WorldWideScience

Sample records for anesthesiology

  1. Anesthesiology and competitive strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Wendy L; Gold, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    Whether we like it or not, medicine is big business. The argument is sometimes made that standard management strategies from the business world do not apply to medicine because the economics and practice of medicine are unique--driven by science and rapid rates of change. But an exploding knowledge base, light-speed technological development, and ever-changing reimbursement schemes are not exclusive to medicine and health care. Some fundamental principles of finance, business management, and strategic development have evolved to deal with problems of rapid change. These principles do apply to modern medicine. The business side of anesthesia practice is off-putting to many clinicians. However, knowledge of the market forces at play can help enhance patient care, improve service, expand opportunities, and extend the perimeter of the discipline. The mission and current market position of anesthesiology practice are considered here.

  2. Anesthesiology, automation, and artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John C; Joshi, Girish P

    2018-01-01

    There have been many attempts to incorporate automation into the practice of anesthesiology, though none have been successful. Fundamentally, these failures are due to the underlying complexity of anesthesia practice and the inability of rule-based feedback loops to fully master it. Recent innovations in artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, may usher in a new era of automation across many industries, including anesthesiology. It would be wise to consider the implications of such potential changes before they have been fully realized.

  3. Anesthesiology — Reanimatology: Historical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Editorial Board of the journal «Obshchaya Reanimatologiya» intends to publish a series of papers dedicated to the history of the science «Anesthesiology and Reanimatology». In the first paper, the authors attempted to gather historical facts concerning the development of anesthesia. This makes it possible to analyze the course of development of the thought of scientists and physicians, the time of striking discoveries in our specialty, to reflect the most important points that impulses the expansion and optimization of methods of anesthesia and resuscitation. The authors understand clearly that they have no sufficient number of factors associated with the history of anesthesiology and reanimatology and they will be grateful in receiving any comments and additional information on historical aspects, specialized sections of the science, bibliographic data of Russian and foreign sciences dealing with this specialty. The to offer apologies for possible inaccuracies since controversial questions occasionally arise as to authorship and priority of ideas and usage of any methods in practice. There are not sometimes coincidences in the dates of the same events in different references used by us. The authors believe that the proposed historical analysis will generally provide a keen insight into the overall picture of development of world anesthesiology and reanimatology.

  4. What is an anesthesiology resident worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Marisa H; Beaman, Shawn T; Metro, David G; Handley, Linda J; Walker, James E

    2009-08-01

    To determine the cost of replacing an anesthesiology resident with a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for equal operating room (OR) work. Retrospective financial analysis. Academic anesthesiology department. Clinical anesthesia (CA)-1 through CA-3 residents. Cost of replacing anesthesiology residents with CRNAs for equal OR work was determined. The cost of replacing one anesthesiology resident with a CRNA for the same number of OR hours ranged from $9,940.32 to $43,300 per month ($106,241.68 to $432,937.50 per yr). Numbers varied depending on the CRNA pay scale and whether the calculations were based on the number of OR hours worked at our residency program or OR hours worked in a maximum duty hour model. A CRNA is paid substantially more per OR hour worked, at all pay levels, than an anesthesiology resident.

  5. Anesthesiology Nurse Scheduling using Particle Swarm Optimization

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    Leopoldo Altamirano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present an approach designed to solve a real world problem: the Anesthesiology Nurse Scheduling Problem (ANSP at a public French hospital. The anesthesiology nurses are one of the most shared resources in the hospital and we attempt to find a fair/balanced schedule for them, taking into account a set of constraints and the nursesarsquo; stated preferences, concerning the different shifts. We propose a particle swarm optimization algorithm to solve the ANSP. Finally, we compare our technique with previous results obtained using integer programming.

  6. The status of women in academic anesthesiology: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cynthia A; Stock, Marie Christine

    2008-07-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased steadily in the last half century. In this study, we reassessed the status of women in academic anesthesiology departments in the United States in 2006. Medical student, resident, and faculty rank gender data were obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Data regarding the make-up and gender of anesthesia subspecialty society leadership, the editorial boards of Anesthesia & Analgesia and Anesthesiology, the awardees of anesthesia research grants, American Board of Anesthesiology examiners, and department chairs were obtained from websites, organization management personnel, and the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. Anesthesiology data were compared with composite data from medical school departments in other clinical specialties and to data from previous years, beginning in 1985. The percentage of medical school graduates, anesthesiology residents, and anesthesiology faculty members who are women has increased since 1985; however, the rate of increase in the percentage of women is significantly faster for medical school graduates compared with anesthesiology residents (P research grants awarded to women has not changed over several decades. The status of women in academic anesthesiology in the first decade of the millennium has, by some measures, advanced compared with 20 yr ago. However, by other measures, there has been no change. The task ahead is to identify factors that discourage qualified women medical students, residents, and junior faculty members from pursuing careers in academic anesthesiology and advancing in academic rank.

  7. Merel Harmel: Portrait of an Anesthesiology Pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves, J G; Newman, Mark F

    2016-02-01

    Merel Harmel, MD, was the first anesthesiologist to give anesthesia for a palliative congenital heart operation performed by Alfred Blalock, MD. He was the first resident in anesthesiology at Johns Hopkins and was the first academic department chairman at 3 different universities during his long career. He was successful because of his steadfast belief that academic anesthesia could and must flourish and his incessant optimism no matter how daunting the many obstacles in his professional life.

  8. Anesthesiological ethics: can informed consent be implied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    Surgical ethics is a well-recognized field in clinical ethics, distinct from medical ethics. It includes at least a dozen important issues common to surgery that do not exist in internal medicine simply because of the differences in their practices. But until now there has been a tendency to include ethical issues of anesthesiology as a part of surgical ethics. This may mask the importance of ethical issues in anesthesiology, and even help perpetuate an unfortunate view that surgeons are "captain of the ship" in the operating theater (leaving anesthesiologists in a subservient role). We will have a better ethical understanding if we see surgery and anesthesia as two equal partners, ethically as well as in terms of patient care. Informed consent is one such issue, but it is not limited to that. Even on the topic of what type of anesthesia to use, anesthesiologists have often felt subsumed to the surgeon's preferences. This commentary takes the case study and uses it as a exemplar for this very claim: it is time to give due recognition for a new field in clinical ethics, ethics in anesthesia.

  9. How Social Media is Changing the Practice of Regional Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Eric S; Chu, Larry F; Gupta, Rajnish K; Mariano, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    This review summarizes the current applications of social media in regional anesthesiology, describes ways that specific platforms may promote growth, and briefly discusses limitations and future directions. Although Facebook users outnumber Twitter users, the latter has been better studied in regional anesthesiology and may have the advantages of speed and expansion of reach. Highly tweeted publications are more likely to be cited in the medical literature, and twitter-enhanced journal clubs facilitate communication regarding important articles with international colleagues. In both the United States and internationally, Twitter has been shown to enhance the anesthesiology conference experience, changing communication among attendees and non-attendees. YouTube and podcasts are quickly finding a niche in regional anesthesiology for just-in-time training and continuing professional development. Social media use is rapidly growing in regional anesthesiology, and benefits include global interaction and knowledge translation within the specialty and with the general public.

  10. [Anesthesiological management of patients with an acute abdomen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Samir G; Wappler, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Patients with an acute abdomen present with marked deterioration in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, which make general anesthesia to a challenging but also potentially dangerous procedure. A broad and fundamental knowledge of the pathophysiologically involved mechanisms of cardiovascular functions during anesthesia and appropriate anesthesiological approach are crucial for a successful peri-operative management. The anesthesiologist's goal is to perform adequate anesthesia while maintaining cardiovascular stability. Monitoring and management of acid-base-status as well as cardiovascular functions are required to maintain sufficient tissue oxygenation during anesthesia. The postoperative anesthesiological management may also crucially influence the further course and therefore should be considered in the anesthesiological planning. Finally, adequate pain management in all these patients is an important and not to underestimate part in the treatment. This article gives an overview on the major aspects in the different fields in the anesthesiological management of patients with an acute abdomen.

  11. The role of simulation training in anesthesiology resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Kazuma; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2018-03-09

    An increasing number of reports indicate the efficacy of simulation training in anesthesiology resident education. Simulation education helps learners to acquire clinical skills in a safe learning environment without putting real patients at risk. This useful tool allows anesthesiology residents to obtain medical knowledge and both technical and non-technical skills. For faculty members, simulation-based settings provide the valuable opportunity to evaluate residents' performance in scenarios including airway management and regional, cardiac, and obstetric anesthesiology. However, it is still unclear what types of simulators should be used or how to incorporate simulation education effectively into education curriculums. Whether simulation training improves patient outcomes has not been fully determined. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the status of simulation in anesthesiology resident education, encourage more anesthesiologists to get involved in simulation education to propagate its influence, and stimulate future research directed toward improving resident education and patient outcomes.

  12. Using cognitive modeling for requirements engineering in anesthesiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, C; le Feber, J

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive modeling is a complexity reducing method to describe significant cognitive processes under a specified research focus. Here, a cognitive process model for decision making in anesthesiology is presented and applied in requirements engineering. Three decision making situations of

  13. Job burnout in 159 anesthesiology trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Cokay Abut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesiology may be stressful and most anesthesiologists develop mechanisms for coping. However, inexperienced trainee anesthesiologists seem to be vulnerable. We studied stress perception and job burnout in trainee anesthesiologists. Methods: Responses to perceived stress scale (PSS and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were evaluated in 159 trainee anesthesiologists. Results: In our results, when perceived stress was increased, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased but personal accomplishment decreased, as expected. Perceived stress was very high in the early years of training. There was a negative correlation between age and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, but positive correlation with personal accomplishment. Female anesthesiologists had higher personal accomplishment, but lower depersonalization points than male anesthesiologists in our study. There was no statistical association between marital status, PSS, and MBI; ≥2 children group had a significant high personal accomplishment but low depersonalization and emotional exhaustion scores. Line regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between PSS and emotional exhaustion and between age and depersonalization. Conclusions: Social factors such as gender and number of children affect the work life of our trainees.

  14. Managing intergenerational differences in academic anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangraw, Robert E; Whitten, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Common definitions for workplace generations are the silent generation (born 1925-1945), the baby boomer generation (1946-1962), generation X (1963-1981), and generation Y (1982-2000). Distinct motivational and value perceptions stereotype generations. This review defines the characteristics of workplace generations today and provides insight into how differences influence the workplace environment. Senior faculty members are mostly boomers, whereas residents and junior faculty members tend to belong to generation X. Medical students and incoming interns are from generation Y. When compared with boomers, generation X is more savvy with technology, more independent, less loyal to the institution, and seeks balance between work and lifestyle. The 80-h resident working week restriction has reinforced differences between older and younger physicians. Generation Y exhibits traits that are similar to those of generation X. Their increased interest in anesthesiology may reflect, in part, their assumption that it affords better control of lifestyle. Understanding, improved communication strategies, mentorship, and flexibility in methods employed to achieve common goals are most likely to capture the interest and cooperation of members of generation X and possibly Y. Future studies should test effects of particular interventions on outcome in terms of recruitment and performance milestones.

  15. Systematic reviews of anesthesiologic interventions reported as statistically significant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imberger, Georgina; Gluud, Christian; Boylan, John

    2015-01-01

    : From 11,870 titles, we found 682 systematic reviews that investigated anesthesiologic interventions. In the 50 sampled meta-analyses, the median number of trials included was 8 (interquartile range [IQR], 5-14), the median number of participants was 964 (IQR, 523-1736), and the median number...

  16. Personality Testing May Improve Resident Selection in Anesthesiology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Matveevskii, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Current methods of selecting future residents for anesthesiology training programs do not adequately distinguish those who will succeed from the pool of seemingly well-qualified applicants. Some residents, despite high exam scores, may struggle in the OR in stressful situations. Aims This study examined whether specific neuropsychological and personality measures can distinguish high competency residents from low competency residents to aid in resident selection. Methods 25 residents enrolled in an anesthesiology program at a major academic institution were identified for participation. 13 were evaluated identified as “high competency” residents and 12 as “low competency ” by the department's clinical competency committee. Groups were evaluated on measures of fine motor dexterity, executive functioning, processing speed, attention, and personality using IPIP-NEO. Results There were no significant differences between groups on measures of fine-motor dexterity, executive functioning, processing speed, or attention. High competency residents scored significantly higher than low competency residents on measures of cooperation, self-efficacy, and adventurousness, and lower on measures of neuroticism, anxiety, anger, and vulnerability. Conclusion Although measures of fine-motor dexterity, executive functioning, processing speed, and attention do not appear to distinguish between high- and low competency residents in anesthesiology, specific personality characteristics may be associated with future success in an anesthesiology training program. PMID:19995155

  17. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology: a way forward with the European Board and the European Society of Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, F; Solca, M; De Robertis, E; Peduto, V A; Pasetto, A; Conti, G; Antonelli, M; Pelosi, P

    2010-11-01

    Anesthesiology, which includes anaesthesia, perioperative care, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy, is acknowledged as the leading medical specialty in addressing issues of patient safety, but there is still a long way to go. Several factors pose hazards in Anesthesiology, like increasingly older and sicker patients, more complex surgical interventions, more pressure on throughput, as well as new drugs and devices. To better design educational and research strategies to improve patient safety, the European Board of Anesthesiology (EBA) and the European Society of Anesthesiology (ESA) have produced a blueprint for patient safety in Anesthesiology. This document, to be known as the Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology, was endorsed together with the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists (WFSA), and the European Patients' Federation (EPF) at the Euroanaesthesia meeting in Helsinki in June 2010. It was signed by several Presidents of National Anesthesiology Societies as well as other stakeholders. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology represents a shared European view of what is necessary to improve patient safety, recommending practical steps that all anesthesiologists can include in their own clinical practice. The Italian Society of Anaesthesia, Analgesia, Reanimation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) is looking forward to continuing work on "patient safety" issues in Europe, and to cooperating with the ESA in the best interest of European patients.

  18. Plagiarism in Personal Statements of Anesthesiology Residency Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Lance J; Sizemore, Daniel C; Johnstone, Robert E

    2016-02-15

    Plagiarism by residency applicants in their personal statements, as well as sites that sell personal statements, have been described, and led in 2011 to advice to avoid plagiarism and the caution that plagiarism detection software was available. We screened personal statements of 467 anesthesiology residency applicants from 2013-2014 using Viper Plagiarism Scanner software, and studied them for plagiarism. After quotes and commonly used phrases were removed, 82 statements contained unoriginal content of 8 or more consecutive words. After the study, 13.6% of personal statements from non-United States medical school graduates, and 4.0% from United States medical school graduates, contained plagiarized material, a significant difference. Plagiarized content ranged up to 58%. Plagiarism continues to occur in anesthesiology residency personal statements, with a higher incidence among graduates of non-United States medical schools.

  19. Developing a trauma curriculum for anesthesiology residents and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Joshua M

    2014-04-01

    The board certification process for qualification by the American Board of Anesthesiology is undergoing significant review. A basic sciences examination has been added to the process and the traditional oral examination is evolving into a combined oral interview and practical skills assessment. These recent developments, as well as the growing body of evidence regarding the resuscitation of trauma patients, call for a revision in the curriculum beyond the documentation of participation in the anesthetics of 20 trauma patients. The implications of the 80-h work week are beginning to be appreciated. The development of a new trauma curriculum must take this significant change in residency training into account while incorporating modern educational theory (e.g. simulation) and new data on the resuscitation of trauma patients. Currently, the curriculum for trauma anesthesia requires only that residents participate in the anesthetics of 20 trauma patients. There is no plan for, and little literature regarding, a more extensive educational program. This offers a unique opportunity to innovate a novel curriculum in the anesthesiology residency. The American Society of Anesthesiologists Committee on Trauma and Emergency Preparedness has designed a curriculum that can serve as a template for this important step forward in anesthesiology education.

  20. Patient Simulation: A Literary Synthesis of Assessment Tools in Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Edler

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS has been hypothesized as a modality for assessing competency of knowledge and skill in patient simulation, but uniform methods for HFPS performance assessment (PA have not yet been completely achieved. Anesthesiology as a field founded the HFPS discipline and also leads in its PA. This project reviews the types, quality, and designated purpose of HFPS PA tools in anesthesiology. We used the systematic review method and systematically reviewed anesthesiology literature referenced in PubMed to assess the quality and reliability of available PA tools in HFPS. Of 412 articles identified, 50 met our inclusion criteria. Seventy seven percent of studies have been published since 2000; more recent studies demonstrated higher quality. Investigators reported a variety of test construction and validation methods. The most commonly reported test construction methods included “modified Delphi Techniques” for item selection, reliability measurement using inter-rater agreement, and intra-class correlations between test items or subtests. Modern test theory, in particular generalizability theory, was used in nine (18% of studies. Test score validity has been addressed in multiple investigations and shown a significant improvement in reporting accuracy. However the assessment of predicative has been low across the majority of studies. Usability and practicality of testing occasions and tools was only anecdotally reported. To more completely comply with the gold standards for PA design, both shared experience of experts and recognition of test construction standards, including reliability and validity measurements, instrument piloting, rater training, and explicit identification of the purpose and proposed use of the assessment tool, are required.

  1. Deliberate practice for achieving and maintaining expertise in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Randolph H; Rickard, Timothy C

    2015-02-01

    For the dedicated anesthesiologist, a high level of expertise is needed to deliver good care to patients and to provide excellent service to surgeons, anesthesia colleagues, and others. Expertise helps the anesthesiologist recover from difficult situations and generally makes the practice run more effectively. Expertise also contributes to quality of life through higher self-esteem and long-term career satisfaction. We begin by reviewing the attributes that characterize expert performance and discussing how a specific training format, known as deliberate practice, contributes to acquisition and maintenance of expertise. Deliberate practice involves rehearsal of specific tasks to mastery, ideally under the eye of a mentor to provide feedback. This amounts to an orchestrated effort to improve that enables trainees to progress to expert levels of performance. With few exceptions, people who become recognized experts have pursued deliberate practice on the order of 4 hours per day for 10 to 15 years. In contrast, those who practice their profession in a rote manner see their skills plateau well below the level of top performers. Anesthesiology instruction with attending supervision provides all of the necessary components for deliberate practice, and it can be effective in anesthesia. Using deliberate practice in teaching requires organization in selecting training topics, effort in challenging students to excel, and skill in providing feedback. In this article, we discuss how educational programs can implement deliberate practice in anesthesiology training, review resources for instructors, and suggest how anesthesiologists can continue the practice after residency.

  2. Results of a Flipped Classroom Teaching Approach in Anesthesiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Susan M; Chen, Fei; DiLorenzo, Amy N; Mayer, David C; Fairbanks, Stacy; Moran, Kenneth; Ku, Cindy; Mitchell, John D; Bowe, Edwin A; Royal, Kenneth D; Hendrickse, Adrian; VanDyke, Kenneth; Trawicki, Michael C; Rankin, Demicha; Guldan, George J; Hand, Will; Gallagher, Christopher; Jacob, Zvi; Zvara, David A; McEvoy, Matthew D; Schell, Randall M

    2017-08-01

    In a flipped classroom approach, learners view educational content prior to class and engage in active learning during didactic sessions. We hypothesized that a flipped classroom improves knowledge acquisition and retention for residents compared to traditional lecture, and that residents prefer this approach. We completed 2 iterations of a study in 2014 and 2015. Institutions were assigned to either flipped classroom or traditional lecture for 4 weekly sessions. The flipped classroom consisted of reviewing a 15-minute video, followed by 45-minute in-class interactive sessions with audience response questions, think-pair-share questions, and case discussions. The traditional lecture approach consisted of a 55-minute lecture given by faculty with 5 minutes for questions. Residents completed 3 knowledge tests (pretest, posttest, and 4-month retention) and surveys of their perceptions of the didactic sessions. A linear mixed model was used to compare the effect of both formats on knowledge acquisition and retention. Of 182 eligible postgraduate year 2 anesthesiology residents, 155 (85%) participated in the entire intervention, and 142 (78%) completed all tests. The flipped classroom approach improved knowledge retention after 4 months (adjusted mean = 6%; P  = .014; d  = 0.56), and residents preferred the flipped classroom (pre = 46%; post = 82%; P  < .001). The flipped classroom approach to didactic education resulted in a small improvement in knowledge retention and was preferred by anesthesiology residents.

  3. Fifty years of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Anesthesiology: a history of our specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rita; Riefe, Jennifer; Houck, Constance S

    2017-06-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 2015. The Section was one of the first and only subspecialty organizations in anesthesiology at the time. This special article will focus on the contributions of the Section to the practice of pediatric anesthesiology in the areas of advocacy, education and member contributions. In 1986, the Section created the Robert M. Smith Award to honor those members who had made significant advances in the practice of pediatric anesthesiology. It is named after one of the Section founders, an influential educator, inventor, and researcher in our field. We will focus the latter part of the article on the Robert M. Smith award winners to illustrate the contributions of the Section and its members to the development of the field of pediatric anesthesiology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Competency-based education in anesthesiology: history and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Thomas J; Fox, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education is transitioning to a competency-based system with milestones to measure progress and define success of residents. The confines of the time-based residency will be relaxed. Curriculum must be redesigned and assessments will need to be precise and in-depth. Core anesthesiology faculty will be identified and will be the "trained observers" of the residents' progress. There will be logistic challenges requiring creative management by program directors. There may be residents who achieve "expert" status earlier than the required 36 months of clinical anesthesia education, whereas others may struggle to achieve acceptable status and will require additional education time. Faculty must accept both extremes without judgment. Innovative new educational opportunities will need to be created for fast learners. Finally, it will be important that residents embrace this change. This will require programs to clearly define the specific aims and measurement endpoints for advancement and success.

  5. Assessing the quality of random clinical anesthesiology trials published on the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology from 2005 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Jucá, Mário Jorge

    2009-01-01

    A random clinical trial (RCT) is defined as a study involving intervention and control groups with random distribution of the participants. The objective of the present study was to assess the quality of RCT in anesthesiology published during a specific time. descriptive. A manual search of the articles published by the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology between January 2005 and February 2008 was undertaken to identify studies with characteristics of RCTs. The quality of RCTs was the primary parameter; secondary parameters included: approval by the Ethics on Research Committee (ERC), use of the informed consent (IC), description of the source of the grant, the sample size was calculated, number of authors, place of origin, statistical tests used, level of significance adopted, and classification of the type of study. The quality scale, descriptive statistics, and calculation of the 95% confidence interval were used to evaluate the quality of the RCTs. Out of 114 studies, 42 were identified as RCT. Only 3 (7.1%) of those were classified as having good methodological quality considering the random distribution, double blind, losses, and exclusions. One-hundred and seven out of 114 studies were submitted to the ERC, 67 used IC, none of them described the source of the grant, 17 calculated the size of the sample, the studies had a mean of 4.49 authors; 60 publications were from São Paulo; the Student t test was used more often (47.4%), a level of significance of 5% was adopted by 97 studies; and 42 were RCTs. After the manual search, 7.1% of the random clinical assays were considered of good methodological quality.

  6. Recruitment of house staff into anesthesiology: a longitudinal evaluation of factors responsible for selecting a career in anesthesiology and an individual training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Ian D; Long, Timothy R; Rose, Steven H; Wass, C Thomas

    2014-03-01

    To re-evaluate factors responsible for selecting a career in anesthesiology and for selecting an anesthesiology training program. The perceptions of anesthesiology residents about employment opportunities and future job security were also re-examined. Novel data on the impact of duty hour restrictions on residency training were obtained. Survey instrument. Academic medical center. 63 residents enrolled in the anesthesiology residency at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN (clinical base year and clinical anesthesia years 1-3) during the 2010-11 academic year. All responses were anonymous. Current study data were compared to data from two similar studies published by the authors (1995-96 and 2000-01) using an f-exact test. A P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. 55 of 63 (87%) residents responded to the survey. The most frequently cited reasons for selecting a career in anesthesiology were: anesthesiology is a "hands-on" specialty (49%), critical care medicine is included in the scope of training/practice (33%), anesthesiology provides opportunities to perform invasive procedures (31%), and the work is immediately gratifying (31%). When current data were compared with data from the 1995-96 survey, respondents reported significant decreases in interest in physiology/pharmacology (42% vs 21%; P = 0.03), opportunities to conduct research (13% vs 2%; P = 0.05) and opportunities to train in pain medicine (13% vs 0%; P = 0.01) as reasons for selecting anesthesiology. When current data were compared with data from the 2000-2001 survey, respondents reported a significant increase in critical care medicine (7% vs 33%, P = 0.01), significant decreases in time off (36% vs 11%; P = 0.01) and work time mostly devoted to patient care (20% vs 2%; P = 0.01) as factors in selecting anesthesiology as a career. Nearly all (94%) respondents reported a high level of satisfaction with their specialty choice and would choose anesthesiology again if currently graduating medical school

  7. [Publication performances of university clinics for anesthesiology: Germany, Austria and Switzerland from 2001 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, G; Ausserer, J; Wenzel, V; Pehböck, D; Widmann, T; Lindner, K; Hamm, P; Paal, P

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the publication performance of university departments of anesthesiology in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The number of publications, original articles, impact factors and citations were evaluated. A search was performed in PubMed to identify publications related to anesthesiology from 2001 to 2010. All articles from anesthesiology journals listed in the fields of anesthesia/pain therapy, critical care and emergency medicine by the "journal citation report 2013" in Thomson Reuters ISI web of knowledge were included. Articles from non-anaesthesiology journals, where the stem of the word anesthesia (anes*, anaes*, anäst*, anast*) appears in the affiliation field of PubMed, were included as well. The time periods 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 were compared. Articles were allocated to university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland via the affiliation field. A total of 45 university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland and 125,979 publications from 2,863 journals (65 anesthesiology journals, 2,798 non-anesthesiology journals) were analyzed. Of the publications 23 % could not be allocated to a given university department of anesthesiology. In the observation period the university department of anesthesiology in Berlin achieved most publications (n = 479) and impact points (1,384), whereas Vienna accumulated most original articles (n = 156). Austria had the most publications per million inhabitants in 2006-2010 (n=50) followed by Switzerland (n=49) and Germany (n=35). The number of publications during the observation period decreased in Germany (0.5 %), Austria (7 %) and Switzerland (8 %). Tables 2 and 4-8 of this article are available at Springer Link under Supplemental. The research performance varied among the university departments of anesthesiology in Germany, Austria and Switzerland whereby larger university departments, such as Berlin or Vienna published most. Publication output in Germany, Austria and

  8. Simulation of spinal nerve blocks for training anesthesiology residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.; Martin, David P.

    1998-06-01

    Deep nerve regional anesthesiology procedures, such as the celiac plexus block, are challenging to learn. The current training process primarily involves studying anatomy and practicing needle insertion is cadavers. Unfortunately, the training often continues on the first few patients subjected to the care of the new resident. To augment the training, we have developed a virtual reality surgical simulation designed to provide an immersive environment in which an understanding of the complex 3D relationships among the anatomic structures involved can be obtained and the mechanics of the celiac block procedure practiced under realistic conditions. Study of the relevant anatomy is provided by interactive 3D visualization of patient specific data nd the practice simulated using a head mounted display, a 6 degree of freedom tracker, and a haptic feedback device simulating the needle insertion. By training in a controlled environment, the resident may practice procedures repeatedly without the risks associated with actual patient procedures, and may become more adept and confident in the ability to perform nerve blocks. The resident may select a variety of different nerve block procedures to practice, and may place the virtual patient in any desired position and orientation. The preliminary anatomic models used in the simulation have been computed from the Visible Human Male; however, patient specific models may be generated from patient image data, allowing the physician to evaluate, plan, and practice difficult blocks and/or understand variations in anatomy before attempting the procedure on any specific patient.

  9. Anesthesiology Journal club assessment by means of semantic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Edson Vieira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: the interactive approach of a journal club has been described in the medical education literature. The aim of this investigation is to present an assessment of journal club as a tool to address the question whether residents read more and critically. METHODS: this study reports the performance of medical residents in anesthesiology from the Clinics Hospital - University of São Paulo Medical School. All medical residents were invited to answer five questions derived from discussed papers. The answer sheet consisted of an affirmative statement with a Likert type scale (totally disagree-disagree-not sure-agree-totally agree, each related to one of the chosen articles. The results were evaluated by means of item analysis - difficulty index and discrimination power. RESULTS: residents filled one hundred and seventy three evaluations in the months of December 2011 (n = 51, July 2012 (n = 66 and December 2012 (n = 56. The first exam presented all items with straight statement, second and third exams presented mixed items. Separating "totally agree" from "agree" increased the difficulty indices, but did not improve the discrimination power. CONCLUSIONS: the use of a journal club assessment with straight and inverted statements and by means of five points scale for agreement has been shown to increase its item difficulty and discrimination power. This may reflect involvement either with the reading or the discussion during the journal meeting.

  10. Anesthesiology Journal club assessment by means of semantic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Joaquim Edson; Torres, Marcelo Luís Abramides; Pose, Regina Albanese; Auler, José Otávio Costa Junior

    2014-01-01

    the interactive approach of a journal club has been described in the medical education literature. The aim of this investigation is to present an assessment of journal club as a tool to address the question whether residents read more and critically. this study reports the performance of medical residents in anesthesiology from the Clinics Hospital - University of São Paulo Medical School. All medical residents were invited to answer five questions derived from discussed papers. The answer sheet consisted of an affirmative statement with a Likert type scale (totally disagree-disagree-not sure-agree-totally agree), each related to one of the chosen articles. The results were evaluated by means of item analysis - difficulty index and discrimination power. residents filled one hundred and seventy three evaluations in the months of December 2011 (n=51), July 2012 (n=66) and December 2012 (n=56). The first exam presented all items with straight statement, second and third exams presented mixed items. Separating "totally agree" from "agree" increased the difficulty indices, but did not improve the discrimination power. the use of a journal club assessment with straight and inverted statements and by means of five points scale for agreement has been shown to increase its item difficulty and discrimination power. This may reflect involvement either with the reading or the discussion during the journal meeting. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Current applications of big data in obstetric anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpner, Thomas T; Bauer, Melissa E; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2017-06-01

    The narrative review aims to highlight several recently published 'big data' studies pertinent to the field of obstetric anesthesiology. Big data has been used to study rare outcomes, to identify trends within the healthcare system, to identify variations in practice patterns, and to highlight potential inequalities in obstetric anesthesia care. Big data studies have helped define the risk of rare complications of obstetric anesthesia, such as the risk of neuraxial hematoma in thrombocytopenic parturients. Also, large national databases have been used to better understand trends in anesthesia-related adverse events during cesarean delivery as well as outline potential racial/ethnic disparities in obstetric anesthesia care. Finally, real-time analysis of patient data across a number of disparate health information systems through the use of sophisticated clinical decision support and surveillance systems is one promising application of big data technology on the labor and delivery unit. 'Big data' research has important implications for obstetric anesthesia care and warrants continued study. Real-time electronic surveillance is a potentially useful application of big data technology on the labor and delivery unit.

  12. Special article: Francis Hoeffer McMechan, MD: creator of modern anesthesiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Douglas R

    2012-12-01

    If one person can be credited with the creation of the infrastructure of modern anesthesiology, that individual would be Francis Hoeffer McMechan. He has been largely forgotten since his death in 1939 despite his remarkable and enduring accomplishments. McMechan edited the first national journal devoted to anesthesiology, created and managed almost all of the national and regional societies devoted to the specialty between 1912 and his death, and created the first international physician certification as a specialist in anesthesiology. His accomplishments are even more amazing given the severe arthritis that left him wheelchair-bound for almost his entire professional life and denied him the ability to practice anesthesia. Our specialty owes an incredible debt to this largely unknown and unsung hero.

  13. China's Contribution to Anesthesiology Research: A 10-Year Survey of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guohao; Zhang, Kai; Wood, Chris; Hoeft, Andreas; Liu, Jin; Fang, Xiangming

    2016-05-01

    Anesthesiology has advanced in China over the past decade. We compared the trends in publication of anesthesiology articles from China between 2005 and 2014 with the trends in 5 developed countries. We included all journals listed in the ''Anesthesiology'' category of Journal Citation Reports. Anesthesiology-related publications from 2005 to 2014 were retrieved from the PubMed and Web of Knowledge online databases. The total number of articles, publication type categories, number of citations, and citation rate (number of citations/years since publication) were analyzed. The sample size was the n = 10 years for all confidence intervals and P values. We additionally evaluated the total number of articles published in the 10 top-ranking journals. From 2005 to 2014, 41,344 articles were published in anesthesiology journals. Of these, 3.07% were contributed by authors from Chinese institutions. Although this contribution was less than the Unites States, Great Britain, Germany, France, or Japan, publications from Chinese institutions grew at an annual rate of 13% (95% confidence interval: 3.08%-23.38%, P reports than clinical investigations. China ranked before Great Britain (221 articles) and France (245 articles) in basic research, with 448 basic researches publications during the study period. The articles from China averaged 2.24 citations per year, comparable to the articles from the United States (2.71, P = 0.545), Great Britain (2.57, P = 0.999), Germany (2.35, P = 0.999), France (1.50, P = 0.520), and Japan (1.24, P = 0.065). In the 10 highest impact anesthesiology journals, China published 780 articles during the decade. The 3 journals with the most publications from Chinese institutions were Anesthesia & Analgesia, Anesthesiology, and Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica. In the studied decade, anesthesiology research published by Chinese institutions lagged behind publications from developed countries. There was a steady increase in the number of articles

  14. Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellows' Perception of Quality of Attending Supervision and Medical Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hubert A; Hajduk, John; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Suresh, Santhanam; Nizamuddin, Sarah L; McCarthy, Robert; Jagannathan, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate supervision has been shown to reduce medical errors in anesthesiology residents and other trainees across various specialties. Nonetheless, supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellows has yet to be evaluated. The main objective of this survey investigation was to evaluate supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellows in the United States. We hypothesized that there was an indirect association between perceived quality of faculty supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellow trainees and the frequency of medical errors reported. A survey of pediatric fellows from 53 pediatric anesthesiology fellowship programs in the United States was performed. The primary outcome was the frequency of self-reported errors by fellows, and the primary independent variable was supervision scores. Questions also assessed barriers for effective faculty supervision. One hundred seventy-six pediatric anesthesiology fellows were invited to participate, and 104 (59%) responded to the survey. Nine of 103 (9%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-16%) respondents reported performing procedures, on >1 occasion, for which they were not properly trained for. Thirteen of 101 (13%, 95% CI, 7%-21%) reported making >1 mistake with negative consequence to patients, and 23 of 104 (22%, 95% CI, 15%-31%) reported >1 medication error in the last year. There were no differences in median (interquartile range) supervision scores between fellows who reported >1 medication error compared to those reporting ≤1 errors (3.4 [3.0-3.7] vs 3.4 [3.1-3.7]; median difference, 0; 99% CI, -0.3 to 0.3; P = .96). Similarly, there were no differences in those who reported >1 mistake with negative patient consequences, 3.3 (3.0-3.7), compared with those who did not report mistakes with negative patient consequences (3.4 [3.3-3.7]; median difference, 0.1; 99% CI, -0.2 to 0.6; P = .35). We detected a high rate of self-reported medication errors in pediatric anesthesiology fellows in the United States

  15. Incidence and Factors Associated with Burnout in Anesthesiology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Foresta, Grazia; Santonocito, Cristina; Palumbo, Gaetano J; Arcadipane, Antonio; Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O

    2017-01-01

    Burnout syndrome has reached epidemic levels among physicians (reported around 50%). Anesthesiology is among the most stressful medical disciplines but there is paucity of literature as compared with others. Analysis of burnout is essential because it is associated with safety and quality of care. We summarize evidence on burnout in anesthesiology. We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE up to 30.06.2017). We included studies reporting burnout in anesthesiology with no restriction on role or screening test used. Fifteen surveys/studies described burnout in anesthesiology, including different workers profiles (nurses, residents, consultants, and directors). All studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory test but with significant differences for risk stratification. Burnout prevalence greatly varied across studies (10%-41% high risk, up to 59% at least moderate risk). Factors most consistently associated with burnout were strained working pattern, working as younger consultant, and having children. There was no consistent relationship between burnout and hospital characteristics, gender, or marital status. Burnout prevalence among anesthesiologists is relatively high across career stages, and some risk factors are reported frequently. However, the small number of studies as well as the large differences in their methodology and in reporting approach warrants further research in this field.

  16. Incidence and Factors Associated with Burnout in Anesthesiology: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Foresta, Grazia; Santonocito, Cristina; Palumbo, Gaetano J.; Arcadipane, Antonio; Maybauer, Dirk M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout syndrome has reached epidemic levels among physicians (reported around 50%). Anesthesiology is among the most stressful medical disciplines but there is paucity of literature as compared with others. Analysis of burnout is essential because it is associated with safety and quality of care. We summarize evidence on burnout in anesthesiology. Methods We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE up to 30.06.2017). We included studies reporting burnout in anesthesiology with no restriction on role or screening test used. Results Fifteen surveys/studies described burnout in anesthesiology, including different workers profiles (nurses, residents, consultants, and directors). All studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory test but with significant differences for risk stratification. Burnout prevalence greatly varied across studies (10%–41% high risk, up to 59% at least moderate risk). Factors most consistently associated with burnout were strained working pattern, working as younger consultant, and having children. There was no consistent relationship between burnout and hospital characteristics, gender, or marital status. Conclusions Burnout prevalence among anesthesiologists is relatively high across career stages, and some risk factors are reported frequently. However, the small number of studies as well as the large differences in their methodology and in reporting approach warrants further research in this field. PMID:29318155

  17. Incidence and Factors Associated with Burnout in Anesthesiology: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Sanfilippo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Burnout syndrome has reached epidemic levels among physicians (reported around 50%. Anesthesiology is among the most stressful medical disciplines but there is paucity of literature as compared with others. Analysis of burnout is essential because it is associated with safety and quality of care. We summarize evidence on burnout in anesthesiology. Methods. We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE up to 30.06.2017. We included studies reporting burnout in anesthesiology with no restriction on role or screening test used. Results. Fifteen surveys/studies described burnout in anesthesiology, including different workers profiles (nurses, residents, consultants, and directors. All studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory test but with significant differences for risk stratification. Burnout prevalence greatly varied across studies (10%–41% high risk, up to 59% at least moderate risk. Factors most consistently associated with burnout were strained working pattern, working as younger consultant, and having children. There was no consistent relationship between burnout and hospital characteristics, gender, or marital status. Conclusions. Burnout prevalence among anesthesiologists is relatively high across career stages, and some risk factors are reported frequently. However, the small number of studies as well as the large differences in their methodology and in reporting approach warrants further research in this field.

  18. Anesthesiology teaching during undergraduation through an academic league: what is the impact in students' learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Alan Saito; Silva, Felipe Duarte; Kronemberger, Tatiana Barboza; Pose, Regina Albanese; Torres, Marcelo Luis Abramides; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho; Auler, José Otávio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Academic leagues have been consolidated as instruments of medical teaching and for the introducing of medical students to practice of specialties, including anesthesiology. As the role of leagues in the development process of competencies and learning of their students is not well known, the learning of members of an anesthesiology academic league was evaluated after participating in its activities for one year. Students of an anesthesiology academic league were followed up from March to December 2010 and evaluated through objective cognitive tests of multiple choice applied before the beginning of activities and after their conclusion. Attendance in activities and epidemiologic profile of students were correlated with the tests results. Twenty medical students from 3rd to 6th year were analyzed, with an average age of 22.8 (21-26) years. The average participation in the proposed activities was 10.4/13 (80%). The average of right answers on the first test was 8.1/17 (47.6%), and 3rd year students had lower grades (pgrades of different years of the medical undergraduation. A strong relationship between participation in activities and improved grades was found (r=0.719; p<0.001). Students who participated in the league had improvement in knowledge evaluation tests, suggesting that the league is a useful teaching instrument that can provide improved learning of anesthesiology. Participation in activities was connected with improved performance. Activities developed in leagues may have a positive role in students' academic education, more specifically in this article, in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of Clinical Education in the Alborz University of Medical Sciences from Surgical Technology and Anesthesiology Students’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bahrami Babaheidary

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: Because of surgical technology and anesthesiology students needs to acquire clinical skills along with theoretical training, providing suitable clinical environment seems to be critical to achieve essential in-depth experience in professional aspects.

  20. Summer anesthesiology externship: Demonstrating the ability of early clinical involvement to educate and increase specialty interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin S; Cormican, Daniel; Seidman, Peggy A

    2012-01-01

    We describe the influence of a 6-week "Summer Anesthesiology Externship" featuring didactic, procedure, and simulation education on formation of medical students' specialty choice. Eighteen months after externship completion, externs were sent a questionnaire with Likert scale agreement ratings of subspecialties/simulations and yes/no questions about student career interests before/after the program, stipend importance, and procedural skill performance during/after the program. General anesthesiology had the highest subspecialty approval rating (9.0). Externs strongly agreed that simulations successfully progressed at first year student understanding levels (9.2 mean agreement rating), increased confidence in being part of a care team (9.4 mean agreement rating), and provided personal/interpersonal development. Externs unanimously agreed that the program introduced them to the breadth of anesthesiology, and that practicing clinical/procedural skills improved confidence when performing the procedures later in medical school. Four of 14 students applied for the externship with some focus on anesthesiology as a career choice. After the externship, a significantly higher number of students (12 of 14) were strongly considering applying to the field (ptype of setting. Furthermore, knowledge acquired during the workshop was retained when CA1 residents were re-tested one year after the workshop. The ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop will become part of the didactic series for our CA1 residents and will be a required learning activity. Additional work still needs to be done to find out the best way to test knowledge and skill outcomes in residents learning new technology and techniques.

  1. Scientific publications in anesthesiology journals from East Asia: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Li-Qun; Sun, Yu-Ming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2011-04-01

    The scientific publications in anesthesiology research from East Asian authors have not been reported yet. The present study was designed to analyze the contribution of articles from East Asia to anesthesiology research. Articles published in 17 journals in anesthesiology originating from Japan, China, and South Korea from 2000 to 2009 were retrieved from the PubMed database and Web of Science. From 2000 to 2009, there were 3,076 articles published from East Asia. During this period, there were a notable decrease in publications from Japan and modest increases in publications from both China and South Korea. The average 5-year impact factor of the published articles was similar among the three regions, and China had the highest average number of citations to each article. Anesthesia & Analgesia published more articles than any other journal from all three regions. Our analysis showed that Japan was the most productive region in East Asia, but there was a notable decrease in publications from Japan in 2000-2009. The impact factor of the articles suggests similar levels of scholarship. Anesthesia & Analgesia was the most popular journal in East Asia.

  2. The impact of new-generation physicians on the function of academic anesthesiology departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Patricia A

    2007-12-01

    Academic departments of anesthesiology have had to adapt a wide variety of clinical and educational work functions to the viewpoints, values and normative expectations of the newer generations of physicians who now present themselves for training as well as for faculty employment. This commentary will elaborate on key points that academic departments must recognize and incorporate into their functional and organizational imperatives in order to remain successful with regard to physician recruitment and retention. Recognition of differences between newer-generation vs. established physician issues and concerns include differences in: learning style, teaching style, approach to clinical schedules and the concept of life-work balance, academic and personal motivation, desire for control of their work experience, effective productivity incentives, as well as communication style issues and implications thereof. The spectrum of physicians who contribute to the impact of these factors on contemporary academic anesthesiology departments include faculty, nonfaculty staff physicians, residents and medical students. Academic departments of anesthesiology which can successfully incorporate the changes and most importantly the functional and organizational flexibility needed to respond to the newer generations' worldview and so-called balanced goals will be able to best attract high-caliber housestaff and future faculty.

  3. Perspective: Hospital support for anesthesiology departments: aligning incentives and improving productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laureen L; Evers, Alex S

    2012-03-01

    Anesthesiology groups, particularly academic departments, are increasingly dependent on hospital support for financial viability. Economic stresses are driven by higher patient acuity, by multiple subspecialty service and call demands, by high-risk obstetric services, and by long case durations attributable to both case complexity and time for teaching. An unfavorable payer mix, university taxation, and other costs associated with academic education and research missions further compound these stresses. In addition, the current economic climate and the uncertainty surrounding health care reform measures will continue to increase performance pressures on hospitals and anesthesiology departments.Although many researchers have published on the mechanics of operating room (OR) productivity, their investigations do not usually address the motivational forces that drive individual and group behaviors. Institutional tradition, surgical convenience, and parochial interests continue to play predominant roles in OR governance and scheduling practices. Efforts to redefine traditional relationships, to coordinate operational decision-making processes, and to craft incentives that align individual performance goals with those of the institution are all essential for creating greater economic stability. Using the principles of shared costs, department autonomy, hospital flexibility and control over institutional issues, and alignment between individual and institutional goals, the authors developed a template to redefine the hospital-anesthesiology department relationship. Here, they describe both this contractual template and the results that followed implementation (2007-2009) at one institution.

  4. APEP-Anesthesiology Preceptorship Enrichment Program: A Curriculum for First and Second Year Medical Students…An Early Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amy; Kileny, Joel; LeVan, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this educational innovation was to create a program for first and second year medical students (MS1s and MS2s) that would: (1) Provide students with early clinical exposure to the subspecialty field of anesthesiology, (2) Expose MS1s and MS2s to dedicated anesthesiologists serving as preceptors, (3) Enrich the students' basic science knowledge in a practical way using an integrated curriculum with clinical correlates and (4) Convey an accurate depiction of anesthesiology as a possible career choice. The Anesthesiology Preceptorship Enrichment Program (APEP) was designed for MS1s and MS2s as a seven month curriculum for each level, integrated with basic science course content. APEP students shadowed faculty from the Department of Anesthesiology (APEP preceptors). Guided by handouts, preceptors reviewed basic science concepts with clinical correlates. APEP encounters from October 2006-April 2007, October 2007-April 2008, and October 2008-April 2009 were documented and students completed a questionnaire about their experience. After three years, APEP has become a successful program, as evidenced by the increasing numbers of interested incoming students, active students and returning students. According to the end of program questionnaire, 38-68% of the APEP students used the APEP handouts to guide discussions with their preceptor, enhance intra-operative teaching, and/or refer to while studying for basic science course exams. According to the questionnaire, 71-80% of the APEP students were more interested in the field of anesthesiology after participating in APEP, 10-16% were neither more or less interested, and 4-19% were less interested. Early clinical exposure to anesthesiology with APEP was viewed as a very positive experience, increasing interest in anesthesiology at the MS1 and MS2 level. The APEP handouts were deemed a useful aid for discussion and created opportunities for teaching clinical correlates of basic science knowledge.

  5. Leadership and management of academic anesthesiology departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, Berend; Galford, Jennifer A

    2009-03-01

    To characterize the approach of academic chairs of anesthesiology in leading and managing their departments, and to gain insights into what they considered the most difficult challenges as chairs. Internet-based survey instrument conducted during July and August of 2006. Academic medical center. Department chairs of 132 academic anesthesiology programs who were listed on the Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs Listserv, were surveyed. The overall number of respondents were reported. However, as all questions were voluntary, not all were answered by each respondent. Observations are therefore reported as absolute numbers and percentages on a question-by-question basis. Respondents were asked to rank responses to some questions in order of importance (eg, 1 = most important). These data are presented as rank ordered median values, determined by the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Significant differences between groups were determined by Dunn's post test. A P-value leadership as most important. Seventy-nine percent had developed "Vision" statements for the department and 64% of respondents had set goals for divisions. To communicate within departments, 74% of Chairs had at least monthly faculty meetings and 50% held at least yearly faculty retreats. Chairs preferred communicating contentious issues face to face. Ninety-five percent of Chairs held at least yearly performance appraisals and 85% had an established incentive system in the department. Academic productivity (73%) and clinical time (68%) were the most common components of the incentive system. In 65% of departments, Chairs delegated the program directorship and in 73%, the running of the National Residency Matching Program. The financial state of the department was shared at least annually in 93% of departments. In most departments (77%), faculty salary ranges were known but individual faculty salaries were not shared. Chairs considered the most important leadership challenge to be setting direction for the

  6. Anesthesiology resident personality type correlates with faculty assessment of resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Randall M; Dilorenzo, Amy N; Li, Hsin-Fang; Fragneto, Regina Y; Bowe, Edwin A; Hessel, Eugene A

    2012-11-01

    To study the association between anesthesiology residents' personality preference types, faculty evaluations of residents' performance, and knowledge. Convenience sample and prospective study. Academic department of anesthesiology. Consenting anesthesiology residents (n = 36). All participants completed the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®). All residents' 6-month summation of daily focal evaluations completed by faculty [daily performance score (DPS); 1 = unsatisfactory, 2 = needs improvement, 3 = meets expectations, 4 = exceeds expectations], as well as a global assessment of performance (GAP) score based on placement of each resident into perceived quartile compared with their peers (ie,1 = first, or top, quartile) by senior faculty (n = 7) who also completed the MBTI, were obtained. The resident MBTI personality preferences were compared with the DPS and GAP scores, the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) I and II scores, and faculty MBTI personality type. There was no association between personality preference type and performance on standardized examinations (USMLE I, II). The mean GAP score was better (higher quartile score) for Extraverts than Introverts (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0047) and for Sensing versus Intuition (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0206) preference. Faculty evaluator MBTI preference type did not influence the GAP scores they assigned residents. Like GAP, the DPS was better for residents with Sensing versus Intuition preference (median 3.5 vs 3.3, P = 0.0111). No difference in DPS was noted between Extraverts and Introverts. Personality preference type was not associated with resident performance on standardized examinations, but it was associated with faculty evaluations of resident performance. Residents with Sensing personality preference were evaluated more favorably on global and focal faculty evaluations than those residents who chose the Intuition preference. Extraverted residents were evaluated more favorably on

  7. Readability evaluation of Internet-based patient education materials related to the anesthesiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Jung, Michael; Mccaffery, Kirsten J; McCarthy, Robert J; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of the current investigation was to assess the readability of Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology. We hypothesized that the majority of patient education materials would not be written according to current recommended readability grade level. Online patient education materials describing procedures, risks, and management of anesthesia-related topics were identified using the search engine Google (available at www.google.com) using the terms anesthesia, anesthesiology, anesthesia risks, and anesthesia care. Cross-sectional evaluation. None. Assessments of content readability were performed using validated instruments (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Formulae, the Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook, the New Dale-Chall Test, the Fry graph, and the Flesch Reading Ease score). Ninety-six Web sites containing Internet patient education materials (IPEMs) were evaluated. The median (interquartile range) readability grade level for all evaluated IPEMs was 13.5 (12.0-14.6). All the evaluated documents were classified at a greater readability level than the current recommended readability grade, P < .001. Readability grades were not significantly different among different IPEM sources. Assessment by the Flesch Reading Ease test classified all but 4 IPEMs as at least fairly difficult to read. Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology are currently written far above the recommended readability grade level. High complexity of written education materials likely limits access of information to millions of American patients. Redesign of online content of Web sites that provide patient education material regarding anesthesia could be an important step in improving access to information for patients with poor health literacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality Improvement in Anesthesiology - Leveraging Data and Analytics to Optimize Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Elizabeth A; Falk, Scott A

    2018-03-01

    Quality improvement is at the heart of practice of anesthesiology. Objective data are critical for any quality improvement initiative; when possible, a combination of process, outcome, and balancing metrics should be evaluated to gauge the value of an intervention. Quality improvement is an ongoing process; iterative reevaluation of data is required to maintain interventions, ensure continued effectiveness, and continually improve. Dashboards can facilitate rapid analysis of data and drive decision making. Large data sets can be useful to establish benchmarks and compare performance against other providers, practices, or institutions. Audit and feedback strategies are effective in facilitating positive change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anesthesiological Management of a Patient with Williams Syndrome Undergoing Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Boncagni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome (WS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a mutation on chromosome 7. Patients with WS usually display dysmorphic facial and musculoskeletal features, congenital heart diseases, metabolic disturbances and cognitive impairment. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are present in the majority of the children and may provide a substrate for perioperative Sudden Cardiac Death, as presented by several reports, something that creates a great challenge to the anesthetic conduct. We present the case of a 12-year old girl who required anesthetic care for surgical correction of an acquired kyphoscoliosis. Potential anesthesiological implications of WS are subsequently reviewed.

  10. The Pediatric Anesthesiology Workforce: Projecting Supply and Trends 2015-2035.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Singleton, Mark; Agarwal, Rita; Scheinker, David; Miller, Daniel; Muffly, Tyler M; Honkanen, Anita

    2018-02-01

    A workforce analysis was conducted to predict whether the projected future supply of pediatric anesthesiologists is balanced with the requirements of the inpatient pediatric population. The specific aims of our analysis were to (1) project the number of pediatric anesthesiologists in the future workforce; (2) project pediatric anesthesiologist-to-pediatric population ratios (0-17 years); (3) project the mean number of inpatient pediatric procedures per pediatric anesthesiologist; and (4) evaluate the effect of alternative projections of individual variables on the model projections through 2035. The future number of pediatric anesthesiologists is determined by the current supply, additions to the workforce, and departures from the workforce. We previously compiled a database of US pediatric anesthesiologists in the base year of 2015. The historical linear growth rate for pediatric anesthesiology fellowship positions was determined using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Data Resource Books from 2002 to 2016. The future number of pediatric anesthesiologists in the workforce was projected given growth of pediatric anesthesiology fellowship positions at the historical linear growth rate, modeling that 75% of graduating fellows remain in the pediatric anesthesiology workforce, and anesthesiologists retire at the current mean retirement age of 64 years old. The baseline model projections were accompanied by age- and gender-adjusted anesthesiologist supply, and sensitivity analyses of potential variations in fellowship position growth, retirement, pediatric population, inpatient surgery, and market share to evaluate the effect of each model variable on the baseline model. The projected ratio of pediatric anesthesiologists to pediatric population was determined using the 2012 US Census pediatric population projections. The projected number of inpatient pediatric procedures per pediatric anesthesiologist was determined using the Kids' Inpatient

  11. [New study on the history of anesthesiology (8)--Etymological consideration on a Japanese word "Masui"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, A

    2001-05-01

    The author briefly describes etymology of a Japanese word "Masui" ([symbol: see text]) and discusses why this word has not been correctly understood by lay people as well as Japanese anesthesiologists. The word "Masui" was coined by Seikei Sugita in 1850 when he translated Dutch edition of Schelesinger's monograph on ether anesthesia into Japanese. Therefore the word is not of Chinese origin and has subsequently been exported to China and the countries of Korean peninsula. Although half a century has elapsed since the first Department of Anesthesiology was established at the Tokyo University Faculty of Medicine, social acceptance for our specialty has not adequately and widely been achieved. The author thinks that one of the causes for this inadequate acceptance is that the correct Japanese words of "Masuika-gaku" and "Masuika-i" for Anesthesiology and Anesthesiologists were not coined and the incorrect words as "Masuigaku" and "Masui-i" have been used. Not a small number of Japanese anesthesiologists still employ the words "Masuigaku" and "Masui-i" without any special reasons.

  12. QUALIS EVALUATION OF MEDICINE III: ANALYSIS OF ANESTHESIOLOGY AND GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS JOURNALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Iracema de Mattos Paranhos

    2015-01-01

    To know the current publication of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology subareas, to support the updating of Qualis Journals criteria in these specific subareas. Cross-sectional, descriptive study in which was evaluated in quantitatively and qualitatively way the bibliographic production of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology subareas, from January 2010 to December 2012. Were investigated the values ​​of the impact factor; calculated (i) the number (n) and the percentage of journals in each stratum Qualis A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5, and (ii) the median values ​​and their extreme limits (minimum values ​​and maximum) and quartiles (p25; p50; p75; p90) of the impact factors in the different strata. The bibliographic production of the three-year period 2010-2012 was published in 69 journals in Anesthesiology subarea and in 345 in Gynecology and Obstetrics. In Anesthesiology, 44% were within the limits of impact factor of superior A1, A2 and B1; in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 42.4% were in those limits and strata. Despite lagging behind by international standards, publications of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology showed tendency to improve the quality. In these sub-areas, the median of journals impact factor is beyond the limits defined by the area in the last assessment. Therefore, it must be reconsidered new indicators to assess this aspect. Conhecer a publicação atual das subáreas Anestesiologia e Ginecologia e Obstetrícia, para subsidiar a atualização dos critérios Qualis-periódicos, específicos dessas subáreas. Estudo de corte transversal, descritivo, onde avaliou-se, de modo quantitativo e qualitativo, a produção bibliográfica das subáreas Anestesiologia e Ginecologia e Obstetrícia, no período de janeiro de 2010 a dezembro de 2012. Foram definidos os valores do fator de impacto das revistas; foram calculados (i) o número (n) e percentual de periódicos em cada um dos estratos Qualis - A1, A2, B1, B2, B3

  13. Anesthesiology: About the Anesthesiology Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... group invoicing for membership renewals as well as marketing, education, and quality improvement solutions. Learn more About ... 371-0384 Connect with Us Facebook Linkedin Twitter Youtube © 2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), All Rights ...

