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Sample records for anesthesia spinal

  1. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Kübra Mehel; Güzel, Is Il; Oskovi, Aslı; Guzel, Ali Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia is a rare and life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is the postdural puncture headache. When severe and persistent headache after spinal anesthesia occur, differential diagnosis can be explored. In this report, we aimed to evaluate a patient with persistent headache following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a 31-year-old woman ,and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma.

  3. Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics and sedation. ... Libyan Journal of Medicine ... evaluated the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, sedpain, and compared them with those of saline infusion.

  4. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

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    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  5. Testing haptic sensations for spinal anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    Having identified key determinants of teaching and learning spinal anesthesia, it was necessary to characterize and render the haptic sensations (feeling of touch) associated with needle insertion in the lower back. The approach used is to match recreated sensations (eg, "pop" through skin or dura mater) with experts\\' perceptions of the equivalent clinical events.

  6. Spinal Anesthesia in a Patient with Scleroderma

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    Fatih Simsek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma, a multisystem connective tissue disease and etiology is still unclear. In the pathogenesis, it is charcterized by increased fibroblast proliferation with activation of immunological mechanisms and accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Patients might have anesthesia-related potential problems because many systems affected and have functional disorders due to accumulation of collagen. For this reason, anesthetic management is extremely important. A careful preoperative evaluation is essential. In this article, we will be discuss in the light of the literature a cachectic 60-year-old female patient who had urethral polyp excision with scleroderma applied spinal anesthesia.

  7. [Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conangla, G; Rodríguez, L; Alonso-Tarrés, C; Avila, A; de la Campa, A G

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a usual commensal of skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, oral cavity and paranasal sinuses. Although it is usually considered to have low virulence, S. salivarius may cause life-threatening infections, particularly endocarditis. On the other hand, bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia is very rare, there being some reported cases caused by S. salivarius, S. mitis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We report a 57 year old man who developed meningitis symptoms within 10 h of an uncomplicated inguinal herniorrhaphy performed during spinal anesthesia. Cerebrospinal cultures grew S. salivarius sensitive to penicillin. The patient was successfully treated with penicillin G and left the hospital without sequelae. In the literature, bacterial meningitis due to S. salivarius is rarely reported. Of the 28 cases, 18 occurred after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or for spinal anesthesia, 5 occurred following a bacteriemia for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or intestinal neoplasia, and the other 5 in patients who had dural defects. We discuss the possible etiological causes of the meningitis due to S. salivarius cases reports. The early recognition of this entity and the aseptic precautions likely to reduce the incidence of infectious complications after lumbar puncture are stressed.

  8. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

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    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  9. Spinal anesthesia in children: A review

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    Anju Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even after a vast safety record, the role of spinal anesthesia (SA as a primary anesthetic technique in children remains contentious and is mainly limited to specialized pediatric centers. It is usually practiced on moribund former preterm infants (<60 weeks post-conception to reduce the incidence of post-operative apnea when compared to general anesthesia (GA. However, there is ample literature to suggest its safety and efficacy for suitable procedures in older children as well. SA in children has many advantages as in adults with an added advantage of minimal cardio-respiratory disturbance. Recently, several reports from animal studies have raised serious concerns regarding the harmful effects of GA on young developing brain. This may further increase the utility of SA in children as it provides all components of balanced anesthesia technique. Also, SA can be an economical option for countries with finite resources. Limited duration of surgical anesthesia in children is one of the major deterrents for its widespread use in them. To overcome this, several additives like epinephrine, clonidine, fentanyl, morphine, neostigmine etc. have been used and found to be effective even in neonates. But, the developing spinal cord may also be vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, though this has not been systematically evaluated in children. So, adjuvants and drugs with widest therapeutic index should be preferred in children. Despite its widespread use, incidence of side-effects is low and permanent neurological sequalae have not been reported with SA. Literature yields encouraging results regarding its safety and efficacy. Technical skills and constant vigilance of experienced anesthesia providers is indispensable to achieve good results with this technique.

  10. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Spinal Anesthesia with Marcaine

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    S.M.R. Rabani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The efficacy of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL in the treatment of renal stones has been proven in its indications. The main method of anesthesia in this procedure is general anesthesia. We used spinal anesthesia (SA as an alternative method of anesthesia with many benefits. This study was intended to show the possibility of SA as a more comfortable method of anesthesia for the surgeon , the anesthesiologist and the patient via more cooperation of the patient during changing the position and prevention of some complications mostly in upper extremities and neck. Materials & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial study, a total of 112 patients underwent PCNL under SA with marcaine , from Nov 2004 till Feb 2009. Their mean age was 36 years (22-48, at first the syringe was stained by epinephrine and then 2 -3.5 ml marcaine was used for SA and addition of analgesics , sedatives or both., if needed. The rest of the procedure was done as routine.Results: Stone clearance was achieved in 82% of the patients and the rest were managed by ESWL. The mean operation time was 126 minutes (90-220, 36% of the patients needed sedation, analgesia, or both, specially those with bigger stones. 6% of the patients had upper pole stones .Blood transfusion was needed only in one patient. No significant complication was observed in this study.Conclusion: PCNL under SA afforded the surgeon and the anesthesiologist the opportunity of more patient cooperation during position changes and precludes some morbidities that may happen under general anesthesia because the patient is awake and able to portend.

  11. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

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    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  12. Lack of effect of spinal anesthesia on drug metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, E.; Wood, A.J.; Shay, S.; Wood, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of spinal anesthesia on drug disposition was determined in six dogs with chronically implanted vascular catheters using propranolol as a model compound. On the first study day, 40 mg of unlabeled propranolol and 200 microCi of [3H]propranolol were injected into the portal and femoral veins respectively. Arterial blood samples were taken for 4 hr for measurement of plasma concentrations of labeled and unlabeled propranolol by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and of [3H]propranolol by liquid scintillation counting of the HPLC eluant corresponding to each propranolol peak. Twenty-four hr later, spinal anesthesia was induced with tetracaine (mean dose 20.7 +/- 0.6 mg) with low sacral to midthoracic levels and the propranolol infusions and sampling were then repeated. Spinal anesthesia had no significant effect on either the intrinsic clearance of propranolol (2.01 +/- 0.75 L/min before and 1.9 +/- 0.7 L/min during spinal anesthesia), or on mean hepatic plasma flow (2.01 +/- 0.5 L/min before and 1.93 +/- 0.5 L/min during spinal anesthesia). The systemic clearance and elimination half-life of propranolol were also unchanged by spinal anesthesia (0.9 +/- 0.23 L/min on the first day, 0.7 +/- 0.1 L/min during spinal anesthesia; and 101 +/- 21 min on the first day, 115 +/- 16 min during spinal anesthesia, respectively). The volume of distribution (Vd) of propranolol was similarly unaffected by spinal anesthesia

  13. Correlation of bupivacaine 0.5% dose and conversion from spinal anesthesia to general anesthesia in cesarean sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seljogi, D; Wolff, A P; Scheffer, G J; van Geffen, G J; Bruhn, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Failed spinal anesthesia for cesarean sections may require conversion to general anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administered spinal bupivacaine dose for performing a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia was related to the conversion rate to general

  14. [YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgar, Serkan; Selvi, Onur; Serifsoy, Talat Ercan; Senturk, Ozgur; Ozer, Zeliha

    Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1) evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2) was designed for evaluating patient information. After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p>0.05). Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87±4.28 vs. 5.84±2.90, p=0.044 and 3.89±5.43 vs. 1.19±3.35, p=0.01 respectively). Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia

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    Serkan Tulgar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. Material and method A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1 evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2 was designed for evaluating patient information. Results After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p > 0.05. There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p > 0.05. Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87 ± 4.28 vs. 5.84 ± 2.90, p = 0.044 and 3.89 ± 5.43 vs. 1.19 ± 3.35, p = 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions.

  16. [A case of conversion disorder (hysteria) after spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Makino, Shiho; Doi, Yumiko; Nishimura, Mitsuo; Baba, Miwa; Mizukawa, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Yoji

    2009-02-01

    We report a case of conversion disorder after spinal anesthesia. A 16-year-old healthy woman underwent arthroscopic surgery under spinal anesthesia. She showed tremor all over and it did not stop. We sedated her with propofol during the operation. After the operation, her involuntary tremble continued. We consulted with a pediatrician who diagnosed her as conversion disorder. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were performed to rule out some pathological changes and abnormality in her head. As a result, Rathke cleft cyst was suspected but it could not explain this episode. We consider that her stress for the operation under spinal anesthesia caused this episode. In a case of a younger patient, it is necessary to consider mental support. And we need to suspect conversion disorder when we see tremor during operation under regional anesthesia.

  17. Total spinal anesthesia in an achondroplasic patient: case report

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    Amiri H R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total spinal anesthesia is a complication of lumbar epidural anesthesia following undiagnosed subarachnoid or subdural injection of local anesthetic. Although many achondroplastic dwarfs have a normal spine, catheter insertion may be more problematic with a narrow epidural space making a subarachnoid tap more probable.  Other malformations associated with achondroplasia, such as prolapsed intervertebral discs, reduced interpedicular distance, shortened pedicles, and osteophyte formation, combined with a narrow epidural space may make identification of the space difficult and increases the risk of dural puncture. Furthermore, subarachnoid tap or dural puncture may be hard to recognize if a free flow of CSF is difficult to achieve due spinal stenosis. Yet, for those who meet the criteria, epidural regional anesthesia is frequently preferred over other forms, which often have more or more dangerous side effects in this type of patient.Case report: A 22-year-old achondroplastic male dwarf patient was scheduled for pelvic mass resection and was considered a candidate for continuous epidural anesthesia. The anesthesia became complicated by total spinal anesthesia, which was reversed following supportive management for about two hours.Conclusion: There is significant debate over the composition and volume of the test dose, especially for patients with achondroplasia. We nevertheless recommend repeated test-doses during the accomplishment of epidural anesthesia to exclude unintended intravascular, intrathecal or subdural injection, keeping in mind that a test dose of local anesthetic does not completely prevent complications.

  18. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; De Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Lee, Katherine; Sheppard, Suzette; Hartmann, Penelope; Ragg, Philip; Backstrom, Marie; Costi, David; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Knottenbelt, Graham; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mameli, Leila; Giribaldi, Gaia; Prato, Alessio Pini; Mattioli, Girolamo; Wolfler, Andrea; Izzo, Francesca; Sonzogni, Valter; Van Gool, Jose T D G; Numan, Sandra C.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Hagenaars, J. H M; Absalom, Anthony R.; Hoekstra, Frouckje M.; Volkers, Martin J.; Furue, Koto; Gaudreault, Josee; Berde, Charles; Soriano, Sulpicio; Young, Vanessa; Sethna, Navil; Kovatsis, Pete; Cravero, Joseph P.; Bellinger, David; Marmor, Jacki; Lynn, Anne; Ivanova, Iskra; Hunyady, Agnes; Verma, Shilpa; Polaner, David; Thomas, Joss; Meuller, Martin; Haret, Denisa; Szmuk, Peter; Steiner, Jeffery; Kravitz, Brian; Suresh, Santhanam; Hays, Stephen R.; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Williams, Robert K.; Bell, Graham T.; Dorris, Liam; Adey, Claire; Bagshaw, Oliver; Chisakuta, Anthony; Eissa, Ayman; Stoddart, Peter; Davis, Annette; Myles, Paul; Wolf, Andy; McIntosh, Neil; Carlin, John; Leslie, Kate; De Lima, Jonathan; Hammer, Greg; Field, David; Gebski, Val; Tibboel, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  19. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  20. [Spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia in the surgical treatment of inguinal hernia. Cost-effectiveness analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ordóñez, M; Tenías, J M; Picazo-Yeste, J

    2014-05-01

    To compare the costs related to the clinical effectiveness of general anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in inguinal hernioplasty ambulatory surgery. An observational, retrospective cohort study measurement and analysis of cost-effectiveness, in the ambulatory surgery unit of a general hospital. All patients over 18 years of age diagnosed with primary inguinal hernia and scheduled for unilateral hernioplasty between January 2010 and December 2011 were included. Duration of anesthetic induction, length of stay in both the operating room, and in the post-anesthesia care unit, the anesthetic effectiveness (the incidence of adverse effects and the patient's comfort level), and variable economic costs associated with the use of drugs, as well as the use of human resources, were compared. The final analysis included 218 patients, 87.2% male, with a mean age of 53 years (range: 18-85 years). Of these, 139 (63.76%) received subarachnoid anesthesia and 79,(36.2%) general anesthesia. The length of time a patient remained in the post-anesthesia care unit was 337.6±160.2min in the subarachnoid anesthesia group, and 210.0±97.5min for the general anesthesia group (P<.001). Costs of drugs for general anesthesia were higher than that for subarachnoid anesthesia (86.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±7.2). The total cost difference between the 2 techniques was €115.8 more for subarachnoid anesthesia (P<.001). Both techniques showed similar effectiveness. The overall costs for subarachnoid anesthesia were greater than for the general. The cost-effectiveness of general anesthesia is better for outpatient inguinal hernia repair surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Vittorio; Zanconato, Giovanni; Lonati, Gisella; Baggio, Silvia; Gottin, Leonardo; Polati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia is an infrequent occurrence in the obstetric population. Nevertheless, it is a potentially life-threatening complication. In the majority of the cases, the first clinical symptom associated with intracranial subdural bleeding is severe headache, but the clinical course may have different presentations. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with an acute intracranial subdural hematoma shortly after spinal anesthe...

  2. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia in achondroplastic dwarf for femur surgery

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    Rochana Girish Bakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia is the commonest form of short-limbed dwarfism and occurs in 1:26,000- 40,000 live births. This is an autosomal dominant disorder with abnormal endochondral ossification whereas periosteal and intramembranous ossification are normal. The basic abnormality is a disturbance of cartilage formation mainly at the epiphyseal growth plates and at the base of the skull. The anesthetic management of achondroplastic dwarfs is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Both regional as well as general anesthesia have their individual risks and consequences. We report a case of an achondroplastic dwarf in whom combined spinal epidural anesthesia was used for fixation of a fractured femur. The patient had undergone previous femur surgery under general anesthesia since he had been informed that spinal anesthesia could be very problematic. There was no technical difficulty encountered during the procedure and an adequate level was achieved with low-dose local anesthetics without any problem. Postoperative pain relief was offered for three consecutive postoperative days using epidural tramadol. We discuss the anesthetic issues and highlight the role of combined spinal epidural anesthesia with low-dose local anesthetics in this patient. This approach also helped in early ambulation and postoperative pain relief.

  3. Dexmedetomidine for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia

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    Burhanettin Usta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on shivering during spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Sixty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged 18-50 years, scheduled for elective minor surgical operations under spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine, were enrolled. They were administered saline (group C, n = 30 or dexmedetomidine (group D, n = 30. Motor block was assessed using a Modified Bromage Scale. The presence of shivering was assessed by a blinded observer after the completion of subarachnoid drug injection. RESULTS: Hypothermia was observed in 21 patients (70% in group D and in 20 patients (66.7% in group C (p = 0.781. Three patients (10% in group D and 17 patients (56.7% in group C experienced shivering (p = 0.001. The intensity of shivering was lower in group D than in group C (p = 0.001. Time from baseline to onset of shivering was 10 (5-15 min in group D and 15 (5-45 min in group C (p = 0.207. CONCLUSION: Dexmedetomidine infusion in the perioperative period significantly reduced shivering associated with spinal anesthesia during minor surgical procedures without any major adverse effect during the perioperative period. Therefore, we conclude that dexmedetomidine infusion is an effective drug for preventing shivering and providing sedation in patients during spinal anesthesia.

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis after spinal anesthesia: case report

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    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare but serious complication after spinal anesthesia. It is often related to the presence of predisposing factors, such as pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive use, and malignancies. Headache is the most common symptom. We describe a case of a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia and had postoperative headache complicated with CVT. Case report Male patient, 30 years old, ASA 1, who underwent uneventful arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anesthesia. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, the patient showed frontal, orthostatic headache that improved when positioned supine. Diagnosis of sinusitis was made in the general emergency room, and he received symptomatic medication. In subsequent days, the headache worsened with holocranial location and with little improvement in the supine position. The patient presented with left hemiplegia followed by tonic-clonic seizures. He underwent magnetic resonance venography; diagnosed with CVT. Analysis of procoagulant factors identified the presence of lupus anticoagulant antibody. The patient received anticonvulsants and anticoagulants and was discharged on the eighth day without sequelae. Discussion Any patient presenting with postural headache after spinal anesthesia, which intensifies after a plateau, loses its orthostatic characteristic or become too long, should undergo imaging tests to rule out more serious complications, such as CVT. The loss of cerebrospinal fluid leads to dilation and venous stasis that, coupled with the traction caused by the upright position, can lead to CVT in some patients with prothrombotic conditions.

  5. Dexmedetomidine for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Burhanettin; Gozdemir, Muhammet; Demircioglu, Ruveyda Irem; Muslu, Bunyamin; Sert, Huseyin; Yaldiz, Adnan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on shivering during spinal anesthesia. Sixty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged 18-50 years), scheduled for elective minor surgical operations under spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine, were enrolled. They were administered saline (group C, n = 30) or dexmedetomidine (group D, n = 30). Motor block was assessed using a Modified Bromage Scale. The presence of shivering was assessed by a blinded observer after the completion of subarachnoid drug injection. Hypothermia was observed in 21 patients (70%) in group D and in 20 patients (66.7%) in group C (p = 0.781). Three patients (10%) in group D and 17 patients (56.7%) in group C experienced shivering (p = 0.001). The intensity of shivering was lower in group D than in group C (p = 0.001). Time from baseline to onset of shivering was 10 (5-15) min in group D and 15 (5-45) min in group C (p = 0.207). Dexmedetomidine infusion in the perioperative period significantly reduced shivering associated with spinal anesthesia during minor surgical procedures without any major adverse effect during the perioperative period. Therefore, we conclude that dexmedetomidine infusion is an effective drug for preventing shivering and providing sedation in patients during spinal anesthesia.

  6. [Cerebral venous thrombosis after spinal anesthesia: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisinotto, Flora Margarida Barra; Dezena, Roberto Alexandre; Abud, Tania Mara Vilela; Martins, Laura Bisinotto

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare, but serious complication after spinal anesthesia. It is often related to the presence of predisposing factors, such as pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive use, and malignancies. Headache is the most common symptom. We describe a case of a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia who had postoperative headache complicated with CVT. Male patient, 30 years old, ASA 1, who underwent uneventful arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anesthesia. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, the patient showed frontal, orthostatic headache that improved when positioned supine. Diagnosis of sinusitis was made in the general emergency room, and he received symptomatic medication. In subsequent days, the headache worsened with holocranial location and with little improvement in the supine position. The patient presented with left hemiplegia followed by tonic-clonic seizures. He underwent magnetic resonance venography; diagnosed with CVT. Analysis of procoagulant factors identified the presence of lupus anticoagulant antibody. The patient received anticonvulsants and anticoagulants and was discharged eight days without sequelae. Any patient presenting with postural headache after spinal anesthesia, which intensifies after a plateau, loses its orthostatic characteristic or become too long, should undergo imaging tests to rule out more serious complications, such as CVT. The loss of cerebrospinal fluid leads to dilation and venous stasis that, coupled with the traction caused by the upright position, can lead to TVC in some patients with prothrombotic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  8. Comparison of the effects and complications of unilateral spinal anesthesia versus standard spinal anesthesia in lower-limb orthopedic surgery

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    Seyyed Mostafa Moosavi Tekye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A restricted sympathetic block during spinal anesthesia may minimize hemodynamic changes. This prospective randomized study compared unilateral and bilateral spinal anesthesia with respect to the intra- and postoperative advantages and complications of each technique. Material and methods: Spinal anesthesia was induced with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and a 25-G Quincke needle (Dr. J in two groups of patients with physical status ASA I-II who had been admitted for orthopedic surgeries. In group A, dural puncture was performed with the patient in a seated position using 2.5 cm3 of hyperbaric bupivacaine. Each patient was then placed in the supine position. In group B, dural puncture was performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position with 1.5 cm3 of hyperbaric bupivacaine. The lower limb was the target limb. The speed of injection was 1 mL/30 s, and the duration of time spent in the lateral decubitus position was 20 min. Results: The demographic data were similar in both groups. The time to the onset of the sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in group A (p = 0.00. The duration of motor and sensory block was shorter in group B (p < 0.05. The success rate for unilateral spinal anesthesia in group B was 94.45%. In two patients, the spinal block spread to the non-dependent side. The incidence of complications (nausea, headache, and hypotension was lower in group B (p = 0.02. Conclusion: When unilateral spinal anesthesia was performed using a low-dose, low-volume and low-flow injection technique, it provides adequate sensory-motor block and helps to achieve stable hemodynamic parameters during orthopedic surgery on a lower limb. Patients were more satisfied with this technique as opposed to the conventional approach. Furthermore, this technique avoids unnecessary paralysis on the non-operated side.

  9. Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine Alleviates Shivering during Cesarean Delivery under Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liang; Xu, Jun-Mei; Liu, Su-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Li, Xin; Zhu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Shivering associated with spinal anesthesia during Cesarean delivery is an uncomfortable experience for the parturient, which may also cause adverse effects. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we sought to evaluate the effect of intrathecal dexmedetomidine, administered as an adjunct to hyperbaric bupivacaine for Cesarean delivery, on the incidence and severity of shivering associated with spinal anesthesia. Patients undergoing Cesarean delivery were randomly allocated to three groups of 30 patients each. Experimental treatments were added to hyperbaric bupivacaine as follows: Patients in group I (control) were administered isotonic saline. Patients in groups II and III received dexmedetomidine (2.5, 5 µg, respectively), mixed with isotonic saline. Shivering was observed in 11, 10 and 2 patients in groups I, II and III, respectively. The incidence of shivering in group III was significantly lower than that in groups I (p=0.005) and II (p=0.01). The severity of shivering was significantly different between the three groups (p=0.01). There were no significant inter-group differences with respect to mean arterial pressure and heart rate at any time point after administration of intrathecal local anesthesia (p>0.05). Intrathecal dexmedetomidine (5 µg) administered as an adjunct to hyperbaric bupivacaine during Cesarean delivery significantly reduced the incidence and intensity of shivering associated with spinal anesthesia.

  10. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

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    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  11. [Foot drop: an iatrogenic complication of spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Vipin Kumar; Mathur, Vijay

    2018-01-16

    Foot drop in postoperative period is very rare after spinal anesthesia. Early clinical assessment and diagnostic interventions is of prime importance to establish the etiology and to start appropriate management. Close follow-up is warranted in early postoperative period in cases when patient complain paresthesia or pain during needle insertion or drug injection. A 22-year-old male was undergone lower limb orthopedic surgery in spinal anesthesia. During shifting from postoperative ward footdrop was suspected during routine assessment of regression of spinal level. Immediately the patient was referred to a neurologist and magnetic resonance imaging was done, which was inconclusive. Conservative management was started and nerve conduction study was done on the 4th postoperative day that confirmed pure motor neuropathy of right peroneal nerve. Patient was discharged with ankle splint and physiotherapy after slight improvement in motor power (2/5). Foot drop is very rare after spinal anesthesia. Any suspected patient must undergo emergent neurological consultation and magnetic resonance imaging to exclude major finding and need for early surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

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    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB versus spinal anesthesia (SA in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001 and at discharge (P < 0.001 in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001, with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients.

  13. Prophylactic vs. therapeutic magnesium sulfate for shivering during spinal anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim T.; Megalla, Soheir A.; Khalifa, Omyma Sh.M.; salah El Deen, Hala M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Shivering is one of the most common complications of neuraxial blockade. Some patients find shivering sensation worse than surgical pain. Therefore, both prevention and treatment of established shivering should be regarded as clinically relevant intervention in the perioperative period. The aim of our study is to compare the efficacy of magnesium sulfate when used for prevention or treatment of shivering following spinal anesthesia. Methods: In this prospective, double blind,...

  14. General Versus Spinal Anesthesia: Which is a Risk Factor for Octogenarian Hip Fracture Repair Patients?

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    Yi-Ju Shih

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: General anesthesia increased the risk of postoperative morbidity in octogenarian patients after hip fracture repair, and patients with preexisting respiratory diseases were especially vulnerable. Spinal anesthesia is strongly recommended in such individuals.

  15. Intravenous dex medetomidine or propofol adjuvant to spinal anesthesia in total knee replacement surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlOweidi, A.S.; Al-Mustafa, M.M.; Alghanem, S.M.; Qudaisat, Y.; Halaweh, S.A.; Massad, I.M.; Al Ajlouni, J.M; Mas'ad, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effect of intravenous dex medetomidine with the intravenous propofol adjuvant to spinal intrathecal anesthesia on the duration of spinal anesthesia and hemodynamic parameters during total knee replacement surgery. Supplementation of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexemedetomidine or propofol produces good sedation levels without significant clinical hemodynamic changes. Adding dex medetomidine produces significantly longer sensory and motor block than propofol . (authors).

  16. Spinal anesthesia with diphenhydramine and pheniramine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chu, Chin-Chen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Li, Zong-Ying; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2011-12-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effects of pheniramine and diphenhydramine, two histamine H₁ receptor antagonists, on spinal anesthesia and their comparison with lidocaine, a commonly used local anesthetic. After rats were injected intrathecally with diphenhydramine and pheniramine, the dose-response curves were obtained. The potency and duration of diphenhydramine and pheniramine on spinal anesthesia were compared with lidocaine. We showed that diphenhydramine and pheniramine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED₅₀) basis, the rank of potency of drugs was diphenhydramine=pheniramine>lidocaine (ppheniramine or lidocaine (ppheniramine or lidocaine, elicited longer duration of sensory block than that of motor block at the same dose of 1.75 μmol. These preclinical data reported that diphenhydramine with a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade demonstrated more potent and longer-lasting spinal blockades, compared with pheniramine or lidocaine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair under spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia: a randomized prospective study

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    Donmez T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Turgut Donmez,1 Vuslat Muslu Erdem,2 Oguzhan Sunamak,3 Duygu Ayfer Erdem,2 Huseyin Imam Avaroglu1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Lutfiye Nuri Burat State Hospital, 3Department of General Surgery, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Background: Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP inguinal hernia repair is a well-known approach to inguinal hernia repair that is usually performed under general anesthesia (GA. To date, no reports compare the efficacy of spinal anesthesia (SA with that of GA for laparoscopic hernia repairs. The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcome of TEP inguinal hernia repair performed when the patient was treated under SA with that performed under GA. Materials and methods: Between July 2015 and July 2016, 50 patients were prospectively randomized to either the GA TEP group (Group I or the SA TEP group (Group II. Propofol, fentanyl, rocuronium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg and fentanyl (10 µg were used for SA to achieve a sensorial level of T3. Intraoperative events related to SA, operative and anesthesia times, postoperative complications, and pain scores were recorded. Each patient was asked to evaluate the anesthetic technique by using a direct questionnaire filled in 3 months after the operation. Results: All the procedures were completed by the allocated method of anesthesia as there were no conversions from SA to GA. Pain was significantly less for 1 h (P<0.0001 and 4 h (P=0.002 after the procedure for the SA and GA groups, respectively. There was no difference between the two groups regarding complications, hospital stay, recovery, or surgery time. Generally, patients were more satisfied with SA than GA (P<0.020. Conclusion: TEP inguinal hernia repair can be safely performed under SA, and SA was associated with less postoperative pain, better recovery, and better

  18. Is it possible to predict hypotension during onset of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Haarmark, Christian; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2009-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of various predictors of hypotension during onset of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: 32 ASA physical status I, II, and III patients, aged >or=60 years, scheduled for elective lower limb surgery...... with spinal anesthesia. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received spinal anesthesia with 10-17.5 mg of bupivacaine. No prophylactic ephedrine or fluid preloading was used. MEASUREMENTS: A 5-minute baseline was recorded and during onset of spinal anesthesia, hemodynamic changes were measured every 10 seconds from...

