputation for excellence in the hydro industry and is successful at exporting its expertise to develop hydro resources in the international market. A prominent example is provided by the Three Gorges Project in China, for which the Chinese Ministry of Energy searched for the best foreign engineers to prepare a feasibility report. A Canadian team that integrated the expertise of hydro consultants, utilities, and major equipment suppliers was chosen to prepare the report, winning over teams from the USA, Brazil, and Europe. Success in this initiative is attributed to Canada's ability to demonstrate the favorable application of new technology at James Bay. Domestic hydro projects are thus seen as crucial in efforts to expand into international markets. However, Canada's new completed hydro capacity has fallen dramatically since 1986, and Canadian hydro contractors have tended to remain domestic operators with little incentive to enter foreign markets. By having the foresight to begin new hydro developments now, Canada would benefit from increased employment and orders for equipment, and would ensure a continuing base of technical expertise and innovation in the electrical industry. 2 figs.

  12. Developing Weight Training Programs with Microsoft Excel: Techtorial #2. Article #3 in a 6-Part Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    Developing personalized fitness programs to meet individual needs of students can be an overwhelming task for the physical educator. The National Standards for Physical Education (NASPE) indicate that students should achieve and maintain appropriate levels of physical fitness. To effectively meet standards with the growing diversity of curricular…

  13. Cool products for building envelope - Part I: Development and lab scale testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revel, G.M.; Martarelli, M.; Emiliani, M.; Gozalbo, A.; Orts, M.J.; Bengochea, M.T.; Guaita Delgado, L.; Gaki, A.; Katsiapi, A.; Taxiarchou, M.; Arabatzis, I.; Fasaki, I.; Hermanns, S.

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology followed for the development of new cool products in order to widen the range of existing solutions both including coloured (even dark) materials and extending the application also to building vertical components. Cool coloured ceramic tiles and acrylic paints for

  14. The implementation of microstructural and heat treatment models to development of forming technology of critical aluminum-alloy parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biba, Nikolay; Alimov, Artem; Shitikov, Andrey; Stebunov, Sergei

    2018-05-01

    The demand for high performance and energy efficient transportation systems have boosted interest in lightweight design solutions. To achieve maximum weight reductions, it is not enough just to replace steel parts by their aluminium analogues, but it is necessary to change the entire concept of vehicle design. In this case we must develop methods for manufacturing a variety of critical parts with unusual and difficult to produce shapes. The mechanical properties of the material in these parts must also be optimised and tightly controlled to provide the best distribution within the part volume. The only way to achieve these goals is to implement technology development methods based on simulation of the entire manufacturing chain from preparing a billet through the forming operations and heat treatment of the product. The paper presents an approach to such technology development. The simulation of the technological chain starts with extruding a round billet. Depending on the extrusion process parameters, the billet can have different levels of material workout and variation of grain size throughout the volume. After extrusion, the billet gets formed into the required shape in a forging process. The main requirements at this stage are to get the near net shape of the product without defects and to provide proper configuration of grain flow that strengthens the product in the most critical direction. Then the product undergoes solution treatment, quenching and ageing. The simulation of all these stages are performed by QForm FEM code that provides thermo-mechanical coupled deformation of the material during extrusion and forging. To provide microstructure and heat treatment simulation, special subroutines has been developed by the authors. The proposed approach is illustrated by an industrial case study.

  15. Development of a wind converter and investigation of its operational function. Part 1: Technical description of the wind energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molly, J. P.; Steinheber, R.

    1982-11-01

    A 10 kW wind energy converter was developed by using as far possible standard serial production parts. The design criteria and the description of the essential machinery components of the MODA 10 wind energy converter are discussed. For some special load cases the safety calculation of the important components is shown. The blade control system which qualified for small wind energy converters, is explained. Weight and cost of the MODA 10 are considered.

  16. The book, the stories, the people: an ongoing dialogic narrative inquiry study combining a practice development project. Part 2: the practice development context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A; Biley, F C; Leigh-Phippard, H; Walker, H

    2012-12-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-article practice development report. It builds on the first part by introducing and discussing a Writing for Recovery practice development project, conducted at two UK sites. The paper begins by briefly describing the project within the context of helping mental health users, carers and survivors develop skills in creative writing in order to engage in the process of narrative re-storying in line with preferred identity. A selective overview of broad and focal background literature relevant to the project is then provided in order to position it within a values-based mental health nursing practice. Following this, the specific plan for running the project is briefly summarized, covering actual and anticipated ethical issues. The paper ends with a discussion of dissemination aims. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  17. Anesthetic Sevoflurane Causes Rho-Dependent Filopodial Shortening in Mouse Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Zimering

    Full Text Available Early postnatal anesthesia causes long-lasting learning and memory impairment in rodents, however, evidence for a specific neurotoxic effect on early synaptogenesis has not been demonstrated. Drebrin A is an actin binding protein whose localization in dendritic protrusions serves an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis, and is a marker for early synaptogenesis. We therefore set out to investigate whether clinically-relevant concentrations of anesthetic sevoflurane, widely- used in infants and children, alters dendritic morphology in cultured fetal day 16 mouse hippocampal neurons. After 7 days in vitro, mouse hippocampal neurons were exposed to four hours of 3% sevoflurane in 95% air/5% CO2 or control condition (95% air/5% CO2. Neurons were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and stained with Alexa Fluor555-Phalloidin, and/or rabbit anti-mouse drebrin A/E antibodies which permitted subcellular localization of filamentous (F-actin and/or drebrin immunoreactivity, respectively. Sevoflurane caused acute significant length-shortening in filopodia and thin dendritic spines in days-in-vitro 7 neurons, an effect which was completely rescued by co-incubating neurons with ten micromolar concentrations of the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Filopodia and thin spine recovered in length two days after sevoflurane exposure. Yet cluster-type filopodia (a precursor to synaptic filopodia were persistently significantly decreased in number on day-in-vitro 9, in part owing to preferential localization of drebrin immunoreactivity to dendritic shafts versus filopodial stalks. These data suggest that sevoflurane induces F-actin depolymerization leading to acute, reversible length-shortening in dendritic protrusions through a mechanism involving (in part activation of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and impairs localization of drebrin A to filopodia required for early excitatory synapse formation.

  18. Ambulatory anesthetic care in children undergoing myringotomy and tube placement: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hal; Engelhardt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Myringotomy and tube placement is one of the most frequently performed ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeries in the pediatric population. Effective anesthetic management is vital to ensuring successful ambulatory care and ensuring child and parental satisfaction. This review summarizes recently published studies about the long-term effects of general anesthesia in young children, novel approaches to preoperative fasting and simplified approaches to the assessment and management of emergence delirium (ED) and emergence agitation (EA). New developments in perioperative ambulatory care, including management of comorbidities and day care unit logistics, are discussed. Long-term follow-up of children exposed to general anesthesia before the age of 4 years has limited impact on academic achievement or cognitive performance and should not delay the treatment of common ENT pathology, which can impair speech and language development. A more liberal approach to fasting, employing a 6-4-0 regime allowing children fluids up until theater, may become an accepted practice in future. ED and EA should be discriminated from pain in recovery and, where the child is at risk of harm, should be treated promptly. Postoperative pain at home remains problematic in ambulatory surgery and better parental education is needed. Effective ambulatory care ultimately requires a well-coordinated team approach from effective preassessment to postoperative follow-up.

  19. [Anesthetic management for surgery of giant coronary aneurysms complicated with Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Koji; Tokuda, Rui; Suzuki, Tomofumi; Hanashiro, Ako; Kobashigawa, Teruyo; Mayama, Takashi; Kamikawa, Michie

    2014-04-01

    Few cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) complicated by giant coronary aneurysms (CAs)have been reported thus far. We report a case of CSS in a 60-year-old man who underwent surgery for giant CAs, and was managed with anesthetics. The patient developed acute myocardial infarction, and was diagnosed with giant CAs in the right coronary artery (RCA, 11 cm) and circumflex artery (3 cm). The CA in RCA was communicating with the right ventricle. He had a history of pericardiectomy for pericarditis caused by the CSS and developed thrombocytopenia due to consumptive coagulopathy within the CAs. An operation, including ligation and excision of the CAs, and coronary artery bypass grafting was performed under general anesthesia and cardiopulmonary bypass. There was massive hemorrhage followed by hemodynamic instability while detaching the tight pericardial adhesion and fragile surface of the CAs. Massive transfusion was required along with inotropes administration and intraaortic balloon support. In this case, determination of the appropriate surgical timing was difficult because symptoms of the CSS became worse followed by rapid enlargement of the CAs, myocardial infarction, and thrombocytopenia. Steroids were administered for treating CSS, and the blood transfusion was sufficient. However, it was difficult to control the hemorrhage and maintain hemodynamic stability.