  14. Gender Diversity in Anesthesiology Programs: The Role of Current Residents and Department Leadership in the 2014 Match Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranner, Paul W; Mussehl, Denise A; Hess, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of graduates of American medical colleges are women, yet the percentage of women entering accredited anesthesiology programs remains less than 40%. There are obviously many factors that influence the choice of a residency training program, from geography to reputation to the atmosphere, composition and camaraderie of the department. We examined whether a greater number of current female residents, a female Chair, or a female Program Director were associated with a program matching a greater number of female candidates in the 2014 NRMP Match. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all 132 ACGME-accredited anesthesiology programs immediately following the 2014 Match seeking information on the gender mix of their current residents, the gender of the Chair and Program Director, and the gender composition of their newly-matched candidates. The percentage of current female residents was significantly associated with the percentage of incoming female residents (p = 0.013). There was no association between the percentage of new female residents obtained in the Match and the presence of a female Chair or Program Director. The results of the 2013 NRMP anesthesiology match indicate that programs with a higher proportion of female residents were able to sustain that diversity and successfully match a higher percentage of female candidates. No correlation was seen with Chair and Program Director gender, suggesting further work is needed to define the influence of female role models on female applicants' choice of anesthesiology residency programs.

  15. [Books on anesthesiology and resuscitation published in Spain. An approach to their study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, E; Baños, J E

    1998-03-01

    Few authors have examined the publication of medical books. Our aim was to analyze the nature of books published in Spain on anesthesiology and recovery. Books listed by the Spanish ISBN agency were selected if they included anestesi* or reanima* in any field. Duplicates were removed. Multiple editions or references were considered single books, with data for the oldest edition entered into analysis. Multiple volume collections were grouped as complete works. Data analyzed for each book were year of publication, language (of publication and the original), subject (according to ISBN classification) and place of publication. Nine subject classifications were applied: general, recovery, anesthetic techniques, pharmacology, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, veterinary anesthesia, dental anesthesia and miscellaneous. We analyzed 216 books. Years that saw publication of the greatest number of books were 1988 (17), 1993 (16) and 1979 (15), and the five-year period in which the most books were published was 1985 to 1989 (48 books, 22.2%). Most books (114, 52.8%) were originally written in English, Spanish being the second most common original language (58, 26.8%). All books were published in Spanish. The Spanish ISBN classification system identified 11 categories: general diseases/clinical medicine/therapy (161, 74.5%); drugs/pharmacology/physical therapy/toxicology (20, 9.3%); gynecology/obstetrics (9, 4.2%), veterinary medicine (9, 4.2%) and medicine (8, 3.7%). Classification by specific subjects showed a predominance of monographs or treatises on general aspects (42, 19.4%) followed by books on recovery (37, 17.1%), anesthetic techniques (25, 11.6%) and pharmacology (17, 7.9%). Most books were published in Barcelona (142, 65.7%), Madrid (36, 16.7%) or Saragossa (10, 4.6%). Spanish publication of books on anesthesiology and recovery has increased in recent years. Most books are translations usually from English. Spanish ISBN agency data, although it has limitations, can

  16. Body temperature change during anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy: implications for quality incentives in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Jerome H; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2008-11-01

    The American Society of Anesthesiologists has announced that perioperative normothermia is a "Quality Incentive in Anesthesiology." We examined whether we could meet this quality incentive in a simple population: patients undergoing anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We compared infrared-measured ear temperature before anesthesia to temperature upon delivery of patients to the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) after 101 consecutive brief anesthetics to facilitate ECT. For 35 procedures, the patients had an infrared ear thermometer temperature of measures were substandard. Also, current methods of measuring temperature may be inadequate to ascertain if patients are hypothermic after surgery. As the avoidance of hypothermia is a meritorious goal, anesthesia departments need to ensure that their temperature monitoring equipment is adequate to ensure accurate measurement of postanesthetic temperature if this variable is to be used as a quality incentive.

  17. Marketing or strategy? Defining the best approach to expand the anesthesiology workforce in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael C; Grant, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    There is a chronic shortage of anesthesiologists in Israel. The study by Cohen et al. suggests that a marketing campaign may be one method of addressing this shortage. This commentary argues for a more comprehensive strategy based on the US experience. This would not only involve marketing as suggested by Cohen et al. but would also involve a fundamental change in the Israel anesthesia care model, as well as providing substantial financial incentives to young physicians. We believe that a combination of these approaches will help to alleviate the shortage of anesthesia providers in Israel. Creating a new class of physician extenders, namely, anesthesiologist assistants, would also provide an employment pathway for the skilled medical technicians trained by the Israel Defense Forces, and other non-physicians with an interest in anesthesiology.

  18. Pediatric anesthesiology fellow education: is a simulation-based boot camp feasible and valuable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardekar, Aditee P; Singh, Devika; Lockman, Justin L; Rodgers, David L; Hales, Roberta L; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Nathan, Aruna; Deutsch, Ellen S

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric anesthesiologists must manage crises in neonates and children with timely responses and limited margin for error. Teaching the range of relevant skills during a 12-month fellowship is challenging. An experiential simulation-based curriculum can augment acquisition of knowledge and skills. To develop a simulation-based boot camp (BC) for novice pediatric anesthesiology fellows and assess learner perceptions of BC activities. We hypothesize that BC is feasible, not too basic, and well received by fellows. Skills stations, team-based in situ simulations, and group discussions of complex cases were designed. Stations were evaluated by anonymous survey; fellows rated usefulness in improving knowledge, self-confidence, technical skill, and clinical performance using a Likert scale (1 strongly disagree to 5 strongly agree). They were also asked if stations were too basic or too short. Median and interquartile range (IQR) data were calculated and noted as median (IQR). Fellows reported the difficult airway station and simulated scenarios improved knowledge, self-confidence, technical skill, and clinical performance. They disagreed that stations were too basic or too short with exception of the difficult airway session, which was too short [4 (4-3)]. Fellows believed the central line station improved knowledge [4 (4-3)], technical skills [4 (4-4)], self-confidence [4 (4-3)], and clinical performance [4 (4-3)]; scores trended toward neutral likely because the station was perceived as too basic [3.5 (4-3)]. An interactive session on epinephrine and intraosseous lines was valued. Complicated case discussion was of educational value [4 (5-4)], the varied opinions of faculty were helpful [4 (5-4)], and the session was neither too basic [2 (2-2)] nor too short [2 (2-2)]. A simulation-based BC for pediatric anesthesiology fellows was feasible, perceived to improve confidence, knowledge, technical skills, and clinical performance, and was not too basic. © 2016 John Wiley

  19. A tribute to Dr. Paul A. J. Janssen: entrepreneur extraordinaire, innovative scientist, and significant contributor to anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Theodore H; Egan, Talmage D; Van Aken, Hugo

    2008-02-01

    Dr. Paul Janssen was the founder of Janssen Pharmaceutica and the developer of over 80 pharmaceutical compounds that proved useful in human, botanical, and veterinary medicine. He and his coworkers synthesized the fentanyl family of drugs, many other potent analgesics, droperidol, etomidate, and numerous other important medicines that were extremely useful in psychiatry, parasitology, gastroenterology, cardiology, virology, and immunology. Anesthesiology and medicine as a whole have benefited a great deal from his resourcefulness, creativity, and entrepreneurial spirit.

  20. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ferrando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (=0.04. On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (=0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8 and intubation (=0.62; C95%  −6.1, +10.0 between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation.

  1. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Aguilar, Gerardo; Belda, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq) anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (P = 0.04). On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (P = 0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8) and intubation (P = 0.62; C95%  -6.1, +10.0) between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation.

  2. Developing a specialty: J.S. Lundy's three major contributions to anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Terry A; Narr, Bradly J; Bacon, Douglas R

    2004-05-01

    John S. Lundy was able to accomplish three major goals during the early years of his stewardship of the section on anesthesia of the Mayo Clinic. In 1925, Lundy established the first anatomy lab at the Mayo Clinic. He believed that the lab would serve as a useful tool for teaching residents as well as research into regional anesthetic techniques. Second, Lundy desired to advance the science of anesthesiology. Lundy developed the concept of balanced anesthesia, pioneered the introduction of barbiturates to the practice of anesthesia, developed anesthesia section services for the use of ventilators, ventilator vests, oxygen tents, and nasal oxygen supplementation. Lastly, in 1935, he established the nation's first blood bank. Lundy and Ralph Tovell had the opportunity to do pioneering work in transfusion medicine, which led to an improvement in the quality of service, and patient safety. These three major accomplishments provided Lundy with abundant scientific material to present to the American Medical Association (AMA) in Chicago. These trips to Chicago allowed him to gain the ear of Olin West, Morris Fishbien, and James E. Pallin. Lundy was able to successfully lobby in 1939 for the creation of a section of anesthesia within the AMA. In 1940, Lundy's dream came true with the recognition of anesthesia as a specialty by the AMA.

  3. Anesthesiology residents' perspective about good teaching--a qualitative needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortwein, Heiderose; Blaum, Wolf E; Spies, Claudia D

    2014-01-01

    Germany, like many other countries, will soon have a shortage of qualified doctors. One reason for the dissatisfaction amongst medical residents are the relatively unstructured residency training programs despite increasing importance of outcome-based education. The aim of our study was to identify characteristics and requirements for good teaching during anesthesiology residency training from the resident's point of view. A consensus workshop with residents from all medical universities in Germany was held. Participants were allocated to one of the three topics, chosen based on a 2009 nationwide evaluation of residency. The three topics were (A) characteristics of helpful/good teachers, (B) characteristics of helpful/good conditions and (C) characteristics of helpful/good curricular structure. Each group followed a nominal group technique consensus process to define and rank characteristics for a good residency. 31 (79.5%) resident representatives were present. The consented results put emphasis on the importance of structured curricula including transparent goals and objectives, in training formative assessments and quality assurance measures for the program. Residents further long for trained trainers with formal teaching qualifications and protected teaching time. Good residency training requires careful consideration of all stakeholders' needs. Results reflect and extend previous findings and are at least to some degree easily implemented. These findings are an important step to establish a broader consensus within the discipline.

  4. Migration and Workforce Planning in Medicine with Special Focus on Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannicke Mellin-Olsen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Counting health personnel and defining migration is more complicated than one should think at first glance. Migrating health workers are not a homogenous group, and many factors cause people to migrate—not only low wages but also lack of professional development possibilities, poor job satisfaction, outdated equipment, unsafe environment, and more. The opposite factors encourage people to stay. Many countries, including high-income countries benefit from remittances from migrating individuals. The World Health Organization has installed a code of Practice on the international recruitment of health workers. Although member countries have committed to follow this Code, it is not widely adhered to. Planning for the future is difficult, also because there are so many unknown factors related to the development of health-care levels, policies, inflow and outflow and more. Action must be taken in both donor and receiving countries. In anesthesiology, there is a huge workforce deficit globally. The world would need 136,000 additional physician anesthesia providers today to achieve an absolute minimum of five per 100,000 population. This will not happen unless all countries follow those that already have taken proactive steps in leading the direction forward. Anaesthesiology Society involvement is crucial.

  5. [Model to predict staffing for anesthesiology and post-anesthesia intensive care units and pain clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, J; Moral, V; Villalonga, A; Pelegrí, D; Gomar, C; Montero, A

    2001-01-01

    Human resources account for a large part of the budgets of anesthesia and post-anesthesia intensive care units and pain clinics (A-PICU-PC). Adequate staffing is a key factor in providing for both effective care and professional staff development. Changes in professional responsibilities have rendered obsolete the concept of one anesthesiologist per operating room. Duties must be analyzed objectively to facilitate understanding between hospital administrators and A-PICU-PC chiefs of service when assigning human resources. The Catalan Society of Anesthesiology, Post-anesthesia Intensive Care and Pain Therapy has developed a model for estimating requirements for A-PICU-PC staffing based on three factors: 1) Definition of staff positions that must be filled and criteria for assigning human resources; 2) Estimation of non-care-related time required by the department for training, teaching, research and internal management, and 3) Estimation of staff required to cover absences from work for vacations, personal leave or illness. The model revealed that the ratio of number of staff positions to number of persons employed by an A-PICU-PC is approximately 1.3. Differences in the nature of services managed by an A-PICU-PC or the type of hospital might change the ratio slightly. The model can be applied universally, independently of differences that might exist among departments. Widespread application would allow adoption of a common language to be used by health care managers and A-PICU-PC departments when discussing a basis for consensus about our specialty.

  6. 50th Year Anniversary of Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertakyamanee, Jariya

    2016-05-01

    Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, has started to be a formal anesthesia division, divided from division of Surgery in 1965; hence our 50th year anniversary in 2015. Research is now a priority and mandatory mission, according to the vision of Mahidol University. Second mission is to teach and train, and we produce the highest number of states-of-the-art anesthesiologists and anesthetic nurses each year Curriculum and training are being continuously improved. From a small unit, now it is one of the largest departments and extends the service, our third mission, to more than only in the operating theaters. We look after pre-anesthesia assessment, inside and outside operating room anesthesia, post-operative pain relief Intensive Care Unit, and chronic pain management. The number of patients and their diseases increase; so do the complexities of surgeries. There are tremendous changes in drugs and equipment. There is the fourth mission on administration, IT and resource management. And the fifth mission which is corporate social responsibility. However, we still believe that compassion, responsibility and integrity are most important. We have taught and tried to live by the teaching of HRH the King's Father. And these will contribute to our progress and shine in the next 50 years.

  7. Using the Affective Domain to Enhance Teaching of the ACGME Competencies in Anesthesiology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Nyquist, Julie G

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and assessing the advanced competencies will continue to be a challenge. Incorporating new and nontraditional skills into an already complex and challenging clinical curriculum and practice is not easy. This makes development of methods for curricular design, teaching and assessment of anesthesiology resident and fellow performance essential. The Domains of learning, particularly the Affective Domain can serve as an organizing structure for developing objectives and selecting teaching and assessment techniques. Using the Affective Domain to select targeted teaching techniques might help foster development of key beliefs and values that underlie the advanced competencies (and sub-competencies). Targeted teaching, outside of the patient care arena, when combined with traditional clinical teaching practices, may help to ensure continued performance of desired behaviors. These include acting in a consultative role for other health professionals (ICS), providing culturally responsive care (Professionalism), using evidence to enhance the care of patients (PBLI), and advocating for quality of care and working to enhance patient safety (SBP). As educators, our aim is not only to impact knowledge, attitudes and skills, but to impact the daily behavior of our graduates.

  8. Strategies to optimize MEDLINE and EMBASE search strategies for anesthesiology systematic reviews. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Enilze de Souza Nogueira; Betini, Marluci; Puga, Maria Eduarda; Agarwal, Arnav; Cataneo, Antônio José Maria; Oliveira, Luciane Dias de; Bazan, Rodrigo; Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Pereira, José Eduardo Guimarães; El Dib, Regina

    2018-01-15

    A high-quality electronic search is essential for ensuring accuracy and comprehensiveness among the records retrieved when conducting systematic reviews. Therefore, we aimed to identify the most efficient method for searching in both MEDLINE (through PubMed) and EMBASE, covering search terms with variant spellings, direct and indirect orders, and associations with MeSH and EMTREE terms (or lack thereof). Experimental study. UNESP, Brazil. We selected and analyzed 37 search strategies that had specifically been developed for the field of anesthesiology. These search strategies were adapted in order to cover all potentially relevant search terms, with regard to variant spellings and direct and indirect orders, in the most efficient manner. When the strategies included variant spellings and direct and indirect orders, these adapted versions of the search strategies selected retrieved the same number of search results in MEDLINE (mean of 61.3%) and a higher number in EMBASE (mean of 63.9%) in the sample analyzed. The numbers of results retrieved through the searches analyzed here were not identical with and without associated use of MeSH and EMTREE terms. However, association of these terms from both controlled vocabularies retrieved a larger number of records than did the use of either one of them. In view of these results, we recommend that the search terms used should include both preferred and non-preferred terms (i.e. variant spellings and direct/indirect order of the same term) and associated MeSH and EMTREE terms, in order to develop highly-sensitive search strategies for systematic reviews.

  9. Decreased Parasympathetic Activity of Heart Rate Variability During Anticipation of Night Duty in Anesthesiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man-Ling; Lin, Pei-Lin; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Hui-Hsun

    2018-03-01

    In residency programs, it is well known that autonomic regulation is influenced by night duty due to workload stress and sleep deprivation. A less investigated question is the impact on the autonomic nervous system of residents before or when anticipating a night duty shift. In this study, heart rate variability (HRV) was evaluated as a measure of autonomic nervous system regulation. Eight residents in the Department of Anesthesiology were recruited, and 5 minutes of electrocardiography were recorded under 3 different conditions: (1) the morning of a regular work day (baseline); (2) the morning before a night duty shift (anticipating the night duty); and (3) the morning after a night duty shift. HRV parameters in the time and frequency domains were calculated. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the HRV parameters among the 3 conditions. There was a significant decrease of parasympathetic-related HRV measurements (high-frequency power and root mean square of the standard deviation of R-R intervals) in the morning before night duty compared with the regular work day. The mean difference of high-frequency power between the 2 groups was 80.2 ms (95% confidence interval, 14.5-146) and that of root mean square of the standard deviation of R-R intervals was 26 milliseconds (95% confidence interval, 7.2-44.8), with P = .016 and .007, respectively. These results suggest that the decrease of parasympathetic activity is associated with stress related to the condition of anticipating the night duty work. On the other hand, the HRV parameters in the morning after duty were not different from the regular workday. The stress of anticipating the night duty work may affect regulation of the autonomic nervous system, mainly manifested as a decrease in parasympathetic activity. The effect of this change on the health of medical personnel deserves our concern.

  10. [Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudia Regina; Sousa, Rafael Queiroz de; Arcanjo, Francisco Sávio Alves; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de Menezes; Gomes, Josenília Maria Alves; Giaxa, Renata Rocha Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the Social Representation Theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians), who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with prior and posterior experience to the establishment of residency. From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment of a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. METHOD: Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the social representation theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians, who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with a prior and a posteriori experience to the establishment of residency. RESULTS: From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, and recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident from upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries.

  12. Reporting and Methodology of Multivariable Analyses in Prognostic Observational Studies Published in 4 Anesthesiology Journals: A Methodological Descriptive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielminotti, Jean; Dechartres, Agnès; Mentré, France; Montravers, Philippe; Longrois, Dan; Laouénan, Cedric

    2015-10-01

    Prognostic research studies in anesthesiology aim to identify risk factors for an outcome (explanatory studies) or calculate the risk of this outcome on the basis of patients' risk factors (predictive studies). Multivariable models express the relationship between predictors and an outcome and are used in both explanatory and predictive studies. Model development demands a strict methodology and a clear reporting to assess its reliability. In this methodological descriptive review, we critically assessed the reporting and methodology of multivariable analysis used in observational prognostic studies published in anesthesiology journals. A systematic search was conducted on Medline through Web of Knowledge, PubMed, and journal websites to identify observational prognostic studies with multivariable analysis published in Anesthesiology, Anesthesia & Analgesia, British Journal of Anaesthesia, and Anaesthesia in 2010 and 2011. Data were extracted by 2 independent readers. First, studies were analyzed with respect to reporting of outcomes, design, size, methods of analysis, model performance (discrimination and calibration), model validation, clinical usefulness, and STROBE (i.e., Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) checklist. A reporting rate was calculated on the basis of 21 items of the aforementioned points. Second, they were analyzed with respect to some predefined methodological points. Eighty-six studies were included: 87.2% were explanatory and 80.2% investigated a postoperative event. The reporting was fairly good, with a median reporting rate of 79% (75% in explanatory studies and 100% in predictive studies). Six items had a reporting rate reported, a few methodological shortcomings were observed, both in explanatory and predictive studies, such as an insufficient number of events of the outcome (44.6%), exclusion of cases with missing data (93.6%), or categorization of continuous variables (65.1%.). The reporting of

  13. A retrospective review of required projects in systems-based practice in a single anesthesiology residency: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Emerick, Trent D; Patel, Rita M

    2015-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has emphasized in its core competencies and more recently, in its Milestones Project, that residents understand the importance of systems-based practice (SBP). The objectives of the study are to evaluate the quality of residents' SBP projects and to determine the degrees that were subsequently implemented. A retrospective educational observational study. A university-based anesthesiology training institution. One hundred forty-nine anesthesiology residents in their final (postgraduate year 4) year of training who completed SBP projects for the last 10 years (2004-2013). A structured SBP course was provided for postgraduate year 4 anesthesiology residents with deadlines set such as project identification, data collection, and proposal draft. Each resident's written SBP proposal received inputs by 2 members of the department executive steering committee. The SBP projects concluded with oral presentations by each resident to the department executive steering committee, who provided overall scores. All SBP projects were categorized into 7 categories: safety initiatives, economic analysis, process analysis, policy change recommendations, education initiatives, teamwork/communication, and operating room efficiency. Evaluation scores using a Likert scale (1-9, where 9 is the best) were analyzed. The rate of implementation of project ideas within the department based on the presentations to the executive committee was examined. Of 149 projects, policy change recommendations was the most frequently chosen category (46 projects; 30.9%), followed by process analysis (36 projects; 24.2%). The overall evaluation score was 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD). A total of 53 projects (35.6%) were implemented in the department. There was no statistical difference between SBPs with implementation vs SBPs without implementation in terms of evaluation scores, year of the presentation, or categories. This SBP project has given residents the

  14. Jumpstarting Academic Careers: A Workshop and Tools for Career Development in Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Voytko, Mary Lou; Tobin, Joseph R; Nyquist, Julie G

    2011-01-01

    Career development is essential and has the potential to assist in building a sustained faculty within academic departments of Anesthesiology. Career development is essential for growth in academic medicine. Close attention to the details involved in career management, goal setting as part of career planning, and professional networking are key elements. This article examines the specific educational strategies involved in a 120 minute workshop divided into four 25 minute segments with 20 minutes at the end for discussion for training junior faculty in career development. The teaching methods include 1) brief didactic presentations, 2) pre-workshop completion of two professional development tools, 3) facilitated small group discussion using trained facilitators and 4) use of a commitment to change format. Three major learning tools were utilized in conjunction with the above methods: a professional network survey, a career planning and development form and a commitment to change form. Forty one participants from 2009 reported 80 projected changes in their practice behaviors in relation to career management: Build or enhance professional network and professional mentoring (36.3%); Set career goals, make a plan, follow though, collaborate, publish (35.1%); Increase visibility locally or nationally (10.0%); Building core skills, such as clinical, teaching, leading (36.3%); Identify the criteria for promotion in own institution (5.0%); Improved methods of documentation (2.5%). Over the past two years, the workshop has been very well received by junior faculty, with over 95% marking each of the following items as excellent or good (presentation, content, audiovisuals and objectives met). The challenge for continuing development and promotion of academic anesthesiologists lies in the explicit training of faculty for career advancement. Designing workshops using educational tools to promote a reflective process of the faculty member is the one method to meet this

  15. Serious gaming for orthotopic liver transplant anesthesiology: A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel; Zerillo, Jeron; Kim, Sang; Hill, Bryan; Wang, Ryan; Goldberg, Andrew; DeMaria, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Anesthetic management of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is complex. Given the unequal distributions of liver transplant surgeries performed at different centers, anesthesiology providers receive relatively uneven OLT training and exposure. One well-suited modality for OLT training is the "serious game," an interactive application created for the purpose of imparting knowledge or skills, while leveraging the self-motivating elements of video games. We therefore developed a serious game designed to teach best practices for the anesthetic management of a standard OLT and determined if the game would improve resident performance in a simulated OLT. Forty-four residents on the liver transplant rotation were randomized to either the gaming group (GG) or the control group (CG) prior to their introductory simulation. Both groups were given access to the same educational materials and literature during their rotation, but the GG also had access to the OLT Trainer. Performance on the simulations were recorded on a standardized grading rubric. Both groups experienced an increase in score relative to baseline that was statistically significant at every stage. The improvements in scores were greater for the GG participants than the CG participants. Overall score improvement between the GG and CG (mean [standard deviation]) was statistically significant (GG, 7.95 [3.65]; CG, 4.8 [4.48]; P = 0.02), as were scores for preoperative assessment (GG, 2.67 [2.09]; CG, 1.17 [1.43]; P = 0.01) and anhepatic phase (GG, 1.62 [1.01]; CG, 0.75 [1.28]; P = 0.02). Of the residents with game access, 81% were "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with the game overall. In conclusion, adding a serious game to an existing educational curriculum for liver transplant anesthesia resulted in significant learning gains for rotating anesthesia residents. The intervention was straightforward to implement and cost-effective. Liver Transplantation 23 430-439 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association

  16. Effect of a simulation-based workshop on breaking bad news for anesthesiology residents: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Vanda Yazbeck; Barakat, Hanane; Aouad, Marie; Harris, Ilene; Park, Yoon Soo; Youssef, Nazih; Boulet, John Jack; Tekian, Ara

    2017-06-14

    Breaking bad news (BBN) to patients and their relatives is a complex and stressful task. The ideal structure, training methods and assessment instruments best used to teach and assess BBN for anesthesiology residents remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an education intervention for BBN based on immersive experiences with a high fidelity simulator and role-play with standardized patients (SPs). A secondary purpose is to gather validity evidence to support the use of a GRIEV_ING instrument to assess BBN skills. The communication skills for BBN of 16 residents were assessed via videotaped SP encounters at baseline and immediately post-intervention. Residents' perceptions about their ability and comfort for BBN were collected using pre and post workshop surveys. Posttest scores were significantly higher than the pretest scores for the GRIEV_ING checklist, as well as on the communication global rating. The GRIEV_ING checklist had acceptable inter-rater and internal-consistency reliabilities. Performance was not related to years of training, or previous BBN experience. Anesthesiology residents' communication skills when BBN in relation to a critical incident may be improved with educational interventions based on immersive experiences with a high fidelity simulator and role-play with SPs.

  17. Optimization of serious bacterial infections intensive therapy in children in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kurochkin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective selection of antibiotics in children with severe bacterial infections is often difficult because of microflora resistance. Extracorporeal detoxication methods, particularly discrete plasmapheresis are usually used for septic shock and total organ failure prevention. The aim of research. To conduct microbiological monitoring and to study a dynamics of medium molecular peptides in discrete plasmapheresis for intensive care optimization in children with severe bacterial infections in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Department (AICU. Materials and methods. We investigated respiratory tract microflora by bacteriological method in 120 newborns and 30 children from 1 month with severe bacterial infections at admission and during prolonged stay in AICU. Discrete plasmapheresis was held in four children. Dynamic of medium molecular peptides was studied at admission, before discrete plasmapheresis and after it. Statistical data processing was performed using the Microsoft Excel software package. Results. It was found that in AICU in older children in admission grampositive and gramnegative flora was defined in equal quantity. The best sensitivity of the respiratory tract microflora was for the glycopeptides, oxazolidinones , II generation cephalosporins and macrolides, more than 60% - for aminoglycosides and lincosamides. However, when children spent more than 7-14 days in the department, nosocomial microflora was represented primarily by gram-negative organisms (80%, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was found to be inappropriate to use cephalosporins and macrolides in AICU for older children after their long stay there; the sensitivity to aminoglycosides was less than 60%, to anti-pseudomonal carbapenems not more than 30%. In AICU of newborns grampositive flora was found in 95%, mostly Staphylococcus haemolyticus. It was entirely sensitive for glycopeptides, oxazolidinones, fluoroquinolones, carbapenems, and also for co-trimoxazole and

  18. [Personnel marketing in anesthesiology. Perception, use and evaluation by the target group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlet, T

    2015-09-01

    The human resources situation in the healthcare system is characterized by a manpower shortage. Recruiting medical staff is of great importance for hospitals and particularly in anesthesiology. Approaching and recruiting staff usually happens through external personnel marketing (PM); however, up until now the efficacy of these PM measures has barely been empirically investigated. The goal of this empirical study was to examine how familiar hospital physicians at varying career levels are with the different tools employed by external PM and how frequently they used as well as rated these tools in terms of benefits. Based on this information, the preferences of medical staff with respect to detailing the workplace of "hospital physician" as well as factors of the hospital's attractiveness as an employer were evaluated. Another aim was to derive recommendations on how to optimize the marketing instruments used for external PM in the healthcare system. In an internet-based survey, 154 female and male physicians were questioned about their knowledge, use and benefit assessment of a total of 43 PM tools. Conventional methods of addressing applicants were commonly used but ranked behind the more personal and direct targeting tools in terms of benefit assessments. Internet-based tools with a conceptual affinity to conventional methods were also highly rated in terms of benefits. In contrast, unconventional methods of addressing applicants were hardly known and were not viewed as being useful. The PM tools from the field of "overall conditions for cooperation in the company" mainly received high to very high benefit assessments. These referred primarily to non-monetary factors, human resource development measures and also to aspects of remuneration. Image-promoting PM tools were rarely assessed as being useful, with the exception of measures aimed at creating personal contact between the hospital or unit/department and applicants or those allowing personal insight into the

  19. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...... compared to surgical tracheostomy, anaesthesia and technique, decannulation strategy, as well as training and education....

  20. Program Director as Webmaster? Analysis of 131 Anesthesiology Department Web Sites and Program Director Web Site Involvement and Opinion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpayeh, Negin; Lee, Howard; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The last formal review of academic anesthesiology department Web sites (ADWs) for content was conducted in 2009. ADWs have been rated as very important by medical students in researching residency training programs; however, the rapid evolution of sites require that descriptive statistics must be more current to be considered reliable. We set out to provide an updated overview of ADW content and to better understand residency program directors' (PD) role and comfort with ADWs. Two independent reviewers (ND and HL) analyzed all 131 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited ADWs. A binary system (Yes/No) was used to determine which features were present. Reviewer reliability was confirmed with inter-rater reliability and percentage agreement calculation. Additionally, a blinded electronic survey (Survey Monkey, Portland, OR) was sent to anesthesiology residency PDs via electronic mail investigating the audiences for ADWs, the frequency of updates and the degree of PD involvement. 13% of anesthesiology departments still lack a Web site with a homepage with links to the residency program and educational offerings (18% in 2009). Only half (55%) of Web sites contain information for medical students, including clerkship information. Furthermore, programs rarely contain up-to-date calendars (13%), accreditation cycle lengths (11%), accreditation dates (7%) or board pass rates (6%). The PD survey, completed by 42 of 131 PDs, noted a correlation (r = 0.36) between the number of years as PD and the frequency of Web site updates - less experienced PDs appear to update their sites more frequently (p = 0.03). Although 86% of PDs regarded a Web site as "very" important in recruitment, only 9% felt "very" comfortable with the skills required to advertise and market a Web site. Despite the overall increase in ADW content since 2009, privacy concerns, limited resources and time constraints may prevent PDs from providing the most up-to-date Web sites for

  1. [Stress and job satisfaction in the discipline of inpatient anesthesiology : results of a web-based survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Groneberg, D A

    2014-01-01

    How do physicians in the specialty of anesthesiology perceive the working conditions regarding stress and job satisfaction? The health system in Germany has been confronted with a rapidly changing framework over the last 20 years: For example, an increased influence of economic patterns on the workflow and the medical decision of physicians has been established forcing them to always take the economic aspects into account. Moreover, a new generation (generation Y) of physicians with other requirements of the work place, meaning mainly a demand for a better work-life balance, has gained a foothold in hospitals. These changes make it very important to investigate the status quo of current working conditions. Working conditions in hospitals in the specialty of anesthesiology is the main issue investigated in this study. For this study 1,321 completed online-questionnaires from physicians in hospitals with the specialty of anesthesiology were analyzed. The questionnaire was based on the stress theory, the effort-reward-imbalance model (ERI) and the job-demand-control model (JDC).The items used in the questionnaire were taken from the ERI questionnaire and the short questionnaire on work analysis (KFZA). By calculating a certain ratio of several items (according to the stress theory), the prevalence of distress could be measured. In addition the overall job satisfaction in the field of anesthesiology was measured and analyzed. In this study 47.0 % (95 %-CI: 44.3-49.7 %) of all respondents showed signs of distress. Simultaneously, 61.8 % (95 %-CI: 59.2-64.5 %) were very satisfied with the job situation. Regarding gender, female physicians perceived a lower control of the work situation whereas male physicians perceived a much higher decision level. This led to a higher prevalence of distress in the group of female physicians regarding the JDC model (odds ratio, OR: 1.54, 95 %-CI: 1.19-2.01). Regarding age, the prevalence of distress increased from 36.5

  2. [Web-based for preanesthesia evaluation record: a structured, evidence-based patient interview to assess the anesthesiological risk profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Sylvia; Lau, Alexandra; Krämer, Michael; Wendler, Olafur Gunnarsson; Müller-Lobeck, Lutz; Scheding, Christoph; Klarhöfer, Manja; Schaffartzik, Walter; Neumann, Tim; Krampe, Henning; Spies, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    At present, providers at an Anesthesia Preoperative Evaluation Clinic (APEC) may have difficulties in gaining access to relevant clinical information, including external medical records, surgical dictations etc. This common occurence makes obtaining an informed consent by the patient after a complete pre-anesthetic assessment difficult. This form of patient information is subject to wide interindividual variations and, thus, represents a challenge for quality assurance. Insufficient or not completed pre-anesthetic assessments can lead to an untimely termination of an elective procedure.A web-based pre-anesthetic evaluation record moves the time point of the first contact to well before the day of admission. The current pre-anesthesia evaluation record is replaced by a structured interview in the form of a complex of questions in a specific hierarchy taking guidelines, standard operating procedures (SOP) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) into consideration. The answers to the complex of questions are then classified according to agreed criteria and possible scoring systems of relevant classifications. The endpoints result in procedural recommendations not only for the informing anesthesiologist but also for the patient. The standardized risk criteria can be used as core process indicators to check the process quality of the anesthesiological risk evaluation. Short-notice cancellations of elective operations due to incomplete premedication procedures will then be avoided with the help of such structured and evidence-based patient interviews with detailed assessment of the anesthesiological risk profile.The web-based anesthesia evaluation record (WAR) corresponds with the recommendations of the DGAI to carry out the staged information in analogy to the staged information of Weissauer. The basic practice is not changed by WACH. By means of WACH, the time point of the first contact with anesthesia is moved forward and occurs within a different framework. WACH has

  3. The Evaluation of the Distribution and Antimcrobial Susceptibility Profile of the Strains Isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ece

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hospital infections are important uptodate health problems because of high mortality and increased cost. The increment in antimicrobial resistance is progressing though new antimicrobial agents are arising. This leads to an increase in hospital infections and difficulty in treatment. In our study we aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit. Material and Method: The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit between April 1st 2012- October 25th 2012 were included. The identification and the antimicrobial susceptibility were studied by automatized Vitek version 2.0 (Biomerieux, France. Results: A total of 155 strains isolated from wound, blood, tracheal secretion, sputum and urine samples were included. They are consisted of 40 A. baumannii, 24 E.coli, 25 P. aeruginosa, 20 K.pneumoniae, 12 Methicilin Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (MRCoNS, nine Methiciline Susceptible S.aureus (MSSA, eight C.albicans, four Methicilin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, one C.famata, one C.tropicalis, three E.faecalis, two E.faecium, three S.marsecens, two P. mirabilis and one H.influenzae. Clinical samples were 81 tracheal secretions, 25 wound specimen, 23 blood culture, 18 urine, seven sputum, and one BAL. All the Gram positive strains were susceptible to glycopeptides. Enterobacteriaceae members were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. Discussion: Antimicrobial resistance is an important issue worldwide. Multidiciplinary approach is needed as in ICUs where the complicated patients are followed. Monitoring antibiotic resistance profile contributes to treatment and decreasing resistance rates. The resistance profile will guide the antibiotic use policy. Increment in number of isolates in future will help to obtain the antimicrobial resistance profile.

  4. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  5. Effect of Performance Deficiencies on Graduation and Board Certification Rates: A 10-yr Multicenter Study of Anesthesiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A; Fitzsimons, Michael G; Pardo, Manuel C; Hawkins, Joy L; Huang, Yue Ming; Rudolph, Maria D D; Keyes, Mary A; Howard-Quijano, Kimberly J; Naim, Natale Z; Buckley, Jack C; Grogan, Tristan R; Steadman, Randolph H

    2016-07-01

    This multicenter, retrospective study was conducted to determine how resident performance deficiencies affect graduation and board certification. Primary documents pertaining to resident performance were examined over a 10-yr period at four academic anesthesiology residencies. Residents entering training between 2000 and 2009 were included, with follow-up through February 2016. Residents receiving actions by the programs' Clinical Competency Committee were categorized by the area of deficiency and compared to peers without deficiencies. A total of 865 residents were studied (range: 127 to 275 per program). Of these, 215 residents received a total of 405 actions from their respective Clinical Competency Committee. Among those who received an action compared to those who did not, the proportion graduating differed (93 vs. 99%, respectively, P board certification (89 vs. 99%, respectively, P board certification rates were consistently high in residents with no, or isolated, deficiencies. Residents deficient in an Essential Attribute, or multiple competencies, are at high risk of not graduating or achieving board certification. More research is needed on the effectiveness and selective deployment of remediation efforts, particularly for high-risk groups.

  6. [Simulation-based intervention to improve anesthesiology residents communication with families of critically ill patients--preliminary prospective evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenstadt, Haim; Perlson, Daria; Shalomson, Orit; Tuval, Atalia; Haviv-Yadid, Yael; Ziv, Amitai

    2013-08-01

    Although effective communication with families of critically ill patients is a vital component of quality care, training in this field is neglected. The article aims to validate communication skills training program for anesthesiology residents in the intensive care set up. Ten anesthesia residents, following 3 months of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) rotation, had 4 hours of lectures and one day simulation-based communication skills training with families of critically ill patients. Participants completed an attitude questionnaire over 3 time periods--before training [t1], immediately following training (t2) and three months following training (t3). The participants' communication skills were assessed by two blinded independent observers using the SEGUE framework while performing a simulation-based scenario at t1 and t3. Seven participants finished the study protocol. Participants ndicated communication importance as 3.68 +/- 0.58 (t1), 4.05 +/- 0.59 (t2), 4.13 +/- 0.64 (t3); their communication ability as 3.09 +/- 0.90 (t1), 3.70 +/- 0.80 (t2), 3.57 +/- 0.64 (t3); the contribution of lecture to communication 3.04 +/- 0.43 (t1), 3.83 +/- 0.39 (t2), 3.87 +/- 0.51 (t3), and contribution of simulation training to communication 3.00 +/- 0.71 (t1), 4.04 +/- 0.52 (t2), 3.84 +/- 0.31 (t3). The differences did not reach statistical significance. Objective assessment of the communication skills using the SEGUE framework indicated that 6/7 participants improved their communication skills, with communication ability before training at 2.66 +/- 0.83 and 1 month following training it was 3.38 +/- 0.78 (p = 0.09). This preliminary study demonstrates the value of communication skills training in the intensive care environment.

  7. [Consensus on Perioperative Transesophageal Echocardiography of the Brazilian Society of Anesthesiology and the Department of Cardiovascular Image of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Filho, Marcello Fonseca; Morhy, Samira Saady; Vasconcelos, Henrique Doria de; Lineburger, Eric Benedet; Papa, Fabio de Vasconcelos; Botelho, Eduardo Souza Leal; Fernandes, Marcelo Ramalho; Daher, Maurício; Bihan, David Le; Gatto, Chiara Scaglioni Tessmer; Fischer, Cláudio Henrique; Silva, Alexander Alves da; Galhardo Júnior, Carlos; Neves, Carolina Baeta; Fernandes, Alexandre; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos

    Through the Life Cycle of Intraoperative Transesophageal Echocardiography (ETTI/SBA) the Brazilian Society of Anesthesiology, together with the Department of Cardiovascular Image of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology (DIC/SBC), createded a task force to standardize the use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography by Brazilian anesthesiologists and echocardiographers based on scientific evidence from the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists/American Society of Echocardiography (SCA/ASE) and the Brazilian Society of Cardiology. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of web-based and face-to-face interviews for application to an anesthesiology training program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadi, Marissa G; Malkin, Mathew R; Lenart, John; Stier, Gary R; Gatling, Jason W; Applegate, Richard L

    2016-04-03

    This study compared admission rates to a United States anesthesiology residency program for applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews during the admissions process. We also explored factors driving applicants to select each interview type. The 211 applicants invited to interview for admission to our anesthesiology residency program during the 2014-2015 application cycle were participants in this pilot observational study. Of these, 141 applicants selected face-to-face interviews, 53 applicants selected web-based interviews, and 17 applicants declined to interview. Data regarding applicants' reasons for selecting a particular interview type were gathered using an anonymous online survey after interview completion. Residency program admission rates and survey answers were compared between applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews. One hundred twenty-seven (75.1%) applicants completed face-to-face and 42 (24.9%) completed web-based interviews. The admission rate to our residency program was not significantly different between applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews. One hundred eleven applicants completed post-interview surveys. The most common reasons for selecting web-based interviews were conflict of interview dates between programs, travel concerns, or financial limitations. Applicants selected face-to-face interviews due to a desire to interact with current residents, or geographic proximity to the residency program. These results suggest that completion of web-based interviews is a viable alternative to completion of face-to-face interviews, and that choice of interview type does not affect the rate of applicant admission to the residency program. Web-based interviews may be of particular interest to applicants applying to a large number of programs, or with financial limitations.

  9. Comparison of the didactic lecture with the simulation/model approach for the teaching of a novel perioperative ultrasound curriculum to anesthesiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Alexander, Brenton; Le, Khanhvan; Williams, Wendell; Canales, Cecilia; Cannesson, Maxime

    2014-09-01

    To expose residents to two methods of education for point-of-care ultrasound, a traditional didactic lecture and a model/simulation-based lecture, which focus on concepts of cardiopulmonary function, volume status, and evaluation of severe thoracic/abdominal injuries; and to assess which method is more effective. Single-center, prospective, blinded trial. University hospital. Anesthesiology residents who were assigned to an educational day during the two-month research study period. Residents were allocated to two groups to receive either a 90-minute, one-on-one didactic lecture or a 90-minute lecture in a simulation center, during which they practiced on a human model and simulation mannequin (normal pathology). Data points included a pre-lecture multiple-choice test, post-lecture multiple-choice test, and post-lecture, human model-based examination. Post-lecture tests were performed within three weeks of the lecture. An experienced sonographer who was blinded to the education modality graded the model-based skill assessment examinations. Participants completed a follow-up survey to assess the perceptions of the quality of their instruction between the two groups. 20 residents completed the study. No differences were noted between the two groups in pre-lecture test scores (P = 0.97), but significantly higher scores for the model/simulation group occurred on both the post-lecture multiple choice (P = 0.038) and post-lecture model (P = 0.041) examinations. Follow-up resident surveys showed significantly higher scores in the model/simulation group regarding overall interest in perioperative ultrasound (P = 0.047) as well understanding of the physiologic concepts (P = 0.021). A model/simulation-based based lecture series may be more effective in teaching the skills needed to perform a point-of-care ultrasound examination to anesthesiology residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An organized, comprehensive, and security-enabled strategic response to the Haiti earthquake: a description of pre-deployment readiness preparation and preliminary experience from an academic anesthesiology department with no preexisting international disaster response program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCunn, Maureen; Ashburn, Michael A; Floyd, Thomas F; Schwab, C William; Harrington, Paul; Hanson, C William; Sarani, Babak; Mehta, Samir; Speck, Rebecca M; Fleisher, Lee A

    2010-12-01

    On Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at 16:53 local time, a magnitude 7.0 M(w) earthquake struck Haiti. The global humanitarian attempt to respond was swift, but poor infrastructure and emergency preparedness limited many efforts. Rapid, successful deployment of emergency medical care teams was accomplished by organizations with experience in mass disaster casualty response. Well-intentioned, but unprepared, medical teams also responded. In this report, we describe the preparation and planning process used at an academic university department of anesthesiology with no preexisting international disaster response program, after a call from an American-based nongovernmental organization operating in Haiti requested medical support. The focus of this article is the pre-deployment readiness process, and is not a post-deployment report describing the medical care provided in Haiti. A real-time qualitative assessment and systematic review of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's communications and actions relevant to the Haiti earthquake were performed. Team meetings, conference calls, and electronic mail communication pertaining to planning, decision support, equipment procurement, and actions and steps up to the day of deployment were reviewed and abstracted. Timing of key events was compiled and a response timeline for this process was developed. Interviews with returning anesthesiology members were conducted. Four days after the Haiti earthquake, Partners in Health, a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization based in Boston, Massachusetts, with >20 years of experience providing medical care in Haiti contacted the University of Pennsylvania Health System to request medical team support. The departments of anesthesiology, surgery, orthopedics, and nursing responded to this request with a volunteer selection process, vaccination program, and systematic development of equipment lists. World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control guidelines, the American

  11. [French national survey on evaluation by residents in anesthesiology and critical care of choice's motivations of the specialty and their practical and theoretical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbet, S; Eisenmann, N; Constantin, J-M; Colomb, S; Soummer, A; Jaber, S; Bazin, J-E

    2010-02-01

    The duration of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (AIC) residency increased from four to five years in 2002 in France. AIC is a specialty increasingly chosen in relation to medical and surgical specialties. We conducted a national survey by questionnaire on the evaluation of their theoretical and practical training by the French residents. A questionnaire (demographics, motivations for the choice, training) was sent to 1422 residents, enrolled since 2002, in each province. In total, 562 questionnaires (40 %) were returned. The mean age of residents is 28+/-2 years, 46 % are women, on average in 6th semester [1-10th]. The obtained specialty was their first choice for 90 % and of the obtained city home for 73 %. Residents declare that the place of their definitive installation will be chosen depending on the quality of life mainly. So, 97 % referred the same choice of specialty. Training in locoregional anaesthesia (LRA) was evaluated correct or good by 53 % of residents and in the management of difficult intubation correct or good by 62 %. Theoretical training was assessed correct by 31 % of responders and good by 53 % and practical training correct by 25 % and good by 61 %. The AIC is now a specialty of positive choice by students. This choice is reinforced by teaching and practice during the residency. The global training is as good as a whole. Residents wish to deepen in some areas (ultrasound, LRA, critical reading, medical redaction) and an evaluation of their practical training with simulations. French AIC residents seem satisfied with almost all their training and referred the same choice of specialty. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A serendipidade na medicina e na anestesiologia A serendipidade en la medicina y en la anestesiologia Serendipity in medicine and anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Bezerra do Vale

    2005-04-01

    biología, anatomía, física, química, fisiología, farmacología, astronomía, arqueología y... mucha suerte. CONCLUSIONES: Aunque accidentes en la pesquisa y en la sala de operación sean lamentables, hay aquéllos que acontecen y, a veces, pueden llevar a avances espectaculares, como tratamientos heroicos y hasta Premios Nobel. Mantener la mente abierta es un trazo común a aquellos que desean contar con la gran suerte, como afirmaba el físico americano Henry (1842: "Las semillas del hallazgo flotan constantemente alrededor nuestro, pero apenas lanzan raíces en las mentes bien preparadas para recibirlas".BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study has evaluated more than a hundred of the most fortunate couplings of a brilliant mind with fortunate luck (serendipity, through the re-reading of most relevant histories on science-related (n = 46 and anesthesiology-related (n = 16 inventions and discoveries. CONTENTS: This educational article encourages anesthesiologists to appreciate events related to scientific inventions and discoveries, showing that serendipity is possible, provided it is expected. Each discovery or invention includes history, references and scientific or anecdotal explanation. In addition to traditional discoveries, such as wine, gravity, photograph, Velcro, airbag, etc., there are other Medicine-related (microscope, X-rays, vaccine, penicillin, insulin, laser, Paps smear, etc. and Anesthesiology-related (isometry, gloves, N2O, ether, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, blood patch, etc. discoveries. Creativity and serendipity may act as cornerstones for clinical and basic research of pioneer inventions for medical and anesthesiologic advances. In fact, topics related to biology, anatomy, physics, chemistry, physiology, pharmacology, astronomy and archeology should be master and … lots of luck. CONCLUSIONS: Although research and operating room accidents are regrettable, some of them happen and may sometimes lead to spectacular advances, such as heroic

  13. Low-Fidelity Haptic Simulation Versus Mental Imagery Training for Epidural Anesthesia Technical Achievement in Novice Anesthesiology Residents: A Randomized Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Grace; Krohner, Robert G; Metro, David G; Rosario, Bedda L; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2016-05-01

    There are many teaching methods for epidural anesthesia skill acquisition. Previous work suggests that there is no difference in skill acquisition whether novice learners engage in low-fidelity (LF) versus high-fidelity haptic simulation for epidural anesthesia. No study, however, has compared the effect of LF haptic simulation for epidural anesthesia versus mental imagery (MI) training in which no physical practice is attempted. We tested the hypothesis that MI training is superior to LF haptic simulation training for epidural anesthesia skill acquisition. Twenty Post-Graduate Year 2 (PGY-2) anesthesiology residents were tested at the beginning of the training year. After a didactic lecture on epidural anesthesia, they were randomized into 2 groups. Group LF had LF simulation training for epidural anesthesia using a previously described banana simulation technique. Group MI had guided, scripted MI training in which they initially were oriented to the epidural kit components and epidural anesthesia was described stepwise in detail, followed by individual mental rehearsal; no physical practice was undertaken. Each resident then individually performed epidural anesthesia on a partial-human task trainer on 3 consecutive occasions under the direct observation of skilled evaluators who were blinded to group assignment. Technical achievement was assessed with the use of a modified validated skills checklist. Scores (0-21) and duration to task completion (minutes) were recorded. A linear mixed-effects model analysis was performed to determine the differences in scores and duration between groups and over time. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups for scores and duration to task completion. Both groups showed similarly significant increases (P = 0.0015) in scores over time (estimated mean score [SE]: group MI, 15.9 [0.55] to 17.4 [0.55] to 18.6 [0.55]; group LF, 16.2 [0.55] to 17.7 [0.55] to 18.9 [0.55]). Time to complete the procedure decreased

  14. Anesthesia and Monitoring in Small Laboratory Mammals Used in Anesthesiology, Respiratory and Critical Care Research: A Systematic Review on the Current Reporting in Top-10 Impact Factor Ranked Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Christopher; Krause, Hannes; Koch, Thea; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Spieth, Peter Markus

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the quality of reporting of anesthesia and euthanasia in experimental studies in small laboratory mammals published in the top ten impact factor journals. A descriptive systematic review was conducted and data was abstracted from the ten highest ranked journals with respect to impact factor in the categories 'Anesthesiology', 'Critical Care Medicine' and 'Respiratory System' as defined by the 2012 Journal Citation Reports. Inclusion criteria according to PICOS criteria were as follows: 1) population: small laboratory mammals; 2) intervention: any form of anesthesia and/or euthanasia; 3) comparison: not specified; 4) primary outcome: type of anesthesia, anesthetic agents and type of euthanasia; secondary outcome: animal characteristics, monitoring, mechanical ventilation, fluid management, postoperative pain therapy, animal care approval, sample size calculation and performed interventions; 5) study: experimental studies. Anesthesia, euthanasia, and monitoring were analyzed per performed intervention in each article. The search yielded 845 articles with 1,041 interventions of interest. Throughout the manuscripts we found poor quality and frequency of reporting with respect to completeness of data on animal characteristics as well as euthanasia, while anesthesia (732/1041, 70.3%) and interventions without survival (970/1041, 93.2%) per se were frequently reported. Premedication and neuromuscular blocking agents were reported in 169/732 (23.1%) and 38/732 (5.2%) interventions, respectively. Frequency of reporting of analgesia during (117/610, 19.1%) and after painful procedures (38/364, 10.4%) was low. Euthanasia practice was reported as anesthesia (348/501, 69%), transcardial perfusion (37/501, 8%), carbon dioxide (26/501, 6%), decapitation (22/501, 5%), exsanguination (23/501, 5%), other (25/501, 5%) and not specified (20/501, 4%, respectively. The present systematic review revealed insufficient reporting of anesthesia and euthanasia

  15. Addiction and substance abuse in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Ethan O; Silverstein, Jeffrey H

    2008-11-01

    Despite substantial advances in our understanding of addiction and the technology and therapeutic approaches used to fight this disease, addiction still remains a major issue in the anesthesia workplace, and outcomes have not appreciably changed. Although alcoholism and other forms of impairment, such as addiction to other substances and mental illness, impact anesthesiologists at rates similar to those in other professions, as recently as 2005, the drug of choice for anesthesiologists entering treatment was still an opioid. There exists a considerable association between chemical dependence and other psychopathology, and successful treatment for addiction is less likely when comorbid psychopathology is not treated. Individuals under evaluation or treatment for substance abuse should have an evaluation with subsequent management of comorbid psychiatric conditions. Participation in self-help groups is still considered a vital component in the therapy of the impaired physician, along with regular monitoring if the anesthesiologist wishes to attempt reentry into clinical practice.

  16. Addiction and Substance Abuse in Anesthesiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bryson, Ethan O.; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Despite substantial advances in our understanding of addiction and the technology and therapeutic approaches used to fight this disease, addiction still remains a major issue in the anesthesia workplace and outcomes have not appreciably changed. While alcoholism and other forms of impairment such as addiction to other substances and mental illness impact anesthesiologists at similar rates to other professions, as recently as 2005, the drug of choice for anesthesiologists entering treatment wa...

  17. Importância do treinamento de residentes em eventos adversos durante anestesia: experiência com o uso do simulador computadorizado Importancia del entrenamiento de los practicantes (médicos en ejercicio en eventos adversos durante la anestesia: experiencia con el uso del simulador computadorizado Importance of critical events training for anesthesiology residents: experience with computer simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos Dias Cicarelli

    2005-04-01

    durante los procedimientos anestésicos. Sin embargo, continua importante el entrenamiento de los médicos practicantes para este tipo de ocurrencia. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el desempeño práctico de los médicos practicantes de Anestesiología en eventos adversos durante una anestesia simulada. MÉTODO: Fueron evaluados 17 médicos en especialización de primero y segundo años de Anestesiología (ME1 y ME2 y 5 instructores del Centro de Enseñanza y Entrenamiento (CEE del HCFMUSP (Título Superior en Anestesiología - TSA. Fue utilizado el simulador computadorizado Anesthesia Simulator Consultant (ASC versión 2.0 - 1995/Anesoft para realización de las simulaciones de los eventos. Los incidentes críticos escogidos fueron fibrilación ventricular (FV y choque anafiláctico. Después de la realización de la simulación, fueron impresos los resultados de cada participante, evaluados y puntuados las conductas adoptadas para resolver los incidentes críticos pre-determinados. Los participantes evaluaron el simulador a través de un cuestionario para ser respondido. RESULTADOS: No hubo diferencia estadística entre las medias obtenidas por los grupos, sin embargo, se notó una tendencia de un desempeño mejor de los grupos TSA y ME2 en la simulación de FV. En relación al choque anafiláctico, hubo una tendencia de desempeño mejor del grupo TSA. CONCLUSIONES: El entrenamiento para el diagnóstico y conductas en eventos adversos debe ser un foco de atención durante el entrenamiento de médicos practicantes y en la actualización de anestesiologistas. El uso del simulador puede ser una de las formas de realizar el entrenamiento en estas situaciones.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Because of monitoring and drugs evolution, there has been a decrease in the incidence of critical events during anesthetic procedures. Despite this low frequency, critical event training for Anesthesiology residents remains important. This study aimed at evaluating Anesthesiology

  18. A farmacobotânica, ainda tem lugar na moderna anestesiologia? ¿La farmacobotánica, aún tiene lugar en la moderna anestesiología? Is there still a place for pharmacobotany in modern anesthesiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Bezerra do Vale

    2002-06-01

    models for organic synthesis in fine leading edge modern chemistry, as well as shedding more light on the advantages, potential adverse effects, interactions and risks for side-effects which may affect anesthesia in surgical patients users of phytotherapy. CONTENTS: Selected anesthesiologic considerations are discussed focusing a brief review of popular herbs essentials on the development of anesthetic pharmacology and the potential drug-herb interactions between synthetic drugs used in anesthesia and the medicinal herbs used by patients in their illness and symptoms management. CONCLUSIONS: While specialized Medicine is increasingly fascinated by the advanced technology of new drugs and fantastic monitors, there is an increasing trend in several countries for a more holistic approach and rejection of new treatment methods, with an option for teas, meditation, vegetarian diets and anti-oxidants, among others. It is the anesthesiologist’s role to evaluate how much pharmacognosy and pharmacobotany knowledge may help him in the anesthetic practice and, especially, in patients safety.

  19. Avaliação da qualidade dos ensaios clínicos aleatórios em anestesia publicados na Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia no período de 2005 a 2008 Evaluación de la calidad de los ensayos clínicos aleatorios en anestesia publicados en la Revista Brasileña de Anestesiología en el período de 2005 a 2008 Assessing the quality of random clinical anesthesiology trials published on the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology from 2005 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2009-04-01

    participants. The objective of the present study was to assess the quality of RCT in anesthesiology published during a specific time. Design of the study: descriptive. METHODS: A manual search of the articles published by the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology between January 2005 and February 2008 was undertaken to identify studies with characteristics of RCTs. The quality of RCTs was the primary parameter; secondary parameters included: approval by the Ethics on Research Committee (ERC, use of the informed consent (IC, description of the source of the grant, the sample size was calculated, number of authors, place of origin, statistical tests used, level of significance adopted, and classification of the type of study. The quality scale, descriptive statistics, and calculation of the 95% confidence interval were used to evaluate the quality of the RCTs. RESULTS: Out of 114 studies, 42 were identified as RCT. Only 3 (7.1% of those were classified as having good methodological quality considering the random distribution, double blind, losses, and exclusions. One-hundred and seven out of 114 studies were submitted to the ERC, 67 used IC, none of them described the source of the grant, 17 calculated the size of the sample, the studies had a mean of 4.49 authors; 60 publications were from São Paulo; the Student t test was used more often (47.4%, a level of significance of 5% was adopted by 97 studies; and 42 were RCTs. CONCLUSIONS: After the manual search, 7.1% of the random clinical assays were considered of good methodological quality.