  19. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  20. Epidural anesthesia as a cause of acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklar, E.M.L.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Post, M.J.D.; Montalvo, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Six patients with acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts secondary to epidural anesthesia were evaluated with MR imaging (seven patients) and intraoperative US (three patients). The cysts were located in the lower cervical and thoracic spine. Adhesions and irregularity of the cord surface were frequently noted. Associated intramedullary lesions, including intramedullary cysts and myelomalacia, were seen in two of the patients. Arachnoiditis was unsuspected clinically in three patients, and MR imaging proved to be the diagnostic examination that first suggested the cause of the patients symptoms. The underlying mechanism for the formation of these cysts is a chemically induced arachnoiditis

  1. The Study of Oral Clonidine Effect in Duration of Spinal Anesthesia with Lidocaine and Its Complications

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    M. Baalbaki

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available There are many kinds of intervention to prolong the duration of spinal anesthesia which one of them is preoperation oral drugs. The purpose of this study was determination of clonidine effects in duration of spinal anesthesia and its complications. This study was a double - blinded randomized controlled clinical trial in 40-60 years old males of Mobasher and Ekbatan hospitals in Hamadan. In this study there were 40 cases candidated for spinal anesthesia and we divided them to 2 groups i.e. test and control then the results were recorded on questionnaire sheets. The test cases were prescribed 0.2 mg clonidine P.O. preoperatively and their duration of spinal anesthesia prolonged 11 minutes averagely and decreased its complications related to control prescribed placebo. Hence , the result showed preparation oral clonidine prolongs the duration of spinal anesthesia and decreases its complications like hypotention , nausea and vomiting.

  2. The relationship between preoperative anxiety levels and vasovagal incidents during the administration of spinal anesthesia

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    Mürsel Ekinci

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: It was aimed to investigate the relationship between preoperative anxiety and vasovagal symptoms observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery in the perianal and inguinal regions. Methods: The study included patients with planned surgery for inguinal hernia repair, anal fissure, hemorrhoid and pilonidal sinus excision. The study included a total of 210 patients of ASA I-II, aged 18-65 years. Patients were evaluated in respect of demographic characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption, ASA grade and educational level. Correlations were evaluated between the number of attempts at spinal anesthesia and anesthesia history with vasovagal symptoms and educational level, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption and anesthesia history with anxiety scores. The instant (transient state anxiety inventory part of the Transient State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (State Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI was used to determine the anxiety levels of the participants. Clinical findings of peripheral vasodilation, hypotension, bradycardia and asystole observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia were recorded. Results: Vasovagal incidences during the administration of spinal anesthesia were seen to increase in cases of high anxiety score, male gender, and an absence of anesthesia history. Educational level and the number of spinal needle punctures were not found to have any effect on vasovagal incidents. Conclusion: The determination of causes triggering vasovagal incidents seen during the application of spinal anesthesia, better patient information of regional anesthesia implementations and anxiety relief with preoperative anxiolytic treatment will help to eliminate potential vasovagal incidents.

  3. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under continuous spinal anesthesia in a patient with Steinert's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Mariana; Santos, Angela dos; Lages, Neusa; Correia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Steinert's disease is an intrinsic disorder of the muscle with multisystem manifestations. Myotonia may affect any muscle group, is elicited by several factors and drugs used in general anesthesia like hypnotics, sedatives and opioids. Although some authors recommend the use of regional anesthesia or combined anesthesia with low doses of opioids, the safest anesthetic technique still has to be established. We performed a continuous spinal anesthesia in a patient with Steinert's disea...

  4. Cost analysis of spinal and general anesthesia for the surgical treatment of lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar spine surgery is typically performed under general anesthesia, although spinal anesthesia can also be used. Given the prevalence of lumbar spine surgery, small differences in cost between the two anesthetic techniques have the potential to make a large impact on overall healthcare costs. We sought to perform a cost comparison analysis of spinal versus general anesthesia for lumbar spine operations. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective cohort study was performed from 2009-2012 on consecutive patients undergoing non-instrumented, elective lumbar spine surgery for spondylosis by a single surgeon. Each patient was evaluated for both types of anesthesia, with the decision for anesthetic method being made based on a combination of physical status, anatomical considerations, and ultimately a consensus agreement between patient, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups. Operating room costs were calculated whilst blinded to clinical outcomes and reported in percentage difference. General anesthesia (n=319) and spinal anesthesia (n=81) patients had significantly different median operative times of 175 ± 39.08 and 158 ± 32.75 minutes, respectively (p<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Operating room costs were 10.33% higher for general anesthesia compared to spinal anesthesia (p=0.003, Mann-Whitney U test). Complications of spinal anesthesia included excessive movement (n=1), failed spinal attempt (n=3), intraoperative conversion to general anesthesia (n=2), and a high spinal level (n=1). In conclusion, spinal anesthesia can be performed safely in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. It has the potential to reduce operative times, costs, and possibly, complications. Further prospective evaluation will help to validate these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas before and during spinal anesthesia for application of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, H.D.; Knocke, T.H.; Poetter, R.; Gustorff, B.; Vaupel, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To date, no information is available concerning the impact of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the influence of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas. Patients and Methods: In ten patients with cervical carcinoma who received spinal anesthesia for a first application of brachytherapy, intratumoral pO 2 measurements (pO 2 histography system, Eppendorf-Netheler-Hinz, Hamburg, Germany) were performed. Systemic parameters were documented prior to and during spinal anesthesia. Patients breathed room air spontaneously. For further evaluation, all intratumoral pO 2 values were pooled, and overall median pO 2 values and fractions of hypoxic pO 2 values ≤ 5 mm Hg were calculated. Overall median pO 2 values in the subcutis were also calculated. Results: There were no significant changes of systemic parameters, median subcutaneous pO 2 values, median intratumoral pO 2 values, and the fractions of hypoxic pO 2 values ≤ 5 mm Hg in the tumor upon administration of spinal anesthesia. The variability of measured pO 2 values increased during spinal anesthesia, although substantial changes in the oxygenation status were only seen in individual cases (n = 2). Conclusion: This study shows for the first time that the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas, in general, is not influenced by spinal anesthesia prior to application of brachytherapy. To conclude, the data presented suggest that reliable pO 2 measurements can be performed under spinal anesthesia. At the same time, since no substantial changes in tumor oxygenation were observed, spinal anesthesia should not affect the O 2 -related efficacy of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. (orig.)

  6. Safety Aspects of Postanesthesia Care Unit Discharge without Motor Function Assessment after Spinal Anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) discharge without observation of lower limb motor function after spinal anesthesia has been suggested to signifcantly reduce PACU stay and enhance resource optimization and early rehabilitation but without enough data to allow clinical recommendations...

  7. Continuous spinal anesthesia versus combined spinal epidural block for major orthopedic surgery: prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: In major orthopedic surgery of the lower limbs, continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE are safe and reliable anesthesia methods. In this prospective randomized clinical study, the blockading properties and side effects of CSA were compared with single interspace CSE, among patients scheduled for major hip or knee surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective clinical study conducted at the Institute for Regional Anesthesia, Hospital de Base, São José do Rio Preto. METHODS: 240 patients scheduled for hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty or femoral fracture treatment were randomly assigned to receive either CSA or CSE. Blockades were performed in the lateral position at the L3-L4 interspace. Puncture success, technical difficulties, paresthesia, highest level of sensory and motor blockade, need for complementary doses of local anesthetic, degree of technical difficulties, cardiocirculatory changes and postdural puncture headache (PDPH were recorded. At the end of the surgery, the catheter was removed and cerebrospinal fluid leakage was evaluated. RESULTS: Seven patients were excluded (three CSA and four CSE. There was significantly lower incidence of paresthesia in the CSE group. The resultant sensory blockade level was significantly higher with CSE. Complete motor blockade occurred in 110 CSA patients and in 109 CSE patients. Arterial hypotension was observed significantly more often in the CSE group. PDPH was observed in two patients of each group. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that both CSA and CSE provided good surgical conditions with low incidence of complications. The sensory blockade level and hemodynamic changes were lower with CSA.

  8. [The relationship between preoperative anxiety levels and vasovagal incidents during the administration of spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Mürsel; Gölboyu, Birzat Emre; Dülgeroğlu, Onur; Aksun, Murat; Baysal, Pınar Karaca; Çelik, Erkan Cem; Yeksan, Ayşe Nur

    It was aimed to investigate the relationship between preoperative anxiety and vasovagal symptoms observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery in the perianal and inguinal regions. The study included patients with planned surgery for inguinal hernia repair, anal fissure, hemorrhoid and pilonidal sinus excision. The study included a total of 210 patients of ASA I-II, aged 18-65 years. Patients were evaluated in respect of demographic characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption, ASA grade and educational level. Correlations were evaluated between the number of attempts at spinal anesthesia and anesthesia history with vasovagal symptoms and educational level, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption and anesthesia history with anxiety scores. The instant (transient) state anxiety inventory part of the Transient State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (State Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI) was used to determine the anxiety levels of the participants. Clinical findings of peripheral vasodilation, hypotension, bradycardia and asystole observed during the administration of spinal anesthesia were recorded. Vasovagal incidences during the administration of spinal anesthesia were seen to increase in cases of high anxiety score, male gender, and an absence of anesthesia history. Educational level and the number of spinal needle punctures were not found to have any effect on vasovagal incidents. The determination of causes triggering vasovagal incidents seen during the application of spinal anesthesia, better patient information of regional anesthesia implementations and anxiety relief with preoperative anxiolytic treatment will help to eliminate potential vasovagal incidents. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative apnea in former preterm infants: prospective comparison of spinal and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welborn, L G; Rice, L J; Hannallah, R S; Broadman, L M; Ruttimann, U E; Fink, R

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-six former preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair were studied. All were less than or equal to 51 weeks postconceptual age at the time of operation. Patients were randomly assigned to receive general or spinal anesthesia. Group 1 patients received general inhalational anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade. Group 2 patients received spinal anesthesia using 1% tetracaine 0.4-0.6 mg/kg in conjunction with an equal volume of 10% dextrose and 0.02 ml epinephrine 1:1000. In the first part of the study, infants randomized to receive spinal anesthesia also received sedation with im ketamine 1-2 mg/kg prior to placement of the spinal anesthetic (group 2 A). The remainder of group 2 patients did not receive sedation (group 2 B). Respiratory pattern and heart rate were monitored using an impedance pneumograph for at least 12 h postoperatively. Tracings were analyzed for evidence of apnea, periodic breathing and/or bradycardia by a pulmonologist unaware of the anesthetic technique utilized. None of the patients who received spinal anesthesia without ketamine sedation developed postoperative bradycardia, prolonged apnea, or periodic breathing. Eight of nine infants (89%) who received spinal anesthesia and adjunct intraoperative sedation with ketamine developed prolonged apnea with bradycardia. Two of the eight infants had no prior history of apnea. Five of the 16 patients (31%) who received general anesthesia developed prolonged apnea with bradycardia. Two of these five infants had no prior history of apnea. When infants with no prior history of apnea were analyzed separately, there was no statistically significant increased incidence of apnea in children receiving general versus spinal anesthesia with or without ketamine sedation. Because of the small numbers of patients studied, and the multiple factors that may influence the incidence of postoperative apnea (e.g., prior history of neonatal apnea), standard postoperative respiratory monitoring of these high

  10. Unanticipated cardiac arrest under spinal anesthesia: An unavoidable mystery with review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anita; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amrinder

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during anesthesia and perioperative period is a matter of grave concern for any anesthesiologist. But such mishaps have been reported for one reason or the other in the literary sciences. We are reporting the occurrence of unanticipated delayed cardiac arrest following spinal anesthesia in two young and healthy patients. Fortunately, these patients were successfully resuscitated with timely and appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures. Occurrence of such cases needs timely reporting and exploring all the possible causes of these unusual and possibly avoidable events. The present case reports are an important addition to a series of recently published mishaps that occurred during spinal anesthesia in young and healthy patients.

  11. [Rare and severe complication of spinal anesthesia: bacterial meningitis (about a case and literature review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouaib, Naoufal; Jidane, Said; Rafai, Mostafa; Belkouch, Ahmed; Zidouh, Saad; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2017-01-01

    Spinal anesthesia (SA) is the first locoregional anesthesia. It can cause side effects and carry risks that need to be avoided, prevented or treated early. We here report the case of a female patient operated under spinal anesthesia who had intense headache associated with nausea and vomiting evolving in the context of fever within a few days after surgeryLumbar puncture showed cloudy liquid revealing Gram + cocci on direct examination. This allowed the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Patient's evolution was favorable after antibiotic therapy.

  12. A case of late diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia

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    Ali Aygun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial subdural hematoma developing following spinal anesthesia is a rare but serious complication. We describe a case of subdural hematoma developing following spinal anesthesia and diagnosed late.A female patient receiving spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery 45 days prior to arrival at the emergency department presented to our hospital with non-severe headache persisting for 45 days after discharge. Computerized tomography (CT of the brain performed due to long-term persisting headache resistant to medical treatment and a history of spinal intervention revealed a hypodense chronic subdural hematoma in the left frontoparietal area and a shift from left to right in midline structures. The patient was operated and discharged without sequelae on the 7th day postoperatively.Care must be taken over subdural hematoma in the presence of headache after spinal anesthesia persisting despite fluid intake and medical treatment and exceeding 48 h in duration, and diagnosis must not be delayed. Keywords: Spinal anesthesia, Subdural hematoma, Headache

  13. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Under Spinal Anesthesia with Low-Pressure Pneumoperitoneum - Prospective Study of 150 Cases

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    Sunder Goyal

    2012-08-01

    Materials and Methods: In a private rural medical college, 150 patients were selected prospectively for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, under low-pressure (8mmHg pneumoperitoneum and under spinal anesthesia over a span of one and a half years. Injection bupivacaine (0.5% was used for spinal anesthesia. All ports were made in a head-down position to avoid hypotension. Shoulder pain was managed by reassurance as well as by diverting the attention and sedation in a few cases. Results: We successfully performed the operations in 145 patients without major complications. Spinal anesthesia was converted to general anesthesia in five patients due to severe shoulder pain. Age varied between 21 and 75 years. Duration of operation time (skin to skin was between 40 and 80 minutes. Twenty-nine patients complained of right shoulder pain. Most of them were managed by reassurance from the anesthetist and a few needed an injection of fentanyl along with midazolam. Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum is feasible and safe under spinal anesthesia. Incidence of postoperative shoulder pain and complications are comparable with laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(4.000: 224-228

  14. Does Spinal Analgesia have Advantage over General Anesthesia for Achieving Success in In-Vitro Fertilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaamoo, Shahrzad; Azmoodeh, Azra; Yousefshahi, Fardin; Berjis, Katayon; Ahmady, Farahnazsadat; Qods, Kamran; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid

    2014-03-01

    Because of high psychological burden and considerable costs of in-vitro fertilization, it is greatly important to identify all factors that may influence its results. In this study, general anesthesia and spinal analgesia used for oocyte retrieval were compared in terms of success in treating infertility among couples who had undergone in-vitro fertilization at an infertility center in Tehran, Iran. This cohort study that was based on analysis of patient records at Mirza Kochak Khan Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, in 2008-2009. In this study, the status of chemical pregnancy among those who experienced general anesthesia or spinal anesthesia for in-vitro fertilization for the first time were compared, and the possible effects of clinical and laboratory factors using logistic regression models were considered. Considering the number of transferred embryos, underlying cause of infertility and fetus grade, it was found that practicing spinal anesthesia is significantly related to increased chance of chemical pregnancy (adjusted Odds Ratio=2.07; 95% CI: 1.02,4.20; p=0.043). According to analysis of recorded data in an infertility treatment center in Iran, it is recommended to use spinal anesthesia instead of general anesthesia for oocyte retrieval to achieve successful in-vitro fertilization outcome. This can be studied and investigated further via a proper multicentric study in the country.

  15. Efficacy of ondansetron for spinal anesthesia during cesarean section: a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengmao; Zhu, Yu; Bao, Zeqing; Wang, Xianxue; Liu, Qili

    2018-02-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of ondansetron during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Methods We sought randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on ondansetron during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in The Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Science from their inception to September 2016. Results Altogether, 21 RCTs were included in this study. Meta-analysis showed that the ondansetron group had a lower incidence of nausea/vomiting and bradycardia than the placebo group during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia [relative risk (RR) = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.36, 0.51) and RR = 0.45, 95% CI (0.26, 0.80), respectively]. There were no significant differences in the incidences of pruritus, hypotension, or shivering during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia [RR = 0.92, 95% CI (0.83, 1.02); RR = 0.72 (0.50, 1.06), 95% CI (0.50, 1.06); and RR = 0.89, 95% CI (0.71, 1.11), respectively]. Conclusion Ondansetron effectively reduces the incidences of nausea/vomiting and bradycardia under spinal anesthesia during cesarean section.

  16. Combined spinal and general anesthesia is better than general anesthesia alone for laparoscopic hysterectomy

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    Poonam S Ghodki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Spinal anesthesia (SA was combined with general anesthesia (GA for achieving hemodynamic stability in laparoscopic hysterectomy. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of SA combined with GA in maintaining hemodynamic stability in laparoscopic hysterectomy. The secondary outcomes studied were requirement of inhaled anesthetics, vasodilators, and recovery profile. Settings and Design: We conducted a prospective, randomized study in ASAI/II patients posted for laparoscopic hysterectomy, who were willing to participate in the study. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive SA with GA (group SGA or plain GA (group GA. Group SGA received 10 mg bupivacaine (heavy for SA. GA was administered using conventional balanced technique. Maintenance was carried out with nitrous oxide, oxygen, and isoflurane. Comparison of hemodynamic parameters was carried out during creation of pneumoperitoneum and thereafter. Total isoflurane requirement, need of vasodilators, recovery profile, and regression of SA were studied. Statistical analysis used: Descriptive statistics in the form of mean, standard deviation, frequency, and percentages were calculated for interval and categorical variables, respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied for noting significant difference between the two groups, with chi-square tests for categorical variables and post-hoc Bonferroni test for interval variables. Comparison of heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, SPO2, and etCO2 was done with Student′s t-test or Mann-Whitney test, wherever applicable. Results: Patients in group SGA maintained stable and acceptable MAP values throughout pneumoperitoneum. The difference as compared to group GA was statistically significant (P < 0.01. Group GA showed additional requirement of metoprolol (53.33% and higher concentration of isoflurane (P < 0.001 to combat the increased MAP. Recovery was early and quick in group SGA as

  17. Spinal Anesthesia is Associated with Lower Recurrence Rates after Resection of Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpan, Yuri; Jaeger, Melanie; Mizubuti, Glenio Bitencourt; Tanzola, Rob; Jain, Kunal; Hosier, Gregory; Hopman, Wilma; Siemens, D Robert

    2017-11-14

    We sought to determine whether anesthetic type (general vs spinal) would influence cancer recurrence following transurethral resection of bladder tumors. With institutional ethics board approval we examined the electronic medical records of all patients who underwent transurethral bladder tumor resection for nonmuscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer between 2011 and 2013 at a single tertiary care center. Followup information was gathered on all patients in December 2016. The time to first cancer recurrence and the incidence of cancer recurrence were the main outcome measures. A total of 231 patients underwent 1 or more transurethral bladder tumor resections between 2011 and 2013. Of the 231 patients 135 received spinal anesthesia and 96 received general anesthesia. On univariable analysis the 135 patients who received spinal anesthesia had a longer median time to recurrence than the 96 who received general anesthesia (42.1 vs 17.2 months, p = 0.014). As anticipated, adjuvant therapies and risk category were associated with recurrence rates (p = 0.003 and 0.042, respectively). On multivariable analyses incorporating a priori variables of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification and postoperative therapies the patients who received general anesthesia had a higher incidence of recurrence (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.14-3.74, p = 0.017) and an earlier time to recurrence (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.13-2.19, p = 0.008) than those who received spinal anesthesia. Anesthetic type was not associated with cancer progression or overall mortality. Patients who received spinal anesthesia had a lower incidence of recurrence and a delayed time to recurrence following transurethral bladder tumor resection for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. These findings should prompt large-scale prospective studies to confirm this association. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unanticipated cardiac arrest under spinal anesthesia: An unavoidable mystery with review of current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Anita; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amrinder

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during anesthesia and perioperative period is a matter of grave concern for any anesthesiologist. But such mishaps have been reported for one reason or the other in the literary sciences. We are reporting the occurrence of unanticipated delayed cardiac arrest following spinal anesthesia in two young and healthy patients. Fortunately, these patients were successfully resuscitated with timely and appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures. Occurrence of such cases needs t...

  19. Sympathovagal effects of spinal anesthesia assessed by the spontaneous cardiac baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratadour, P; Viale, J P; Parlow, J; Sagnard, P; Counioux, H; Bagou, G; Annat, G; Hughson, R; Quintin, L

    1997-12-01

    The changes in sympathovagal balance induced by spinal anesthesia remain controversial. The spontaneous baroreflex method allows the continuous assessment of the spontaneous engagement of the cardiac baroreflex, giving an index of sympathovagal balance. The purpose of this study was to follow the effects of spinal anesthesia on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Continuous electrocardiogram and noninvasive blood pressure were recorded in 24 patients scheduled for elective inguinal hernia repair and randomly assigned to three groups: (1) no volume loading, (2) volume loading of 15 ml/kg lactated Ringer's solution, and (3) continuous infusion of etilefrine (an ephedrine-like drug). Each patient was studied before, during, and after bupivacaine-induced spinal anesthesia (mean sensory block: T4). Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and parameters of time-domain analysis of heart rate variability were calculated from 30 min of recording of each period. No significant change in spontaneous baroreflex slope or parameters of time-domain analysis were observed after regional anesthesia in any group. However, three patients experienced episodes of bradycardia and hypotension in the absence of a high block; these three patients showed an increase in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and time-domain parameters. Using a noninvasive, continuous technique to estimate cardiac sympathovagal balance, no significant variation in autonomic balance induced by spinal anesthesia was observed. However, untoward episodes of bradycardia and hypotension occurred in three patients, who could not be prospectively identified by the parameters studied.

  20. A Comparison of Satisfaction; Spinal versus General Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, S. A.; Siddique, S.; Meo, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the patients satisfaction with spinal and general anesthesia after cesarean section at CMH Lahore. Study Design: Randomized controlled trials. Study Setting: The study was conducted at the department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology combined military Hospital, Lahore, for 6 months from July to Dec 2011. Patients and Methods: Total 70 patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two groups of 35 each using random numbers table. All patients between ages of 20-40 years admitted for elective cesarean section and presented for following up at day 5-7 who never had any type of anesthesia in the past. There included in the study patients with complaints of migraine, low backaches, positive history or any other medical disorder were excluded from the study. Results: A total number of patients included were 70. Out of these selected patients, 35 procedures were carried out under spinal anesthesia and 35 under general anesthesia. Insignificant difference was found in satisfaction level of both the groups (p=0.220). There is significant difference for the future choice between two groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Spinal anesthesia provides equal satisfaction for patients of cesarean section than general anesthesia. (author)

  1. Effects of prophylactic ondansetron on spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Zheng, G; Han, J; Wang, Y; Zheng, J

    2015-11-01

    A range of strategies including physical interventions, intravenous fluids and vasopressor drugs have been used to minimize or prevent spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension. Recent studies suggest that ondansetron, a commonly used antiemetic, also affects hypotension. This systematic review investigated the effects of prophylactic ondansetron on hemodynamic changes following spinal anesthesia. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library databases and www.clinicaltrials.gov were searched for randomized controlled trials studying the effects of ondansetron on hemodynamic changes induced by spinal anesthesia. The primary outcome was hypotension. Relative risk (RR) or mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were used to analyze outcomes. Ten randomized controlled trials with 863 patients were included in the analysis. Prophylactic ondansetron reduced the incidence of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension in both obstetric and non-obstetric patients. The RR of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension after ondansetron administration was 0.53 (95% CI 0.32 to 0.86) in obstetric patients and 0.16 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.51) in non-obstetric patients. There was significant heterogeneity among obstetric studies (I(2) = 71%). Ondansetron also reduced the incidence of bradycardia, nausea and vomiting after spinal anesthesia with RRs of 0.27 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.47), 0.24 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.42) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.08 to 3.08), respectively. The doses of ephedrine and phenylephrine required to treat hypotension were reduced by ondansetron with mean differences of -2.35 mg (95% CI -4.14 to -0.55 mg) and -31.16 μg (95% CI -57.46 to -4.87 μg), respectively. This review suggests that prophylactic ondansetron reduces the incidence of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension and vasopressor consumption in both obstetric and non-obstetric patients. In addition, ondansetron can also reduce related adverse outcomes such as bradycardia, nausea and vomiting. However, given the relatively large

  2. Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: Case report and review of literature

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    Uma Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH is a rare but serious complication of spinal anesthesia. We report a case of intracranial SDH in a patient developing 11 days after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. The patient complained of headache on the 2nd post-operative day that was relieved by analgesics, bed rest and hydration. Later she presented with severe headache, vomiting, dizziness, dysarthria, irritability and somnolence. Diagnosis of the left sided SDH was confirmed radiologically and treated surgically. The patient recovered completely. The report highlights the need of considering the possibility of SDH in patients when postdural puncture headache is prolonged or recurs after a headache free period with neurological symptoms.

  3. [Effect of video-based education on anxiety and satisfaction of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Meltem; Kose, Isil; Zinzircioglu, Ciler; Karaman, Yucel; Tekgul, Zeki Tuncel; Pektas, Sinan; Balik, Yelda; Gonullu, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Pervin Sutas

    2018-04-07

    Providing sufficient information during a preanesthetic interview may help improve patient understanding and decrease anxiety related to spinal anesthesia. We investigated the effect of video-based education on anxiety and satisfaction in patients about to undergo spinal anesthesia. A total of 198 patients scheduled for minor elective surgery under spinal anesthesia were prospectively enrolled. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/Trait) questionnaires and visual analog scale were used to measure anxiety levels before the standard anesthesia evaluation was initiated. Then, 100 patients in Group 1 received written, verbal, and video-based education, whereas 98 patients in Group 2 received only written and verbal instructions regarding spinal anesthesia. Then all participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State and visual analog scale to evaluate anxiety. Finally, a 5-point Likert scale was used to measure satisfaction during postoperative period. No differences were found in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/Trait, or visual analog scale scores between the two groups before the information period. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory/State scores evaluating anxiety during the post-information period were differed in both groups and they found as 36.5±10.0 in Group 1 and 39.6±8.6 in Group 2 (p=0.033). The 5-point Likert scale scores to measure satisfaction were stated as 4.5±0.6 in Group 1 and 3.5±1.2 in Group 2 (p<0.001). Providing video-based information during the preanesthetic interview alleviated anxiety and increased satisfaction in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  4. Hypotension after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: identification of risk factors using an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenck, F; Hartmann, B; Katzer, C; Obaid, R; Brüggmann, D; Benson, M; Röhrig, R; Junger, A

    2009-04-01

    To determine risk factors for developing hypotension after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section to prevent obstetric patients from hypotensive episodes potentially resulting in intrauterine malperfusion and endangering the child. The data from 503 women, having received spinal anesthesia for cesarean sections were investigated using online gathered vital signs and specially checked manual entries employing an anesthesia information management system. Blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were measured throughout and hypotension was defined as either a drop in mean arterial blood pressure of >20% from baseline value or readings of <90 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure. Thirty-two variables were studied for association with hypotensive episodes using univariate analysis and logistic regression employing a forward stepwise algorithm to identify independent variables (P < 0.05). Hypotension was found in 284 cases (56.5%). The univariate analysis identified the neonate's weight, mother's age, body mass index, and peak sensory block height associated with hypotension. Body mass index, age and sensory block height were detected as independent factors for hypotension (odds-ratio: 1.61 each). Knowledge of these risk factors should increase the anesthesiologist's attention to decide for the necessity to employ prophylactic or therapeutic techniques or drugs to prevent the neonate from any risk resulting of hypotension of the mother.