  20. Development of a three-part time-of-day electrical energy tariff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.S. [Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Hossain, A.K.M.T. [Bangladesh Power Development Board, Narayangganj (Bangladesh). Siddhirganj Power Station

    1998-10-10

    This paper presents an analytical technique for determining peak, offpeak and midpeak hours tariffs for various durations of these three periods. The technique considers the existing flat rate tariff, an hourly generation scenario of a utility on an average yearly demand day, the weighted average life time, annutised capital cost and fuel cost of base and peak load plants, and a break even point condition in the utility's revenue. The developed tariff has been applied to 30 representative industrial consumers served by the Bangladesh Power Development Board (BPDB) to estimate the minimum possible shift in consumption pattern and hence corresponding reduction in peak generation capacity requirements as well as peak time load shedding by BPDB. (author)

  1. RES-E Support Policies In The Baltic States: Development Aspect (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobinaite V.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite quite similar conditions (natural resources for electricity production from renewable energy sources (RES-E in three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, significant differences exist in these countries as to the RES-E production volume. In Latvia this volume is the highest, while in Estonia and Lithuania it is half as high. One of the factors that determine the RES-E production volumes is support policies, which in the Baltic States are different. The main objective of this work was to analyze and compare these support policies. The results have shown that for rapid RES-E development the most effective policy is to be market-oriented (as in Estonia, whereas for more stable development such policy should be producer-oriented (as in Lithuania.

  2. Development of a Career Enhancement Training is Inherent Part of an Educational Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabdrakhmanova R.G.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Career enhancement training is common for teachers, yet participating in the project requires special training. Project training courses expose project objectives and allow getting necessary skills, materials and tools to determine the results. Training course have to include a content for which teachers will need to make a report. R. A. Valeeva, Ph.D., Professor, was the manager of a project “Development and testing of new modules and rules for the implementing of the basic bachelor educational program in an "Education and Pedagogy" aggregated group (psycho-pedagogical training direction, which implies academic mobility of students studying education science (non-educational training directions in the context of networking”. To implement the project, it was decided to establish close partnerships with five higher educational institutions in the country. We have developed training courses to prepare teaching and resource staff of our university, as well as our partners to strong partnership in the project execution.

  3. Homegrown hydro, part 2: Private sector an important resource for developing Canadian exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A review of four major hydro consultants across Canada illustrates how the private sector has become an important resource for export of Canadian goods and services. The major utilities have contributed in operations and training and have acted as catalysts in this process. An overview is presented of the history and export activities of four consultants: Monenco, Acres, SNC, and Klohn-Crippen. The linkage between domestic experience and expansion into foreign markets in hydro resource development is apparent. Domestic projects have fallen into a severe decline due to the market; it is suggested that cyclical markets might be avoided by constructing capacity in advance. A tally is provided of current Canadian projects, which represent a substantial economic potential for sustainable, renewable hydroelectric resource development. 1 fig

  4. Development of gastroenterology and hepatology in Iran: Part II- advances in research and therapeutic modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Mir-Madjlessi, Seid-Hossein

    2009-09-01

    Following the establishment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Fellowship Programs in 1987, significant developments in research and health care delivery have been achieved. The number of published articles has increased significantly and now more than 10 approved research centers are involved in several longitudinal and population based studies in GI epidemiology, viral hepatitis and GI oncology around the country. Before 1987 less than 50 gastroenterologists were working in the country, but now more than 300 gastroenterologists are involved in public and private health care delivery systems. Advanced diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures and complex surgical procedures such as liver transplantation are a routine now. These achievements are indicative of hard work and determination of dedicated physicians after the Islamic Revolution, and the support of governmental and non-governmental sectors. The future prospect of development in the discipline of gastroenterology and hepatology in Iran seems to be very encouraging.

  5. National preceptor development program (PDP): Influential evidence and theory. The first of a 3-part series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulherin, Katrina; Walter, Sheila; Cox, Craig D

    2018-03-01

    Priority #3 of the Canadian Experiential Education Project for Pharmacy provided evidence-based guidance for the design and implementation of a national approach to preceptor development. In this first article (of three), findings from the project and recommendations to achieve a high-quality preceptor development program (PDP) are presented. A multi-method approach including detailed semi-structured interviews, classic literature review, and advisory committee feedback was employed. The research team performed an integrated analysis of all data to achieve the objectives of Priority #3. Fifteen formal interviews, 167 articles and two stakeholder meetings informed findings. Experiential Education programs exhibited commonality in content and usually delivered programs online using modules or live lectures. Not all programs required preceptor education despite it being mandated by academic accreditors. Academics' perceptions varied regarding pharmacists' baseline knowledge, skills and attitudes prior to engaging in the preceptor role. A national approach to a PDP was desired if jurisdictional content was accommodated. Copious interprofessional literature of generally fair quality did not identify superior preceptor development approaches although there were numerous descriptions of interventions. Only 29 articles measured educational outcomes. Outcomes included satisfaction rates, self-efficacy and perceived knowledge, skill retention, skill implementation and participation rates. Twelve recommendations were identified to guide successful development of a national PDP. In the absence of good evidence, adult educational theory provided a basis for an effective PDP. Findings from Priority #3 may be relevant not only to pharmacy in Canada but other health professions and counterparts in other western nations with similar approaches to professional education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High-Uranium-Loaded U3O8-Al fuel element development program. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    The High-Uranium-Loaded U 3 O 8 -Al Fuel Element Development Program supports Argonne National Laboratory efforts to develop high-uranium-density research and test reactor fuel to accommodate use of low-uranium enrichment. The goal is to fuel most research and test reactors with uranium of less than 20% enrichment for the purpose of lowering the potential for diversion of highly-enriched material for nonpeaceful usages. The specific objective of the program is to develop the technological and engineering data base for U 3 O 8 -Al plate-type fuel elements of maximal uranium content to the point of vendor qualification for full scale fabrication on a production basis. A program and management plan that details the organization, supporting objectives, schedule, and budget is in place and preparation for fuel and irradiation studies is under way. The current programming envisions a program of about four years duration for an estimated cost of about two million dollars. During the decades of the fifties and sixties, developments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory led to the use of U 3 O 8 -Al plate-type fuel elements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge Research Reactor, Puerto Rico Nuclear Center Reactor, and the High Flux Beam Reactor. Most of the developmental information however applies only up to a uranium concentration of about 55 wt % (about 35 vol % U 3 O 8 ). The technical issues that must be addressed to further increase the uranium loading beyond 55 wt % U involve plate fabrication phenomena of voids and dogboning, fuel behavior under long irradiation, and potential for the thermite reaction between U 3 O 8 and aluminum

  7. Double tube heat exchanger with novel enhancement: Part I - flow development length and adiabatic friction factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiruselvam, R.; Raghavan, Vijay R. [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Tronoh (Malaysia)

    2012-04-15

    The study is conducted to evaluate the flow characteristics in a double tube heat exchanger using two new and versatile enhancement configurations. The novelty is that they are usable in single phase forced convection, evaporation and condensation. Correlations are proposed for flow development length and friction factor for use in predicting fluid pumping power in thermal equipment as well as in subsequent heat transfer characterization of the surface. (orig.)

  8. Medico-biological factors of speech and language development in young children (part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernov D.N.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzed the main results of medico-biological directions in the study of the factors of children's speech and language. It shows that a variety of pre-, peri-and neonatal developmental factors (teratogenic effects, prematurity, low birth weight, maternal diseases during pregnancy, and chronic diseases of the child had a negative impact on the child-parent relationship that has a lasting influence on child speech and language development.

  9. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the role of pattern-recognition receptors involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of Staphylococcus aureus. There are shown the basic operation of macrophage and monocyte NLRP3, NLRC5, NLRP7, AIM2 inflammasomes that form the active forms of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1-beta and IL-18 du-ring the development of pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Gelatin- and starch-based hydrogels. Part A: Hydrogel development, characterization and coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Graulus, Geert-Jan; Martins, José C; Frankel, Daniel; Kersemans, Ken; De Vos, Filip; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter

    2016-11-05

    The present work aims at constructing the ideal scaffold matrix of which the physico-chemical properties can be altered according to the targeted tissue regeneration application. Ideally, this scaffold should resemble the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) as close as possible both in terms of chemical composition and mechanical properties. Therefore, hydrogel films were developed consisting of methacrylamide-modified gelatin and starch-pentenoate building blocks because the ECM can be considered as a crosslinked hydrogel network consisting of both polysaccharides and structural, signaling and cell-adhesive proteins. For the gelatin hydrogels, three different substitution degrees were evaluated including 31%, 72% and 95%. A substitution degree of 32% was applied for the starch-pentenoate building block. Pure gelatin hydrogels films as well as interpenetrating networks with gelatin and starch were developed. Subsequently, these films were characterized using gel fraction and swelling experiments, high resolution-magic angle spinning (1)H NMR spectroscopy, rheology, infrared mapping and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate that both the mechanical properties and the swelling extent of the developed hydrogel films can be controlled by varying the chemical composition and the degree of substitution of the methacrylamide-modified gelatin applied. The storage moduli of the developed materials ranged between 14 and 63kPa. Phase separation was observed for the IPNs for which separated starch domains could be distinguished located in the surrounding gelatin matrix. Furthermore, we evaluated the affinity of aggrecan for gelatin by atomic force microscopy and radiolabeling experiments. We found that aggrecan can be applied as a bioactive coating for gelatin hydrogels by a straightforward physisorption procedure. Thus, we achieved distinct fine-tuning of the physico-chemical properties of these hydrogels which render them promising candidates for tissue engineering

  11. DEVELOPING A CYCLING SUBSYSTEM AS PART OF A SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY STRATEGY: THE CASE OF GDANSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanika OKRASZEWSKA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modal share is an important component in developing sustainable transport within a city. In recent years, many cities have set modal share targets for balanced and sustainable transport modes: 30% of public transport and 30% of non-motorized (cycling and walking modes. Gdansk strategic documents have set similar goals with some actions already taken towards those goals. The cycle network is increasing popular. Gdansk’s cycling infrastructure is more developed than that in other Polish cities. Promotional actions are undertaken each year. Despite that, the share of cycling in the modal split still remains at the low level of 1-3%. The article analyses the case study of Gdansk’s cycling policy and its results. The article summarizes the modal share targets set in Gdansk’s strategic documents, describes the development of its cycle network and promotional campaigns, and presents the volume of bicycle traffic and its share in the city’s modal split. Finally, the article aims to identify the causes behind the low percentage of bicyclists in Gdansk.