  20. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  1. Hypoglycaemia in anesthesiology practice: Diagnostic, preventive, and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has emerged as one of the fastest growing non communicable diseases worldwide. Management of diabetic patients during surgical and critically illness is of paramount challenge to anesthesiologist and intensivist. Among its major acute complications, hypoglycemia has been given lesser attention as compared to other major acute complications; diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar non ketotic coma. However, newer studies and literary evidence have established the serious concerns of morbidity and mortality, both long- and short-term, related to hypoglycemia. basis. Invariably, diabetic patients are encountered in our daily routine practice of anesthesia. During fasting status as well as the perioperative period, it is hypoglycemia that is of high concern to anesthesiologist. Management has to be based on clinical, pharmacological, social, and psychological basis, so as to completely prevent the complications arising from an acute episode of hypoglycemia. This review aims to highlight various aspects of hypoglycemia and its management both from endocrine and anesthesia perspective.

  2. Remimazolam: Pharmacologic Considerations and Clinical Role in Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Alexandra M; Zaccagnino, Michael P; Malapero, Raymond J; Kaye, Alan D; Urman, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    Midazolam, fentanyl, and propofol are commonly used for sedation in modern anesthesia practice. These agents possess characteristics that have afforded various anesthetics to be delivered and produce relatively safe and effective outcomes. However, each agent has certain drawbacks in clinical practice. Remimazolam, a novel benzodiazepine created out of so-called soft drug development, is an ultrashort-acting intravenous sedative-hypnotic currently being investigated in clinical trials. In this review, we evaluate the recent literature on the use of remimazolam in clinical practice as compared with current sedative agents, and we describe its potential roles for use in sedation. A literature search of the Medline database (2012-May 2016) was performed. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations, manufacturer reports, and professional meeting abstracts. All premarket studies involving remimazolam as the primary study drug were evaluated. Literature describing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of remimazolam, propofol, and midazolam was also included. Phase I and II studies in the United States have shown remimazolam to be a safe and effective option for procedural sedation. Unlike midazolam and propofol, remimazolam undergoes organ-independent metabolism to an inactive metabolite. Because remimazolam follows first-order pharmacokinetics, prolonged infusions or higher doses are unlikely to result in accumulation and extended effect, making it favorable for use as an intravenous anesthetic and for sedation in the intensive care unit. It is expected that phase III trials will further describe the niche that remimazolam may be able to occupy in clinical practice. Postmarket cost-benefit analyses will need to be performed. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  3. Needs assessment for business strategies of anesthesiology groups' practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock, Corey; Dexter, Franklin; Reich, David L; Galati, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Progress has been made in understanding strategic decision making influencing anesthesia groups' operating room business practices. However, there has been little analysis of the remaining gaps in our knowledge. We performed a needs assessment to identify unsolved problems in anesthesia business strategy based on Porter's Five Forces Analysis. The methodology was a narrative literature review. We found little previous investigation for 2 of the 5 forces (threat of new entrants and bargaining power of suppliers), modest understanding for 1 force (threat of substitute products or services), and substantial understanding for 2 forces (bargaining power of customers and jockeying for position among current competitors). Additional research in strategic decisions influencing anesthesia groups should focus on the threat of new entrants, bargaining power of suppliers, and the threat of substitute products or services.

  4. Assessing the Quality of Random Clinical Anesthesiology Trials Published on the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology from 2005 to 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Jucá, Mário Jorge

    2009-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O ensaio clínico aleatório (ECA) é definido como um estudo que envolve grupos de intervenção e controle, com alocação aleatória dos participantes. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a qualidade dos artigos de ECA em anestesia publicados num determinado período. Desenho do estudo: descritivo. MÉTODO: Foi realizada busca manual dos artigos publicados na Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia entre janeiro de 2005 e fevereiro de 2008, que tivessem características de E...

  5. Atitudes atuais de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização com relação à anestesia venosa total Actitudes actuales de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización con relación a la anestesia venosa total Current attitude of anesthesiologists and anesthesiology residents regarding total intravenous anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Squeff Nora

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: No passado, tempo, custos, informações, treinamento e avaliação da profundidade da anestesia limitavam a aceitação da anestesia venosa total (TIVA. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar atitudes de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização com relação à anestesia venosa total. MÉTODO: Um questionário foi enviado a 150 anestesiologistas e 102 residentes. A concordância (C e discordância (D em cada item foram comparadas por testes z (consenso, se p JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Antiguamente, tiempo, costes, informaciones, capacitación y evaluación de la profundidad de la anestesia limitaban la aceptación de la anestesia venosa total (TIVA. El objetivo de este estudio fue el de determinar las actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización con relación a la anestesia venosa total. MÉTODO: Un cuestionario fue enviado a 150 anestesiólogos y 102 residentes. La concordancia (C y discordancia (D en cada ítem se compararon por pruebas z (consenso, si p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In the past, time, cost, information, training, and the evaluation of the plane of anesthesia limited the acceptance of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA. The objective of this study was to determine the attitude of anesthesiologists and other anesthesiology residents regarding total intravenous anesthesia. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 150 anesthesiologists and 102 residents. The concordance (C and disaccord (D of each item were compared by z tests (consensus if p < 0.05. RESULTS: There were 98 responses. The data represent the number of answers for each category. The majority of the participants agreed that the quality of the awakening stimulates the use of the TIVA (C/D = 86/8; p < 0.05; that the future depends on the development of drugs with a fast onset of action and immediate recovery (C/D = 88/5; p < 0.05; that they would like to use TIVA more often (C/D = 72/21; p < 0.05; and to have more information

  6. Simulação de bloqueios periféricos guiados por ultra-som: curva de aprendizado dos residentes de anestesiologia do CET-SMA/HSL Simulacro de bloqueos periféricos guiados por ultrasonido: curva de aprendizaje de los residentes de anestesiología del CET-SMA/HSL Simulation of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block: learning curve of CET-SMA/HSL anesthesiology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Bonifácio Baranauskas

    2008-04-01

    por ultrasonido a través de modelo experimental de gelatina. MÉTODO: Fue desarrollado un modelo experimental con un recipiente lleno de gelatina y aceituna sumergida. Nueve residentes se distribuyeron aleatoriamente en tres grupos (G1, G2, G3 compuestos cada uno, por un R1, un R2 y un R3. Los tres grupos recibieron una explicación teórica. El G1 recibió dos horas de entrenamiento práctico, el G2 una hora y el G3 no fue entrenado. Acto seguido, se les solicitó a los participantes que pusiesen la aguja en el punto medio de la pared de la aceituna, cerca del transductor y reposicionar la aguja entre la aceituna y el fondo del recipiente, simulando la inyección perineural del anestésico. Se evaluaron la velocidad y la eficacia de las tareas, además de las fallas técnicas. RESULTADOS: El G1 presentó un promedio de tiempo para la realización de las tareas de 37,63 segundos, sin fallas técnicas; en el G2 se observó un promedio de 64,40 segundos, ocurriendo dos fallas técnicas y el G3 presentó un promedio de 93,83 segundos, con doce fallas técnicas. CONCLUSIONES: El estudio permite concluir que el mayor tiempo de entrenamiento en un modelo experimental de bloqueos periféricos guiados por ultrasonido mejoró la curva de aprendizaje en el simulacro de la técnica.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of ultrasound imaging in peripheral nerve block has been increasing. However, there are few reports in the literature on the learning curve of the ultrasound technique. The objective of this report was to evaluate the learning curve of CET-SMA/HSL Anesthesiology residents of ultrasound-guided peripheral block using an experimental agar model. METHODS: An experimental model was developed by filling a bowl with agar and olives. Nine residents were randomly divided in three groups (G1, G2, and G3, each one with a R1, a R2, and a R3. All three groups received theoretical explanation. G1 also had two hours of practical training, G2 had one hour, and G3 had no training

  7. Bases teóricas para a implementação do aprendizado orientado por problemas na residência médica em anestesiologia Bases teóricas para la implementación del aprendizaje orientado por problemas en la práctica médica en anestesiología Theoretical basis for the implementation of problem-oriented learning in anesthesiology residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getúlio Rodrigues de Oliveira Filho

    2003-04-01

    higher level of students and professors satisfaction, a wider source of queries and search for knowledge and more time spent with individual learning. Since the method has no disadvantages as compared to traditional methods, it could be considered a valid alternative for teaching Anesthesiology in Medical Residency Programs.

  8. Atitudes de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização em anestesiologia dos CET/SBA em relação aos bloqueios nervosos dos membros superior e inferior Actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización en anestesiología de los CET/SBA con relación a los bloqueos nerviosos de los miembros superior e inferior The attitude of anesthesiologists and anesthesiology residents of the CET/SBA regarding upper and lower limb nerve blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Escovedo Helayel

    2009-06-01

    aumentado en la práctica anestesiológica, debido a una menor necesidad de instrumentación de las vías aéreas, a un menor coste y a una excelente analgesia postoperatoria. Sin embargo, su utilización sufre restricciones causadas por la falta de entrenamiento, un mayor tiempo de realización, el temor de las complicaciones neurológicas y la toxicidad sistémica. El objetivo de este estudio, fue medir las actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización en los Centros de Enseñanza y Entrenamiento (CET/SBA con relación a los BNP. MÉTODO: Se constituyó un cuestionario con 25 ítems, quedando a disposición electrónicamente y por correo, para los responsables de 80 CET, sus instructores y médicos en especialización. RESULTADOS: Cuarenta y dos CET (52,5% devolvieron 188 cuestionarios, siendo 62 (32% médicos en especialización (ME y 126 (68% anestesiólogos. El coeficiente de confiabilidad de Cronbach del cuestionario fue de 0,79. El análisis factorial reveló seis factores que explicaron un 53% de la variancia de los puntajes: factor 1 - actitudes positivas, responsables de un 18,34 % de la variancia; factor 2 - entrenamiento/aplicación, responsable de un 11,73 % de la variancia; factor 3 - aspectos negativos, responsable de un 7,11 % de la variancia; factor 4 - factores limitantes, responsable de un 6,39 % de la variancia; factor 5 - anestesia regional como diferencial de competencia, responsable de un 5,79 % de la variancia; y factor 6 - respecto del paciente, responsable de un 5,4 % de la variancia. CONCLUSIONES: El cuestionario pareció ser una herramienta fidedigna para mensurar las actitudes con relación a la anestesia regional. Los anestesiólogos demostraron un mayor interés en los aspectos relacionados con los pacientes, mientras los ME tuvieron como foco principal la adquisición de habilidades técnicas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of regional blocks especially peripheral nerve blocks (PNB has been increasing in anesthesiology due to

  9. Hotly debated topics in obstetric anesthesiology 2008: a theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbach, D J; Soens, M A

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses three controversial subjects regarding treatment of intraoperative nausea and other complications experienced by patients undergoing cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia: (1) the administration of supplemental oxygen, (2) prophylactic vasopressors and (3) the use of low-dose combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE). While not universally acknowledged, recent data suggest that the routine administration of supplemental oxygen to normal-weight, healthy patients undergoing elective cesarean delivery is unnecessary, especially when spinal hypotension is minimized. Supplemental oxygen administration does not prevent intraoperative or postoperative nausea and vomiting. Additionally, although higher inspired oxygen fractions modestly increase fetal oxygenation, they also cause a concomitant increase in oxygen free radical activity in both mother and fetus, which may weaken the infant's ability to withstand subsequent neonatal insult. The use of prophylactic vasopressor infusions may benefit some patients, but parenteral preanesthetic ephedrine administration is not warranted. Heart rate variability guided therapy could help identify patients at risk for developing severe hypotension after spinal anesthesia. High-dose phenylephrine infusion in conjunction with rapid co-hydration is efficient, but is unfortunately associated with a relatively high incidence of maternal bradycardia. Oxygen, fluid administration and prophylactic vasopressors may not be the solution to hypotension, nausea and vomiting associated with spinal anesthesia during cesarean delivery. Lower dose spinal anesthesia as part of a CSE technique reduces the incidence of maternal hypotension, and in our opinion is the best option currently available.

  10. Clinical Databases and Registries in Congenital and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Cardiology, Critical Care, and Anesthesiology Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, David F; Gaies, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K

    2017-01-01

    The growth in large-scale data management capabilities and the successful care of patients with congenital heart defects have coincidentally paralleled each other for the last three decades, and participation in multicenter congenital heart disease databases and registries is now a fundamental component of cardiac care. This manuscript attempts for the first time to consolidate in one location all of the relevant databases worldwide, including target populations, specialties, Web sites, and participation information. Since at least 1,992 cardiac surgeons and cardiologists began leveraging this burgeoning technology to create multi-institutional data collections addressing a variety of specialties within this field. Pediatric heart diseases are particularly well suited to this methodology because each individual care location has access to only a relatively limited number of diagnoses and procedures in any given calendar year. Combining multiple institutions data therefore allows for a far more accurate contemporaneous assessment of treatment modalities and adverse outcomes. Additionally, the data can be used to develop outcome benchmarks by which individual institutions can measure their progress against the field as a whole and focus quality improvement efforts in a more directed fashion, and there is increasing utilization combining clinical research efforts within existing data structures. Efforts are ongoing to support better collaboration and integration across data sets, to improve efficiency, further the utility of the data collection infrastructure and information collected, and to enhance return on investment for participating institutions.

  11. Assessing the completeness of reporting of observational studies in Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology. Cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo-Peña, M. (Mary); Barona-Fong, L. (Luis); Campo-López, J. (Julio); Arroyave, Y. (Yeni); J.A. Calvache (Jose Andres)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction The STROBE statement (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology), consisting of 22 points, was published in 2007 with the aim of improving the reporting of observational research. Objective To determine the completeness of reporting of

  12. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Ketelaars, R.; Wolff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline ...

  13. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, R.; Wolff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system

  14. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaars, R; Wolff, A P

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline in order to try to prevent post-dural-puncture headache. After arrival at the postanesthesia care unit and fifteen minutes after removal of the catheter the patient suffered an unexpected high thoracic sensory blockade and hypotension requiring treatment. The continuous spinal anesthesia technique can be used in selected cases to be able to administer local anesthetic agents in a slow and controlled manner to reach the desired effect. The risk of post-dural-puncture headache using this technique in elderly patients is very low and therefore precludes the need to try to prevent it. We have described a potentially dangerous complication of flushing a bupivacaine-filled system into the spinal canal of an elderly patient resulting in an undesirable high sensory blockade.

  15. Perioperative complications at patients with high anesthesiologic-operational risk (literature review, part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadchikov D.M.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the literary review frequency, risk factors, reasons and mechanisms of perioperative complications occurrence are submitted at thorax and abdominal interventions, including common data, cardiovascular complications, data about massive blood loss, condition of respiratory system, hemostasiologic complications; reasons of complications development are specified, consequences of inadequate anesthesia are named, mechanisms of perioperative complications development and consequence of a protein-power failure are considered

  16. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, R; Wolff, A P

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system

  17. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ketelaars

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline in order to try to prevent post-dural-puncture headache. After arrival at the postanesthesia care unit and fifteen minutes after removal of the catheter the patient suffered an unexpected high thoracic sensory blockade and hypotension requiring treatment. The continuous spinal anesthesia technique can be used in selected cases to be able to administer local anesthetic agents in a slow and controlled manner to reach the desired effect. The risk of post-dural-puncture headache using this technique in elderly patients is very low and therefore precludes the need to try to prevent it. We have described a potentially dangerous complication of flushing a bupivacaine-filled system into the spinal canal of an elderly patient resulting in an undesirable high sensory blockade.

  18. Impact of an Innovative Classroom-Based Lecture Series on Residents’ Evaluations of an Anesthesiology Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Millennial resident learners may benefit from innovative instructional methods. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of a new daily, 15 minutes on one anesthesia keyword, lecture series given by faculty member each weekday on resident postrotation evaluation scores. Methods. A quasi-experimental study design was implemented with the residents’ rotation evaluations for the 24-month period ending by 7/30/2013 before the new lecture series was implemented which was compared to the 14-month period after the lecture series began on 8/1/2013. The primary endpoint was “overall teaching quality of this rotation.” We also collected survey data from residents at clinical rotations at two other different institutions during the same two evaluation periods that did not have the education intervention. Results. One hundred and thirty-one residents were eligible to participate in the study. Completed surveys ranged from 77 to 87% for the eight-question evaluation instrument. On a 5-point Likert-type scale the mean score on “overall teaching quality of this rotation” increased significantly from 3.9 (SD 0.8 to 4.2 (SD 0.7 after addition of the lecture series, whereas the scores decreased slightly at the comparison sites. Conclusion. Rotation evaluation scores for overall teaching quality improved with implementation of a new structured slide daily lectures series.

  19. Impact of an Innovative Classroom-Based Lecture Series on Residents' Evaluations of an Anesthesiology Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Pedro; Yanez, David; Lemmens, Hendrikus; Djurdjulov, Adam; Scotto, Lena; Borg, Lindsay; Walker, Kim; Bereknyei Merrell, Sylvia; Macario, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Millennial resident learners may benefit from innovative instructional methods. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of a new daily, 15 minutes on one anesthesia keyword, lecture series given by faculty member each weekday on resident postrotation evaluation scores. Methods. A quasi-experimental study design was implemented with the residents' rotation evaluations for the 24-month period ending by 7/30/2013 before the new lecture series was implemented which was compared to the 14-month period after the lecture series began on 8/1/2013. The primary endpoint was "overall teaching quality of this rotation." We also collected survey data from residents at clinical rotations at two other different institutions during the same two evaluation periods that did not have the education intervention. Results. One hundred and thirty-one residents were eligible to participate in the study. Completed surveys ranged from 77 to 87% for the eight-question evaluation instrument. On a 5-point Likert-type scale the mean score on "overall teaching quality of this rotation" increased significantly from 3.9 (SD 0.8) to 4.2 (SD 0.7) after addition of the lecture series, whereas the scores decreased slightly at the comparison sites. Conclusion. Rotation evaluation scores for overall teaching quality improved with implementation of a new structured slide daily lectures series.

  20. 78 FR 1158 - Anesthesiology Devices; Reclassification of Membrane Lung for Long-Term Pulmonary Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    .../thromboembolism. Blood clots may form within the extracorporeal circuit due to inadequate blood flow. Hemorrhage...., ``Mechanical Component Failures in 28,171 Neonatal and Pediatric Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Courses...

  1. Review article: the influence of psychology and human factors on education in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Ronnie; Flin, Rhona

    2012-02-01

    We look at the changing nature of medical education in the developed world with particular reference to those areas of the new curriculum frameworks which have introduced topics from the psychosocial realm. Research in the branch of psychology dealing with human factors has developed a useful body of working knowledge which applies to other industries where humans interact with the complex systems in which they function. Some findings are already being applied to facets of anesthesia performance, including situation awareness, effective teamwork, countermeasures against active errors and latent pathogens, and limitations of human performance. However, existing lessons and practices from industrial or military research may not translate directly into effective strategies for anesthesiologists. Collaborative studies between psychologists and clinicians should continue in order to provide the anesthetic curriculum with an effective body of knowledge for each role of the anesthesiologist. Although individual anesthesiologists have made important contributions in this field, such material has not been formally incorporated into the curricula serving anesthesiologists in the developed world. There is a gap between the human factors psychologists now know and the human factors anesthesiologists need to know. As that gap closes, anesthesiologists may come to think more like human factor psychologists as well as biomedical scientists.

  2. Simulation in Medical Education: Focus on Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. John Doyle

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation refers to the artificial representation of a complex real-world process with sufficient fidelity to achieve a particular objective, usually for the purposes of training or performance testing. While simulation has been important from early times (as in the rehearsal of animal hunting activities or preparing for warfare, the needs of World War II greatly accelerated simulation technology for use in flight training. With the available of inexpensive computer technology in recent years, simulation technology has blossomed again, especially in the field of medicine, where applications range from scientific modeling to clinical performance appraisal in the setting of crisis management.

  3. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for Medical Students in Anesthesiology Rotation in Ardabil Medical University (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Isazadehfar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training for undergraduate medical students has been noted to be poor in the past. Attempts have been made The aim of this study is to determine effect of CPR training in the anesthetic ward to improve knowledge and practice undergraduate medical student of CPR.Methods: A 12 month Educational experimental study with self control was done on all undergraduate medical student (n=30 at the medical university of Ardabil in 2006-2007. During I month of program allthis students have undergone CPR training including basic life support (BLS , advanced cardiac life support (ACLS and practical skills. Data were collected via questionnaire, demographic, pre/post knowledge and practice.Results: After training the acceptable score (good and very good about knowledge of BLS, ACLS and practical skill significantly increased %6.7 to %50 (p=0.0001 , %13.3 to %53.4 (p=0.001 and %3.3 to %100 (p=0.001 respectively. A significant relationship between knowledge of ACLS and practical skills was shown (p=0.005.Conclusion: The CPR training course in anesthetic ward leads to a significant increased in skills and knowledge. Adding this course to undergraduate curriculum of medical students especially in operaticallywards (e.g. Anesthetic ward is essential.Keywords: CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION; TRAINING; BASIC LIFE SUPPORT; ADVANCED CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT

  4. Comparing Anesthesiology Residency Training Structure and Requirements in Seven Different Countries on Three Continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias V

    2017-01-01

    , for example, the duration of post-medical school training and national requirements for certain rotations, a number of cases, faculty supervision, national in-training written exams, and duty hour limits. These data were augmented by review of each country's publicly available residency training documents...... as available on the internet. Post-medical school anesthesia residency duration varied: three years (Brazil), four years (USA), five years (Canada and Switzerland), six years (Japan and Denmark) to nine years (UK), as did the number of explicitly required clinical rotations of a defined duration: zero (Denmark......), one (Switzerland and UK), four (Brazil), six (Canada), and 12 (USA). Minimum case requirements exist in the USA, Japan, and Brazil, but not in the other countries. National written exams taken during training exist for all countries studied except Japan and Denmark. The countries studied increasingly...

  5. Use of tablet (iPad®) as a tool for teaching anesthesiology in an orthopedic rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Pedro Paulo; Hawrylyshyn, Kathryn Ashley; Macario, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare scores on house staff evaluations of "overall teaching quality" during a rotation in anesthesia for orthopedics in the first six months (n=11 residents were provided with curriculum in a printed binder) and in the final six months (n=9 residents were provided with the same curriculum in a tablet computer (iPad, Apple®, Inc, Cupertino, Ca)). At the beginning of the two-week rotation, the resident was given an iPad containing: a syllabus with daily reading assignments, rotation objectives according to the ACGME core competencies, and journal articles. Prior to the study, these curriculum materials had been distributed in a printed binder. The iPad also provided peer reviewed internet sites and direct access to online textbooks, but was not linked to the electronic medical record. At the end of the rotation, residents anonymously answered questions to evaluate the rotation on an ordinal scale from 1 (unsatisfactory) to 5 (outstanding). All residents were unaware that the data would be analyzed retrospectively for this study. The mean global rating of the rotation as assessed by "overall teaching quality of this rotation" increased from 4.09 (N=11 evaluations before intervention, SD 0.83, median 4, range 3-5) to 4.89 (N=9 evaluations after intervention, SD 0.33, median 5, range 4-5) p=0.04. Residents responded favorably to the introduction of an innovative iPad based curriculum for the orthopedic anesthesia rotation. More studies are needed to show how such mobile computing technologies can enhance learning, especially since residents work at multiple locations, have duty hour limits, and the need to document resident learning in six ACGME core competencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. The Attitude of Nurses towards Euthanasia at the Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitation Care and Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    CHOBOTSKÁ, Martina

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Does a person suffering from an incurable disease causing him terrible pain have the right to end his/her life? Does a physician have the right to fulfill such patient{\\crq}s wish and help him to commit suicide? These questions are the basic ones concerning euthanasia. Euthanasia is nowadays a frequently discussed issue not only for medical personnel but also for wide public. It is considered a problem of human rights and it includes moral, religious, medical, nursing and also cultur...

  7. Use Exercise Testing for an Estimation of a Oxygen-Power Exchange at Patients of High Anesthesiology-Operational Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM. Sadchikov

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is lead randomized prospective research with the double "blind" control over 228 patients of high risk (ASA>III, undergone long and traumatic to operations on bodies of a breast and a stomach. Have excluded from research 133 patients. The staying 95 patients have divided into groups without complications and with complications (accordingly 51 and 44 patients which one day prior to operation have carried out exercise testing. Investigated: ADP, CPRV, SI, a arterio-ve-nous difference on oxygen, delivery of oxygen to fabrics, consumption of oxygen in fabrics, factor extraction oxygen in tissue, a power exchange. In reply to exercise testing in both groups growth of SI is marked due to a tachycardia and falling CPRV which in group of complication remained above norm. In group without complications it was normalized FEO, 6-v the difference on О became higher than norm, in other group — FEO and б-v a difference on 02 began to exceed norm, and consumption of oxygen has grown almost in 2 times. After exercise testing б-v a difference on 02 and consumption of oxygen were essentially higher in group with complications. The total of complications made — 53, respiratory — 16, inflammatory — 23 and purulent — septic complications — 14. Clinically important connection (p=0,06939 perioperative complications with growth a-v differences on oxygen and a power exchange is received

  8. [Principal characteristics of the endoscopic programmed hemostasis in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings in patients with high operational-anesthesiological risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timen, L Ia; Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z

    2013-01-01

    Application of the endoscopic programmed hemostasis for patients with ulcer gastroduodenal bleedings and with high operational-anesthetic risk provided metabolic rehabilitation (5% solutions of glucose and ascorbic acid) for the purpose of prevention of recurrence of the bleedings which have arisen after a hemostasis at 5.5% of patients.

  9. Defining Value-Based Care in Cardiac and Vascular Anesthesiology: The Past, Present, and Future of Perioperative Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarczyk, Lavinia M; Arora, Harendra; Manning, Michael W; Zvara, David A; Isaak, Robert S

    2018-02-01

    Health care reimbursement models are transitioning from volume-based to value-based models. Value-based models focus on patient outcomes both during the hospital admission and postdischarge. These models place emphasis on cost, quality of care, and coordination of multidisciplinary services. Perioperative physicians are challenged to evaluate traditional practices to ensure coordinated, cost-effective, and evidence-based care. With the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services planned introduction of bundled payments for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, cardiovascular anesthesiologists are financially responsible for postdischarge outcomes. In order to meet these patient outcomes, multidisciplinary care pathways must be designed, implemented, and sustained, a process that is challenging at best. This review (1) provides a historical perspective of health care reimbursement; (2) defines value as it pertains to quality, service, and cost; (3) reviews the history of value-based care for cardiac surgery; (4) describes the drive toward optimization for vascular surgery patients; and (5) discusses how programs like Enhanced Recovery After Surgery assist with the delivery of value-based care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. La anestesiología, profesión signada por la drogadicción Anesthesiology and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio Alvarez Echeverri

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Se informa sobre la prevalencia de drogadicción y alcoholismo entre los anestesiólogos, cuyas cifras alcanzan el 2% del total. Las drogas más utilizadas son: fentanil y otros opioides, diazepam, alcohol, anestésicos inhalados, ketamina, barbitúricos, sulfentanil, cocaína, morfina y heroína. Entre los factores de riesgo figuran algunos comunes a la población adicta en general (predisposición genética, exposición ambiental, falta de educación, de programas preventivos y de estrategias de control, estrés y otros peculiares a estos profesionales: disponibilidad de las drogas, autoprescripción, actitud permisiva de los colegas. El tratamiento tiene como objetivos desintoxicar a la persona y lograr que viva sin usar fármacos, que recupere sus aspectos social y ocupacional, que mantenga el tratamiento interdisciplinario, se vincule a grupos de soporte y psicoterapia y se reintegre plenamente a las actividades de la vida diaria una vez haya signos de franca recuperación. Incluye, además, identificar los problemas psiquiátricos de fondo, establecer metas de recuperación a largo plazo y utilizar, si es necesario, drogas antagonistas.

    Prevalence of drug addiction and alcoholism among anesthesiologists has been reported to be around 2%. Most frequently utilized drugs are phentanyl and other opioids, diazepam, alcohol, inhaled anesthetics, ketamine, barbiturates, sulphentanyl, cocaine, morphine and heroine. Besides risk factors that are common to the whole population (genetic predisposition, environmental exposure, stress and lack of education, preventive programs and control strategies, there are others peculiar to anes. thesiologists: availability of drugs, self. prescription and permissivenes of colleagues. Objectives of treatment are: to achieve detoxification and a drug-free life, to recuperate the social and occupational aspects of life, to adhere to interdisciplinary schemes of treat. ment with long.term goals, to enter support and psychotherapy groups, to identify and treat underlying psychiatric disorders and, if neces. sary, to utilize antagonist drugs.

  11. A Review on John Snow’s (1813-1858 CE Contributions to the Epidemiology and Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad EJ Golzari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available “In riding his hobby very hard, he has fallen down through a gully hole and has never since been able to get out again” “Has he any facts to show in proof? No!”* * From an Editorial on John Snow’s theories published in the Lancet in 1855   Biography John Snow, the famous physician, epidemiologist and anesthetist, was born on March 15th, 1813 in York, England (Image 1. He was the eldest of nine children born to William and Frances Snow in their North Street home. His first 12 years of life were spent in a poor and unsanitary area in Michaelgate. River Ouse, which provided the drinking water for the people and often contaminated with excreta, was in the vicinity of his home. This exposed him and his family to the danger of flooding and contamination with excrements of drinking water (1. After financial status of his father improved, they moved to a more wholesome area which was appropriate for the children's education. When he was 14, he was apprenticed to William Hardcastle, a surgeon in Newcastle upon Tyne School of Medicine. Later, he attended in lectures and visited the different wards of the local infirmary (2. His apprenticeship was finished in 1833. Between 1833 and 1836 Snow worked as an assistant to a colliery surgeon. He returned to London after completing his education to get a London degree and became a student in the Royal College of Surgeons and began working at the Westminster Hospital. Snow finished his education in 1844. Then he was elected as the chancellor of the London Medical Society. Snow suffered a stroke while working in his London office on June 10th, 1858. He was 45 years old at the time. This valuable and memorable researcher and scientist died in London on June 16th, 1858 aged 45 years from a stroke. He was buried in Brompton Cemetery (3. Many books, papers, and letters to journals on various topics such as rickets, chest deformities, the circulation of the blood, lead poisoning, and scarlet fever have been written by Snow during his short life (4.

  12. [Innovation structure of postgraduate medical education in the specialty of anesthesiology as a constituent of the continuing professional development concept in the light of the Bologna Declaration provisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatian, A A; Vyzhigina, M A; Sizova, Zh M

    2009-01-01

    To implement the basic provisions of the Bologna Declaration for postgraduate professional education of anesthesiologists-resuscitators, to upgrade the quality of training specialists, it is important that, by preserving the existing forms of an educational process, to introduce into continuing professional development the following innovation educational technologies, by taking into account the existing forms and technologies of the Russian higher medical school: to realize the continuing professional development (CPD) concept; a credit accumulation system as a generalizing function during CPD; distance and multimedia learning; and a modular organization of a learning and educational process.

  13. [Burnout-associated factors in anesthesia and intensive care medicine. 2009 survey of the French Society of anesthesiology and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, G; Libert, N; Journois, D

    2013-03-01

    To assess factors related to burnout in anesthesia and intensive care. National prospective observational study. Questionnaire posted on the French Society of anesthesia website from 3rd June 2009 to 27th August 2009: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Fast Alcohol Consumption Evaluation (FACE) and The Harvard National Depression Screening Day Scale (HANDS) scales and questions to assess health, work and personal life. One thousand six hundred and three questionnaires returned: 1091 anesthetists (67.6%), 241 intensivists (14.9%), 204 nurses (12.6%), emergency physicians (2.8%), supervisor nurses (0.9%). Seven hundred and sixty three in a university hospital (47.3%), 259 in a regional hospital (16.1%), 405 in a private structure (25.1%), 71 in a non-lucrative private structure (4.4%), 75 in a military hospital (4.6%). Rest of safety: 69.2% of institutions. Depression: 38.7%. Drug or chemicals addicted: 10.6%. Alcohol addicts: 10.6%. Among them, 62.3% of individuals were in burnout. Burnout was linked to fragmented sleep (Pburnout intended more frequently to leave the profession (Pburnout: quality of work, of personal life, of fatigue, depression, conflicts with colleagues and patients, regretting the choice of specialty. This study of the largest cohort of anesthesia personnel performed in France detects a high proportion of burnout. It highlights links with tensors that may constitute possibilities of prevention of the burnout syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Randomized crossover study evaluating the effect of a hand sanitizer dispenser on the frequency of hand hygiene among anesthesiology staff in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Patel, Zalak; Banks, Shawn; Arheart, Kristopher; Eber, Scott; Lubarsky, David A; Birnbach, David J

    2014-06-01

    Forty anesthesia providers were evaluated with and without hand sanitizer dispensers present on the anesthesia machine. Having a dispenser increased the frequency of hand hygiene only from 0.5 to 0.8 events per hour (P = .01). Other concomitant interventions are needed to further increase hand hygiene frequency among anesthesia providers.

  15. Item response analysis on an examination in anesthesiology for medical students in Taiwan: A comparison of one- and two-parameter logistic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Huang

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Item response models are useful for medical test analyses and provide valuable information about model comparisons and identification of differential items other than test reliability, item difficulty, and examinee's ability.

  16. [Complex therapy of obstetric patients hospitalized for eclampsia and systemic complications in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy in the Silesian Medical Academy in Katowice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupa, A; Dyaczyńska-Herman, A

    1995-12-01

    The paper reviews the treatment introduced to control cerebral oedema in 30 puerperal women with eclampsia, tonic-clonic seizures and symptoms of increased JcP. Methods of hypotensive treatment, introduced in 23 of 30 patients are presented. Other elements of the therapeutical management aimed at the maintenance of homeostasis, normothermia, normotension and normoglycaemia are also discussed in the paper. Patients required not only complex pharmacological therapy but also mechanical ventilation by means of respirator, often with use of special techniques.

  17. Postpartum hemorrhage: guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF): in collaboration with the French Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (SFAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Vayssière, Christophe; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Aya, Antoine Guy; Bayoumeu, Françoise; Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Djoudi, Rachid; Dolley, Patricia; Dreyfus, Michel; Ducroux-Schouwey, Chantal; Dupont, Corinne; François, Anne; Gallot, Denis; Haumonté, Jean-Baptiste; Huissoud, Cyril; Kayem, Gilles; Keita, Hawa; Langer, Bruno; Mignon, Alexandre; Morel, Olivier; Parant, Olivier; Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Phan, Emmanuelle; Rossignol, Mathias; Tessier, Véronique; Mercier, Frédéric J; Goffinet, François

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is defined as blood loss ≥500mL after delivery and severe PPH as blood loss ≥1000mL, regardless of the route of delivery (professional consensus). The preventive administration of uterotonic agents just after delivery is effective in reducing the incidence of PPH and its systematic use is recommended, regardless of the route of delivery (Grade A). Oxytocin is the first-line prophylactic drug, regardless of the route of delivery (Grade A); a slowly dose of 5 or 10 IU can be administered (Grade A) either IV or IM (professional consensus). After vaginal delivery, routine cord drainage (Grade B), controlled cord traction (Grade A), uterine massage (Grade A), and routine bladder voiding (professional consensus) are not systematically recommended for PPH prevention. After caesarean delivery, placental delivery by controlled cord traction is recommended (grade B). The routine use of a collector bag to assess postpartum blood loss at vaginal delivery is not systematically recommended (Grade B), since the incidence of severe PPH is not affected by this intervention. In cases of overt PPH after vaginal delivery, placement of a blood collection bag is recommended (professional consensus). The initial treatment of PPH consists in a manual uterine examination, together with antibiotic prophylaxis, careful visual assessment of the lower genital tract, a uterine massage, and the administration of 5-10 IU oxytocin injected slowly IV or IM, followed by a maintenance infusion not to exceed a cumulative dose of 40IU (professional consensus). If oxytocin fails to control the bleeding, the administration of sulprostone is recommended within 30minutes of the PPH diagnosis (Grade C). Intrauterine balloon tamponade can be performed if sulprostone fails and before recourse to either surgery or interventional radiology (professional consensus). Fluid resuscitation is recommended for PPH persistent after first line uterotonics, or if clinical signs of severity (Grade B). The objective of RBC transfusion is to maintain a haemoglobin concentration (Hb) >8g/dL. During active haemorrhaging, it is desirable to maintain a fibrinogen level ≥2g/L (professional consensus). RBC, fibrinogen and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) may be administered without awaiting laboratory results (professional consensus). Tranexamic acid may be used at a dose of 1 g, renewable once if ineffective the first time in the treatment of PPH when bleeding persists after sulprostone administration (professional consensus), even though its clinical value has not yet been demonstrated in obstetric settings. It is recommended to prevent and treat hypothermia in women with PPH by warming infusion solutions and blood products and by active skin warming (Grade C). Oxygen administration is recommended in women with severe PPH (professional consensus). If PPH is not controlled by pharmacological treatments and possibly intra-uterine balloon, invasive treatments by arterial embolization or surgery are recommended (Grade C). No technique for conservative surgery is favoured over any other (professional consensus). Hospital-to-hospital transfer of a woman with a PPH for embolization is possible once hemoperitoneum is ruled out and if the patient's hemodynamic condition so allows (professional consensus). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A serendipidade na medicina e na anestesiologia A serendipidade en la medicina y en la anestesiologia Serendipity in medicine and anesthesiology

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Bezerra do Vale; José Delfino; Lúcio Flávio Bezerra do Vale

    2005-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Neste trabalho foram examinados mais de uma centena dos mais felizes acoplamentos de uma mente brilhante com a sorte benfazeja (serendipidade), através da releitura das mais relevantes histórias sobre invenções e descobertas relacionadas à ciência (n = 46), à Medicina (n = 46) e à Anestesiologia (n = 16). CONTEÚDO: Conceito de serendipidade; exemplos célebres de serendipidade em Ciência e Tecnologia; serendipidade na pesquisa e prática médicas; serendipidade na Anes...

  19. Implementing a successful journal club in an anesthesiology residency program [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel D Pitner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal clubs are an integral element of residency training. We report the successful implementation of a monthly structured journal club in our anesthesia residency program. Based on resident surveys before and one year after its start, the journal club led to a significantly higher confidence in how to critically appraise literature and present a manuscript. The journal club also improved the residents' ability to search the literature and their statistical knowledge, skills that are essential in the practice of evidence-based medicine. We describe key features that may aid other training programs in organizing a stimulating an educational and sustainable journal club.

  20. Anesthesia and Monitoring in Small Laboratory Mammals Used in Anesthesiology, Respiratory and Critical Care Research: A Systematic Review on the Current Reporting in Top-10 Impact Factor Ranked Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Thea; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Spieth, Peter Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rationale This study aimed to investigate the quality of reporting of anesthesia and euthanasia in experimental studies in small laboratory mammals published in the top ten impact factor journals. Methods A descriptive systematic review was conducted and data was abstracted from the ten highest ranked journals with respect to impact factor in the categories ‘Anesthesiology’, ‘Critical Care Medicine’ and ‘Respiratory System’ as defined by the 2012 Journal Citation Reports. Inclusion criteria according to PICOS criteria were as follows: 1) population: small laboratory mammals; 2) intervention: any form of anesthesia and/or euthanasia; 3) comparison: not specified; 4) primary outcome: type of anesthesia, anesthetic agents and type of euthanasia; secondary outcome: animal characteristics, monitoring, mechanical ventilation, fluid management, postoperative pain therapy, animal care approval, sample size calculation and performed interventions; 5) study: experimental studies. Anesthesia, euthanasia, and monitoring were analyzed per performed intervention in each article. Results The search yielded 845 articles with 1,041 interventions of interest. Throughout the manuscripts we found poor quality and frequency of reporting with respect to completeness of data on animal characteristics as well as euthanasia, while anesthesia (732/1041, 70.3%) and interventions without survival (970/1041, 93.2%) per se were frequently reported. Premedication and neuromuscular blocking agents were reported in 169/732 (23.1%) and 38/732 (5.2%) interventions, respectively. Frequency of reporting of analgesia during (117/610, 19.1%) and after painful procedures (38/364, 10.4%) was low. Euthanasia practice was reported as anesthesia (348/501, 69%), transcardial perfusion (37/501, 8%), carbon dioxide (26/501, 6%), decapitation (22/501, 5%), exsanguination (23/501, 5%), other (25/501, 5%) and not specified (20/501, 4%, respectively. Conclusions The present systematic review revealed insufficient reporting of anesthesia and euthanasia methods throughout experimental studies in small laboratory mammals. Specific guidelines for anesthesia and euthanasia regimens should be considered to achieve comparability, quality of animal experiments and animal welfare. These measures are of special interest when translating experimental findings to future clinical applications. PMID:26305700

  1. [An attempt at optimization of diagnosis for patients in puerperium treated due to eclampsia and systemic complications in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy in the Silesian Medical Academy in Katowice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupa, A; Dyaczyńska-Herman, A

    1995-12-01

    Conditions under which episodes of eclampsia occurred in puerperal, who were than admitted to the Intensive Care Units for treatment are presentation the paper. Multidirectional diagnostic procedures introduced in those 30 patients are discussed. In the analysed group of patients various types of organ complications were diagnosed. The paper underlines value and benefits of the interdisciplinary consultation in diagnostic procedure in cases of dramatic and rapidly occurring complications overlapping existing puerperal status.

  2. Danish national sedation strategy. Targeted therapy of discomfort associated with critical illness. Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Hein, Lars; Nibroe, Helle

    2015-01-01

    should be to focus on the reversible causes of agitation, such as: pain, anxiety, delirium, dyspnea, withdrawal symptoms, sleep or gastrointestinal symptoms. If sedation is used a validated sedation scale is recommended. On a daily basis sedation should be interrupted and only restarted after a thorough...

  3. 42 CFR 121.9 - Designated transplant program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the fields of radiology, infectious disease, pathology, immunology, anesthesiology, physical therapy..., pediatrics, nephrology with dialysis capability, and pulmonary medicine with respiratory therapy support; (vi...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1040 - Powered algesimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1040 Powered algesimeter. (a... sensitivity to pain after administration of an anesthetic agent. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  5. 77 FR 21750 - Endangered Species; File Nos. 16549 and 17095

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... animal research in laboratory tests of up- and downstream fish passage studies, swimming performance tests, tagging studies, anesthesiology, behavior, physiology and contaminant studies, as well as...

  6. 75 FR 30043 - Medicare Program; Meeting of the Advisory Panel on Medicare Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    .... ADDRESSES: Meeting Location: Hilton Washington Hotel Embassy Row, 2015 Massachusetts Avenue, NW., Washington... R. Green, M.D., Professor, Anesthesiology and Associate Professor, Health, Management, and Policy...

  7. [Anesthesia for medical students : A brief guide to practical anesthesia in adults with a web-based video illustration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, S; Schlafer, O; Abram, J; Kreutziger, J; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2016-12-01

    In Germany, Austria and Switzerland, anesthesiologists are the second largest group of physicians in hospitals, but this does not correspond to the amount of anesthesiology teaching that medical students receive in medical schools. Accordingly, the chances of medical students recognizing anesthesiology as a promising personal professional career are smaller than in other disciplines with large teaching components. Subsequent difficulties to recruit anesthesiology residents are likely, although many reasons support anesthesiology as a professional career.Traditional strategies to teach medical students in anesthesiology in medical school consist of airway management or cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts in manikins. Anesthesiology is a complex interaction consisting of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, clinical evaluation, experience, knowledge, and manual skills. While some medical schools offer teaching in high fidelity simulators, clinical teaching in the operating room is often limited. When medical students opt for a clinical rotation in anesthesiology, there is a chance to demonstrate the fascinating world of anesthesiology, but this chance has to be utilized carefully by anesthesiologists, as young talents have to be discovered, supported, and challenged.We have put together a short guide for medical students for a clinical rotation in anesthesiology in adults in order to generate basic knowledge and interest in anesthesiology as well as a sense of achievement. Basic knowledge about premedication, induction, maintenance and strategies for anesthesia is discussed. Further, the most important anesthesia drugs are discussed and manual skills, such as intravenous cannulation, mask ventilation, intubation, and regional anesthesia are featured with QR-code based video illustrations on a smartphone or personal computer. We did not discuss possible local mannerism and special patient groups (e. g., children, special medical history), local guidelines

  8. 21 CFR 868.1030 - Manual algesimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1030 Manual algesimeter. (a) Identification. A manual algesimeter is a mechanical device intended to determine a patient's sensitivity to pain after...

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS residents serve on the medical anesthesiology service, ... during and after the operation. This is the time to discuss any concerns you may have about ...

  10. Two-port Laparoscopic-assisted Appendicectomy Under Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Laparoscopic appendicectomy, laparoscopic- assisted appendicectomy, local anesthesia, monitored anesthesia care. Departments of Anesthesiology, and 1General Surgery,. Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University,. Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India. Address for correspondence: Dr. V. K. Shukla,.

  11. Analysis of deaths related to anesthesia in the period 1996-2004 from closed claims registered by the Danish Patient Insurance Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Lars Dahlgaard; Steinmetz, Jacob; Christoffersen, Jens Krogh

    2007-01-01

    Anesthesia is associated with complications, and some of them may be fatal. The authors investigated the circumstances under which deaths were associated with anesthesia. In Denmark, the specialty anesthesiology encompasses emergency medicine, chronic and acute pain medicine, anesthetic procedure...

  12. Anecdotes from the history of anesthesia in dentistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Trieger, N.

    1995-01-01

    I believe that dentists have made important contributions to anesthesiology and patient care. Medical anesthesiology is now being required to provide more same-day or ambulatory care. Where it was once good sport to criticize dentists providing brief anesthesia services for their patients, it has now become appropriate for physician anesthesiologists to use shorter-acting agents, improved physiologic monitoring, reversal agents, and early discharge as part of their care of patients. Anecdotes...

  13. McArdle's disease (glycogen storage disease type V) and anesthesia--a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg

    2013-09-01

    McArdles disease (glycogen storage disease type v) is a rare condition in which energy-metabolism in the muscle is hampered. A case report is presented and the possible risk for perioperative complications including malignant hyperthermia is discussed. A checklist for the anesthesiological management of patients with McArdles disease is provided. A short overview of anesthesiological challenges and perioperative complications of other glycogen storage diseases is given. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Breaking the glass ceiling: an interview with Dr. Shirley Graves, a pioneering woman in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Mai, Christine L; Elder, Badrea; Rodriguez, Samuel; Yaster, Myron

    2014-04-01

    Shirley Graves M.D., D.Sc. (honorary) (1936), Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics at the University of Florida, was one of the most influential women in medicine in the 1960 and 1970s, a time when the medical profession was overwhelmingly male-dominated. In today's society, it is hard to believe that only 50 years ago, women were scarce in the field of medicine. Yet Dr. Graves was a pioneer in the fields of pediatric anesthesia and pediatric critical care medicine. She identifies her development of the pediatric intensive care unit and her leadership in the Division of Pediatric Anesthesia at the University of Florida as her defining contributions. Through her journal articles, book chapters, national and international lectures, and leadership in the American Society of Anesthesiology and the Florida Society of Anesthesiology, she inspired a generation of men and women physicians to conquer the unthinkable and break through the glass ceiling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadsden J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Gadsden,1 Sabry Ayad,2 Jeffrey J Gonzales,3 Jaideep Mehta,4 Jan Boublik,5 Jacob Hutchins6,7 1Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, 4Department of Anesthesiology, UT Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, 5Department of Anesthesiology, NYU Langone Medical Center – Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY, 6Department of Anesthesiology, 7Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by

  16. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  17. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into a...

  18. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 2017 end of year summary: cardiovascular and hemodynamic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Bendjelid, Karim; Critchley, Lester A H; Scheeren, Thomas W L

    2018-02-26

    Hemodynamic monitoring provides the basis for the optimization of cardiovascular dynamics in intensive care medicine and anesthesiology. The Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing (JCMC) is an ideal platform to publish research related to hemodynamic monitoring technologies, cardiovascular (patho)physiology, and hemodynamic treatment strategies. In this review, we discuss selected papers published on cardiovascular and hemodynamic monitoring in the JCMC in 2017.

  19. 21 CFR 868.2377 - Apnea monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Apnea monitor. 868.2377 Section 868.2377 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2377 Apnea monitor. (a) Identification. An apnea monitor is a... breath. The apnea monitor also includes indirect methods of apnea detection such as monitoring of heart...

  20. Cornelia de Lange sendromu ve anestezi: olgu sunumu

    OpenAIRE

    ÇEVİK, Banu; ÇOLAKOĞLU, Serhan; AÇIKGÖZ, Alican; KİTAPÇI, İlknur

    2008-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange (CdLS) is a rare dysmorphogenie syndrome characterized by distinctive facial appearence, failure to thrive and mental retardation. This article presents anesthetic management of CdLS syndrome suggesting difficult tracheal intubation on preoperative physical examination and evaluation of the anesthesiologic aspects of this syndrome.

  1. Evaluating the effect of preoperative oral gabapentin on

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-02

    May 2, 2010 ... Conclusion: Preoperative gabapentin, when administered one hour prior to surgery in a dose of 1 200 mg, decreases postoperative pain scores at ... and impending tissue damage. Acute pain accompanies almost all surgical procedures. .... consumption after mastectomy. Anesthesiology 2002;97:560–4. 8.

  2. Simulation and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Krage, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is relevant for improving the use of simulation in anesthesiology, as it allows us to describe, explain and optimize the interactions of learners and instructors as well as the design of simulation scenarios and debriefings. Much psychological expertise is not used for simulation...

  3. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  4. Perioperative medicine. The surgeons point of view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    2001-01-01

    A satisfactory postoperative outcome goes through the control of several factors, to ensure well-being and free-pain state. A multi-disciplinary effort is necessary to achieve this goal, and the adjustment of postoperative surgical care is as important as the supply of anesthesiological techniques....

  5. Predicting the need for blood during cardiopulmonary bypass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    ness of autologous blood transfusions during open heart surgery. AR Coetzee, JF Coetzee. Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Abstract. Background: Haematocrit (Hct) values <18%-20% during cardiopulmonary bypass ...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5995 - Tee drain (water trap).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tee drain (water trap). 868.5995 Section 868.5995...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5995 Tee drain (water trap). (a) Identification. A tee drain (water trap) is a device intended to trap and drain water that collects in ventilator...

  7. 21 CFR 868.2450 - Lung water monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lung water monitor. 868.2450 Section 868.2450 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2450 Lung water monitor. (a) Identification. A lung water monitor is a device used to monitor the trend of fluid volume changes in a patient's lung by...

  8. Antiemetic effects of dexamethasone and ondansetron combination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    caesarean section. British journal of anaesthesia. 2000;84:463-7. 4. Crocker JS, Vandam LD. Concerning nausea and vomiting during spinal anesthesia. Anesthesiology. 1959;20:587-92. 5. Ratra CK, Badola RP, Bhargava KP. A study of factors concerned in emesis during spinal anaesthesia. British journal of anaesthesia.

  9. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous oxide...

  10. Prévention des nausées et vomissements postopératoires dans la ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to reduce the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV)following strabismus surgery, by using available and accessible drugs in our disadvantaged environment. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in 18 months in the anesthesiology department of the Yaoundé ...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1730 - Oxygen uptake computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen uptake computer. 868.1730 Section 868.1730...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1730 Oxygen uptake computer. (a) Identification. An oxygen uptake computer is a device intended to compute the amount of oxygen consumed by a...

  12. Dexmedetomidine: An Adjuvant Making Large Inroads into Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introduction of newer more selective α-2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine has made a revolution in the field of anesthesia owing to its varied application. The aim of the current review is to highlight the various clinical and pharmacological aspects of dexmedetomidine in daily routine practice of anesthesiology and ...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5130 - Anesthesia conduction filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction filter. 868.5130 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5130 Anesthesia conduction filter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction filter is a microporous filter used while administering to a patient...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional, or...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5150 - Anesthesia conduction needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction needle. 868.5150 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5150 Anesthesia conduction needle. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction needle is a device used to inject local anesthetics into a patient to...

  19. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    1Department of Physical medicine & Rehabilitation, 2,5Maternity Research Center, 3Department of anesthesiology and critical care,. 4Department of ... pain, of which epidural anesthesia is an effective one, but not all mothers agree to receive this invasive inter- vention. ..... Miller R.D. (2010) Text book Anesthesia.

  1. Formula for Calculating Maintenance Fluid Volumes in Low Birth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    2007-08-14

    Aug 14, 2007 ... Department of Anesthesiology, Braithwaite Memorial Specialist Hospital,Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND. Fluid management of low birth weight and preterm babies can be challenging, as the determination of maintenance fluid volumes have to be calculated to suit the demands of this ...

  2. Receptors, G proteins, and their interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollmann, Markus W.; Strumper, Danja; Herroeder, Susanne; Durieux, Marcel E.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane receptors coupling to intracellular G proteins (G protein-coupled receptors) form one of the major classes of membrane signaling proteins. They are of great importance to the practice of anesthesiology because they are involved in many systems of relevance to the specialty (cardiovascular

  3. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... breathing circuit as a container for carbon dioxide absorbent. It may include a canister and water drain. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a...

  4. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    510, Jhong-Jheng Rd., Sin-Jhuang, New Taipei, Taiwan (Republic of China); Department of Health Business Administration, Meiho University, No.23, Pingguang Rd., Neipu, Pingtung, Taiwan (Republic of China); Department of Anesthesiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, No.325, Sec.2, ...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5620 - Breathing mouthpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing mouthpiece. 868.5620 Section 868.5620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5620 Breathing mouthpiece. (a) Identification. A breathing mouthpiece is a rigid device that is inserted into a patient's mouth and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory support...

  7. 21 CFR 868.2375 - Breathing frequency monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing frequency monitor. 868.2375 Section 868.2375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2375 Breathing frequency monitor. (a...

  8. Analysis of deaths related to anesthesia in the period 1996-2004 from closed claims registered by the Danish Patient Insurance Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Lars Dahlgaard; Steinmetz, Jacob; Christoffersen, Jens Krogh

    2007-01-01

    Anesthesia is associated with complications, and some of them may be fatal. The authors investigated the circumstances under which deaths were associated with anesthesia. In Denmark, the specialty anesthesiology encompasses emergency medicine, chronic and acute pain medicine, anesthetic procedures......, perioperative care medicine, and intensive care medicine....

  9. A Civilian/Military Trauma Institute: National Trauma Coordinating Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    maxillofacial Trauma, Trauma Mental Health, Neurosurgery, Craniofacial, Anesthesiology, and Burn Surgery . Page | 5 A. National Coordinating...research information to the trauma community 3. Breakouts included; Trauma/Critical Care, Orthopedic Trauma, Emergency Care, Trauma Nursing, Oral ...was presented at the 2012 Annual American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) meeting in September 2012, in Kauai, Hawaii (Appendix A

  10. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter. (a) Identification. A bourdon gauge flowmeter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used in conjunction...

  11. Thermographic control of the initial narcosis adequacy for patients with space-occupying brain lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, A. V.; Volovik, M. G.; Rufova, Natalya Y.; Bakunin, L. M.

    1993-11-01

    The present study attempts to make use of the pattern of infra-red radiation from the skin surface, indirectly visualizing the brain heat production as a control means of the anesthesiologic aid for different variants of the total intravenous anesthesia when operating on the brain.

  12. 21 CFR 868.5915 - Manual emergency ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual emergency ventilator. 868.5915 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5915 Manual emergency ventilator. (a) Identification. A manual emergency ventilator is a device, usually incorporating a bag and valve, intended to...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5925 - Powered emergency ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered emergency ventilator. 868.5925 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5925 Powered emergency ventilator. (a) Identification. A powered emergency ventilator is a demand valve or inhalator intended to provide emergency...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5895 - Continuous ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous ventilator. 868.5895 Section 868.5895...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5895 Continuous ventilator. (a) Identification. A continuous ventilator (respirator) is a device intended to mechanically control or assist...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5270 - Breathing system heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing system heater. 868.5270 Section 868.5270...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5270 Breathing system heater. (a) Identification. A breathing system heater is a device that is intended to warm breathing gases before they enter...

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-04

    Oct 4, 2017 ... The effect of anesthetic technique on postoperative outcomes in hip fracture repair. Anesthesiology. 2000 Apr;. 92(4):947-57. Google Scholar. 11. Rooke GA, Freund PR, Jacobson AF. Hemodynamic response and change in organ blood volume during spinal anesthesia in elderly men with cardiac disease.

  17. JPRS Report East Asia Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-17

    experts in various fields such as surgery, pediatrics, internal medicine, anesthesiology, obstetrics , and laboratory. During the period that they...malarxa, and kidney diseases and achieved good results. The obstetrics section has helped women deliver their babies safely. The section has done...patent, seedlings, and computer software. The government, placed in such a critical dilemma , must courageously and honestly make explanations to the

  18. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    Department of Anesthesiology, Chatrapati Shahuji Maharaj (CSMMU) (upgraded KGMC [King George's Medical College]), Lucknow, India .... SAJAA 2009;15(2) • Apr/May. Original Research. Table III: Intra-operative supplementary fentanyl requirement. * p < 0.05 (I vs II and I vs III). + p < 0.05 (II vs III). Group I (n = 20).