  5. Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  6. Spinal anesthesia increases the risk of venous thromboembolism in total arthroplasty: Secondary analysis of a J-PSVT cohort study on anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mashio; Kamei, Masataka; Bito, Seiji; Migita, Kiyoshi; Miyata, Shigeki; Kumagai, Kenji; Abe, Isao; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Nakayama, Yuichiro; Saito, Masanobu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Motokawa, Satoru

    2017-05-01

    Clinical guidance on the choice of anesthetic modality vis-à-vis the risk of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely lacking because of a paucity of recent evidence. A comparative effect of general anesthesia and neuraxial blockade on the perioperative incidence of VTE has not been well-investigated.We compared the effects of different types of anesthetic modalities on the risk of VTE after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA).This is a secondary analysis of the Japanese Study of Prevention and Actual Situation of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Arthroplasty (J-PSVT). Data pertaining to a total of 2162 patients who underwent THA and TKA at 34 hospitals were included in this analysis. We compared the different anesthetic modalities with respect to the incidence of VTE. The composite end-point was asymptomatic/symptomatic deep vein thrombosis detected using scheduled bilateral ultrasonography up to postoperative day (POD) 10 and fatal/non-fatal pulmonary embolism up to POD 10.The study groups were as follows: general anesthesia (n = 646), combined epidural/general anesthesia (n = 1004), epidural anesthesia (n = 87), and spinal anesthesia (n = 425). On multivariate analysis, only spinal anesthesia was associated with a significant increase in the risk of VTE as compared with that associated with general anesthesia. Propensity score-matched analysis for "combined epidural/general anesthesia group" versus "spinal anesthesia group" demonstrated a 48% higher incidence of VTE (relative risk = 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.85) in the latter.Spinal anesthesia was associated with a higher risk of postoperative VTE, as compared with that associated with combined epidural/general anesthesia, in patients undergoing total arthroplasty.

  7. Minidose Bupivacaine – Fentanyl Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section In Preeclamptic Parturients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fatholahzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Spinal anesthesia for cesarean section is associated with a high incidence of hypotension. The synergism between intrathecal opioids and local anesthetics may make it possible to achieve reliable spinal anesthesia with minimal hypotension using a minidose of local anesthetic. Methods: Forty-four preeclamptic parturients undergoing cesarean section were randomized in two groups of 22 patients. Group A received a spinal anesthetic of bupivacaine 6 mg plus fentanyl 20 µg , and group B received 12 mg bupivacaine. Hypotension was defined as a 30% decrease in systolic and diastolic pressure from baseline. Hypotension was treated with intravenous ephedrine boluses 2.5-5 mg up to maximum 50 mg. Results: All patients had satisfactory anesthesia. Five of 22 patients in group A required ephedrine, a single dose of 5 mg. Seventeen of 22 patients in group B required vasopressor support of blood pressure.The lowest recorded systolic,diastolic and mean blood pressures as fractions of the baseline pressures were 71.2%, 64.5% and 70.3% versus 59.9%, 53.5% and 60.2% respectively for group A versus group B. Conclusion: A “minidose” of 6 mg bupivacaine in combination with 20 µg fentanyl may provide satisfactory spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in the preeclamptic patient. The minidose combination caused dramatically less hypotension than 12 mg bupivacaine and nearly eliminated the need for vasopressor support of blood pressure. 

  8. Postoperative urinary retention after general and spinal anesthesia in orthopedic surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdel aziz Niazi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Urinary retention is more common after spinal than general anesthesia in orthopedic patients. Adding narcotics to the local anesthetics intrathecally causes more incidence of postoperative urinary retention, which may delay patients discharge and transabdominal ultrasonography is a reliable, noninvasive, inexpensive and simple method to measure bladder volume postoperatively.

  9. The addition of lidocaine to bupivacaine does not shorten the duration of spinal anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jon; Husum, Bent; Staffeldt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The duration of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine is often too long for day surgery. A recent study of patients presenting for transurethral surgery suggested that the addition of a small amount of lidocaine to intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine could shorten the duration of the sensory and motor...

  10. Safe spinal anesthesia in a woman with chronic renal failure and placenta previa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit ZencirciKahramanmaras, TurkeyBackground: Chronic renal failure is strongly associated with poor pregnancy outcome. Women dependent on hemodialysis before conception rarely achieve a successful live birth.Case presentation: A 31-year-old multiparous Turkish woman was scheduled for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia at 37 weeks and five days’ gestation because of hemorrhage due to secondary placenta previa. Spinal anesthesia with 8 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine was successfully performed. Invasive blood pressure, central venous pressure, and heart rate were stable during the surgery. The mother returned to regular hemodialysis on the first postoperative day.Conclusion: Pregnancy is uncommon in women with chronic renal failure requiring chronic dialysis. Rates of maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia, anemia, and infection in the pregnant chronic dialysis patient are high. However, our findings suggest that with careful, close, and effective monitoring preoperatively and intraoperatively, spinal anesthesia can be safely performed for cesarean section in patients undergoing hemodialysis.Keywords: chronic renal failure, pregnancy, spinal anesthesia, hemodialysis, placenta previa

  11. A prospective randomized study comparing percutaneous nephrolithotomy under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with percutaneous nephrolithotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Sankhwar, S N; Malik, Anita

    2011-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was executed to compare the surgical parameters and stone clearance in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) versus those who underwent PNL under general anesthesia (GA). Between January 2008 to December 2009, 64 patients with renal calculi were randomized into 2 groups and evaluated for the purpose of this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under CSEA and Group 2 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under GA. The operative time, stone clearance rate, visual pain analog score, mean analgesic dose and mean hospital stay were compared amongst other parameters. The difference between visual pain analog score after the operation and the dose of analgesic requirement was significant on statistical analysis between both groups. PNL under CSEA is as effective and safe as PNL under GA. Patients who undergo PNL under CESA require lesser analgesic dose and have a shorter hospital stay. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

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    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  13. The stress response and anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia for total Hip Replacement in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Tian, Chun; Li, Min; Peng, Ming-Qing; Ma, Kun-Long; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cai, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, some scholars suggested that it is important to keep a stablehemodynamic state and prevent the stress responses in geriatric patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR). We conducted this randomized prospective study to observe anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia and stress response to it in geriatric patients during THR. We compared the effect of unilateral spinal and bilateral spinal on inhibition of stress response through measuring Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and cortisol (CORT). Plasma concentrations of NE, E and CORT were determined in blood samples using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) at three time points: To (prior to anesthesia) T1 (at the time point of skin closure), T2 (twenty-four hours after the operation). Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (unilateral spinal anesthesia) and group B (conventional bilateral spinal anesthesia). 7.5tymg of hypobaric bupivacaine were injected into subarachnoid cavity at group A and 12mg hypobaric bupivacaine were given at group B. The onset time of sensory and motor block, loss of pinprick sensation, degree of motor block, regression of sensory and motor blocks and hemodynamic changes were also recorded. These data were used to evaluate anesthetic potency of spinal anesthesia. The results of this experiment show that unilateral spinal anesthesia can provide restriction of sensory and motor block, minimize the incidence of hypotension and prevent the stress responses undergoing THR. It is optimal anesthesia procedure for geriatric patients by rapid subarachnoid injection of small doses of bupivacaine.

  14. Exposure to intermittent nociceptive stimulation under pentobarbital anesthesia disrupts spinal cord function in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Brianne C.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Hudson, Kara L.; Grau, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Spinal cord plasticity can be assessed in spinal rats using an instrumental learning paradigm in which subjects learn an instrumental response, hindlimb flexion, to minimize shock exposure. Prior exposure to uncontrollable intermittent stimulation blocks learning in spinal rats but has no effect if given before spinal transection, suggesting that supraspinal systems modulate nociceptive input to the spinal cord, rendering it less susceptible to the detrimental consequences of uncontrollable stimulation. Objective The present study examines whether disrupting brain function with pentobarbital blocks descending inhibitory systems that normally modulate nociceptive input, making the spinal cord more sensitive to the adverse effect of uncontrollable intermittent stimulation. Materials and methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats received uncontrollable intermittent stimulation during pentobarbital anesthesia after (experiment 1) or before (experiment 2) spinal cord transection. They were then tested for instrumental learning at a later time point. Experiment 3 examined whether these manipulations affected nociceptive (thermal) thresholds. Results Experiment 1 showed that pentobarbital had no effect on the induction of the learning deficit after spinal cord transection. Experiment 2 showed that intact rats anesthetized during uncontrollable intermittent stimulation failed to learn when later transected and tested for instrumental learning. Experiment 3 found that uncontrollable intermittent stimulation induced an antinociception in intact subjects that was blocked by pentobarbital. Conclusions The results suggest a surgical dose of pentobarbital (50 mg/kg) suppresses supraspinal (experiment 2) but not spinal (experiment 1) systems that modulate nociceptive input to the spinal cord by blocking the antinociception that is induced by this input (experiment 3). PMID:17297638

  15. Investigating the Effects of Adding Fentanyl to Bupivacaine in Spinal Anesthesia of Opium-addicted Patients

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    H Satari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinal anesthesia in opium-addicted patients can be associated with many complications. Hence, this study aimed to investigate sensory and motor block characteristics, duration of postoperative analgesia, hemodynamic and side effects by adding Fentanyl to bupivacaine in spinal Anesthesia of opium-addicted patients. Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 60 American society of Anesthesiology (ASA class I and II opium-addicted patients under spinal anesthesia in lower abdominal and lower limb operations were randomly classified into two groups of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine and bupivacaine-fentanyl. Clinical symptoms, side effects, the duration of sensory and motor block, initiation of analgesia requirement and sensory block were assessed. Results: The study results indicated no significant difference between bupivacaine and bupivacaine-fentanyl groups in regard with demographic, side effects, blood pressure and heart rate, though a significant difference was observed in respiratory rate 5min, 10min, 45min, 75min and 90 min after block. Duration of sensory (100.33 to 138.83 and motor block (93.43 to 107.66 and , initiation of analgesia requirement (165.33 to 187.76 was significantly longer in bupivacaine-fentanyl, though initiation of sensory block (8.83 to 4.93 was significantly longer in bupivacaine. Conclusion: Addition of fentanyl to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia increases the duration of sensory and motor block and initiation of analgesia requirement in opium-addicted patients and also decreases initiation of sensory block in these patients.

  16. Effect of phenylephrine vs. ephedrine on frontal lobe oxygenation during caesarean section with spinal anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Visti T; Christensen, Robin; Rokamp, Kim Z

    2014-01-01

    pressure (p = 0.1904) or CO (p = 0.0683) was observed between groups. The two drugs also elicited an equal increase in fetal heart rate (by 19 ± 3 vs. 18 ± 3 bpm; p = 0.744). CONCLUSION: In the choice between phenylephrine and ephedrine for maintenance of blood pressure during caesarean section with spinal...... that is the case for patients exposed to spinal anesthesia is not known. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of phenylephrine vs. ephedrine on ScO2during caesarean section with spinal anesthesia in a single center, open-label parallel-group study with balanced randomization of 24 women (1:1). Secondary aims were...

  17. Cognitive function after spinal or general anesthesia for transurethral prostatectomy in elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, J; van Kleef, J W; Bloem, B R; Zwartendijk, J; Lanser, J B; Brand, R; van der Does, I G; Krul, E J; Elshove, H M; Moll, A C

    1991-06-01

    Cognitive functions in 53 elderly men who underwent a transurethral prostatectomy were assessed pre-operatively and 4 days and 3 months post-operatively. Thirteen patients had a preference for one particular type of anesthesia, and the remaining 40 were randomly allocated to receive either spinal or general anesthesia. Cognitive function was not different between the groups receiving different types of anesthesia at either time point and did not decrease post-operatively. No pre- or perioperative variable could distinguish the subgroup of patients who had a post-operative decrease of 2 points or more on the Mini-Mental State Examination. No difference in post-operative performance was found in the patient groups with pre-operative Mini-Mental State Examination scores above or under their age-specific norm. It is concluded that neither hospitalization nor the two forms of anesthesia investigated cause a decrease in cognitive function in elderly men.

  18. Comparison of Preemptive Intramuscular and Intravenous Ephedrine for Reduction of Spinal Anesthesia Induced Hypotension during Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Manochehrian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Spinal anesthesia offers many advantages for cesarean section delivery. But one of its disadvantages is higher incidence of hypotension. Comparison of preemptive intramuscular and intravenous ephedrine for reduction of spinal anesthesia induced hypotension during cesarean section was the aim of this study.Materials & Methods: This study was a randomized double blind clinical trial. 76 women candidate for elective cesarean section & A.S.A (class I,II after obtaining an informed patients consent were randomly divided in four groups. Group IM50: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia , 50 mg ephedrine IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 2 ml N/S Iv were injected. Group IV20: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia, 1ml N/S IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 20 mg ephedrine IV were injected. Group IV10: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia, 1ml N/S IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 10 mg ephedrine IV were injected. Group P: 10 minutes before spinal anesthesia, 1ml N/S IM and immediately after spinal anesthesia 2 ml N/S IV were injected (Placebo. In all patients blood pressure and heart rate were measured by Reishter manometer and pulse oximetry device (oxypleth 520 A. after infusion of 500 ml ringer IV, spinal anesthesia was performed in sitting position , using needle number 25 gauge , at L3-L4 or L4-L5 level with 1.5 ml hyperbaric lidocaine 5%. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured every minute for five minutes, also every 5 minutes and after 20 minutes every 10 minutes. Hypotension was defined as decreased blood pressure greather than 25% of baseline blood pressure or systolic blood pressure lower than 90 mmHg , which was treated with 10 mg IV ephedrine . Time and dose of therapeutic ephedrine was recorded. Results: By considering age and baseline blood pressure and heart rate, all patients were similar. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP in IV20 group were

  19. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  20. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants: The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study--Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-07-01

    Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Infants aged 60 weeks or younger, postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorrhaphy, were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born less than 26 weeks gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 h postoperatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Three hundred sixty-three patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall, the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 h) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms; odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.31 to 1.30, P = 0.2133); however, the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 min) was lower in the RA arm (1 vs. 3%; OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.91; P = 0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 min to 12 h) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.41 to 3.33; P = 0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR, 21.87; 95% CI, 4.38 to 109.24), and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy reduces apnea in the early postoperative period. Cardiorespiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants.

  1. Dexmedetomidine versus Nefopam for the management of post-spinal anesthesia shivering: A randomized double-blind controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Saber Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Nefopam is better as compared to dexmedetomidine for control of intraoperative shivering under spinal anesthesia due to its rapid onset, higher response rate, no sedation, lesser hemodynamic alterations, lesser requirements of rescue analgesics and lesser costs.

  2. Intravenous granisetron attenuates hypotension during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery: A double-blind, prospective randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaba, Ahmed A.; Amr, Yasser M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of intravenous (IV) granisetron in the prevention of hypotension and bradycardia during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery. Material and Methods: A total of 200 parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I was given 1 mg granisetron diluted in 10 ml normal saline slowly IV, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Group II was given 10 ml of normal saline, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded every 3 min until the end of surgery (for 45 min). The total consumption of vasopressors and atropine were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min were also assessed. Results: Serial mean arterial blood pressure and HR values for 45 min after onset of spinal anesthesia were decreased significantly in group II, P cesarean section significantly reduces hypotension, bradycardia and vasopressors usage. PMID:26330710

  3. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a patient with cor triloculare biventriculare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuan; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Sun, Qingchun; Ding, Ke; Han, Liu; Dong, Mengmeng; Xu, Yifan; Ge, Lei

    2017-08-29

    Cor triloculare biventriculare accounts for approximately 0.31% of cases of congenital heart disease (CHD). Moreover, people with cor triloculare biventriculare always have shorter life spans, and cases of gestation are rare. There have been various related reports of cor triloculare biventriculare in recent years. We described an emergency cesarean section of a 30-year-old, 38-weeks-pregnant woman suffering from cardiac insufficiency and fetal distress. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia was performed safely, and a male baby was smoothly delivered 10 min after the procedure without any adverse outcome on the mother or newborn. After surgery, we advised that the patient submit to an echocardiogram examination, which revealed the congenital heart disease cor triloculare biventriculare. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia was administered to a patient with cor triloculare biventricularethis with good effect, ensuring the patient's safety and meeting the need for emergency surgery.

  4. Producing patient-avatar identification in animation video information on spinal anesthesia by different narrative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Vesterby, Martin; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2016-06-01

    Visual approaches to health information reduce complexity and may bridge challenges in health literacy. But the mechanisms and meanings of using animated video in communication with patients undergoing surgery are not well described. By comparing two versions of a two-dimensional animated video on spinal anesthesia, this study tested the patient-avatar identification within two different narrative models. To explore the perspectives of total hip arthroplasty, we employed qualitative methods of interviews and ethnographic observation. The animated presentation of the spinal anesthesia procedure was immediately recognized by all participants as reflecting their experience of the procedure independent of the narrative form. The avatar gender did not affect this identification. We found no preference for either narrative form. This study supports the potential of animation video in health informatics as a didactic model for qualifying patient behavior. Animation video creates a high degree of identification that may work to reduce pre-surgical anxiety. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. The comparison between lateral spinal anesthesia and sitting positions in lower limb vascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohajer MR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Patients who require surgery on the lower extremities are considered to be a high risk group from the point of anesthesia. This study was performed to compare sitting and lateral positions in spinal anesthesia method with hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% for hemodynamic status and analgesic period in patients under vascular surgery of the lower limbs in Imam-Khomeini Hospital Complex affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2009."n "nMethods: In this study 40 patients were divided into two groups of 20 to undergo spinal anesthesia with 3 ml of hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% injected into the subarachnoid space in sitting or lateral positions. The anesthesia was performed at T10 level and the hemodynamic status and analgesic periods were compared in the two groups."n "nResults: The changes in mean arterial blood pressure and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were different between the two groups (P<0.05. Except in the first and thirtieth minutes, the changes in heart rate (HR were significantly different throughout the study between the two groups (P<0.04 and they were higher in sitting position. The duration of analgesia was significantly longer in lateral position (P<0.04 and the use of fluid was significantly larger in the sitting group (P<0.05."n "nConclusion: According to the obtained results, the changes in hemodynamic variables were significantly lower in the group in lateral versus sitting position in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine for vascular surgery of the lower limb.

  6. Spinal anesthesia reduces postoperative delirium in opium dependent patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, O; Matin, N; Heidari, A; Tabatabaie, A; Hadaegh, A; Yazdanynejad, S; Tabatabaie, K

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high spinal anesthesia on postoperative delirium in opium dependent patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study was conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital on a population of 60 opium dependent patients undergoing CABG surgery. Patients were divided into two groups based on anesthesia protocol. One group were given general anesthesia (GA Group), the other group additionally received intrathecal morphine and bupivacaine (SGA Group). Postoperative delirium (POD) was defined as the main outcome of interest. Incidence of POD was significantly higher in patients of GA Group as compared with those in SGA Group (47% and 17% for GA and SGA respectively; P-value = 0.01). Time to extubation was on average 2.2 h shorter in SGA than in GA (7.1 h and 9.3 h respectively, P-value opium dependent patients.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of a virtual reality-based simulator for learning spinal anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-12-27

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of a simulation-based program on the initial performance of dural puncture by medical interns, and to refine the design of simulator-based teaching and competence assessment. DESIGN: Prospective interventional study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: 27 medical interns inexperienced in the technique of spinal anesthesia or dural puncture and within 12 months of graduating from medical school, were randomly assigned to a conventional or a simulator-based teaching course of spinal anesthesia: 13 were recruited to the Conventional Group (CG) and 14 to the Simulator Group (SG). MEASUREMENTS: A SenseGraphic Immersive workbench and a modified Phantom desktop with shutter glasses were used to create a teaching environment. Outcomes of teaching were assessed in two phases within three weeks of the teaching course: Phase I consisted of a written examination followed by assessment on the simulator. A global rating scale and a task-specific checklist were used. Phase II (for those participants for whom a suitable opportunity arose to perform spinal anesthesia under supervision within three wks of the teaching course) consisted of structured observation of clinical performance of the procedure in the operating room. Participants were assessed by independent, study-blinded experts. Student\\'s two-tailed impaired t-tests were used to compare the parametric outcomes (P < 0.05 was considered significant). MAIN RESULTS: All participants completed the written test successfully with no difference between groups. Ten participants from CG and 13 from SG completed the simulator-based testing performing similarly in terms of the global rating scale. Five participants in CG and 6 in SG proceeded to clinical testing. On the global rating scale, interns in SG scored higher than those in CG. They performed similarly according to the task-specific checklist. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, no difference was measured between those taught with

  8. Effects of music listening on cortisol levels and propofol consumption during spinal anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, Stefan; Fuermetz, Julian; Sack, Ulrich; Bauer, Katrin; Hohenadel, Maximilian; Wiegel, Martin; Kaisers, Udo X.; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    Background: This study explores effects of instrumental music on the hormonal system (as indicated by serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone), the immune system (as indicated by immunoglobulin A) and sedative drug requirements during surgery (elective total hip joint replacement under spinal anesthesia with light sedation). This is the first study investigating this issue with a double-blind design using instrumental music. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients (n = 40) were ra...

  9. Effects of Music Listening on Cortisol Levels and Propofol Consumption during Spinal Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, Stefan; Fuermetz, Julian; Sack, Ulrich; Bauer, Katrin; Hohenadel, Maximilian; Wiegel, Martin; Kaisers, Udo X.; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study explores effects of instrumental music on the hormonal system (as indicated by serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone), the immune system (as indicated by immunoglobulin A) and sedative drug requirements during surgery (elective total hip joint replacement under spinal anesthesia with light sedation). This is the first study investigating this issue with a double-blind design using instrumental music. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients (n = 40) were random...

  10. The influence of dexamethasone administration in spinal anesthesia for femur fracture on postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    ŠAKIĆ, LIVIJA; TONKOVIĆ, DINKO; GODAN, BORNA JOSIP; ŠAKIĆ, KATARINA

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cognitive side-effects often complicate postoperative care especially in elderly and fragile patients.The aim of this research is to establish the influence of intrathecal dexamethasone administration in spinal anesthesia with levobupivacaine on postoperative pain, consciousness and values of cortisol levels for patients with femur fracture. Methods: The study is planned as a prospective, interventional, randomized clinical trial. A total of 60 patients ASA2 and...

  11. [Acute rhabdomyolysis after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, P M; Chavagnac, B; Cognet, V; Banssillon, V

    2001-08-01

    We report an observation of acute rhabdomyolysis of gluteus maximum muscles occurring in a non-obese patient installed in supine position that underwent knee arthroscopy under spinal anaesthesia. The patient had insulin-dependent diabetes melitus with documented microangiopathy. The interest of this observation resides in the occurrence of the syndrome after a short period of time (one hour) of installation in the supine position in a patient that did not have any of the generally described risk factors of rhabdomyolysis.

  12. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet medications and spinal axis anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadman, Lynn M

    2005-03-01

    Many individuals use cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (COX-1 and COX-2 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and antiplatelet medications on a regular basis. This is particularly true of the elderly, who are more prone to having osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cardiac disease. Some of these agents alter platelet function and may increase the risk of spinal/epidural hematoma formation if spinal axis anesthesia is utilized without following proper precautions. All anesthesiologists should be familiar with these agents and how they work. More importantly, they should be familiar with the established guidelines set forth by the American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA) [Regional anesthesia in the anticoagulated patient-defining the risk (2002); Reg. Anes. Pain Med. 28 (2003)172], the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI) [Anaesthesiol. Intensivmed. 38 (1997) 623], and the Spanish Consensus Forum [Rev. Esp. Anesthesiol. Reanim. 48 (2001) 270]. This article explains the mechanism of action of each of the medications which alter platelet function, defines the risks of hematoma formation should the medication be inadvertently continued into the perioperative period, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how to manage each class of drug prior to the placement of spinal/epidural blocks.

  13. The Effect of Acupressure on Nausea and Vomiting after Cesarean Section Under Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydar Noroozinia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV is one of the most common postoperative complications. Aside from pharmacological interventions, other complementary healing modalities have been introduced to assist patients in decreasing PONV and improving postoperative outcomes. This study examined acupressure as a safe complement to the more traditional approach of using drugs to prevent and/or relieve nausea and vomiting in the Cesarean section (C/S under spinal anesthesia. In a prospective randomized clinical trial, 152 patients who were candidate for elective C/S under spinal anesthesia were evaluated in two groups (acupressure vs control groups. Subjects in the acupressure group received constant pressure by a specific wrist elastic band (without puncture of the skin on the Nei-Guan acupuncture point, 30 min prior to spinal anesthesia. The incidence of PONV was assessed during the surgery, at recovery room and at 1st, 2nd and 3rd two hours after the surgery. Significant differences in the incidence of the post-operative nausea and vomiting were found between the acupressure and control groups, with a reduction in the incidence rate of nausea from 35.5% to 13.2%. The amount of vomitus and the degree of discomfort were, respectively, less and lower in the study group. In view of the total absence of side-effects in acupressure, its application is worthy. Our study confirmed the effectiveness of acupressure in preventing post-operative nausea and vomiting, when applied 30 minutes prior to surgery

  14. Core Temperature Monitoring in Obstetric Spinal Anesthesia Using an Ingestible Telemetric Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Leon; van Dyk, Dominique; Hofmeyr, Ross; Lombard, Carl J; Dyer, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Perioperative hypothermia may affect maternal and neonatal outcomes after obstetric spinal anesthesia. Core temperature is often poorly monitored during spinal anesthesia, due to the lack of an accurate noninvasive core temperature monitor. The aim of this study was to describe core temperature changes and temperature recovery during spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery. We expected that obstetric spinal anesthesia would be associated with a clinically relevant thermoregulatory insult (core temperature decrease >1.0°C). A descriptive study was conducted in 28 women. An ingestible telemetric temperature sensor was used to record core temperature over time (measured every 10 seconds). The primary outcome was the maximum core temperature decrease after spinal anesthetic injection. The secondary outcomes were lowest absolute core temperature, time to lowest temperature, time to recovery of core temperature, hypothermic exposure (degree-hours below 37.0°C), and the time-weighted hypothermic exposure (median number of degrees below 37.0°C per hour). Basic descriptive statistics, median spline smooth, and integration of the area below the 37.0°C line of the temperature-over-time curve were utilized to analyze the data. Intestinal temperature decreased by a mean (standard deviation) of 1.30°C (0.31); 99% confidence interval (CI), 1.14 to 1.46 after spinal anesthetic injection. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) time to temperature nadir was 0.96 (0.73-1.32) hours (95% CI, 0.88-1.22). Fourteen of the 28 participants experienced intestinal temperatures below 36.0°C after spinal injection. Temperature was monitored for a minimum of 8 hours after spinal injection. In 8 of 28 participants, intestinal temperature did not recover to baseline during the monitored period. A median (IQR) of 4.59 (3.38-5.92) hours (95% CI, 3.45-5.90) was required for recovery to baseline intestinal temperature in the remaining 20 patients. Participants experienced a median (IQR

  15. Comparison of effect of electroacupuncture and nefopam for prevention of postanesthetic shivering in patients undergoing urologic operation under spinal anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Min-Sub

    2016-01-01

    Background Shivering during spinal anesthesia is a frequent complication and is induced by the core-to-peripheral redistribution of heat. Nefopam has minimal side effects and prevents shivering by reducing the shivering threshold. Electroacupuncture is known to prevent shivering by preserving the core body temperature. We compared the efficacies of electroacupuncture and nefopam for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia. Methods Ninety patients scheduled for elective urological surgery under spinal anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly divided into the control group (Group C, n = 30), the electroacupuncture group (Group A, n = 30), and the nefopam group (Group N, n = 30). Groups C and A received 100 ml of isotonic saline intravenously for 30 minutes before spinal anesthesia, while Group N received nefopam (0.15 mg/kg) mixed in 100 ml of isotonic saline. Group A received 30 minutes of electroacupuncture before receiving anesthesia. Shivering scores, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, body temperature and side effects were recorded before, and at 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after spinal anesthesia. Results The incidence of postanesthetic shivering was significantly lower in Group N (10 of 30) and Group A (4 of 30) compared with that in Group C (18 of 30)(P shivering. PMID:27924198

  16. Failed regional anesthesia with reduced spinal bupivacaine dosage in a parturient with achondroplasia presenting for urgent cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRenzo, J S; Vallejo, M C; Ramanathan, S

    2005-04-01

    A 36-year-old patient with a history of previous back surgery, asthma, latex allergy and achondroplasia presented for urgent cesarean delivery at 31 weeks' gestation for worsening nonimmune fetal hydrops. The fetus was diagnosed with trisomy 21 and achondroplasia. Because of the urgent clinical situation, the patient was given a spinal anesthetic, which required supplemental intravenous sedation after delivery of the fetus. This case report discusses the controversies in anesthetic management of this complicated patient and compromised fetus regarding general anesthesia, epidural, spinal and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia.