  12. Selected element contents formation in linseed plants (Linum usitatissimum L. depending on the phase of development and plant part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Zając

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A single factor (variety strict field experiment was carried out in 1999-2000 at the experimental station of the Department of Plant Production, Agricultural University of Krakow located at Prusy near Cracow to study the changes in selected macro-and microelement concentrations in the top parts of linseed and the uptake of these elements during vegetation at the characteristic phases of development, including also the plant parts, i.e. leaves, stems, seeds and straw. On the basis of obtained results it was demonstrated that microelement contents in the linseed top parts changed considerably with the plant growth. The levels of Cr, Zn,Cd, Fe and Mn were highest at budding, while Cr, Pb, Fe and Mn levels were lowest at full maturity phase. Linseed grown in the area unpolluted with trace elements did not reveal the ability to accumulate excessive amounts of Cr, Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Fe and Mn, undesired from the usefulness for consumption point of view. Cadmium, irrespective of the examined stage of plant development, revealed high capacity for an excessive accumulation in the top parts. The contents and reciprocal ratios of macroelements in plants changed variously with their growth. The highest Na and K contents were noticed at budding phase, Ca at vegetative stage (arborescent and Mg at the initial budding. The widest Ca:P ratio and K:(Ca+Mg ratio occurred at budding, whereas K:Na ratio at full maturity phase. Linseed accumulated macro- and microele ments in the yield at various rates. Among the analysed elements Cd, Zn and Ni were taken up proportionally to increasing yields of linseed top part biomass.

  13. The physician/hospital joint venture. Developing a win/win strategy for success. Part I: The first step: developing the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, A B

    1987-02-01

    This four part series, "The Physician/Hospital Joint Venture: Developing a Win/Win Strategy," will examine the philosophical basis of marketing to physicians, the options for the organization in formulating a strategy for joint venture development, structuring and negotiating the deal, and finally how to build the physician loyalty and commitment essential for the joint venture's continued success. In this first article, the author emphasizes the organization's need to develop a strategic plan that includes a program for attracting physicians. It also points out the need for sensitivity to physicians' concerns and provides examples of successes and failures.

  14. A novel local anesthetic system: transcriptional transactivator peptide-decorated nanocarriers for skin delivery of ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chuanyu Chen, Peijun You Department of Anesthesiology, Shandong Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Jining, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Barrier properties of the skin and physicochemical properties of drugs are the main factors for the delivery of local anesthetic molecules. The present work evaluates the anesthetic efficacy of drug-loaded nanocarrier (NC systems for the delivery of local anesthetic drug, ropivacaine (RVC. Methods: In this study, transcriptional transactivator peptide (TAT-decorated RVC-loaded NCs (TAT-RVC/NCs were successfully fabricated. Physicochemical properties of NCs were determined in terms of particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug-loading capacity, stability, and in vitro drug release. The skin permeation of NCs was examined using a Franz diffusion cell mounted with depilated mouse skin in vitro, and in vivo anesthetic effect was evaluated in mice. Results: The results showed that TAT-RVC/NCs have a mean diameter of 133.2 nm and high drug-loading capacity of 81.7%. From the in vitro skin permeation results, it was observed that transdermal flux of TAT-RVC/NCs was higher than that of RVC-loaded NCs (RVC/NCs and RVC injection. The evaluation of in vivo anesthetic effect illustrated that TAT-RVC/NCs can enhance the transdermal delivery of RVC by reducing the pain threshold in mice. Conclusion: These results indicate that TAT-decorated NCs systems are useful for overcoming the barrier function of the skin, decreasing the dosage of RVC and enhancing the anesthetic effect. Therefore, TAT-decorated NCs can be used as an effective transdermal delivery system for local anesthesia. Keywords: local anesthetic system, ropivacaine, transcriptional transactivator peptide, nanocarriers, skin delivery

  15. Assessment of the densities of local anesthetics and their combination with adjuvants: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Moreira, Adriano Dias; Gaspar, Flávia Cunha; Gouveia, Marildo A; Cordeiro, José Antônio

    2009-01-01

    The relative density of a local anesthetic in relation to that of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at 37 degrees C is one of the most important physical properties that affect the level of analgesia obtained after the subarachnoid administration of the drug. The objective of this study was to determine the density of local anesthetic solutions, with and without glucose, and the combination of the local anesthetic with adjuvants at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C. The density (g.mL(-1)) was determined by using a DMA 450 densimeter with a sensitivity of +/- 0.00001 g.mL(-1). The densities, and variations, according to the temperature were obtained for all local anesthetics and their combination with opioids at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C. The solution is hyperbaric if its density exceeds 1.00099, hypobaric when its density is lower than 1.00019, and isobaric when its density is greater than 1.00019 and lower than 1.00099. The densities of both local anesthetics and adjuvants decrease with the increase in temperature. At 37 degrees C, all glucose-containing solutions are hyperbaric. In the absence of glucose, all solutions are hypobaric. At 37 degrees C, morphine, fentanyl, sufentanil, and clonidine are hypobaric. The densities of local anesthetics and adjuvants decrease with the increase in temperature and increase when glucose is added. The knowledge of the relative density helps select the most adequate local anesthetic to be administered in the subarachnoid space.

  16. Global Functional Connectivity Differences between Sleep-Like States in Urethane Anesthetized Rats Measured by fMRI.

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    Ekaterina Zhurakovskaya

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for nervous system functioning and sleep disorders are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the macroscale connectivity changes in brain networking during different sleep states are poorly understood. One of the hindering factors is the difficulty to combine functional connectivity investigation methods with spontaneously sleeping animals, which prevents the use of numerous preclinical animal models. Recent studies, however, have implicated that urethane anesthesia can uniquely induce different sleep-like brain states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM (NREM sleep, in rodents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess changes in global connectivity and topology between sleep-like states in urethane anesthetized rats, using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging. We detected significant changes in corticocortical (increased in NREM-like state and corticothalamic connectivity (increased in REM-like state. Additionally, in graph analysis the modularity, the measure of functional integration in the brain, was higher in NREM-like state than in REM-like state, indicating a decrease in arousal level, as in normal sleep. The fMRI findings were supported by the supplementary electrophysiological measurements. Taken together, our results show that macroscale functional connectivity changes between sleep states can be detected robustly with resting-state fMRI in urethane anesthetized rats. Our findings pave the way for studies in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases where sleep abnormalities are often one of the first markers for the disorder development.

  17. Anesthetic management of comprehensive dental restoration in a child with glutaric aciduria type 1 using volatile sevoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Nung Teng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1 is a rare, inherited mitochondrial disorder that results from deficiency of mitochondrial glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase. Most patients develop neurological dysfunction early in life, which leads to severe disabilities. We present a 37-month-old girl with GA1 manifested as macrocephaly and hypotonia who received comprehensive dental restoration surgery under general anesthesia with sevoflurane. She was placed on specialized fluid management during a preoperative fasting period and anesthesia was administered without complications. All the physiological parameters, including glucose and lactate blood levels and arterial blood gas were carefully monitored and maintained within normal range perioperatively. Strategies for anesthetic management should include prevention of pulmonary aspiration, dehydration, hyperthermia and catabolic state, adequate analgesia to minimize surgical stress, and avoidance of prolonged neuromuscular blockade. We administered general anesthesia with sevoflurane uneventfully, which was well tolerated by our patient with GA1. Additionally, communication with a pediatric geneticist and surgeons should be undertaken to formulate a comprehensive anesthetic strategy in these patients.

  18. Delineation of groundwater development potential zones in parts of marginal Ganga Alluvial Plain in South Bihar, Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipankar; Dhar, Y R; Vittala, S S

    2010-06-01

    A part of the Gangetic Alluvial Plain covering 2,228 km(2), in the state of Bihar, is studied for demarcating groundwater development potential zones. The area is mainly agrarian and experiencing intensive groundwater draft to the tune of 0.12 million cubic metre per square kilometres per year from the Quaternary marginal alluvial deposits, unconformably overlain northerly sloping Precambrian bedrock. Multiparametric data on groundwater comprising water level, hydraulic gradient (pre- and post-monsoon), aquifer thickness, permeability, suitability of groundwater for drinking and irrigation and groundwater resources vs. draft are spatially analysed and integrated on a Geographical Information System platform to generate thematic layers. By integrating these layers, three zones have been delineated based on groundwater development potential. It is inferred that about 48% of the area covering northern part has high development potential, while medium and low development potential category covers 41% of the area. Further increase in groundwater extraction is not recommended for an area of 173 km(2), affected by over-exploitation. The replenishable groundwater resource available for further extraction has been estimated. The development potential enhances towards north with increase in thickness of sediments. Local deviations are due to variation of-(1) cumulative thickness of aquifers, (2) deeper water level resulting from localised heavy groundwater extraction and (3) aquifer permeability.