  19. A Medical Student Workshop in Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Kushins, Lawrence G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to teach applied respiratory physiology to medical students, the anesthesiology faculty at the University of Florida College of Medicine has designed and implemented a course that includes a laboratory workshop in mechanical ventilation of an animal model that allows students to apply and expand their knowledge. (JMD)

  20. fistulation and cannulation of goat single stage technique using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Y. P. Mbaya

    An effective device for rumen cannulation in sheep. Priory Lodge Education Limited 2007. Cairo, Egypt. Abdel-fattah, M., 1999. The goat as a model for experimental surgery. Ph.D. thesis, surgery, anesthesiology, and radiology, Fac. Vet. Med.,. Cairo Univ., Beni-Suef brnch, Egypt. Anderson, J. F., Frederikson, E. D., 1976.

  1. 75 FR 16353 - Revision of Organization and Conforming Changes to Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Office of the Administrative Law Judge.\\1\\ Office of Women's Health. Office of Policy, Planning & Budget... Laboratories Complex Staff. Division of Engineering Services. Environment, Safety And Strategic Initiatives... Anesthesiology, General Hospital, Infection Control, and Dental Devices. Office of Science and Engineering...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5365 - Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5365 Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment. (a) Identification. A posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary...

  3. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    ADDRESS OF POST-TENURE POSITION / JOB 0RGANIZATION University hospital Bonn, Dept. for Anesthesiology and operative Intensive Care medicine, Sigmund ... Freud -Str 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany 16) POST-TENURE POSITION STATUS / CATEGORY Please indicate only one. Permanent position at the NRC host agency

  4. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in a...

  5. Spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section: How can we make it safer?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... Jenkins JG, Khan MM: Anaesthesia for Caesarean section: a survey in a UK region from 1992 to 2002. Anaesthesia 2003; 58: 1114-8. 2. Hawkins JL, Koonin LM, Palmer SK, Gibbs CP: Anaesthesia-related deaths during obstetric delivery in the United States, 1979-1990. Anesthesiology 1997; 86: 277-284.

  6. Caesarean section and mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hawkins JL, Gibbs CP, Orleans M, et al. Obstetric anesthesia work force survey, versus 1992. Anesthesiology. 1981;1997(87):135–43. 2. Bert CJ, Atrash HK, Koonin KM, et al. Pregnacy related mortality in the. United States, 1987–1990. Obstet Gynecol. 1996;88:161–7. Received: 10-08-2015 Accepted: 14-08-2015.

  7. 42 CFR 405.502 - Criteria for determining reasonable charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Brief history and examination, and initiation of diagnostic and treatment programs. Treatment of an... manifesting itself by acute symptoms of sufficient severity (including severe pain) such that the absence of... organ or part. (iv) Anesthesiology services and diagnostic and therapeutic radiology services. (v...

  8. The Relationship between Esmolol and the Onset and Duration of Action of Succinylcholine in Patients Undergoing General or Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    including coronary arteries), and inhibition of glycogenolysis . Beta blockade has also been shown to alter the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen, shifting...Evaluation of acute cardiovascular effects of esmolol in the dog --awake and anesthetized with halothane and enflurane. Anesthesiology, 61, A17. Girard, D

  9. 21 CFR 868.5220 - Blow bottle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blow bottle. 868.5220 Section 868.5220 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5220 Blow bottle. (a) Identification. A blow bottle is a device that is intended for medical purposes to induce a forced expiration from a patient. The patient blows...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a patient's...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask. (a) Identification. A nonrebreathing mask is a device fitting over a patient's face to administer oxygen. It utilizes...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is a...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification. A scavenging mask is a device positioned over a patient's nose to deliver anesthetic or analgesic gases to the...

  16. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate medical...

  17. Ketamine and the Obstetric Patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... Finster, M. and Poppers, P. J. (1968): Anesthesiolngy, 29, 190. 7. Stenger, V. L., Blechner, J. N. and Prystowsky, H. (1969): Amer. J. Obstet. Gynec., 103, 901. 8. Marx, G. F., Joshi, C. W. and Orkin, L. R. (1970): Anesthesiology,. 32, 429. 9. Kalappa, R., Veland, K., Hansen, J. M. and Parek, J. T. (1971):. Amer.

  18. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  19. Double-balloon endoscopy: Who needs it?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, J.W.; Vilmann, P.; Jensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) made the small bowel accessible to inspection and therapy in its entirety. However, DBE is a time-consuming procedure that requires a highly skilled endoscopist, several nurses and - more often than not - anesthesiological support. This makes the selection...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5440 - Portable oxygen generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Portable oxygen generator. 868.5440 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5440 Portable oxygen generator. (a) Identification. A portable oxygen generator is a device that is intended to release oxygen for respiratory...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1100 - Arterial blood sampling kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1100 Arterial blood sampling kit. (a) Identification. An arterial blood sampling kit is a device, in kit form, used to obtain arterial blood samples... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arterial blood sampling kit. 868.1100 Section 868...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868.5795 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a...

  3. Caudal analgesia for herniotomy: Comparative evaluation of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... renders a drug useless for the recipient and defeats the main goal of anesthesiology: Safe relief from pain.[1]. Herniotomy ranks among the most common procedures in pediatric surgical practice, offering surgical cures with a high success rate for childhood inguino‑scrotal hernias.[2]. The surgical incision ...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5955 - Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment. 868.5955 Section 868.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5955 Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment. (a)...

  5. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Olusoji

    in a high dependency unit (HDU). 3.5% of. 1 which were transferred to the ICU . In a case control study which examined the risk factors for ICU admission during delivery in ..... The Internet Journal of. Anesthesiology. 2005 Volume 10 Number 2. 9. Gupta S, Naithani U, Doshi V, Bhargava V,. Vijay BS. Obstetric critical care: A.

  6. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade.

  7. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade. PMID:22428968

  8. Evolution of consciousness: phylogeny, ontogeny, and emergence from general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashour, George A; Alkire, Michael T

    2013-06-18

    Are animals conscious? If so, when did consciousness evolve? We address these long-standing and essential questions using a modern neuroscientific approach that draws on diverse fields such as consciousness studies, evolutionary neurobiology, animal psychology, and anesthesiology. We propose that the stepwise emergence from general anesthesia can serve as a reproducible model to study the evolution of consciousness across various species and use current data from anesthesiology to shed light on the phylogeny of consciousness. Ultimately, we conclude that the neurobiological structure of the vertebrate central nervous system is evolutionarily ancient and highly conserved across species and that the basic neurophysiologic mechanisms supporting consciousness in humans are found at the earliest points of vertebrate brain evolution. Thus, in agreement with Darwin's insight and the recent "Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness in Non-Human Animals," a review of modern scientific data suggests that the differences between species in terms of the ability to experience the world is one of degree and not kind.

  9. Lessons from the sky: an aviation-based framework for maximizing the delivery of quality anesthetic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Ashley Szabo

    2018-02-23

    Though aviation is practiced in airplanes and anesthesiology in operating rooms, the two professions have substantial parallels. Both require readiness to manage a crisis situation, where lives are at stake, at a moment's notice and with incomplete information. The determinants of quality performance in both professions extend far beyond knowledge base and formal training. The science of human factors, a prominent cornerstone of the aviation industry, has not yet found the same place in medicine, but it could change the understanding and execution of medical decision-making in profound ways. This article reviews specific components of crisis management and root cause analysis in aviation that can serve as models for improving those same aspects within anesthesiology.

  10. Estudo de traços de simplificação e explicitação em artigos científicos de anestesiologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Tavares Pinto Paiva

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the interdisciplinary research by Camargo (2004, 2005, the present study aims at examining aspects of simplification and explicitation (Baker, 1996 present in translated scientific papers of anesthesiology. According to Baker (1996, simplification is the tendency to simplify the language used in translated texts in order to facilitate for reader’s comprehension. It can be verified with the use of breaking up long sentences of original texts in their translation, punctuation changes, ambiguity resolution and lower lexical density compared to original texts. Explicitation is the overall tendency to explain, in the translated text, parts of the original text that had been left implicit. This tendency can be found in longer translated texts, as well as, syntactic and lexical changes. As study corpus, we have used a parallel corpus composed by 15 scientific texts originally written in Portuguese and their respective translated texts published in a scientific journal of anesthesiology.

  11. Anecdotes from the history of anesthesia in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieger, N.

    1995-01-01

    I believe that dentists have made important contributions to anesthesiology and patient care. Medical anesthesiology is now being required to provide more same-day or ambulatory care. Where it was once good sport to criticize dentists providing brief anesthesia services for their patients, it has now become appropriate for physician anesthesiologists to use shorter-acting agents, improved physiologic monitoring, reversal agents, and early discharge as part of their care of patients. Anecdotes are informative and often provide us with nostalgic recognition and a smile. Ask yourself how you would have responded to the needs of your patients if you were practicing 40 or more yrs ago. We owe a major debt of gratitude to our gallant forebearers and an acknowledgement saying "Well done," and "God bless." PMID:8934968

  12. Association of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms with oral cancer susceptibility: evidence from a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang S; Xu J; Zhuo Z; Hua Z

    2017-01-01

    Sui Jiang,1,* Jin-Dong Xu,2 Zhen-Jian Zhuo,3 Zhu-Ming Hua2,* 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 3School of Chinese Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a central enzyme involved ...

  13. Moderate glucose supply reduces hemolysis during systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Jägers J; Brauckmann S; Kirsch M; Effenberger-Neidnicht K

    2018-01-01

    Johannes Jägers,1 Stephan Brauckmann,2 Michael Kirsch,1 Katharina Effenberger-Neidnicht1,3 1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany Background: Systemic inflammation alters energy metabolism. A sufficient glucose level, however, is most important for erythrocytes, since erythrocy...

  14. Moderate glucose supply reduces hemolysis during systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Jägers,Johannes; Brauckmann,Stephan; Kirsch,Michael; Effenberger-Neidnicht,Katharina

    2018-01-01

    Johannes Jägers,1 Stephan Brauckmann,2 Michael Kirsch,1 Katharina Effenberger-Neidnicht1,3 1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany Background: Systemic inflammation alters energy metabolism. A sufficient glucose level, however, is most important for erythrocytes, since eryth...

  15. Extended-release hydrocodone – gift or curse?

    OpenAIRE

    Trescot, Andrea; Krashin,Daniel; Murinova,Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Daniel Krashin,1 Natalia Murinova,2 Andrea M Trescot31Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 2Department of Neurology University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA 3Algone Pain Center, Wasilla, AK, USAAbstract: Hydrocodone is a semisynthetic opioid, which has been used for decades as a short-acting analgesic combined with acetaminophen (or less commonly ibuprofen). Several long-acting, non-acetaminophen-containing hydrocodone formulations are undergoing trials in the US under the auspic...

  16. Newer treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Richard E Harris, Daniel J ClauwDepartment of Anesthesiology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a common chronic pain disorder of unknown etiology. The lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia has made this condition frustrating for patients and clinicians alike. The most common symptoms of this disorder are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, difficulty with memory, and morning stiffness. Emerging evidence p...

  17. Can we predict postoperative complications in elderly Chinese patients with hip fractures using the surgical risk calculator?

    OpenAIRE

    Wang X; Zhao BJ; Su Y

    2017-01-01

    Xiao Wang, Bin Jiang Zhao, Yue Su Department of Anesthesiology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Purpose: Hip fractures are associated with poor prognosis in elderly patients partly due to the high rate of postoperative complications. This study was aimed to investigate whether the surgical risk calculator is suitable for predicting postoperative complications in elderly Chinese patients with hip fractures.Methods: The incidence of postoperative complica...

  18. Duloxetine in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Howard; Smith,; Smith,

    2012-01-01

    Howard S Smith,1 Eric J Smith,2 Benjamin R Smith21Department of Anesthesiology, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY; 2The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USAAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is among the most frequent painful complaints that healthcare providers address. The bulk of these complaints are chronic low back pain and chronic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United State...

  19. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Paoletti; Chiara Bolego; Andrea Poli; Andrea Cignarella

    2006-01-01

    Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI), Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also...

  20. Efficacy of tramadol as a preincisional infiltration anesthetic in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair: a prospective randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Numanoğlu, Kemal Varım; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Er, Duygu TatlıEbubekir

    2014-01-01

    Kemal Varim Numanoğlu,1 Hilal Ayoğlu,2 Duygu Tatli,1 Ebubekir Er11Department of Pediatric Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bülent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak, TurkeyBackground: Preincisional local anesthetic infiltration at the surgical site is a therapeutic option for postoperative pain relief for pediatric inguinal hernia. Additionally, tramadol has been used as an analgesic for postoperative pain in children. Recently, the local anesthetic eff...

  1. Caroline B. Palmer: Pioneer Physician Anesthetist and First Chair of Anesthesia at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2015-12-01

    Caroline B. Palmer was appointed as Chief of Anesthesia at Cooper Medical College (soon renamed as Stanford Medical School) in 1909. For the next 28 years, she was an innovative leader, a clinical researcher, and a strong advocate for recognition of anesthesiology as a medical specialty. To honor her accomplishments, the operating room suite in the new Stanford Hospital will be named after this pioneering woman anesthesiologist.

  2. The Resident Academic Project Program: A Structured Approach to Inspiring Academic Development During Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Jill; Vaida, Sonia J; Bezinover, Dmitri; McCloskey, Diane E; Mets, Berend

    2016-02-15

    We report the successful implementation of structured resident academic projects in our Department of Anesthesiology at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Beginning with the graduating class of 2010, we adopted an expectation that each resident complete a project that results in a manuscript of publishable quality. Defining a clear timeline for all steps in the project and providing research education, as well as the necessary infrastructure and ongoing support, has helped grow the academic productivity of our anesthesia residents.

  3. Literature review of the usefulness of the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric blockade as part of multimodal management of postoperative analgesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman Brooks, Katia Maurenia

    2012-01-01

    An specialized literature review was realized for the practice of anesthesiology, revealing the usefulness of blockings of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves to control pain or postoperative analgesia. Pain and acute postoperative pain are defined. Also, the different techniques or pharmacological options for treating and controlling postoperative pain are determined. For example, systemic opioid and non-opioid analgesics, regional analgesic techniques (neuraxial and peripheral). The use of ultrasound is described as technical support to regional anesthesia and nerve block guided by images [es

  4. Management of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: role of netupitant–palonosetron combination

    OpenAIRE

    Janicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Piotr K JanickiDepartment of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USAPurpose: The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the recently published data (both original studies and reviews) on the oral medication NEPA, consisting of netupitant (a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist [NK1RA], 300 mg dose) and palonosetron (5-hydroxytryptamine [serotonin or 5HT] type 3 receptor ant...

  5. Alcohol Intoxication Impact on Outcome from Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    ethanol as related to trauma in the awake dog. J Trauma 11:76Y86, 1971. 18. Edgarian H, Altura BM: Ethanol and contraction of venous smooth muscle...vasodilation (Brackett et al., 1994), decreased cardiac output (Malt and Baue, 1971), impaired vasoreactivity (Edgarian and Altura , 1976), or depressed...increased with ethanol. J Emerg Med 18:165–171. Edgarian H, Altura BM (1976) Ethanol and contraction of venous smooth muscle. Anesthesiology 44:311–317

  6. Comparison of Women in Department Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology With Those in Other Specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Lisa G; Hacker, Michele R; Dodge, Laura E; Schutzberg, Rose; Ricciotti, Hope A

    2016-03-01

    To compare the representation of women in obstetrics and gynecology department-based leadership to other clinical specialties while accounting for proportions of women in historical residency cohorts. This was a cross-sectional observational study. The gender of department-based leaders (chair, vice chair, division director) and residency program directors was determined from websites of 950 academic departments of anesthesiology, diagnostic radiology, general surgery, internal medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, pathology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. Each specialty's representation ratio-proportion of leadership roles held by women in 2013 divided by proportion of residents in 1990 who were women-and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. A ratio of 1 indicates proportionate representation. Women were significantly underrepresented among chairs for all specialties (ratios 0.60 or less, P≤.02) and division directors for all specialties except anesthesiology (ratio 1.13, 95% CI 0.87-1.46) and diagnostic radiology (ratio 0.97, 95% CI 0.81-1.16). The representation ratio for vice chair was below 1.0 for all specialties except anesthesiology; this finding reached statistical significance only for pathology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. Women were significantly overrepresented as residency program directors in general surgery, anesthesiology, obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatrics (ratios greater than 1.19, P≤.046). Obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics had the highest proportions of residents in 1990 and department leaders in 2013 who were women. Despite having the largest proportion of leaders who were women, representation ratios demonstrate obstetrics and gynecology is behind other specialties in progression of women to departmental leadership. Women's overrepresentation as residency program directors raises concern because education-based academic tracks may not lead to major leadership roles.

  7. Comparison of Women in Department Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology With Other Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Lisa G.; Hacker, Michele R.; Dodge, Laura E.; Schutzberg, Rose; Ricciotti, Hope A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the representation of women in Obstetrics and Gynecology department-based leadership to other clinical specialties, while accounting for proportions of women in historical residency cohorts. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study. The gender of department-based leaders (chair, vice chair, division director) and residency program directors was determined from websites of 950 academic departments of Anesthesiology, Diagnostic Radiology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pathology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry. Each specialty's representation ratio—proportion of leadership roles held by women in 2013 divided by proportion of residents in 1990 who were women—and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. A ratio of one indicates proportionate representation. Results Women were significantly under-represented among chairs for all specialties (ratios ≤0.60, P≤0.02) and division directors for all specialties except Anesthesiology (ratio: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.87–1.46) and Diagnostic Radiology (ratio: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.81–1.16). The representation ratio for vice chair was below 1.0 for all specialties except Anesthesiology; this finding reached statistical significance only for Pathology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry. Women were significantly over-represented as residency program directors in General Surgery, Anesthesiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pediatrics (ratios >1.19, P≤0.046). Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pediatrics had the highest proportions of residents in 1990 and department leaders in 2013 who were women. Conclusion Despite having the largest proportion of leaders who were women, representation ratios demonstrate Obstetrics and Gynecology is behind other specialties in progression of women to departmental leadership. Women's over-representation as residency program directors raises concern because education-based academic tracks may not lead to major leadership roles. PMID

  8. Usefulness of Ultrasound View of Larynx in Pre-Anesthetic Airway Assessment: A Comparison With Cormack-Lehane Classification During Direct Laryngoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani Mohammadi, Sussan; Saliminia, Alireza; Nejatifard, Nasim; Azma, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the main challenges in anesthesiology is difficult intubation. There are many anatomical parameters for evaluating the feasibility of tracheal intubation; one that can reliably predict a difficult intubation is the Cormack-Lehane classification obtained during direct laryngoscopy. This is an invasive procedure that cannot be performed in an awake patient or for pre-anesthetic airway assessments in patients with no prior history of tracheal intubation. Recently, ultrasound ha...

  9. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alimi, David

    2015-01-01

    David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have resi...

  10. Outcome and Complications in Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Stenosis or Spondylolisthesis in Geriatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin-Young; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Suh, Bo-Kyung; Yang, Myung Ho; Park, Moon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Development of anesthesiology and improvement of surgical instruments enabled aggressive surgical treatment even in elderly patients, who require more active physical activities than they were in the past. However, there are controversies about the clinical outcome of spinal surgery in elderly patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical outcome of spinal surgery in elderly patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. MEDLINE s...

  11. Suppression of kidney pathological function using roentgenoendovascular occlusion in patients with chronic renal insufficiency before or after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Matevosov, A.L.; Gotman, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    The carried out investigations on REO efficiency in treatment of refractory hypertension in patients with chronic insufficiency(CRI) and renal ischemia of vascular origin manifested necessity of separation of diagnostic and tretment stages, anesthesiologic supply is important for efficient REO of renal arteries. It is shown that REO of renal arteries in patients with CRI before and after kidney transplantation is relatively safe and sufficiently reliable method of treating renin-dependent arterial hypertension

  12. Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief with Alternative Perineural Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    histamine release in human skin mast cells induced by morphine, fentanyl, and oxymorphone. Anesthesiology. 1985;62:124Y129. 20. Busch-Dienstfertig M...systemic side effects in vivo. D and B blocked neither C- nor A-fibers at clinically relevant concentrations. The combination of B, C and D had no...influence on either LA- or M- induced nerve block. Further analysis of M effects indicated that peripheral nerve block and toxicity were due to a

  13. Neurotox-98 Neuroprotection by Progesterones Through Stimulation of Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    partially supported by this award. He is now Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 3. This award...Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care and of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 4. The postdoctoral research of Dr...A., Bowlby , D.A., MacLusky, N.J., 1999. Steroid hormones affect limbic afterdischarge thresholds and kindling rates in adult female rats. Brain Res

  14. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy Extended Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    development of cerebral edema . Insults and behavioral testing of therapy 8, AER-271 have been completed and data are being analyzed. Therapy 9, amantadine is...necessary fluid resuscitation—highlights the development of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension (Blasiole et al, Anesthesiology, 118:649...8. AER 271 (a more speculative therapy tested on OBTT-ES) Treatment of cerebral edema after TBI has largely been accomplished via five

  15. Cystic fibrosis: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care

    OpenAIRE

    Kreindler, James L; Miller, Victoria A

    2013-01-01

    James L Kreindler,1,2 Victoria A Miller1,31The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Survival for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) increased to nearly 40 years in 2012 from the early childhood years in the 1940s. Therefore, patients are living long enough to require transition from pediatric CF centers to ...

  16. SAJAA MarApr 40-4 Con.fh9

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studio G5

    Levin AI, MBChB, MMed(Anes), PhD, DA(SA), FCA. Coetzee AR, MBChB, PhD, MMed(Anes), ..... Anesth Analg 1999 Jan;88(1):224–6. 50. Benumof JL. Airway exchange catheters: Simple concept, potentially great danger. Anesthesiology 1999 Aug;91(2):342–4. 51. Chen WY, Lin JA, Chen HL, Wong CS, Ho ST, Lu CC.

  17. Assessment of effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis and caudal epidural injections in managing post lumbar surgery syndrome: 2-year follow-up of a randomized, controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2012-01-01

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Vijay Singh,3 Kimberly A Cash,1 Vidyasagar Pampati11Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 3Pain Diagnostics Associates, Niagara, WI, USABackground: The literature is replete with evaluations of failed surgery, illustrating a 9.5%–25% reoperation rate. Speculated causes of post lumbar surgery syndrome include epidural fibrosis, acquired stenosis, recu...

  18. Anesthesia and pain management in traditional Iranian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Alireza; Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda

    2016-12-01

    Studying the history of science could help develop an understanding of the contributions made by ancient nations towards scientific advances. Although Iranians had an important impact on the improvement of science, the history of Iranian medicine seems not to have been given enough attention by historians. The present study focused on the history of anesthesia and pain management in Iranian medical history. In this regard, related books such as Avesta and Shahnameh were studied in order to obtain the history of anesthesiology in Iranian pre Islamic era. This subject was also studied in the famous books of Rhazes, Haly Abbas, Avicenna, Jorjani, MomenTunekaboni and Aghili from different times of the Islamic era. Scientific data bases such as PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched using key words "Iranian", "Persian", "pain management" and "anesthesia". It was discovered that pain management and anesthesiology were well known to the Iranians. Rhazes and Avicenna had innovations in this regard. Fourteen Mokhader (anesthetic) herbs, which were included in the collection of the previous knowledge of the 18th century entitled Makhzan al-Advieyh and used as the Persian Materia Medica, were identified and listed. This study introduces the history of anesthesiology and pain management at different periods in the history of Iran.

  19. Review article: leading the future: guiding two predominant paradigm shifts in medical education through scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Viren N; Wong, Anne K; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to consolidate some of the key concepts about scholarship in education related to the specialty of anesthesiology. We frame the discussion on two paradigm shifts in medical education, i.e., competency-based education and lifelong learning, and the scholarly approaches to lead these paradigm shifts in anesthesiology. Conventional medical education is being challenged by a shift from time-based education to competency-based education. This potential shift will also create a continuous need to foster a culture of lifelong learning in contrast with the traditional compartmentalized model of undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education. The specialty of anesthesia has the capacity to lead these changes by enhancing scholarship in education locally and nationally. The promotion of scholarship in education necessitates the creation of infrastructure and accountability frameworks to show return on investment. High-quality scholarship in medical education requires a solid rationale and, ultimately, a demonstrable benefit to patient care. Accountability of lifelong learning to established competency frameworks seems inevitable. Anesthesiology is one of only a few specialties that can truly protect faculty from clinical responsibilities in favour of scholarship pursuits. With appropriate support for scholarship in education, anesthesiologists have an opportunity to lead these paradigm shifts.

  20. Blended learning in anesthesia education: current state and future model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Jaya; Kurup, Viji

    2012-12-01

    Educators in anesthesia residency programs across the country are facing a number of challenges as they attempt to integrate blended learning techniques in their curriculum. Compared with the rest of higher education, which has made advances to varying degrees in the adoption of online learning anesthesiology education has been sporadic in the active integration of blended learning. The purpose of this review is to discuss the challenges in anesthesiology education and relevance of the Universal Design for Learning framework in addressing them. There is a wide chasm between student demand for online education and the availability of trained faculty to teach. The design of the learning interface is important and will significantly affect the learning experience for the student. This review examines recent literature pertaining to this field, both in the realm of higher education in general and medical education in particular, and proposes the application of a comprehensive learning model that is new to anesthesiology education and relevant to its goals of promoting self-directed learning.

  1. Shaping the operating room and perioperative systems of the future: innovating for improved competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Andreas R; Sandberg, Warren S

    2010-12-01

    To review the current state of anesthesiology for operative and invasive procedures, with an eye toward possible future states. Anesthesiology is at once a mature specialty and in a crisis--requiring breakthrough to move forward. The cost of care now approaches reimbursement, and outcomes as commonly measured approach perfection. Thus, the cost of further improvements seems ready to topple the field, just as the specialty is realizing that seemingly innocuous anesthetic choices have long-term consequences, and better practice is required. Anesthesiologists must create more headroom between costs and revenues in order to sustain the academic vigor and creativity required to create better clinical practice. We outline three areas in which technological and organizational innovation in anesthesiology can improve competitiveness and become a driving force in collaborative efforts to develop the operating rooms and perioperative systems of the future: increasing the profitability of operating rooms; increasing the efficiency of anesthesia; and technological and organizational innovation to foster improved patient flow, communication, coordination, and organizational learning.

  2. Factors Influencing the Choice of Anesthesia as a Career by Undergraduates of the University of Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Denise M; Wong, Rex; Runnels, Sean; Muhizi, Epaphrodite; McClain, Craig D

    2016-08-01

    Rwanda currently faces a severe shortage of trained medical personnel, including physician anesthesiologists. The recruitment of residents into the anesthesia program has been consistently low. This study aimed at determining the factors that influence undergraduates' decision to pursue anesthesia as a career choice. A questionnaire was created and administered to final year undergraduate medical students at the University of Rwanda. The questionnaire was created based on factors identified from literature review and key informant interviews. The questionnaire was translated, field-tested, and refined. The final survey questionnaire contains 27 4-point Likert scale items and 4 free-text questions. Seventy-nine final year undergraduate medical students responded to the survey. Only 2 students (2.5%) chose anesthesia as their top choice for postgraduate training. The most frequently named factors for not choosing anesthesiology were long work hours and high stress level, insufficient mentorship, and low job opportunity. The issues identified by our survey must be considered when making efforts toward increasing anesthesia recruitment in Rwanda. Factors such as lack of material resources and high workload will not be easily addressed. Others can be addressed through changes in medical student anesthesiology rotations and better mentorship by anesthesiologists during formative years. Focusing on factors that can be changed now may increase enrollment into anesthesiology. Future studies will include broadening the survey population and further investigating the influencing factors elucidated by this study.

  3. The Current Landscape of US Pediatric Anesthesiologists: Demographic Characteristics and Geographic Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Muffly, Tyler M; Weterings, Robbie; Singleton, Mark; Honkanen, Anita

    2016-07-01

    There is no comprehensive database of pediatric anesthesiologists, their demographic characteristics, or geographic location in the United States. We endeavored to create a comprehensive database of pediatric anesthesiologists by merging individuals identified as US pediatric anesthesiologists by the American Board of Anesthesiology, National Provider Identifier registry, Healthgrades.com database, and the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia membership list as of November 5, 2015. Professorial rank was accessed via the Association of American Medical Colleges and other online sources. Descriptive statistics characterized pediatric anesthesiologists' demographics. Pediatric anesthesiologists' locations at the city and state level were geocoded and mapped with the use of ArcGIS Desktop 10.1 mapping software (Redlands, CA). We identified 4048 pediatric anesthesiologists in the United States, which is approximately 8.8% of the physician anesthesiology workforce (n = 46,000). The median age of pediatric anesthesiologists was 49 years (interquartile range, 40-57 years), and the majority (56.4%) were men. Approximately two-thirds of identified pediatric anesthesiologists were subspecialty board certified in pediatric anesthesiology, and 33% of pediatric anesthesiologists had an identified academic affiliation. There is substantial heterogeneity in the geographic distribution of pediatric anesthesiologists by state and US Census Division with urban clustering. This description of pediatric anesthesiologists' demographic characteristics and geographic distribution fills an important gap in our understanding of pediatric anesthesia systems of care.

  4. Anesthetic services in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Due to the development of knowledge and technology our world is becoming a global city where rapidly occur changes in political and economic milieu, such as the introduction of corporate capitalism in the economic crisis, contemporary migrations etc. Health care as a public good on one hand and as the highest individual value of each individual on the other hand, changes and suffers changes. Health care system policy insists on partnership relation of the individual with medical service providers. This refers to the a secure and accessible modern treatment of each individual and to the state as to rationalize and reduce medical costs with effective methods of treatment. Topic position in scientific/professional public: Anesthesiology is evolving along with the surgical disciplines. Highly sophisticated with organized service, anesthesiology is equally important because of the multiplicity of anesthetic services in the surgical treatment of the disease in terms of teamwork and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease. The intention is to provide a description of work, education and our results in the economic, geopolitical and cultural context of the Serbian health system policy as well as to improve safe performance, availability and cost rationalization in anesthesia. The health care system is territorially organized in Serbia. In hospitals, Serbia employs 940 anesthesiologists (1:7,575 inhabitants. According to data from the Regional Medical Chamber of Belgrade,382 anesthesiologists were registered in Belgrade out of total. Anesthesia department network is well organized in all surgical hospitals. Anesthesia services are available depending on the place of residence, type of surgical illness or injury, and the distance to the nearest clinic. Sub-specializations in the field of anesthesiology have not been introduced although pediatric, neurosurgery and cardiosurgical anesthesia have spontaniously singled, as well as

  5. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Shi,1,* Ke Jiang,2,* Zhaoduan Li,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, glutamate, glutamate transporter-1

  6. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block, caudal analgesia, or surgical site infiltration for pediatric umbilical herniorrhaphy: a prospective, double-blinded, randomized comparison of three regional anesthetic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relland LM

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lance M Relland,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,1–3 David Martin,1,2 Giorgio Veneziano,1,2 Ralph J Beltran,1,2 Christopher McKee,1,2 Tarun Bhalla1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Umbilical hernia repair is a common pediatric surgical procedure. While opioid analgesics are a feasible option and have long been a mainstay in the pharmacological intervention for pain, the effort to improve care and limit opioid-related adverse effects has led to the use of alternative techniques, including regional anesthesia. The current study prospectively compares the analgesic efficacy of three techniques, including caudal epidural blockade, peripheral nerve blockade, and local wound infiltration, in a double-blinded study.Patients and methods: A total of 39 patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair were randomized to receive a caudal epidural block (CDL, ultrasound-guided bilateral rectus sheath blocks (RSB, or surgical site infiltration (SSI with local anesthetic. Intraoperative anesthetic care was standardized, and treatment groups were otherwise blinded from the intraoperative anesthesiology team and recovery nurses. Postoperatively, the efficacy was evaluated using Hannallah pain scores, Aldrete recovery scores, the need for intravenous fentanyl, and the time to discharge.Results: Each cohort was similar in terms of age, weight, premedication dosing, length of case, intraoperative and postoperative fentanyl requirements, and time to tracheal extubation. Among the three cohorts, there were no significant differences noted in terms of pain scores or time to recovery.Conclusion: All the three techniques provided effective analgesia following umbilical hernia repair. Our findings offer

  7. The postgraduate hospital educational environment measure (PHEEM questionnaire identifies quality of instruction as a key factor predicting academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Edson Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzes the reliability of the PHEEM questionnaire translated into Portuguese. We present the results of PHEEM following distribution to doctors in three different medical residency programs at a university hospital in Brazil. INTRODUCTION: Efforts to understand environmental factors that foster effective learning resulted in the development of a questionnaire to measure medical residents' perceptions of the level of autonomy, teaching quality and social support in their programs. METHODS: The questionnaire was translated using the modified Brislin back-translation technique. Cronbach's alpha test was used to ensure good reliability and ANOVA was used to compare PHEEM results among residents from the Surgery, Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine departments. The Kappa coefficient was used as a measure of agreement, and factor analysis was employed to evaluate the construct strength of the three domains suggested by the original PHEEM questionnaire. RESULTS: The PHEEM survey was completed by 306 medical residents and the resulting Cronbach's alpha was 0.899. The weighted Kappa was showed excellent reliability. Autonomy was rated most highly by Internal Medicine residents (63.7% ± 13.6%. Teaching was rated highest in Anesthesiology (66.7% ± 15.4%. Residents across the three areas had similar perceptions of social support (59.0% ± 13.3% for Surgery; 60.5% ± 13.6% for Internal Medicine; 61.4% ± 14.4% for Anesthesiology. Factor analysis suggested that nine factors explained 58.9% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that PHEEM is a reliable instrument for measuring the quality of medical residency programs at a Brazilian teaching hospital. The results suggest that quality of teaching was the best indicator of overall response to the questionnaire.

  8. Inclusion of non-English-speaking patients in research: A single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Rachel; Halpin, Erin; Staffa, Steven J; Benson, Lindsey; DiNardo, James A; Nasr, Viviane G

    2018-03-30

    Considering the recent increase in medical care provided to patients from foreign countries and the diversity of languages spoken by families living within the United States, it is important to determine whether non-English-speaking patients have access to participate in clinical research from which they may benefit. We aimed to determine the number of non-English-speaking patients presenting to Boston Children's Hospital for medical care between 2011 and 2016, the number of clinical research protocols active within the Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine approved to enroll non-English-speaking patients, as well as the number of both non-English- and English-speaking patients approached and enrolled in these studies. Furthermore, we attempted to determine barriers that may have prevented non-English-speaking patients from inclusion in clinical research. We conducted a retrospective review of various data sources during a 5-year period. Data included the number of non-English-speaking patients presenting to Boston Children's Hospital for care as well as the number of English- and non-English-speaking patients approached for studies at the Department of Anesthesiology each year. Additionally, we reviewed data from the IRB which included the justification that research teams provided when opting to exclude non-English-speaking participants. In addition, we attempted to determine the barriers that may have prevented these patients from inclusion in research protocols. We found that the number of non-English-speaking patients presenting to Boston Children's Hospital increased over time. However, the number of studies approved to enroll non-English-speaking patients within the Department of Anesthesiology and the rate of enrollment of these patients did not increase at the same rate. In order to increase the number of non-English-speaking patients approached to participate in research, we must improve cultural awareness and provide investigators

  9. Cuffed endotracheal tubes in infants and children: should we routinely measure the cuff pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joseph D; Schwartz, Lawrence; Rice, Julie; Jatana, Kris; Kang, D Richard

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a change in the clinical practice of pediatric anesthesiology with a transition to the use of cuffed instead of uncuffed endotracheal tubes in infants and children. However, there are few studies evaluating the current practices of inflation of these cuffs and the intracuff pressures. There was no change dictated in clinical practice for these patients. During the first 30 min of the case, the pressure in the cuff was measured using a hand held manometer. Additional data collected included the patient's demographic data (age, weight, and gender), the size of the ETT, whether nitrous oxide was in use, whether the patient was breathing spontaneously or undergoing positive pressure ventilation, and the type of anesthesia provider (resident, fellow, CRNA or SRNA). The cohort for the study included 200 patients ranging in age from 1 month to 17 years and in weight from 3.5 to 99.1 kg. The average cuff pressure was 23 ± 22 cmH(2)O in the total cohort of 200 patients. The cuff pressure was ≥ 30 cmH(2)O in 47 of the 200 patients (23.5%). The average cuff pressure was significantly higher in patients who were 8 years of age or greater compared to younger patients. Additionally, there were significantly more patients with a cuff pressure ≥ 30 cmH(2)O in the ≥ 8 year old age group. Although no difference in the mean cuff pressure was noted when comparing staff anesthesia providers (pediatric anesthesiologist or CRNA) versus trainees (SRNA, anesthesiology resident, medical student or pediatric anesthesiology fellow), the incidence of significantly excessive cuff pressures (≥ 60 cmH(2)O) was higher in the trainee group versus the faculty group (12 of 99 versus 2 of 101, ppressure greater than the generally recommended upper limit of 30 cmH(2)O. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cost-Conscious of Anesthesia Physicians: An awareness survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimoglu, Sedat; Hancı, Volkan; Karcıoglu, Murat; Tuzcu, Kasım; Davarcı, Isıl; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Increasing competitive pressure and health performance system in the hospitals result in pressure to reduce the resources allocated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anesthesiology and intensive care physicians awareness of the cost of the materials used and to determine the factors that influence it. This survey was conducted between September 2012 and September 2013 after the approval of the local ethics committee. Overall 149 anesthetists were included in the study. Participants were asked to estimate the cost of 30 products used by anesthesiology and intensive care units. One hundred forty nine doctors, 45% female and 55% male, participated in this study. Of the total 30 questions the averages of cost estimations were 5.8% accurate estimation, 35.13% underestimation and 59.16% overestimation. When the participants were divided into the different groups of institution, duration of working in this profession and sex, there were no statistically significant differences regarding accurate estimation. However, there was statistically significant difference in underestimation. In underestimation, there was no significant difference between 16-20 year group and >20 year group but these two groups have more price overestimation than the other groups (p=0.031). Furthermore, when all the participants were evaluated there were no significant difference between age-accurate cost estimation and profession time-accurate cost estimation. Anesthesiology and intensive care physicians in this survey have an insufficient awareness of the cost of the drugs and materials that they use. The institution and experience are not effective factors for accurate estimate. Programs for improving the health workers knowledge creating awareness of cost should be planned in order to use the resources more efficiently and cost effectively.

  11. Ultrasound for the Anesthesiologists: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. Terkawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a safe, portable, relatively inexpensive, and easily accessible imaging modality, making it a useful diagnostic and monitoring tool in medicine. Anesthesiologists encounter a variety of emergent situations and may benefit from the application of such a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in their routine practice. This paper reviews current and potential applications of ultrasound in anesthesiology in order to encourage anesthesiologists to learn and use this useful tool as an adjunct to physical examination. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade and vascular access represent the most popular ultrasound applications in anesthesiology. Ultrasound has recently started to substitute for CT scans and fluoroscopy in many pain treatment procedures. Although the application of airway ultrasound is still limited, it has a promising future. Lung ultrasound is a well-established field in point-of-care medicine, and it could have a great impact if utilized in our ORs, as it may help in rapid and accurate diagnosis in many emergent situations. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD measurement and transcranial color coded duplex (TCCD are relatively new neuroimaging modalities, which assess intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow. Gastric ultrasound can be used for assessment of gastric content and diagnosis of full stomach. Focused transthoracic (TTE and transesophageal (TEE echocardiography facilitate the assessment of left and right ventricular function, cardiac valve abnormalities, and volume status as well as guiding cardiac resuscitation. Thus, there are multiple potential areas where ultrasound can play a significant role in guiding otherwise blind and invasive interventions, diagnosing critical conditions, and assessing for possible anatomic variations that may lead to plan modification. We suggest that ultrasound training should be part of any anesthesiology training program curriculum.

  12. Medical student indebtedness and choice of specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M

    1993-01-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the impact of indebtedness on medical student choice of specialty. Nonprimary care was disaggregated into distinct specialties. The study found that indebtedness induced medical students to choose the remunerative field of anesthesiology but had the opposite effect on the decision to choose the comparably remunerative field of radiology. The results imply that if specialties are aggregated into broad categories, such as primary and nonprimary care, the estimated impact of indebtedness on specialty choice may be misleading. Such estimates may also be biased if the type of medical school attended (public or private) is not included as a control variable.

  13. Total Intravenous Anesthesia Including Ketamine versus Volatile Gas Anesthesia for Combat-related Operative Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Total vent days†‡ 2 (1–6) 2 (0–6) 0.31 Total ICU days†‡ 5 (3–10) 5 (2–9) 0.19 Total hospitalization days†‡ 10 (5–24) 8 (4–16) 0.21 GOS* 3.4 1.4 4...activated; FFP given fresh frozen plasma administered intraoperatively; GOS Glasgow Outcome Score; ICP intracranial pressure; ICU intensive care...in neonatal rats. ANESTHESIOLOGY 2004; 101:695–703 24. Strebel S, Lam AM, Matta B, Mayberg TS, Aaslid R, Newell DW: Dynamic and static cerebral

  14. Caffeine as an opioid analgesic adjuvant in fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Scott JR; Hassett AL; Brummett CM; Harris RE; Clauw DJ; Harte SE

    2017-01-01

    J Ryan Scott,1 Afton L Hassett,1 Chad M Brummett,1 Richard E Harris,1,2 Daniel J Clauw,1,2 Steven E Harte1,2 1Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center, Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background: Caffeine’s properties as an analgesic adjuvant with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/acetaminophen are well documented. However, little clinical research has explored ca­ffeine&a...

  15. The development of pain medicine in Italy and the rest of Europe 40 years after the first International Association for the Study of Pain Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Professor Giustino Varrassi and Antonella Paladini speak to Jade Parker, Commissioning Editor: Professor Giustino Varrassi is Full Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine in the LUdeS University, Valletta, Malta. He graduated at the Medical School of the University 'La Sapienza' (Rome, Italy) in 1973, and became board certified in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care in 1976 and in Pneumology in 1978, both in the same Medical School. He is currently President of the European League Against Pain and of the Paolo Procacci Foundation, and is a founding member of both of these. He is also a member of the World Institute of Pain, and a member of the Board of the Associazione Italiana per lo Studio del Dolore. He has been an invited speaker at more than 500 congresses (national and international), mainly in obstetric anesthesia and pain medicine. He is also the author of approximately 500 papers, published in international and national scientific journals, and 46 book chapters, mainly on obstetric anesthesia and pain medicine. He is the editor of 31 books and congress proceedings, including a textbook on obstetric anesthesia. He has also been the organizer of around 40 congresses, including European and World congresses on Pain Medicine. Professor Antonella Paladini is an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the L'Aquila University, Italy. She has recently been nominated as Associate Professor of Anesthesiology in the LUdeS University, in Valletta, Malta. She graduated in medicine at L'Aquila University in 1989, and has got her Board Certification with laude in Anesthesia in 1992 and served as anesthetist in few teaching hospitals, mainly in cardiac surgery departments. Since 2000, she is in charge of the L'Aquila University, and has addressed her interests toward pain medicine. In 2004, she got the Board Certificate in Pain Medicine, with laude, in the University of Verona. She has a huge scientific production, with over 60 papers published in

  16. Using digital media to keep anesthesia history alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rafael A; Rengasamy, Sundara K

    2005-01-01

    Multimedia applications have been developed to explain many aspects of anesthesiology, including anesthesia machines, cardiopulmonary bypass systems, airway management, anesthetic pharmacology, regional anesthesia, and more recently, the history of the specialty. This article describes how computer-assisted instruction and multimedia have made it possible for an anesthesia department in a teaching hospital to become involved in the preservation, publication, and distribution of historically related anesthesia materials. The production of a digital video disc (DVD) based on the career of Leroy D. Vandam is discussed to illustrate the value of digital media in preserving, rejuvenating, and distributing anesthesia-related historical materials.

  17. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...... critically ill patients in the ICU outside the context of randomized controlled trials (GRADE 1C). No robust evidence supports recommendations for subpopulations in the ICU such as septic, burn, trauma, cardiothoracic or enterally fed patients. However, if SUP is considered clinically indicated in individual...

  18. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin C Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve.

  19. Preeclampsia/Eclampsia: An Insight into the Dilemma of Treatment by the Anesthesiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Hussain Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available "nA complicated and controversial subject in obstetrics i.e., toxemia of pregnancy is looked upon, both from an anesthesiological and obstetrical point of view. As pre-eclampsia and eclampsia involve immediate treatment and obstetric considerations, the choice between epidural and general anesthesia becomes necessary when cesarean section is contemplated. Apart from the pathophysiology of the vessel spasm as it is induced by preeclampsia, the therapeutic managements of fluid administration, the drugs of choice to treat hypertension as well as the technical aspects of anesthesia are reviewed.

  20. Preeclampsia/eclampsia: an insight into the dilemma of treatment by the anesthesiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahid Hussain

    2011-01-01

    A complicated and controversial subject in obstetrics i.e., toxemia of pregnancy is looked upon, both from an anesthesiological and obstetrical point of view. As pre-eclampsia and eclampsia involve immediate treatment and obstetric considerations, the choice between epidural and general anesthesia becomes necessary when cesarean section is contemplated. Apart from the pathophysiology of the vessel spasm as it is induced by preeclampsia, the therapeutic managements of fluid administration, the drugs of choice to treat hypertension as well as the technical aspects of anesthesia are reviewed.

  1. Locally advanced transverse colon cancer with Trousseau’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aliyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Migratory venous thrombosis is a manifestation of the rare paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with malignant neoplasms. The paper describes successful surgical treatment in a young patient with a colon tumor associated with Trousseau’s syndrome. The latter manifesting itself as ischemia forced urgent surgeons to amputate the lower third of the left leg. Locally advanced transverse colon cancer spreading to the great vessels was subsequently diagnosed. All paraneoplastic manifestations disappeared after tumor removal. The patient was professionally given surgical, anesthesiological, and resuscitative aids that not only improved his quality of life, but also gave the chance to prolong it.

  2. The Effect of Using a Written Preanesthetic Machine Checklist on Detection of Anesthesia Machine Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    liability: A lawyer’s viewpoint. ASA Newsletter, December, 1984. "i-A>. 39 38. MacKent, S.H. Advanced Medical Malpractice : Anesthesiology, General Surgery ...supply was lost. . 4. LV, 18 7. There was a 1/2" hole in the plastic tubing of the oxygen circle system, creating a leak in the breathing system and... plastic dome which covers the unidirectional valves is often clouded by condensation of water vapor. The oversight of the oxygen low pressure alarm is

  3. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  4. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  5. [Coping with complex medical emergency situations : Competent and successful decision-making, communication and leadership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, B; Gasch, B; Padosch, S A

    2015-04-01

    Stress is an integral part of the daily routine among healthcare workers in anesthesiology and emergency medicine. This article describes negative stress effects in complex emergency situations and presents helpful tools for coping with them. Evaluation and discussion of selected medical and psychological publications and the inclusion of expert opinions are presented. Negative stress of healthcare providers in medical emergencies severely affects their reasoning and communication and is inadequately taken into account during routine care. Research in aviation and psychology has provided various tools to improve performance during stressful events and should be taken into consideration for routine daily use.

  6. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and complete tracheal rings: Repair on ECMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J. Tharakan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A term newborn female presented with prenatally diagnosed congenital diaphragmatic hernia and postnatally diagnosed complete tracheal rings and tracheal stenosis. Initially, the spells associated with tracheal stenosis were misdiagnosed as pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed a critically narrowed airway, and veno-arterial ECMO stabilized the baby for further workup. The endotracheal tube was removed while on ECMO to avoid further injury to the airway. Staged CDH repair followed by slide tracheoplasty were performed on ECMO. The multidisciplinary approach included neonatology, general surgery, otolaryngology, cardiac surgery and anesthesiology.

  7. Cognitive effects of electro-acupuncture and pregabalin in a trigeminal neuralgia rat model induced by cobra venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen RW

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruo-Wen Chen,1,2 Hui Liu,2 Jian-Xiong An,1,2 Xiao-Yan Qian,2 Yi-De Jiang,2 Doris K Cope,3 John P Williams,3 Rui Zhang,1 Li-Na Sun1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang City, Shandong, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine and Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University and Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA and pregabalin on cognition impairment induced by chronic trigeminal neuralgia (TN in rats. Design: Controlled animal study. Setting: Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine and Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University. Subjects: Forty adult male Sprague Dawley rats. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into four groups. The TN model was induced by administration of cobra venom to the left infraorbital nerve. On postoperative day 14, either EA or pregabalin was administered, free behavioral activities were observed. Spatial learning and memory abilities were determined in the Morris water maze. The ultrastructural alterations of the Gasserian ganglion, medulla oblongata and hippocampus were examined by electron microscopy. The changes on long-term potentiation were investigated. Results: After treatment, the exploratory behavior increased and the grooming behavior decreased (P<0.05 for the EA group and pregabalin group compared with the cobra venom group; moreover, demyelination of neurons in Gasserian ganglion and medulla oblongata was reversed. The number of platform site crossings, the average percentages of time in the target quadrant and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential slopes increased (P<0.05 in the EA group compared to the cobra venom group. However, the pregabalin group

  8. Ketamine - A Multifaceted Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Li, Jian; Lu, Yi; Sun, Dajin; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Liu, Renyu; Luo, Jin Jun

    There is a petition for tight control of ketamine from the Chinese government to classify ketamine as a Schedule I drug, which is defined as a drug with no currently accepted medical use but a high potential for abuse. However, ketamine has unique properties that can benefit different patient populations. Scholars from the Translational Perioperative and Pain Medicine and the International Chinese Academy of Anesthesiology WeChat groups had an interactive discussion on ketamine, including its current medical applications, future research priorities, and benefits versus risks. The discussion is summarized in this manuscript with some minor edits.

  9. An anesthesiologist with an allergy to multiple neuromuscular blocking drugs: a new occupational hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Matthew J; Goel, Pooja

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of a final-year anesthesiology trainee who developed a severe allergic reaction to cutaneous exposure of succinylcholine. Intradermal testing was strongly positive to succinylcholine and all the aminosteroid neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBDs). Specific immunoglobulin E to succinylcholine was also strongly positive. This unusual case of an anesthesiologist acquiring an allergy to an NMBD through occupational exposure has a significant effect on his practice of anesthesia. However, by avoiding operating rooms with a high usage of NMBDs and by wearing personal protective equipment, the anesthesiologist has worked in clinical anesthesia without incident.

  10. Tramadol/paracetamol combination tablet for postoperative pain following ambulatory hand surgery: a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, parallel-group trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawal N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Narinder Rawal1, Valery Macquaire2, Elena Catalá3, Marco Berti4, Rui Costa5, Markus Wietlisbach61Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; 2Clinique du Parc Leopold, Brussels, Belgium; 3Pain Clinic, Department Anesthesiology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Parma Hospital, Parma, Italy; 5Garcia de Orta Hospital, Almada, Portugal; 6Department of Anesthesiology, Sursee Hospital, Sursee, SwitzerlandAbstract: This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter trial compared efficacy and safety of tramadol HCL 37.5 mg/paracetamol 325 mg combination tablet with tramadol HCL 50 mg capsule in the treatment of postoperative pain following ambulatory hand surgery with iv regional anesthesia. Patients received trial medication at admission, immediately after surgery, and every 6 hours after discharge until midnight of the first postoperative day. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patients (n = 128 in each group, full analysis set and recorded in a diary on the evening of surgery day and of the first postoperative day. They also documented the occurrence of adverse events. By the end of the first postoperative day, the proportion of treatment responders based on treatment satisfaction (primary efficacy variable was comparable between the groups (78.1% combination, 71.9% tramadol; P = 0.24 and mean pain intensity (rated on a numerical scale from 0 = no pain to 10 = worst imaginable pain had been reduced to 1.7 ± 2.0 for both groups. Under both treatments, twice as many patients experienced no pain (score = 0 on the first postoperative day compared to the day of surgery (35.9% vs 16.4% for tramadol/paracetamol and 36.7% vs 18% for tramadol treatment. Rescue medication leading to withdrawal (diclofenac 50 mg was required by 17.2% patients with tramadol/paracetamol and 13.3% with tramadol. Adverse events (mainly nausea, dizziness

  11. Current perspectives on intrathecal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottros MM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael M Bottros,1 Paul J Christo2 1Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 2Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Advances in intrathecal analgesia and intrathecal drug delivery systems have allowed for a range of medications to be used in the control of pain and spasticity. This technique allows for reduced medication doses that can decrease the side effects typically associated with oral or parenteral drug delivery. Recent expert panel consensus guidelines have provided care paths in the treatment of nociceptive, neuropathic, and mixed pain syndromes. While the data for pain relief, adverse effect reduction, and cost-effectiveness with cancer pain control are compelling, the evidence is less clear for noncancer pain, other than spasticity. Physicians should be aware of mechanical, pharmacological, surgical, and patient-specific complications, including possible granuloma formation. Newer intrathecal drug delivery systems may allow for better safety and quality of life outcomes. Keywords: pain control, intrathecal analgesia, drug delivery systems

  12. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  13. Topical local anesthesia: focus on lidocaine–tetracaine combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Davide Giordano,1 Maria Gabriella Raso,2 Carmine Pernice,1 Vanni Agnoletti,3 Verter Barbieri1 1Otorhinolaryngology Unit, Department of Surgery, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova – IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, 2Anesthesiology, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University Hospital of Parma, Parma, 3Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Unit, Department of Cardiology, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, and Critical Care Medicine, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova – IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy Abstract: In recent years, the popularity of aesthetic and cosmetic procedures, often performed in outpatient settings, has strongly renewed interest in topical anesthetics. A number of different options are widely used, alone or in combination, in order to minimize the pain related to surgery. Moreover, interest in local anesthetics in the treatment of some painful degenerative conditions such as myofascial trigger point pain, shoulder impingement syndrome, or patellar tendinopathy is increasing. Numerous clinical trials have shown that lidocaine–tetracaine combination, recently approved for adults aged 18 or older, is effective and safe in managing pain. The present paper gives an overview of the recent literature regarding the efficacy and safety of lidocaine–tetracaine combination use. Keywords: lidocaine, tetracaine, local anesthetics, efficacy, safety

  14. Thoracic epidural catheter for postoperative pain control following an ineffective transversus abdominis plane block using liposome bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrien BD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brian D Terrien,1 David Espinoza,2 Charles C Stehman,3 Gabriel A Rodriguez,1 Nicholas C Connolly1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Naval Medical Center San Diego, 2Surface Warfare Medical Institute, San Diego, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Robert E. Bush Naval Hospital, Twenty Nine Palms, CA, USA Abstract: A 24-year-old female with a history of ulcerative colitis underwent colectomy. The patient received an ineffective transversus abdominis plane (TAP block with liposome bupivacaine (Exparel intraoperatively and was started on a hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia 5 hours after the TAP block, which did not relieve her pain. A continuous thoracic epidural (CTE was then placed after blood levels of bupivacaine were drawn, and the patient immediately experienced significant pain relief. The combined use of liposome bupivacaine and bupivacaine CTE infusion in the postoperative management of this patient demonstrated no safety concerns, provided excellent analgesia and plasma concentrations of bupivacaine remained far below toxic levels. Keywords: liposome bupivacaine (bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension, plasma bupivacaine levels, transversus abdominis plane (TAP nerve block, thoracic epidural

  15. The creation and impact of a dedicated section on quality and patient safety in a clinical academic department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Arthur M; Vetter, Thomas R

    2013-02-01

    Optimizing the effectiveness, efficiency, integration, and satisfaction associated with delivered health care is not only highly principled but also good business practice in an extremely competitive environment. Programs that foster quality improvement and patient safety efforts while also promoting a scholarly focus can generate the incentives and organizational recognition needed to make patient safety and quality improvement bona fide components of the academic mission. The authors describe the development, implementation, and results of a dedicated Section on Quality and Patient Safety (SQPS) within an academic anesthesiology department. Spearheaded by a physician champion and vigorously supported by the departmental chair, this SQPS engaged core leaders from the Department of Anesthesiology. This departmental quality and patient safety management team adopted quality improvement and performance improvement techniques that have been successfully used in other industries. The SQPS has gained support through data-driven results and reiterative promotion. Transparency and accountability have also been powerful motivators for achieving clinician buy-in and changing behavior. Since its inception in 2007, the SQPS has initiated or managed through to completion more than 25 quality and performance improvement projects, including an intraoperative corneal injury reduction program, a wrong-sided regional anesthesia procedure, a drug-eluting coronary stent protocol, and a practice-improvement initiative for resident physicians. The SQPS has not only robustly promoted a departmental culture of quality patient care and safety but also set the standard for other departments and stakeholders within the authors' health system.