  17. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes among patients undergoing cesarean section under general and spinal anesthesia: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anıl İçel Saygı

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: As the rates of cesarean births have increased, the type of cesarean anesthesia has gained importance. Here, we aimed to compare the effects of general and spinal anesthesia on maternal and fetal outcomes in term singleton cases undergoing elective cesarean section.DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary-level public hospital.METHODS: Our study was conducted on 100 patients who underwent cesarean section due to elective indications. The patients were randomly divided into general anesthesia (n = 50 and spinal anesthesia (n = 50 groups. The maternal pre and postoperative hematological results, intra and postoperative hemodynamic parameters and perinatal results were compared between the groups.RESULTS: Mean bowel sounds (P = 0.036 and gas discharge time (P = 0.049 were significantly greater and 24th hour hemoglobin difference values (P = 0.001 were higher in the general anesthesia group. The mean hematocrit and hemoglobin values at the 24th hour (P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively, urine volume at the first postoperative hour (P < 0.001 and median Apgar score at the first minute (P < 0.0005 were significantly higher, and the time that elapsed until the first requirement for analgesia was significantly longer (P = 0.042, in the spinal anesthesia group.CONCLUSION: In elective cases, spinal anesthesia is superior to general anesthesia in terms of postoperative comfort. In pregnancies with a risk of fetal distress, it would be appropriate to prefer spinal anesthesia by taking the first minute Apgar score into account.

  18. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic appendectomy in adults: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S Mane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is one of the most common surgical procedures and is the procedure of choice for most of the elective abdominal surgeries performed preferably under endotracheal general anesthesia. Technical advances in the field of laparoscopy have helped to reduce surgical trauma and discomfort, reduce anesthetic requirement resulting in shortened hospital stay. Recently, regional anaesthetic techniques have been found beneficial, especially in patients at a high risk to receive general anesthesia. Herewith we present a case series of laparoscopic appendectomy in eight American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA I and II patients performed under spinal-epidural anaesthesia. Methods: Eight ASA Grade I and II adult patients undergoing elective Laparoscopic appendectomy received Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia. Spinal Anaesthesia was performed at L 2 -L 3 interspace using 2 ml of 0.5% (10 mg hyperbaric Bupivacaine mixed with 0.5ml (25 micrograms of Fentanyl. Epidural catheter was inserted at T 10 -T 11 interspace for inadequate spinal anaesthesia and postoperative pain relief. Perioperative events and operative difficulty were studied. Systemic drugs were administered if patients complained of shoulder pain, abdominal discomfort, nausea or hypotension. Results: Spinal anaesthesia was adequate for surgery with no operative difficulty in all the patients. Intraoperatively, two patients experienced right shoulder pain and received Fentanyl, one patient was given Midazolam for anxiety and two were given Ephedrine for hypotension. The postoperative period was uneventful. Conclusion: Spinal anaesthesia with Hyperbaric Bupivacaine and Fentanyl is adequate and safe for elective laparoscopic appendectomy in healthy patients but careful evaluation of the method is needed particularly in compromised cardio respiratory conditions.

  19. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under spinal anesthesia: comparative study between conventional-dose and low-dose hyperbaric bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imbelloni LE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni1, Raphael Sant'Anna2, Marcos Fornasari2, José Carlos Fialho21Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medecine Nova Esperança, Hospital de Mangabeira, João Pessoa, 2Hospital Rio Laranjeiras, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has the advantages of causing less postoperative pain and requiring a short hospital stay, and therefore is the treatment of choice for cholelithiasis. This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia using hyperbaric bupivacaine given as a conventional dose by lumbar puncture or as a low-dose by thoracic puncture.Methods: A total of 140 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease were randomized to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum under spinal anesthesia using either conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia (hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg and fentanyl 20 mg or low-dose thoracic spinal anesthesia (hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and fentanyl 20 µg. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two treatment groups.Results: All procedures were completed under spinal anesthesia, with no cases needing conversion to general anesthesia. Values for time for block to reach the T3 dermatomal level, duration of motor and sensory block, and hypotensive events were significantly lower with low-dose bupivacaine. Postoperative pain was higher for low-dose hyperbaric bupivacaine at 6 and 12 hours. All patients were discharged after 24 hours. Follow-up 1 week postoperatively showed all patients to be satisfied and to be keen advocates of spinal anesthesia.Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed successfully under spinal anesthesia. A small dose of hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and 20 µg fentanyl provides adequate spinal anesthesia for laparoscopy and, in comparison with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15% and fentanyl 20 µg, causes markedly

  20. Using of spinal-epidural block for multicomponent anesthesias in infants with surgical pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kurochkin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In Ukrainian and foreign literature there are publications about usage of central neuroaxial blocks (spinal or caudal to improve the quality of anesthesia in infants. However, these techniques are used separately in this group of patients as the components of anesthesia and have some imperfections: on the one hand it is the rapid onset of spinal block and a relatively short period of its effect (1.5-2 hours, on the other hand it is slower onset of epidural block, and its more prolonged effect (4-5 hours.One can avoid these imperfections with the help of combined spinal-epidural applications of local anesthetics. Objective. The aim of this investigation was to improve the quality of anesthetic management in infants by optimization of the anesthesia techniques. Materials and Methods. Investigations of central hemodynamics and cortisol levels in the blood were performed in 52 infants operated on for abdominal pathology (congenital disorder of the intestine, Hirschsprung's disease, intussusception, and anomalies of the urinary system (hydronephrosis. The first group consisted of 13 children who received combined endotracheal anesthesia with the use of spinal-epidural block; the 2nd group (control included 39 ataralgesia subjected children. Blood sampling were carried out in three phases - before making the incision, during operation and after it. Method of anesthesia in infants of the first group differed from the method of control group in the following way: after initial narcosis and using ALV 0.5% solution of bupivacaine in the dosage of 2 mg/kg was injected into the epidural space through the sacral canal. Total volume was 1.2 ml/kg. After that 0.5% solution of bupivacaine was injected into the spinal canal in dosage of 0.3-0.4 mg/kg. The skin incision was performed 5 minutes after endolumbar introduction of bupivacaine. Hemodynamics was studied by impedance rheoplethysmography, cortisol level was determined by enzyme immunoassay

  1. Baricity of Bupivacaine on Maternal Hemodynamics after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Simin Atashkhoei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: After spinal anesthesia, patients undergoing cesarean section are more likely to develop hemodynamic changes. The baricity of local anesthetic has an important role on spinal blockade effects. The aim of this study was to compare the isobar and hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% plus fentanyl on maternal hemodynamics after spinal anesthesia for C/S. Methods: In this double-blind study, 84 healthy pregnant women undergoing C/S using bupivacaine 0.5% isobar (study group, n=42 or hyperbaric (control group, n=42 for spinal anesthesia were scheduled. The study was conducted from 21 April 2014 to 21 November 2014 at Al-Zahra Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Parameters such as maternal hemodynamics, block characteristics, side effects, and neonatal Apgar scores were recorded. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software by performing chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, one-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-test, and student’s t test. Results: The incidence of hypotension in the isobar group was lower than the hyperbaric group, although it was not statistically significant (40.47% vs. 61.9%, P=0.08. The duration of hypotension was shorter in the study group (1.6±7.8 min vs. 7.4±12.5 min, P=0.004. The dose of ephedrine was lower in the study group (2.4±6.6 mg vs. 5.3±10.7 mg, P=0.006. The main maternal side effect is sustained hypotension that was seen in 0 patients of the isobar and 7 (16.66% of hyperbaric groups (P=0.006. None of the neonates had Apgar score≤7 at 5 min of delivery (P=1.0. Sensory and motor block duration was shorter in the study group (P=0.01. Conclusion: Isobaric bupivacaine is associated with more hemodynamic stability and shorter sensory and motor blockade in mothers under spinal anesthesia for C/S. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201401287013N7

  2. Comparison of Clonidin, Pethedin and Fentanyl for Post-spinal Anesthesia Shivering in Elective Caesarian Sections

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    F Javaherforoosh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Post operative shivering is a prevalent complication of general and spinal anesthesia. Many drugs were used for prevention and treatment of shivering. The objective of this study was the comparison of clonidin, pethedin and fentanyl for treatment of post spinal anesthesia shivering. Materials & Methods: In this double blind randomized clinical trial, we compared the effects of 3 drug regimens to treat post operative shivering after spinal anesthesia in 60 elective caesarian sections with ASA class 1. Patients were divided into 3 groups (20 patients for each group. Each group received intravenously either pethedin 25 mg, clonidine 30 μg or fentanyl 50 μg. If a patient did not respond to the first dose, the same dose would be repeated up to a total of 3 times (with 5 minute intervals. Homodynamic changes, treatment responses and side effects were recorded. Then the resulting data were analyzed by SPSS software and chi-square test. Results: Considering control of shivering after first injection with pethedin 70%, clonidin 50% and fentanyl 30% with (p=0.04 major side effects in pethedin group were tachycardia 10%, nausea & vomiting 15%. In clonidine group the main side effects were dry mouth & drowsiness (16.7% & 3.3% respectively. Fentanyl group had only 3.3% nausea vomiting accounting for the fewest number of side effects (p< 0.05. Homodynamic was stable in fentanyl & clonidine groups. Conclusion: We concluded that, clonidine offers better thermodynamics along with modest failure rate but pethedin was most effective with more serious side effects.

  3. Prophylactic ketamine to prevent shivering in parturients undergoing Cesarean delivery during spinal anesthesia.

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    Kose, E A; Honca, M; Dal, D; Akinci, S B; Aypar, U

    2013-06-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of ketamine 0.25 mg/kg with ketamine 0.5 mg/kg to prevent shivering in patients undergoing Cesarean delivery. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Operating rooms and postoperative recovery rooms. 120 ASA physical status 1 and 2 pregnant women scheduled for Cesarean delivery during spinal anesthesia. Patient characteristics, anesthetic and surgical details, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, and side effects of the study drugs were recorded. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry, tympanic temperature, severity of shivering, and degree of sedation were recorded before intrathecal injection and thereafter every 5 minutes. Patients were randomized to three groups: saline (Group C, n=30), intravenous (IV) ketamine 0.25 mg/kg (Group K-0.25, n=30), or IV ketamine 0.5 mg/kg (Group K-0.5, n=30). Grade 3 or 4 shivering was treated with IV meperidine 25 mg and the prophylaxis was regarded as ineffective. The number of shivering patients was significantly less in Group K-0.25 and in Group K-0.5 than in Group C (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, respectively). The tympanic temperature values of Group C were lower at all times of the study than in either ketamine group. Median sedation scores of Group K-0.5 were significantly higher than in Group K-0.25 or Group C at 10, 20, 30, and 40 minutes after spinal anesthesia. Prophylactic IV ketamine 0.25 mg/kg was as effective as IV ketamine 0.5 mg/kg in preventing shivering in patients undergoing Cesarean section during spinal anesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing the Effect of Intrathecal Alfentanil in the Quality and Duration of Spinal Anesthesia in Cesarean Section and Side Effects:

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    Abedin Zadeh M.R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The use of neuraxial opioids has gained popularity over the last few years; they may cause analgesia by the local anesthetic through direct binding with the specific spinal receptors. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of intrathecal alfentanil in patients undergoing cesarean section on spinal anesthesia during the operation, and after the operation on spinal anesthesia and side effects.Methods: The study was a randomized prospective and double blind study. 60 young adult females, with ASA physical status I and II with singleton pregnancy undergoing elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to receive spinal elective anesthesia either by using 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 2.5 ml with 0.5 ml normal saline (saline group or with 0.5ml alfentanil (alfentanil group. Blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and side effects were observed before spinal anesthesia and every 5 minutes interval during the surgery, therefore at 30 minute interval until the patient complained of pain. Intraoprative quality of analgesia during spinal anesthesia, time of first feeling of pain (complete analgesia, time of first request of analgesics postoperatively (effective analgesia, side effects (nausea, vomiting, shivering, Purities and fetal outcomes were evaluated and analyzed.Results: It was shown that 90% of patients in alfentanil group had excellent analgesia Intraopratively, while only 16.7% of patients in the saline group had an analgesia which was qualified as excellent (p0/05. Purities were the most common side effect in the alfentanil group (76.7% of patients. Nausea was less present in alfentanil group than in saline group (50% versus 85%. The incidence of shivering and vomiting did not differ between two groups (p>0/05. APGAR scores were similar in both groups (p>0/05.Conclusion: The addition of alfentanil 250 micrograms to hyperbaric bupivacaine 12.5mg for spinal

  5. The duration of spinal anesthesia with 5% lidocaine in chronic opium abusers compared with nonabusers.

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    Vosoughian, Maryam; Dabbagh, Ali; Rajaei, Samira; Maftuh, Hassan

    2007-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that chronic opium abusers have lower thresholds for pain. In this study we sought to determine whether chronic opium abuse has any effect on the duration of spinal block by local anesthetics. In a case-controlled study, 50 opium abusers and 50 nonabusers undergoing lower abdomen operations were selected from among the patients admitted to a university hospital for elective surgery. All patients received 100 mg hyperbaric preservative-free 5% lidocaine in dextrose, intrathecally. The duration of anesthesia was much shorter in the opium abusers (60 +/- 7 min) than in the nonabusers (83 +/- 10 min) (P opium abusers.

  6. Intravenous granisetron attenuates hypotension during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery: A double-blind, prospective randomized controlled study

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    Ahmed A Eldaba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of intravenous (IV granisetron in the prevention of hypotension and bradycardia during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery. Material and Methods: A total of 200 parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I was given 1 mg granisetron diluted in 10 ml normal saline slowly IV, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Group II was given 10 ml of normal saline, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR were recorded every 3 min until the end of surgery (for 45 min. The total consumption of vasopressors and atropine were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min were also assessed. Results: Serial mean arterial blood pressure and HR values for 45 min after onset of spinal anesthesia were decreased significantly in group II, P < 0.0001. The incidence of hypotension after spinal anesthesia was 64% in group II and 3% in group I (P < 0.0001. The total doses of ephedrine (4.07 ± 3.87 mg vs 10.7 ± 8.9 mg, P < 0.0001, phenylephrine (0.0 microg vs 23.2 ± 55.1 microg, P < 0.0001, and atropine (0.0 mg vs 0.35 ± 0.49 mg P < 0.0001 consumed in both the groups respectively, were significantly less in group I versus group II. Conclusion: Premedication with 1 mg IV granisetron before spinal anesthesia in an elective cesarean section significantly reduces hypotension, bradycardia and vasopressors usage.

  7. Effect of cooled hyperbaric bupivacaine on unilateral spinal anesthesia success rate and hemodynamic complications in inguinal hernia surgery.

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    Tomak, Yakup; Erdivanli, Basar; Sen, Ahmet; Bostan, Habib; Budak, Ersel Tan; Pergel, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that cooling hyperbaric bupivacaine from 23 to 5 °C may limit the intrathecal spread of bupivacaine and therefore increase the success rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia and decrease the rate of hemodynamic complications. A hundred patients scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal hernia surgery were randomly allocated to receive 1.8 ml of 0.5 % hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally at either 5 °C (group I, n = 50) or at 23 °C (group II, n = 50). Following spinal block at the L2-3 interspace, the lateral decubitus position was maintained for 15 min. Unilateral spinal anesthesia was assessed and confirmed at 15 and 30 min. The levels of sensory and motor block on the operative side were evaluated until complete resolution. The rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia at 15 and 30 min was significantly higher in group I (p = 0.015 and 0.028, respectively). Hypotensive events and bradycardia were significantly rarer in group I (p = 0.014 and 0.037, respectively). The density and viscosity of the solution at 5 °C was significantly higher than at 23 °C (p bupivacaine to 5 °C increased the density and viscosity of the solution and the success rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia, and decreased the hemodynamic complication rate.

  8. The effect of small dose bupivacaine-fentanyl in spinal anesthesia on hemodynamic nausea and vomiting in cesarean section

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    Seyedhejazi, M.; Madarek, E.

    2007-01-01

    To compare the hemodynamic, nausea and vomiting with small dose bupivacaine-fentanyl spinal anesthetic versus a conventional dose of spinal bupivacaine in parturients undergoing cesarean section. Forty patients aged 17-35 years old which underwent cesarean section were randomized into two groups. Group-A received spinal anesthesia with 8 mg of bupivacaine and 10 microg fentanyl, group B received 12 mg bupivacaine. The mean dose of ephedrine needed was 4mg in group A and 11.75 mg in group B (P=0.006). The mean ratio of lowest systolic pressure to baseline systolic pressure was 0.75 for group A and 0.65 for group B (P=0.04). Nausea and vomiting was observed in 10% of group A versus 20% in group B. Small dose of bupivacaine and fentanyl provides good spinal anesthesia for cesarean section with less hypotension, nausea and vomiting. (author)

  9. Comparison of Butorphanol and Fentanyl for the Relief of Postoperative Shivering Associated with Spinal Anesthesia

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    Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna; Gondi, Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare fentanyl and butorphanol for the relief of postoperative shivering in spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Class I and II patients aged 19–60 years belonging to both sexes who were posted for elective surgical procedures under spinal anesthesia were divided into two groups (fentanyl and butorphanol) and monitored intraoperatively for the occurrence of shivering and time taken to control shivering after administration of fentanyl and butorphanol drugs. Results: Relief of shivering is rapid and more effective with fentanyl than butorphanol. There is a significant increase in pulse rate, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate (RR), and decreased in oxygen saturation at the onset of shivering and also a decrease in core body temperature. Sedation, nausea, vomiting, and recurrence of shivering are more with butorphanol with fentanyl. Conclusion: On the basis of the study, it is concluded that fentanyl is more effective and takes less time to control perioperative shivering as compared to butorphanol. PMID:28298762

  10. Optimization of Spinal Anesthesia for Operative Delivery in High-Weight Women

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    I. P. Zharkov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to develop a scheme for calculating the dose of a local anesthetic (LA for spinal anesthesia (SA during operative delivery, by taking into account the individual physical characteristics of a female patient. Subjects and methods. The course of SA was analyzed in 35 overweight women. In accordance with the body mass index (BMI, the patients were divided into 3 groups. In each group the authors identified subgroups with no arterial hypotension development (NAHD and with arterial hypotension development (AHD until a fetus was extracted. In each specific case, the used dose of a LA was compared with its dose calculated by the height of a patient and the difference between the BMI of a female patient and that taken as the normal value of 25 kg/m2. Results. When the doses of a LA, which were used for SA, were investigated, in all cases the doses of a LA were determined to be smaller than those calculated by the height of a patient. In the NAHD subgroups, the percentage reduction in LA doses was significantly greater than that in the AHD subgroups in all the three groups and the dose was increased as BMI rose from 13.6±1.6% in the NAHD subgroup in Group 1 to 34.7±1.2% in the same subgroup in Group 3. By comparing the percentage reduction in the LA dose and excess BMI, the authors established the correction coefficient for the LA dose calculated by height and derived a formula for calculating the dose of a LA, by taking into account the physical characteristics of a female patient. Conclusion. The LA dose calculation formula considering the individual physical characteristics of a female patient makes the determination of a LA dose more precise in order to optimize the course of anesthesia from the hemodynamic profile. Key words: spinal anesthesia, obesity, cesarean section.

  11. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive

  12. Management of temporary urinary retention after arthroscopic knee surgery in low-dose spinal anesthesia: development of a simple algorithm.

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    Luger, Thomas J; Garoscio, Ivo; Rehder, Peter; Oberladstätter, Jürgen; Voelckel, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    In practice, trauma and orthopedic surgery during spinal anesthesia are often performed with routine urethral catheterization of the bladder to prevent an overdistention of the bladder. However, use of a catheter has inherent risks. Ultrasound examination of the bladder (Bladderscan) can precisely determine the bladder volume. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify parameters indicative of urinary retention after low-dose spinal anesthesia and to develop a simple algorithm for patient care. This prospective pilot study approved by the Ethics Committee enrolled 45 patients after obtaining their written informed consent. Patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery received low-dose spinal anesthesia with 1.4 ml 0.5% bupivacaine at level L3/L4. Bladder volume was measured by urinary bladder scanning at baseline, at the end of surgery and up to 4 h later. The incidence of spontaneous urination versus catheterization was assessed and the relative risk for catheterization was calculated. Mann-Whitney test, chi(2) test with Fischer Exact test and the relative odds ratio were performed as appropriate. *P 300 ml postoperatively had a 6.5-fold greater likelihood for urinary retention. In the management of patients with short-lasting spinal anesthesia for arthroscopic knee surgery we recommend monitoring bladder volume by Bladderscan instead of routine catheterization. Anesthesiologists or nurses under protocol should assess bladder volume preoperatively and at the end of surgery. If bladder volume is >300 ml, catheterization should be performed in the OR. Patients with a bladder volume of 500 ml.

  13. Maternal and Neonatal Effects of Vasopressors Used for Treating Hypotension after Spinal Anesthesia for Caesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Study

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    Alma Soxhuku-Isufi

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Ephedrine and phenylephrine have the same efficacy in treating hypotension after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section. The use of Phenylephrine was associated with better fetal acid-base status, and there were no differences on Apgar score values and on the incidence of maternal bradycardia and hypotension.

  14. The effects of prophylactic bolus phenylephrine on hypotension during low-dose spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

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    Lee, H-M; Kim, S-H; Hwang, B-Y; Yoo, B-W; Koh, W-U; Jang, D-M; Choi, W-J

    2016-02-01

    Continuously infused phenylephrine is frequently used to reduce the incidence of hypotension in women undergoing cesarean section under spinal anesthesia, but less is known about the prophylactic bolus method. We evaluated three prophylactic bolus doses of phenylephrine during low-dose spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. One-hundred-and-eighty-four patients were randomized to receive 0.9% saline 2mL (Control Group) or phenylephrine 1.0μg/kg (PHE1 Group), 1.5μg/kg (PHE1.5 Group), or 2.0μg/kg (PHE2 Group) immediately after induction of combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Maternal blood pressure and heart rate were recorded at 1-min intervals until delivery. Hypotension, defined as systolic blood pressure hypotension resolved. The incidence of nausea, vomiting, bradycardia, and hypertension, as well as Apgar scores and umbilical blood gases, were recorded. The incidence of hypotension was 71.7% (33/46) in the Control Group, 68.9% (31/45) in the PHE1 Group, 37.0% (17/46) in the PHE1.5 Group and 45.7% (21/46) in the PHE2 Group (P=0.001). The total rescue dose of phenylephrine was greater in the Control Group than those in the PHE1.5 Group (Phypotension during low-dose spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety and Efficacy of Dexmedetomidine in Treating Post Spinal Anesthesia Shivering: A Randomized Clinically Controlled Dose-Finding Trial.

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    Abdel-Ghaffar, Hala Saad; Mohamed, Sahar Abd-Elbaky; Fares, Khaled M; Osman, Mohamed Abdel-Kadr

    2016-05-01

    The optimum dose of dexmedetomidine for shivering control with the least hemodynamic derangements is still under research. To compare the efficacy, hemodynamic and side effects of dexmedetomidine in 3 different doses with those of meperidine for the treatment of shivering in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor elective lower abdominal surgery. Prospective double-blind randomized clinically controlled study. University hospital. One hundred twenty patients who developed shivering under spinal anesthesia.On shivering, patients were randomly allocated to receive an intravenous 2 mL bolus dose of meperidine 0.4 mg/kg (meperidine group, n = 30), dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg/kg (DEX I group, n = 30), 0.3 µg/kg (DEX II group, n = 30), or 0.2µg/kg (DEX III group, n = 30). Control of shivering, time taken for cessation of shivering, response rate, recurrence, hemodynamic changes, sedation score, tympanic temperature, and side effects were noted and compared between groups. The groups were comparable regarding demographic profile, tympanic temperature decline, and shivering onset time (P > 0.05). Lower shivering cessation time (P shivering activity was higher in DEX III group (36.7%, P shivering associated with spinal anesthesia with modest hemodynamic and sedation effects. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02382432. Dexmedetomidine, hypothermia, shivering, spinal anesthesia.

  16. THE COMPARISON OF HYPERBARIC BUPIVACAINE AND ROPIVACAINE USAGE IN SPINAL ANESTHESIA AT HIP AND LOWER EXTREMITY SURGERY

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    Aynur sahin

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Ropivacaine and bupivacaine usage in hip and lower extremity surgery may provide hemodynamic stability, therefore we suggest that ropivacaine and bupivacaine are safe to use in spinal anesthesia for this kind of processes. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 36-41

  17. Spinal Anesthesia and Minimal Invasive Laminotomy for Paddle Electrode Placement in Spinal Cord Stimulation: Technical Report and Clinical Results at Long-Term Followup

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    S. Sarubbo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. We arranged a mini-invasive surgical approach for implantation of paddle electrodes for SCS under spinal anesthesia obtaining the best paddle electrode placement and minimizing patients’ discomfort. We describe our technique supported by neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring and clinical results. Methods. 16 patients, affected by neuropathic pain underwent the implantation of paddle electrodes for spinal cord stimulation in lateral decubitus under spinal anesthesia. The paddle was introduced after flavectomy and each patient confirmed the correct distribution of paresthesias induced by intraoperative test stimulation. VAS and patients’ satisfaction rate were recorded during the followup and compared to preoperative values. Results. No patients reported discomfort during the procedure. In all cases, paresthesias coverage of the total painful region was achieved, allowing the best final electrode positioning. At the last followup (mean 36.7 months, 87.5% of the implanted patients had a good rate of satisfaction with a mean VAS score improvement of 70.5%. Conclusions. Spinal cord stimulation under spinal anesthesia allows an optimal positioning of the paddle electrodes without any discomfort for patients or neurosurgeons. The best intraoperative positioning allows a better postoperative control of pain, avoiding the risk of blind placements of the paddle or further surgery for their replacement.