  19. Indian experience in capacity building as a part of development of atomic energy programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    India embarked on a programme to harness nuclear technologies for the welfare of the nation more than five decades ago and adopted an approach involving knowledge generation through research and development, disseminating the knowledge acquired to the young generation through in-house arrangement, encouraging the researchers in the university system to work on problems of interest to the nuclear industry by providing research funding, networking with the university system, collaborating with industry to upgrade their skills to take up challenging manufacturing jobs, setting up industry under the control of the Government wherever private industry was not coming forward and so on. The basic approach underlying all efforts was to tap the 'knowledge' wherever available and to upgrade the 'knowledge' by R and D. For developing new technologies and for problem solving, 'bottoms up approach' implying study of scientific basis of all issues beginning from fundamentals was used and shortcuts were avoided. This has enabled the country to be self sufficient in all aspects of nuclear fuel cycle as well as applications of radiation technology to industry, agriculture and health care. This also enabled the industry to gain skills and use the skills gained for other sectors of economy. Now that the industry in India is much more mature and the engineering education at the post-graduate level is well developed, several changes in the approach followed have been made. These include making use of the skills and size of the industry by ordering total systems of a power plant rather than individual components and involving industry as consultants for several jobs, which were done in-house in the earlier days. The paper summarizes Indian experience of the last five decades and what is planned for the future. (author)

  20. Mathematical method to build an empirical model for inhaled anesthetic agent wash-in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grouls René EJ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wide range of fresh gas flow - vaporizer setting (FGF - FD combinations used by different anesthesiologists during the wash-in period of inhaled anesthetics indicates that the selection of FGF and FD is based on habit and personal experience. An empirical model could rationalize FGF - FD selection during wash-in. Methods During model derivation, 50 ASA PS I-II patients received desflurane in O2 with an ADU® anesthesia machine with a random combination of a fixed FGF - FD setting. The resulting course of the end-expired desflurane concentration (FA was modeled with Excel Solver, with patient age, height, and weight as covariates; NONMEM was used to check for parsimony. The resulting equation was solved for FD, and prospectively tested by having the formula calculate FD to be used by the anesthesiologist after randomly selecting a FGF, a target FA (FAt, and a specified time interval (1 - 5 min after turning on the vaporizer after which FAt had to be reached. The following targets were tested: desflurane FAt 3.5% after 3.5 min (n = 40, 5% after 5 min (n = 37, and 6% after 4.5 min (n = 37. Results Solving the equation derived during model development for FD yields FD=-(e(-FGF*-0.23+FGF*0.24*(e(FGF*-0.23*FAt*Ht*0.1-e(FGF*-0.23*FGF*2.55+40.46-e(FGF*-0.23*40.46+e(FGF*-0.23+Time/-4.08*40.46-e(Time/-4.08*40.46/((-1+e(FGF*0.24*(-1+e(Time/-4.08*39.29. Only height (Ht could be withheld as a significant covariate. Median performance error and median absolute performance error were -2.9 and 7.0% in the 3.5% after 3.5 min group, -3.4 and 11.4% in the 5% after 5 min group, and -16.2 and 16.2% in the 6% after 4.5 min groups, respectively. Conclusions An empirical model can be used to predict the FGF - FD combinations that attain a target end-expired anesthetic agent concentration with clinically acceptable accuracy within the first 5 min of the start of administration. The sequences are easily calculated in an Excel file and simple to

  1. Effects of mercury on the arterial blood pressure of anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossoni L.V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The available data suggests that hypotension caused by Hg2+ administration may be produced by a reduction of cardiac contractility or by cholinergic mechanisms. The hemodynamic effects of an intravenous injection of HgCl2 (5 mg/kg were studied in anesthetized rats (N = 12 by monitoring left and right ventricular (LV and RV systolic and diastolic pressures for 120 min. After HgCl2 administration the LV systolic pressure decreased only after 40 min (99 ± 3.3 to 85 ± 8.8 mmHg at 80 min. However, RV systolic pressure increased, initially slowly but faster after 30 min (25 ± 1.8 to 42 ± 1.6 mmHg at 80 min. Both right and left diastolic pressures increased after HgCl2 treatment, suggesting the development of diastolic ventricular dysfunction. Since HgCl2 could be increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, isolated lungs (N = 10 were perfused for 80 min with Krebs solution (continuous flow of 10 ml/min containing or not 5 µM HgCl2. A continuous increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was observed, suggesting the direct effect of Hg2+ on the pulmonary vessels (12 ± 0.4 to 29 ± 3.2 mmHg at 30 min. To examine the interactions of Hg2+ and changes in cholinergic activity we analyzed the effects of acetylcholine (Ach on mean arterial blood pressure (ABP in anesthetized rats (N = 9 before and after Hg2+ treatment (5 mg/kg. Using the same amount and route used to study the hemodynamic effects we also examined the effects of Hg2+ administration on heart and plasma cholinesterase activity (N = 10. The in vivo hypotensive response to Ach (0.035 to 10.5 µg was reduced after Hg2+ treatment. Cholinesterase activity (µM h-1 mg protein-1 increased in heart and plasma (32 and 65%, respectively after Hg2+ treatment. In conclusion, the reduction in ABP produced by Hg2+ is not dependent on a putative increase in cholinergic activity. HgCl2 mainly affects cardiac function. The increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac failure due to diastolic

  2. Amperometric cell for subcutaneous detection of hydrogen sulfide in anesthetized experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, L; Nagy, G; Filotás, D; Boros, M; Pozsgai, G; Pintér, E

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a toxic gas. It has been recognized that H 2 S evolving in biochemical reactions in living organisms has an important role in different physiologic processes. Nowadays, H 2 S is known as an endogenous messenger molecule. Natural sulfurous spring water has been proved beneficial in the therapy of diseases of the skin and other organs (Boros et al 2013). In vivo real-time detection of local H 2 S concentration is an important but challenging task. We developed a two-electrode amperometric cell for selective subcutaneous detection of H 2 S in anesthetized mice. The cell is a small size implantable gas sensor containing a platinum disc anode and a silver cathode. The selectivity is provided by a membrane permeable only by gases. There is a buffered reversible electrochemical mediator solution in an oxidized form inside the cell. As gaseous H 2 S penetrates into the cell the mediator is reduced, and +0.4 V versus the reference is employed on the platinum working electrode. The reduced mediator is oxidized on the anode surface. The current provides an analytical signal representing the concentration of H 2 S. Appropriate shape, size and membrane material were selected, and optimal working parameters—such as mediator concentration, pH and cell voltage—were determined in vitro. The lower limit of detection in the stirred sample solution at pH = 5.5 was as small as 9.4  ×  10 −7  M and a dynamic concentration range of 0–6  ×  10 –4  M could be achieved. The detecting surfaces of the cell were covered with freshly dissected mouse skin to test dermal H 2 S permeability. In other experiments, the cell was implanted subcutaneously in an anesthetized mouse and the animal was submerged in a buffer solution containing different concentrations of H 2 S so that the skin surface over the sensor was covered by the solution. Measurements of subcutaneous H 2 S concentration were taken. The experiments clearly proved that H 2 S

  3. The development, deployment, and impact of the virtual observatory, Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    This is the second special issue of Astronomy and Computing devoted to the Virtual Observatory, and we again see a combination of papers covering various aspects of the VO, from infrastructure to applications to programmatics. The critical role of data models is described by Louys, and the method by which applications communicate amongst each other through the Simple Applications Messaging Protocol (SAMP) is described by Taylor et al. Demleitner et al. explain the client interfaces to the VO registry, that is, how applications developers can query the registry for information about VO-compliant data collections and services.1

  4. Hydro-climatic conditions and thermoelectric electricity generation – Part I: Development of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Hagen; Vögele, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there have been several heat waves affecting the use of thermoelectric power plants, e.g. in Europe and the U.S. In this paper the linkage between hydro-climatic conditions and possible electricity generation restrictions is described. The coupling of hydrological models and a power plant model is presented. In this approach each power plant is considered separately with its technical specifications. Also environmental regulations, e.g. permissible rise in the cooling water temperature, are considered for the respective power plant. The hydrological models developed to simulate river runoff and water temperature are also site specific. The approach presented is applied to Krümmel nuclear power plant in Germany. Analysed are the uncertainties with regard to electricity generation restrictions on account of climatic developments and corresponding higher water temperatures and low flows. Overall, increased water temperatures and declining river runoff lead to more frequent and more severe generation restrictions. It is concluded that the site-specific approach is necessary to reliably simulate power plants water demand, river runoff and water temperature. Using a simulation time step of one day, electricity generation restrictions are significantly higher than for simulations at monthly time step. - Highlights: • An approach to assess climate effects on electricity generation is presented. • Site specific models for power plants, water temperature and discharge are used. • Monthly and daily simulation time-steps give different results. • Climate change effects on generation depend on cooling system and climate scenario

  5. The Objectives of Competitive Intelligence as a Part of Corporative Development Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Bartes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the issue of the management cycle of Competitive Intelligence. The author describes the process of Competitive Intelligence in Czech corporate management. He concludes that in most cases, the Competitive Intelligence operations are directed by the top management, and the attention of Competitive Intelligence is being paid to Key Intelligence Topics (KIT. The Competitive Intelligence is then focused on the output of strategic analyses, complemented in some cases with a summary (synthesis of acquired intelligence plus some signal intelligence (SIGINT. The results of the Competitive Intelligence produced in such a way are actually the outputs mostly applicable in operational management and mostly unsuitable for strategic management. However, top managers abroad almost invariably need the data relevant to the future situation since their decisions are of strategic nature. The following section of the paper is devoted to the conceptual solution of Competitive Intelligence, i.e. the Competitive Intelligence objectives linked with the development strategy of the corporation. Here the author arrives at three basic development strategies: a. the corporation desires status quo, i.e. to keep its market position as it is, b. the corporation is out to expand, and c. the corporation intends not only to keep its existing and dominant market position but strives for its long-term dominance to last.