  16. Water in the human body: An anesthesiologist's perspective on the connection between physicochemical properties of water and physiologic relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraín Riveros-Perez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure and multifaceted physicochemical properties of the water molecule, in addition to its universal presence in body compartments, make water a key player in multiple biological processes in human physiology. Since anesthesiologists deal with physiologic processes where water molecules are critical at different levels, and administer medications whose pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics depend on interaction with water molecules, we consider that exploration of basic science aspects related to water and its role in physiology and pharmacology is relevant to the practice of anesthesiology. The purpose of this paper is to delineate the physicochemical basis of water that are critical in enabling it to support various homeostatic processes. The role of water in the formation of solutions, modulation of surface tension and in homeostasis of body temperature, acid-base status and osmolarity, is analyzed. Relevance of molecular water interactions to the anesthesiologist is not limited to the realm of physiology and pathophysiology. Deep knowledge of the importance of water in volatile anesthetic effects on neurons opens a window to a new comprehensive understanding of complex cellular mechanisms underlying the practice of anesthesiology. Keywords: Water, Anesthesia, Physicochemistry, Osmolarity, Surface tension

  17. Pain control following inguinal herniorrhaphy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjurstrom MF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Martin F Bjurstrom,1,* Andrea L Nicol,2,* Parviz K Amid,3 David C Chen3 1Department of Anesthesiology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS, USA; 3Department of Surgery, Lichtenstein Amid Hernia Clinic at UCLA, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgeries performed worldwide. With the success of modern hernia repair techniques, recurrence rates have significantly declined, with a lower incidence than the development of chronic postherniorrhaphy inguinal pain (CPIP. The avoidance of CPIP is arguably the most important clinical outcome and has the greatest impact on patient satisfaction, health care utilization, societal cost, and quality of life. The etiology of CPIP is multifactorial, with overlapping neuropathic and nociceptive components contributing to this complex syndrome. Treatment is often challenging, and no definitive treatment algorithm exists. Multidisciplinary management of this complex problem improves outcomes, as treatment must be individualized. Current medical, pharmacologic, interventional, and surgical management strategies are reviewed. Keywords: inguinodynia, chronic postherniorrhaphy inguinal pain, inguinal hernia

  18. Usability of ultrasound assessment of gastric content. Case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stach, Orest; Starczewska, Małgorzata H; Kański, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the use of ultrasound assessment of gastric content in anesthesiological practice. Factors influencing pulmonary aspiration of gastric content and the risk of a complication in the form of aspiration pneumonia are discussed. The examination was performed on two patients hospitalized in a state of emergency who required surgical intervention. The first patient, a 46-year-old male with a phlegmon of the foot, treated for type 2 diabetes, ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency, required urgent incision of the phlegmon. The second patient, a 36-year-old male with a post-traumatic pericerebral hematoma, qualified for an urgent trepanation. Interviews with the patients and their medical documentation indicated that they had been fasting for the recommended six hours before the surgery. However, during a gastric ultrasound examination it was found that food was still present in the stomach, which caused a change in the anesthesiological procedure chosen. The authors present a method of performing gastric ultrasound examination, determining the nature of the food content present and estimating its volume.

  19. Pulmonary complications after major abdominal surgery: National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun Kevin; Teng, Annabelle; Lee, David Y; Rose, Keith

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) after major abdominal surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and high cost of care. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for PPCs after major abdominal surgery. The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005-2012 was queried for patients who underwent major abdominal surgery (esophagectomy, gastrectomy, pacnreatectomy, enterectomy, hepatectomy, colectomy, and proctectomy). Predictors of PPCs were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Of 165,196 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery 9595 (5.8%) suffered PPCs (pneumonia 3.2%, prolonged ventilator support ≥48 h 3.0%, and unplanned intubation 2.8%). On multivariate analysis, significant predictors of overall and individual PPCs include esophagectomy, advanced American Society of Anesthesiology Classification System, dependent functional status, prolonged operative time, age ≥80 y, severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, preoperative shock, ascites, and smoking. Obesity was not a risk factor. Female gender was overall protective for PPCs. PPCs after abdominal procedures are associated with a number of clinical variables. Esophageal operations and American Society of Anesthesiology Classification System were the strongest predictors. These results provide a framework for identifying patients at risk for developing pulmonary complications after major abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolution of consciousness: Phylogeny, ontogeny, and emergence from general anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashour, George A.; Alkire, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Are animals conscious? If so, when did consciousness evolve? We address these long-standing and essential questions using a modern neuroscientific approach that draws on diverse fields such as consciousness studies, evolutionary neurobiology, animal psychology, and anesthesiology. We propose that the stepwise emergence from general anesthesia can serve as a reproducible model to study the evolution of consciousness across various species and use current data from anesthesiology to shed light on the phylogeny of consciousness. Ultimately, we conclude that the neurobiological structure of the vertebrate central nervous system is evolutionarily ancient and highly conserved across species and that the basic neurophysiologic mechanisms supporting consciousness in humans are found at the earliest points of vertebrate brain evolution. Thus, in agreement with Darwin’s insight and the recent “Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness in Non-Human Animals,” a review of modern scientific data suggests that the differences between species in terms of the ability to experience the world is one of degree and not kind. PMID:23754370

  1. The impact of intensivists' base specialty of training on care process and outcomes of critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Goldwasser, Eleanor R; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C

    2013-09-01

    The care of the critically ill trauma patients is provided by intensivists with various base specialties of training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of intensivists' base specialty of training on the disparity of care process and patient outcome. We performed a retrospective review of an institutional trauma registry at an academic level 1 trauma center. Two intensive care unit teams staffed by either board-certified surgery or anesthesiology intensivists were assigned to manage critically ill trauma patients. Both teams provided care, collaborating with a trauma surgeon in house. We compared patient characteristics, care processes, and outcomes between surgery and anesthesiology groups using Wilcoxon tests or chi-square tests, as appropriate. We identified a total of 620 patients. Patient baseline characteristics including age, sex, transfer status, injury type, injury severity score, and Glasgow coma scale were similar between groups. We found no significant difference in care processes and outcomes between groups. In a logistic regression model, intensivists' base specialty of training was not a significant factor for mortality (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval; 0.79-2.80; P = 0.22) and major complication (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-1.67; P = 0.63). Intensive care unit teams collaborating with trauma surgeons had minimal disparity of care processes and similar patient outcomes regardless of intensivists' base specialty of training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Considering context in academic medicine: differences in demographic and professional characteristics and in research productivity and advancement metrics across seven clinical departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Erica T; Carapinha, René; Weber, Griffin M; Hill, Emorcia V; Reede, Joan Y

    2015-08-01

    To understand the disciplinary contexts in which faculty work, the authors examined demographics, professional characteristics, research productivity, and advancement across seven clinical departments at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and nationally. HMS analyses included faculty from seven clinical departments-anesthesiology, medicine, neurology, pediatrics, psychiatry, radiology, and surgery-in May 2011 (N = 7,304). National analyses included faculty at 141 U.S. medical schools in the same seven departments as of December 31, 2011 (N = 91,414). The authors used chi-square and Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests to compare departmental characteristics. Heterogeneity in demographics, professional characteristics, and advancement across departments was observed in HMS and national data. At HMS, psychiatry had the highest percentage of underrepresented minority faculty at 6.6% (75/1,139). In anesthesiology, 24.2% (128/530) of faculty were Asian, whereas in psychiatry only 7.9% (90/1,139) were (P clinical departments at HMS and nationally. The context in which faculty work, of which department is a proxy, should be accounted for in research on faculty career outcomes and diversity inclusion in academic medicine.

  3. Non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse among anesthesia care providers: a narrative review.

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    Zuleta-Alarcón, Alix; Coffman, John C; Soghomonyan, Suren; Papadimos, Thomas J; Bergese, Sergio D; Moran, Kenneth R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the problem of non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse among anesthesia care providers (ACPs) and to describe current approaches to screening, therapy, and rehabilitation of ACPs suffering from non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse. We first performed a search of all literature available on PubMed prior to April 11, 2016. The search was limited to articles published in Spanish and English, and the following key words were used: anesthesiology, anesthesia personnel, AND substance-related disorders. We also searched Ovid MEDLINE ® databases from 1946-April 11, 2016 using the following search terms: anesthesiology OR anesthesia, OR nurse anesthetist OR anesthesia care provider OR perioperative nursing AND substance-related disorders. Despite an increased awareness of drug abuse among ACPs and improvements in preventive measures, the problem of non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse remains significant. While opioids are the most commonly abused anesthesia medications among ACPs, the abuse of non-opioid anesthetics is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, and professional demise. Early detection, effective therapy, and long-term follow-up help ACPs cope more effectively with the problem and, when possible, resume their professional activities. There is insufficient evidence to determine the ability of ACPs to return safely to anesthesia practice after rehabilitation, though awareness of the issue and ongoing treatment are necessary to minimize patient risk from potentially related clinical errors.

  4. A Checklist to Help Faculty Assess ACGME Milestones in a Video-Recorded OSCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easdown, L Jane; Wakefield, Marsha L; Shotwell, Matthew S; Sandison, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Faculty members need to assess resident performance using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones. In this randomized study we used an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) around the disclosure of an adverse event to determine whether use of a checklist improved the quality of milestone assessments by faculty. In 2013, a total of 20 anesthesiology faculty members from 3 institutions were randomized to 2 groups to assess 5 videos of trainees demonstrating advancing levels of competency on the OSCE. One group used milestones alone, and the other used milestones plus a 13-item checklist with behavioral anchors based on ideal performance. We classified faculty ratings as either correct or incorrect with regard to the competency level demonstrated in each video, and then used logistic regression analysis to assess the effect of checklist use on the odds of correct classification. Thirteen of 20 faculty members rated assessing performance using milestones alone as difficult or very difficult . Checklist use was associated with significantly greater odds of correct classification at entry level (odds ratio [OR] = 9.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.0-21.2) and at junior level (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7) performance. For performance at other competency levels checklist use did not affect the odds of correct classification. A majority of anesthesiology faculty members reported difficulty with assessing a videotaped OSCE of error disclosure using milestones as primary assessment tools. Use of the checklist assisted in correct assessments at the entry and junior levels.

  5. Intraoperative complications in pediatric neurosurgery: review of 1807 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lindert, Erik J; Arts, Sebastian; Blok, Laura M; Hendriks, Mark P; Tielens, Luc; van Bilsen, Martine; Delye, Hans

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal literature exists on the intraoperative complication rate of pediatric neurosurgical procedures with respect to both surgical and anesthesiological complications. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish intraoperative complication rates to provide patients and parents with information on which to base their informed consent and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of pediatric neurosurgical care. METHODS A clinical complication registration database comprising a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out in a general neurosurgical department from January 1, 2004, until July 1, 2012, was analyzed. During the study period, 1807 procedures were performed on patients below the age of 17 years. RESULTS Sixty-four intraoperative complications occurred in 62 patients (3.5% of procedures). Intraoperative mortality was 0.17% (n = 3). Seventy-eight percent of the complications (n = 50) were related to the neurosurgical procedures, whereas 22% (n = 14) were due to anesthesiology. The highest intraoperative complication rates were for cerebrovascular surgery (7.7%) and tumor surgery (7.4%). The most frequently occurring complications were cerebrovascular complications (33%). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative complications are not exceptional during pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Awareness of these complications is the first step in preventing them.

  6. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome: management challenges

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    Chrona E

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleni Chrona,1,2 Georgia Kostopanagiotou,1 Dimitrios Damigos,3 Chrysanthi Batistaki1 1Second Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, “Attikon” Hospital, Athens, 2Department of Anesthesiology, General Hospital of “Ag. Panteleimon,” Piraeus, 3Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Abstract: Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES is a commonly underdiagnosed and undertreated chronic state of pain. This syndrome is characterized by the entrapment of the cutaneous branches of the lower thoracoabdominal intercostal nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle, which causes severe, often refractory, chronic pain. This narrative review aims to identify the possible therapeutic strategies for the management of the syndrome. Seventeen studies about ACNES therapy were reviewed; of them, 15 were case–control studies, case series, or case reports, and two were randomized controlled trials. The presently available management strategies for ACNES include trigger point injections (diagnostic and therapeutic, ultrasound-guided blocks, chemical neurolysis, and surgical ­neurectomy, in combination with systemic medication, as well as some emerging techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation and neuromodulation. An increased awareness of the syndrome and the use of specific diagnostic criteria for its recognition are required to facilitate an early and successful management. This review compiles the proposed ­management strategies for ACNES. Keywords: anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, intercostal, neuralgia, management

  7. Tapentadol extended release in the management of peripheral diabetic neuropathic pain

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    Vadivelu N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu,1 Alice Kai,2 Benjamin Maslin,1 Gopal Kodumudi,3 Aron Legler,1 Jack M Berger4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA; 3Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 4Department of Anesthesiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Tapentadol, a µ-opioid agonist and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, has been found to be an effective medication for a wide variety of chronic pain conditions, including back pain, cancer-related pain, and arthritic pain. It has also been found to have fewer gastrointestinal side effects than more traditional opioid-based therapies. More recently, tapentadol extended release has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of painful diabetic neuropathy, an often debilitating condition affecting approximately one-third of all patients with diabetes. This review highlights the most up-to-date basic and clinical studies by focusing on the mechanisms of action of tapentadol and its clinical efficacy, especially with regard to painful diabetic neuropathy. Keywords: chronic pain, neuropathic pain, pharmacology, analgesia, pain management

  8. [Training -- competency-based education -- learning theory and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Georg

    2013-11-01

    A lifelong learning process is necessarily the basis for the specialization and expertise in the field of anesthesiology. Thus competency as a physician is a complex, multidimensional construction of knowledge, skills and attitudes to be able to solve and persist the complex daily work challenges in a flexible and responsible way. Experts therefore showflexible and intuitive capabilities in pursuing their profession. Accordingly modern competency based learning objectives are very helpful. The DGAI Commission for “Further Education” already thought ahead in defining a competencybased curriculum for the specialization in the field of anesthesiology and could be integrated into the frameworks of the German Medical Association. In addition to the curricular framework elements of assessment are necessary. A single oral exam is consequently not representative for different levels of competencies. However, there is beside the responsibility of the learners for their learning processalso a high obligation of the clinical teachers to attend the learning process and to ensure a positive learning atmosphere with scope for feedback. Some competencies potentially could be better learned in a “sheltered” room based on simulation outside the OR, for example to train rare incidents or emergency procedures. In general there should be ongoing effort to enhance the process of expertise development, also in context of patient safety and quality management.

  9. [Advantages and disadvantages of different methods for the implementation and the support of standard operating procedures: From PDF files to an app- and webbased SOP management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Riech, S; Brandes, I; Waeschle, R M

    2015-11-01

    The quality assurance of care and patient safety, with increasing cost pressure and performance levels is of major importance in the high-risk and high cost area of the operating room (OR). Standard operating procedures (SOP) are an established tool for structuring and standardization of the clinical treatment pathways and show multiple benefits for quality assurance and process optimization. An internal project was initiated in the department of anesthesiology and a continuous improvement process was carried out to build up a comprehensive SOP library. In the first step the spectrum of procedures in anesthesiology was transferred to PDF-based SOPs. The further development to an app-based SOP library (Aesculapp) was due to the high resource expenditure for the administration and maintenance of the large PDF-based SOP collection and to deficits in the mobile availability. The next developmental stage, the SOP healthcare information assistant (SOPHIA) included a simplified and advanced update feature, an archive feature previously missing and notably the possibility to share the SOP library with other departments including the option to adapt each SOP to the individual situation. A survey of the personnel showed that the app-based allocation of SOPs (Aesculapp, SOPHIA) had a higher acceptance than the PDF-based developmental stage SOP form. The SOP management system SOPHIA combines the benefits of the forerunner version Aesculapp with improved options for intradepartmental maintenance and administration of the SOPs and the possibility of an export and editing function for interinstitutional exchange of SOPs.

  10. Comparison of proseal laryngeal mask and endotracheal tube for airway safety in pediatric strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rauf; Goksu, Sitki; Ugur, Berna K; Sahin, Levent; Koruk, Senem; Okumus, Seydi; Erbagci, Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    To compare proseal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) with an endotracheal tube (ET) for airway safety, maintained ease of insertion, and hemodynamic stability in pediatric strabismus surgery (PSS). This prospective-randomized clinical study was carried out in the Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Turkey between April 2008 and July 2009. Eighty American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) I-II children, weight 10-30 kg, aged between 1-12 years undergoing PSS were selected. The anesthesia was induced with 8% sevoflurane, 50% nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture, and a neuromuscular blockade with 0.5 mg/kg atracurium in both groups. After a sufficient dosage of anesthesia, the patients were randomized into 2 groups (Group P: PLMA, n= 40, Group T: ET, n=40) and an airway management device; either a PLMA or ET was inserted. The number of placement attempts, placement success or failure, success or failure of a gastric suction tube placement during the procedures and perioperative complications were assessed. Thirty-eight patients (95%) in the PLMA group, 39 (97.5%) patients in the ET group were successfully placed with a PLMA and ET on the first attempt (p>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the hemodynamic parameters, end-tidal carbon dioxide, and complications. This study revealed that PLMA may offer an alternative airway to ET wherein positive pressure ventilation was the preferred choice for children undergoing PSS.

  11. Influence of provider type (nurse anesthetist or resident physician), staff assignments, and other covariates on daily evaluations of anesthesiologists' quality of supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Ledolter, Johannes; Smith, Thomas C; Griffiths, David; Hindman, Bradley J

    2014-09-01

    At many U.S. healthcare facilities, supervision of anesthesiology residents and/or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) is a major daily responsibility of anesthesiologists. Our department implemented a daily process by which the supervision provided by each anesthesiologist working in operating rooms was evaluated by the anesthesiology resident(s) and CRNA(s) with whom they worked the previous day. Requests for evaluation were sent daily via e-mail to each resident and CRNA after working in an operating room. Supervision scores were analyzed after 6 months, and aligned with the cases' American Society of Anesthesiologists Relative Value Guide units. (1) Mean monthly evaluation completion rates exceeded 85% (residents P = 0.0001, CRNAs P = 0.0005). (2) Pairwise by anesthesiologist, residents and CRNAs mean supervision scores were correlated (P supervision scores provided by residents were: (a) greater when a resident had more units of work that day with the rated anesthesiologist (P supervision" significantly share commonalities, supervision scores should be analyzed separately for residents and CRNAs. Although mean supervision scores differ markedly among anesthesiologists, supervision scores are influenced negligibly by staff assignments (e.g., how busy the anesthesiologist is with other operating rooms).

  12. Publication trends for articles related to the history of anesthesia: a 10-year analysis from six journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulita, Avenir; Liu, Xiaoxia; Desai, Sukumar P

    2013-04-01

    Anesthesia historians believe they have difficulty in getting their work published in peer reviewed journals devoted to anesthesiology. To test the hypothesis of whether such publication bias exists, we conducted a review of all articles published in six journals. We examined all articles published between January 2001 and December 2010. In order to enable comparison among journals, articles were categorized as major or minor. We also examined whether there were trends in publication over this period. During this 10-year period, 30,600 articles were published in these journals (range, 2573 to 8563 articles). Of all articles published, only 382 (1.25%, range, 0.41% to 2.87%) were related to the history of anesthesia. The proportion of all articles related to history showed a significant difference with time (Particles (Particles published shows no obvious difference over the 10-year period (P=.25), but a significant difference among journals (P=.005). For major articles, there was a significant effect with time (P=.046) and journal (Particles revealed no significant effect with time (P=.15), but significant differences among journals (P=.02). Our analysis of 30,600 articles published in six mainstream journals devoted to anesthesiology found that considerable differences exist in the proportion and number of articles that were related to history of anesthesia.

  13. Perioperative care in an adolescent patient with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia for placement of a cardiac assist device and heart transplantation: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamata M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mineto Kamata,1 Roby Sebastian,1,2 Patrick I McConnell,3 Daniel Gomez,4 Aymen Naguib,1,2 Joseph D Tobias1,2,5 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Cardiovascular Perfusion Services and Heart Center, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University, 5Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT can cause life-threatening complications following the administration of heparin. Discontinuation of all sources of heparin exposure and the use of alternative agents for anticoagulation are necessary when HIT is suspected or diagnosed. We present the successful use of bivalirudin anticoagulation in an adolescent patient during cardiopulmonary bypass who underwent both placement of a left ventricular assist device and subsequent heart transplantation within a 36-hour period. The pathophysiology and diagnosis of HIT are reviewed, previous reports of the use of direct thrombin inhibitors for cardiac surgery are presented, and potential dosing regimens for bivalirudin are discussed. Keywords: bivalirudin, anticoagulation, cardiopulmonary bypass, heart transplant

  14. Resident Physicians Improve Nontechnical Skills When on Operating Room Management and Leadership Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Devon C; Giordano, Christopher R; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Fahy, Brenda G

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiology residency primarily emphasizes the development of medical knowledge and technical skills. Yet, nontechnical skills (NTS) are also vital to successful clinical practice. Elements of NTS are communication, teamwork, situational awareness, and decision making. The first 10 consecutive senior residents who chose to participate in this 2-week elective rotation of operating room (OR) management and leadership training were enrolled in this study, which spanned from March 2013 to March 2015. Each resident served as the anesthesiology officer of the day (AOD) and was tasked with coordinating OR assignments, managing care for 2 to 4 ORs, and being on call for the trauma OR; all residents were supervised by an attending AOD. Leadership and NTS techniques were taught via a standardized curriculum consisting of leadership and team training articles, crisis management text, and daily debriefings. Resident self-ratings and attending AOD and charge nurse raters used the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) scoring system, which involved task management, situational awareness, teamwork, and decision making. For each of the 10 residents in their third year of clinical anesthesiology training (CA-3) who participated in this elective rotation, there were 14 items that required feedback from resident self-assessment and OR raters, including the daily attending AOD and charge nurse. Results for each of the items on the questionnaire were compared between the beginning and the end of the rotation with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched samples. Comparisons were run separately for attending AOD and charge nurse assessments and resident self-assessments. Scaled rankings were analyzed for the Kendall coefficient of concordance (ω) for rater agreement with associated χ and P value. Common themes identified by the residents during debriefings were recurrence of challenging situations and the skills residents needed to instruct and manage clinical teams. For

  15. Traumatic osteoarthritis-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of anterior cruciate ligament transection plus a medial meniscectomy

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    Tsai HC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Chien Tsai,1–3 Ta-Liang Chen,2–4 Yu-Pin Chen,5 Ruei-Ming Chen1,3,6 1Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Anesthesiology and Health Policy Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Comprehensive Cancer Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain.Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks.Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant

  16. Generative Retrieval Improves Learning and Retention of Cardiac Anatomy Using Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Amanda M; Forkin, Katherine T; Bechtel, Allison J; Collins, Stephen R; Ma, Jennie Z; Nemergut, Edward C; Huffmyer, Julie L

    2017-05-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a valuable monitor for patients undergoing cardiac and noncardiac surgery as it allows for evaluation of cardiovascular compromise in the perioperative period. It is challenging for anesthesiology residents and medical students to learn to use and interpret TEE in the clinical environment. A critical component of learning to use and interpret TEE is a strong grasp of normal cardiovascular ultrasound anatomy. Fifteen fourth-year medical students and 15 post-graduate year (PGY) 1 and 2 anesthesiology residents without prior training in cardiac anesthesia or TEE viewed normal cardiovascular anatomy TEE video clips; participants were randomized to learning cardiac anatomy in generative retrieval (GR) and standard practice (SP) groups. GR participants were required to verbally identify each unlabeled cardiac anatomical structure within 10 seconds of the TEE video appearing on the screen. Then a correctly labeled TEE video clip was shown to the GR participant for 5 more seconds. SP participants viewed the same TEE video clips as GR but there was no requirement for SP participants to generate an answer; for the SP group, each TEE video image was labeled with the correctly identified anatomical structure for the 15 second period. All participants were tested for intermediate (1 week) and late (1 month) retention of normal TEE cardiovascular anatomy. Improvement of intermediate and late retention of TEE cardiovascular anatomy was evaluated using a linear mixed effects model with random intercepts and random slopes. There was no statistically significant difference in baseline score between GR (49% ± 11) and SP (50% ± 12), with mean difference (95% CI) -1.1% (-9.5, 7.3%). At 1 week following the educational intervention, GR (90% ± 5) performed significantly better than SP (82% ± 11), with mean difference (95% CI) 8.1% (1.9, 14.2%); P = .012. This significant increase in scores persisted in the late posttest session at one month

  17. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Wiesmann,1 Stefan Müller,1,2 Hans-Helge Müller,3 Hinnerk Wulf,1 Thorsten Steinfeldt1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, 3Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Philipps University, Marburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Diakoniekrankenhaus Schwäbisch Hall, Schwäbisch Hall, Germany Background: Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear.Methods: Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S, bupivacaine (Bupi, bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi, and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni were applied topically.Results: Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67–1.18, median (25th–75th percentile; Bupi: 0.33 (0.25–0.60; BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38–0.63; and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30–0.54. The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry

  18. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous ozone injection of the Gasserian ganglion for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

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    An JX

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Xiong An,1,2 Hui Liu,1 Ruo-Wen Chen,1,2 Yong Wang,1 Wen-Xing Zhao,1 Derek Eastwood,3 John P Williams4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine & Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University & Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Weifang Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pain Services, Wirral University Teaching Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UK; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of computed tomography (CT-guided percutaneous ozone injection for refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed in the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a university hospital pain center. Patients and methods: A total of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of refractory trigeminal neuralgia were enrolled. All patients were treated with a percutaneous ozone injection and one patient was excluded. There were 21 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (group A and seven patients with painful trigeminal neuropathy caused by post-herpetic neuralgia (group B. The percutaneous injection was an oxygen–ozone mixture at an ozone concentration of 30 mg/­mL into the Gasserian ganglion performed under CT guidance. The number of ­procedures performed varied from one to as many as 16. Outcomes were evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS pain scores. Results: The combined VAS scores were 7.11 ± 1.23 pretreatment, 2.86 ± 1.69 posttreatment (P < 0.05 and 3.25 ± 2.01 after 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05. In group A, the VAS scores were 7.10 ± 1.04 pretreatment and 2.90 ± 1.84 posttreatment (P < 0.05. In group B, the VAS scores were 7.14 ± 1.77 pretreatment and 2.71 ± 1.25 posttreatment (P < 0.05. After 6-months follow-up, the VAS score was 3.38

  19. Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger

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    Chaibou MS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Maman Sani Chaibou,1 Samuila Sanoussi,2 Rachid Sani,2 Nouhou A Toudou,1 Hadjara Daddy,1 Moussa Madougou,1 Idrissa Abdou,1 Habibou Abarchi,2 Martin Chobli31Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, 2Department of Surgery, The Niamey National Hospital, Niamey, Republic of Niger; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Hubert K Maga University Teaching Hospital, Cotonou, BeninObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital.Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient's ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS, the numerical rating scale (NRS, or the visual analog scale (VAS. Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery.Results: The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion: Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results

  20. The impact of anesthesia providers on major morbidity following screening colonoscopies

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    Lubarsky DA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available David A Lubarsky,1 Jason R Guercio,2 John W Hanna,3,4 Maria T Abreu,5 Qianli Ma,3 Claudia Uribe,3 David J Birnbach,1,6 David R Sinclair,1 Keith A Candiotti1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Humana, Comprehensive Health Insights, Miami, FL, USA; 4University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 5Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 6Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background and aims: Few studies evaluate the impact of anesthesia providers during procedures, such as colonoscopy, on low-risk patients. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of anesthesia providers on several outcome variables, including major morbidity, following screening colonoscopies. Methods: A propensity-matched cohort study of 14,006 patients who enrolled with a national insurer offering health maintenance organization (HMO, preferred provider organization (PPO, and Medicare Advantage plans for a screening colonoscopy between July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2007 were studied. Records were evaluated for completion of the colonoscopy, new cancer diagnosis (colon, anal, rectal within 6 months of the colonoscopy, new primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI, new primary diagnosis of stroke, hospital admission within 7 days of the colonoscopy, and adherence to guidelines for use of anesthesia providers. Results: The presence of an anesthesia provider did not affect major morbidity or the percent of completed exams. Overall morbidity within 7 days was very low. When an anesthesia provider was present, a nonsignificant trend toward greater cancer detection within 6 months of the procedure was observed. Adherence to national

  1. Initiation of labor analgesia with injection of local anesthetic through the epidural needle compared to the catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristev G

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Goran Ristev,1 Angela C Sipes,1 Bryan Mahoney,2 Jonathan Lipps,1 Gary Chan,3 John C Coffman1 1Department of Anesthesiology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai Roosevelt, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: The rationale for injection of epidural medications through the needle is to promote sooner onset of pain relief relative to dosing through the epidural catheter given that needle injection can be performed immediately after successful location of the epidural space. Some evidence indicates that dosing medications through the epidural needle results in faster onset and improved quality of epidural anesthesia compared to dosing through the catheter, though these dosing techniques have not been compared in laboring women. This investigation was performed to determine whether dosing medication through the epidural needle improves the quality of analgesia, level of sensory blockade, or onset of pain relief measured from the time of epidural medication injection. Methods: In this double-blinded prospective investigation, healthy term laboring women (n=60 received labor epidural placement upon request. Epidural analgesia was initiated according to the assigned randomization group: 10 mL loading dose (0.125% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 µg/mL through either the epidural needle or the catheter, given in 5 mL increments spaced 2 minutes apart. Verbal rating scale (VRS pain scores (0–10 and pinprick sensory levels were documented to determine the rates of analgesic and sensory blockade onset. Results: No significant differences were observed in onset of analgesia or sensory blockade from the time of injection between study groups. The estimated difference in the rate of pain relief (VRS/minute was 0.04 (95% CI: −0.01 to 0.11; p=0

  2. The effect of body mass index on perioperative thermoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özer AB

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ayşe Belin Özer,1 Aysun Yildiz Altun,1 Ömer Lütfi Erhan,1 Tuba Çatak,2 Ümit Karatepe,1 İsmail Demirel,1 Gonca Çağlar Toprak3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Firat University Medical School, Elaziğ, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Clinic, Bingol State Hospital, Bingöl, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Clinic, Elazig Training and Research Hospital, Elaziğ, Turkey Purpose: We evaluated the effects of body mass index (BMI on thermoregulation in obese patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery with no premedication were included in the study. The patients were classified into 4 groups according to BMI <24.9, 25–39.9, 40–49.9, and >50. Anesthesia was provided with routine techniques. Tympanic and peripheral temperatures were recorded every 5 minutes starting with the induction of anesthesia. The mean skin temperature (MST, mean body temperature (MBT, vasoconstriction time, and vasoconstriction threshold that triggers core warming were calculated with the following formulas: MST = 0.3 (Tchest + Tarm + 0.2 (Tthigh + Tcalf. MBT was calculated using the equation 0.64Tcore+0.36Tskin, and vasoconstriction was determined by calculating Tforearm-Tfinger. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, gender, duration of operation, and room temperature. Compared to those with BMI <24.9, the tympanic temperature was significantly higher in those with BMI =25–39.9 in the 10th, 15th, 20th, and 50th minutes. In addition, BMI =40–49.9 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 40th, 45th, 50th, and 55th minutes and BMI >50 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 50th, and 55th minutes were less than those with BMI <24.9 (P<0.05. There was no significant difference in terms of MST and MBT. Vasoconstriction occurred later, and that vasoconstriction threshold was

  3. Risks of the ionizing radiations for the anesthesia personnel in operating room in Hospital Dr. Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro Alujas, Yassell N.

    2005-01-01

    The extent of the problem on the radiological exposure of anesthesiologists in the operating rooms was identified in the Hospital Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia, San Jose, Costa Rica. It was necessary to establish the risks in the professional disciplines more exposed to ionizing radiations, including Anesthesiology. Provides information on the radiations received by the anesthesia personnel as a risk factor of labor during professional practice. Within the findings were met dose ionizing radiation received by the participating subjects. It was determined that the monthly doses do not reach the limits of permissible dose average. Besides, no relationship was found between the number of procedures that were used ionizing radiations and the values of dosimetric measurements personal; but, if the type of procedure. In this way was showed that in some radiointerventional procedures there is a higher risk of irradiation [es

  4. A Dog Is a Doctor’s Best Friend: The Use of a Service Dog as a Perioperative Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Tew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Service dogs are beneficial in providing assistance to people with multiple types of disabilities and medical disorders including visual impairment, physical disabilities, seizure disorders, diabetes, and mental illness. Some service animals have been trained as a screening tool for cancer. We review a case involving a 6-year-old female with a history of mast cell mediator release and immediate hypersensitivity due to the urticaria pigmentosa variant of cutaneous mastocytosis who underwent a cystourethroscopy. Her service dog, JJ, who would alert to mast cell mediator release, was used throughout the perioperative course as a means of anxiolysis and comfort and to monitor for mast cell mediator release. This case presents an example of a service dog used in a family-care model in the field of anesthesiology and provides a unique example of using a service dog as an additional monitor to alert the care team for impending mast cell mediator release.

  5. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  6. Proportional Distribution of Patient Satisfaction Scores by Clinical Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Leonard MD, MS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Proportional Responsibility for Integrated Metrics by Encounter (PRIME model is a novel means of allocating patient experience scores based on the proportion of each physician's involvement in care. Secondary analysis was performed on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys from a tertiary care academic institution. The PRIME model was used to calculate specialty-level scores based on encounters during a hospitalization. Standard and PRIME scores for services with the most inpatient encounters were calculated. Hospital medicine had the most discharges and encounters. The standard model generated a score of 74.6, while the PRIME model yielded a score of 74.9. The standard model could not generate a score for anesthesiology due to the lack of returned surveys, but the PRIME model yielded a score of 84.2. The PRIME model provides a more equitable method for distributing satisfaction scores and can generate scores for specialties that the standard model cannot.

  7. An integrated software system for quality assurance-related kappa coefficient analysis of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography interpretive skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, T; Edwards, B; Judd, J; Swamy, V; Workman, R; Lippmann, H; Harris, S; Cohen, I; Prokop, E; Ezekowitz, M

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the development of a quality assurance-oriented integrated software system designed for an anesthesiology-based intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography service. Entry data include patient and operation demographics, two-dimensional echocardiographic, saline-contrast, and color flow/pulsed Doppler assessments of the heart and great vessels, presented in a defined sequence. A statistical analysis component (kappa coefficient analysis) allows for comparison of intraoperative real-time interpretations with laboratory interpretations made by experienced full-time echocardiographers on a field-by-field basis. This provides a means of quantifying expertise in each individual aspect of the patient examination sequence. We believe that such self-appraisal data are essential for delineating the status and tracking the progress of service being provided.

  8. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botney, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  9. Aproximación a la obra científica del Comandante médico Fidel Pagés Miravé Approach to the scientific work of medical Commander Fidel Pagés Miravé

    OpenAIRE

    I. Velázquez Rivera

    2011-01-01

    A. Faulconer en su libro "Foundations of Anesthesiology" refiriéndose a Pagés afirma: "No se encuentran apenas datos sobre la vida de este importante cirujano español". Esta concluyente afirmación unida a imperdonables omisiones de la figura de Pagés por historiógrafos de la anestesia o de la cirugía, y a graves errores en datos sobre su vida u obra, nos movió a realizar una aproximación, lo más exacta posible, a la obra científica del Comandante Médico Fidel Pagés Miravé. Escasas han sido la...

  10. Gender-specific Issues in Traumatic Injury and Resuscitation: Consensus-based Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Kinjal N.; Marcolini, Evie G.; McCunn, Maureen; Hansoti, Bhakti; Vaca, Federico E.; Napolitano, Lena M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury remains an unacceptably high contributor to morbidity and mortality rates across the United States. Gender-specific research in trauma and emergency resuscitation has become a rising priority. In concert with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference “Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes,” a consensus-building group consisting of experts in emergency medicine, critical care, traumatology, anesthesiology, and public health convened to generate research recommendations and priority questions to be answered and thus move the field forward. Nominal group technique was used for the consensus-building process and a combination of face-to-face meetings, monthly conference calls, e-mail discussions, and preconference surveys were used to refine the research questions. The resulting research agenda focuses on opportunities to improve patient outcomes by expanding research in sex- and gender-specific emergency care in the field of traumatic injury and resuscitation. PMID:25420732

  11. Current status and prospect of therapy with advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1979-01-01

    Symtomatic or palliative therapy of the patients with advanced cancer must be directed to the relief of specific distressing symptoms caused by or associated with neoplasm. The radiotherapy must have a clear concepts of the potential accomplishments of other treatment modalities, such as neurosurgery, anesthesiology, chemotherapy, pharmacology and psychotherapy, so that he may use his own method in proper perspective. I discussed following is an list of contents in this papers. Relief of pain, Psychotherapy, SVC obstruction, Obstructive jaundice, Brain and lung metastasis, prevention of fracture, Skin metastasis, Liver metastasis and treatment of advanced pediaric tumor etc. For the future: 1) Establishment of Stage and Grade of advanced cancer. 2) Development of new chemotherapeutic drug and immunotherapy. 3) Combination of multidisciplinary team and multidisciplinary treatment. (author)

  12. Awake Surgery for a Violin Player: Monitoring Motor and Music Performance, A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piai, Vitória; Vos, Sandra H; Idelberger, Reinhard; Gans, Pauline; Doorduin, Jonne; Ter Laan, Mark

    2018-02-27

    We report the case of a professional violin player who underwent an awake craniotomy to resect a tumor in the left supplementary motor area, an area involved in motor planning. A careful pre- and intraoperative monitoring plan for music performance and complex motor function was established that could be used in combination with cortical stimulation. The patient suffered an epileptic seizure during cortical stimulation. The monitoring of complex motor and musical functions was implemented with the patient playing the violin while the resection was performed. Almost complete resection was achieved with no notable postoperative deficits contributing to functional impairment. The multidisciplinary approach, involving neurosurgery, neuropsychology, anesthesiology, and clinical neurophysiology, allowed us to successfully cope with the theoretical and practical challenges associated with tailored care for a professional musician. The music and motor monitoring plan is reported in detail to enable other sites to reproduce and adapt it accordingly.

  13. Integration of quality assurance activities into a computerized patient data management system in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, C; Mossel, P; Haimet, S; King, T C

    1990-11-01

    A prototype computer-based patient data management system (PDMS) was developed for a surgery-anesthesiology intensive care unit (ICU) to reduce the time and staff needed to implement quality assurance (QA) functions. Goals of the system were to make QA functions routine and minimally intrusive to the daily operation of the ICU. PDMS collects general data (eg, admissions and discharges, lengths of stay, and bed utilization rates) and specialized data (eg, specific indicators) unique to the ICU and performs prospective monitoring for the occurrence of specific events (occurrence screening) and retrospective examinations of patient records (targeted reviews). Preliminary results suggest that PDMS facilitates the acquisition and analysis of QA data and reduces the time needed to acquire these data. Research to validate these claims and efforts to improve and expand the prototype system with a permanent production system are in progress.

  14. [History of anesthesia : "From narcosis to perioperative homeostasis"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, H; Goerig, M

    2016-10-01

    In the western World 16 October 1846 is often called "Ether Day", marking the beginning of anesthesia. Before that date, for physicians there was only a struggle against pain. In the following 170 years all fields of general anesthesia as well as regional and local anesthesia were continuously developed. Pharmacological developments and technical innovations made this evolution possible. The complexity of this field of medicine requires a specialist: the anesthesiologist, whose selection of the most suitable form of anesthesia for the patient makes the surgical intervention painless. In addition, the history of anesthesia was characterized by personalities who were responsible for the progress of this medical field. Anesthesia is one part of the discipline of anesthesiology, which also includes resuscitation, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy.

  15. Enhanced recovery pathways optimize health outcomes and resource utilization: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamina, Michel; Kehlet, Henrik; Tomlinson, George A

    2011-01-01

    was halved (relative risk, 0.52; 95% CrI, 0.36–0.73) and readmission was not increased (relative risk, 0.59; 95% CrI, 0.14–1.43) when compared with patients undergoing traditional care. Conclusion Adherence to ERP achieves a reproducible improvement in the quality of care by enabling standardization...... in costs that threatens the stability of health care systems. Enhanced recovery pathways (ERP) have been proposed as a means to reduce morbidity and improve effectiveness of care. We have reviewed the evidence supporting the implementation of ERP in clinical practice. Methods Medline, Embase......, and the Cochrane library were searched for randomized, controlled trials comparing ERP with traditional care in colorectal surgery. Systematic reviews and papers on ERP based on data published in major surgical and anesthesiology journals were critically reviewed by international contributors, experienced...

  16. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Point of Care Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Goudie, Adrian; Chiorean, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the use of portable ultrasound scanners has enhanced the concept of point of care ultrasound (PoC-US), namely, "ultrasound performed at the bedside and interpreted directly by the treating clinician." PoC-US is not a replacement for comprehensive ultrasound, but rather allow...... and critical care medicine, cardiology, anesthesiology, rheumatology, obstetrics, neonatology, gynecology, gastroenterology and many other applications. In the future, PoC-US will be more diverse than ever and be included in medical student training.......Over the last decade, the use of portable ultrasound scanners has enhanced the concept of point of care ultrasound (PoC-US), namely, "ultrasound performed at the bedside and interpreted directly by the treating clinician." PoC-US is not a replacement for comprehensive ultrasound, but rather allows...

  18. [Quality management in regional anesthesia using the example of a Regional Anesthesia Surveillance System (RASS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stübner, S; Czaplik, M

    2013-02-01

    Regional anesthesia and regional analgesia techniques with or without a continuous catheter are frequently utilized in all areas of modern anesthesiology. There are individual and economic benefits but also risks involved with those techniques. While the incidence of severe complications is rare and preventive action not always possible, the consequences can be detrimental especially with hematoma or abscess formation associated with central neuraxial blocks. Therefore, it is important to create national and international databases with large case numbers utilizing standardized definitions of complications in order to allow realistic risk assessment and early discovery of potential dangers and preventive actions. This article shows the integration of standardized codes from the Regional Anesthesia Surveillance System with a software tool to allow high-quality data acquisition and the building of a foundation for national and international data collection and analysis as well as for feedback of institutional data for individual process optimization as part of a quality management system.

  19. Cell-based therapy for acute organ injury: preclinical evidence and ongoing clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver, or brain. Genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of promitotic, antiapoptotic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, the authors review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. (ANESTHESIOLOGY 2014; 121:1099-121).

  20. A case of gait disturbance caused by low-dose gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanao-Kanda M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Kanao-Kanda, Hirotsugu Kanda, Osamu Takahata, Takayuki Kunisawa Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan Abstract: Gabapentin, an anticonvulsant agent, is now often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain all over the world. It is unclear whether the combined use of gabapentin, sodium valproate, and flunitrazepam results in enhancement of the side effect, a gait disturbance. A 60-year-old man was taking oral sodium valproate for symptomatic epilepsy after a brain contusion and flunitrazepam to relieve insomnia. Oral gabapentin therapy was started for suspected neuropathic pain. Although the initial dose of oral gabapentin (200 mg relieved the pain, the lower extremities became weak, resulting in a gait disturbance. The therapy was restarted with a halved dose, and this resolved the gait disturbance and relieved the pain. Keywords: gabapentin, gait disturbance, side effect, neuropathic pain

  1. A tribute to Dr Willem J. Kolff: innovative inventor, physician, scientist, bioengineer, mentor, and significant contributor to modern cardiovascular surgical and anesthetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Theodore H

    2013-06-01

    Dr Willem J. Kolff was surely one of the greatest inventors/physicians/scientists/bioengineers of the last few hundred years. He was knighted (Commander of the Order of Oranje-Nassau) in 1970 by Queen Juliana of the Netherlands. In 1990, Life magazine published a list of its own 100 most important figures of the 20th century. Kolff stood in 99th place as the Father of Artificial Organs. Dr Kolff forged a path of innovative thinking and creativity that has had a huge impact on the quality of human life. His contributions to the development of the artificial kidney and dialysis, the heart-lung machine, the membrane oxygenator, potassium arrest of the heart, the AH, mechanical cardiac assistance, and other artificial organs, and his support and mentoring of hundreds to thousands of anesthesiologists, surgeons, and bioengineers throughout the world, have had a significant impact on anesthesiology and the medical community.

  2. [Analysis of pain management in a pre- and post-surgical periods performed for traumatic injury of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of the vertebral column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, Iu A; Tanasiĭchuk, O F; Tolstikhin, O V; Holovan', M V

    2013-11-01

    The results of managing of 129 injured persons, treated for injuries of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of vertebral column, are adduced. The puncture transcutaneous vertebroplasty was done in 58 patients, stabilizing systems "Sekstant" were installed in 15, the "Mantis" systems--in 13, rigid systems by the open method--in 43. The pain syndrome dynamics was estimated in of the patients in accordance to the visual analogue scale. Positive dynamics in a frame of the pain syndrome regression was noted postoperatively. Differentiated application of various methods of treatment in the patients, suffering nonstable compressional fracture of the lower-thoracic and lumbar portions of vertebral column, permits to reduce anesthesiological risk significantly, to improve the results of treatment, to reduce the patients rehabilitation duration.

  3. Pregnancy in a Previously Conjoined Thoracopagus Twin with a Crisscross Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam H. Rimawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Crisscross heart (CCH is a complex, rare, congenital, rotational, cardiac abnormality that accounts for <0.1% of congenital heart defects (CHD. CCH is characterized by the crossing of the inflow streams of the two ventricles due to an abnormal twisting of the heart. A case of maternal CCH has not been previously reported. Case. We report a case of a primigravida with a CCH, who was separated at birth from her thoracopagus conjoined twin. Pregnancy was managed by congenital cardiology, maternal-fetal medicine, anesthesiology, and obstetrics. She underwent a 39-week vaginal delivery without maternal or neonatal complication. Conclusion. A successful term pregnancy outcome was achieved in a patient with CCH using a multidisciplinary approach to address her cardiac condition.

  4. Why Aren't There More Female Pain Medicine Physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Tina L; Bicket, Mark C

    2018-04-09

    Despite a growing awareness about the importance of gender equity and the rising number of women in medicine, women remain persistently underrepresented in pain medicine and anesthesiology. Pain medicine ranks among the bottom quartile of medical specialties in terms of female applicants, female trainees, and proportion of female practitioners. Female pain medicine physicians are also notably disadvantaged compared with their male colleagues in most objective metrics of gender equity, which include financial compensation, career advancement, public recognition, and leadership positions. Increased gender diversity among pain medicine physicians is vital to fostering excellence in pain research, education, and clinical care, as well as creating a high-quality work environment. Pain medicine stands at a crossroads as a specialty, and must examine reasons for its current gender gap and consider a call to action to address this important issue.

  5. EEG-based "serious" games and monitoring tools for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourina, Olga; Wang, Qiang; Nguyen, Minh Khoa

    2011-01-01

    EEG-based "serious games" for medical applications attracted recently more attention from the research community and industry as wireless EEG reading devices became easily available on the market. EEG-based technology has been applied in anesthesiology, psychology, etc. In this paper, we proposed and developed EEG-based "serious" games and doctor's monitoring tools that could be used for pain management. As EEG signal is considered to have a fractal nature, we proposed and develop a novel spatio-temporal fractal based algorithm for brain state quantification. The algorithm is implemented with blobby visualization tools for patient monitoring and in EEG-based "serious" games. Such games could be used by patient even at home convenience for pain management as an alternative to traditional drug treatment.

  6. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R.P.; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K.; Dueber, Christoph [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus-Peter [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Chest Clinic at University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberle, Balthasar [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Anesthesiology, Mainz (Germany); Inselspital, Department of Anesthesiology, Bern (Switzerland); Mayer, Eckhard [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Heart, Thorax and Vascular Surgery, Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH. (orig.)

  7. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R.P.; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K.; Dueber, Christoph; Ley, Sebastian; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Eberle, Balthasar; Mayer, Eckhard; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH. (orig.)

  8. Circumcision: Pros and cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgu Berk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is possibly the most frequently performed elective surgical procedure in men. It can simply be described as the excision of the preputium. There have been several studies about the association between circumcision and urinary tract infections (UTI. Many studies have demonstrated that the frequency of UTI increase in uncircumcised males, especially in the first year of life. This review discusses the embryology of the preputium, epidemiology, indications, complications and benefits of circumcision, as well as operation and anesthesiology techniques. It especially examines the association between UTI and circumcision and the importance of circumcision in congenital urinary system anomalies. In addition, this review examines the associations between circumcision and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV, and the protective role of circumcision on penile cancer.

  9. [Neuroanesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, K

    2016-02-01

    Anesthesiological challenges during craniotomy result from the anatomically related low compensatory capacity of the intracranial space in response to increased volume and the low ischemic tolerance of brain tissue. The anesthetic agents used should therefore not increase the intracranial volume and improve the ischemic tolerance. An acute life-threatening increase of intracranial pressure can be temporarily treated by hyperventilation until measures, such as osmotherapy and infusion of intravenous anesthetics become effective. During an operation the homeostatic parameters including blood volume, blood pressure, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen in blood, plasma glucose concentration and core body temperature have to be closely monitored and kept normal (6 Ns). Optimal implementation of anesthesia necessitates a detailed knowledge of the surgical approach and potential complications. Postoperatively, patients should be extubated as soon as possible to closely monitor cognitive function so that potential deterioration can be detected.

  10. Upgrading a Social Media Strategy to Increase Twitter Engagement During the Spring Annual Meeting of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Eric S; Jaremko, Kellie M; Gupta, Rajnish K; Udani, Ankeet D; McCartney, Colin J L; Snively, Anne; Mariano, Edward R

    Microblogs known as "tweets" are a rapid, effective method of information dissemination in health care. Although several medical specialties have described their Twitter conference experiences, Twitter-related data in the fields of anesthesiology and pain medicine are sparse. We therefore analyzed the Twitter content of 2 consecutive spring meetings of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine using publicly available online transcripts. We also examined the potential contribution of a targeted social media campaign on Twitter engagement during the conferences. The original Twitter meeting content was largely scientific in nature and created by meeting attendees, the majority of whom were nontrainee physicians. Physician trainees, however, represent an important and increasing minority of Twitter contributors. Physicians not in attendance predominantly contributed via retweeting original content, particularly picture-containing tweets, and thus increased reach to nonattendees. A social media campaign prior to meetings may help increase the reach of conference-related Twitter discussion.

  11. Chromosome analyses of nurses handling cytostatic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksvik, H.; Klepp, O.; Brogger, A.

    1981-01-01

    A cytogenetic study of ten nurses handling cytostatic agents (average exposure, 2150 hours) and ten female hospital clerks revealed an increased frequency of chromosome gaps and a slight increase in sister chromatid exchange frequency among the nurses. The increase may be due to exposure to cytostatic drugs and points to these agents as a possible occupational health hazard. A second group of 11 nurses handling cytostatic agents for a shorter period of time (average exposure, 1078 hours), and three other groups (eight nurses engaged in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology, nine nurses engaged in anesthesiology, and seven nurses in postoperative ward) did not differ from the office personnel, except for an increased frequency of chromosome gaps in the radiology group

  12. Artificial intelligence research in anesthesia and intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennels, G D; Miller, P L

    1988-10-01

    This article describes several research directions exploring the application of artificial intelligence techniques in anesthesia and intensive care. Artificial intelligence can be loosely defined as the discipline of designing computer systems that exhibit "intelligent" behavior. This article first introduces artificial intelligence and computer science research and discusses why medicine has proved to be a challenging domain for applying artificial intelligence techniques. A discussion of the central research themes that arise in medical artificial intelligence, many of which are common to different projects and to different medical settings, is followed by a description of specific research projects that apply artificial intelligence techniques in anesthesiology, ventilatory management, and cardiovascular management. Finally, further comments are made on the current state of the field.

  13. The quality of cholecystectomy in Denmark: outcome and risk factors for 20,307 patients from the national database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Kirstine Moll; Bardram, Linda

    2011-01-01

    20,307 cholecystectomies from a national prospective database that combines administrative data with clinical data. This report states the quality of cholecystectomy in Denmark, establishes benchmarks, and identifies significant risk factors. Methods The Danish Cholecystectomy Database was queried.......27%. Age older than 60 years, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score exceeding 1, and open procedure were significant risk factors for all the outcomes. Body mass index (BMI) was not a risk factor for any of the outcomes. Conclusion The quality of cholecystectomy is high in Denmark, with a low......Background Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the standard treatment for symptomatic gallstones. The quality of the procedure frequently is included in quality improvement programs, but outcome values have not been described to define the standard of care for a general population. This study included...

  14. [Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy, complicated by rupture of aneurysm of artery lienalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostinská, E; Huml, K; Pilka, R

    We present a case of pregnant woman with acute pacreatitis in 38th week comlicated by acute rupture of aneurysm of artery lienalis. Case report. Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Faculty Hospital and Palacky University, Olomouc. 28-years-old primipara in 38th week of gestation was admitted to our department for acute pancreatitis caused by gallstones. Subsequent conservative treatment was complicated by rupture of aneurysm of lienal artery and haemorrhagic shock. Urgent caesarean section was performed with two subsequent revisions and peroperative 5l of blood loss. Operation was followed by intensive anesthesiology-resuscitate care of ARDS, gradual realimentation and conservative care of acute pancreatitis. Patient was discharged in good condition 20th day. Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy. In severe and complicated cases maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality may be elevated, despite early diagnosis and intensive treatment.

  15. Rating scale for the assessment of competence in ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access - a Delphi Consensus Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Stine C; Todsen, Tobias; Clemmesen, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Peripheral vascular access is vital for treatment and diagnostics of hospitalized patients. Ultrasound-guided vascular access (UGVA) is superior to the landmark technique. To ensure competence-based education, an assessment tool of UGVA competence is needed. We aimed to develop...... a global rating scale (RS) for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions on the content from ultrasound experts in a modified Delphi consensus study. METHODS: We included experts from anesthesiology, emergency medicine and radiology across university hospitals in Denmark. Nine elements were drafted...... Delphi round, the experts excluded one element from the scale. In the third Delphi round, consensus was obtained on the eight elements: preparation of utensils, ergonomics, preparation of the ultrasound device, identification of blood vessels, anatomy, hygiene, coordination of the needle, and completion...

  16. Is cobalamin deficiency associated with increased risk for all subtypes of postoperative delirium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang LK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Li-Kai Wang,1 Kuo-Mao Lan,1,2 Yao-Tsung Lin,1,2 Jen-Yin Chen1,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, 2Department of Food Science and Applied Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 3Department of the Senior Citizen Service Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, TaiwanIn a recent paper, Sevuk et al used the single-hospital-based database to investigate whether cobalamin (vitamin B12 deficiency increased the risk of postoperative delirium in patients aged .60 years undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.1View the original paper by Sevuk and colleagues. 

  17. Use of a botulinum toxin A in dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chi-Heun

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) was the first toxin to be used in the history of human medicine. Among the eight known serotypes of this toxin, those currently used in medicine are types A and B. This review article mainly discusses BT type A (BTA) because it is usually used in dentistry including dental anesthesiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery. BTA has been used mainly in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and hypertrophy and hyperactivity of the masticatory muscles, along with being a therapeutic option to relieve pain and help in functional recovery from dental and oral and maxillofacial surgery. However, it is currently used broadly for cosmetic purposes such as reducing facial wrinkles and asymmetry. Although the therapeutic effect of BTA is temporary and relatively safe, it is essential to have knowledge about related anatomy, as well as the systemic and local adverse effects of medications that are applied to the face. PMID:28884147

  18. [Percutaneous maxillary nerve block anesthesia in maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1999-01-01

    Personal experience in percutaneous maxillary nerve block anesthesia in association with transmucosal anesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in oral and maxillofacial surgery, is presented. Six Caldwell-Luc, 9 anthrotomies and biopsies of maxillary sinus, 8 removals of extensive odontogenic cysts and 12 surgical maxillary expansions were performed from 1994 to 1996 at our Department. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block in association with transmucosal anesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion were performed. Carbocaine without adrenaline in association with NaCO3 1/10 for maxillary nerve block anesthesia and lidocaineoprilocaine cream (EMLA) for transmucosal anesthesia were employed. Intra- and post-operative pain were evaluated by visual analogue scale in all the patients. Anesthesiological procedures revealed to be effective in all surgical interventions and postoperative analgesia allowed easier pain control. The simplicity of execution, the effective pre- and postoperative anesthesia and the absence of side effects make this procedure particularly indicated in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  19. OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA AND PREGNANCY: PROBLEMS EVOLVING BY THE TIME OF DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Mravyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a case of pregnancy in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. It is of note that both local and foreign medicine this disorder is a contraindication to pregnancy due to a high risk of maternal and fetal complications. The authors review literature on pre-pregnancy planning and preparation, pregnancy management, types of deliveries and approaches to anesthesia in female patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Special attention is paid to anesthesiological complications during delivery, ways of their management and correction. Due to a high inheritance rate of this disorder, genetic consulting and extracorporeal fertilization methods are of great importance.