  18. Magnesium sulfate infusion prevents shivering during transurethral prostatectomy with spinal anesthesia: a randomized, double-blinded, controlled study.

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    Gozdemir, Muhammet; Usta, Burhanettin; Demircioglu, Ruveyda Irem; Muslu, Bunyamin; Sert, Huseyin; Karatas, Omer Faruk

    2010-05-01

    To determine whether magnesium sulfate (MgSO(4)) infusion during surgery reduces shivering during spinal anesthesia. Double-blinded placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Operation room of a university hospital. 60 patients, aged 40 to 70 years, scheduled for elective transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) during spinal anesthesia. Subarachnoid anesthesia consisting of hyperbaric bupivacaine three mL 0.5% was injected using a 25-G Quincke spinal needle. Patients received either saline (Group C, n = 30) or MgSO(4) (Group Mg, n = 30). Group Mg received an intravenous (IV) bolus of MgSO(4) 80 mg/kg via syringe pump over a 30-minute period, followed by a two g/hr infusion during the intraoperative period. Group C received an equal volume of saline. Motor blockade was evaluated by Bromage motor scale. Sensory block level was assessed by pinprick test. Shivering was assessed after the completion of subarachnoid drug injection. Side effects were recorded. Hypothermia was observed in all patients (100%) in Group Mg and in 24 patients (80%) in Group C (P = 0.024). The decrease in core temperature in Group Mg was significantly greater (P Shivering was observed in two patients (6.7%) in Group Mg and 20 patients (66.7%) in Group C (P = 0.0001). MgSO(4) infusion in the perioperative period significantly reduced shivering during TURP with spinal anesthesia. MgSO(4) infusion prevents shivering in patients receiving spinal anesthesia but increases the risk of hypothermia. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Changing trends in the management of hypotension following spinal anesthesia in cesarean section

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    J K Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypotension during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia remains a frequent scenario in obstetric practice. A number of factors play a role in altering the incidence and severity of hypotension. Counteracting aortocaval compression does not significantly prevent hypotension in most singleton pregnancies. Intravenous crystalloid pre-hydration is not very efficient. Thus, the focus has changed toward co-hydration and use of colloids. Among vasopressors, phenylephrine is now established as a first line drug, although there is limited data in high-risk patients. Though ephedrine crosses the placenta more than phenylephrine and can possibly cause alterations in the fetal physiology, it has not been shown to affect the fetal Apgar or neurobehavioral scores.

  20. The versatile August Bier (1861-1949), father of spinal anesthesia.

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    Goerig, M; Agarwal, K; Schulte am Esch, J

    2000-11-01

    "A professor is a gentleman with a different point of view." This characteristic and sarcastic statement was often recited by August Bier (1861-1949) and can also be aptly applied to him. As the father of spinal and intravenous regional neural blockade, Bier had a tremendous impact on surgery and anesthesia. It took him only two years to become a senior lecturer in surgery (so-called "Habilitation") under the guidance of Friedrich von Esmarch. In 1899, he was appointed chairman of the Department of Surgery at the University of Greifswald. From there, he moved to the University of Bonn in 1903 and then succeeded Ernst von Bergmann in Berlin in 1907. Bier's interest in the philosophical theories of Hippocrates and Heraclitus had a significant influence on his outlook on medical practice. His surgical colleagues disapproved of this and his interest in homeopathy. On the other hand, he earned much respect as the co-author of a surgical textbook, i.e., Chirurgische Operationslehre (Operative Surgery). He had a remarkable breadth of nonmedical interests, including philosophy and forestry, and the ideas he expressed are viable even today. His publications on philosophical subjects are as up to date as his concepts in forestry. In 1932, Bier finally decided to retire, although by then he was no longer operating. From that time on, he lived out his days at his estate in Sauen, and he died in 1949 at the age of 88. In this paper we describe some previously unknown aspects of Bier's work in both surgery and research; anesthesiologists and their patients are the beneficiaries of two other of his inventions, namely, spinal and IV local anesthesia. Unfortunately, it is not possible to acknowledge all the innovations of this ingenious surgeon, who truly deserved the description "A professor is a gentleman with a different point of view."

  1. Synergistic effect of intrathecal fentanyl and bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for cesarean section

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    Srivastava Pratima

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potentiating the effect of intrathecal local anesthetics by addition of intrathecal opiods for intra-abdominal surgeries is known. In this study by addition of fentanyl we tried to minimize the dose of bupivacaine, thereby reducing the side effects caused by higher doses of intrathecal bupivacaine in cesarean section. Methods Study was performed on 120 cesarean section parturients divided into six groups, identified as B8, B10 and B 12.5 8.10 and 12.5 mg of bupivacaine mg and FB8, FB10 and FB 12.5 received a combination of 12.5 μg intrathecal fentanyl respectively. The parameters taken into consideration were visceral pain, hemodynamic stability, intraoperative sedation, intraoperative and postoperative shivering, and postoperative pain. Results Onset of sensory block to T6 occurred faster with increasing bupivacaine doses in bupivacaine only groups and bupivacaine -fentanyl combination groups. Alone lower concentrations of bupivacaine could not complete removed the visceral pain. Blood pressure declined with the increasing concentration of Bupivacaine and Fentanyl. Incidence of nausea and shivering reduces significantly whereas, the postoperative pain relief and hemodynamics increased by adding fentanyl. Pruritis, maternal respiratory depression and changes in Apgar score of babies do not occur with fentanyl. Conclusion Spinal anesthesia among the neuraxial blocks in obstetric patients needs strict dose calculations because minimal dose changes, complications and side effects arise, providing impetus for this study. Here the synergistic, potentiating effect of fentanyl (an opiod on bupivacaine (a local anesthetic in spinal anesthesia for cesarian section is presented, fentanyl is able to reduce the dose of bupivacaine and therefore its harmful effects.

  2. Effects of Music Listening on Cortisol Levels and Propofol Consumption during Spinal Anesthesia.

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    Koelsch, Stefan; Fuermetz, Julian; Sack, Ulrich; Bauer, Katrin; Hohenadel, Maximilian; Wiegel, Martin; Kaisers, Udo X; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    This study explores effects of instrumental music on the hormonal system (as indicated by serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone), the immune system (as indicated by immunoglobulin A) and sedative drug requirements during surgery (elective total hip joint replacement under spinal anesthesia with light sedation). This is the first study investigating this issue with a double-blind design using instrumental music. Patients (n = 40) were randomly assigned either to a music group (listening to instrumental music), or to a control group (listening to a non-musical placebo stimulus). Both groups listened to the auditory stimulus about 2 h before, and during the entire intra-operative period (during the intra-operative light sedation, subjects were able to respond lethargically to verbal commands). Results indicate that, during surgery, patients of the music group had a lower propofol consumption, and lower cortisol levels, compared to the control group. Our data show that listening to music during surgery under regional anesthesia has effects on cortisol levels (reflecting stress-reducing effects) and reduces sedative requirements to reach light sedation.

  3. Analysis of direct costs of anesthesia-related materials between spinal and venous anesthesia with propofol associated with local perianal block in hemorrhoidectomy

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    Paulo Gustavo Kotze

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus on the ideal anesthesia for hemorrhoidectomy in ambulatory facilities. Spinal anesthesia and venous propofol associated with local perianal block (combined anesthesia are frequently used, and their direct costs may be crucial for the anesthesia type selection. The objective of this study was to compare the direct costs of anesthesia-related materials in hemorrhoidectomy between these two anesthetic techniques.Retrospective and cross-section analysis, comparing the direct costs of the materials of spinal and venous anesthesia with propofol associated with local perianal block, in hemorrhoidectomy. Twenty patients were included, ten submitted to each anesthesia type (five from each gender. The mean age in the spinal anesthesia group was 46.5 years and in the combined anesthesia group, 42.5 years (p=0.334. The mean cost of anesthesia-related materials was R$ 58.50 (R$ 36.48 - R$ 85.79 in the first group versus R$ 190.31 (R$ 98.16 - R$ 358.51 in the second - 69.27% difference between them (pNão há consenso sobre a técnica anestésica de escolha para hemorroidectomias em regime ambulatorial. A raquianestesia e a anestesia combinada (venosa com propofol + local são frequentemente utilizadas, e os custos das mesmas podem ser determinantes na escolha do melhor tipo de anestesia. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar e comparar os custos diretos dos materiais anestésicos utilizados em hemorroidectomias entre essas duas técnicas. Foi feito um estudo retrospectivo e transversal, comparativo entre os custos diretos dos materiais anestésicos entre a raquianestesia e a anestesia venosa com poropofol associada ao bloqueio perianal local, em hemorroidectomias. Foram analisados 20 pacientes, 10 operados com cada técnica anestésica (5 de cada gênero. A média de idade do grupo da raquianestesia foi de 46,5 anos e do grupo da anestesia combinada foi de 42,5 anos (p=0,334. O custo médio do procedimento anestésico no primeiro grupo

  4. Preload versus coload and vasopressor requirement for the prevention of spinal anesthesia induced hypotension in non-obstetric patients

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    Khan, M.U.; Aqil, M.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of preload and coload for the prevention of Spinal Induced Hypotension (SIH) and vasopressor requirements. Study Design: Randomized trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anesthesia, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from June 2007 - June 2010. Methodology: Sixty patients were randomly divided into preload and coload group of 30 each. Patients with ASA1 - 3, aged 20 - 60 years were included. Patients with history of IHD, COPD, BMI > 30 and surgical procedure TURP were excluded. All patients received crystalloid 10 ml/kg before induction of spinal anesthesia in preload group and at the time of spinal anesthesia in coload group. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded at different time intervals till 45 minutes. Patients received ephedrine 5 mg when systolic blood pressure dropped below 90 mmHg and heart rate was less than 60 beats/minute and/or phenylephrine 50 micrograms when systolic blood pressure dropped below 90 mmHg and heart rate was more than 60 beats/minute. Results: There was no statistically significant difference at different time intervals in heart rate, systolic and mean arterial pressure between the groups. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly different in both groups at 6 - 15 minutes after spinal anesthesia. SIH occurred (21) 70% and (15) 50% in preload and coload groups, respectively (p=0.187). Ephedrine requirement for SIH was significantly high in preload group (p=0.017). Phenylephrine requirement for SIH was high in preload group which was statistically non-significant (p=0.285). Conclusion: Coload group has lower incidence of spinal induced hypotension and significantly less vasopressor requirement than the preload group. (author)

  5. Preoperative measurement of maternal abdominal circumference relates the initial sensory block level of spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: An observational study

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    Chi-Hang Kuok

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Parturients with greater abdominal circumference value have a higher level of sensory blockade at 5 minutes after spinal anesthesia. Abdominal circumference cannot predict the maximum sensory blockade level and the incidence of hypotension.

  6. Comparison of Oral Intake Profiles at 2 and 8 Hours following Cesarean Section under Spinal Anesthesia

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    Arbabi Kalati Farshid

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: After cesarean section, practices vary considerably between institutions and individual practitioners, ranging from early oral fluids or food to delayed introduction of oral fluids and food which may be after 24 hours or more. This study was carried out to assess and compare the outcome, length of hospital stay and maternal satisfaction of early (2 hours and late (8 hours postoperative feeding after uncomplicated cesarean section done under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 112 women undertaking uncomplicated cesarean section under regional anesthesia from August 2008 to August 2009 were randomly assigned to early feeding ( 2 hours after operation and late feeding (conventional 8 hours after operation groups. Two groups were compared for the occurrence of postoperative outcome, possible complications, length of hospital stay and patient´s satisfaction. Chi Squared and t-tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was set at P< 0.05.Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data and operation variables between the two groups. No significant differences were noted between the groups regarding post feeding nausea and vomiting, post operative ileus and other complications and duration of hospitalization. Compared with the late postoperative feeding, the early feeding group had a shorter mean time to first flatus (P=0.03 and higher satisfaction rate (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Early feeding (2 hours after uncomplicated cesarean in low-risk woman is associated with higher maternal satisfaction without higher rates of gastrointestinal and non gastrointestinal complications

  7. Influence of the timing of administration of crystalloid on maternal hypotension during spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery: preload versus coload.

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    Oh, Ah-Young; Hwang, Jung-Won; Song, In-Ae; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Jeon, Yeong-Tae; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic fluid preloading before spinal anesthesia has been a routine procedure to prevent maternal hypotension during cesarean delivery. Unlike colloid, timing of infusion of crystalloid may be important because of its short stay in intravascular space. We hypothesized that crystalloid loading just after intrathecal injection compared to preload would be more effective in preventing maternal hypotension. In this prospective controlled study, sixty parturients were randomized to receive 15 ml/kg of crystalloid before (preload group) or after (coload group) intrathecal drug injection for spinal anesthesia. Hypotension was defined if systolic arterial pressure decreased below 80% of baseline and ephedrine was administered to treat hypotension. The incidence of hypotension and the total dose of ephedrine were checked. Blood pressure, heart rate and nausea before childbirth were assessed. Neonatal outcomes were evaluated with Apgar scores and umbilical blood gas analysis. The incidence of hypotension was lower in the coload group compared to the preload group (53% vs. 83%, P = 0.026). The blood pressure showed the bigger drop during spinal anesthesia in the preload group (34 ± 13 vs. 25 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.002) and smaller dose of ephedrine was required in the coload group (7.5 [0-30] vs. 15 [0-40] mg, P = 0.015). The incidence of nausea was also lower in the coload group (27% vs. 60%, P = 0.019). Neonatal outcome measures were comparable between two groups. In case of using crystalloids for cesarean delivery, coload is more effective than preload for the prevention of maternal hypotension after spinal anesthesia. Clinical Research Information Service KCT0000324 (Jan 12(th), 2012).

  8. Norepinephrine versus Ephedrine to Maintain Arterial Blood Pressure during Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery: A Prospective Double-blinded Trial

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    Ali Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed; Selim, Mohamed Foad

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ephedrine was conventionally regarded as the first-choice drug to maintain maternal blood pressure during spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery, due to its stimulant activity on α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Norepinephrine is a weak β-adrenergic and potent α-adrenergic receptor agonist. Therefore, it may be suitable for maintaining blood pressure with less chronotropic effects compared to ephedrine. Patients and Methods: One hundred and forty healthy patients having cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were randomized to Group N (n = 61) who received a prophylactic bolus of norepinephrine 5 μg intravenous (i.v.) at the time of intrathecal block or Group E (n = 61) who received a prophylactic bolus of i.v. ephedrine 10 mg. Rescue i.v. bolus interventions of norepinephrine 5 μg or ephedrine 10 mg were given as required to maintain systolic blood pressure. Maternal and fetal hemodynamic variables, Apgar score, and number of boluses of vasopressors used were recorded. Results: The numbers of maternal hypotension and hypertension episodes and the frequency of bradycardia and tachycardia were significantly lower in Group N compared with Group E (P = 0.02, 0.003, 0.0002, and 0.008, respectively). The number of boluses of vasopressors used was also lower in Group N (P = 0.005). Uterine artery pulsatility index was lower in Group N compared to Group E (P = 0.01) when measured 5 min after spinal anesthesia. Moreover, it was higher at 5 min in Group E when compared with the baseline readings in the same group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Norepinephrine is a suitable and potent drug to counterbalance the hemodynamic effects of spinal anesthesia during cesarean delivery.

  9. ANALYSIS OF MATERNAL AND FETAL OUTCOME IN SPINAL VERSUS EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA FOR CESAREAN DELIVERY IN SEVERE PRE-ECLAMPSIA

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    Jyothi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM Our primary aim is to analyze of maternal and fetal outcome in spinal versus epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery in severe pre-eclampsia. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty parturients (60 with severe pre-eclampsia posted for cesarean section were randomized into two groups of thirty (30 each for either spinal anesthesia that is group S or epidural anesthesia that is group E. Spinal group (group S, n=30 received 10mg (2ml of 0.5% of hyperbaric bupivacaine solution intrathecally in left lateral decubitus or sitting position at L3-4 lumbar space with 25G quincke-babcock spinal needle. Patients received 6l/min of oxygen through Hudson’s face mask throughout the surgery. In Epidural group (group E, n=30, after thorough aseptic precautions, an 18G Tuohy’s epidural needle inserted at the L3-4 lumbar space with the patient in lateral decubitus or sitting position. Three ml of 1.5% lidocaine with was given as a test dose. After ruling out any intrathecal injection of the drug, initially 8ml of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine given and the vitals monitored. Then 3ml top-ups of the same bupivacaine solution is given in a graded manner slowly, simultaneously checking the height of block. A blockade upto T4 to T6 is required. Vitals are carefully monitored and oxygen is provided 6l/min throughout the procedure and surgery. Blood pressure (systolic, mean, diastolic, pulse rate, oxygen saturation are recorded immediately after giving anesthesia, every minute for first 10mins, then every 3mins for the rest of the surgery. Then vitals are also noted post-operatively for the first 24hrs. Apgar score after 1 and 5 minutes, of the newborn baby is also recorded. Other parameters noted were incidence and duration of hypotension or hypertension both intra-operatively and post-operatively, any usage of vasopressors (ephedrine and its dose, convulsions, renal failure, pulmonary edema, requirement for ICU stay and the number of days in the mother, and the incidence of

  10. The Effect of Subcutaneous Ketamine Infiltration on Postoperative Pain in Elective Cesarean Section under Spinal Anesthesia

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    N. Manouchehrian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Appropriate analgesia after cesarean section helps women feel more comfortable and increase the mobility of the mother's and also their ability to take better care of their newborns. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of subcutaneous infiltration of ketamine on postoperative pain reduction and hemodynamic status of patients after elective cesarean section. Materials & Methods: This study was designed as a double blinded prospective, randomized clinical trial and 60 cases of women undergoing elective cesarean section under spinal anes-thesia were randomly assigned into two groups. For 30 cases in the ketamine group, infiltra-tion of subcutaneous ketamine 0.5 mg / kg was administered after closure of surgical inci-sion. 30 patients in the placebo group received subcutaneous infiltration of saline. During the patient's recovery time and after transferring to the ward, the VAS of pain and vital signs were continuously assessed. if VAS ? 3, 100 mg diclofenac suppository was administered and if there were no response, 30 mg intravenous pethidine was also administered. Prescribed number of suppositories and pethidine dosage were compared. The complications, such as hallucination, nystagmus, nausea, vomiting and drowsiness in patients were also recorded and compared. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS16 software and ?2 and t-test. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant in all of the cases. Results: In the course of systolic blood pressure, heart rate and arterial blood oxygen satura-tion during the first 24 hours, no significant differences were mentioned between the two groups. At the time of arrival to the recovery room and 30 minutes later, the mean VAS was not significantly different in the groups. However, the mean VAS at 1, 2 , 4 , 6 , 8 and 12 hours after surgery were significantly lower in the ketamine group (0.61±059 than in the sa-line group (3.37±096 (P<0.001. The mean

  11. Maternal and Neonatal Effects of Vasopressors Used for Treating Hypotension after Spinal Anesthesia for Caesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soxhuku-Isufi, Alma; Shpata, Vjollca; Sula, Hektor

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the study was to examine whether ephedrine and phenylephrine were different in their efficacy for managing maternal hypotension and their effect of adverse maternal and neonatal outcome. A double-blind randomized controlled study in healthy pregnant women ASA physical status 2, which underwent elective caesarian delivery under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomized to receive an intravenous bolus of either phenylephrine (Ph group) or ephedrine (E group) immediately after the episode of hypotension after spinal anesthesia. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were recorded. Two hundred and two (202) pregnant women at term were entered in this study. There were no differences between group E and group Ph regarding the incidence of hypotension after vasopressor therapy, and the incidence of nausea and vomiting. There was no significant difference between groups in the first-minute and the 5th minute Apgar score, none of the neonates had the true fetal acidosis. Ephedrine and phenylephrine have the same efficacy in treating hypotension after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section. The use of Phenylephrine was associated with better fetal acid-base status, and there were no differences on Apgar score values and on the incidence of maternal bradycardia and hypotension.

  12. Study of the Effect of Dexamethasone and Normal Saline in Reducing Headache after Spinal Anesthesia in Cesarean Section

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    K Tavakol

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Post dural puncture headache (PDPH is a bothersome complication of spinal anesthesia specially in young parturient women after cesarean, which causes not only psychotic and somatic problems, but also increases hospital costs due to delay in patients discharge from hospital. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dexamethasone in improvement of complications of PDPH after spinal anesthesia in cesarean section. Materials & Methods: This is a randomised clinical trial in which 35 cases of parturient women, aged 21-44 years, who developed pain in head (PDPH, lumbar, shoulder, or more than one site due to spinal anesthesia after cesarean section in spite of consumption of NSAID drug, opoid, bed rest, rehydration. They received intravenously drip dexamethasone 0.2mg/kg (maximum 16mg in one liter of normal saline for 2 hours. Visual analogue scale (0=no pain, 10=most unbearable pain for patients before and after dexamethasone therapy was used and recorded. Results: The most common complaints of patients were headache (87.5%, low back pain (56.2%, shoulder and neck pain (25%. Results showed that mean of VAS pain score before tretment was 6.5±1.8 and decreased to 1.6±1.2 after treatment indicating a decrease of 77% in pain among the subjects. Conclusion: The advantage of dexamethasone therapy in comparisn with routine supportive therapy is the greater rapidity in pain relief and earlier release of patients from hospital.

  13. [Examination of the optimal midazolam dose required for loss of puncture memory at the time of spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boku, Aiji; Koyama, Shinichi; Kishimoto, Naotaka; Nakatani, Keiji; Kurita, Satoshi; Nagata, Noboru; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    We examined midazolam ED50 according to age that was necessary for loss of puncture memory at the time of spinal anesthesia and determined whether we could estimate the presence of puncture memory from the degree of sedation after midazolam administration. We enrolled patients with ASA PS 1 or 2 and patients from 50 to 80 years of age who had been planned for surgery with spinal anesthesia. We divided the patients into groups according to their age--50s, 60s, and 70s as L, M, and H groups, respectively. We evaluated the degree of sedation with six phases of scores after intravenous administration of midazolam and spinal anesthesia was performed. The midazolam dose was based on the ups and downs method. The midazolam ED50s required for the loss of puncture memory in groups L, M, and H were 0.043, 0.035, and 0.026 mg x kg(-1), respectively. We estimated the association between the sedation degree score after midazolam administration and the puncture memory from ROC curve, but AUC was 0.56 for all cases. The midazolam ED50 required for the loss of puncture memory decreased with age but it was difficult to estimate puncture memory from the degree of sedation.

  14. Hyperbaric Versus Isobaric Bupivacaine for Spinal Anesthesia: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis for Adult Patients Undergoing Noncesarean Delivery Surgery.

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    Uppal, Vishal; Retter, Susanne; Shanthanna, Harsha; Prabhakar, Christopher; McKeen, Dolores M

    2017-11-01

    It is widely believed that the choice between isobaric bupivacaine and hyperbaric bupivacaine formulations alters the block characteristics for the conduct of surgery under spinal anesthesia. The aim of this study was to systematically review the comparative evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of the 2 formulations when used for spinal anesthesia for adult noncesarean delivery surgery. Key electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials, excluding cesarean delivery surgeries under spinal anesthesia, without any language or date restrictions. The primary outcome measure for this review was the failure of spinal anesthesia. Two independent reviewers selected the studies and extracted the data. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) or mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven hundred fifty-one studies were identified between 1946 and 2016. After screening, there were 16 randomized controlled clinical trials, including 724 participants, that provided data for the meta-analysis. The methodological reporting of most studies was poor, and appropriate judgment of their individual risk of bias elements was not possible. There was no difference between the 2 drugs regarding the need for conversion to general anesthesia (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.08-4.41; P = .62; I = 0%), incidence of hypotension (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.69-1.92; P = .58; I = 0%), nausea/vomiting (RR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.06-1.32; P = .11; I = 7%), or onset of sensory block (MD = 1.7 minutes; 95% CI, -3.5 to 0.1; P = .07; I = 0%). The onset of motor block (MD = 4.6 minutes; 95% CI, 7.5-1.7; P = .002; I = 78%) was significantly faster with hyperbaric bupivacaine. Conversely, the duration of motor (MD = 45.2 minutes; 95% CI, 66.3-24.2; P < .001; I = 87%) and sensory (MD = 29.4 minutes; 95% CI, 15.5-43.3; P < .001; I = 73%) block was longer with isobaric bupivacaine. Both hyperbaric bupivacaine and isobaric bupivacaine provided effective anesthesia with no

  15. Evaluation of the olfactory memory after spinal anesthesia: a pilot study.

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    Demirhan, A; Erdem, K; Akkaya, A; Tekelioglu, U Y; Bilgi, M; Isik, C; Sit, M; Gok, U; Kocoglu, H

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of spinal anesthesia (SA) on olfactory memory using Brief-Smell Identification TestTM (B-SIT). This, prospective, clinical study was performed on 40 ASA physical status I-III patients, between 18-65 years of age undergoing a planned elective minor surgery under SA. All participants were preoperatively informed about B-SIT and the mode of application of the test according to the information in the book. B-SIT was applied to each patient preoperatively and the scores were recorded. B-SIT was reapplied to all patients on the 1st and 2nd postoperative days and the scores were recorded. Moreover, development of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) and/or neurological symptoms (such as hearing loss, diplopia) were checked. Postoperative headache was observed in 7 of the participants and 3 of them was diagnosed to have PDPH. No statistically significant difference was observed in the olfactory memory evaluation of the patients suffering from headache and the 3 patients diagnosed with PDPH. No statistically significant difference was observed in the correct odor answer ratio between the preoperative and postoperative 1st and 2nd days (p > 0.05). We confirm that SA does not affect olfactory memory. Further studies are necessary to confirm the results of our pilot study in a larger sample.

  16. Transient left ventricular dysfunction due to coronary spasm after spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Małek-Elikowska, Małgorzata; Słomczyński, Marek; Horbacka, Karolina; Bartkowski, Jarosław; Kalawski, Bartosz

    2017-10-23

    Bupivacaine is a long-acting local anesthetic (LA) used for cutaneous infiltration, peripheral nerve blocks, epidural and spinal anesthesia. However, its application may result in cardiovascular complications such as: hypotension, bradycardia, cardiac arrest and toxic myocardial injury. The authors describe a 53-year-old male with a history of cigarette smoking, admitted for an elective inguinal hernia surgery. Before surgery, the patient received subarachnoid injection of bupivacaine (20 mg). After the operation, he developed transient hypotension. Blood pressure returned to normal after gelofusine infusion; no sympathomimetics were administered. The male denied chest pain; however, ECG showed ST segment elevation coexisting with left ventricular anterolateral hypokinesia and decreased longitudinal strain in echocardiography. A significant increase in troponin I level was suggestive rather of myocardial infarction than of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Urgent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery spasm, which remitted after intracoronary nitroglycerin injection. Normalization of ECG and echocardiography was observed within a few days. The authors indicate that the presented atypical adverse effect of bupivacaine manifested itself with delay and that coronary spasm proceeded without angina. A close observation of the patient after anesthetic procedure with LA should be extended over the postoperative period.