  6. Remediation strategies after nuclear or radiological accidents: part 1 - database development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Diogo N.G.; Wasserman, Maria Angelica V.; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.

    2009-01-01

    The selection of protective measures and of remediation strategies of areas after a nuclear or radiological accident needs to be based on previously established criteria, in way to minimize the public's emotional stress and the exposure to workers involved in cleanup operations due to the implementation of procedures that are not effective in reducing doses to the public. Thus this work intended to develop a database which allows supporting the decision-making process after these accidents, by describing the foreseen strategies according to the type of accident and the type of affected environment, in order to be used in a multi-criteria selective process. To achieve that, in this first stage, the database has been developed including the following aspects: type of environment (urban, rural or aquatic); their contamination removal efficiency, as function of the time elapsed since the contamination event; the type and the amount of waste generated in the application of the strategy; the expected doses to the work team and basic needs such as specific materials, equipment, training, IPE, among others. The protection measures are usually described in literature considering their activity removal efficiency of a certain surface or environment. In order to determine their efficiency in the reduction of doses, a second stage is foreseen, involving the simulation of the implementation of the measures in different moments after the contamination, based on pre-defined accidents and scenarios, with focus on the surroundings of the Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants in Angra dos Reis. (author)

  7. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part I. DNA technology and recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, pharmaceutical biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biotechnology revolution redrew the research, development, production and even marketing processes of drugs. Powerful new instruments and biotechnology related scientific disciplines (genomics, proteomics) make it possible to examine and exploit the behavior of proteins and molecules. Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. This technology, now approximately 25 years old, is becoming one of the most important technologies developed in the 20(th) century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances regarding rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we describe these processes.

  8. Developing Standards for EFL in Indonesia as Part of the EFL Teaching Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarsih Madya

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The teaching of English in Indonesia has so far been unable to reach its declared goal, which is the students' mastery of the English macro skills listening, speaking, reading, writing. Various factors have certainly contributed to this failure, but the highly centralized curriculum has been one of the many to be blamed for it. The new system of regional autonomy gives ample opportunity to schools/ regions to develop their own curricula. This will lead to the need for the establishment of standard of English to ensure the achievement of the ultimate goal of teaching English throughout the country. This paper suggests that the development of standards for English should involve as many parties concerned as possible, including EFL teachers, EFL teacher educators, and users of school graduates. Another suggestion made related to the aspects to be covered in the standards, namely (1 the qualification of EFL policy makers, EFL teacher educators, and EFL teachers; (2 class size, (3 facilities and equipment, and (4 assessment and evaluation.

  9. Development of an Automatic Combination System of Clothing Parts for Blind People: MyEyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rocha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blind people have been, over time, a reason for motivation in the development of solutions to improve their quality of life. The aim of this work is to propose a solution for one of such problems, namely, the selection and combination of clothing for the blind. Thus, this paper describes the whole project developed, in agreement with the Portuguese Association of the Blind and Amblyopic of Portugal (ACAPO, for the creation of a Web platform to aid the blind in selecting combinations of clothing. Near Field Communication (NFC technology is the basis of this project in the identification of garments. The features of the garments are inserted manually, and a combination of features is possible. There is also the possibility to automatically identify the color of the garment. The system has been tested by the ACAPO organization and preliminary feedback is positive, which are a good starting point for the future. This solution helps promote an increased autonomy for blind people.

  10. Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part I: Developing Inputs and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, T.; Murakami, K.; Kato, S.; Matsunaga, T.; Saigusa, N.; Hiraki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern in land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. However, most studies, which aimed at the estimation of carbon exchanges between ecosystem and atmosphere, remained within several tens of kilometers grid spatial resolution, and the results have not been enough to understand the detailed pattern of carbon exchanges based on ecological community. Improving the sophistication of spatial resolution is obviously necessary to enhance the accuracy of carbon exchanges. Moreover, the improvement may contribute to global warming awareness, policy makers and other social activities. In this study, we show global terrestrial carbon exchanges (net ecosystem production, net primary production, and gross primary production) with 1km-grid resolution. As methodology for computing the exchanges, we 1) developed a global 1km-grid climate and satellite dataset based on the approach in Setoyama and Sasai (2013); 2) used the satellite-driven biosphere model (Biosphere model integrating Eco-physiological And Mechanistic approaches using Satellite data: BEAMS) (Sasai et al., 2005, 2007, 2011); 3) simulated the carbon exchanges by using the new dataset and BEAMS by the use of a supercomputer that includes 1280 CPU and 320 GPGPU cores (GOSAT RCF of NIES). As a result, we could develop a global uniform system for realistically estimating terrestrial carbon exchange, and evaluate net ecosystem production in each community level; leading to obtain highly detailed understanding of terrestrial carbon exchanges.

  11. Remediation strategies after nuclear or radiological accidents: part 1 - database development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Diogo N.G.; Wasserman, Maria Angelica V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: dneves@ird.gov.br, e-mail: angelica@ird.gov.br, e-mail: lfcconti@ird.gov.br; Rochedo, Elaine R.R. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Nucleares], e-mail: erochedo@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The selection of protective measures and of remediation strategies of areas after a nuclear or radiological accident needs to be based on previously established criteria, in way to minimize the public's emotional stress and the exposure to workers involved in cleanup operations due to the implementation of procedures that are not effective in reducing doses to the public. Thus this work intended to develop a database which allows supporting the decision-making process after these accidents, by describing the foreseen strategies according to the type of accident and the type of affected environment, in order to be used in a multi-criteria selective process. To achieve that, in this first stage, the database has been developed including the following aspects: type of environment (urban, rural or aquatic); their contamination removal efficiency, as function of the time elapsed since the contamination event; the type and the amount of waste generated in the application of the strategy; the expected doses to the work team and basic needs such as specific materials, equipment, training, IPE, among others. The protection measures are usually described in literature considering their activity removal efficiency of a certain surface or environment. In order to determine their efficiency in the reduction of doses, a second stage is foreseen, involving the simulation of the implementation of the measures in different moments after the contamination, based on pre-defined accidents and scenarios, with focus on the surroundings of the Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants in Angra dos Reis. (author)

  12. Strategy Planning of Technology Development for High Speed Railways : Electrical Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. J.; Kim, K. H.; Rim, G. H.; Ha, H. D.; Park, K. Y.; Lee, J. D.; Kang, D. H. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    At the beginning of 1996, Government has set up the Technology Development Program for High Speed Railways as a national project. Accordingly, the detailed action planning has been established with the collaboration works between Ministry of Construction and Transport and Ministry of Commerce and Trade. On the other hand, the current technology status of domestic manufacturer and many related organizations in Korea only reveals the lack of capabilities in producing the high speed trains. Without the technology transfer programs from the advanced foreign manufacturer (GEC-Alsthom), the domestic manufacturers could not produce HSR. Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute has steered the study to integrate the domestic engineering and technology units specialized in the diversified areas by formulating the feasible collaboration structure between KERI and many organizations on the technology basis. The long term action planning both with the strategic guide and on the technology basis shall be the key function to upgrade the current technology status feasibly for development of the advanced high speed train of 350 km/h. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  13. The potential of socio-psychological models for the development of prevention programs (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovina I.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of designing prevention programs in health and disease. We note that smoking cessation on the planet would reduce mortality from various types of cancer by 25%, and would also save the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who die each year from heart attacks. Losing weight by only 10% through proper nutrition and exercise would reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease, as well as certain types of cancer. Based on the literature review, we reveal the different types of prevention, show the importance of preventive measures aimed at the patient's immediate environment. Among the main difficulties associated with the development of effective prevention programs we discuss the following: 1 ignoring the psychological mechanisms of behavior change; 2 irrelevance of media broadcast methods in prevention campaigns; 3 the time between the problem behavior and its negative effects on health. We discuss the potential of social influence models for the development of prevention programs in the field of health and disease.