  20. An overview of anesthetic procedures, tools, and techniques in ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messieha Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zakaria Messieha Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care (ASAC, also known as Same Day Surgery or Day Care in some countries, is the fastest growing segment of ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care. Over 50 million ambulatory surgical procedures are conducted annually comprising over 60% of all anesthesia care with an impressive track record of safety and efficiency. Advances in ambulatory anesthesia care have been due to newer generation of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics as well as airway management technology and techniques. Successful ambulatory anesthesia care relies on patient selection, adequate facilities, highly trained personnel and quality improvement policies and procedures. Favoring one anesthetic technique over the other should be patient and procedure-specific. Effective management of post-operative pain as well as nausea and vomiting are the final pieces in assuring success in ambulatory anesthesia care. Keywords: ambulatory anesthesia, out-patient anesthesia, Day-Care anesthesia

  1. An Anesthetist’s Experience and the Incidence of Critical Cases in Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Bolshedvorov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of experience on the quality of anesthesia in ambulatory surgery. Materials and methods. The authors undertook a study of the role of experience and specialization on the occurrence of complications in ambulatory anesthesia care. By using the internal audit and calculating the frequency of critical cases, they examined the results of the work of two groups of anesthetists: 1 medical beginners after 2-year adjunct practice and 2 one-day hospital specialists having an at least 7-year practice length. Results. In the beginner group, the number of critical cases per operation was twice higher than that in the experienced specialists. The paper shows the detrimental pattern of the residual principle in selecting anesthetists for work at a one-day hospital and provides evidence that specialization is required in the area under discussion. Key words: ambulatory anesthesiology, role of an anesthetist’s experience, critical cases.

  2. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active......-question written survey rating the session. The most common primary instructional methods were computer slides-based classroom lectures (66%), workshops (15%), simulations (5%), and journal club (5%). The number of teaching techniques used per formal teaching session averaged 5.31 (SD, 1.92; median, 5...... had a mean score of 8.44 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.2) compared with a mean score of 8.63 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.1) for active sessions (P = 0.63). Slides-based classroom lectures were the most common instructional method, and faculty used an average of 5 known teaching techniques per...

  3. Ketofol for monitored anesthesia care in shoulder arthroscopy and labral repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kevin C Lee,1 Hanyuan Shi,2 Brian C Lee3 1Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, New York, NY, 2Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: A 21-year-old male (body mass index: 28.3 with a history of asthma and reactive airway disease since childhood underwent left shoulder arthroscopy and labral repair surgery under monitored anesthesia care. Because the procedure was performed in the beach chair position, access to the patient’s airway was limited throughout. To avoid general anesthesia and to limit potential complications associated with monitored anesthesia care, a ketofol admixture was used. This case demonstrates that, in conjunction with regional anesthesia, ketofol may be an acceptable alternative to propofol for maintenance in outpatient orthopedic procedures. Keywords: ketamine, propofol, ketofol, sedation, case report

  4. Patient perception of pain care in hospitals in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Gupta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Anita Gupta1, Sarah Daigle2, Jeffrey Mojica3, Robert W Hurley41Pain Management Division, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Division of Pain Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Medical Director of the Johns Hopkins Pain Treatment Center, Division of Pain Medicine, Deparment of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAStudy objective: Assessment of patients’ perception of pain control in hospitals in the United States.Background: Limited data are available regarding the quality of pain care in the hospitalized patient. This is particularly valid for data that allow for comparison of pain outcomes from one hospital to another. Such data are critical for numerous reasons, including allowing patients and policy-makers to make data-driven decisions, and to guide hospitals in their efforts to improve pain care. The Hospital Quality Alliance was recently created by federal policy makers and private organizations in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare and Medicare Services to conduct patient surveys to evaluate their experience including pain control during their hospitalization.Methods: In March 2008, the results of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS survey was released for review for health care providers and researchers. This survey includes a battery of questions for patients upon discharge from the hospital including pain-related questions and patient satisfaction that provide valuable data regarding pain care nationwide. This study will review the results from the pain questions from this available data set and evaluate the performance of these hospitals in pain care in relationship to patient satisfaction. Furthermore, this analysis will be providing valuable

  5. A surprising cause of wheezing in a morbidly obese patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnutala LN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lakshmi N Kurnutala, Minal Joshi, Hattiyangadi Kamath, Joel Yarmush Department of Anesthesiology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA Abstract: A typical patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has small airway disease, which often responds to bronchodilators. If the patient is obese, he or she may be further compromised and not tolerate being in the supine position. We present a case of a patient with history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea with acute renal failure and urosepsis scheduled for an emergent debridement of Fournier's gangrene. In this patient, the fiberoptic intubation was performed in semi-Fowler's position, and tracheomalacia was observed. Keywords: tracheomalacia, difficult airway, fiberoptic intubation, COPD

  6. The life of Rudolf Nissen: advancing surgery through science and principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fults, D W; Taussky, P

    2011-06-01

    Rudolf Nissen (1896-1981) was a surgeon whose career began in Germany during the first third of the 20th century, a period of rapid progress in biomedical technology, during which neurosurgery, anesthesiology, and other specialties emerged. A protégé and later close colleague of thoracic surgery pioneer Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951), Nissen resigned from the Berlin Charité Clinic and left Germany in 1933, in response to the rise of Nazi fascism. Throughout his subsequent career in Istanbul, Turkey, the American cities of Boston and New York, and finally Basel, Switzerland, Nissen developed innovative surgical techniques, advocated for patient-centered medical education, and promoted surgical subspecialization. A lifelong proponent of clear scientific writing, Nissen expressed, in extensively published work, his philosophy that progress in surgery depends critically on rigorously applying the scientific method, upholding professional integrity, and respecting human dignity.

  7. Impact of volume expansion on the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of liposome bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadzic A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Admir Hadzic,1,2 John A Abikhaled,3 William J Harmon4 1Department of Anesthesiology, The New York School of Regional Anesthesia (NYSORA, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Ziekenhouse Oost Limburgh, Genk, Belgium; 3Austin Surgeons, Austin, TX, 4Urology San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Liposome bupivacaine is a prolonged-release liposomal formulation of bupivacaine indicated for single-dose infiltration into the surgical site to produce postsurgical analgesia of longer duration than traditional local anesthetics. This review summarizes the available data on how volume expansion may impact the analgesic efficacy of liposome bupivacaine. The Phase II and III clinical studies that involved surgical site administration of liposome bupivacaine at various concentrations in different surgical settings revealed no apparent concentration–efficacy relationship. A single-center, prospective study comparing the efficacy of transversus abdominis plane infiltration with liposome bupivacaine administered in a lower (266 mg/40 mL vs a higher (266 mg/20 mL dose concentration in subjects undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy also reported similar postsurgical pain intensity scores and opioid usage in both treatment groups. The pharmacokinetic profile of liposome bupivacaine following subcutaneous injections in rats was unaltered by differences in drug concentration, dose, or injection volume within the ranges tested. Volume expansion of liposome bupivacaine to a total volume of 300 mL or less does not appear to impact its clinical efficacy or pharmacokinetic profile, thus allowing flexibility to administer the formulation across a wide range of diluent volumes. Keywords: pain, analgesia, liposome bupivacaine, dose, concentration, dilution 

  8. Active research fields in anesthesia: a document co-citation analysis of the anesthetic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Milan P; Kaufmann, Mark; Kindler, Christoph H

    2008-05-01

    The expansion of science has resulted in an increased information flow and in an exponentially growing number of connections between knowledge in different research fields. In this study, we used methods of scientometric analysis to obtain a conceptual network that forms the structure of active scientific research fields in anesthesia. We extracted from the Web of Science (Institute for Scientific Information) all original articles (n = 3275) including their references (n = 79,972) that appeared in 2003 in all 23 journals listed in the Institute for Scientific Information Journal Citation Reports under the subject heading "Anesthesiology." After identification of highly cited references (> or = 5), pairs of co-cited references were created and grouped into uniformly structured clusters of documents using a single linkage and variable level clustering method. In addition, for each such cluster of documents, we identified corresponding front papers published in 2003, each of which co-cited at least two documents of the cluster core. Active anesthetic research fields were then named by examining the titles of the documents in both the established clusters and in their corresponding front papers. These research fields were sorted according to the proportion of recent documents in their cluster core (immediacy index) and were further analyzed. Forty-six current anesthetic research fields were identified. The research field named "ProSeal laryngeal mask airway" showed the highest immediacy index (100%) whereas the research fields "Experimental models of neuropathic pain" and "Volatile anesthetic-induced cardioprotection" exhibited the highest level of co-citation strength (level 9). The research field with the largest cluster core, containing 12 homogeneous papers, was "Postoperative nausea and vomiting." The journal Anesthesia & Analgesia published most front papers while Anesthesiology published most of the fundamental documents used as references in the front papers

  9. Methodological and Reporting Quality of Systematic Reviews Published in the Highest Ranking Journals in the Field of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riado Minguez, Daniel; Kowalski, Martin; Vallve Odena, Marta; Longin Pontzen, Daniel; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Jeric, Milka; Dosenovic, Svjetlana; Jakus, Dora; Vrdoljak, Marija; Poklepovic Pericic, Tina; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are important for making clinical recommendations and guidelines. We analyzed methodological and reporting quality of pain-related SRs published in the top-ranking anesthesiology journals. This was a cross-sectional meta-epidemiological study. SRs published from 2005 to 2015 in the first quartile journals within the Journal Citation Reports category Anesthesiology were analyzed based on the Journal Citation Reports impact factor for year 2014. Each SR was assessed by 2 independent authors using Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) and Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) tools. Total score (median and interquartile range, IQR) on checklists, temporal trends in total score, correlation in total scores between the 2 checklists, and variability of those results between journals were analyzed. A total of 446 SRs were included. Median total score of AMSTAR was 6/11 (IQR: 4-7) and of PRISMA 18.5/27 (IQR: 15-22). High compliance (reported in over 90% SRs) was found in only 1 of 11 AMSTAR and 5 of 27 PRISMA items. Low compliance was found for the majority of AMSTAR and PRISMA individual items. Linear regression indicated that there was no improvement in the methodological and reporting quality of SRs before and after the publication of the 2 checklists (AMSTAR: F(1,8) = 0.22; P = .65, PRISMA: F(1,7) = 0.22; P = .47). Total scores of AMSTAR and PRISMA had positive association (R = 0.71; P reporting quality of pain-related SRs should be improved using relevant checklists. This can be remedied by a joint effort of authors, editors, and peer reviewers.

  10. Acetaminophen for analgesia following pyloromyotomy: does the route of administration make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arvid Yung,1 Arlyne Thung,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,1–3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: During the perioperative care of infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, an opioid-sparing technique is often advocated due to concerns such as postoperative hypoventilation and apnea. Although the rectal administration of acetaminophen is commonly employed, an intravenous (IV preparation is also currently available, but only limited data are available regarding IV acetaminophen use for infants undergoing pyloromyotomy. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of IV and rectal acetaminophen for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Methods: A retrospective review of the use of IV and rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed. The efficacy was assessed by evaluating the perioperative need for supplemental analgesic agents, postoperative pain scores, tracheal extubation time, time in the postanesthesia care unit, time to oral feeding, and time to hospital discharge. Results: The study cohort included 68 patients, of whom 34 patients received IV acetaminophen and 34 received rectal acetaminophen. All patients also received local infiltration of the surgical site with 0.25% bupivacaine. No intraoperative opioids were administered. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative pain scores, need for supplemental analgesic agents, time in the postanesthesia care unit, or time in the hospital. There was no difference in the number of children who tolerated oral feeds on the day of surgery or in postoperative complications. Conclusion: Our preliminary data suggest that there is no clinical difference or advantage with the use of IV versus

  11. [Acquiring skills in malignant hyperthermia crisis management: comparison of high-fidelity simulation versus computer-based case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Vilma; Gonzalez, Carlos; Delfino, Alejandro E; Altermatt, Fernando R; Corvetto, Marcia A

    2018-04-06

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare the effect of high fidelity simulation versus a computer-based case solving self-study, in skills acquisition about malignant hyperthermia on first year anesthesiology residents. After institutional ethical committee approval, 31 first year anesthesiology residents were enrolled in this prospective randomized single-blinded study. Participants were randomized to either a High Fidelity Simulation Scenario or a computer-based Case Study about malignant hyperthermia. After the intervention, all subjects' performance in was assessed through a high fidelity simulation scenario using a previously validated assessment rubric. Additionally, knowledge tests and a satisfaction survey were applied. Finally, a semi-structured interview was done to assess self-perception of reasoning process and decision-making. 28 first year residents finished successfully the study. Resident's management skill scores were globally higher in High Fidelity Simulation versus Case Study, however they were significant in 4 of the 8 performance rubric elements: recognize signs and symptoms (p = 0.025), prioritization of initial actions of management (p = 0.003), recognize complications (p = 0.025) and communication (p = 0.025). Average scores from pre- and post-test knowledge questionnaires improved from 74% to 85% in the High Fidelity Simulation group, and decreased from 78% to 75% in the Case Study group (p = 0.032). Regarding the qualitative analysis, there was no difference in factors influencing the student's process of reasoning and decision-making with both teaching strategies. Simulation-based training with a malignant hyperthermia high-fidelity scenario was superior to computer-based case study, improving knowledge and skills in malignant hyperthermia crisis management, with a very good satisfaction level in anesthesia residents. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  12. The future of anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There was an era when bark of mandrake plant, boiled in wine was used to administer anesthesia. Ether, after reigning the kingdom of anaesthesiology for more than a century, came to be superseded by newer and newer agents. Anaesthesiology has witnessed tremendous developments since infancy. The introduction of advanced airway adjuncts, labour analgesia, patient controlled analgesia, fibreoptics, Bispectral Index monitors, workstations, simulators and robotic surgeries are only to name a further few. Anaesthesia for robotic surgery received much impetus and is still a dream to come true in many countries. But then, the rapid spin in technology and fast sophistication of medical field has even surpassed this. The next event to venture is entry of robots into human body made possible by a culmination of intricate medicine and fine technology that is Nanotechnology. This article briefly introduces the field of nanotechnology in relation to its potential benefits to the field of anaesthesiology. As with any new tecnique or application, nanotechnology as applied to anaesthesiology has tremendous potential for research and exploration. This article therefore orients the reader′s mind towards the immense potential and benefits that can be tapped by carrying out further studies and experimentations.The literature was searched using databases, peer reviewed journals and books for over a period of one year (till December 2011. The search was carried out using keywords as nanotechnology, robotics, anesthesiology etc. Initially a master database was formed including human as well as animal studies. Later on the broad topic area was narrowed down to developments in nanotechnology as applied to anesthesiology. Further filtering of search results were done based on selection of researches and developments relating to local, regional and general anesthesia as well as critical care and pain and palliative care.

  13. Scientific fraud in 20 falsified anesthesia papers : detection using financial auditing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J; Zobrist, R; Konrad, C; Schuepfer, G

    2012-06-01

    Data from natural sources show counter-intuitive distribution patterns for the leading digits to the left of the decimal point and the digit 1 is observed more frequently than all other numbers. This pattern, which was first described by Newcomb and later confirmed by Benford, is used in financial and tax auditing to detect fraud. Deviations from the pattern indicate possible falsifications. Anesthesiology journals are affected not only by ghostwriting and plagiarism but also by counterfeiting. In the present study 20 publications in anesthesiology known to be falsified by an author were investigated for irregularities with respect to Benford's law using the χ(2)-test and the Z-test. In the 20 retracted publications an average first-digit frequency of 243.1 (standard deviation SD ± 118.2, range: 30-592) and an average second-digit frequency of 132.3 (SD ± 72.2, range: 15-383) were found. The observed distribution of the first and second digits to the left of the decimal point differed significantly (pvalues. In an analysis of each paper 17 out of 20 studies differed significantly from the expected value for the first digit and 18 out of 20 studies varied significantly from the expected value of the second digit. Only one paper did not vary significantly from expected values for the digits to the left of the decimal. For comparison, a meta-analysis using complex mathematical procedures was chosen as a control. The analysis showed a first-digit distribution consistent with the Benford distribution. Thus, the method used in the present study seems to be sensitive for detecting fraud. Additional statements of specificity cannot yet be made as this requires further analysis of data that is definitely not falsified. Future studies exploring conformity might help prevent falsified studies from being published.

  14. Treatment of chronic low back pain – new approaches on the horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knezevic NN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nebojsa Nick Knezevic,1–3 Shane Mandalia,1 Jennifer Raasch,1 Ivana Knezevic,1 Kenneth D Candido1–3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Department of Surgery, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Back pain is the second leading cause of disability among American adults and is currently treated either with conservative therapy or interventional pain procedures. However, the question that remains is whether we, as physicians, have adequate therapeutic options to offer to the patients who suffer from chronic low back pain but fail both conservative therapy and interventional pain procedures before they consider surgical options such as discectomy, disc arthroplasty, or spinal fusion. The purpose of this article is to review the potential novel therapies that are on the horizon for the treatment of chronic low back pain. We discuss medications that are currently in use through different phases of clinical trials (I–III for the treatment of low back pain. In this review, we discuss revisiting the concept of chemonucleolysis using chymopapain, as the first drug in an intradiscal injection to reduce herniated disc size, and newer intradiscal therapies, including collagenase, chondroitinase, matrix metalloproteinases, and ethanol gel. We also review an intravenous glial cell-derived neurotrophic growth factor called artemin, which may repair sensory nerves compressed by herniated discs. Another new drug in development for low back pain without radiculopathy is a subcutaneous monoclonal antibody acting as nerve growth factor called tanezumab. Finally, we discuss how platelet-rich plasma and stem cells are being studied for the treatment of low back pain. We believe that with these new therapeutic options, we can bridge the current gap between conservative/interventional procedures and surgeries in patients with chronic back pain. Keywords: chronic low back pain

  15. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de León-Casasola OA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oscar A de León-Casasola,1,2 Victor Mayoral3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, 2University at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. NY, USA; 3Anesthesiology Department, Pain Management Unit, University Hospital of Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Abstract: Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP. This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. Keywords: 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, clinical evidence, localized neuropathic pain, postherpetic neuralgia, review

  16. From QUOROM to PRISMA: a survey of high-impact medical journals' instructions to authors and a review of systematic reviews in anesthesia literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kun-ming; Li, Xiao-qian; Zhou, Qing-hui; Moher, David; Ling, Chang-quan; Yu, Wei-feng

    2011-01-01

    The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) Statement was published to help authors improve how they report systematic reviews. It is unknown how many journals mention PRISMA in their instructions to authors, or whether stronger journal language regarding use of PRISMA improves author compliance. An Internet-based investigation examined the extent to which 146 leading medical journals have incorporated the PRISMA Statement into their instructions to authors. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Also, systematic reviews published in the leading anesthesiology journals and the QUOROM (QUality Of Reporting Of Meta-analyses) Statement were used to explore the hypothesis that indicating compliance with the QUOROM Statement in the manuscript is associated with improved compliance with the reporting guideline. In a sample of 146 journals publishing systematic reviews, the PRISMA Statement was referred to in the instructions to authors for 27% (40/146) of journals; more often in general and internal medicine journals (7/14; 50%) than in specialty medicine journals (33/132; 25%). In the second part of the study, 13 systematic reviews published in the leading anesthesiology journals in 2008 were included for appraisal. Mention of the QUOROM Statement in the manuscript was associated with higher compliance with the QUOROM checklist (P = 0.022). Most of the leading medical journals used ambiguous language regarding what was expected of authors. Further improvement on quality of reporting of systematic reviews may entail journals clearly informing authors of their requirements. Stronger directions, such as requiring an indication of adherence to a research quality of reporting statement in the manuscript, may improve reporting and utility of systematic reviews.

  17. Burnout among anaesthetists in Chinese hospitals: a multicentre, cross-sectional survey in 6 provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Min; Ting, Chen; Pengqian, Fang; Xinqiao, Fu

    2016-06-01

    Anesthesiology has reached a new stage which anaesthesia safety is significantly affected by human factors. The number of Chinese anaesthetists has increased to nearly twice as many as that in 2005. Attributed to traditional concepts, many problems in anesthesiology persist in Chinese hospitals. This study aims to determine the current status of anaesthesia job burnout, including problems related to burnout, as well as the conditions of anaesthesia human resources in Chinese hospitals. A multi-center, cross-sectional survey of 395 anaesthetists from 60 hospitals in 6 provinces was conducted to collect data on the work conditions of anesthesiologists by using questionnaires. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to measure burnout. Different statistical models were also used to evaluate the data. The number of Chinese anaesthetists has increased to nearly twice as many as that in 2005. According to our field survey of burnout among anaesthetists, only 17 (4.30%) respondents exhibited high levels of burnout. The average scores corresponding to the dimensions of burnout are 14.64 ± 11.40 (emotional exhaustion, EE), 4.22 ± 5.74 (depersonalization, DP), and 33.41 ± 10.05 (personal accomplishment, PA), as determined by MBI. These results indicate the differences in the spatial distribution of anaesthetists. Moreover, 15.3% of the anaesthetists showed high EE, 8.1% exhibited high DP, and 33.6% had low PA. Anxiety and undesirable conditions experienced by professional groups in anaesthesiology need to be addressed. Educational level, an important factor in anaesthesia care, influences not only psychological health of practitioners but patient safety as well. Thus, personnel structure must be optimized to relieve tension in the practice of the profession and reduce burnout among anaesthetists in hospitals in China. Meanwhile, the management must increase its effort toward improving the mental health of practitioners and patient safety in anaesthesia care. © 2016

  18. Presentation of research in anesthesia: Culmination into publication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Tyagi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the quality of research presentations made in conferences, its success or failure to be published in a peer-reviewed journal is a well-accepted marker. However, there is no data regarding the publication of research presentations made in Indian conferences of anesthesiology. Objective: The primary objective was to determine publication rate of research presented at the largest and best attended national conference in anesthesiology, the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists′ Conference (ISACON, and also compare it with the rate from an international conference American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA annual meeting held in the same year. Materials and Methods: All 363 abstracts presented as poster or podium presentations at the ISACON, and an equal number of randomly selected abstracts presented at ASA annual meeting were searched on Pubmed and Google Scholar for their full-text publications in peer-reviewed journals using a standardized search strategy. As secondary observations, abstracts were assessed for completeness by noting certain components central to research methodology. Also, changes between abstract of the presentation and published paper were noted with respect to certain components. Results: The publication rate of presentations at ISACON and ASA meetings was 5% and 22%, respectively. The abstracts from ISACON lacked central components of research such as methods and statistical tests. The commonest change in the full-text publications as compared with the original abstract from both conferences was a change in authorship. Conclusion: Steps are required to augment full-text publication of Indian research, including a more rigorous peer review of abstracts submitted to ISACON to ensure their completeness.

  19. Utilization of Smartphone Applications by Anesthesia Providers

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    Michael S. Green

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care-related apps provide valuable facts and have added a new dimension to knowledge sharing. The purpose of this study is to understand the pattern of utilization of mobile apps specifically created for anesthesia providers. Smartphone app stores were searched, and a survey was sent to 416 anesthesia providers at 136 anesthesiology residency programs querying specific facets of application use. Among respondents, 11.4% never used, 12.4% used less than once per month, 6.0% used once per month, 12.1% used 2-3 times per month, 13.6% used once per week, 21% used 2-3 times per week, and 23.5% used daily. Dosage/pharmaceutical apps were rated the highest as most useful. 24.6% of the participants would pay less than $2.00, 25.1% would pay $5.00, 30.3% would pay $5–$10.00, 9.6% would pay $10–$25.00, 5.1% would pay $25–$50.00, and 5.1% would pay more than $50.00 if an app saves 5–10 minutes per day or 30 minutes/week. The use of mobile phone apps is not limited to reiterating information from textbooks but provides opportunities to further the ever-changing field of anesthesiology. Our survey illustrates the convenience of apps for health care professionals. Providers must exercise caution when selecting apps to ensure best evidence-based medicine.

  20. Artificial neural networks can be effectively used to model changes of intracranial pressure (ICP) during spinal surgery using different non invasive ICP surrogate estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watad, Abdulla; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Amital, Howard; Watad, Samaa; Sharif, Kassem; Bisharat, Bishara; Siri, Anna; Mahamid, Ala; Abu Ras, Hakim; Nasr, Ahmed; Bilotta, Federico; Robba, Chiara; Adawi, Mohammad

    2018-02-23

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques play a major role in anesthesiology, even though their importance is often overlooked. In the extant literature, AI approaches, such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), have been underutilized, mainly being used to model patient's consciousness state, to predict the precise amount of anesthetic gases, the level of analgesia, or the need of anesthesiological blocks, among others. In the field of neurosurgery, ANNs have been effectively applied to the diagnosis and prognosis of cerebral tumors, seizures, low back pain, and also to the monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP). A MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP), which is a feedforward ANN, with hyperbolic tangent as activation function in the input/hidden layers, softmax as activation function in the output layer, and cross-entropy as error function, was used to model the impact of prone versus supine position and the use of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) on ICP in a sample of 30 patients undergoing spinal surgery. Different non invasive surrogate estimations of ICP have been used and compared: namely, mean optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), non invasive estimated cerebral perfusion pressure (NCPP), pulsatility index (PI), ICP derived from PI (ICP-PI), and flow velocity diastolic formula (FVDICP). ONSD proved to be a more robust surrogate estimation of ICP, with a predictive power of 75%, whilst the power of NCPP, ICP-PI, PI, and FVDICP were 60.5%, 54.8%, 53.1%, and 47.7%, respectively. Our MLP analysis confirmed our findings previously obtained with regression, correlation, multivariate Receiving Operator Curve (multi-ROC) analyses. ANNs can be successfully used to predict the effects of prone versus supine position and PEEP on ICP in patients undergoing spinal surgery using different non invasive surrogate estimators of ICP.

  1. Safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia in patients less than 1 year of age

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    Walia H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hina Walia,1 Dmitry Tumin,1 Sharon Wrona,1 David Martin,1,2 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,1-3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: The management of acute pain presents unique challenges in the younger pediatric population. Although patient-controlled devices are frequently used in patients ≥6 years of age, alternative modes of analgesic delivery are needed in infants.Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia (NCA in neonates less than 1 year of age.Methods: Data from patients <1 year of age receiving NCA as ordered by the Acute Pain Service at our institution were collected over a 5-year period and reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcomes were activation of the institution’s Rapid Response Team (RRT or Code Blue, signifying severe adverse events. Pain score after NCA initiation was a secondary outcome.Results: Among 338 girls and 431 boys, the most common opioid used for NCA was fentanyl, followed by morphine and hydromorphone. There were 39 (5% cases involving RRT or Code Blue activation, of which only one (Code Blue was activated due to a complication of NCA (apnea. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated morphine NCA to be associated with greater odds of RRT activation (OR=3.29, 95% CI=1.35, 8.03, P=0.009 compared to fentanyl NCA. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores after NCA initiation across NCA agents.Conclusion: NCA is safe in neonates and infants, with comparable efficacy demonstrated for the three agents used. The elevated incidence of RRT activation in patients receiving morphine suggests caution in its use and consideration of alternative agents in this population. Keywords: nurse-controlled analgesia, pain medicine, Rapid Response Team

  2. Analysis of Production, Impact, and Scientific Collaboration on Difficult Airway Through the Web of Science and Scopus (1981-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aroca, Miguel Ángel; Pandiella-Dominique, Andrés; Navarro-Suay, Ricardo; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Granda-Orive, José Ignacio; Anguita-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-García, Andrés

    2017-06-01

    Bibliometrics, the statistical analysis of written publications, is an increasingly popular approach to the assessment of scientific activity. Bibliometrics allows researchers to assess the impact of a field, or research area, and has been used to make decisions regarding research funding. Through bibliometric analysis, we hypothesized that a bibliometric analysis of difficult airway research would demonstrate a growth in authors and articles over time. Using the Web of Science (WoS) and Scopus databases, we conducted a search of published manuscripts on the difficult airway from January 1981 to December 2013. After removal of duplicates, we identified 2412 articles. We then analyzed the articles as a group to assess indicators of productivity, collaboration, and impact over this time period. We found an increase in productivity over the study period, with 37 manuscripts published between 1981 and 1990, and 1268 between 2001 and 2010 (P 9% for both WoS and Scopus, and CAGR for anesthesiology as a whole =0.64% in WoS, and =3.30% in Scopus. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the number of papers published per author and the number of coauthored manuscripts (P < .001). We also found an increase in the number of coauthored manuscripts, in international cooperation between institutions, and in the number of citations for each manuscript. For any author, we also identified a positive relationship between the number of citations per manuscript and the number of papers published (P < .001). We found a greater increase over time in the number of difficult airway manuscripts than for anesthesiology research overall. We found that collaboration between authors increases their impact, and that an increase in collaboration increases citation rates. Publishing in English and in certain journals, and collaborating with certain authors and institutions, increases the visibility of manuscripts published on this subject.

  3. Natriuretic Peptides: Biochemistry, Physiology, Clinical Implication

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    I. A. Kozlova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, the interest of theorists and clinicians has steadily increased in the myocardially secreted hormones – natriuretic peptides. At the Congress of the European Society of Anesthesiology (Munich, 2007, B-type natriuretic peptides were included into the list of the parameters of perioperative laboratory monitoring that is expedient in the practice of anesthetists and resuscitation specialists. The literature review shows the history of discovery and identification of different types of natriuretic peptides and considers the matters of their biochemistry. It also details information on the synthesis, secretion, and clearance of these peptides, as well as their receptor apparatus in various organs and tissues. The physiology of the regulatory system is described, as applied to the cardiovascular, excretory, central nervous systems, and the neuroendocrine one. Special attention is given to the current publications on the control of B-type natriuretic peptides as biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction. The diagnostic and prognostic values of peptides are analyzed in chronic circulatory insufficiency, coronary heart disease, and other car-diological and non-cardiological diseases. The prognostic value of elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels in cardiac surgery is separately considered. It is concluded that the changes in the level of B-type natriuretic peptides in different clinical situations are the subject of numerous researches mainly made in foreign countries. The bulk of these researches are devoted to the study of peptides in cardiology and other areas of therapy. Studies on the use of peptides in reanimatology are relatively few and their results are rather discordant. The foregoing opens up wide prospects for studying the use of B-type natriuretic peptides in Russian intensive care and anesthesiology. Key words: natriuretic peptides, brain nautriuretic peptides, NT-proBNP.

  4. CONSORT item adherence in top ranked anaesthesiology journals in 2011: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münter, Nils H; Stevanovic, Ana; Rossaint, Rolf; Stoppe, Christian; Sanders, Robert D; Coburn, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for measuring the efficacy of any medical intervention. The present study assesses the implementation of the CONSORT statement in the top 11 anaesthesiology journals in 2011. We designed this study in order to determine how well authors in the top 11 ranked anaesthesiology journals follow the CONSORT statement's criteria. A retrospective cross-sectional data analysis. The study was performed at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital. Journals included Pain, Anesthesiology, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, European Journal of Pain, Anesthesia and Analgesia, Anaesthesia, Minerva Anestesiologica, Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology and the European Journal of Anaesthesiology. All articles in the online table of contents from the top 11 anaesthesiology journals according to the ISI Web of Knowledge were screened for RCTs published in 2011. The RCTs were assessed using the CONSORT checklist. We also analysed the correlation between the number of citations and the adherence to CONSORT items. We evaluated 319 RCTs and found that, more than ten years after the publication of the CONSORT statement, the RCTs satisfied a median of 60.0% of the CONSORT criteria. Only 72.1% of the articles presented clearly defined primary and secondary outcome parameters. The number of citations is only weakly associated with the fulfilment of the CONSORT statement (r = 0.023). Adherence to the CONSORT criteria remains low in top-ranked anaesthesiology journals. We found only a very weak correlation between the number of citations and fulfilment of the requirements of the CONSORT statement.

  5. Mixed-realism simulation of adverse event disclosure: an educational methodology and assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Francisco M; Raemer, Daniel B

    2013-04-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to disclose adverse events to patients or families. Various strategies have been reported for teaching disclosure, but no instruments have been shown to be reliable for assessing them.The aims of this study were to report a structured method for teaching adverse event disclosure using mixed-realism simulation, develop and begin to validate an instrument for assessing performance, and describe the disclosure practice of anesthesiology trainees. Forty-two anesthesiology trainees participated in a 2-part exercise with mixed-realism simulation. The first part took place using a mannequin patient in a simulated operating room where trainees became enmeshed in a clinical episode that led to an adverse event and the second part in a simulated postoperative care unit where the learner is asked to disclose to a standardized patient who systematically moves through epochs of grief response. Two raters scored subjects using an assessment instrument we developed that combines a 4-element behaviorally anchored rating scale (BARS) and a 5-stage objective rating scale. The performance scores for elements within the BARS and the 5-stage instrument showed excellent interrater reliability (Cohen's κ = 0.7), appropriate range (mean range for BARS, 4.20-4.47; mean range for 5-stage instrument, 3.73-4.46), and high internal consistency (P realism simulation that engages learners in an adverse event and allows them to practice disclosure to a structured range of patient responses. We have developed a reliable 2-part instrument with strong psychometric properties for assessing disclosure performance.

  6. Carlos Parsloe (1919-2009 - in memoriam Carlos Parsloe (1919-2009 - in memoriam Carlos Parsloe (1919-2009 - in memory

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    Almiro dos Reis Júnior

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Dr. Carlos Pereira Parsloe foi o mais importante e conhecido anestesiologista brasileiro e o que alcançou maior repercussão mundial. Teve papel fundamental como Presidente da Comissão Científica do III Congresso Mundial de Anestesiologia (Brasil. Foi Presidente da SAESP e atingiu a Presidência da WFSA. Sua autobiografia foi publicada pela Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (Illinois, EUA. Com seu desaparecimento em janeiro deste ano de 2009, a Anestesiologia brasileira perdeu um dos seus mais valiosos membros. CONTEÚDO: A vida de Parsloe é descrita, ressaltando-se seu caráter, sua competência, sua dedicação ao estudo e ao ensino, as funções que brilhantemente exerceu e as conquistas que obteve. Registram-se fatos desde sua infância até o curso médico no Rio de Janeiro e seus primeiros anos de exercício da Medicina nesta cidade e em Chicago (EUA. Transmite fatos ocorridos durante os dois anos de residência dele em Madison (Wisconsin, sob a orientação de Ralph Waters, da qual sempre se orgulhou. Relata sua volta temporária ao Brasil, seu segundo período de vida em Madison, seu retorno definitivo ao nosso país e sua vida e importância no Serviço Médico de Anestesia (SMA de São Paulo. Recorda algumas das numerosas homenagens que recebeu no Brasil e no exterior. CONCLUSÕES: Ocorrendo neste ano o triste desaparecimento do Dr. Carlos Pereira Parsloe, justifica-se prestar a ele esta homenagem, fundamentada no que ele significou para a Anestesiologia brasileira e mundial, marcando para sempre quem foi e o que fez pela especialidade, pela WFSA, SBA, SAESP, por diversas outras sociedades nacionais e internacionais e, ainda, por muitos anestesiologistas do nosso país.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: El Dr. Carlos Pereira Parsloe fue el más importante y conocido anestesiólogo brasileño y el que alcanzó mayor repercusión mundial. Jugó un rol fundamental como Presidente de la Comisión Científica del

  7. [Simulation-based training and OR apprenticeship for medical students : A prospective, randomized, single-blind study of clinical skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, T; Schmidtmann, I; Limbach, T; Gottschling, P F; Buggenhagen, H; Kurz, S; Pestel, G

    2016-11-01

    Simulation-based training (SBT) has developed into an established method of medical training. Studies focusing on the education of medical students have used simulation as an evaluation tool for defined skills. A small number of studies provide evidence that SBT improves medical students' skills in the clinical setting. Moreover, they were strictly limited to a few areas, such as the diagnosis of heart murmurs or the correct application of cricoid pressure. Other studies could not prove adequate transferability from the skills gained in SBT to the patient site. Whether SBT has an effect on medical students' skills in anesthesiology in the clinical setting is controversial. To explore this issue, we designed a prospective, randomized, single-blind trial that was integrated into the undergraduate anesthesiology curriculum of our department during the second year of the clinical phase of medical school. This study intended to explore the effect of SBT on medical students within the mandatory undergraduate anesthesiology curriculum of our department in the operating room with respect to basic skills in anesthesiology. After obtaining ethical approval, the participating students of the third clinical semester were randomized into two groups: the SIM-OR group was trained by a 225 min long SBT in basic skills in anesthesiology before attending the operating room (OR) apprenticeship. The OR-SIM group was trained after the operating room apprenticeship by SBT. During SBT the students were trained in five clinical skills detailed below. Further, two clinical scenarios were simulated using a full-scale simulator. The students had to prepare the patient and perform induction of anesthesia, including bag-mask ventilation after induction in scenario 1 and rapid sequence induction in scenario 2. Using the five-point Likert scale, five defined skills were evaluated at defined time points during the study period. 1) application of the safety checklist, 2) application of

  8. Presentation of a method at the Exploration Stage according to IDEAL: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) under local infiltrative anesthesia is a feasible and effective method - retrospective analysis of 439 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecke, Thorsten H; Barski, Dimitri; Weingart, Guido; Lange, Carsten; Hallmann, Steffen; Ruttloff, Jürgen; Wawroschek, Friedhelm; Gerullis, Holger

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses minimally invasive anesthesiologic and analgetic approaches for stone surgery in the upper urinary tract. Aim of this retrospective analysis is to compare feasibility, safety and complication rates of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) under local infiltration anesthesia alone (Group I) and additive intravenous analgetics and/or sedative medications (Group II). This is a single center study. A total of 439 patients have been included from November 2003 until March 2012. A total of 226 patients were assigned to Group I receiving local infiltration anesthesia alone, whereas 213 patients were assigned to Group II receiving additive intravenous analgetics and/or sedative medications. Demographic characteristics and stone characteristics have been evaluated to determine feasibility, complication rates for safety, and stone-free rates for effectiveness. The study and the reported technique have then been retrospectively analysed according to the IDEAL stages of surgical innovation. All included patients who accepted local infiltration anesthesia underwent PCNL successfully. The mean American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA) of the included patients was 2.15 ±0.37 (range, 1-4). PCNL was indicated in 138 patients due to pelvic calculi, in 171 patients due to renal calculi, in 66 patients due to partial staghorn, in 48 patients due to complete staghorn and in 16 patients due to upper ureteral stones. The total stone free rate in our patients was 78.4% over all stone localizations. Compared to the possibility of using additive intravenous analgetics and/or sedative medications we could show differences in the median age ( p =0.005) suggesting that older patients did better tolerate the infiltration anesthesia than patients at younger ages. We did also remark not statistically significant differences in Group I and Group II as for number of tracts, operation duration, hemoglobin drop, fever, transfusion rate, and stone free rate, but not for

  9. Clinical relevance of persistent postoperative pain after total hip replacement – a prospective observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlenwein J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Joachim Erlenwein,1,* Martin Müller,1,* Deborah Falla,1,2 Michael Przemeck,3 Michael Pfingsten,1 Stefan Budde,4 Michael Quintel,1 Frank Petzke1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Clinic, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg August University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany; 2Centre of Precision Rehabilitation for Spinal Pain (CPR Spine, School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Annastift, Hannover, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The development of persistent postoperative pain may occur following surgery, including total hip replacement. Yet, the prevalence may depend on the definition of persistent pain. This observational cohort study explored whether the prevalence of persistent pain after total hip replacement differs depending on the definition of persistent pain and evaluated the impact of ongoing pain on the patient’s quality of life 6 months after surgery.Patients and methods: Pre- and postoperative characteristics of 125 patients undergoing elective total hip replacement were assessed and 104 patients were available for the follow-up interview, 6 months after surgery.Results: Six months after surgery, between 26% and 58% of patients still reported hip pain – depending on the definition of persistent pain. Patients with moderate-to-severe persistent pain intensity (>3 on a numerical rating scale were more restricted in their daily life activities (Chronic Pain Grade – disability score but did not differ in reported quality of life (Short-Form 12 from those with no pain or milder pain intensity. Maximal preoperative pain intensity and body mass index were the only independent factors influencing daily function 6 months after total hip replacement.Conclusion: These

  10. P2Y12 receptor-mediated activation of spinal microglia and p38MAPK pathway contribute to cancer-induced bone pain

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    Liu MJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mingjuan Liu,1 Ming Yao,1,2 Hanqi Wang,1 Longsheng Xu,1 Ying Zheng,1 Bing Huang,1 Huadong Ni,1 Shijie Xu,1 Xuyan Zhou,1 Qingquan Lian2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The First Hospital of Jiaxing, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jiaxing University, Jiaxing, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP is one of the most challenging clinical problems due to a lack of understanding the mechanisms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of microglial G-protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R and proinflammatory cytokine production play an important role in neuropathic pain generation and maintenance. However, whether P2Y12R is involved in CIBP remains unknown.Methods: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of P2Y12R in CIBP and its molecular mechanisms. Using the bone cancer model inoculated with Walker 256 tumor cells into the left tibia of Sprague Dawley rat, we blocked spinal P2Y12R through intrathecal administration of its selective antagonist MRS2395 (400 pmol/µL, 15 µL.Results: We found that not only the ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1-positive microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord but also mechanical allodynia was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, it decreased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK and the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6, whereas it increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α.Conclusion: Taken together, our present results suggest that microglial P2Y12R in the spinal cord may contribute to CIBP by the activation of spinal microglia and p38MAPK pathway, thus identifying a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CIBP. Keywords: P2Y12 receptor, cancer-induced bone pain, p38MAPK pathway, cytokines

  11. [Acute pain therapy in German hospitals as competitive factor. Do competition, ownership and case severity influence the practice of acute pain therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Hinz, J; Meißner, W; Stamer, U; Bauer, M; Petzke, F

    2015-07-01

    Due to the implementation of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, the competitive pressure on German hospitals increased. In this context it has been shown that acute pain management offers economic benefits for hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the competitive situation, the ownership and the economic resources required on structures and processes for acute pain management. A standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management was mailed to the 885 directors of German departments of anesthesiology listed as members of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin). For most hospitals a strong regional competition existed; however, this parameter affected neither the implementation of structures nor the recommended treatment processes for pain therapy. In contrast, a clear preference for hospitals in private ownership to use the benchmarking tool QUIPS (quality improvement in postoperative pain therapy) was found. These hospitals also presented information on coping with the management of pain in the corporate clinic mission statement more often and published information about the quality of acute pain management in the quality reports more frequently. No differences were found between hospitals with different forms of ownership in the implementation of acute pain services, quality circles, expert standard pain management and the implementation of recommended processes. Hospitals with a higher case mix index (CMI) had a certified acute pain management more often. The corporate mission statement of these hospitals also contained information on how to cope with pain, presentation of the quality of pain management in the quality report, implementation of quality circles and the implementation of the expert standard pain management more frequently. There were no differences in the frequency of using the benchmarking

  12. Propofol and Remifentanil Sedation for Bronchial Thermoplasty: A Prospective Cohort Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Hooghe, Julia N S; Eberl, Susanne; Annema, Jouke T; Bonta, Peter I

    2017-01-01

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a rapidly emerging bronchoscopic treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. Different sedation strategies are currently used, ranging from mild midazolam sedation to general anesthesia requiring tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and both patients' and bronchoscopists' satisfaction with propofol and remifentanil sedation administered by specialized sedation anesthesiology nurses during BT in severe asthma patients. A prospective observational cohort study in BT-treated severe asthma patients of the TASMA trial was designed. Patients were asked to rate their overall BT procedure satisfaction and tolerance with propofol/remifentanil sedation using a visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging from 0 to 10. Similarly, bronchoscopists were asked to rate patient cooperation and tolerance. Sedation-associated adverse events and the number of BT activations were recorded. Thirty-two BT procedures in 13 severe asthma patients were performed under moderate target-controlled infusion (TCI) propofol/remifentanil sedation. Patients' median VAS scores were as follows: overall satisfaction 9.6 (interquartile range [IQR] 8.5-10.0), dyspnea 0.0 (IQR 0.0-0.6), pain 0.1 (IQR 0.0-1.0), cough 0.5 (IQR 0.0-2.1), and anxiety 0.1 (IQR 0.0-0.7). Bronchoscopists' median VAS scores were as follows: overall patient cooperation 9.1 (IQR 8.5-9.6), dyspnea 0.3 (IQR 0.0-0.9), pain 0.2 (IQR 0.0-1.3), cough 1.2 (IQR 0.7-2.0), and discomfort 0.6 (IQR 0.3-1.5). All patients were willing to undergo the procedure again and would recommend this form of sedation to their best friend. One case of conversion to general anesthesia occurred and no serious adverse events were reported. Moderate sedation with propofol and remifentanil TCI provided by specialized sedation anesthesiology nurses is feasible and safe and results in high satisfaction rates of both patients and bronchoscopists. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. A matrix model for valuing anesthesia service with the resource-based relative value system

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    Sinclair DR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available David R Sinclair,1 David A Lubarsky,1 Michael M Vigoda,1 David J Birnbach,1 Eric A Harris,1 Vicente Behrens,1 Richard E Bazan,1 Steve M Williams,1 Kristopher Arheart,2 Keith A Candiotti1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to propose a new crosswalk using the resource-based relative value system (RBRVS that preserves the time unit component of the anesthesia service and disaggregates anesthesia billing into component parts (preoperative evaluation, intraoperative management, and postoperative evaluation. The study was designed as an observational chart and billing data review of current and proposed payments, in the setting of a preoperative holing area, intraoperative suite, and post anesthesia care unit. In total, 1,195 charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA physical status 1 through 5 patients were reviewed. No direct patient interventions were undertaken. Results: Spearman correlations between the proposed RBRVS billing matrix payments and the current ASA relative value guide methodology payments were strong (r=0.94–0.96, P<0.001 for training, test, and overall. The proposed RBRVS-based billing matrix yielded payments that were 3.0%±1.34% less than would have been expected from commercial insurers, using standard rates for commercial ASA relative value units and RBRVS relative value units. Compared with current Medicare reimbursement under the ASA relative value guide, reimbursement would almost double when converting to an RBRVS billing model. The greatest increases in Medicare reimbursement between the current system and proposed billing model occurred as anesthetic management complexity increased. Conclusion: The new crosswalk correlates with existing evaluation and management and intensive care medicine codes in an

  14. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

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    Likar R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rudolf Likar,1 Susanne Demschar,1 Ingo Kager,1 Stefan Neuwersch,1 Wolfgang Pipam,1 Reinhard Sittl2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design: This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods: Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results: Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients; one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients. During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98 to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1. Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion: Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. Keywords

  15. On the 40th anniversary of the Post graduate studies faculty of state establishment "Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy of Health Ministry of Ukraine"

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    Snysar V.I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 post graduate studies faculty of SE "Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Health Ministry of Ukraine" celebrates the 40th anniversary. By Decree of the Council of Ministers of USSR and Ministry of Health of USSR № 124 from March 24, 1973 (rector’s order № 38 from 30.03.1973. Doctors’ advanced training faculty was founded on the basis of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Institute of Order of the Red Banner of Labor. For the first time in the Soviet Union it was situated at a distance of 150 km from the main base in the city of Krivoy Rog. Four departments in the main branches: therapy, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology were opened and began successful work. Further, the departments of clinical laboratory diagnostics (1974, traumatology and orthopedics (1975, three departments of stomatology (1976 were organized. Starting from 1979 the departments of Doctors’ advanced training faculty have been organized on the basis of Dnipropetrovsk medical institutions of. The Department of gastroenterology was established in 1979, the department of obstetrics, gynecology and perinatology was founded in 1989, the department of psychiatry - in 1986. The department of medical and social expertise of the Post graduate studies faculty was opened in 1979 by the initiative of the Rector of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Institute Prof. I.I. Krizhanovskaya. Since 1997 one of the departments of therapy has moved to the Post graduate studies faculty and was named "department of therapy of interns and family medicine". In 2005 it was renamed to the department of family medicine. In 1983 the qualification upgrading courses of health care managers were reformed in the department of social hygiene and public health organization of the Post graduate studies faculty. The department of anesthesiology, intensive care and emergency states of the Post graduate studies Faculty separated from the department of anesthesiology and intensive Care in 1986. The department

  16. With directed study before a 4-day operating room management course, trust in the content did not change progressively during the classroom time.

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    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Fahy, Brenda G; Van Swol, Lyn M

    2017-11-01

    A 4-day course in operating room (OR) management is sufficient to provide anesthesiologists with the knowledge and problem solving skills needed to participate in projects of the systems-based-practice competency. Anesthesiologists may need to learn fewer topics when the objective is, instead, limited to comprehension of decision-making on the day of surgery, We tested the hypothesis that trust in course content would not increase further after completion of topics related to OR decision-making on the day of surgery. Panel survey. A 4-day 35hour course in OR management. Mandatory assignments before classes were: 1) review of statistics at a level slightly less than required of anesthesiology residents by the American Board of Anesthesiology; and 2) reading of peer-reviewed published articles while learning the scientific vocabulary. N=31 course participants who each attended 1 of 4 identical courses. At the end of each of the 4days, course participants completed a 9-item scale assessing trust in the course content, namely, its quality, usefulness, and reliability. Cronbach alpha for the 1 to 7 trust scale was 0.94. The means±SD of scores were 5.86±0.80 after day #1, 5.81±0.76 after day #2, 5.80±0.77 after day #3, and 5.97±0.76 after day #4. Multiple methods of statistical analysis all found that there was no significant effect of the number of days of the course on trust in the content (all P≥0.30). Trust in the course content did not increase after the end of the 1st day. Therefore, statistics review, reading, and the 1st day of the course appear sufficient when the objective of teaching OR management is not that participants will learn how to make the decisions, but will comprehend them and trust in the information underlying knowledgeable decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Caregivers’ knowledge and acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine in a tertiary care pediatric hospital

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    Trifa M

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mehdi Trifa,1,2 Dmitry Tumin,1,3 Hina Walia,1 Kathleen L Lemanek,4 Joseph D Tobias,1,3 Tarun Bhalla1,3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA; 4Department of Pediatric Psychology and Neuropsychology, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA Background: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies has increased in children, especially in those with chronic health conditions. However, this increase may not translate into acceptance of CAM in the perioperative setting. We surveyed caregivers of patients undergoing surgery to determine their knowledge and acceptance of hypnotherapy, acupuncture, and music therapy as alternatives to standard medication in the perioperative period. Materials and methods: An anonymous, 12-question survey was administered to caregivers of children undergoing procedures under general anesthesia. Caregivers reported their knowledge about hypnotherapy, music therapy, and acupuncture and interest in one of these methods during the perioperative period. CAM acceptance was defined as interest in one or more CAM methods.Results: Data from 164 caregivers were analyzed. The majority of caregivers were 20–40 years of age (68% and mothers of the patient (82%. Caregivers were most familiar with acupuncture (70%, followed by music therapy (60% and hypnotherapy (38%. Overall CAM acceptance was 51%. The acceptance of specific CAM modalities was highest for music therapy (50%, followed by hypnotherapy (17% and acupuncture (13%. In multivariable logistic regression, familiarity with music therapy was associated with greater odds of CAM acceptance (odds ratio=3.36; 95% CI: 1.46, 7.74; P=0.004.Conclusion: Overall CAM acceptance among caregivers of children

  18. Blockade of the mental nerve for lower lip surgery as a safe alternative to general anesthesia in two very old patients

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    Tan FFSL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ferdinand Frederik Som Ling Tan,1 Sjouke Schiere,1 Auke C Reidinga,2 Fennie Wit,3 Peter HJM Veldman3 1Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Anesthesiology, de Tjongerschans Hospital, Heerenveen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Surgery, de Tjongerschans Hospital, Heerenveen, the Netherlands Purpose: Regional anesthesia is gaining popularity with anesthesiologists as it offers superb postoperative analgesia. However, as the sole anesthetic technique in high-risk patients in whom general anesthesia is not preferred, some regional anesthetic possibilities may be easily overlooked. By presenting two cases of very old patients with considerable comorbidities, we would like to bring the mental nerve field block under renewed attention as a safe alternative to general anesthesia and to achieve broader application of this simple nerve block. Patients and methods: Two very old male patients (84 and 91 years both presented with an ulcerative lesion at the lower lip for which surgical removal was scheduled. Because of their considerable comorbidities and increased frailty, bilateral blockade of the mental nerve was considered superior to general anesthesia. As an additional advantage for the 84-year-old patient, who had a pneumonectomy in his medical history, the procedure could be safely performed in a beach-chair position to prevent atelectasis and optimize the ventilation/perfusion ratio of the single lung. The mental nerve blockades were performed intraorally in a blind fashion, after eversion of the lip and identifying the lower canine. A 5 mL syringe with a 23-gauge needle attached was passed into the buccal mucosa until it approximated the mental foramen, where 2 mL of lidocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:100.000 was injected . The other side was anesthetized in a similar fashion. Results: Both patients underwent the surgical procedure uneventfully under a bilateral mental nerve block

  19. Periarticular dextrose prolotherapy instead of intra-articular injection for pain and functional improvement in knee osteoarthritis

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    Rezasoltani Z

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zahra Rezasoltani,1 Mehrdad Taheri,2 Morteza Kazempour Mofrad,3 Seyed Amir Mohajerani2 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, AJA University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease that can lead to painful and dysfunctional joints. Prolotherapy involves using injections to produce functional restoration of the soft tissues of the joint. Intra-articular injections are controversial because of the introduction of needles into the articular capsule.Objectives: To compare the effect of periarticular versus intra-articular prolotherapy on pain and disability in patients with knee OA.Study design: Randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial.Setting: Single center, university hospital (Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran.Methods: A total of 104 patients with chronic knee OA were enrolled. In the intra-articular group, 8 mL of 10% dextrose and 2 mL of 2% lidocaine were injected. Injections were repeated at 1 and 2 weeks after the first injection. In the periarticular group, 5 mL of 20% dextrose and 5 mL of 1% lidocaine were injected subcutaneously at 4 points in the periarticular area. Pain and disability, as assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, were recorded at each follow-up visit at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 months post-injection.Results: The visual analog scale score was significantly lower in the periarticular compared with the intra-articular group at the 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-month visits but not at 1 month. Morning stiffness and difficulty in rising from sitting were improved in both groups and were not significantly different in the peri- and intra-articular groups. Pain, joint locking, and limitation scores were all improved in both

  20. A study on the efficacy and safety of combining dental surgery with tonsillectomy in pediatrics

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    Syed F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Faizaan Syed,1 Joshua C Uffman,1,2 Dmitry Tumin,1 Catherine M Flaitz,3,4 Joseph D Tobias,1,2 Vidya T Raman1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Dentistry, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Division of Dentistry, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, OH, USA Purpose: Few data exist on combining pediatric surgical procedures under a single general anesthetic encounter (general anesthesia. We compared perioperative outcomes of combining dental surgical procedures with tonsillectomy during one anesthetic vs separate encounters. Methods: We classified elective tonsillectomy ± adenoidectomy and restorative dentistry as combined (group C or separate (group S. Outcomes included anesthesia time, recovery duration, the need for overnight hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Results: Patients aged 4±1 years underwent tonsillectomy and dental surgery in combination (n=7 or separately (n=27. No differences were noted in total anesthesia time (C: median: 150, interquartile range [IQR]: 99, 165 vs S: median: 109, IQR: 92, 132; 95% CI of difference in median: –58, +10 minutes; P=0.115 and total recovery time (C: median: 54, IQR: 40, 108 vs S: median: 72, IQR: 58, 109; 95% CI of difference in median: –16, +48 minutes; P=0.307. The need for overnight stay (C: 4 of 7, S: 20 of 27; P=0.394 did not differ between the groups. No postoperative complications were noted in either group. Conclusion: These preliminary data support the potential feasibility of combining dental procedures with tonsillectomy during a single anesthetic encounter. Such care may not only reduce costs but also limit parental work absences and increase convenience for patient families. When compared with procedures performed separately, combined procedures did not result in increased morbidity or

  1. [Pharmacogenetics in anesthesia and intensive care medicine : Clinical and legal challenges exemplified by malignant hyperthermia].