  17. A comparative study on the efficacy of dexmedetomidine and tramadol on post-spinal anesthesia shivering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundra, Tanveer Singh; Kuthiala, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Anupam; Kaur, Parminder

    2017-01-01

    Shivering is a common postanesthesia adverse event with multiple etiologies. At present tramadol is a widely used drug for the control of shivering. However, tramadol may cause a lot of nausea and vomiting. Hence, the need to find a better drug with less of side effects. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of dexmedetomidine and tramadol in the treatment of post-spinal anesthesia (SA) shivering as well as to compare their side-effect profile. This prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary care hospital. A total of 100 patients having shivering after SA were enrolled, out of which fifty received dexmedetomidine (Group A) and 50 received tramadol (Group B). The response rate, time to cessation of shivering and side effects (if any) was noted. All the results were analyzed using Student's t -test and Chi-square test. All patients who received dexmedetomidine as well as tramadol had cessation of shivering. The time to cessation of shivering was significantly less with dexmedetomidine (174.12 ± 14.366 s) than with tramadol (277.06 ± 23.374 s) ( P shivering with dexmedetomidine was less (6%) as compared to tramadol (16%). Nausea and vomiting was found to be higher in the case of tramadol. On the other hand, dexmedetomidine caused moderate sedation (modified Ramsay sedation score = 3-4) from which the patient could be easily awoken up. Dexmedetomidine offers better results than tramadol with fewer side effects.

  18. Spinal Anesthesia for Knee Arthroscopy Using Isobaric Bupivacaine and Levobupivacaine: Anesthetic and Neuroophthalmological Assessment

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    Monica del-Rio-Vellosillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the sensory, motor, and neuroophthalmological effects of isobaric levobupivacaine and bupivacaine when intrathecally administered. Materials and Methods. A prospective, double-blind, randomized study with 60 ASA grade I-II patients aged 18–65 years awaiting knee arthroscopy under spinal anesthesia. Patients received 12.5 mg of isobaric bupivacaine or levobupivacaine. Several features were recorded. Results. No significant intergroup differences were observed for ASA classification, time to micturate, demographic data, surgery duration, and patient/surgeon satisfaction. Similar hemodynamic parameters and sensory/motor blockade duration were found for both groups. There were no neuroophthalmological effects in either group. Sensory (P=0.018 and motor blockade onset (P=0.003 was faster in the bupivacaine group. T6 (T2–T12 and T3 (T2–T12 were the highest sensory block levels for the levobupivacaine and bupivacaine groups, respectively (P=0.008. It took less time to regain maximum motor blockade in the bupivacaine group (P=0.014, and the levobupivacaine group required use of analgesia earlier (P=0.025. Conclusions. Isobaric bupivacaine and levobupivacaine are analogous and well-tolerated anesthetics for knee arthroscopy. However, for bupivacaine, sensory and motor blockade onset was faster, and greater sensory blockade with a longer postoperative painless period was achieved.

  19. Comparison of Two Methods: Spinal Anesthesia and Ischiorectal Block on Post Hemorrhoidectomy Pain and Hospital Stay: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadri, Sedigheh; Mahmoudvand, Hormoz; Rokrok, Shirin; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad

    2017-11-27

    Hemorrhoidectomy is one of the most common hemorrhoid surgery. Many areas are innervated by nerves, and this makes the surgery to be very painful. Various anesthetic methods have been proposed, and the number of investigations and procedures demonstrated the absence of a reliable method for reducing pain. This study compares the cavity ischiorectal block with spinal anesthesia in reducing postoperative pain, analgesic consumption, and hospital stay. This study is a randomized control trial carried out on seventy patients sampled. Thirty-five (35) among them were placed in spinal anesthesia group, and the other 35 were placed in the ischiorectal block group. According to the study, questionnaire was designed in such a way that postoperative variables such as postoperative pain, analgesic consumption, changes in blood pressure, heart rate and hospital stay in both groups were evaluated and compared. IRCT2015111616516N3 ( http://en.search.irct.ir/search?query=IRCT2015111616516N3 ) Results: In this study, the pain scores on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at 0, 6, 12, and 24 hr for spinal anesthesia group after surgery were 0, 3.08 ± 0.78, 2.05 ± 1.02, 1.11 ± 0.83, respectively (p blocks were 0.98 ± 0.25, 1.57 ± 0.81, 0.91 ± 0.91, and 0.63 ± 0.31 respectively, which indicated lesser pain after surgery in the ischiorectal block at 6, 12, and 24 hr. In this study, out of the 35 patients that underwent spinal anesthesia, 28 patients (80%) were hospitalized in the first 6 hr, 13 patients (37.1%) in the second 6 hr, 3 patients (8.6%) in the second 12 hr after surgery. For patients under the ischiorectal block, the number of patients hospitalized were 13 patients (37.1%), in the first 6 hr, 4 patients (11.4%) in the second 6 hr, and 1 (2.9%) were hospitalized in the second 12 hr after surgery (p blocks causes less pain, require fewer painkillers, and reduces the hospital stay after surgery than spinal anesthesia.

  20. Prevention of postoperative hypotension following spinal anesthesia for TURP: a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing ephedrine with placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdeyen, J; Ory, J P; Wyckmans, W; Vandermeersch, E; Jamaer, L; Van Assche, A

    2008-01-01

    Spinal hypotension (SH) is a common side effect of spinal anesthesia and may also occur after the surgical procedure. In this double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised clinical trial fifty patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy under spinal anesthesia received 10 mg of ephedrine IV before being transferred from the operating table into their bed after the procedure, whereas fifty controls received saline IV. The number of per- and postoperative hypotensive episodes and vasopressor use, time delay between the administration of the study medication and the first hypotensive episode, level of spinal blockade at the start of surgery, pre- and postoperative hemoglobine and sodium concentration, cardiovascular co-morbidity and chronic medication were registered. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of postoperative hypotension between the two groups, but Poisson regression of the expected number of postoperative hypotensive episodes per patient showed a protective effect of ephedrine (p hypotension was a risk factor for developing postoperative hypotension (p hypotension, except for a correlation between preoperative alpha-receptor blocking drugs and peroperative hypotension (p hypotension (recorded incidence 31%) was almost as common as peroperative hypotension (recorded incidence 37%) and occurred as late as 190 minutes after the end of surgery. Ephedrine IV at the end of surgery reduced the number of postoperative hypotensive episodes per patient but did not reduce the overall incidence of postoperative SH.

  1. Sufentanil and Bupivacaine Combination versus Bupivacaine Alone for Spinal Anesthesia during Cesarean Delivery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jianqin; Wang, Ruike; Wang, Ying; Xu, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The addition of lipophilic opioids to local anesthetics for spinal anesthesia has become a widely used strategy for cesarean anesthesia. A meta-analysis to quantify the benefits and risks of combining sufentanil with bupivacaine for patients undergoing cesarean delivery was conducted. Methods A comprehensive literature search without language or date limitation was performed to identify clinical trials that compared the addition of sufentanil to bupivacaine with bupivacaine alone for spinal anesthesia in healthy parturients choosing cesarean delivery. The Q and I2 tests were used to assess heterogeneity of the data. Data from each trial were combined using relative ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data or weighted mean differences (WMDs) for continuous data and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for each trial. Sensitivity analysis was conducted by removing one study a time to assess the quality and consistency of the results. Begg’s funnel plots and Egger’s linear regression test were used to detect any publication bias. Results This study included 9 trials containing 578 patients in the final meta-analysis. Sufentanil addition provided a better analgesia quality with less breakthrough pain during surgery than bupivacaine alone (RR = 0.10, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.18, P bupivacaine-alone group (WMD = −1.0 min, 95% CI −1.5 to −0.58, P Bupivacaine and sufentanil combination is superior to that of bupivacaine alone for spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery in analgesia quality. Women receiving the combined two drugs had less breakthrough pain, shorter sensory block onset time, and longer first analgesic request time. However, the addition of sufentanil to bupivacaine increased the incidence of pruritus. PMID:27032092

  2. Levobupivacaine vs racemic bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for sequential bilateral total knee arthroplasty: a retrospective cohort study.

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    Chen, Chee Kean; Lau, Francis C S; Lee, Woo Guan; Phui, Vui Eng

    2016-09-01

    To compare the anesthetic potency and safety of spinal anesthesia with higher dosages of levobupivacaine and bupivacaine in patients for bilateral sequential for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Retrospective cohort study. Operation theater with postoperative inpatient follow-up. The medical records of 315 patients who underwent sequential bilateral TKA were reviewed. Patients who received intrathecal levobupicavaine 0.5% were compared with patients who received hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% with fentanyl 25 μg for spinal anesthesia. The primary outcome was the use of rescue analgesia (systemic opioids, conversion to general anesthesia) during surgery for both groups. Secondary outcomes included adverse effects of local anesthetics (hypotension and bradycardia) during surgery and morbidity related to spinal anesthesia (postoperative nausea, vomiting, and bleeding) during hospital stay. One hundred fifty patients who received intrathecal levobupivacaine 0.5% (group L) were compared with 90 patients given hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% with fentanyl 25 μg (group B). The mean volume of levobupivacaine administered was 5.8 mL (range, 5.0-6.0 mL), and that of bupivacaine was 3.8 mL (range, 3.5-4.0 mL). Both groups achieved similar maximal sensory level of block (T6). The time to maximal height of sensory block was significantly shorter in group B than group L, 18.2 ± 4.5 vs 23.9 ± 3.8 minutes (P< .001). The time to motor block of Bromage 3 was also shorter in group B (8.7 ± 4.1 minutes) than group L (16.0 ± 4.5 minutes) (P< .001). Patients in group B required more anesthetic supplement than group L (P< .001). Hypotension and postoperative bleeding were significantly less common in group L than group B. Levobupivacaine at a higher dosage provided longer duration of spinal anesthesia with better safety profile in sequential bilateral TKA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

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    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population.

  4. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of dexmedetomidine in elderly patients during spinal anesthesia.

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    Kuang, Yun; Zhang, Ran-Ran; Pei, Qi; Tan, Hong-Yi; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Huang, Jie; Xiang, Yu-Xia; Ouyang, Wen; Duan, Kai-Ming; Wang, Sai-Ying; Yang, Guo-Ping

    2015-12-01

    The application of dexmedetomidine in patient sedation is generally accepted, though its clinical application is limited because of the lack of information detailing the specific properties among diverse populations of patients. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of dexmedetomidine between elderly and young patients during spinal anesthesia. 34 subjects (elderly group: n = 15; young group: n = 19) with spinal anesthesia were enrolled in the present study following the inclusion/exclusion criteria detailed below. All subjects received intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine with a loading dose of 0.5 µg x kg⁻¹ for 10 minutes and a maintenance dose of 0.5 µg x kg⁻¹ x h⁻¹ for 50 minutes. Plasma concentrations of dexmedetomidine were detected by the HPLC-MS/MS method and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using WinNolin software. There was no significant difference between the elderly and young subjects in major pharmacokinetic parameters. There was a marked gender difference in the Cmax (peak plasma concentration) and tmax (time to reach Cmax) between genders in elderly subjects, though in this cohort the other pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different. In the young subjects there were no noteworthy variations between genders in pharmacokinetic parameters. There was no significant difference between the two groups in BISAUC(0-t) (the area under the bispectral index-time curve from time 0 to t hours), BISmin (the minimum value of the bispectral index after drug delivery), and or tmin-BIS (bispectral index for the minimum value of time). SBP (systolic blood pressure), DBP (diastolic blood pressure), HR (heart rate), and SpO₂(pulse oxygen saturation) developed substantive differences in a time-dependent manner, but there were no statistically significant differences in these four indicators in the time*group at three time points (1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drug

  5. Randomized controlled trial comparing ondansetron and placebo for the reduction of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension during elective cesarean delivery in Egypt.

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    El Khouly, Nabih I; Meligy, Ashraf M

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of prophylactic ondansetron on spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension and bradycardia among patients undergoing elective cesarean deliveries. A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolled patients aged 20-40years scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia between January 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous ondansetron 4mg in 10mL of saline or 10mL of saline. Participants and investigators were masked to group assignments. The primary outcomes were systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate, measured at baseline, 10-minute intervals to 60minutes, and at 2hours. Per-protocol analyses were performed including patients who delivered under spinal anesthesia. The analyses included 50 patients in each group. Decreases in systolic blood pressure were reduced among patients receiving ondansetron at all time points (P0.05). Among patients who received ondansetron, mean arterial pressure was higher immediately and 30minutes after spinal anesthesia (Pcesarean deliveries under spinal anesthesia. Pan African Clinical Trials Registry: PACTR 201601001397193. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of intravenous propofol on the incidence of post-dural puncture headache following spinal anesthesia in cesarean section

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    Parisa Golfam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post Dural puncture headache is still a common complication among young women undergone cesarean section, although use of small size spinal needles reduced its prevalence. Several methods have been suggested for prevention and treatment of this side effect; such as complete bed rest, hydration, non-opioid analgesics, caffeine, codeine, which none of them proved to be totally effective. The last option would be epidural blood patch, if headache persist. The aim of this study was evaluation the efficacy of intravenous propofol on post dural puncture headache incidence after cesarean section. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial 120 patients aged 18-45 years old in American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA class I or II, who had no history of headache, analgesic consumption, substance abuse and drug addiction, candidate for elective cesarean section, were randomly assigned into intervention (propofol and control groups. The anesthesia method for both groups was precisely the same. After spinal anesthesia in the first group 30µg/kg/min of intravenous propofol have been infused slowly. Then at 1, 6, 18, 24 hours and 2nd to 7th days after surgery, anesthesiologist asked groups for presence or absence of headache. The data analyzed with SPSS 16.0 software. Results: Headache incidence rate in the group who receiving propofol was significantly reduced (P.V=0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that 30µg/kg/min of intravenous propofol caused reduced the incidence of post spinal headache in young women undergone elective cesarean section.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of added fentanyl to hyperbaric bupivacaine for spinal anesthesia

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    Mina Jafari-Javid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Potentiating the effect of the intrathecal local anesthetics by intrathecal injection of opiods for intra-abdominal surgeries is known. The objective of this study is to investigate the pain-relieving effects of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine in elective caesarean surgery.Materials and Method: In a double blind clinical trial 60 patients candidate for elective cesarean section. They were studied in two groups. Cases in the control group received 12.5 mg of bupivacaine and in the study group received 8 mg of bupivacaine and 20 µg fentanyl. The parameters taken into consideration were hemodynamic stability, visceral pain, nausea and vomiting, intraoperative shivering, the amount of intraoperative administered dose of fentanyl and ephedrine and postoperative pain. Results: The average blood pressure changes after 5, 10, 20, 60 minutes were lower in the study group. Shivering and ephedrine dose during operation were lower in study group and statistically significant respectively (p=0.01, p=0.001, respectively. Duration of analgesia after operation increased from (115.5±7.5 min in control group to (138.5±9.9 min in study group, but the quality of analgesia during peritoneal manipulation did not change. Pulse rate and vomiting during operation were not statistically different between two groups.Conclusion: Reduction of local anesthetic dose with adding fentanyl may cause hemodynamic stability, increasing the postoperative pain-free time, decrease shivering and vasopressor consumption in spinal anesthesia and reduction of the amount of blood pressure drop during elective cesarean surgery

  8. [A prospective, randomized, double-blinded control study on comparison of tramadol, clonidine and dexmedetomidine for post spinal anesthesia shivering].

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    Venkatraman, Rajagopalan; Karthik, Krishnamoorthy; Pushparani, Anand; Mahalakshmi, Annadurai

    Shivering, a common intraoperative problem under spinal anesthesia increases the oxygen consumption considerably and is uncomfortable and distressing to the patient, anesthesiologist as well as surgeon. The present study was designed to explore the effectiveness of tramadol, clonidine and dexmedetomidine in the treatment of post spinal anesthesia shivering and to look for their adverse effects. This prospective, randomized, double blinded control study was done on 90 patients who developed shivering under spinal anesthesia. They were randomly allocated into three groups with Group T receiving tramadol 1mg.kg -1 , Group C getting clonidine 1mcg.kg -1 and Group D patients receiving dexmedetomidine 0.5mcg.kg -1 . The time taken to control shivering, recurrence rate, hemodynamic variables, sedation score and adverse effects were observed. Dexmedetomidine was faster in the control of shivering in 5.7±0.79minutes (min) whereas tramadol took 6.76±0.93min and clonidine was slower with 9.43±0.93min. The recurrence rate was much lower in the dexmedetomidine group with 3.3% than for clonidine (10%) and tramadol (23.3%) group. The sedation achieved with dexmedetomidine was better than clonidine and tramadol. The tramadol group had more cases of vomiting (four) and dexmedetomidine group had six cases of hypotension and two cases of bradycardia. Two of the clonidine patients encountered bradycardia and hypotension. Dexmedetomidine is better than tramadol and clonidine in the control of shivering because of its faster onset and less recurrence rate. Though complications are encountered in the dexmedetomidine group, they are treatable. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined use of crystalloid preload and low dose spinal anesthesia for preventing hypotension in spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Ouerghi, Sonia; Bougacha, Mohamed A; Frikha, Nabil; Mestiri, Taher; Ben Ammar, Mohamed S; Mebazaa, Mhamed S

    2010-06-01

    Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section is commonly associated with hypotension and crystalloid preload is widely recommended. Low-dose spinal appears to cause less hypotension. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combined use of crystalloid preload and low dose spinal anaesthesia might further reduce the rates of hypotension. Sixty-two patients were randomly assigned to two groups: crystalloid preload anaesthesia (P): received a rapid infusion of 20 mL/kg lactated Ringer's solution (LR), and no preload anaesthesia (N). The incidence of hypotension and the amount of ephedrine used to treat it were compared. Spinal anaesthesia was performed with 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and fentanyl 10 microg and morphine 100 microg. The incidence of hypotension was similar in the P and N groups. Same doses of ephedrine were required to treat hypotension in the two groups. Crystalloid preload combined with low-dose spinal anaesthesia do not reduce the incidence of hypotension nor its severity.

  10. Pythagoras and Cosines: The skin-dural sac distance and optimal angles in paramedian spinal anesthesia.

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    Puigdellívol-Sánchez, Anna; Reina, Miguel A; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Pomés-Talló, Jaume; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The classical recommendation for paramedian approaches is needle insertion 1-2 cm paramedian and an angle of 10°-15° medial-cephalad to the plane of the back, but contact with vertebrae is frequent. A mathematical approach to individualizing punctures is proposed on the basis of skin-dural sac distance (d): Optimal angle ∼ inverse cosine [d/ √(1+d^2) ] and the distance covered by the needle ∼ √(1+d^2) for 1 cm paramedian punctures. The inferred angles were compared to optimal angles leading to the central dorsal part of the dural sac from 1 to 2 cm paramedian, measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in seven cases and in a short stature volunteer (1.58 m, Body Mass Index (BMI) 23.2), to study supine and fetal positions using both closed MR and ultrasound. The average (d) decreased rostrally [6.8 cm (L4-L5)-4.3 cm (T11-T12)] while the mean optimal incidence angles increased [8.3°-16.5° (L4-L5) to 12.7°-24.1° (T11-T12) at 1-2 cm paramedian, respectively] and coincided with the estimated angles with a correlation coefficient = 0.98. In the volunteer, the optimal lateromedial angles increased from 14.4° to 26.7° (L3-L4) to 17.1°-30.3° (T11-T12) for a (d) = 3.7 cm (L3-L4)-3.1 cm (T11-T12) and increased ≤3.7° and ≤5.1° at 1 and 2 cm paramedian, respectively, in fetal positions in MR. Ultrasound yielded comparable figures. The range of possible angles for dural punctures is wider at 1 cm paramedian in lower approaches in lateral decubitus [from 3.6° at T12L1 (12.2°-15.8°) to 9° at L3L4 (8.8°-18.7°)]. The classically recommended angles of 10°-15° differ from the optimal angles, particularly in small patients, suggesting the need for ultrasound guidance or for inferring angles prior to spinal anesthesia. Clin. Anat. 29:1046-1052, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prediction of hypotension during spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean section by altered heart rate variability induced by postural change.

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    Sakata, K; Yoshimura, N; Tanabe, K; Kito, K; Nagase, K; Iida, H

    2017-02-01

    Maternal hypotension is a common complication during cesarean section performed under spinal anesthesia. Changes in maternal heart rate with postural changes or values of heart rate variability have been reported to predict hypotension. Therefore, we hypothesized that changes in heart rate variability due to postural changes can predict hypotension. A total of 45 women scheduled to undergo cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. A postural change test was performed the day before cesarean section. The ratio of the power of low and high frequency components contributing to heart rate variability was assessed in the order of supine, left lateral, and supine. Patients who exhibited a ⩾two-fold increase in the low-to-high frequency ratio when moving to supine from the lateral position were assigned to the postural change test-positive group. According to the findings of the postural change test, patients were assigned to the positive (n=22) and negative (n=23) groups, respectively. Hypotension occurred in 35/45 patients, of whom 21 (60%) were in the positive group and 14 (40%) were in the negative group. The incidence of hypotension was greater in the positive group (Pcesarean section. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Fentanyl and Morphine on Shivering During Spinal Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Endovenous Ablation of Varicose Veins.

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    Onk, Didem; Akarsu Ayazoğlu, Tülin; Kuyrukluyıldız, Ufuk; Aksüt, Mehmet; Bedir, Zehra; Küpeli, İlke; Onk, Oruç Alper; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2016-02-12

    BACKGROUND We sought to investigate the effect of morphine and fentanyl on shivering when used adjunctively with bupivacaine during spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing varicose vein surgery on an outpatient basis. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included a total of 90 patients, aged 25-45 years, ASA I-II, scheduled to undergo endovenous laser ablation under spinal anesthesia for lower extremity venous insufficiency/varicose vein disease. Patients were randomly allocated into 3 groups: Group M (morphine group) received 5 mg 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine + 0.1 mg morphine, Group F (fentanyl group) received 5 mg 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine + 25 µg fentanyl, and Group C (control group) received 5 mg 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine + physiologic saline. The level of sensory blockade was assessed with pin-prick test and the level of motor blockade was assessed with Bromage scale at 5-min intervals. Shivering grade and time to first postoperative analgesic requirement was recorded. RESULTS Level and time of sensory block showed a slight but insignificant increase in the Morphine Group and Fentanyl Group. Time of postoperative analgesic requirement was significantly longer in patients who received morphine (pShivering was significantly less common in patients who received morphine and fentanyl than in patients who are in the Control Group (pshivering in patients undergoing venous surgery.

  13. Investigation of effect of blood pressure and heart rate changes in different positions (lying and sitting on hypotension incidence rate after spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

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    Nahid Manouchehrian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the relatively high prevalence of hypotension (20% -40% after spinal anesthesia as well as the adverse effects of hypotension on mother and baby, it is better to prevent hypotension as much as possible. Therefore, this study is aimed to determine the relationship between postural blood pressure and heart rate changes and hypotension incidence rate after spinal anesthesia in cesarean section.63 women aging18 to 45years old with fullterm pregnancy, who were candidate for caesarean section with spinal anesthesia, entered the study. Afterwards, the diastolic, systolic, and mean arterial pressures as well as the heart rate (pulse in different positions (sitting, lying, and left lateral were measured. After spinal anesthesia, the patients' blood pressure was measured and recorded every minute until the10thmin, then every 3 minute until the15thmin, and then every 5 minute until the end of cesarean section. Data analysis was performed using SPSS (ver. 19 software, descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Bonferroni test. In this study, the hypotension incidence rate was 30% and the orthostatic variation rate of the systolic blood pressure in more than half of the people was between 4.39 to 13.49psi, which showed the highest variation compared to the diastolic pressure, mean arterial blood pressure (or: mean arterial pressure [MAP], and heart(pulse. Considering the correlation coefficient of 0.27, the systolic blood pressure in the lateral position has the highest relationship with the incidence of hypotension. The postural systolic blood pressure changes in patients prior to the spinal anesthesia can be a predictive factor for the post-spinal hypotension incidence.

  14. Effects of intrathecal dexmedetomidine on shivering after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: a double-blind randomized clinical trial

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    Nasseri K

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Karim Nasseri,1,2 Negin Ghadami,1 Bijan Nouri2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran; 2Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran Background: Shivering is among the common troublesome complications of spinal anesthesia (SA, and causes discomfort and discontentment in parturients undergoing cesarean sections (CSs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intrathecal dexmedetomidine in the prevention of shivering in those who underwent CS under SA.Subjects and methods: Fifty parturients planned for elective CSs under SA were enrolled in this prospective, double-blinded, controlled study and randomly divided into two equal groups. Spinal block was achieved with 12.5 mg 0.5% heavy bupivacaine plus 5 µg dexmedetomidine (BD group or 0.5 mL 0.9% normal saline (BN group. The incidence and intensity of shivering, peripheral and core body temperature, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events was recorded.Results: The incidence of shivering was significantly higher in the BN group (52% than the BD group (24% (P=0.04. Likewise, the intensity of shivering was significantly higher in the BN group than the BD group (P=0.04. The incidence of adverse events, such as hypotension, nausea/vomiting, and bradycardia, was not significantly different between the two groups, although the grade of sedation was higher in the BD group than the BN group (P=0.004.Conclusion: We conclude that intrathecal dexmedetomidine is effective in lowering the incidence and intensity of shivering in parturients undergoing CSs under SA without major adverse effects. Keywords: dexmedetomidine, shivering, spinal anesthesia, cesarean sections, bupivacaine

  15. Acute Paraplegia After General Anesthesia

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    Gholam Hossein Ghaedi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute paraplegia is a rare but catastrophic complication of surgeries performed on aorta and corrective operations of vertebral column. Trauma to spinal cord after spinal anesthesia and ischemia of spinal cord also may lead to acute paraplegia. Acute paraplegia as a complication of general anesthesia in surgeries performed on sites other than aorta and vertebral column is very rare. Here we present a 56 year old woman with acute paraplegia due to spinal cord infarction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia probably caused by atherosclerosis of feeding spinal arteries and ischemia of spinal cord after reduction of blood flow possibly due to hypotension during general anesthesia.

  16. Colloids versus crystalloids in the prevention of hypotension induced by spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Ripollés Melchor, J; Espinosa, Á; Martínez Hurtado, E; Casans Francés, R; Navarro Pérez, R; Abad Gurumeta, A; Calvo Vecino, J M

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of hypotension associated to spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section is high. To determine the effects of colloids and crystalloids in the incidence of hypotension induced by spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section, an attempt was made to define which type of fluid and what total volume should be administered. Following the PRISMA methodology a systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out. A systematic Medline/PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library search was made to identify trials where women were scheduled for elective cesarean section with spinal anesthesia and volume loading (preload or co-load). The primary outcome was the incidence of hypotension. Stratification into subgroups was made for the primary outcome according to the type of colloid administered, differentiating those studies employing new generation colloids (HES 6% 130/0.4) from those not using such colloids, based on the volume of colloid administered and the combination of a vasopressor. The secondary outcome was the incidence of intraoperative nausea and vomiting. Two-hundred and twenty-seven controlled clinical trials were analyzed; eleven randomized clinical trials including 990 patients were included. A significative decrease of incidence of hypotension associated to spinal anesthesia was observed with the use of colloids compared to crystalloids (RR [95% CI] 0.70 [0.53-0.92], P=0.01). However, there was no difference between crystalloid and colloid in the risk of intraoperative nausea and vomiting (RR [95% CI] 0.75 [0.41-1.38]; P=0.33). This meta-analysis shows colloid administration to significantly reduce the incidence of hypotension associated to spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section compared with of crystalloid use.