  14. Patients' expectations of orthodontic treatment: part 1 - development of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, M S; Newton, J T

    2006-12-01

    The development of a questionnaire to measure patients' and their parents' expectations before orthodontic treatment, and to test the reliability and validity of this measure. A two-stage methodology, with open-ended interviews to identify themes and concepts followed by development and testing of the questionnaire. GKT Orthodontic Department, King's College Dental Hospital. The sample consisted of 140 participants, 70 patients aged 12-14 years, who had been referred to the orthodontic department for treatment. One parent of each patient was also recruited. The study was in two phases. In the first phase 30 participants (15 new patients and their 15 parents) participated in open-ended interviews, which were analysed qualitatively. Information from these interviews was used to construct a questionnaire. During the second phase, the questionnaire was piloted on 10 participants, five new consecutive patients and their parents. The questionnaire was then distributed to 174 subjects (87 new patients and their 87 parents). Seventy-eight subjects (39 new patients and their 39 parents) completed the questionnaire before their orthodontic consultation. Another 96 subjects (48 new patients and their 48 parents) were invited to complete the questionnaire prior to and at their orthodontic consultation. Test-retest analysis was conducted on 22 participants (11 patients and their 11 parents), who completed the questionnaire previous to and at their orthodontic consultation, and contributed to the psychometric validation of this questionnaire. A questionnaire was devized using the key themes and concepts identified in the open-ended interviews. As a result, 10 questions, some with sub-questions were constructed using a visual analogue scale as the response format. The questionnaire developed had good face validity. Internal consistency of the questionnaire using Cronbach's alpha, produced an overall inter-item reliability > 0.7 along with item-total correlations > 0.3 in over 50

  15. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  16. Influence of injector technology on injection and combustion development - Part 2: Combustion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payri, R.; Salvador, F.J.; Gimeno, J.; Morena, J. de la [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of injection technology on the fuel-air mixing process and the combustion development are analyzed by means of visualization techniques. For this purpose, two injectors (one solenoid and one piezoelectric) are characterized using an optical accessible two stroke engine. Visualization of liquid penetration has allowed the measurement of the stabilized liquid length, which is related with the efficiency of fuel-air mixing process. A theoretical derivation is used in order to relate this liquid length with chamber conditions, as well as to make a temporal analysis of these phenomena. After this, natural flame emission and chemiluminescence techniques are carried out. These results indicate that the piezoelectric system has a more efficient fuel-air mixing and combustion, reducing the characteristic times as well as soot formation. Finally, a correlation for the ignition delay of the two systems is obtained. (author)

  17. Development of Induction Brazing System for Sealing Instrumentation Feed through Part of Nuclear Fuel Test Rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Kim, Kahye; Heo, Sungho; Ahn, Sungho; Joung, Changyoung; Son, Kwangjae; Jung, Yangil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To test the performance of nuclear fuels, coolant needs to be circulated through the test rig installed in the test loop. Because the pressure and temperature of the coolant is 15.5 MPa and 300 .deg. C respectively, coolant sealing is one of the most important processes in fabricating a nuclear fuel test rig. In particular, 15 instrumentation cables installed in a test rig pass through the pressure boundary, and brazing is generally applied as a sealing method. In this study, an induction brazing system has been developed using a high frequency induction heater including a vacuum chamber. For application in the nuclear field, BNi2 should be used as a paste, and optimal process variables for Ni brazing have been found by several case studies. The performance and soundness of the brazed components has been verified by a tensile test, cross section test, and sealing performance test.

  18. Mechanical properties of Concrete with SAP. Part I: Development of compressive strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jespersen, Morten H. Seneka; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2010-01-01

    The development of mechanical properties has been studied in a test program comprising 15 different concrete mixes with 3 different w/c ratios and different additions of superabsorbent polymers (SAP). The degree of hydration is followed for 15 corresponding paste mixes. This paper concerns...... compressive strength. It shows that results agree well with a model based on the following: 1. Concrete compressive strength is proportional to compressive strength of the paste phase 2. Paste strength depends on gel space ratio, as suggested by Powers 3. The influence of air voids created by SAP...... on compressive strength can be accounted for in the same way as when taking the air content into account in Bolomeys formula. The implication of the model is that at low w/c ratios (w/c SAP additions, SAP increases the compressive strength at later ages (from 3 days after casting and onwards...

  19. 2015 South Carolina PV soft cost and workforce development Part I. Initial survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Elise B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, Thomas B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    The South Carolina solar industry has surged over the past two years, largely due to the implementation of Act 236, and continues to grow at a rapid pace. At the beginning of 2014, there was little more than 3MW total spread across the state, but by the end of 2021, that state solar industry will have grown to over 300MW across all sectors. Prior to this study, there has been little publically available information on the solar industry in SC and throughout the Southeastern US. This makes SC a key case study of an emerging market, enabling the development of regional best practices in order to decrease associated costs and increase deployment.

  20. Modelling of hybrid energy system - Part I: Problem formulation and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ajai; Saini, R.P.; Sharma, M.P. [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India)

    2011-02-15

    A well designed hybrid energy system can be cost effective, has a high reliability and can improve the quality of life in remote rural areas. The economic constraints can be met, if these systems are fundamentally well designed, use appropriate technology and make use effective dispatch control techniques. The first paper of this tri-series paper, presents the analysis and design of a mixed integer linear mathematical programming model (time series) to determine the optimal operation and cost optimization for a hybrid energy generation system consisting of a photovoltaic array, biomass (fuelwood), biogas, small/micro-hydro, a battery bank and a fossil fuel generator. The optimization is aimed at minimizing the cost function based on demand and potential constraints. Further, mathematical models of all other components of hybrid energy system are also developed. This is the generation mix of the remote rural of India; it may be applied to other rural areas also. (author)

  1. Toward a General Theory for Multiphase Turbulence Part I: Development and Gauging of the Model Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. A. Kashiwa; W. B. VanderHeyden

    2000-12-01

    A formalism for developing multiphase turbulence models is introduced by analogy to the phenomenological method used for single-phase turbulence. A sample model developed using the formalism is given in detail. The procedure begins with ensemble averaging of the exact conservation equations, with closure accomplished by using a combination of analytical and experimental results from the literature. The resulting model is applicable to a wide range of common multiphase flows including gas-solid, liquid-solid and gas-liquid (bubbly) flows. The model is positioned for ready extension to three-phase turbulence, or for use in two-phase turbulence in which one phase is accounted for in multiple size classes, representing polydispersivity. The formalism is expected to suggest directions toward a more fundamentally based theory, similar to the way that early work in single-phase turbulence has led to the spectral theory. The approach is unique in that a portion of the total energy decay rate is ascribed to each phase, as is dictated by the exact averaged equations, and results in a transport equation for energy decay rate associated with each phase. What follows is a straightforward definition of a turbulent viscosity for each phase, and accounts for the effect of exchange of fluctuational energy among phases on the turbulent shear viscosity. The model also accounts for the effect of slip momentum transfer among the phases on the production of turbulence kinetic energy and on the tensor character of the Reynolds stress. Collisional effects, when appropriate, are included by superposition. The model reduces to a standard form in limit of a single, pure material, and is expected to do a credible job of describing multiphase turbulent flows in a wide variety of regimes using a single set of coefficients.

  2. Sediment carbon fate in phreatic karst (Part 1): Conceptual model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, A.; Fox, J.; Agouridis, C.; Currens, J.; Ford, W.; Taylor, C.

    2017-06-01

    Recent research has paid increased attention to quantifying the fate of carbon pools within fluvial networks, but few, if any, studies consider the fate of sediment organic carbon in fluviokarst systems despite that karst landscapes cover 12% of the earth's land surface. The authors develop a conceptual model of sediment carbon fate in karst terrain with specific emphasis upon phreatic karst conduits, i.e., those located below the groundwater table that have the potential to trap surface-derived sediment and turnover carbon. To assist with their conceptual model development, the authors study a phreatic system and apply a mixture of methods traditional and novel to karst studies, including electrical resistivity imaging, well drilling, instantaneous velocimetry, dye tracing, stage recording, discrete and continuous sediment and water quality sampling, and elemental and stable carbon isotope fingerprinting. Results show that the sediment transport carrying capacity of the phreatic karst water is orders of magnitude less than surface streams during storm-activated periods promoting deposition of fine sediments in the phreatic karst. However, the sediment transport carrying capacity is sustained long after the hydrologic event has ended leading to sediment resuspension and prolonged transport. The surficial fine grained laminae occurs in the subsurface karst system; but unlike surface streams, the light-limited conditions of the subsurface karst promotes constant heterotrophy leading to carbon turnover. The coupling of the hydrological processes leads to a conceptual model that frames phreatic karst as a biologically active conveyor of sediment carbon that recharges degraded organic carbon back to surface streams. For example, fluvial sediment is estimated to lose 30% of its organic carbon by mass during a one year temporary residence within the phreatic karst. It is recommended that scientists consider karst pathways when attempting to estimate organic matter stocks

  3. Dexmedetomidine as the primary anesthetic agent during cardiac surgery in an infant with a family history of malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Naguib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant hyperthermia (MH is an acute hypermetabolic crisis triggered in susceptible patients by the administration of succinylcholine or a volatile anesthetic agent. When providing anesthetic care for MH-susceptible agents, a total intravenous anesthetic (TIVA technique is frequently chosen. When choosing the components for TIVA, several options exist including the combination of propofol or dexmedetomidine with an opioid. We present our experience with the use of dexmedetomidine as a key component of the anesthetic regimen in a 5-month-old infant with a family history of MH. Previous reports of the use of dexmedetomidine in MH-susceptible patients are reviewed and its benefits in such patients discussed.