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    Klingler, W; Pfenninger, E

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacotherapy is a key component of anesthesiology and intensive care medicine. The individual genetic profile influences not only the effect of pharmaceuticals but can also completely alter the mode of action. New technologies for genetic screening (e.g. next generation sequencing) and increasing knowledge of molecular pathways foster the disclosure of pharmacogenetic syndromes, which are classified as rare diseases. Taking into account the high genetic variability in humans and over 8000 known rare diseases, up to 20 % of the population may be affected. In summary, rare diseases are not rare. Most pharmacogenetic syndromes lead to a weakening or loss of pharmacological action. In contrast, malignant hyperthermia (MH), which is the most relevant pharmacogenetic syndrome for anesthesia, is characterized by a pharmacologically induced overactivation of calcium metabolism in skeletal muscle. Volatile anesthetic agents and succinylcholine trigger life-threatening hypermetabolic crises. Emergency treatment is based on inhibition of the calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum by dantrolene. After an adverse pharmacological event patients must be informed and a clarification consultation must be carried out during which the hereditory character of MH is explained. The patient should be referred to a specialist MH center where a predisposition can be diagnosed by the functional in vitro contracture test from a muscle biopsy. Additional molecular genetic investigations can yield mutations in the genes for calcium-regulating proteins in skeletal muscle, e.g. ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) and calcium voltage-gated channel subunit alpha 1S (CACNA1S). Currently, an association to MH has only been shown for 35 mutations out of more than 400 known and probably hundreds of unknown genetic variations. Furthermore, MH predisposition is not excluded by negative mutation screening. For anesthesiological patient safety it is crucial to identify individuals at risk and

  2. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

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    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  3. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

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    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  4. Patient-controlled analgesia in the pediatric population: morphine versus hydromorphone

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    DiGiusto M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Matthew DiGiusto,2 Tarun Bhalla,1 David Martin,1 Derek Foerschler,3 Megan J Jones,2 Joseph D Tobias1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, 2The Ohio State School of Medicine, 3Department of Anesthesiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Objective: Patient controlled analgesia (PCA is commonly used to provide analgesia following surgical procedures in the pediatric population. Morphine and hydromorphone remain the most commonly used opioids for PCA. Although both are effective, adverse effects may occur. When these adverse effects are unremitting or severe, opioid rotation may be required. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated PCA use, the adverse effect profile, and the frequency of opioid rotation. Methods: This retrospective study was performed at Nationwide Children’s Hospital (Columbus, OH. The hospital's electronic registry was queried for PCA use delivering either morphine or hydromorphone from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Results: A total of 514 patients were identified, that met study entry criteria. Of the 514 cases, 298 (56.2% were initially started on morphine and 225 (43.8% were initially started on hydromorphone. There were a total of 26 (5.1% opioid changes in the cohort of 514 patients. Of the 26 switches, 23 of 298 (7.7% were from morphine to hydromorphone, and 3 of 225 (1.3% were from hydromorphone to morphine (P=0.0008. Of the 17 morphine-to-hydromorphone switches with adverse effects, pruritus (64.7%, and inadequate pain control (47.1% were the most common side effects. The most common side effect resulting in a hydromorphone-to-morphine switch was nausea (66.7%. Conclusion: PCA switches from morphine-to-hydromorphone (88.5% were more common than vice-versa (11.5%. The most common reasons for morphine-to-hydromorphone switch were pruritus and inadequate pain control. These data suggest that a prospective study is necessary

  5. Efficacy profile of liposome bupivacaine, a novel formulation of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia

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    Candiotti KA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sergio D Bergese1, Sonia Ramamoorthy2, Gary Patou3, Kenneth Bramlett4, Stephen R Gorfine5, Keith A Candiotti61Department of Anesthesiology and Neurological Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Surgery, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 3Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Parsippany, NJ, USA; 4Private Practice, Alabama Orthopaedic Institute, Birmingham, AL, USA; 5Department of Surgery, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 6Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USABackground: Liposome bupivacaine is a novel formulation of the local anesthetic bupivacaine, designed to provide prolonged postsurgical analgesia. This analysis examined pooled efficacy data as reflected in cumulative pain scores from 10 randomized, double-blind liposome bupivacaine clinical studies in which the study drug was administered via local wound infiltration.Methods: A total of 823 patients were exposed to liposome bupivacaine in 10 local wound infiltration studies at doses ranging from 66 mg to 532 mg in five surgical settings; 446 patients received bupivacaine HCl (dose: 75–200 mg and 190 received placebo. Efficacy measures were assessed through 72 hours after surgery.Results: Overall, 45% of patients were male and 19% were ≥65 years of age. In the analysis of cumulative pain intensity scores through 72 hours, liposome bupivacaine was associated with lower pain scores than the comparator in 16 of 19 treatment arms assessed, achieving statistically significant differences compared with bupivacaine HCl (P < 0.05 in five of 17 treatment arms. These results were supported by results of other efficacy measures, including time to first use of opioid rescue medication, proportion of patients avoiding opioid rescue medication, total postsurgical consumption of opioid rescue medication, and patient/care provider satisfaction with postoperative analgesia. Local infiltration of liposome bupivacaine

  6. Heparin requirements for full anticoagulation are higher for patients on dabigatran than for those on warfarin – a model-based study

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    Edrich T

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Edrich,1,2 Gyorgy Frendl,2 Gregory Michaud,3 Ioannis Ch Paschalidis4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and General Intensive Care Medicine, Salzburg General Hospital and Paracelsus Private Medical University, Salzburg, Austria, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Division of Systems Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Dabigatran (D is increasingly used for chronic anticoagulation in place of warfarin (W. These patients may present for catheter-based procedures requiring full anticoagulation with heparin. This study compares the heparin sensitivity of patients previously on dabigatran, on warfarin, or on no chronic anticoagulant during ablation of atrial fibrillation. Patients and methods: In a retrospective study of patients treated with D, W, or neither drug (N undergoing atrial ablation, the timing of heparin doses and resulting activated clotting times were collected. First, the initial activated clotting time response to the first heparin bolus was compared. Then, a non-linear mixed effects modelling (NONMEM analysis was performed, fitting a pharmacokinetic and -dynamic model to the entire anticoagulation course of each patient. Resulting model coefficients were used to compare the different patient groups. Results: Data for 66 patients on dabigatran, 95 patients on warfarin, and 27 patients on no anticoagulation were retrieved. The last dose of dabigatran or warfarin had occurred 27 hours and 15 hours before the procedure. Groups D and N both responded significantly less (P<0.05 to the initial heparin bolus than Group W (approximately 50%. Likewise, the model coefficients resulting from the fit to each group reflected a significantly lower heparin sensitivity in groups D and N compared to W. Clearances of the

  7. Effects of dezocine on prevention of propofol injection pain: a meta-analysis

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    Zhou C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chengmao Zhou,1,* Yuting Yang,2,* Yu Zhu,3 Lin Ruan4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Zhaoqing Medical College, Zhaoqing, 2Department of Oncology, The First People’s Hospital of Changde, Changde, 3Department of Nursing, Zhaoqing Medical College, Zhaoqing, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dezocine on the prevention of propofol injection pain.Materials and methods: We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of dezocine in preventing propofol injection pain, from inception to April 2016, in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and CNKI. Next, two reviewers independently screened literature, extracted data, and assessed quality in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Finally, RevMan 5.2 software was used to conduct a meta-analysis.Results: Seven RCTs totaling 630 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis study showed: 1 compared with the control group (relative risk [RR] =0.32, 95% CI [0.26, 0.39], P<0.00001, the dezocine group showed a decreasing incidence of propofol injection pain; 2 for severity of propofol injection pain, incidences of mild pain (RR =0.55, 95% CI [0.40, 0.75], P=0.0001, moderate pain (RR =0.28, 95% CI [0.18, 0.43], P<0.00001, and severe pain (RR =0.11, 95% CI [0.06, 0.23], P<0.00001 were considerably lower in the dezocine group than in the control group; 3 when comparing the incidence of propofol injection pain in the dezocine group with that of the lidocaine group, no statistically significant differences were found (RR =0.86, 95% CI [0.66, 1.13], P=0.29; and 4 subgroup analysis indicated a significant reduction in the incidence of propofol injection.Conclusion: Dezocine can both prevent propofol injection pain and mitigate its severity, and its efficacy shows no significant

  8. Human and equipment resources for difficult airway management, airway education programs, and capnometry use in Japanese emergency departments: a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yuko; Tanigawa, Koichi; Shinohara, Kazuaki; Yano, Tetsuhiro; Sorimachi, Kotaro; Inokuchi, Ryota; Shimada, Jiro

    2017-09-13

    Although human and equipment resources, proper training, and the verification of endotracheal intubation are vital elements of difficult airway management (DAM), their availability in Japanese emergency departments (EDs) has not been determined. How ED type and patient volume affect DAM preparation is also unclear. We conducted the present survey to address this knowledge gaps. This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted from April to September 2016. All EDs received a mailed questionnaire regarding their DAM resources, airway training methods, and capnometry use for tube placement. Outcome measures were the availability of: (1) 24-h in-house back-up; (2) key DAM resources, including a supraglottic airway device (SGA), a dedicated DAM cart, surgical airway devices, and neuromuscular blocking agents; (3) anesthesiology rotation as part of an airway training program; and (4) the routine use of capnometry to verify tube placement. EDs were classified as academic, tertiary, high-volume (upper quartile of annual ambulance visits), and urban. Of the 530 EDs, 324 (61.1%) returned completed questionnaires. The availability of in-house back-up coverage, surgical airway devices, and neuromuscular blocking agents was 69.4, 95.7, and 68.5%, respectively. SGAs and dedicated DAM carts were present in 51.5 and 49.7% of the EDs. The rates of routine capnometry use (47.8%) and the availability of an anesthesiology rotation (38.6%) were low. The availability of 24-h back-up coverage was significantly higher in academic EDs and tertiary EDs in both the crude and adjusted analysis. Similarly, neuromuscular blocking agents were more likely to be present in academic EDs, high-volume EDs, and tertiary EDs; and the rate of routine use of capnometry was significantly higher in tertiary EDs in both the crude and adjusted analysis. In Japanese EDs, the rates of both the availability of SGAs and DAM carts and the use of routine capnometry to confirm tube placement were approximately

  9. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang HF

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hufei Zhang,1,* Xinhe Liu,2,* Hongye Jiang,3 Zimeng Liu,4 Xu-Yu Zhang,1 Hong-Zhe Xie,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Shenzhen Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4Surgical Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT.Materials and methods: The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris. Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Results: Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01. Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07–0.382; P<0

  10. Sevoflurane mitigates shedding of hyaluronan from the coronary endothelium, also during ischemia/reperfusion: an ex vivo animal study

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    Chen C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congcong Chen,1,3 Daniel Chappell,2,3 Thorsten Annecke,2,3 Peter Conzen,2 Matthias Jacob,2,3 Ulrich Welsch,4 Bernhard Zwissler,2 Bernhard F Becker3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Clinic of Anesthesiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Walter-Brendel-Centre of Experimental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 4Institute of Anatomy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany Abstract: Glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA, a major constituent of the endothelial glycocalyx, helps to maintain vascular integrity. Preconditioning the heart with volatile anesthetic agents protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury. We investigated a possible protective effect of sevoflurane on the glycocalyx, especially on HA. The effect of pre-ischemic treatment with sevoflurane (15 minutes at 2% vol/vol gas on shedding of HA was evaluated in 28 isolated, beating guinea pig hearts, subjected to warm ischemia (20 minutes at 37°C followed by reperfusion (40 minutes, half with and half without preconditioning by sevoflurane. HA concentration was measured in the coronary effluent. Over the last 20 minutes of reperfusion hydroxyethyl starch (1 g% was continuously infused and the epicardial transudate collected over the last 5 minutes for measuring the colloid extravasation. Additional hearts were fixed by perfusion after the end of reperfusion for immunohistology and electron microscopy. Sevoflurane did not significantly affect post-ischemic oxidative stress, but strongly inhibited shedding of HA during the whole period, surprisingly even prior to ischemia. Immunohistology demonstrated that heparan sulfates and SDC1 of the glycocalyx were also preserved by sevoflurane. Electron microscopy revealed shedding of glycocalyx caused by ischemia and a mostly intact glycocalyx in hearts exposed to sevoflurane. Coronary vascular permeability of the

  11. No-fault compensation for ventilator-dependent children: a reasonable settlement value for lifetime attendant care

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    Jenkins RC

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Randall C Jenkins,1–3 Brian W Boelens,1 Kari L Aasheim,1 Nikolaus Gravenstein4–5 1University of Florida Self-Insurance Program, 2University of Florida Healthcare Education Insurance Company, 3Department of Health Services Research, Management & Policy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 4Department of Anesthesiology, 5Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Severe neurological outcomes sustained in childhood often result in lifetime health care needs that are beyond the financial means of most families. When severe neurological deficits are alleged to have resulted from professional negligence, relief may be sought through litigation; however, the American tort system often yields inconsistent results or no compensation for patients. We sought to identify a reasonable, objective, and data-based monetary range for a no-fault compensation system with high- and low-financial limits for those with severe neurological deficits. Based on documented life expectancies and attendant care cost studies, the data analysis indicates a no-fault settlement payment ranging from US$479,712.24 to $3,098,504.16, reasonably ensures care and services for life. Keywords: cost of health care, health law, health regulation, long-term care, medical malpractice

  12. The effects of secondhand smoke on postoperative pain and fentanyl consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Ozturk, Erdogan; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Yucel, Aytac; Durmus, Mahmut; Ersoy, Mehmet Ozcan; Colak, Cemil

    2013-08-01

    Although the need for increased postoperative analgesia in smokers has been described, the effect of secondhand smoke on postoperative analgesia requirements has not been studied. We examined the effects of secondhand smoke on fentanyl consumption and postoperative pain. In this study, 101 patients (American Society of Anesthesiology physical status I and II) who underwent abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 groups according to history of exposure to cigarette smoke as per medical records which was retrospectively confirmed by measurement of serum cotinine: smokers (n = 28), nonsmokers (n = 31), and secondhand smokers (n = 32). All patients received propofol-remifentanil total intravenous anesthesia and used fentanyl patient controlled analgesia for postoperative pain. The fentanyl consumption visual analogue scale-pain intensity (VAS-PI) score and side effects were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 h after surgery. Fentanyl consumption at all the evaluation time points was significantly higher in secondhand smokers than in nonsmokers (P secondhand smokers was lower than that in smokers in the PACU and at 24 h (P secondhand smokers than in nonsmokers (P effects such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness (P > 0.05). Secondhand smoking was associated with increased postoperative fentanyl consumption, and increased VAS-PI scores. These findings may be beneficial for managing postoperative pain in secondhand smokers.

  13. Preoperative patient education: can we improve satisfaction and reduce anxiety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ortiz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients' knowledge deficits concerning anesthesia and the anesthesiologist's role in their care may contribute to anxiety. The objective of this study was to develop anesthesia patient education materials that would help improve patient's satisfaction regarding their knowledge of the perioperative process and decrease anxiety in a community hospital with a large Spanish-speaking population. METHODS: A survey (Survey A in English and Spanish was administered to all adult anesthesiology preoperative clinic patients during a 4-week period. The data were analyzed and then a patient education handout was developed in both English and Spanish to assist with our patients' major concerns. A second survey (Survey B was administered that was completed after the education handout had been put into use at the clinic. The survey asked for basic demographic information and included questions on satisfaction with regard to understanding of anesthesia as well as worries regarding surgery and pain. RESULTS: In the patients who received the handout, statistically significant improvement was found in the questions that asked about satisfaction with regard to understanding of type of anesthesia, options for pain control, what patients are supposed to do on the day of surgery, and the amount of information given with regard to anesthetic plan. There was no difference in anxiety related to surgery in patients who received the educational handout compared to those patients who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Patient education handouts improved patient's satisfaction regarding their knowledge of the perioperative process but did not reduce anxiety related to surgery.

  14. [Colorectal cancer in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Bláha, M; Malúšková, D

    2016-01-01

    High incidence of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic is an actual and demographically significant health issue. Half of all of the patients is older than 70 years. Both surgical and non-surgical treatment options in this group of patients depend on factors that are difficult to measure only by current oncological and anesthesiological classifications (cTcNcM, ASA). The objective of this paper is to measure the impact of age on the use of various treatment modalities within the protocol and their results, and also to suggest alternative options for therapy tolerance assessment. Analysis of data over a five-year period from the NOR database prepared by the Institute of Biostatistics and Analyses, Masaryk University. In all parameters a difference was demonstrated between patients below the age of 70 and those above the age of 70 years. Older patients were disadvantaged. Only 11.2% of patients younger than 70 years were not treated, whereas 25.2% over the age of 70 years were not treated. A complex geriatric examination could improve the indication process in various treatment modalities, including surgery. colorectal cancer - elderly - treatment - geriatric assesment.

  15. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy using the ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube®: a teaching course in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Ferraro, Fausto; Frongillo, Elisabetta; Fusco, Pierluigi; Pierdiluca, Matteo; Nagar, Francesca; Iuorio, Angela; Santini, Mario

    2017-10-01

    We planned a training course for trainees of different specialties with the aim of teaching the skills of a new procedure for performing percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) with an ETView tracheoscopic ventilation tube instead of standard bronchoscopy in an ex vivo pig model. The endotracheal tube, with a camera-embedded tip, was used as an alternative to standard bronchoscopy for visualization of patient airways. The procedure was performed on a home-made animal model. The participants were asked to perform PDT in three different sessions to improve their dexterity. The primary endpoint was the reduction of complications seen during the different sessions of the training course. The secondary endpoint was the satisfaction of the participants as assessed by an anonymous survey. Thirty-seven residents in anesthesiology and 7 in thoracic surgery in the first 2 years of their training and without any confidence with percutaneous tracheostomy participated in the study. Tracheal cuff lesions and impalement of the tracheal tube were the most observed complications, and were concentrated in the early sessions. A significant reduction in complications and operative time was seen during the ongoing sessions of the course. No lesions of the posterior tracheal wall and only a ring fracture occurred during the last session of the course. All participants were satisfied with the course. Our course seems to confer the technical skills to perform percutaneous tracheostomy to trainees and instill confidence with the procedure. However, the experience acquired on a training course should be evaluated in clinical practice.

  16. Tapentadol extended-release for treatment of chronic pain: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivelu N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu1, Alexander Timchenko1, Yili Huang2, Raymond Sinatra11Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; 2Internal Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Plainview Hospital, Plainview, NY, USAAbstract: Tapentadol is a centrally acting analgesic with a dual mechanism of action of mu receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition. Tapentadol immediate-release is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the management of moderate-to-severe acute pain. It was developed to decrease the intolerability issue associated with opioids. Tapentadol extended-release has a 12-hour duration of effect, and has recently been evaluated for pain in patients with chronic osteoarthritis, low back pain, and pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tapentadol extended-release was found to provide safe and highly effective analgesia for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, including moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis pain and low back pain. Initial trials demonstrating efficacy in neuropathic pain suggest that tapentadol has comparable analgesic effectiveness and better gastrointestinal tolerability than opioid comparators, and demonstrates effectiveness in settings of inflammatory, somatic, and neuropathic pain. Gastrointestinal intolerance and central nervous system effects were the major adverse events noted. Tapentadol will need to be rigorously tested in chronic neuropathic pain, cancer-related pain, and cancer-related neuropathic pain.Keywords: osteoarthritis, neuropathic pain, analgesic, opioids, norepinephrine

  17. Anesthesia 2.0: internet-based information resources and Web 2.0 applications in anesthesia education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Young, Chelsea; Zamora, Abby; Kurup, Viji; Macario, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Informatics is a broad field encompassing artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science, information science, and social science. The goal of this review is to illustrate how Web 2.0 information technologies could be used to improve anesthesia education. Educators in all specialties of medicine are increasingly studying Web 2.0 technologies to maximize postgraduate medical education of housestaff. These technologies include microblogging, blogs, really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, podcasts, wikis, and social bookmarking and networking. 'Anesthesia 2.0' reflects our expectation that these technologies will foster innovation and interactivity in anesthesia-related web resources which embraces the principles of openness, sharing, and interconnectedness that represent the Web 2.0 movement. Although several recent studies have shown benefits of implementing these systems into medical education, much more investigation is needed. Although direct practice and observation in the operating room are essential, Web 2.0 technologies hold great promise to innovate anesthesia education and clinical practice such that the resident learner need not be in a classroom for a didactic talk, or even in the operating room to see how an arterial line is properly placed. Thoughtful research to maximize implementation of these technologies should be a priority for development by academic anesthesiology departments. Web 2.0 and advanced informatics resources will be part of physician lifelong learning and clinical practice.

  18. Noninvasive Hemodynamic Assessment as Part of Preoperative Examination of Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Aleksandrov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the capacities of a noninvasive hemodynamic study in patients with colorectal cancer within a preoperative anesthesiological examination. Subjects and methods. The hemodynamic status was preoperatively analyzed in 97 patients (46 men and 51 women with colorectal cancer. Their mean age was 67.59±9.48 years. The POSSUM intraoperative risk scores were 20.20+3.2. Central hemodynamics was preoperatively assessed in all the patients, by applying a «Computerized Diamant System for Monitoring the Cardiorespiratory System and Tissue Hydration» (Saint-Petersburg, Russia — Registration Certificate ФСР No 2008/03201 dated 22 August, 2008.Results. The non-invasive hemodynamic study can supplement a preoperative examination in patients with colorectal cancer. The patients with colorectal cancer were diagnosed as having hypodynamic and eudynamic circulation in 43.3 and 56.7% of the cases, respectively. The age of the patients was not established to have a significant impact on their hemodynamic status, which confirms that it is expedient to make perioperative multifactorial risk assessment.

  19. ACOG Committee opinion no. 549: obesity in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, more than one third of women are obese, more than one half of pregnant women are overweight or obese, and 8% of reproductive-aged women are extremely obese, putting them at a greater risk of pregnancy complications. Therefore, preconception assessment and counseling are strongly encouraged for obese women and should include the provision of specific information concerning the maternal and fetal risks of obesity in pregnancy, as well as encouragement to undertake a weight-reduction program. At the initial prenatal visit, height and weight should be recorded for all women to allow calculation of body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and recommendations for appropriate weight gain should be reviewed at the initial visit and periodically throughout pregnancy. Nutrition consultation should be offered to all overweight or obese women, and they should be encouraged to follow an exercise program. Pregnant women who have undergone bariatric surgery should be evaluated for nutritional deficiencies and the need for vitamin supplementation when indicated. Obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery may require thromboprophylaxis with pneumatic compression devices and unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin. For all obese patients, anesthesiology consultation early in labor should be considered, and consultation with weight-reduction specialists before attempting another pregnancy should be encouraged.

  20. Efficacy of Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling in the Prevention of Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4–5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented. PMID:23606888

  1. Risks and recommendations to perform flexible bronchoscopy in pregnant woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, Adnan; Ernst, Armin; Begolli, Melissa; Canas, Alejandra

    2008-01-01

    If possible, it is advisable to postpone Flexible Bronchoscopy until after delivery, or at least until after the twenty eighth week of pregnancy. Bronchoscopy should be carried out by the most experienced pulmonologist and in a hospital facility where anesthesiology, obstetrics and neonatology departments are available. Consultation with these specialists is recommended. A pharmacologist should be consulted with regard to the teratogenic potential of the drugs that are to be used during bronchoscopy. The lowest possible doses of drugs should be used for sedation, and drugs of the D and X categories should not be used. During the procedure, it is advisable to carry out continual monitoring of cardiac rhythm and pulse oximetry, as well as intermittent measurements of arterial blood pressure. If possible, fetal monitoring should be carried out. The patient should be placed in the left lateral decubitus position. If this is not possible, the procedure should be carried out with the patient in the sitting position. The duration of the procedure should be minimized, and it should be terminated if the patient does not tolerate it well. The convenience of using fluoroscopy has to be considered separately in each case, taking into consideration its potential risks and benefits. Technological advances for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary and airway diseases, such as endobronchial ultrasound, CT scanning with fluoroscopy and bronchoscopy

  2. Extended-release hydrocodone – gift or curse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krashin D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Krashin,1 Natalia Murinova,2 Andrea M Trescot31Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 2Department of Neurology University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA 3Algone Pain Center, Wasilla, AK, USAAbstract: Hydrocodone is a semisynthetic opioid, which has been used for decades as a short-acting analgesic combined with acetaminophen (or less commonly ibuprofen. Several long-acting, non-acetaminophen-containing hydrocodone formulations are undergoing trials in the US under the auspices of the US Food and Drug Administration, and may be available shortly. This article reviews some of the advantages (including drug familiarity and lack of acetaminophen toxicity and potential disadvantages (including altered use patterns and high morphine equivalent dosing of such a medication formulation. We also discuss the abuse potential of long-acting versus short-acting opioids in general and hydrocodone specifically, as well as the metabolism of hydrocodone.Keywords: hydrocodone, long-acting opioids, opioid abuse, acetaminophen toxicity, tamper-resistant opioids

  3. The effect of etoricoxib premedication on postoperative analgesia requirement in orthopedic and trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Ahsan K.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Ismail, Salah A.; Sadat-Ali, M.; Al-Dakheel, Dakheel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have hypothesized that etoricoxib premedication would reduce the need for additional opioids following orthopedic trauma surgery. A double blind, controlled study, conducted in King Fahd University Hospital, King Faisal University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. After obtaining the approval of Research and Ethics Committee and written consent, 200 American Society of Anesthesiology grade I and II patients that underwent elective upper limb or lower limb fracture fixation surgeries during the period from August 2005 to October 2007 were studied. Patients were randomly premedicated using 120 mg of etoricoxib or placebo n=100, each. To alleviate postoperative pain, a patient controlled analgesia device was programmed to deliver one mg of morphine intravenously locked lockout time, 6 minutes. Visual analog scale and total postoperative morphine consumption over 24 hours and the adverse effects were recorded. One hundred patients in each group completed the study period. Etoricoxib premedication provides a statistically significant postoperative morphine sparing effect over 24 hours postoperatively. Total morphine consumption was 44.2 (8.2) in the placebo and 35.17 mg in the etoricoxib groups p<0.001. The incidence of nausea and vomiting requiring treatment was lower in the etoricoxib group. p=0.014. The postoperative blood loss was similar in both groups. Etoricoxib is a suitable premedication before traumatic orthopedic surgery as it enhanced postoperative analgesia and reduced the need for morphine. (author)

  4. [Euthanasia in Europe--ten countries with special consideration of the Netherlands and Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernstedt, T; Mohr, M; Kettler, D

    2000-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the current situation of euthanasia in Europe. Emphasis is given to the positions discussed in the Netherlands and in Germany. The current situation, the development of the legal positions, and the resulting debate are established by analysing English and German anesthesiological and medical-ethical journals. It has to be noted that many physicians are not satisfied with the terminology of euthanasia. The traditional concepts of euthanasia do not cover the aspect of accompanying terminally ill persons until they have died. The differentiation of active, passive, and indirect euthanasia does not correspond to the practical handling of the problem. Many physicians are in need of an open discussion of euthanasia-related issues. The way euthanasia is practiced in the Netherlands has strongly influenced the further development of the debate in Europe. Even though the Dutch model is rejected by the jurisdications of virtually all other countries, and official statements of medical corporations stick to the disapproval of active euthanasia, studies examining the attitudes towards euthanasia and the treatment of it in daily routine show that active interventions to shorten life are performed to different degrees outside of the Netherlands as well.

  5. The Role of the Future Career Prospects in Students’ Educational Motivation of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Akbari Booreng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : One of the important factors affecting on students’ educational success is their educational motivation. This study was designed and performed for investigating the role of the future career prospects in students’ educational motivation.   Methods : This was a cross sectional analytic study. For this purpose according to Cochrane formula, 285 participants were selected based on the random-cluster method out of all students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences in 2013-2014 academic year. The questionnaires of mental illustration of the future career and educational motivation were used to gather data. The collected data were analyzed through Structural Equation-Finding Method by using PLS software.   Results : The findings of the present study showed that the used model had a suitable fitting. All direct and indirect paths were significant and confirmed (p<0.01, but the direct path of mental illustration of the future career to demotivation. The results also revealed that the students of Anesthesiology had less motivation compared to the students of medicine, health and laboratory sciences. Moreover, the students of operating room had more extrinsic motivation than nursing students. The students of operating room had less intrinsic motivation than the students of medicine.   Conclusion : With regard to the results of this study and the role of future career prospects in the students’ educational motivation, it seemed that providing a situation for students’ mental illustration of their future career by instructors and university lecturers was necessary.

  6. TelePain: Primary care chronic pain management through weekly didactic and case‐based telementoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Flynn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a significant problem among military personnel and a priority of the military health system. The U.S. Army Surgeon General's Pain Management Task Force recommends using telehealth capabilities to enhance pain management. This article describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain designed to improve access to pain specialist consultation in the military health system. The study uses a wait-list cluster controlled clinical trial to test: 1 effectiveness of the intervention, and 2 interviews to assess barriers and facilitators of the intervention implementation. The intervention involves a didactic presentation based on the Joint Pain Education Curriculum followed by patient case presentations and multi-disciplinary discussion via videoconference by clinicians working in the military health system. A panel of pain specialists representing pain medicine, internal medicine, anesthesiology, rehabilitation medicine, psychiatry, addiction medicine, health psychology, pharmacology, nursing, and complementary and integrative pain management provide pain management recommendations for each patient case. We use the Pain Assessment Screening Tool and Outcomes Registry (PASTOR to measure patient outcomes, including pain, sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. This article reports some of the challenges and lessons learned during early implementation of the TelePain intervention. Weekly telephone meetings among the multisite research team were instrumental in problem solving, identifying problem areas, and developing solutions. Solutions for recruitment challenges included additional outreach and networking to military health providers, both building on existing relationships and new relationships.

  7. EXPERIENCE WITH ROBOTIC LUMЕNIS CO LASER IN ENDOSCOPIC LARYNGEAL SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Novozhilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available  2 The paper describes the first experience in using robotic CO laser at the Department of Head and Neck Tumors, Moscow City Cancer Hospital Sixty-Two. With advances in endoscopic techniques and anesthesiology, there have been new possibilities of usingdirect (rigid larygoscopy in conjunction with laser systems.The Lumеnis laser assembly consists of three interconnected components: a videocamera, an operating microscope, and directly CO laser. It includes a computer system that sets a program to perform an operation.The heart of the laser system is a scanning Digital Acu Blade micromanipulator. This unique assembly makes itpossible to control the area and depth of incision, to cut intricate shapes in relation to the surface anatomy, and to precisely control ablation and hemostasis. The effect of tissue carbonization during surgery is minimal at the expense of the physical characteristics and different modes of radiation. It is noted that this system allows organ-sparing treatment in cancer patients and their prompt rehabilitation after surgical interventions.

  8. Dexmedetomidine for sedation of cardiosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И. А. Козлов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of sedation in cardiosurgical intensive care units has obvious scientific and practical relevance. Many current studies deal with the implementation of novel medications for sedation, some features of their pharmacodynamic effects in different clinical settings, with advantages and disadvantages of their use in cardiosurgical patients. Recent years have seen an increase in the number of publications on the 2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine used for sedation after open-heart surgery. The paper reviews current publications on 2-adrenoceptor agonists used in anesthesiology, considers their physiology and the mechanism of sedative action of dexmedetomidine, its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The experience in using dexmedetomidine sedation in clinical practice is discussed in detail, by analyzing the data of current multicenter randomized trials in which this drug was compared with other sedative medications (propofol, midazolam, lorazepam. Some aspects of clinical pharmacology of dexmedetomidine, such as its effect on the sympathoadrenal system, hemodynamics, and respiratory system are analyzed. The clinical value of different receptor-dependent effects of the drug and the specific features of its application in different situations are also discussed. The authors share their own experience on delirium treatment and non-invasive ventilation in patients who receive dexmedetomidine sedation after heart transplantation and cardiac surgery.

  9. Retracted articles in surgery journals. What are surgeons doing wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassão, Bruna Dell'Acqua; Herbella, Fernando A M; Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-03-08

    Retraction of previously published scientific articles is an important mechanism to preserve the integrity of scientific work. This study analyzed retractions of previously published articles from surgery journals. We searched for retracted articles in the 100 surgery journals with the highest SJR2 indicator grades. We found 130 retracted articles in 49 journals (49%). Five or more retracted articles were published in 8 journals (8%). The mean time between publication and retraction was 26 months (range 1 to 158 months). The United States, China, Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom accounted for more than 3 out of 4 of the retracted articles. The greatest number of retractions came from manuscripts about orthopedics and traumatology, general surgery, anesthesiology, cardiothoracic surgery, and plastic surgery. Nonsurgeons were responsible for 16% of retractions in these surgery journals. The main reasons for retraction were duplicate publication (42%), plagiarism (16%), absence of proven integrity of the study (14%), incorrect data (13%), data published without authorization (12%), violation of research ethics (11%), documented fraud (11%), request of an author(s) (5%), and unknown (3%). In 25% of the retracted articles, other publications by the same authors also had been retracted. Retraction of published articles does not occur frequently in surgery journals. Some form of scientific misconduct was present in the majority of retractions, especially duplication of publication and plagiarism. Retractions of previously published articles were most frequent from countries with the greatest number of publications; some authors showed recidivism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [How should anesthesiologists perform ultrasound examinations? Diagnostic use of ultrasound in emergency and intensive care and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maecken, T; Zinke, H; Zenz, M; Grau, T

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging has attained great significance as a tool for diagnostics in emergency and intensive care medicine. The major advantages of this technique are its instantaneous bedside availability and the possibility to perform repeatable examinations. These advantages are based on recent developments, such as portable ultrasound devices offering excellent imaging quality as well as a quick-start-function. Ultrasound imaging in critically ill patients is frequently performed under pressure of time depending on the current acute physical state. All standard examinations in echocardiography, vascular, abdominal and thoracic ultrasound scanning can be applied in these patients. Based on the clinical scenario the duration of examinations may vary from seconds during cardiopulmonary resuscitations to time-consuming repeated scanning. The transition from basic to subject-specific detailed examinations is flowing and has to be adjusted to local conditions. In the field of emergency and intensive care medicine the technique used is whole-body sonography. The goal is to classify the patient's present physical state and to define a targeted therapeutic approach. The characteristics of whole-body sonography are similar to the field of anesthesiology which is an interdisciplinary one. Currently, these characteristics deserve more attention in training in sonography.

  11. Electrical cardioversion of atrial fibrillation: evaluation of sedation safety with midazolam by means of EtCO₂ and IPI algorithm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Paolo; Mantovan, Roberto

    2013-11-30

    For several years, the electrical external cardioversion (ECV) has entered into clinical practice without assistance of anesthesiology team. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sedation with midazolam in patients undergoing electrical cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF) by means of the evaluation of capnometry and pulmonary integrated index (IPI) using the Oridion Capnostream 20. We studied 45 consecutive patients (pts) who underwent ECV of AF sedated with midazolam at mean dose of 5mg bolus followed by another 5mg in 2 minutes (min). Maximum dosage was 11 mg (average 8 ± 2 mg). After cardioversion we infused Anexate 0.5mg bolus followed by 0.5mg in 30 min. All pts were monitored with blood pressure, O2 saturation, cardiac frequency and capnometers. EtCO2 value at baseline was 37.14 ± 2.7, 35.02 ± 1.7 after induction of sedation and 36.59 ± 1.2 after awaking (pIPI index was 9.58 ± 0.5 at basal 8.09 ± 0.63 at induction time and 9.02 ± 0.5 after awaking (pIPI index. © 2013.

  12. Frequency of anesthesia-related complications in children with Down syndrome under general anesthesia for noncardiac procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Lawrence M; Colligan, Jacqueline; Brandom, Barbara W

    2004-09-01

    Craniofacial and cardiac anomalies of Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) would seem to place these patients at higher risk of anesthesia-related complications (ARCs), but to date no comprehensive large-scale study has quantified this risk. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients with DS undergoing anesthesia between April 1, 1988, and May 31, 1995, at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. In addition, the Anesthesiology Department Quality Assurance (QA) System database of concurrently collected anesthesia information on all patients undergoing anesthesia at the hospital since 1985 was analyzed. Of the total 74,021 anesthetic encounters during the study period, 930 anesthetic encounters in 488 patients with DS undergoing noncardiac procedures were analyzed. The most frequent ARCs were bradycardia (severe) (3.66%), natural airway obstruction (1.83%), difficult intubation (0.54%), postintubation croup (1.83%), and bronchospasm (0.43%). Comprehensive reporting is needed to capture all significant adverse events. The incidences of bradycardia on induction, natural airway obstruction, and postintubation (or instrumentation) croup were significantly higher in the DS noncardiac group compared with the remaining population. Current anesthesia techniques and agents must be compared using quantitative QA data to ensure use of the safest options for each patient.

  13. Postoperative (pressure) alopecia following sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, Madhu; Luck, Ali Maria

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative alopecia is a rare occurrence seen after a variety of surgical procedures performed under general anesthesia. The speculated cause is pressure-induced ischemia due to prolonged head immobilization. This case describes a patient who developed this complication after undergoing sacrocolpopexy. A 57-year-old postmenopausal Caucasian female was consented to undergo a robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy, perineoplasty, and midurethral sling with possible conversion to an open procedure. The indication was symptomatic proximal and distal rectocele with foreshortened vagina. It was converted to laparotomy due to difficult presacral dissection. Her total operative time was 540 with 240 min in the Trendelenburg position. No intraoperative hypotension or excessive blood loss was noted. She started complaining of scalp pain in the postoperative recovery area. She developed soreness, crusting, and later alopecia in the same area. It was noted at her 3-week office visit. Referral was made for dermatology and anesthesiology evaluation. There was spontaneous full recovery by the 5th month. Postoperative alopecia is a rare condition mimicking alopecia areata but it is preceded by inciting events. There is some evidence to suggest that it is a preventable condition by frequent head repositioning during surgery. This case report is intended to increase the surgeon's awareness about this rare complication as its occurrence can be distressing for the patient.

  14. National representation in the anaesthesia literature: a bibliometric analysis of highly cited anaesthesia journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bould, M D; Boet, S; Riem, N; Kasanda, C; Sossou, A; Bruppacher, H R

    2010-08-01

    While previous studies have investigated the country of origin of anaesthetic publications, they have generally used a medline computer search to identify original articles and have often excluded non-English language articles. We undertook a hand-search of journals in the Journal Citation Reports using the subject category of Anesthesiology. We quantified the number of original articles, editorials, review articles, case reports and correspondence attributed to each country. We also calculated the proportion of articles of each type from countries of each national income category. We analysed 9684 articles published in 2007 and 2008. The United States published more original articles than any other country. High-income countries published 89.2% of original articles, middle-income countries 10.5%, and low-income countries just 0.3%. There were more articles published by middle-income countries during the study period than a decade earlier, notably from Turkey, China and India. We discuss barriers to publications from low-income countries.

  15. Investigation of the status quo of massive blood transfusion in China and a synopsis of the proposed guidelines for massive blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Cun; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Dang, Qian-Li; Sun, Yang; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Ma, Ting; Liu, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of massive transfusion in Chinese hospitals, identify the important indications for massive transfusion and corrective therapies based on clinical evidence and supporting experimental studies, and propose guidelines for the management of massive transfusion. This multiregion, multicenter retrospective study involved a Massive Blood Transfusion Coordination Group composed of 50 clinical experts specializing in blood transfusion, cardiac surgery, anesthesiology, obstetrics, general surgery, and medical statistics from 20 tertiary general hospitals across 5 regions in China. Data were collected for all patients who received ≥10 U red blood cell transfusion within 24 hours in the participating hospitals from January 1 2009 to December 31 2010, including patient demographics, pre-, peri-, and post-operative clinical characteristics, laboratory test results before, during, and after transfusion, and patient mortality at post-transfusion and discharge. We also designed an in vitro hemodilution model to investigate the changes of blood coagulation indices during massive transfusion and the correction of coagulopathy through supplement blood components under different hemodilutions. The experimental data in combination with the clinical evidence were used to determine the optimal proportion and timing for blood component supplementation during massive transfusion. Based on the findings from the present study, together with an extensive review of domestic and international transfusion-related literature and consensus feedback from the 50 experts, we drafted the guidelines on massive blood transfusion that will help Chinese hospitals to develop standardized protocols for massive blood transfusion.

  16. Barriers and Facilitators to Effective Feedback: A Qualitative Analysis of Data From Multispecialty Resident Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Shalini T; Zegarek, Matthew H; Fromme, H Barrett; Ryan, Michael S; Schumann, Sarah-Anne; Harris, Ilene B

    2015-06-01

    Despite the importance of feedback, the literature suggests that there is inadequate feedback in graduate medical education. We explored barriers and facilitators that residents in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and surgery experience with giving and receiving feedback during their clinical training. Residents from 3 geographically diverse teaching institutions were recruited to participate in focus groups in 2012. Open-ended questions prompted residents to describe their experiences with giving and receiving feedback, and discuss facilitators and barriers. Data were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with a grounded theory approach. A total of 19 residents participated in 1 of 3 focus groups. Five major themes related to feedback were identified: teacher factors, learner factors, feedback process, feedback content, and educational context. Unapproachable attendings, time pressures due to clinical work, and discomfort with giving negative feedback were cited as major barriers in the feedback process. Learner engagement in the process was a major facilitator in the feedback process. Residents provided insights for improving the feedback process based on their dual roles as teachers and learners. Time pressures in the learning environment may be mitigated by efforts to improve the quality of teacher-learner relationships. Forms for collecting written feedback should be augmented by faculty development to ensure meaningful use. Efforts to improve residents' comfort with giving feedback and encouraging learners to engage in the feedback process may foster an environment conducive to increasing feedback.

  17. Subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction and upper cervical spine after traumatic cerebral contusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Moriconi, Elisa; Gladi, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolò; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hematoma (SSH) is a rare condition, more commonly occurring after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or anesthesiological procedures. It has also been observed after traumatic events, in patients under anticoagulation therapy or in case of arteriovenous malformation rupture. In a very small number of cases no causative agent can be identified and a diagnosis of spontaneous SSH is established. The lumbar and thoracic spine are the most frequently involved segments and only seven cases of cervical spine SSH have been described until now. Differential diagnosis between subdural and subarachnoid hematoma is complex because the common neuroradiological investigations, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not enough sensitive to exactly define clot location. Actually, confirmation of the subarachnoid location of bleeding is obtained at surgery, which is necessary to resolve the fast and sometimes dramatic evolution of clinical symptoms. Nonetheless, there are occasional reports on successful conservative treatment of these lesions. We present a peculiar case of subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction, developing after the rupture of a right temporal lobe contusion within the adjacent arachnoidal spaces and the following clot migration along the right lateral aspect of the foramen magnum and the upper cervical spine, causing severe neurological impairment. After surgical removal of the hematoma, significant symptom improvement was observed.

  18. Detection of Occult Erythrocytic Membrane Damages upon Pharmacological Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yu. Alekseyeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood administration of pharmaceuticals may cause occult effects of these agents on erythrocytic membranes. These effects may damage and cause additional membrane defects, but may strengthen. The type and degree of the effects of an agent were detected by calibrated irreversible electroporation with a pulsed electric field (PEF. The paper considers the erythrocytic membranous effects of a wide concentration range of agents used in anesthesiology, such as esmerone, tracrium, and mar-caine-adrenaline. Under the action of PEF and esmerone at the normal concentration N, the rate of erythrocytic hemolysis increased by several times as compared with the control. The similar effect also occurred when esmerone was added at the concentration C=10N. Tracrium exerted a fixing effect on erythrocytic membranes. Upon a combined exposure to PEF and tracrium in the normal concentration C=N; erythrocytic hemolysis was slow. So was with the concentration C=10N. The rate of hemolysis of the red blood cells subjected to a combined action of marcaine adrenaline at the normal concentration C=N and even at the concentration C=10N and PEF was comparable with the hemolytic rate of the reference suspension. 

  19. The impact of reverse trendelenburg versus head-up position on intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nooraei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of several efforts for decreasing blood loss, our experience sometimes shows that some patients bleed more profusely during rhinoplasty. Patient position could have deep impact on bleeding amount during surgical procedures. Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare reverse trendelenburg position and head-up position on intra-operative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. This was to check the effects of reverse trendelenburg position and head up position on the intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. Methods: In this study, 30 ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiology physical condition classification patients between 18 and 40 years of age who were candidate to rhinoplasty operations for first time were included. Patients were randomly assigned to reverse trendelenburg or head-up position. Exclusion criteria was any history or lab indicating coagulation problems or using any drug. All gauzes used and the blood that accumulated in the aspirator throughout the operation were calculated. Results: Our results showed that the mean amount of blood loss in reverse trendelenburg was lower (77.00 ΁ 13.20 ml than head-up position (83.33 ΁ 21.18 ml, although, there was no statistical difference between two groups. However, there was no significant differences among two groups in different aspects of hemodynamic determinants and bleeding amount during and after rhinoplasty. Conclusions: Our results showed that patient bleeding is not increased because of positioning per se. In conclusion, perhaps in the future reverse trendelenburg will be given more often during rhinoplasry.

  20. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet medications and spinal axis anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadman, Lynn M

    2005-03-01

    Many individuals use cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (COX-1 and COX-2 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and antiplatelet medications on a regular basis. This is particularly true of the elderly, who are more prone to having osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cardiac disease. Some of these agents alter platelet function and may increase the risk of spinal/epidural hematoma formation if spinal axis anesthesia is utilized without following proper precautions. All anesthesiologists should be familiar with these agents and how they work. More importantly, they should be familiar with the established guidelines set forth by the American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA) [Regional anesthesia in the anticoagulated patient-defining the risk (2002); Reg. Anes. Pain Med. 28 (2003)172], the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI) [Anaesthesiol. Intensivmed. 38 (1997) 623], and the Spanish Consensus Forum [Rev. Esp. Anesthesiol. Reanim. 48 (2001) 270]. This article explains the mechanism of action of each of the medications which alter platelet function, defines the risks of hematoma formation should the medication be inadvertently continued into the perioperative period, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how to manage each class of drug prior to the placement of spinal/epidural blocks.

  1. 49 Mathoura Road: Geoffrey Kaye's letters to Paul M. Wood, 1939-1955.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew L; Waisel, David B

    2014-12-01

    From 1930 to 1955, Geoffrey Kaye, M.B.B.S., was one of the most influential anesthetists in Australia. In 1951, he opened a center of excellence for Australian anesthesia at 49 Mathoura Road, Toorak, Melbourne, which Kaye affectionately called "The Anaesthestists' Castle" and "49." "49" was designed to foster the educational, research, and administrative activities that would allow Australian anesthesia to reach the level of practice and professionalism found in Europe and America. Kaye wholly financed the venture and lived on the second floor of the building. During his world-wide travels, Kaye had developed a friendship with Paul M. Wood, M.D., the originator of the American Library-Museum now known eponymously as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. Through the letters Kaye sent to Wood, the authors see Kaye's perception of the events surrounding the rise and fall of "49." Kaye's early letters were optimistic as he discussed the procurements and provisions he made for "49." His later letters exhibit frustration at the lack of participation by members of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. Kaye was truly a visionary for his time. He believed that the diffusion center which "49" was to become was not only realistic and achievable but also necessary if Australian anesthesia was to gain international prominence comparable to anesthesia in Europe and North America. In the end, the failure of "49" left Kaye estranged from Australian anesthesia for many years. How this estrangement affected Australian anesthesia is unknown.

  2. Visual tracking for multi-modality computer-assisted image guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basafa, Ehsan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Hossbach, Martin; Bhanushali, Jasmine; Stolka, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    With optical cameras, many interventional navigation tasks previously relying on EM, optical, or mechanical guidance can be performed robustly, quickly, and conveniently. We developed a family of novel guidance systems based on wide-spectrum cameras and vision algorithms for real-time tracking of interventional instruments and multi-modality markers. These navigation systems support the localization of anatomical targets, support placement of imaging probe and instruments, and provide fusion imaging. The unique architecture - low-cost, miniature, in-hand stereo vision cameras fitted directly to imaging probes - allows for an intuitive workflow that fits a wide variety of specialties such as anesthesiology, interventional radiology, interventional oncology, emergency medicine, urology, and others, many of which see increasing pressure to utilize medical imaging and especially ultrasound, but have yet to develop the requisite skills for reliable success. We developed a modular system, consisting of hardware (the Optical Head containing the mini cameras) and software (components for visual instrument tracking with or without specialized visual features, fully automated marker segmentation from a variety of 3D imaging modalities, visual observation of meshes of widely separated markers, instant automatic registration, and target tracking and guidance on real-time multi-modality fusion views). From these components, we implemented a family of distinct clinical and pre-clinical systems (for combinations of ultrasound, CT, CBCT, and MRI), most of which have international regulatory clearance for clinical use. We present technical and clinical results on phantoms, ex- and in-vivo animals, and patients.

  3. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  4. Atelectasis on pediatric chest CT: comparison of sedation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, M.A.; McEachern, A.M.; Jamieson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Background. A change in practice at our institution resulted in increased use of anesthesia for CT scan of the chest in children who required sedation. Objective. To determine whether there is a difference in the frequency or severity of pulmonary atelectasis on CT scan in children sedated by anesthesiologists compared with children sedated by radiologists using intravenous pentobarbital. Materials and methods. Retrospective blinded review of 60 CT scans of the chest performed in 41 children. Forty-one studies in children sedated by radiologists (median age 29 months) were compared with 19 studies in children sedated by anesthesiologists (median age 25 months). Results. Atelectasis sufficient to obscure pulmonary metastases was shown in 5 of 41 (12 %) radiology sedations and 13 of 19 (68 %) anesthesiology sedations (P < 0.01). Higher grades of atelectasis were recorded in children under anesthesia (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children undergoing general anesthesia compared with intravenous pentobarbital sedation. Consideration should be given to the use of forced inspiration in children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  5. [The anesthesia of anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, G

    2005-03-01

    Viewed from a cultural-ethical perspective, anesthesiology can be understood as a comprehensive concept of medicine in general. As such it contains two dilemmas: very often pain must be inflicted in order to alleviate pain and this can only be done by somebody who is himself relatively free of pain. The necessary apathy or anesthesia of the anesthetist is correlated with a general twentieth century-type of perception: the cool observer. Nevertheless, it is also a modern variation of the original religious constellation of the priest in relationship to the sick person. Curing occurs by representation. The weak self of the sick person is able to take over the strong self, represented by the therapist. In twentieth century art and literature this process of self-therapy by representation was often illustrated. On the background of a phenomenological philosophy that process can be understood as the regaining of a balance between body and soul. In the psalms of the biblical Book of Job there a variety of fundamental forms of pain which may be helpful even in this secular age.

  6. Simulation to Assist in the Selection Process of New Airway Equipment in a Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Joan; Sawyer, Taylor; Foubare, Donald; Reid, Jennifer; Stone, Kimberly; Stephanian, Don; Thompson, Douglas

    2015-09-24

    To provide an informed choice of equipment purchase, we sought to use simulation to allow medical providers an opportunity to evaluate two potential laryngoscopes. The study followed a prospective, blinded comparison design. Participants were blinded to the laryngoscope brands by using alphabetic labels on the handles ("A" and "B"). Participants included a convenience sample of healthcare providers who perform intubation. Participants were allowed to perform intubation with the two laryngoscope brands on neonatal, child, and adolescent/adult airway simulators. After practicing with each of the two different laryngoscopes, participants completed an evaluation indicating their preference for one laryngoscope versus the other for each patient age group. Thirty-four healthcare providers participated in the study, including attendings, fellows, nurse practitioners, and transport team members from Neonatology, Pediatric Intensive Care, Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine, Cardiac Intensive Care, and Otolaryngology. Participants overwhelmingly preferred brand 'A' (89%) over brand 'B' (11%). Providers overwhelmingly chose one laryngoscope over the other. Data from this evaluation were used to determine which of the two laryngoscope brands was purchased. Based on our experience, we feel other hospitals should consider the use of simulation to allow providers to examine, compare, and rate medical equipment prior to making purchasing decisions.

  7. Great auricular neuropraxia with beach chair position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Minal Joshi,1 Ruth Cheng,2 Hattiyangadi Kamath,1 Joel Yarmush1 1Department of Anesthesiology, New York Methodist Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 2School of Medicine, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies Abstract: Shoulder arthroscopy has been shown to be the procedure of choice for many diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Neuropraxia of the great auricular nerve (GAN is an uncommon complication of shoulder surgery, with the patient in the beach chair position. We report a case of great auricular neuropraxia associated with direct compression by a horseshoe headrest, used in routine positioning for uncomplicated shoulder surgery. In this case, an arthroscopic approach was taken, under regional anesthesia with sedation in the beach chair position. The GAN, a superficial branch of the cervical plexus, is vulnerable to neuropraxia due to its superficial anatomical location. We recommend that for the procedures of the beach chair position, the auricle be protected and covered with cotton and gauze to avoid direct compression and the position of the head and neck be checked and corrected frequently. Keywords: neuropraxia, anesthesia, arthroscopy, great auricular nerve

  8. Perfectionism, selected demographic and job characteristics as predictors of burnout in operating suite nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Włodarczyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was aimed at verifying the predictive power of perfectionism for professional burnout among nurses exposed to distress resulting from work in an operating suite and testing whether this effect exists after controlling for selected demographic and job characteristics. Material and Methods: The study group consisted of 100 nurses (93 women; mean age: 38.67 years. The majority in the group worked in public facilities (68%, in duty system (62%, as operating (75% or anesthesiology (25% nurses. To test perfectionism The Polish Adaptive and Maladaptive Perfectionism Questionnaire (AMPQ (Perfekcjonizm Adaptacyjny i Dezadaptacyjny - PAD, developed by Szczucka, was used. To examine burnout the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI by Demerouti et al. was adopted. The effects of selected demographic and job characteristics were controlled. Results: The results of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that after controlling for selected demographic and job characteristics maladaptive perfectionism was a significant predictor of disengagement and exhaustion whereas adaptive perfectionism predicted a better work engagement. Significant predictors were also: education, number of workplaces, duty system and marital status. Conclusions: The study allowed to confirm the hypothesis on a harmful role of maladaptive perfectionism in shaping burnout among operating suite nurses. The hypothesis on protective function of adaptive perfectionism was confirmed only partially, with regard to disengagement. The results of the study also highlighted some risk factors of burnout which may exist in this occupational group. This confirms the need to continue research in this area. Med Pr 2013;64(6:761–773

  9. Perioperative pain management education: a short structured regional anesthesia course compared with traditional teaching among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Marie N; Donnelly, Michael B; Montgomery, Christopher L; Sloan, Paul A

    2005-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a brief course on pain management improved knowledge and attitudes toward analgesic use among medical students. The purpose of this study is to compare a structured clinical instruction course on regional anesthesia techniques for perioperative pain management with traditional teaching given to senior medical students. During a 1-month clerkship in anesthesiology, 40 fourth-year medical students were randomly and equally divided into 2 groups. The study group received a 2-hour structured course on regional anesthesia techniques for pain management, whereas the control group received a 1-hour lecture tutorial on regional anesthesia techniques for perioperative pain management and 1 hour of bedside teaching on acute pain management. Each student completed an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) 2 weeks after completion of the course. The study group performed better on each of the 11 items of the OSCE and on the total performance scores (mean +/- SD of 36.2 +/- 7.3 for study group versus 14.8 +/- 8.4 for the control group; P traditional teaching.

  10. The Validity of Online Patient Ratings of Physicians: Analysis of Physician Peer Reviews and Patient Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Robert J; Priestley, Jennifer Lewis; Zhou, Yiyun; Culligan, Patrick J

    2018-04-09

    Information from ratings sites are increasingly informing patient decisions related to health care and the selection of physicians. The current study sought to determine the validity of online patient ratings of physicians through comparison with physician peer review. We extracted 223,715 reviews of 41,104 physicians from 10 of the largest cities in the United States, including 1142 physicians listed as "America's Top Doctors" through physician peer review. Differences in mean online patient ratings were tested for physicians who were listed and those who were not. Overall, no differences were found between the online patient ratings based upon physician peer review status. However, statistical differences were found for four specialties (family medicine, allergists, internal medicine, and pediatrics), with online patient ratings significantly higher for those physicians listed as a peer-reviewed "Top Doctor" versus those who were not. The results of this large-scale study indicate that while online patient ratings are consistent with physician peer review for four nonsurgical, primarily in-office specializations, patient ratings were not consistent with physician peer review for specializations like anesthesiology. This result indicates that the validity of patient ratings varies by medical specialization. ©Robert J McGrath, Jennifer Lewis Priestley, Yiyun Zhou, Patrick J Culligan. Originally published in the Interactive Journal of Medical Research (http://www.i-jmr.org/), 09.04.2018.

  11. Introducing a methodology for estimating duration of surgery in health services research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Daneman, Nick

    2008-09-01

    The duration of surgery is an indicator for the quality, risks, and efficiency of surgical procedures. We introduce a new methodology for assessing the duration of surgery based on anesthesiology billing records, along with reviewing its fundamental logic and limitations. The validity of the methodology was assessed through a population-based cohort of patients (n=480,986) undergoing elective operations in 246 Ontario hospitals with 1,084 anesthesiologists between April 1, 1992 and March 31, 2002 (10 years). The weaknesses of the methodology relate to missing data, self-serving exaggerations by providers, imprecisions from clinical diversity, upper limits due to accounting regulations, fluctuations from updates over the years, national differences in reimbursement schedules, and the general failings of claims base analyses. The strengths of the methodology are in providing data that match clinical experiences, correspond to chart review, are consistent over time, can detect differences where differences would be anticipated, and might have implications for examining patient outcomes after long surgical times. We suggest that an understanding and application of large studies of surgical duration may help scientists explore selected questions concerning postoperative complications.

  12. KETOROLACO VERSUS METAMIZOL EN EL TRATAMIENTO DEL DOLOR POSOPERATORIO EN NIÑOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Pamella Palo Núñez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the effectiveness of Ketorolac and Metamizol in the treatment of acute postoperative pain of adenotonsillectomy in children three to six years old receiving medical care in the Department of Anesthesiology at the Hospital Alberto Sabogal Sologuren during the period 2012-2013. Material and Methods: Observational, descriptive, retrospective and cross-sectional study. The study involved 115 children who underwent elective adenotonsillectomy whose ages were between three to six years old. They are according to two groups that received analgesic therapy in the operating room, 58 children received Metamizol and 57 children received Ketorolac. Results: In the group receiving Ketorolac, 56.1% had no pain in the postanesthesic recovery unit according to the scale of Oucher and 43.9% had mild to moderate pain (1-6. The group that received Metamizol, 19% of children reported pain and 74.1% rated their pain from mild to moderate. The degree of pain relief measured Oucher scale was higher in patients receiving Ketorolac (p <0.05. Conclusions: Reducing postoperative pain in adenotonsillectomy in children with Ketorolaco is higher than Metamizol.