  17. Comparison of metaraminol, phenylephrine and ephedrine in prophylaxis and treatment of hypotension in cesarean section under spinal anesthesia

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    Fábio Farias de Aragão

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal hypotension is a common complication after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, with deleterious effects on the fetus and mother. Among the strategies aimed at minimizing the effects of hypotension, vasopressor administration is the most efficient. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of phenylephrine, metaraminol, and ephedrine in the prevention and treatment of hypotension after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Ninety pregnant women, not in labor, undergoing cesarean section were randomized into three groups to receive a bolus followed by continuous infusion of vasopressor as follows: phenylephrine group (50 μg + 50 μg/min; metaraminol group (0.25 mg + 0.25 mg/min; ephedrine group (4 mg + 4 mg/min. Infusion dose was doubled when systolic blood pressure decreased to 80% of baseline and a bolus was given when systolic blood pressure decreased below 80%. The infusion dose was divided in half when systolic blood pressure increased to 120% and was stopped when it became higher. The incidence of hypotension, nausea and vomiting, reactive hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, Apgar scores, and arterial cord blood gases were assessed at the 1st and 5th minutes. There was no difference in the incidence of hypotension, bradycardia, reactive hypertension, infusion discontinuation, atropine administration or Apgar scores. Rescue boluses were higher only in the ephedrine group compared to metaraminol group. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and fetal acidosis were greater in the ephedrine group. The three drugs were effective in preventing hypotension; however, fetal effects were more frequent in the ephedrine group, although transient.

  18. [Comparison of metaraminol, phenylephrine and ephedrine in prophylaxis and treatment of hypotension in cesarean section under spinal anesthesia].

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    Aragão, Fábio Farias de; Aragão, Pedro Wanderley de; Martins, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Salgado Filho, Natalino; Barroqueiro, Elizabeth de Souza Barcelos

    2014-01-01

    Maternal hypotension is a common complication after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, with deleterious effects on the fetus and mother. Among the strategies aimed at minimizing the effects of hypotension, vasopressor administration is the most efficient. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of phenylephrine, metaraminol, and ephedrine in the prevention and treatment of hypotension after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Ninety pregnant women, not in labor, undergoing cesarean section were randomized into three groups to receive a bolus followed by continuous infusion of vasopressor as follows: phenylephrine group (50μg+50μg/min); metaraminol group (0.25mg+0.25mg/min); ephedrine group (4mg+4mg/min). Infusion dose was doubled when systolic blood pressure decreased to 80% of baseline and a bolus was given when systolic blood pressure decreased below 80%. The infusion dose was divided in half when systolic blood pressure increased to 120% and was stopped when it became higher. The incidence of hypotension, nausea and vomiting, reactive hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, Apgar scores, and arterial cord blood gases were assessed at the 1st and 5th minutes. There was no difference in the incidence of hypotension, bradycardia, reactive hypertension, infusion discontinuation, atropine administration or Apgar scores. Rescue boluses were higher only in the ephedrine group compared to metaraminol group. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and fetal acidosis were greater in the ephedrine group. The three drugs were effective in preventing hypotension; however, fetal effects were more frequent in the ephedrine group, although transient. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Early post-operative relief of pain and shivering using diclofenac suppository versus intravenous pethidine in spinal anesthesia

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    Ali Janpour Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain and shivering are two challenging components in the post operative period. Many drugs were used for prevention and treatment of them. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of prophylactic prescription of diclofenac suppository versus intravenous (IV pethidine in spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: We conducted a multi central, prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial on a total of 180 patients who were scheduled for surgery under spinal anesthesia including 60 patients in three groups. Patients were randomly allocated to receive 100 mg sodium diclofenac suppository or 30 mg IV pethidine or placebo. Categorical and continuous variables were analyzed by Chi-square test, t-test, Mann-Whitney and ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: There was no statistical difference with regard to patient characteristics and hemodynamic indices among the three groups. Nine (15%, 10 (16.65% and 24 (40% of patients in diclofenac, pethidine and control groups reported pain and 2, 2, 7 patients received treatment due to it, respectively (P = 0.01. Prevalence of shivering in pethidine group and diclofenac group was the same and both of them were different from the control group (P < 0.001. Pruritus was repetitive in the pethidine group and was statistically significant (P = 0.036 but, post-operative nausea and vomiting was not significantly different among groups. Conclusion: A single dose of sodium diclofenac suppository can provide satisfactory analgesia immediately after surgery and decrease shivering without remarkable complications. This investigation highlights the role of pre-operative administration of a single dose of rectal diclofenac as a sole analgesic for early post-operative period.

  20. The effects of music, white noise, and ambient noise on sedation and anxiety in patients under spinal anesthesia during surgery.

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    Ilkkaya, Nazan Koylu; Ustun, Faik Emre; Sener, Elif Bengi; Kaya, Cengiz; Ustun, Yasemin Burcu; Koksal, Ersin; Kocamanoglu, Ismail Serhat; Ozkan, Fatih

    2014-10-01

    To compare effects of music, white noise, and ambient (background) noise on patient anxiety and sedation. Open, parallel, and randomized controlled trial. Seventy-five patients aged 18 to 60 years who were scheduled for surgical procedures under spinal anesthesia were randomly assigned to ambient noise (Group O), white noise (Group B), or music groups (Group M). We evaluated patients' anxiety and sedation levels via the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAA/S) scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. At 5 minutes before surgery, the STAI-State Anxiety Inventory (SA) value was significantly lower in Group M than the other groups. At 30-minute recovery, Group M showed significantly lower STAI-SA values than the other groups. Patient satisfaction was highest in Group M. OAA/S values were not significantly different between groups during any period (P > .05). We suggest that patient-selected music reduces perioperative anxiety and contributes to patient satisfaction during the perioperative period. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of shivering after cesarean section under spinal anesthesia with or without intrathecal sufentanil: a randomized study.

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    de Figueiredo Locks, Giovani

    2012-01-01

    Shivering is a cause of discomfort and dissatisfaction in patients undergoing cesarean section. The objective of this study paper was to assess the impact of intrathecal administration of sufentanil on the incidence of shivering after cesarean section. In a prospective blinded, randomized clinical trial, pregnant women undergoing cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. Pregnant women in labor, febrile, obese, with pregnancy-induced hypertension, anesthetic block failure or surgical complications were excluded. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups. In Group I, 10mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine combined with 80 mcg of morphine and 2.5 mcg of sufentanil were administered. In Group II, 10mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine combined with 80 mcg of morphine were administered. In the post-anesthesia care unit, patients were evaluated for signs of shivering by an investigator blinded to the patient's group allocation. The sample consisted of 80 patients. In both groups there was a decrease in axillary temperature of patients after cesarean section (pshivering in the immediate postoperative period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of intrathecal dexmedetomidine on shivering after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Karim; Ghadami, Negin; Nouri, Bijan

    2017-01-01

    Shivering is among the common troublesome complications of spinal anesthesia (SA), and causes discomfort and discontentment in parturients undergoing cesarean sections (CSs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intrathecal dexmedetomidine in the prevention of shivering in those who underwent CS under SA. Fifty parturients planned for elective CSs under SA were enrolled in this prospective, double-blinded, controlled study and randomly divided into two equal groups. Spinal block was achieved with 12.5 mg 0.5% heavy bupivacaine plus 5 μg dexmedetomidine (BD group) or 0.5 mL 0.9% normal saline (BN group). The incidence and intensity of shivering, peripheral and core body temperature, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events was recorded. The incidence of shivering was significantly higher in the BN group (52%) than the BD group (24%) ( P =0.04). Likewise, the intensity of shivering was significantly higher in the BN group than the BD group ( P =0.04). The incidence of adverse events, such as hypotension, nausea/vomiting, and bradycardia, was not significantly different between the two groups, although the grade of sedation was higher in the BD group than the BN group ( P =0.004). We conclude that intrathecal dexmedetomidine is effective in lowering the incidence and intensity of shivering in parturients undergoing CSs under SA without major adverse effects.

  3. [Conscious sedation and amnesic effect of intravenous low-dose midazolam prior to spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi; Ohashi, Naotsugu; Kurita, Satoshi; Nakatani, Keiji; Nagata, Noboru; Toyoda, Yoshiroh

    2008-06-01

    The pain associated with spinal puncture is severe, and the memory of this uncomfortable procedure often deters patients from undergoing the procedure again. Therefore, it is important to make the patient as comfortable as possible when this procedure is performed. We administrated a low-dose (1-2.5 mg) of midazolam intravenously several minutes before conducting a spinal-tap in 200 patients undergoing elective surgery of the lower limb. The dose of midazolam used was based on the patient's age and weight, and we investigated remaining of a memory concerning the spinal-tap procedure and side effects of midazolam at the end of surgery. Memory of the spinal-tap procedure remained in 14.0%, 1.9%, and 32.7% of the patients who had received benzodiazepine preoperatively and in 25.0%, 40.0%, and 60.9% of the patients who hadn't received benzodiazepine preoperatively in the age group or =70 years, respectively. No patient experienced severe respiratory depression, but an excessive sedation or restlessness was experienced in 1.6%, 4.8%, and 5.2% of the patients. In the patients aged memory concerning the spinal-tap procedure; however, it is important to note that the number of side effects associated with this procedure increases in patients aged > or =60 years.

  4. Spinal anesthesia with small dose bupivakain in the highly elderly patient

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    Gönül Ölmez Kavak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The most patients that are applied hip and lower-extremity surgery are in the elderly group. The presence of cardiac, endocrine, renal, cerebral and respiratory diseases in this age group increases the risk of peroperative, postoperative morbidity and mortality.In this case, it is presented the managing of anesthesia of a 106 year-old man whom the operation of right hip prosthesis is made. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(3: 214-215

  5. Failed spinal anesthesia in addicts: Is it an incidence or coincidence?

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    Maha M.I. Youssef

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The incidence of failure of the intrathecal anesthesia seemed to be higher in the addict than in non-addict patients. Redo intrathecal injection with a top up 1/2 of the initial dose resulted in success of the block in all failed cases. There was a slower onset and decreased duration of both sensory and motor blocks, with higher incidence of hypotension and nausea more in the addict patients than in non-addicts.

  6. Effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia on serum pain mediators and placental hypoxia molecules after cesarean section

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    Xiao-Hui Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia on serum pain mediators and placental hypoxia molecules after cesarean section. Methods: 126 women accepting cesarean section in our hospital between May 2013 and December 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into two groups, observation group of subjects received hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and control group of subjects accepted bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 1, 3 and 5 d after delivery, serum was collected to determine the levels of pain mediators; the placenta tissue was collected to detect the levels of oxidative stress molecules and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules. Results: 1, 3 and 5 d after delivery, serum substance P (SP, β-endorphin (β-EP, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, nitric oxide (NO and norepinephrine (NE levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while β-EP levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05; reactive oxide species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, GRP78, ERdj1, CHOP and ASK1 levels in placenta tissue of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase (CAT and vitamin C (VitC levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia can adjust the pain mediator secretion, relieve postoperative pain and inhibit oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  7. The Effect of Prophylactic Infusion of Combined Ephedrin and Phenylephrine on Maternal Hemodynamic after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Simin Atashkhoie; Hojat Pourfathi; Bahman Naghipour; Shahla Meshgi

    2018-01-01

    Several techniques have been proposed to prevent hypotension in obstetric patients. Ephedrine and phenylephrine are individually used to prevent maternal hypotension; however, each has its own drawbacks. Some researchers have reported that the infusion of combined ephedrine and phenylephrine immediately after spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery reduces the incidence of maternal hypotension. Other studies have indicated that the combination is not superior to the infusion of an individual ...

  8. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy after Spinal Anesthesia for a Minimally Invasive Urologic Procedure

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    Emmanuel Lilitsis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a patient who suffered from Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM immediately after the initiation of subarachnoid anesthesia for a minimally invasive urologic procedure (tension-free vaginal tape (TVT surgery for stress urine incontinence. TCM mimics acute coronary syndrome and is caused by an exaggerated sympathetic reaction to significant emotional or physical stress. Our patient suffered from chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, and hemodynamic instability immediately following subarachnoid anesthesia and later in the postanesthesia care unit. Blood troponin was elevated and new electrocardiographic changes appeared indicative of cardiac ischemia. Cardiac ultrasound indicated left ventricular apical akinesia and ballooning with severely affected contractility. The patient was admitted to coronary intensive care for the proper care and finally was discharged. TCM was attributed to high emotional preoperative stress for which no premedication had been administered to the patient. In conclusion, adequate premedication and anxiety management are not only a measure to alleviate psychological stress of surgical patients, but, more importantly, an imperative mean to suppress sympathetic nerve system response and its cardiovascular consequences.

  9. Transient unilateral brachial plexopathy and partial Horner's syndrome following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Jonathan A; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    A healthy 21-year-old primigravida presented for elective cesarean section. At 45 min after intrathecal (IT) injection of bupivacaine, morphine and fentanyl she developed dysphagia, right sided facial droop, ptosis and ulnar nerve weakness. This constellation of signs and symptoms resolved 2 h later. Based on the time course and laterality of her symptoms, as well as the pharmacologic properties of spinal opioids, we believe her symptoms can be attributed to the IT administration of fentanyl. PMID:24803773

  10. Transient unilateral brachial plexopathy and partial Horner′s syndrome following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section

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    Jonathan A Anson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A healthy 21-year-old primigravida presented for elective cesarean section. At 45 min after intrathecal (IT injection of bupivacaine, morphine and fentanyl she developed dysphagia, right sided facial droop, ptosis and ulnar nerve weakness. This constellation of signs and symptoms resolved 2 h later. Based on the time course and laterality of her symptoms, as well as the pharmacologic properties of spinal opioids, we believe her symptoms can be attributed to the IT administration of fentanyl.

  11. The effect of listening to Quran on umbilical cord cortisol level during caesarean section under spinal anesthesia

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    Shiva Rafati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery and pain increases cortisol levels with inducing hormonal responses. By reducing stress, adverse effects of cortisol can be controlled and accelerated the healing process. Religious practices like listening to Quran have important roles in reducing anxiety. Moreover, the level of cortisol hormone of the blood is one of the best indicators of the stress level. The aim of this study was to investigating the effect of listening to Quran on the plasma cortisol level of the umbilical cord in cesarean with spinal anesthesia. Methods: A clinical trial study was designed and conducted on sixty primigravid mothers who were hospitalized to deliver their first baby by elective caesarian operation, 30 of them were selected as intervention group and 30 of them were selected as control group. For the subjects of the intervention group, the personal information questionnaires were completed and their vital signs were recorded. Also, their blood was sampled for measuring cortisol level. Then they listened to Quran. After spinal anesthesia, vital signs were recorded and the blood of umbilical cord was sampled for measuring the cortisol level. For the subjects of the control group, all the steps were done except listening to Quran. Two groups were statistically homogenous in the variables of age, gestational age, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate and cortisol levels before the intervention. The mean and SD cortisol in intervention group before and after listening to the Quran were 39.08±10.71 versus 41.10±5.05. Results: The reduction of cortisol level of the intervention group (who listened to Quran was significantly greater than of the control group P=0.035. Systolic blood pressure of the intervention group in the operating ward had statistically significant reduction relation to the systolic blood pressure before operation P=0.043. However systolic blood pressure of the control group in the operating ward had

  12. High Spinal Anesthesia Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Aortic Valve Replacement: Randomized Pilot Study.

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    Trevor W R Lee

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery induces many physiologic changes including major inflammatory and sympathetic nervous system responses. Here, we conducted a single-centre pilot study to generate hypotheses on the potential immune impact of adding high spinal anaesthesia to general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery in adults. We hypothesized that this strategy, previously shown to blunt the sympathetic response and improve pain management, could reduce the undesirable systemic inflammatory responses caused by cardiac surgery.This prospective randomized unblinded pilot study was conducted on 14 patients undergoing cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement secondary to severe aortic stenosis. The primary outcome measures examined longitudinally were serum pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1b, CCL2, anti-inflammatory (IL-10, TNF-RII, IL-1Ra, acute phase protein (CRP, PTX3 and cardiovascular risk (sST2 biomarkers.The kinetics of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarker was determined following surgery. All pro-inflammatory and acute phase reactant biomarker responses induced by surgical stress were indistinguishable in intensity and duration between control groups and those who also received high spinal anaesthesia. Conversely, IL-10 levels were markedly elevated in both intensity and duration in the group receiving high spinal anesthesia (p = 0.005.This hypothesis generating pilot study suggests that high spinal anesthesia can alter the net inflammatory response that results from cardiac surgery. In appropriately selected populations, this may add incremental benefit by dampening the net systemic inflammatory response during the week following surgery. Larger population studies, powered to assess immune, physiologic and clinical outcomes in both acute and longer term settings, will be required to better assess potential benefits of incorporating high spinal anesthesia.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00348920.

  13. The comparison of intraincisional injection tramadol, pethidine and bupivacaine on postcesarean section pain relief under spinal anesthesia

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    Mitra Jabalameli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bupivacaine, tramadol, and pethidine has local anesthetic effect. The aim of this study was to compare effect of subcutaneous (SC infiltration of tramadol, pethidine, and bupivacaine on postoperative pain relief after cesarean delivery. Materials and Methods: 120 patient, scheduled for elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated to 1 of the 4 groups according to the drugs used for postoperative analgesia: Group P (Pethidine 50 mg ,Group T (Tramadol 40 mg, Group B (Bupivacaine 0.25% 0.7 mg/kg, and Group C (control 20CC normal saline injection in incision site of surgery. Pain intensity (VAS = visual analogous scale at rest and on coughing and opioid consumption were assessed on arrival in the recovery room, and then 15, 30, 60 minutes and 2, 6, 12, 24 hours after that. Results: VAS scores were significantly lower in groups T and P compared with groups B and C except for 24 hours (VAS rest and 6 hours (VAS on coughing postoperatively (P < 0.05. The number of patients requiring morphine were significantly different between the groups (105 doses vs. 87, 56, 46, doses for group C, B, T and P, respectively, P < 0.05 in all the times, except for 2 and 6 hours postoperatively. Conclusions: The administration of subcutaneous pethidine or tramadol after cesarean section improves analgesia and has a significant morphine-sparing effect compared with bupivacaine and control groups.

  14. A Comparative Study on Different Doses of Pethidine and Ketamine for Prevention of Shivering During and After Spinal Anesthesia at Cesarean Section

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    Hasan Zabetian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative shivering is a common complication during anesthesia, which is usually accompanied with other problems such as increased oxygen intake, increased intracranial pressure and several other complications. This study attempted to compare different doses of pethidine and ketamine for prevention of shivering during and after spinal anesthesia at cesarean section. This was a double-blind randomized clinical trial comprising a population of 45 pregnant women in three 15-subject groups receiving 0.3 and 0.15 mg of ketamine per kg body weight as well as 25 mg of pethidine. Admitted to Motahari Hospital in Jahrom (Iran, the subjects went through selective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Data were analyzed through SPSS 16, t-test, Chi-square and Kruskal–Wallis. The P-value was considered significant at lower than 0.05. As for ketamine 0.15, on patient (6.7% experienced mild shivering at 5, 10, 15 and 30 minutes. The intensity of shivering in recovery between ketamine 0.3, ketamine 0.15 and pethidine 25 mg was not significant at 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 minutes (p-value> 0.05. Although a dose of 0.15 and 0.3 mg per kg led to shivering control, pethidine was still a better choice for shivering control.

  15. Prophylactic ondansetron does not prevent shivering or decrease shivering severity during cesarean delivery under combined spinal epidural anesthesia: a randomized trial.

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    Browning, Roger M; Fellingham, William H; O'Loughlin, Edmond J; Brown, Nicholas A; Paech, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean delivery is commonly performed under regional anesthesia, which is often associated with maternal shivering. This can cause distress and interfere with monitoring. The study objective was to evaluate the antishivering efficacy of ondansetron, which reduces the incidence and severity of shivering in nonobstetric patients. We hypothesized that there would be a significant decrease in the incidence and/or severity of shivering in women who are given intravenous ondansetron 8 mg before combined spinal epidural (CSE) anesthesia, when compared with placebo. This was a randomized, double-blinded, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of 118 women scheduled for elective cesarean surgery. Women received either intravenous ondansetron 8 mg (n = 58) or saline (n = 60) before CSE anesthesia (intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% 2.2-2.5 mL plus fentanyl 15 μg). The incidence and severity of shivering, measured on a validated 5-point scale, and other outcomes, such as nausea, pruritus, headache, or satisfaction, were assessed at 3 time points during the surgery and postoperative period. The incidence of shivering at any time point did not differ significantly between groups: ondansetron 41% versus placebo 47% (P = 0.54). The incidence of severe shivering at any time was not significantly different: ondansetron 32% versus placebo 33% (P = 0.79). There were no significant differences between the groups for any secondary outcomes. Intravenous ondansetron 8 mg before performing CSE anesthesia in women undergoing elective cesarean delivery does not decrease the incidence or severity of shivering.

  16. The incidence of transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine or bupivacaine: The effects of needle type and surgical position: brief report

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    Etezadi F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBurning Transient Neurologic Syndrome (TNS which was first described by Schneider et al in 1993, is defined as a transient pain and dysesthesia in waist, buttocks and the lower limbs after spinal anesthesia.1,2 The incidence of TNS after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine is reported to be as high as 10-40%.3,4 This prospective study was designed to determine the incidence of TNS with two different types of drugs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, in lithotomy or supine positions as the primary outcomes and to determine the association between two different types of needles and surgical positions with the occurrence of TNS as the secondary outcome."nThe present study was conducted on 250 patients (ASA I-II, aged 18-60 years old, who were candidates for surgery in supine or lithotomy positions. According to the needle type (Sprotte or Quincke and the local anesthetic (lidocaine or bupivacaine all patients were randomly divided into four groups. After establishing standard monitoring, spinal anesthesia was performed in all sitting patients by attending anesthesiologists at L2-L3 or L3-L4 levels. The patients were placed in supine or lithotomy position, in regards to the surgical procedure. During the first three postoperative days, patients were observed for post spinal anesthesia complications, especially TNS. Any sensation of pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia or hyperalgesia in the low back area, buttocks, the anterior or posterior thigh, knees, either foot or both feet were recorded. Moreover, duration of pain, its radiation and its relation to sleep and the patients' position were all carefully considered. Ultimately, the patients' response to opioid (pethidine for analgesia was determined."nThe incidence of TNS was higher when spinal anesthesia was induced with lidocaine (68% vs. 22%, P=0.003. TNS developed in 85% of the patients in lidocaine group and 58% in bupivacaine group after surgery in lithotomy position (P=0.002. In 77 patients pain

  17. Effects of opium addiction on level of sensory block in spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine for lower abdomen and limb surgery: a case-control study.

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    Karbasy, Seyyed Hasan; Derakhshan, Pooya

    2014-12-01

    In clinical practice, the level of sensory block in spinal anesthesia in opium abusers is lower than that in non-abusers because of adaptive changes caused by opium use. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of sensory block resulting from the intrathecal administration of 0.5% bupivacaine in opium abuser patients undergoing lower extremity and lower abdominal surgeries. A total of 100 patients who were candidates of elective lower extremity orthopedic and lower abdominal surgeries were recruited and assigned to two groups based on their history of opium addiction (Case or control). Both groups underwent the same anesthesia procedure and pinprick test was used to assess the level of anesthesia. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups regarding age, duration of the surgery, and type of surgery. The frequency of addiction was higher in males than in females. The level of sensory block at three minutes was significantly lower in the opium abuser group (P = 0.006). The mean time to achieve T10 sensory block was 10.33 ± 5.79 minutes in the opium abusers and 6.89 ± 3.88 minutes in the controls (P = 0.001). The level of the highest sensory block was lower in the opium abuser group (P = 0.002). The findings of this study suggested that after induction of spinal anesthesia with intrathecal administration of bupivacaine, chronic opium abusers would have a lower level of sensory block in comparison with patients without a history of opium abuse.

  18. Efficacy of intravenous tramadol and low-dose ketamine in the prevention of post-spinal anesthesia shivering following cesarean section: a double-blinded, randomized control trial.

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    Lema, Girmay Fitiwi; Gebremedhn, Endale Gebreegziabher; Gebregzi, Amare Hailekiros; Desta, Yilkal Tadesse; Kassa, Adugna Aregawi

    2017-01-01

    Shivering is a frequent and undesirable complication of spinal anesthesia. It is a physiologic response to increase the body core temperature in an attempt to raise metabolic heat production. However, shivering may trigger myocardial ischemia; increase intraocular and intracranial pressures, increase wound pain, delay wound healing and interfere with pulse rate, blood pressure and electrocardiogram monitoring. We aimed to compare the efficacy of intravenous (IV) ketamine with IV tramadol for the prevention of shivering in patients who underwent cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted. One hundred and twenty-three American Society of Anesthesiologist I and II patients, aged between 18 and 39 years, who underwent cesarean section were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups: group S (n=41; control group) received saline, group K (n=41) received ketamine 0.2 mg/kg and group T (n=41) received tramadol 0.5 mg/kg. Incidence and grade of shivering and side effects between the treatment groups were recorded. The incidence of shivering was significantly reduced in the ketamine and tramadol groups (41.5% and 53.7%, respectively) compared to the saline group (70.7%; p =0.028). Grade 3 shivering occurred in 16 (39%) patients in the saline group, compared to 9 (22%) in the tramadol group and 8 (19.5%) in the ketamine group ( p =0.011). Only two cases in the saline group developed grade 4 shivering ( p shivering. We recommend low-dose IV ketamine or tramadol prophylaxis for parturients undergoing cesarean section under spinal anesthesia.

  19. Periarticular Morphine-Induced Sphincter of Oddi Spasm Causing Severe Pain and Bradycardia in an Awake Patient Under Spinal Anesthesia: An Important Diagnostic Consideration.

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    Koumpan, Yuri; Engen, Dale; Tanzola, Robert; Saha, Tarit

    2016-10-01

    Sphincter of Oddi spasm from opioids has been documented, presenting as severe epigastric pain and potentially overlooked in a differential diagnosis. We present a case of sphincter of Oddi spasm from periarticular morphine in a patient under spinal anesthesia, causing severe distress and treated effectively with glucagon. It is important for anesthesiologists using opioids to consider it as a cause of perioperative pain and be familiar with treatment as it may be refractory by conventional use of opioids for pain relief. It is also important to consider the systemic effects of periarticular absorption, as evident by our case.