  4. An Advanced TALSPEAK Concept for Separating Minor Actinides. Part 1. Process Optimization and Flowsheet Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Nuclear Science and Engineering Group, Richland, WA, USA; Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Nuclear Science and Engineering Group, Richland, WA, USA; Wilden, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6), Jülich, Germany; Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Nuclear Science and Engineering Group, Richland, WA, USA; Hall, Gabriel B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Nuclear Science and Engineering Group, Richland, WA, USA; Lin, Leigh [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Nuclear Science and Engineering Group, Richland, WA, USA; Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Nuclear Science and Engineering Group, Richland, WA, USA; Law, Jack D. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, Idaho Falls, ID, USA; Modolo, Giuseppe [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6), Jülich, Germany

    2017-08-18

    A system is being developed to separate trivalent actinides from lanthanide fission product elements that uses 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester to extract the lanthanide ions into an organic phase, while the actinide ions are held in the citrate-buffered aqueous phase by complexation to N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid (HEDTA). Earlier investigations of this system using a 2-cm centrifugal contactor revealed that the relatively slow extraction of Sm3+, Eu3+, and Gd3+ resulted in low separation factors from Am3+. In the work reported here, adjustments to the aqueous phase chemistry were made to improve the extraction rates. The results suggest that increasing the concentration of the citric acid buffer from 0.2 to 0.6 mol/L, and lowering the pH from 3.1 to 2.6, significantly improved lanthanide extraction rates resulting in an actinide/lanthanide separation system suitable for deployment in centrifugal contactors. Experiments performed to evaluate whether the lanthanide extraction rates can be improved by replacing aqueous HEDTA with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) exhibited promising results. However, NTA exhibited an unsatisfactorily high distribution value for Am3+ under the extraction conditions examined.

  5. Three phase heat and mass transfer model for unsaturated soil freezing process: Part 1 - model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Zhang, Yaning; Jin, Guangri; Li, Bingxi; Kim, Yong-Song; Xie, Gongnan; Fu, Zhongbin

    2018-04-01

    A three-phase model capable of predicting the heat transfer and moisture migration for soil freezing process was developed based on the Shen-Chen model and the mechanisms of heat and mass transfer in unsaturated soil freezing. The pre-melted film was taken into consideration, and the relationship between film thickness and soil temperature was used to calculate the liquid water fraction in both frozen zone and freezing fringe. The force that causes the moisture migration was calculated by the sum of several interactive forces and the suction in the pre-melted film was regarded as an interactive force between ice and water. Two kinds of resistance were regarded as a kind of body force related to the water films between the ice grains and soil grains, and a block force instead of gravity was introduced to keep balance with gravity before soil freezing. Lattice Boltzmann method was used in the simulation, and the input variables for the simulation included the size of computational domain, obstacle fraction, liquid water fraction, air fraction and soil porosity. The model is capable of predicting the water content distribution along soil depth and variations in water content and temperature during soil freezing process.

  6. Development of a Lunar Scintillometer as part of the national large optical telescope site survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Avinash; Parihar, Padmakar S.; Banyal, Ravinder K.; Kalyaan, Anusha

    2018-03-01

    Ground layer turbulence is a very important site characterization parameter used to assess the quality of an astronomical site. The Lunar Scintillometer is a simple and effective site-testing device for measuring the ground layer turbulence. It consists of a linear array of photodiodes which are sensitive to the slight variations in the moon's brightness due to scintillation by the lower layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The covariance of intensity values between the non-redundant photodiode baselines can be used to measure the turbulence profile from the ground up to a height determined by the furthest pair of detectors. The six channel lunar scintillometer that has been developed at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics is based closely on an instrument built by the team led by Andrei Tokovinin of Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), Chile (Tokovinin et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 404(3), 1186-1196 2010). We have fabricated the instrument based on the existing electronic design, and have worked on the noise analysis, an EMI (Electromagnetic Induction) resistant PCB design and the software pipeline for analyzing the data from the same. The results from the instrument's multi-year campaign at Mount Saraswati, Hanle is also presented.

  7. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed development, Part 1 - Design and fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.E.; Estochen, E.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used first generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and third generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed. (authors)

  8. Development of carbon fiber staves for the strip part of the PANDA micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quagli, Tommaso; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Fracassi, Vincenzo; Grunwald, Dirk; Rosenthal, Eberhard [ZEA-1, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    PANDA is a key experiment of the future FAIR facility, under construction in Darmstadt, Germany. It will study the collisions between an antiproton beam and a fixed proton or nuclear target. The Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) is the innermost detector of the apparatus and is composed of four concentric barrels and six forward disks, instrumented with silicon hybrid pixel detectors and double-sided silicon microstrip detectors; its main task is the identification of primary and secondary vertices. The central requirements include high spatial and time resolution, trigger-less readout with high rate capability, good radiation tolerance and low material budget. Because of the compact layout of the system, its integration poses significant challenges. The detectors in the strip barrels will be supported by a composite structure of carbon fiber and carbon foam; a water-based cooling system embedded in the mechanical supports will be used to remove the excess heat from the readout electronics. In this contribution the design of the barrel stave and the ongoing development of some hardware components related to its integration will be presented.

  9. Verify Occulter Deployment Tolerances as Part of NASA's Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdin, N. J.; Shaklan, S.; Lisman, D.; Thomson, M.; Webb, D.; Cady, E.; Marks, G. W.; Lo, A.

    2013-01-01

    In support of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program and the Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions (TDEM), we recently completed a 2 year study of the manufacturability and metrology of starshade petals. An external occult is a satellite employing a large screen, or starshade, that flies in formation with a spaceborne telescope to provide the starlight suppression needed for detecting and characterizing exoplanets. Among the advantages of using an occulter are the broadband allowed for characterization and the removal of light before entering the observatory, greatly relaxing the requirements on the telescope and instrument. This poster presents the results of our successful first TDEM that demonstrated an occulter petal could be built and measured to an accuracy consistent with close to 10^-10 contrast. We also present the progress in our second TDEM to demonstrate the next critical technology milestone: precision deployment of the central truss and petals to the necessary accuracy. We have completed manufacture of four sub-scale petals and a central hub to fit with an existing deployable truss. We show the plans for repeated stow and deploy tests of the assembly and the metrology to confirm that each deploy repeatably meets the absolute positioning requirements of the petals (better than 1.0 mm).

  10. Verifying occulter deployment tolerances as part of NASA's technology development for exoplanet missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdin, N. J.; Lisman, D.; Shaklan, S.; Thomson, M.; Webb, D.; Cady, E.; Marks, G. W.; Lo, A.

    2013-09-01

    An external occulter is a satellite employing a large screen, or starshade, that flies in formation with a spaceborne telescope to provide the starlight suppression needed for detecting and characterizing exoplanets. Among the advantages of using an occulter are the broadband allowed for characterization and the removal of light before entering the observatory, greatly relaxing the requirements on the telescope and instrument. In support of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program and the Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions (TDEM), we recently completed a 2 year study of the manufacturability and metrology of starshade petals. In this paper we review the results of that successful first TDEM which demonstrated an occulter petal could be built and measured to an accuracy consistent with close to 10-10 contrast. We then present the results of our second TDEM to demonstrate the next critical technology milestone: precision deployment of the central truss and petals to the necessary accuracy. We show the deployment of an existing deployable truss outfitted with four sub-scale petals and a custom designed central hub.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Syntactic Foams: Part 1: Development, Properties, and Recycling Potential of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Patil, Balu; Hoffmann, Niklas; Saltonstall, Brooks; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Gupta, Nikhil

    2018-03-01

    This work focuses on developing filaments of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and their hollow particle-filled syntactic foams for commercial three-dimensional (3D) printers based on fused filament fabrication technology. Hollow fly-ash cenospheres were blended by 40 wt.% in a HDPE matrix to produce syntactic foam (HDPE40) filaments. Further, the recycling potential was studied by pelletizing the filaments again to extrude twice (2×) and three times (3×). The filaments were tensile tested at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. HDPE40 filaments show an increasing trend in modulus and strength with the strain rate. Higher density and modulus were noticed for 2× filaments compared to 1× filaments because of the crushing of some cenospheres in the extrusion cycle. However, 2× and 3× filament densities are nearly the same, showing potential for recycling them. The filaments show better properties than the same materials processed by conventional injection molding. Micro-CT scans show a uniform dispersion of cenospheres in all filaments.