  13. Acute pain management efficiency improves with point-of-care handheld electronic billing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Brenda G

    2009-02-01

    Technology advances continue to impact patient care and physician workflow. To enable more efficient performance of billing activities, a point-of-care (POC) handheld computer technology replaced a paper-based system on an acute pain management service. Using a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA) and software from MDeverywhere (MDe, MDeverywhere, Long Island, NY), we performed a 1-yr prospective observational study of an anesthesiology acute pain management service billings and collections. Seventeen anesthesiologists providing billable acute pain services were trained and entered their charges on a PDA. Twelve months of data, just before electronic implementation (pre-elec), were compared to a 12-m period after implementation (post-elec). The total charges were 4883 for 890 patients pre-elec and 5368 for 1128 patients post-elec. With adoption of handheld billing, the charge lag days decreased from 29.3 to 7.0 (P billing using PDAs to replace a paper-based billing system improved the collection rate and decreased the number of charge lag days with a positive return on investment. The handheld PDA billing system provided POC support for physicians during their daily clinical (e.g., patient locations, rounding lists) and billing activities, improving workflow.

  14. Morphology and topographic anatomy of the spinal cord of the red-footed tortoise (Geochelone carbonaria Spix, 1824

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael C Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the topography of the spinal cord of the red-footed tortoise to establish a morphological basis for applied research in anesthesiology and morphology. Six tortoises from the state of Maranhão (Brazil that had died of natural causes were used. The common carotid artery was used to perfuse the arterial system with saline solution (heated to 37ºC and to fix the material with a 20% formaldehyde solution. The specimens were then placed in a modified decalcifying solution for 72 hours to allow dorsal opening of the carapace with a chisel and an orthopedic hammer. Dissection of the dorsal musculature and sectioning of the vertebral arches were performed to access the spinal cord. The results revealed the spinal cord of G. carbonaria to be an elongated, whitish mass that reached the articulation between the penultimate and last caudal vertebrae. The cervical intumescence (Intumescentia cervicalis was located between vertebral segments C5 and T1, whereas the lumbosacral intumescence (Intumescentia lumbalis was located between T6 and Ca1.

  15. Description and Results of a Comprehensive Care Protocol for Overnight-Stay Spine Surgery in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Drew A

    2017-07-15

    This is a prospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to define the probability of successful morning-after discharge after adult spine surgery achieved with a standard care protocol as applied to patients with a large variety of common degenerative spine disorders. Qualifying criteria for ambulatory or overnight-stay adult spine surgery are not well defined in either the spine or anesthesia literature. Most reports simply go to American Society of Anesthesiology risk classification or surgical technique alternatives and do not present a clearly defined patient care and case management protocol. A standardized protocol of patient preparation, preoperative comorbidities optimization, and perioperative care was applied in a prospective cohort of 126 patients including 83 lumbar and 41 cervical procedures. Office and hospital chart records were reviewed for relevant outcomes. Fully 122 of 124 appropriately selected cases were able to successfully achieve uneventful same-day discharge without any need for readmission, unscheduled early emergency room or clinic visits, or other major complications. Both failures were for urinary retention in senior males and resolved after a single-day admission to the main hospital. A wide variety of common degenerative spinal pathology in adults can be routinely and safely managed on an overnight-stay basis without requirement for formal hospital inpatient admission in patients appropriately selected and pre-educated to the experience and whose major comorbidities are preoperatively optimized. N/A.

  16. An epidemiological survey of Low back pain and its relationship with occupational and personal factors among nursing personnel at hospitals of Shahrood Faculty of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sadeghian

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although low back pain (LBP represents a significant occupational problem for hospital nurses, few investigations target nurses for low back pain and its association with the personal and work-related factors in Iran. Methods: This cross sectional study was performed on 245 nursing personnel (registered nurses, nursing aides, operating room technicians, anesthesiology technicians working full time for at least 1 month at 4 hospitals. Data were collected by modified Nordic questionnaire and interview followed by clinical examination. c2, Mantel and logistic regression statistical tests were used. Results: The 12-month period-prevalence of LBP was 49.9 % (95%CI 43-55/8. In this study 51(21/7% males and 184(78/3% females participated that mean age of them was 32 years .The prevalence of back pain increased with increasing age. There was no differences between the sexes, but more prevalence was observed in the married ones than singles. Odds ratio of LBP was increased 2/2 times with BMI higher than 27kg/m2. In this study the relationship between cumulative duration of employment in nursing job, duration of employment in present ward and manual handling and back pain was significant statistically. Conclusion: LBP is high among nurses. For prevention of LBP, ergonomic program, lifting team, correct lifting technique and wider research with taking into account LBP psychosocial factors and work task are suggested.

  17. Managing atrial fibrillation in the elderly: critical appraisal of dronedarone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trigo P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Paula Trigo, Gregory W FischerDepartment of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly seen arrhythmia in the geriatric population and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment of the elderly with atrial fibrillation remains challenging for physicians, because this unique subpopulation is characterized by multiple comorbidities requiring chronic use of numerous medications, which can potentially lead to severe drug interactions. Furthermore, age-related changes in the cardiovascular system as well as other physiological changes result in altered drug pharmacokinetics. Dronedarone is a new drug recently approved for the treatment of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation and/or atrial flutter. Dronedarone is a benzofuran amiodarone analog which lacks the iodine moiety and contains a methane sulfonyl group that decreases its lipophilicity. These differences in chemical structure are responsible for making dronedarone less toxic than amiodarone which, in turn, results in fewer side effects. Adverse events for dronedarone include gastrointestinal side effects and rash. No dosage adjustments are required for patients with renal impairment. However, the use of dronedarone is contraindicated in the presence of severe hepatic dysfunction.Keywords: atrial fibrillation, elderly, antiarrhythmic agents, amiodarone, dronedarone

  18. Genomics in cardiovascular diseases: analysis of the importance of the toll-like receptor signaling pathway

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    Bustamante J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available J Bustamante,1 E Tamayo,2 J Herreros3,41Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Universitario Valdecilla, Santander, 4Biomedical Engineering Institute of Santander, Santander, SpainAbstract: The development of techniques for genomics study makes it possible for us to further our knowledge about the physiopathology of various immunological or infectious diseases. These techniques improve our understanding of the development and evolution of such diseases, including those of cardiovascular origin, whilst they help to bring about the design of new therapeutic strategies. We are reviewing the genetic alterations of immunity in said field, and focusing on the signaling pathway of toll-like receptors because not only does this play a decisive role in response to microorganisms, it is also heavily involved in modulating the inflammatory response to tissue damage, a side effect of numerous cardiovascular diseases. These alterations in tissue homeostasis are present under a wide range of circumstances, such as reperfusion ischemia (myocardial infarction phenomena, arteriosclerosis, or valvulopathy.Keywords: genome-wide association study, single-nucleotide polymorphism, innate immune system, ischemic/reperfusion, myocardial infarction

  19. Outcomes of a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for medication errors in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lizabeth D; Grigg, Eliot B; Verma, Shilpa; Latham, Gregory J; Rampersad, Sally E; Martin, Lynn D

    2017-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for development of strategies to prevent medication errors, which are one important cause of preventable harm. Although the field of anesthesiology is considered a leader in patient safety, recent data suggest high medication error rates in anesthesia practice. Unfortunately, few error prevention strategies for anesthesia providers have been implemented. Using Toyota Production System quality improvement methodology, a multidisciplinary team observed 133 h of medication practice in the operating room at a tertiary care freestanding children's hospital. A failure mode and effects analysis was conducted to systematically deconstruct and evaluate each medication handling process step and score possible failure modes to quantify areas of risk. A bundle of five targeted countermeasures were identified and implemented over 12 months. Improvements in syringe labeling (73 to 96%), standardization of medication organization in the anesthesia workspace (0 to 100%), and two-provider infusion checks (23 to 59%) were observed. Medication error reporting improved during the project and was subsequently maintained. After intervention, the median medication error rate decreased from 1.56 to 0.95 per 1000 anesthetics. The frequency of medication error harm events reaching the patient also decreased. Systematic evaluation and standardization of medication handling processes by anesthesia providers in the operating room can decrease medication errors and improve patient safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Measuring determinants of career satisfaction of anesthesiologists: validation of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Anoushka M; Diaz, James H; Scher, Corey S; Beyl, Robbie A; Nair, Singh R; Kaye, Alan David

    2013-06-01

    To measure the parameter of job satisfaction among anesthesiologists. Survey instrument. Academic anesthesiology departments in the United States. 320 anesthesiologists who attended the annual meeting of the ASA in 2009 (95% response rate). The anonymous 50-item survey collected information on 26 independent demographic variables and 24 dependent ranked variables of career satisfaction among practicing anesthesiologists. Mean survey scores were calculated for each demographic variable and tested for statistically significant differences by analysis of variance. Questions within each domain that were internally consistent with each other within domains were identified by Cronbach's alpha ≥ 0.7. P-values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Cronbach's alpha analysis showed strong internal consistency for 10 dependent outcome questions in the practice factor-related domain (α = 0.72), 6 dependent outcome questions in the peer factor-related domain (α = 0.71), and 8 dependent outcome questions in the personal factor-related domain (α = 0.81). Although age was not a variable, full-time status, early satisfaction within the first 5 years of practice, working with respected peers, and personal choice factors were all significantly associated with anesthesiologist job satisfaction. Improvements in factors related to job satisfaction among anesthesiologists may lead to higher early and current career satisfaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Is there a place for the Glasgow-Blatchford score in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerraya, Hichem; Bousslema, Amine; Frikha, Foued; Dziri, Chadli

    2011-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent cause for emergency hospital admission. Most severity scores include in their computation the endoscopic findings. The Glasgow-Blatchford score is a validated score that is easy to calculate based on simple clinical and biological variables that can identify patients with a low or a high risk of needing a therapeutic (interventional endoscopy, surgery and/ or transfusions). To validate retrospectively the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS). The study examined all patients admitted in both the general surgery department as of Anesthesiology of the Regional Hospital of Sidi Bouzid. There were 50 patients, which the mean age was 58 years and divided into 35 men and 15 women. In all these patients, we calculated the GBS. Series were divided into 2 groups, 26 cases received only medical treatment and 24 cases required transfusion and / or surgery. Univariate analysis was performed for comparison of these two groups then the ROC curve was used to identify the 'Cut off point' of GBS. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) with confidence interval 95% were calculated. The SGB was significantly different between the two groups (p VPN. Indeed, if GBS <7, we must opt for medical treatment to the risk of being wrong in only 5% of cases. The Glasgow-Blatchford score is based on simple clinical and laboratory variables. It can recognize in the emergency department the cases that require medical treatment and those whose support could need blood transfusions and / or surgical treatment.

  2. Observational study to calculate addictive risk to opioids: a validation study of a predictive algorithm to evaluate opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenton A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ashley Brenton,1 Steven Richeimer,2,3 Maneesh Sharma,4 Chee Lee,1 Svetlana Kantorovich,1 John Blanchard,1 Brian Meshkin1 1Proove Biosciences, Irvine, CA, 2Keck school of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 3Departments of Anesthesiology and Psychiatry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 4Interventional Pain Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Opioid abuse in chronic pain patients is a major public health issue, with rapidly increasing addiction rates and deaths from unintentional overdose more than quadrupling since 1999. Purpose: This study seeks to determine the predictability of aberrant behavior to opioids using a comprehensive scoring algorithm incorporating phenotypic risk factors and neuroscience-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Patients and methods: The Proove Opioid Risk (POR algorithm determines the predictability of aberrant behavior to opioids using a comprehensive scoring algorithm incorporating phenotypic risk factors and neuroscience-associated SNPs. In a validation study with 258 subjects with diagnosed opioid use disorder (OUD and 650 controls who reported using opioids, the POR successfully categorized patients at high and moderate risks of opioid misuse or abuse with 95.7% sensitivity. Regardless of changes in the prevalence of opioid misuse or abuse, the sensitivity of POR remained >95%. Conclusion: The POR correctly stratifies patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories to appropriately identify patients at need for additional guidance, monitoring, or treatment changes. Keywords: opioid use disorder, addiction, personalized medicine, pharmacogenetics, genetic testing, predictive algorithm

  3. [When a patient falls (asleep) and can't get up: conversion disorder - paraplegia following general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Chawla LaToya

    This case report describes the rare occurrence of paraplegia caused by conversion disorder in a woman who received general anesthesia for breast surgery. A 46-year-old healthy woman received general anesthesia for excision of a left breast fibroepithelial lesion. In the post-anesthesia care unit, she reported bilateral loss of both sensation and motor function below the knees. Physical signs and symptoms did not correlate with any anatomical or neurological patterns; imaging revealed no abnormalities. Psychiatric consultation was performed wherein familial stressor circumstances were identified, leading to diagnosis and management of conversion disorder. Conversion disorder is characterized by alteration of physical function due to expression of an underlying psychological ailment. Its diagnosis requires thorough evaluation including appropriate workup to exclude organic causes. The meshing together of anesthesiology and psychiatry - as demonstrated by this case report - offers an opportunity to highlight important information pertaining to the definition, diagnosis, and management of conversion disorder as it may be encountered in the postanesthesia recovery period. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Howard Wilcox Haggard and the Institutionalization of Modern Alcohol Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Nicholas; Bejarano, William; Ward, Judit

    2017-03-01

    This biographical sketch and accompanying bibliography provide a new look at Howard Wilcox Haggard, M.D., Ph.D., whose career highlights the consolidation of alcohol studies as a field in twentieth-century America. The article relies in large part on the works of Haggard assembled for the bibliography project, supplemented by published and unpublished documents and records from collections at Rutgers University. Haggard began his career in respiratory physiology, influenced by his work on chemical weapons for the Army during the First World War. As his reputation grew, he moved into anesthesiology and supplemented his research with textbooks and popular science bestsellers. Haggard moved into the burgeoning field of alcohol studies after the repeal of National Prohibition and, in 1940, became the inaugural editor and president of the corporation of the Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, now the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. Under the aegis of the Yale Laboratory for Applied Physiology, he also assembled and oversaw what would become the Center of Alcohol Studies. Haggard died in 1959, his legacy established as a central figure in the 20th-century transformation of alcohol studies in the United States. A prolific researcher with a talent for tapping into the public zeitgeist, Haggard helped provide the institutional infrastructure, academic credibility, and broad audience that made the renaissance of alcohol studies in post-Prohibition America possible.

  5. Blood component therapy in anesthesia and intensive care: Adoption of evidence based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion of blood and its components has undergone technological advancement, and its use is increasing both perioperatively as well as in the Intensive Care Unit. The separation of blood into its various components has made it very economical as blood donated from a single donor can be utilized for many recipients at the same time. However, the transfusion of blood and its components do carry the inherent risk of various transfusion reactions as well as transmission of infections. The indications for transfusion should be strictly adhered to for preventing nonjudicious use. The health care persons involved in transfusion should be well aware of implications of the mismatched transfusion and should be able to provide treatment if such mishaps do occur. A health care professional should carefully weigh the benefits of blood transfusion against the risks involved before subjecting the patients to the transfusion. This manuscript aims to comprehensively review the current evidence based approaches in blood and component transfusion which are being followed in anesthesiology and intensive care practice.

  6. Newer treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E Harris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard E Harris, Daniel J ClauwDepartment of Anesthesiology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a common chronic pain disorder of unknown etiology. The lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia has made this condition frustrating for patients and clinicians alike. The most common symptoms of this disorder are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, difficulty with memory, and morning stiffness. Emerging evidence points towards augmented pain processing within the central nervous system (CNS as having a primary role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Currently the two drugs that are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the management of fibromyalgia are pregabalin and duloxetine. Newer data suggests that milnacipran, a dual norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, may be promising for the treatment of fibromyalgia. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of milnacipran in 125 fibromyalgia patients showed significant improvements relative to placebo. Milnacipran given either once or twice daily at doses up to 200 mg/day was generally well tolerated and yielded significant improvements relative to placebo on measures of pain, patient’s global impression of change in their disease state, physical function, and fatigue. Future studies are needed to validate the efficacy of milnacipran in fibromyalgia.Keywords: fibromyalgia, pain, pharmacological, treatment

  7. [Deep versus moderate neuromuscular block during one-lung ventilation in lung resection surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Javier; Piñeiro, Patricia; De La Gala, Francisco; Olmedilla, Luis; Cruz, Patricia; Duque, Patricia; Garutti, Ignacio

    Neuromuscular relaxants are essential during general anesthesia for several procedures. Classical anesthesiology literature indicates that the use of neuromuscular blockade in thoracic surgery may be deleterious in patients in lateral decubitus position in one-lung ventilation. The primary objective of our study was to compare respiratory function according to the degree of patient neuromuscular relaxation. Secondary, we wanted to check that neuromuscular blockade during one-lung ventilation is not deleterious. A prospective, longitudinal observational study was made in which each patient served as both treated subject and control. 76 consecutive patients programmed for lung resection surgery in Gregorio Marañon Hospital along the year of 2013 who required one-lung ventilation in lateral decubitus were included. Ventilator data, hemodynamic parameters were registered in different moments according to train-of-four response (intense, deep and moderate blockade) during one-lung ventilation. Peak, plateau and mean pressures were significantly lower during the intense and deep blockade. Besides, compliance and peripheral oxygen saturation were significantly higher in those moments. Heart rate was significantly higher during deep blockade. No mechanical ventilation parameters were modified during measurements. Deep neuromuscular blockade attenuates the poor lung mechanics observed during one-lung ventilation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Work-related stress: A survey of Indian anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Sumitra Ganesh; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha; Kannan, Sadhana; Myatra, Sheila Nainan

    2017-01-01

    Work-related stress is common among medical caregivers and concerns all perioperative care providers. Although anesthesiologists are known to experience stress, there are limited Indian data addressing this issue. This survey was conducted among Indian anesthesiologists to determine their awareness about work stress and views regarding prevention programs. A survey questionnaire was distributed to delegates visiting the exhibits at the national anesthesiology conference in 2011. The questionnaire had ten questions on the work pattern, five on work-related stress, nine on opinion regarding the need and willingness to participate in stress-related programs. There were 1178 responders. Forty-three percent were faculty in medical institutions, 26% were residents and 25% were in free-lance practice. Ninety-one percent of participants rated their stress as moderate-extreme. There was a significant correlation between the amount of stress and working for more than 8 h ( P working on weekends ( P = 0.002), and carrying work back home ( P work stress. Eighty-four percent of participants felt the need for stress management programs and 69% expressed their willingness to participate in the same. The majority of participants rated their stress as moderate-extreme and was higher in anesthesiologists working long hours, over the weekend and those handling high-risk patients. A majority of participants felt the survey made them think about work-related stress and expressed their willingness to participate in stress management programs.

  9. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the cardiometabolic syndrome: impact of incretin-based therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Stanley Schwartz1, Benjamin A Kohl21Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: The rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD continue to increase at epidemic proportions. It has become clear that these disease states are not independent but are frequently interrelated. By addressing conditions such as obesity,­ ­insulin resistance, stress hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes ­mellitus, with its micro- and macrovascular complications, a specific treatment strategy can be ­developed. These conditions can be addressed by early identification of patients at high risk for type 2 diabetes, prompt and aggressive treatment of their hyperglycemia, recognition of the pleiotropic and synergistic benefits of certain antidiabetes agents on CVD, and thus, avoiding potential complications including hypoglycemia and weight gain. Incretin-based therapies, which include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV inhibitors, have the potential to alter the course of type 2 diabetes and associated CVD complications. Advantages of these therapies include glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion, infrequent instances of hypoglycemia, weight loss with GLP-1 receptor agonists, weight maintenance with DPP-IV inhibitors, decreased blood pressure, improvements in dyslipidemia, and potential beneficial effects on CV function.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, glucose control, GLP-1 receptor agonists, DPP-IV inhibitors

  10. Risk management in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, L; Levati, A

    2009-11-01

    Anesthesia is considered a leading discipline in the field of patient safety. Nevertheless, complications still occur and can be devastating. A substantial portion of anesthesia-related adverse events are preventable since risk factors can be detected and eliminated. Risk management (RM) in anesthesia includes preventive and remedial measures to minimize patient anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. RM involves all aspects of anesthesia care. Classically, the following four steps are needed to prevent critical incidents or to learn from them: (1) detection of problems, (2) assessment, (3) implementation of solutions, and (4) verification of effectiveness. Problems and solutions can be identified into the fields of structures, processes and personnel. Authoritative agencies like the World Health Organization, the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists, the Section and Board of Anesthesiology of the European Union of Medical Specialties and the Italian Scientific Society of Anesthesiologists (Società Italiana di Anestesia, Analgesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Intensiva SIAARTI) have proposed initiatives addressing safety in the operating room. The central role of a well-trained, constantly present anesthesiologist and the usefulness of checklists have been highlighted. Cost cutting and production pressure in medical care are potential threats to safety. A shared knowledge of the best standards of care and of the potential consequences of unscrupulous actions could make the daily management of conflicting interests easier. A correctly applied RM can be a powerful, highly beneficial aid to our practice.

  11. Treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): establishment of workflow and initial clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Witt, Olaf; Jäkel, Oliver; Kulozik, Andreas E; Debus, Jürgen; Kessel, Kerstin A; Herfarth, Klaus; Jensen, Alexandra; Oertel, Susanne; Blattmann, Claudia; Ecker, Swantje; Hoess, Angelika; Martin, Eike

    2012-01-01

    To report on establishment of workflow and clinical results of particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. We treated 36 pediatric patients (aged 21 or younger) with particle therapy at HIT. Median age was 12 years (range 2-21 years), five patients (14%) were younger than 5 years of age. Indications included pilocytic astrocytoma, parameningeal and orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, skull base and cervical chordoma, osteosarcoma and adenoid-cystic carcinoma (ACC), as well as one patient with an angiofibroma of the nasopharynx. For the treatment of small children, an anesthesia unit at HIT was established in cooperation with the Department of Anesthesiology. Treatment concepts depended on tumor type, staging, age of the patient, as well as availability of specific study protocols. In all patients, particle radiotherapy was well tolerated and no interruptions due to toxicity had to be undertaken. During follow-up, only mild toxicites were observed. Only one patient died of tumor progression: Carbon ion radiotherapy was performed as an individual treatment approach in a child with a skull base recurrence of the previously irradiated rhabdomyosarcoma. Besides this patient, tumor recurrence was observed in two additional patients. Clinical protocols have been generated to evaluate the real potential of particle therapy, also with respect to carbon ions in distinct pediatric patient populations. The strong cooperation between the pediatric department and the department of radiation oncology enable an interdisciplinary treatment and stream-lined workflow and acceptance of the treatment for the patients and their parents

  12. Rating scale for the assessment of competence in ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access - a Delphi Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primdahl, Stine C; Todsen, Tobias; Clemmesen, Louise; Knudsen, Lars; Weile, Jesper

    2016-09-21

    Peripheral vascular access is vital for treatment and diagnostics of hospitalized patients. Ultrasound-guided vascular access (UGVA) is superior to the landmark technique. To ensure competence-based education, an assessment tool of UGVA competence is needed. We aimed to develop a global rating scale (RS) for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions on the content from ultrasound experts in a modified Delphi consensus study. We included experts from anesthesiology, emergency medicine and radiology across university hospitals in Denmark. Nine elements were drafted based on existing literature and recommendations from international societies. In a multi-round survey, the experts rated the elements on a five-point Likert scale according to importance, and suggested missing elements. The final Delphi round occurred when >80% of the experts rated all elements ≥4 on the Likert scale. Sixteen experts consented to participate in the study, one withdrew consent prior to the first Delphi round, and 14 completed all three Delphi rounds. In the first Delphi round the experts excluded one element from the scale and changed the content of two elements. In the second Delphi round, the experts excluded one element from the scale. In the third Delphi round, consensus was obtained on the eight elements: preparation of utensils, ergonomics, preparation of the ultrasound device, identification of blood vessels, anatomy, hygiene, coordination of the needle, and completion of the procedure. We developed an RS for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions of ultrasound experts through a modified Delphi consensus study.

  13. Outpatient unicompartment knee arthroplasty with indwelling femoral nerve catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervin, Geoffrey F; Madden, Susan M; Crawford-Newton, Barbara A; Lane, Alan T; Evans, Holly C

    2012-06-01

    Contemporary multimodal anesthesia regimens allow the performance of unicompartment knee arthroplasty (UKA) on an outpatient basis. Our initial pilot experience is presented using a continuous femoral nerve block as an adjunct for 24 patients classified as American Society of Anesthesiology class 1 (14 men, 10 women; median age, 56 years; range, 46-72 years). After minimally invasive UKA, patients documented their pain and oral medication use while at home for the first 5 days. Adverse events, medication adverse effects, and the amount of infused ropivacaine were recorded. Median pain scores for the first 3 days were 1, 2, and 2 (at rest) and 4, 5, and 3 (during physical therapy). Eighteen patients (75%) required less than 4 mg oral hydromorphone/d. Of the 18, 10 (42%) did not require supplemental oral opioids. The median catheter use was 3 days. Our results suggest that with careful patient selection and adequate teaching, continuous femoral nerve blocks may be used as part of a multimodal pain regimen to assist the delivery of outpatient UKA with high patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of oral oxymorphone in the management of pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sloan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul SloanUniversity of Kentucky Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Lexington, KY, USAAbstract: Chronic cancer and nonmalignant pain (CNMP is a common and major health problem afflicting approximately 40 million persons in the US. Most cancer patients, and many patients with CNMP, require opioid analgesics to obtain adequate pain relief. Oral oxymorphone is a new formulation of an existing parenteral opioid that has become available for the treatment of significant pain: acute postoperative, chronic arthritis, chronic low back, and chronic cancer pain. Oxymorphone is a typical mu-opioid agonist that is effective in both immediate- and extended-release (IR and ER formulations. Oxymorphone is more lipid soluble than morphine, resulting in a rapid onset of action when given in tablet formulation, with a duration of action of approximately 4–6 hours in IR and 12 hours in ER preparations. Oxymorphone provides excellent pain relief for significant pain, with typical opioid side effects that are usually mild or moderate in intensity. Multiple double-blind, prospective, placebo-controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical efficacy and safety of this new oral opioid preparation. Oral oxymorphone is an effective opioid that provides a new therapeutic option for the physician.Keywords: chronic pain, oxymorphone, opioids, extended-release, sustained-release, cancer pain

  15. Rocuronium-Sugammadex in Anesthesia for Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Tas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a form of treatment which is very effective in many psychiatric disorders. The administration of anesthesia plays a positive role in the success of ECT and improves the oxygenation of the body during the process. Succinylcholine, is a depolarizing neuromuscular blocker of choice, the most common agent used to provide muscular relaxation during ECT. Alternative neuromusculer blokers have been used during anesthesia because of contraindications and serious side effects of succinylcholine. Rocuronium is a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker with inter-mediate time of action which may be used safely during ECT. Although relatively late onset of action and long half life compared to succinylcholine may seem as drawbacks, the new generation reversing agents like suggamadex have made these disadvantages ignorable. Sugammadex, a new generation neuromuscular blocker reversal agent, not having serious side effects as much as the classic reversals, such as cardiovascular side effects, is playing an important role in anesthesiology practice. In recent years, rocuronium-sugammadex combination is being included in the ECT practice extensively. In this paper, the usability of rocuronium-sugammadex combination as an alternative to succinylcholine has been revised. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(1: 76-84

  16. Update on the clinical utility and practical use of ropivacaine in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Man Li, Li Wan, Wei Mei, Yuke Tian Department of Anesthesiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China Abstract: We reviewed the Chinese and English literature for efficacy and tolerability data as well as pharmacological properties of ropivacaine in Chinese patients. Ropivacaine is a long-acting amide local anesthetic agent that elicits nerve block via reversible inhibition of sodium ion influx in nerve fibers. The available evidence in the literature on anesthesia practice indicates that ropivacaine produces equally surgical sensory block and postoperative and obstetrics analgesia with good maternal and fetal outcome to those of bupivacaine or levobupivacaine. It appears to be associated with comparable onset, quality, and duration of sensory block, but with a lower incidence or grade of motor block, compared to bupivacaine. The satisfaction of both patients and surgeons is high when ropivacaine is used. Thus, ropivacaine appears to be an important option for regional anesthesia and for the management of postoperative and labor pain, with its enhanced sensorimotor differentiation blockage at lower concentrations and enhanced safety at higher concentrations. Keywords: local anesthetics, anesthesia, analgesia, pharmacology, efficacy, side effect

  17. Perceptions of communication in the operating room: a pilot survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyche, Melville Q; Lemay, Allyson C; Tiemann, Dawn D; Billeaud, Craig B; Ma, John G; Elhassan, Amir O; Fox, Mary E; Diaz, James H; Bell, Laura J; Beutler, Sascha S; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    An operating room (OR) environment is challenging and complicated. At any given time, several vital tasks are being performed by skilled individuals, including physicians, nurses, and ancillary staff. There is a potential for multifactorial mistakes; many arise because of communication issues. To evaluate the current state of perceptions of interdisciplinary communication in an OR setting, a survey was developed and administered to four academic residency training departments of anesthesiology in a single U.S. state. The results of this survey show that perceived poor communication within the OR leads to a lack of emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to patient care in the OR. Survey data can be used internally to identify shortcomings in communication at a facility, to stress the importance of communication, and to serve as a powerful education tool to potentially improve patient care. Through this type of survey, which emphasizes communication in the OR, stakeholders can work more effectively to improve patient care and decrease adverse outcomes in the hospital environment.

  18. How to teach regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröking, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2006-10-01

    The demand for peripheral nerve blocks and neuroaxial blocks from both patients and surgeons has increased over the last few years. This change in attitude towards regional anesthesia is prompted by the insight that adequate perioperative pain management leads to earlier ambulation, shorter hospital stay, reduced cost and increased patient satisfaction. To avoid serious complications of these techniques structured residency programs need to be available. Until 2004, the Residency Review Committee for Anesthesiology in the United States required a minimum of 50 epidurals, 40 spinals and 40 peripheral nerve blocks during residency. Similarly, the German Society for Anesthesia and Intensive Care required 100 neuroaxial blocks and 50 peripheral nerve blocks. In 2004 the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine endorsed standardized guidelines for regional anesthesia fellowships which regulate the administrative, equipment and educational demands. This review introduces the reader to the different teaching methods available, including cadaver workshops, three-dimensional videoclips, video filming, ultrasound guidance and acoustic assist devices as well as demonstrating their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, an overview is given of future residency training programs, which integrate administrative, material and educative demands as well as the teaching means into the daily clinical routine.

  19. Teaching surgery takes time: the impact of surgical education on time in the operating room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinden, Christopher; Malthaner, Richard; McGee, Jacob; McClure, J. Andrew; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; Liu, Kuan; Nash, Danielle M.; Welk, Blayne; Dubois, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that surgical training is associated with increased surgical duration. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of this increase for common surgical procedures by comparing surgery duration in teaching and nonteaching hospitals. Methods This retrospective population-based cohort study included all adult residents of Ontario, Canada, who underwent 1 of 14 surgical procedures between 2002 and 2012. We used several linked administrative databases to identify the study cohort in addition to patient-, surgeon- and procedure-related variables. We determined surgery duration using anesthesiology billing records. Negative binomial regression was used to model the association between teaching versus nonteaching hospital status and surgery duration. Results Of the 713 573 surgical cases included in this study, 20.8% were performed in a teaching hospital. For each procedure, the mean surgery duration was significantly longer for teaching hospitals, with differences ranging from 5 to 62 minutes across individual procedures in unadjusted analyses (all p surgery duration, adjusting for patient-, surgeon- and procedure-related variables as well as the clustering of patients within surgeons and hospitals. Conclusion Our results show that a wide range of surgical procedures require significantly more time to perform in teaching than nonteaching hospitals. Given the magnitude of this difference, the impact of surgical training on health care costs and clinical outcomes should be a priority for future studies. PMID:27007088

  20. Fresh gas low flow anesthesia in dogs/ Anestesia com fluxo baixo de gases frescos em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Nunes

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available With this work, the authors provide information about low flow anesthesia in dogs. They comment about the use of this technique, its advantages and disadvantages, and a comparative evaluation about volatile anesthetics regarding to their efficiency and safety when used in low flow anesthesia. Complementary, it was aimed to update the professionals that work with Veterinary Anesthesiology, through new papers and reports.Com este trabalho, os autores procuram fornecer informações sobre a anestesia com fluxo baixo em cães. São tecidas considerações relativas ao emprego da técnica, suas vantagens e restrições de uso, bem como a avaliação comparativa dos anestésicos voláteis quanto à sua eficiência e segurança quando utilizados sob anestesia com fluxo baixo de gases frescos. Complementarmente, procurou-se atualizar com literatura recente os conhecimentos dos profissionais que militam na área de Anestesiologia Veterinária.

  1. Advances in the staging of renal cell carcinoma with high-resolution imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallscheidt, P.; Noeldge, G.; Schawo, S.; Kauffmann, G.; Palmowski, M.; Bartling, S.; Pfitzenmaier, J.

    2007-01-01

    Modern imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow high-resolution imaging of the abdomen. Modern scanners made high temporal as well as high spatial resolution available. Therapeutic approaches to the treatment of renal cell carcinoma have been improved over the recent years. Besides conventional and open laparoscopic tumor nephrectomy and nephron sparing, surgical approaches such as local tumor cryotherapy and radiofrequency ablation (RF) are ablative modalities and are used increasingly. Improved anesthesiological methods and new surgical approaches also allow curative treatment in extended tumors. Prerequisites for preoperative imaging modalities include visualization of the kidney tumor as well as its staging. Tumor-related infiltration of the renal pelvis or invasion of the perinephric fat and the renal hilus has to be excluded prior to nephron sparing surgery. In cases with extended tumors with infiltration of the inferior vena cava, it is necessary to visualize the exact extension of the tumor growth towards the right atrium in the vena cava. The radiologist should be informed about the diagnostic possibilities and limitations of the imaging modalities of CT and MRI in order to support the urologist in the planning and performance of surgical therapeutical approaches. (orig.)

  2. Advances in the staging of renal cell carcinoma with high-resolution imaging; Fortschritte im Staging des Nierenzellkarzinoms mittels hochaufloesender Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallscheidt, P.; Noeldge, G.; Schawo, S.; Kauffmann, G.; Palmowski, M. [Abt. Radiodiagnostik, Radiologische Klinik, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Bartling, S. [Medizinische Physik, DKFZ Heidelberg (Germany); Pfitzenmaier, J. [Urologische Klinik, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Modern imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow high-resolution imaging of the abdomen. Modern scanners made high temporal as well as high spatial resolution available. Therapeutic approaches to the treatment of renal cell carcinoma have been improved over the recent years. Besides conventional and open laparoscopic tumor nephrectomy and nephron sparing, surgical approaches such as local tumor cryotherapy and radiofrequency ablation (RF) are ablative modalities and are used increasingly. Improved anesthesiological methods and new surgical approaches also allow curative treatment in extended tumors. Prerequisites for preoperative imaging modalities include visualization of the kidney tumor as well as its staging. Tumor-related infiltration of the renal pelvis or invasion of the perinephric fat and the renal hilus has to be excluded prior to nephron sparing surgery. In cases with extended tumors with infiltration of the inferior vena cava, it is necessary to visualize the exact extension of the tumor growth towards the right atrium in the vena cava. The radiologist should be informed about the diagnostic possibilities and limitations of the imaging modalities of CT and MRI in order to support the urologist in the planning and performance of surgical therapeutical approaches. (orig.)

  3. Work stress and gender-dependent coping strategies in anesthesiologists at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, Johann F; Traweger, Christian; Trefalt, Ernestine; Riccabona, Ulla; Lederer, Wolfgang

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate stressors and coping strategies for stress in a sample of anesthesiologists working at a university hospital. Cross-sectional study via survey instrument. University department of anesthesiology and critical care at a 1305-bed hospital. 135 anesthesia specialists and specialist trainees of anesthesia. A total of 135 self-reporting questionnaires used to assess sociodemographic data, workload, task demands, stress-coping strategies, physical health, emotional well-being, and working conditions, were distributed. Of these, 89 questionnaires were completed and returned, for a response rate of 65.9%: 33 (37.1%) female anesthesiologists and 56 (62.9%) male anesthesiologists. The burden of task-related stressors and of communication possibilities was assessed differently by male and female anesthesiologists. Female anesthesiologists more frequently reported higher concentration demands (P = 0.013) and limited possibilities to control work (P = 0.009) than did their male colleagues. Work at intensive care units (P = 0.001) was particularly demanding and burdensome for female anesthesiologists. Combined evaluation of various stress-coping strategies did not show significant differences between the genders. Generally, anesthesiologists had more confidence in their own personal capabilities and resources and in their social-particularly family-support outside the workplace, than in their social support from colleagues and superiors. Task-related stressors and communication possibilities differed between male and female anesthesiologists in our institution. Female anesthesiologists felt that they had less control over their work.

  4. Unexpected difficult airway with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferda Yaman,1 Bengi Arslan,2 Ercan Yuvanç,3 Ünase Büyükkoçak1 1Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department, 2Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department, 3Urology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Kirikkale University, Kirikkale, Turkey Background: A critical aspect of safe general anesthesia is providing adequate ventilation and oxygenation. Failed endotracheal intubation and inadequate ventilation with insufficient oxygenation may lead to serious complications, even death. Anesthesiologists rarely encounter unexpected difficult airway problems in daily routine. Management of an unexpectedly difficult airway consists of laryngeal mask ventilation, gum-elastic bougie and video laryngoscopy-assisted intubation. Gum-elastic bougie is the easiest and cheapest tool used in case of an unexpected difficult intubation occurring in the operating room. Case: A 53-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism presented as an unexpected difficult intubation after the induction of anesthesia. No pathological finding or predictor of difficult intubation was present. In addition, bag-mask ventilation was poor and inadequate. The patient was finally successfully intubated with a gum-elastic bougie. Conclusion: A difficult airway has been described in patients with a variety of endocrine disorders, including pituitary diseases, but not with hypogonadism. There may be an unrevealed relationship between hypogonadism and difficult airway. Gum-elastic bougie is still the most attainable and effective tool in the operation room in this situation. Keywords: airway management, intubation, hypogonadism

  5. Percutaneous dilational tracheotomy for airway management in a newborn with Pierre-Robin syndrome and a glossopharyngeal web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirat, Arash; Candan, Selim; Unlükaplan, Aytekin; Kömürcü, Ozgür; Kuşlu, Selim; Arslan, Gülnaz

    2012-04-01

    Pierre-Robin syndrome (PRS) is often associated with difficulty in endotracheal intubation. We present the use of percutaneous dilational tracheotomy (PDT) for airway management of a newborn with PRS and a glossopharyngeal web. A 2-day-old term newborn with PRS and severe obstructive dyspnea was evaluated by the anesthesiology team for airway management. A direct laryngoscopy revealed a glossopharyngeal web extending from the base of the tongue to the posterior pharyngeal wall. The infant was spontaneously breathing through a 2 mm diameter fistula in the center of this web. It was decided that endotracheal intubation was impossible, and a PDT was planned. The trachea of the newborn was cannulated, using a 20 gauge peripheral venous catheter and a 0.71 mm guide wire was introduced through this catheter. Using 5 French, 7 French, 9 French, and 11 French central venous catheter kit dilators, staged tracheotomy stoma dilation was performed. By inserting a size 3.0 tracheotomy cannula, PDT was successfully completed in this newborn. This case describes the successful use of PDT for emergency airway management of a newborn with PRS and glossopharyngeal web.

  6. Daptomycin: a novel lipopeptide antibiotic against Gram-positive pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Beiras-Fernandez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Andres Beiras-Fernandez1,*, Ferdinand Vogt1,*, Ralf Sodian1, Florian Weis21Department of Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital Großhadern, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Großhadern, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich, Germany *Andres Beiras-Fernandez and Ferdinand Vogt contributed equally to this paperAbstract: The aim of this review is to summarize the historical background of drug resistance of Gram-positive pathogens as well as to describe in detail the novel lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic aspects are reviewed and the current clinical use of daptomycin is presented. Daptomycin seems to be a reliable drug in the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections, infective right-sided endocarditis, and bacteremia caused by Gram-positive agents. Its unique mechanism of action and its low resistance profile, together with its rapid bactericidal action make it a favorable alternative to vancomycin in multi-drug resistant cocci. The role of daptomycin in the treatment of prosthetic material infections, osteomyelitis, and urogenital infections needs to be evaluated in randomized clinical trials.Keywords: daptomycin, multi-drug resistance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, left-sided endocarditis

  7. Impact of preoperative chronic renal failure on liver transplantation: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung PC

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peter Chi-Ho Chung,1,2 Hsiu-Pin Chen,1,2 Jr-Rung Lin,3,4 Fu-Chao Liu,1,2 Huang-Ping Yu1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 2College of Medicine, 3Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center, 4Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess whether preoperative chronic renal failure (CRF affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. Methods: This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2,931 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the presence or absence of preoperative CRF. Results: The overall estimated survival rate of liver transplantation recipients (LTRs with preoperative CRF was significantly lower than that of patients without preoperative CRF (P=0.0085. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of duration of intensive care unit stay, total hospital stay, bacteremia, postoperative bleeding, and pneumonia during hospitalization. Long-term adverse effects, including cerebrovascular disease and coronary heart disease, were not different between patients with versus without CRF. Conclusion: These findings suggest that LTRs with preoperative CRF have a higher rate of mortality. Keywords: chronic renal failure, cohort study, survival rate, liver transplantation, population-based study

  8. Nuclear DNA as Predictor of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhvantsev, Valery V; Landoni, Giovanni; Grebenchikov, Oleg A; Skripkin, Yuri V; Zabelina, Tatiana S; Zinovkina, Liudmila A; Prikhodko, Anastasia S; Lomivorotov, Vladimir V; Zinovkin, Roman A

    2017-12-01

    To measure the release of plasma nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and to assess the relationship between nuclear DNA level and acute kidney injury occurrence in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Cardiovascular anesthesiology and intensive care unit of a large tertiary-care university hospital. Prospective observational study. Fifty adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Nuclear DNA concentration was measured in the plasma. The relationship between the level of nuclear DNA and the incidence of acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting was investigated. Cardiac surgery leads to significant increase in plasma nuclear DNA with peak levels 12 hours after surgery (median [interquartile range] 7.0 [9.6-22.5] µg/mL). No difference was observed between off-pump and on-pump surgical techniques. Nuclear DNA was the only predictor of acute kidney injury between baseline and early postoperative risk factors. The authors found an increase of nuclear DNA in the plasma of patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting, with a peak after 12 hours and an association of nuclear DNA with postoperative acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A study on the relationship between employee mental health and agility strategic readiness: A case study of Esfahan hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghodrati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether enhancing organizational agility and mental health of staff could increase strategic readiness for crises or not. In this study, descriptive statistics is used to present demographic data of the research, and P-Test is employed for analyzing the data. In addition, to examine research hypotheses, correlation coefficients and descriptive statistics are implemented. Finally, to rank the variables and indicators of the research, Friedman test and for comparison of indicators and components of the research, nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test are used. The proposed study designs a questionnaire and The questionnaire and distributes it among some nurses in obstetrics and anesthesiology department and among supervisors. Cronbach's alpha is also employed for determining the reliability in this study. The results indicate that working conditions as well as employees’ mental health are in good conditions, the employees with higher levels of mental health have higher readiness to deal with potential crises, and the relationship between agility of hospitals and their strategic readiness for dealing with crises is confirmed.

  10. Mobbing Exposure of Anaesthesiology Residents in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Gülnihal; Efe, Esra Mercanoğlu; Bayraktar, Selcan; Şentürk, Sinem; Başeğmez, İrem; Özkumit, Özlem; Kabak, Elmas; Yavaşçaoğlu, Belgin; Bilgin, Hülya

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, psychological problems that are caused by working conditions, like burn out syndrome, are more commonly observed. In our study, we aimed to evaluate mobbing exposure, factors causing mobbing and precautions for mobbing in residency students who are educated in anaesthesiology and reanimation clinics in Turkey. After obtaining consent from the ethics committee, we sent our questionnaires to the secretariats of the departments by postal mail. Completed questionnaires were collected in our department's secretariat blindly and randomly mixed. One hundred and one participants were returned the questionnaires. Data was statistically analysed in SPSS 21.0 software programme. During residency programme, sated to have experienced mobbing one or more time. Interestingly, 5.9% participants complained of physical mobbing. Mobbing exposure was more common in females. The most serious new onset psychosomatic symptoms stated during residency were committing suicide (2%), addiction (16%), severe depression (18%), panic attack (8%), more accidents (7%) and tendency of violence (15%). In mobbing group there was statistically significant dissatisfaction rate. In professions where mobbing is common, incidences of psychiatric diseases and suicide attempts are high are increased. Who are under risk for experiencing mobbing should be noticed carefully to ensure good judgement and problems should be inspected objectively in a detailed manner. Anesthesiology societies and other medical professional societies should establish mobbing committees. Thus, mobbing problems can be resolved and healthy career oppurtunities can be presented to residents.

  11. Optimizing pain control through the use of implantable pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Todoroff

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilfried Ilias1, Boris Todoroff21Dept Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, Academic Teaching Hospital St. John of God, Vienna, Austria; 2Dept. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hospital of St. Vincent, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Intrathecal therapy represents an effective and well established treatment of nonmalignant as well as malignant pain. Devices available include mechanical constant flow pumps as well as electronic variable flow pumps with patient-controlled bolus release. The latter provide faster dose finding, individual pain control, and good acceptance by patients. New technologies such as membrane pumps and rechargeable devices are expected to be developed to clinical perfection. The available drugs for intrathecal therapy are listed according to the polyanalgesic consensus on intrathecal therapy. The integration of remote patient-controlled analgesia into electronic implantable devices, and the peptide analgesic ziconotide, have significantly improved intrathecal therapy. Complications include infections, catheter ruptures or disconnections, catheter granulomas, and technical dysfunctions. Further possibilities for optimizing intrathecal therapy include development of new drugs, drug side effects, catheter and pump technologies, and surgical techniques.Keywords: intrathecal therapy, implantable pumps, morphine pumps, intrathecal drugs, intrathecal catheters, intrathecal pain control

  12. Ketamine: 50 Years of Modulating the Mind

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    Linda Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine was introduced into clinical practice in the 1960s and continues to be both clinically useful and scientifically fascinating. With considerably diverse molecular targets and neurophysiological properties, ketamine’s effects on the central nervous system remain incompletely understood. Investigators have leveraged the unique characteristics of ketamine to explore the invariant, fundamental mechanisms of anesthetic action. Emerging evidence indicates that ketamine-mediated anesthesia may occur via disruption of corticocortical information transfer in a frontal-to-parietal (top down distribution. This proposed mechanism of general anesthesia has since been demonstrated with anesthetics in other pharmacological classes as well. Ketamine remains invaluable to the fields of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, in large part due to its ability to maintain cardiorespiratory stability while providing effective sedation and analgesia. Furthermore, there may be an emerging role for ketamine in treatment of refractory depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. In this article, we review the history of ketamine, its pharmacology, putative mechanisms of action, and current clinical applications.

  13. Job satisfaction among anesthesiologists at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukewe, Ambrose; Fatiregun, Akinola; Oladunjoye, Adeolu O; Oladunjoye, Olubunmi O

    2012-01-01

    We assessed job satisfaction among anesthesiologists at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria and identified elements of job stress and dissatisfaction. A cross-sectional study design was employed; a structured self-administered questionnaire was distributed, which focused on sociodemographic data, rating of job satisfaction, identification of stressors, and work relationships. Out of 55 questionnaires distributed, 46 (83.6%) completed questionnaires were returned. Overall, 27 (58.7%) of the anesthesiologists were satisfied with their job. While 8.7% were very satisfied (grade 5), 6.5% were very dissatisfied (grade 1) with their job. The stressors identified by the respondents were time pressures, long working hours with complaints of insufficient sleep, and employment status. Among the respondents, the medical officers were the most discontented (9 out of 12, 75%), followed by senior registrars (5 out of 9, 56%). A high percentage of participants (54.1%) declared that the one change if implemented that would enhance their job satisfaction was having a definite closing time. Our results showed that despite the demanding nature of anesthesiology as a specialty, many anesthesiologists were contented with their job.

  14. Evaluation of Radiation Exposure Pattern and Radiation Absorbed Dose Resulting from Occupational Exposure of Anesthesiologists to Ionizing Radiation

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    Maghsoudi B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little information is available concerning the radiation exposure of anesthesiologists, and no such data have previously been collected in Iran. This prospective study was performed to determine the amount of radiation exposure of anesthesiologists for the purpose of assessing whether or not dangerous levels of radiation exposures were being reached, and to identify factors that correlate with excessive risk. Participants and Methods: The radiation exposure of all anesthesiology residents and the attending of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during a 3-month period (from June to August 2016 was measured using a film badge with monthly readings. Physicians were divided into two groups: group 1 (the ones assigned to ORs with radiation exposure, and group 2 (the ones assigned to ORs with no or minimal radiation exposure. Results: A total number of 10744 procedures were performed in 3 major university hospitals including 353 cases of pediatric angiography, 251 cases of percutaneous nephrolithotomy, 43 cases of chronic pain palliation and 672 cases of orthopedic surgeries with C-arm application. In all 3 months, there were statistically significant differences in the amount of radiation exposure between the two groups. Conclusion: Anesthesiologists working in the cardiac catheterization laboratory, pain treatment service, orthopedic and urologic ORs are exposed to statistically significantly higher radiation levels compared to their colleagues in other ORs. The radiation exposure to anesthesiologists can rise to high levels; therefore, they should get proper teaching, shielding and periodic evaluations.

  15. Comparison of fluoroscopic Guided Transforaminal Epidural Injections of Steroid and Local Anaesthetic with Conservative Management in Patients with Chronic Lumbar Radiculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nandita; Salaria, Misbah; Salaria, A Q

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lumbar radiculopathy is a common medical problem and the treatment modalities used over years have been many ranging from conservative or symptomatic management to open decompression surgery. This study was aimed at to compare two modalities of treatment, i.e., conservative and lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs). A total of 120 patients of American Society of Anesthesiology class - (a healthy patient or a patient with mild systemic disease) were randomized to two groups. Group C ( n = 60) were managed conservatively with bed rest, analgesics, and physiotherapy. Group T ( n = 60) received lumbar TFESIs with methylprednisolone 40 mg with 2 ml bupivacaine (0.5%). Measurements using visual analog scale (VAS) were taken before treatment and at various time intervals after the start of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference regarding the demographic characteristics of both groups. The VAS scores were less and statistically significant in Group T after 30 min postinjection, at the 2 nd week and after 1 month. Recovery rate of straight leg raise test was found to be 98% in those treated with TFESI. The Group T had significantly better patient satisfaction score and additionally there was drug dose intake reduction before and after the treatment. Patients treated with fluoroscopic-guided TFESI have better pain relief, quality-of-life, and less analgesic requirement than those managed conservatively.

  16. Predicting gangrenous cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Buddensick, Thomas J; Ferdosi, Hamid; Narducci, Dusty Marie; Sautter, Amanda; Setiawan, Lisa; Shaukat, Haroon; Siddique, Mustafa; Sulkowski, Gisela N; Kamangar, Farin; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Gangrenous cholecystitis (GC) is often challenging to treat. The objectives of this study were to determine the accuracy of pre-operative diagnosis, to assess the rate of post-cholecystectomy complications and to assess models to predict GC. A retrospective single-institution review identified patients undergoing a cholecystectomy. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association of variables with GC and to build risk-assessment models. Of 5812 patients undergoing a cholecystectomy, 2219 had acute, 4837 chronic and 351 GC. Surgeons diagnosed GC pre-operatively in only 9% of cases. Patients with GC had more complications, including bile-duct injury, increased estimated blood loss (EBL) and more frequent open cholecystectomies. In unadjusted analyses, variables significantly associated with GC included: age >45 years, male gender, heart rate (HR) >90, white blood cell count (WBC) >13,000/mm(3), gallbladder wall thickening (GBWT) ≥ 4 mm, pericholecystic fluid (PCCF) and American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) >2. In adjusted analyses, age, WBC, GBWT and HR, but not gender, PCCF or ASA remained statistically significant. A 5-point scoring system was created: 0 points gave a 2% probability of GC and 5 points a 63% probability. Using models can improve a diagnosis of GC pre-operatively. A prediction of GC pre-operatively may allow surgeons to be better prepared for a difficult operation. © 2014 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  17. Cost-effectiveness assessment in outpatient sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuaire, G; Theis, D; Fackeure, R; Chevalier, D; Gengler, I

    2018-02-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of outpatient sinonasal surgery in terms of clinical efficacy and control of expenses. A retrospective study was conducted from January 2014 to January 2016. Patients scheduled for outpatient sinonasal surgery were systematically included. Clinical data were extracted from surgical and anesthesiology computer files. The cost accounting methods applied in our institution were used to evaluate logistic and technical costs. The standardized hospital fees rating system based on hospital stay and severity in diagnosis-related groups (Groupes homogènes de séjours: GHS) was used to estimate institutional revenue. Over 2years, 927 outpatient surgical procedures were performed. The crossover rate to conventional hospital admission was 2.9%. In a day-1 telephone interview, 85% of patients were very satisfied with the procedure. All outpatient cases showed significantly lower costs than estimated for conventional management with overnight admission, while hospital revenue did not differ between the two. This study confirmed the efficacy of outpatient surgery in this indication. Lower costs could allow savings for the health system by readjusting the rating for the procedure. More precise assessment of cost-effectiveness will require more fine-grained studies based on micro costing at hospital level and assessment of impact on conventional surgical activity and post-discharge community care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Pedicle subtraction osteotomies (PSO) in the lumbar spine for sagittal deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjano, Pedro; Aebi, Max

    2015-01-01

    The narrow correlation between sagittal alignment parameters and clinical outcomes has been widely established, demonstrating that improper sagittal alignment is a clinical condition that is associated with increased pain and limitations in patients' functional ability. Lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is indicated in the treatment of large sagittal (more than 25° of rigid loss of lordosis) deformities of the lumbar spine or its combination with coronal deformity, especially when they are rigid. Indication should be based on careful assessment of the severity of symptoms, functional impairment, functional expectations of the patient, general clinical condition and surgical and anesthesiological team experience. Risk should be carefully assessed and discussed to obtain appropriate informed consent. Surgical planning includes selection of the safest levels for the upper and lower instrumented vertebra, site of the osteotomy, modality of fixation, and, most importantly angular value of the correction goal (target lumbar lordosis). Failure to adequately obtain the necessary amount of sagittal correction is the most frequent cause of failure and reoperation. PSO is a valuable surgical procedure in correction of severe hypolordosis (=relative kyphosis) in the lumbar spine. It is a demanding procedure for the surgeon, the anesthesiologist and the intensive care team. Although its complication rate is high, it has a substantial positive impact in the quality of life of patients, including the elderly.

  19. Gender-specific issues in traumatic injury and resuscitation: consensus-based recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Kinjal N; Marcolini, Evie G; McCunn, Maureen; Hansoti, Bhakti; Vaca, Federico E; Napolitano, Lena M

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injury remains an unacceptably high contributor to morbidity and mortality rates across the United States. Gender-specific research in trauma and emergency resuscitation has become a rising priority. In concert with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," a consensus-building group consisting of experts in emergency medicine, critical care, traumatology, anesthesiology, and public health convened to generate research recommendations and priority questions to be answered and thus move the field forward. Nominal group technique was used for the consensus-building process and a combination of face-to-face meetings, monthly conference calls, e-mail discussions, and preconference surveys were used to refine the research questions. The resulting research agenda focuses on opportunities to improve patient outcomes by expanding research in sex- and gender-specific emergency care in the field of traumatic injury and resuscitation. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Ultrasound-guided retroclavicular approach infraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper extremity emergency procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftig, Josh; Mantuani, Daniel; Herring, Andrew A; Nagdev, Arun

    2017-05-01

    The America Society of Anesthesiology guidelines recommend multimodal analgesia that combines regional anesthetic techniques with pharmacotherapy to improve peri-procedural pain management and reduce opioid related complications. Commonly performed emergency procedures of the upper extremity such as fracture and dislocation reduction, wound debridement, and abscess incision and drainage are ideal candidates for ultrasound-guided (USG) regional anesthesia of the brachial plexus. However, adoption of regional anesthesia by emergency practitioners has been limited by concerns for potential complications and perceived technical difficulty. The Retroclavicular Approach to The Infraclavicular Region (RAPTIR) is a newly described USG brachial plexus block technique that optimizes sonographic needle visualization as a means of making regional anesthesia of the upper extremity safer and easier to perform. With RAPTIR a single well-visualized injection distant from key anatomic neck and thorax structures provides extensive upper extremity anesthesia, likely reducing the risk of complications such as diaphragm paralysis, central block, nerve injury, vascular puncture, and pneumothorax. Additionally, patient positioning for RAPTIR is well suited for the awake, acutely injured ED patient as the upper extremity remains adducted in a position of comfort at the patient's side. Thus, RAPTIR is a potentially ideal combination of infraclavicular targeting, excellent needle visualization, single injection, safety, comprehensive upper extremity analgesia, rapid performance, and comfortable patient positioning. Herein we present the first description of the RAPTIR utilized in the ED. Our initial experience suggests this is a promising new technique for brachial plexus regional anesthesia in the ED setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.