  12. Kaiser Permanente's performance improvement system, part 2: developing a value framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Lisa; Deas, Dennis; Jedlinsky, Maile; Aronoff, Deborah; Fershtman, Juliette; Wali, Abdul

    2010-12-01

    In 2008, Kaiser Permanente began phased implementation of a nationwide performance improvement (PI) system. The aim was to improve performance by providing consistent, highly meaningful performance measurement, increase PI skills in staff at all levels, develop organizational capabilities, and provide support for making improvements in medical centers and across regions. Evaluating the PI System: The intermediate results of the PI system were assessed in the 22 medical centers in four of the eight Kaiser Permanente regions. Implementation for 3 of these medical centers occurred in January 2008 through November 2008, with implementation for the remaining 19 medical centers occurring from September 2008 through September 2009. The 22 medical centers that were evaluated achieved a 61% improvement in selected capabilities, and improvement advisors (IAs) successfully completed 84% of initial PI projects. For each dollar invested, estimates suggested an average return on investment of $2.36. Critical factors include adequate dedicated time for PI activities by staff with necessary expertise, expert support to operations, alignment of projects with regional and national strategic priorities, and close working relationships between PI staff and operational management. Involving finance leaders in improvement planning, prioritization, and oversight is important. These elements can be adapted to smaller systems and single hospitals. The initial evaluation of the Kaiser Permanente PI system indicated that (1) IAs successfully led projects in conjunction with frontline teams, (2) organizational capabilities increased, and (3) the investment in PI infrastructure and staff was sound. Expansion throughout the entire Kaiser Permanente system is under way.

  13. Storage and growth of denitrifiers in aerobic granules: part I. model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yu, Han-Qing

    2008-02-01

    A mathematical model, based on the Activated Sludge Model No.3 (ASM3), is developed to describe the storage and growth activities of denitrifiers in aerobic granules under anoxic conditions. In this model, mass transfer, hydrolysis, simultaneous anoxic storage and growth, anoxic maintenance, and endogenous decay are all taken into account. The model established is implemented in the well-established AQUASIM simulation software. A combination of completely mixed reactor and biofilm reactor compartments provided by AQUASIM is used to simulate the mass transport and conversion processes occurring in both bulk liquid and granules. The modeling results explicitly show that the external substrate is immediately utilized for storage and growth at feast phase. More external substrates are diverted to storage process than the primary biomass production process. The model simulation indicates that the nitrate utilization rate (NUR) of granules-based denitrification process includes four linear phases of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, the methodology for determining the most important parameter in this model, that is, anoxic reduction factor, is established. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Anesthetic management of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Eriko; Murata, Hiroaki; Minami, Hitomi; Sumikawa, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a newly developed, less invasive treatment for esophageal achalasia that requires general anesthesia under positive pressure ventilation. In this retrospective case series, we describe the anesthetic management of 28 consecutive patients who underwent POEM for esophageal achalasia. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil under positive pressure ventilation through a tracheal tube. Retained contents in the esophagus were evacuated just before anesthesia induction to prevent regurgitation into the trachea. The POEM procedure was performed using an orally inserted flexible fiberscope. Elevation of end-tidal carbon dioxide after initiating esophageal carbon dioxide insufflation was observed in all patients and was treated by minute adjustments to the ventilation volume. Scopolamine butylbromide-induced tachycardia in one patient was treated with landiolol hydrochloride, which is a short-acting beta 1-selective blocker. Minor subcutaneous emphysema around the neck was observed in one patient. POEM was successfully completed, and tracheas were extubated immediately after the procedure in all patients. Our findings suggest that prevention of aspiration pneumonia during anesthesia induction, preparation for carbon dioxide insufflation-related complications, and treatment of scopolamine butylbromide-induced tachycardia play important roles in safe anesthesia management of POEM for esophageal achalasia.

  15. A national survey into perioperative anesthetic management of patients with a fractured neck of femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soinikoski Mirka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We made a survey among Finnish anesthesiologists concerning the current perioperative anesthetic practice of hip fracture patients for further development in patient care. Methods All members of the Finnish Society of Anesthesiologists with a known e-mail address (786 were invited to participate in an internet-based survey. Results The overall response rate was 55% (423 responses; 298 respondents participated in the care of hip fracture patients. Preoperative analgesia was mostly managed with oxycodone and paracetamol; every fifth respondent applied an epidural infusion. Most respondents (98% employed a spinal block with or without an epidural catheter for intraoperative anesthesia. Midazolam, propofol and/or fentanyl were used for additional sedation. General anesthesia was used rarely. Postoperatively, paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and occasionally peroral oxycodone, were prescribed in addition to epidural analgesia. Conclusions The survey suggests that the impact of more individualised analgesia regimens, both preoperatively and postoperatively, should be investigated in further studies.

  16. Prolonged local anesthetic action through slow release from poly (lactic acid co castor oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate a new formulation of bupivacaine loaded in an injectable fatty acid based biodegradable polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) in prolonging motor and sensory block when injected locally. The polyesters were synthesized from DL: -lactic acid and castor oil with feed ratio of 4:6 and 3:7 w/w. Bupivacaine was dispersed in poly(fatty ester) liquid and tested for drug release in vitro. The polymer p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 10% bupivacaine was injected through a 22G needle close to the sciatic nerve of ICR mice and the duration of sensory and motor nerve blockade was measured. The DL: -lactic acid co castor oil p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 released 65% of the incorporated bupivacaine during 1 week in vitro. Single injection of 10% bupivacaine loaded into this polymer caused motor block that lasted 24 h and sensory block that lasted 48 h. Previously we developed a ricinoleic acid based polymer with incorporated bupivacaine which prolonged anesthesia to 30 h. The new polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 provides slow release of effective doses of the incorporated local anesthetic agent and prolongs anesthesia to 48 h.

  17. Hypnosis control based on the minimum concentration of anesthetic drug for maintaining appropriate hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Eiko; Nishigaki, Yuki; Kanda, Chiaki; Takeda, Toshihiro; Shirakami, Gotaro

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypnosis control method using Auditory Evoked Potential Index (aepEX) as a hypnosis index. In order to avoid side effects of an anesthetic drug, it is desirable to reduce the amount of an anesthetic drug during surgery. For this purpose many studies of hypnosis control systems have been done. Most of them use Bispectral Index (BIS), another hypnosis index, but it has problems of dependence on anesthetic drugs and nonsmooth change near some particular values. On the other hand, aepEX has an ability of clear distinction between patient consciousness and unconsciousness and independence of anesthetic drugs. The control method proposed in this paper consists of two elements: estimating the minimum effect-site concentration for maintaining appropriate hypnosis and adjusting infusion rate of an anesthetic drug, propofol, using model predictive control. The minimum effect-site concentration is estimated utilizing the property of aepEX pharmacodynamics. The infusion rate of propofol is adjusted so that effect-site concentration of propofol may be kept near and always above the minimum effect-site concentration. Simulation results of hypnosis control using the proposed method show that the minimum concentration can be estimated appropriately and that the proposed control method can maintain hypnosis adequately and reduce the total infusion amount of propofol.

  18. Anesthetic activity of plant essential oils on Cyprinus carpio (koi carp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumpirapang, Nattakanwadee; Pikulkaew, Surachai; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2018-03-19

    The aims of this study were to investigate the anesthetic and cytotoxic effects of essential oils (EOs) of Ocimum basilicum (OBO), O. canum (OCO), and O. sanctum (OSO) on Cyprinus carpio (koi carp). For anesthetic effect, induction time to surgical anesthesia and recovery time were determined. For cytotoxicity effect, viability of fish peripheral blood nuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated. Results indicated that increasing oil concentration caused significant (p OSO at 100, 200, and 300 mg/L gave the induction time of 169.5 ± 10.2, 62.8 ± 2.3, 45.3 ± 2.2 sec, respectively, significantly shorter than OCO, and OBO. The recovery time of anesthetized fish was dose dependent (p OSO and OBO, respectively. Within 10 min contact time of the EOs and fish PBMCs, the fish PBMC viability was higher than 80%. Increase contact time and EO concentration caused an increase in cytotoxicity to fish PBMC. OBO showed less toxic than OSO and OCO. Based on the desired induction and recovery times for anesthetizing koi carp, OBO, OCO, and OSO at 300, 200, and 100 mg/L, respectively were suggested to be the most suitable. It was concluded that OBO, OCO, and OSO can be used as natural anesthetics for fish.

  19. Anesthetic management for Cesarean delivery in parturients with a diagnosis of dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Elizabeth M S; Toledo, Paloma; Stariha, Jillian; Nixon, Heather C

    2016-08-01

    The literature on the anesthetic management of parturients with dwarfism is sparse and limited to isolated case reports. Pregnancy complications associated with dwarfism include an increased risk of respiratory compromise, an increased risk of Cesarean delivery, and an unpredictable degree of anesthesia with neuraxial techniques. Therefore, we conducted this retrospective review to evaluate the anesthetic management of parturients with a diagnosis of dwarfism. We used a query of billing data to identify short statured women who underwent a Cesarean delivery during May 1, 2008 to May 1, 2013. We then hand searched the electronic medical record for qualifying patients with heights diagnosis of dwarfism. The extracted data included patient demographics and obstetric and anesthetic information. We identified 13 women with dwarfism who had 15 Cesarean deliveries in total. Twelve of the women had disproportionate dwarfism, and ten of the 15 Cesarean deliveries were due to cephalopelvic disproportion. Neuraxial anesthesia was attempted in 93% of deliveries. The dose chosen for initiation of neuraxial anesthesia was lower than the typical doses used in parturients of normal stature. Neuraxial anesthetic complications included difficult neuraxial placement (64%), high spinal (7%), inadequate surgical level (13%), and unrecognized intrathecal catheter (7%). The data collected suggest that females with a diagnosis of dwarfism may have difficult neuraxial placement and potentially require lower dosages of local anesthetic for both spinal and epidural anesthesia to achieve adequate surgical blockade.

  20. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

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    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.