  20. Single shot spinal anesthesia with very low hyperbaric bupivacaine dose (3.75 mg) for hip fracture repair surgery in the elderly. A randomized, double blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Peiró, C M; Gimeno, A; Soriano, J L

    2014-11-01

    Single shot spinal anesthesia is used worldwide for hip fracture repair surgery in the elderly. Arterial hypotension is a frequent adverse effect. We hypothesized that lowering local anesthetics dose could decrease the incidence of arterial hypotension, while maintaining quality of surgical anesthesia. In a randomized double blinded study, 66 patients over the age of 65 years, with hip fracture needing surgical repair, were assigned to B0.5 group 7.5mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 5mg/ml (control group), and B0.25 group 3.75mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 2.5mg/ml (study group). Sensory and motor block level, and hemodynamic parameters including blood presure, heart rate and vasopressor dose administration were registered, along with rescue anesthesia needs, the feasibility of surgery, its duration, and regression time of sensory anesthesia to T12. After exclusions, 61 patients were included in the final analysis. Arterial hypotension incidence was lower in the B0.25 group (at the 5, 10, and 15min determinations), and a lower amount of vasopressor drugs was needed (mean accumulated ephedrine dose 1.6mg vs. 8.7mg in the B0.5 group, p<0.002). Sensory block regression time to T12 was shorter in the B0.25 group, mean 78.6±23.6 (95% CI 51.7-110.2)min vs. 125.5±37.9 (95% CI 101.7-169.4)min in the B0.5 group, p=0.033. All but one patient in the B0.25 group were operated on under the anesthetic procedure first intended. No rescue anesthesia was needed. Lowering bupivacaine dose for single shot spinal anesthesia for hip fracture repair surgery in elderly patients was effective in decreasing the occurrence of arterial hypotension and vasopressor use, while intraoperative quality remained. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison of three vasopressors for tight control of maternal blood pressure during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia: Effect on maternal and fetal outcome

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    Neerja Bhardwaj

    2013-01-01

    Results: The umbilical pH was comparable in all the three groups (P > 0.05. The mean SBP from spinal block until delivery was similar over time for all the three groups. The incidence of reactive hypertension was more in group M (P < 0.05 than in group E and group P. Total drug consumption to meet target blood pressure till delivery was 39.3 ± 14.6 mg in group E, 1.7 ± 0.9 mg in group M, and 283.6 ± 99.8 mcg in group P. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was comparable in the three groups. Conclusion: All the three vasopressors were equally effective in maintaining maternal blood pressure as well as umbilical pH during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section without any detrimental effects on fetal and maternal outcome.

  2. A comparison of prophylactic use of meperidine, meperidine plus dexamethasone, and ketamine plus midazolam for preventing of shivering during spinal anesthesia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhpour, Ali; Jafari, Alireza; Hashemi, Masoud; Hosseini, Behnam; Razavi, Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Vosoughian, Maryam; Behnaz, Faranak; Amin Nejad, Reza; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Soltani, Fereshteh

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of combination of meperidine and dexamethasone with that of placebo, meperidine alone, and the combination of ketamine and midazolam in preventing shivering during spinal anesthesia. This is a prospective, placebo-controlled study. The setting is at an operating room of a university-based teaching hospital. Two hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients undergoing orthopedic and urologic surgery under spinal anesthesia were included. Subarachnoid anesthesia was performed by using 15mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. Patients were randomly allocated to receive saline (placebo, group C), meperidine 0.4mg/kg (group Me), ketamine 0.25mg/kg plus midazolam 37.5μg/kg (group KMi), and meperidine 0.2mg/kg plus dexamethasone 0.1mg/kg (group MeD). All drugs were given as an intravenous bolus immediately after intrathecal injection. During surgery and stay in the recovery room, shivering score, blood pressure, and some other adverse effects were recorded at 5-minute intervals. Axillary and tympanic temperatures were recorded at 15-minute intervals during the perioperative period. The incidence of shivering after 30minutes of spinal anesthesia in groups C, Me, KMi, and MeD was 64%, 20%, 20%, and 4%, respectively, which was significantly higher in group C compared with other groups (Pshivering resulting from spinal anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prophylactic phenylephrine infusion for the prevention of hypotension after spinal anesthesia in the elderly: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Fabrice; Marty, Philippe; Bruneteau, Laura; Merlet, Virgine; Bataille, Benoît; Ferrier, Anne; Gris, Claude; Kurrek, Matt; Fourcade, Olivier; Minville, Vincent; Sommet, Agnes

    2016-12-01

    Hypotension frequently occurs during spinal anesthesia (SA), especially in the elderly. Phenylephrine is effective to prevent SA-induced hypotension during cesarean delivery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of prophylactic infusion of phenylephrine after SA for orthopedic surgery in the elderly. This prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study included 54 patients older than 60 years undergoing elective lower limb surgery under SA (injection of 10 mg of isobaric bupivacaine with 5 μg of sufentanyl). Patients were randomized to group P (100-μg/mL solution of phenylephrine solution at 1 mL/min after placement of SA) or the control group C (0.9% isotonic sodium chloride solution). The flow of the infusion was stopped if the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was higher than the baseline MAP and maintained or restarted at 1 mL/min if MAP was equal to or lower than the baseline MAP. Heart rate and MAP were collected throughout the case. Hypotension was defined by a 20% decrease and hypertension as a 20% increase from baseline MAP. Bradycardia was defined as a heart rate lower than 50 beats per minute. Twenty-eight patients were randomized to group P and 26 patients to group C. MAP was higher in group P than in group C (92 ± 2 vs 82 ± 2 mm Hg, mean ± SD, Phypotensive episodes per patient was higher in group C compared with group P (9 [0-39] vs 1 [0-10], median [extremes], Phypotensive patients was similar between groups (19 [73%] vs 20 [71%], P= 1). The time to onset of the first hypotension was shorter in group C (3 [1-13] vs 15 [1-95] minutes, P= .004). The proportion of patients without hypotension (cumulative survival) was better in group P (P= .04). The number of hypertensive episodes per patient and the number of bradycardic episodes per patient were similar between groups (P= not significant). Prophylactic phenylephrine infusion is an effective method of reducing SA-induced hypotension in the elderly

  4. Combined use of hyperbaric and hypobaric ropivacaine significantly improves hemodynamic characteristics in spinal anesthesia for caesarean section: a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled study.

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    ZheFeng Quan

    Full Text Available To observe the hemodynamic changes of parturients in the combined use of hyperbaric (4 mg and hypobaric (6 mg ropivacaine during spinal anesthesia for caesarean section in this randomized double-blind study.Parturients (n = 136 undergoing elective cesarean delivery were randomly and equally allocated to receive either combined hyperbaric and hypobaric ropivacaine (Group A or hyperbaric ropivacaine (Group B. Outcome measures were: hemodynamic characteristics, maximum height of sensory block, time to achieve T8 sensory blockade level, incidence of complications, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min, and neonatal blood gas analysis.Group A had a lower level of sensory blockade (T6 [T6-T7] and longer time to achieve T8 sensory blockade level (8 ± 1.3 min than did patients in Group B (T3 [T2-T4] and 5 ± 1.0 min, respectively; P < 0.001, both. The incidence rates for hypotension, nausea, and vomiting were significantly lower in Group A (13%, 10%, and 3%, respectively than Group B (66%, 31%, and 13%; P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P = 0.028.Combined use of hyperbaric (4 mg and hypobaric (6 mg ropivacaine significantly decreased the incidences of hypotension and complications in spinal anesthesia for caesarean section by extending induction time and decreasing the level of sensory blockade.Chinese Clinical Trial Register ChiCTR-TRC-13004622.

  5. A prospective randomized study comparing short- and intermediate-term perioperative outcome variables after spinal or general anesthesia for lumbar disk and laminectomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W S; Thalji, Z; Stevenson, K; Shea, J

    1996-09-01

    General or regional anesthesia may be used for lumbar laminectomy. To determine whether one method is superior, 122 patients were randomly assigned to receive either a standard general anesthetic (GA) or spinal anesthesia (SA) supplemented with intravenous (IV) propofol sedation. Data from the intraoperative period through hospital discharge were collected and compared. Demographically, both groups were similar. Total anesthesia (131.0 +/- 4.3 vs 106.6 +/- 3.2 min) and surgical times (81.5 +/- 3.6 vs 67.1 +/- 2.8 min) were longer in the GA group. Intraoperative hemodynamics were similar between groups except that the incidence of increased blood pressure was more frequent with GA (26.2% vs 3.3%). Blood loss was less during SA (133 +/- 18 mL vs 221 +/- 32 mL). Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) heart rates and mean arterial pressures were higher in the GA group. Peak pain scores in the PACU were higher after GA compared with SA (58 +/- 4 vs 22 +/- 3) as were the number of patients who required analgesics. Severe nausea was more common in the GA group both in the PACU and during the 24 h after surgery. Analgesic requirements after discharge from the PACU, urinary retention, and days in the hospital did not differ between groups. This study suggests that SA may be superior to GA both intraoperatively and postoperatively for lumbar spine procedures lasting less than 2 h.

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

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    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  7. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Nout, Remi A.; Sturdza, Alina; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  8. The effects of different doses of intrathecal meperidine on the incidence and severity of shivering during lower extremity orthopedic surgery under spinal anesthesia: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind-clinical trial

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    Azim Honarmand

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Using higher dosage of intrathecal meperidine (0.3 mg/kg was more effective than using lower dosage of meperidine (0.1 mg/kg and 0.2 mg/kg in reducing the incidence and severity of shivering during spinal anesthesia in lower extremity orthopedic surgeries.

  9. The evaluation of effects two different doses of hydrocortisone on the intensity of perioperative shivering in elective surgery under spinal anesthesia: A double-blind randomized controlled trial study

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    Mohammadreza Safavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post- and intra-operative shivering is one of the most complications of spinal anesthesia so recommend a suitable drug with at least complications for prevention and control of postoperative shivering. This current study aimed to compare the preventive effect of hydrocortisone on intra- and post-operative shivering in patients undergoing surgery with spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial study, ninety patients who candidate for surgery with spinal anesthesia were selected and randomly divided into three groups. The first and second groups were received 1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg hydrocortisone, respectively, and the third group was received normal saline, and postoperative shivering was compared between the three groups. Results: The investigation of the incidence of inter- and post-operative shivering in patients in the three groups revealed that within the study period, 31 patients suffered from shivering among which 9, 5, and 17 cases were in 1 mg/kg hydrocortisone group, 2 mg/kg hydrocortisone group, and placebo group, respectively, and according to the Chi-square test, the difference among the three groups was significant (P = 0.004. Conclusion: According to the obtained results, the overall conclusion of the study is that using hydrocortisone at least with the dose of 1 mg/kg as a preventive drug reduced the incidence of intra- and post-operative shivering with spinal anesthesia.

  10. Retrospective analysis of clinical efficacy of protocol-based management of postdural puncture headache in patients undergoing cesarean section under spinal anesthesia

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    Zainab Salim Said Al Amri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in needle size and design, postdural puncture headache (PDPH still remains a significant cause of morbidity in parturients receiving spinal anesthesia. Several treatment options have been suggested to treat PDPH ranging from bed rest, rehydration, and analgesics to epidural blood patch. At our institution, we adhere to a strict protocol for managing PDPH wherein adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH is one of the treatment steps in cases of unrelieved PDPH. We carried out a 1-year retrospective analysis to note the efficacy of ACTH in managing PDPH in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. All patients with PDPH were followed up for at least 2 months after being discharged from the hospital to note recurrence, if any. Data revealed that a total of 614 patients received spinal anesthesia during this period using a 25- or 26-G Quincke needle with the patient in the sitting position using a midline approach. Totally 31 patients developed PDPH and all patients reported their headache spontaneously. As per protocol, if the PDPH did not resolve or lessen in intensity with bed rest and simple analgesics (paracetamol, diclofenac or tramadol alone, or in combination over the first 24 h, two injections of ACTH (1.5 μg/kg in 500 ml saline intravenous over 30 min were administered 12 h apart. No further injections of ACTH were administered. If any treatment modality demonstrated relief or attenuation in PDPH, the patient was observed for the next 2 days. If there was no further improvement, next step of the protocol using epidural blood patch was adopted. Of these 614 patients, 31 developed PDPH giving an incidence of 5.04%. The first line of conservative treatment with bed rests and simple analgesics was successful in relieving or alleviating PDPH in 20 patients (64.5% within 24 h. About 11 patients (35.5% went on to receive ACTH as the second conservative line of management. In 10 of these 11 patients (90.9%, PDPH

  11. Analgesia and side effects of the addition of 10 or 20 µg fentanyl to articaine in spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopy: a randomized and observer-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, Paula; Salonen, Merja; Tarkkila, Pekka; Rosenberg, Per

    2017-06-01

    Articaine, a popular and rapidly acting local anesthetic in dentistry, has been also found to be beneficial in ambulatory spinal anesthesia. Analgesia in the intraoperative and immediate postoperative period may be further improved by adding fentanyl to the local anesthetic solution for spinal anesthesia. The aim was to evaluate dose-dependency of analgesia and side effects associated with intrathecal fentanyl additive to articaine for spinal anesthesia in knee arthroscopy patients. In this randomized, observer- and patient-blinded study, 90 adult patients scheduled for elective ambulatory knee arthroscopy under spinal anesthesia were randomized into three groups: plain articaine 60 mg with saline (group AF0), articaine 60 mg with fentanyl 10 µg (group AF10) or 20 µg (group AF20) in a total volume of 1.9 ml. The blinded observer tested the sensory and the motor block, and performed telephone interviews on the first and seventh postoperative days. The median (IQR) duration of sensory block at the dermatomal level of T10 was significantly longer in groups AF10, 69 min (56) and AF20, 69 min (45) than in group AF0, 41 min (35) (p = 0.013). Motor block duration was similar in all groups (median 120 min). Group AF20 patients experienced pruritus significantly more often than patients in the other groups (p = 0.039). No acute or late anesthetic side effects occurred, and satisfaction with the anesthetic technique was the same in all groups (97% satisfied). Fentanyl 10 or 20 µg as additive to articaine for spinal anesthesia prolonged the duration of sensory block significantly and similarly. Fentanyl 20 µg was more often associated with pruritus than fentanyl 10 µg.

  12. Comparison of 2-Chloroprocaine, Bupivacaine, and Lidocaine for Spinal Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Knee Arthroscopy in an Outpatient Setting: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunkens, An; Vermeulen, Kristien; Van Gerven, Elke; Fieuws, Steffen; Van de Velde, Marc; Rex, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Knee arthroscopy is a well-established procedure in day-case surgery, which is frequently performed under spinal anesthesia. It is, however, controversial whether the choice for a specific local anesthetic translates into relevant outcomes. We hypothesized that the use of 2-chloroprocaine would be associated with a faster recovery from sensorimotor block. Ninety-nine patients were included in this prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial and randomly allocated to receive either 40 mg 2-chloroprocaine, 40 mg lidocaine, or 7.5 mg bupivacaine. The primary endpoint was the time until complete recovery of sensory block. Secondary endpoints included time to recovery from motor block, failure rates, incidence of hypotension/bradycardia, postoperative pain, first mobilization, voiding and discharge times, and the incidence of transient neurologic symptoms. This clinical trial was registered prior to patient enrollment (EudraCT 2011-003675-11). Patients in the chloroprocaine group had a significantly shorter time until recovery from sensory block (median, 2.6 hours; interquartile range [IQR], 2.2-2.9 hours) than patients in the lidocaine group (3.1 hours; IQR, 2.7-3.6 hours; P bupivacaine group (6.1 hours; IQR, 5.5 hours to undefined hours; P bupivacaine. Times to first mobilization, voiding, and discharge were significantly shorter for chloroprocaine when compared with bupivacaine, but not with lidocaine. In the bupivacaine group, patients needed significantly less rescue medication for postoperative pain when compared with lidocaine and chloroprocaine. Groups did not differ with respect to patient satisfaction, incidence of bradycardia/hypotension, and transient neurologic symptom rate. For spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing ambulatory knee arthroscopy, chloroprocaine has the shortest time to complete recovery of sensory and motor block compared with bupivacaine and lidocaine.

  13. Evaluation of spinal anesthesia blockade time with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, with or without sufentanil, in chronic opioid users: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Yekta, Reza Atef; Azimaraghi, Omid; Barzin, Gilda; Movafegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The primary outcome of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding sufentanil to hyperbaric bupivacaine on duration of sensory blockade of spinal anesthesia in chronic opioid users in comparison with non-addicts. Sixty patients scheduled for orthopedic surgery under spinal anesthesia were allocated into four groups: group 1 (no history of opium use who received intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine along with 1mL saline as placebo); group 2 (no history of opium use who received intrathecal bupivacaine along with 1mL sufentanil [5μg]); group 3 (positive history of opium use who received intrathecal bupivacaine along with 1mL saline as placebo) and group 4 (positive history of opium use who received intrathecal bupivacaine along with 1mL sufentanil [5μg]). The onset time and duration of sensory and motor blockade were measured. The duration of sensory blockade in group 3 was 120±23.1min which was significantly less than other groups (G1=148±28.7, G2=144±26.4, G4=139±24.7, p=0.007). The duration of motor blockade in group 3 was 145±30.0min which was significantly less than other groups (G1=164±36.0, G2=174±26.8, G4=174±24.9, p=0.03). Addition of 5μg intrathecal sufentanil to hyperbaric bupivacaine in chronic opioid users lengthened the sensory and motor duration of blockade to be equivalent to blockade measured in non-addicts. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. [Evaluation of a protocol of spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a Tunisian maternity unit: hemodynamic repercussions and risk factors for hypotension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikha, Nabil; Ben Ayed, Mahdi; Ellouze, Omar; Ouerghi, Sonia; Bellazreg, Ramzi; Ben Ammar, Mohamed Salah

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate hemodynamic repercussion of a protocol of spinal anesthesia (SA) for cesarean and release the predictive factors of maternal arterial hypotension post spinal anesthesia. We included parturients proposed for Cesarean under SA. They were not included the women of statute ASA > II, preeclamptics, eclamptics and/or having counter-indications of SA. We excluded the cases where there were technical difficulties at the time of the realization of SA, a failure or a complication of this SA. We injected 10 Mg of bupivacaïne 0.5% isobar, 10 μg of fentanyl and 100 μg of morphine. The data were collected before the realization of SA (anthropometric parameters; antecedents; basic systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BSBP and DSBP) and basic heart rate (BHR)) and after SA (systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), heart rate (HR); occurred or not of a sympathetic block (falls of the SBP of more than 20% of its basic value or a SBPcesarean and group 2: 500 elective cesarean). The incidence of the sympathetic block was of 44.2% as a whole and this block was significantly more frequent in group 2 (p=0.0001). There was a significant relation between the incidence of a sympathetic block and the advanced age of the parturient (p=0.0001), the important weight (p=0.047), high ASA statute (p=0.0001), the presence of hypertension (p=0.0001), diabetes (p=0.001) or cesarean (p=0.00015) in the antecedents and the low BSBP (p=0.015). In spite of the beneficial effect of the reduction in the amounts of local anesthetic in the SA, the sympathetic block remains frequent after SA for Cesarean. Thus, it is essential to detect the high risk women of occurred of sympathetic block after SA, and to propose strategies of prevention, monitoring and management for this population.

  15. Prevention of Spinal Anesthesia-Induced Hypotension During Cesarean Delivery by 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 Receptor Antagonists: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis and Meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesen, Michael; Klimek, Markus; Hoeks, Sanne E; Rossaint, Rolf

    2016-10-01

    Hypotension remains a frequent complication of spinal anesthesia, increasing the risk of nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and aspiration. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine whether 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, administered before the initiation of spinal anesthesia, mitigate hypotension. After a systematic literature search in various databases, randomized placebo-controlled double-blind trials studying the preventive effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists were included. A random-effects model was applied, risk ratio (RR, binary variables) or weighted mean difference (continuous variables) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. The primary outcome was the incidence of hypotension. Seventeen trials (8 obstetric, 9 non-obstetric) reporting on 1604 patients were identified. Ondansetron in doses from 2 to 12 mg was studied in 12 trials. Prophylactic 5-HT3 administration significantly reduced the risk of hypotension in the combined analysis of 17 trials, RR 0.54 (95% CI 0.36-0.81, I = 79%). In obstetric trials, the RR was 0.52, 95% CI 0.30-0.88, I = 87% (number needed to treat 4). In non-obstetric studies, the 95% CIs were wide and included a clinically relevant reduction in the risk of hypotension (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.22-1.16; I = 66%). Contour-enhanced funnel plots confirmed publication bias. Meta-regression showed a significant ondansetron dose response in non-obstetric patients (β = -0.355, P = .04). In the combined and in the obstetric-only analysis, the risk of bradycardia was significantly reduced as was the use of phenylephrine equivalents. 5-HT3 antagonists are effective in reducing the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia; the effects are moderate and are only significant in the subgroup of patients undergoing cesarean delivery. The effects in the non-obstetric population are not significant.

  16. The Effect of Low-Dose Intravenous Ketamine on Postoperative Pain Following Cesarean Section with Spinal Anesthesia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Mojgan Rahmanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Low-dose ketamine has been considered a good substitute for opioids for controlling postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of low-dose intravenous ketamine following cesarean section with spinal anesthesia on postoperative pain and its potential complications. Methods: One hundred and sixty pregnant women volunteered to participate in this randomized controlled trial. Participants were randomly divided into two groups (n=80 for each group. Five minutes after delivery, the experimental group received 0.25mg/kg ketamine while the control group received the same amount of normal saline. Results: There was a significant difference between the two groups in the severity of pain at one, two, six, and 12 hours following surgery. Postoperative pain was significantly less severe in the experimental group. Compared to the control group, the experimental group felt pain less frequently and therefore asked for analgesics less often. On average, the number of doses of analgesics used for the participants in the experimental group was significantly less than the number of doses used for the control group. Analgesic side effects (including nausea, itching, and headache were not significantly different between the two groups. However, vomiting was significantly more prevalent in the control group and hallucination was more common in the experimental group. Conclusion: We conclude that administration of low doses of ketamine after spinal anesthesia reduces the need for analgesics and has fewer side effects than using opioids. Further studies are required to determine the proper dose of ketamine which offers maximum analgesic effect. Furthermore, administration of low-dose ketamine in combination with other medications in order to minimize its side effects warrants further investigation.

  17. The effects of unilateral and bilateral spinal anaesthesia on hemodynamic parameters in patients surgically treated for inguinal hernia: Hemodynamic parameters and spinal anesthesia

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    Milosavljević Snežana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conventional bilateral spinal anaesthesia is commonly used for surgical treatment of inguinal hernia because it causes fast development of block with relatively small dosage of local anaesthetic; furthermore, it is easily administered, reduces the level of metabolic response to stress, reduces the incidence of deep venous thrombosis and respiratory depression. On the other hand, the main side effect is hypotension Objective: The goal of the research was to determine which of the two methods of spinal anaesthesia (conventional bilateral, achieved with regular dosage of long-lasting bupivacaine or hypobaric unilateral, achieved with combined application of bupivacaine and fentanyl ensures higher hemodynamic stability during tension-free hernioplasty in patients from group I and II of ASA classification system. Methods: The research was conducted as a prospective, controlled clinical study with the total amount of 50 patients, males and females, and within the age span ranging from 17 to 77, who all had indications for surgical treatment of one-sided inguinal hernia under spinal anaesthesia. The hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure were measured during following intervals: T1 - during preanaesthetic visit, T2 - after premedication and the iv administration of Ringer's lactate solution, T3 - 15 minutes after the administration of spinal anaesthesia, T4 - after the surgical incision, T5 - intraoperatively, T6 - during the placement of the last surgical stitch on the skin, T7 - one hour postoperatively. Results: The results showed that the frequency of clinically relevant hypotension was statistically much higher in patients with bilateral spinal anaesthesia (24 % when compared to patients administered with unilateral spinal anaesthesia (4%. Ten minutes after the application of spinal anaesthesia the mean arterial pressure has decreased by 20% when compared to basic values in group BB, and by

  18. A comparison of effect of preemptive use of oral gabapentin and pregabalin for acute post-operative pain after surgery under spinal anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafna, Usha; Rajarajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Khandelwal, Mamta; Verma, Anand Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Preemptive analgesia is an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered processing of afferent input. Pregabalin has been claimed to be more effective in preventing neuropathic component of acute nociceptive pain of surgery. We conducted a study to compare the effect of oral gabapentin and pregabalin with control group for post-operative analgesia Materials and Methods: A total of 90 ASA grade I and II patients posted for elective gynecological surgeries were randomized into 3 groups (group A, B and C of 30 patients each). One hour before entering into the operation theatre the blinded drug selected for the study was given with a sip of water. Group A- received identical placebo capsule, Group B- received 600mg of gabapentin capsule and Group C — received 150 mg of pregabalin capsule. Spinal anesthesia was performed at L3-L4 interspace and a volume of 3.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine heavy injected over 30sec through a 25 G spinal needle. VAS score at first rescue analgesia, mean time of onset of analgesia, level of sensory block at 5min and 10 min interval, onset of motor block, total duration of analgesia and total requirement of rescue analgesia were observed as primary outcome. Hemodynamics and side effects were recorded as secondary outcome in all patients. Results: A significantly longer mean duration of effective analgesia in group C was observed compared with other groups (P < 0.001). The mean duration of effective analgesia in group C was 535.16 ± 32.86 min versus 151.83 ± 16.21 minutes in group A and 302.00 ± 24.26 minutes in group B. The mean numbers of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 hours in group A, B and C was 4.7 ± 0.65, 4.1 ±0.66 and 3.9±0.614. (P value <0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that preemptive use of gabapentin 600mg and pregabalin 150 mg orally significantly reduces the postoperative rescue analgesic requirement and increases the duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing

  19. Comparison of complications of spinal and general anesthasia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the complications of spinal anesthesia are much less than general anesthesia, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is still performed under general anesthesia in most centers. Therefore, in this study spinal anesthesia is compared with general anesthesia in patients undergoing PCNL. This research was a ...

  20. Post spinal meningitis and asepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Ruiz-Neto, P P; Brandao Neto, M

    2002-07-01

    Post spinal meningitis (PSM) is a complication still currently being reported. After two PSM cases in our hospital an epidemiological study was initiated, which included a survey of techniques for asepsis that are applied in our department. Cases defined as PSM comprised meningitis within a week after spinal anesthesia. Anesthesia records, anesthesia complication files and the records of the Hospital Commission for Infection Control from 1997 to 2000 were reviewed. Asepsis techniques applied were surveyed by a questionnaire answered by all our department's anesthesiologists. The equipment and procedures for spinal anesthesia were listed. Current anesthesia textbooks were reviewed for recommendations regarding asepsis techniques in conjunction with spinal anesthesia. Three cases of PSM were identified following 38,128 spinal anesthesias whereas none was observed in 12,822 patients subjected to other types of regional or general anesthesia (P>0.05). Culture of cerebrospinal fluid yielded Streptococcus in two patients and was negative in the other patient. The asepsis technique applied by the anesthesiologists varied considerably. The literature review showed that aspects on asepsis for spinal anesthesia are poorly covered. The incidence of meningitis was similar in patients subjected to spinal anesthesia and in those subjected to other anesthetic techniques. Asepsis techniques were found to differ considerably among our staff members, reflecting the lack of well-defined published standards for this procedure. We recommend that asepsis for spinal anesthesia should not be less rigorous than for surgical asepsis.

  1. Randomized clinical trial comparing spinal anesthesia with local anesthesia with sedation for loop colostomy closure Ensaio clínico randomizado comparando raquianestesia com anestesia local, associadas à sedação para o fechamento de colostomia em alça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rone Antônio Alves de Abreu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Recent studies have shown that local anesthesia for loop colostomy closure is as safe as spinal anesthesia for this procedure. OBJECTIVES: Randomized clinical trial to compare the results from these two techniques. METHODS: Fifty patients were randomized for loop colostomy closure using spinal anesthesia (n = 25 and using local anesthesia (n = 25. Preoperatively, the bowel was evaluated by means of colonoscopy, and bowel preparation was performed with 10% oral mannitol solution and physiological saline solution for lavage through the distal colostomy orifice. All patients were given prophylactic antibiotics (cefoxitin. Pain, analgesia, reestablishment of peristaltism or peristalsis, diet reintroduction, length of hospitalization and rehospitalization were analyzed postoperatively. RESULTS: Surgery duration and local complications were greater in the spinal anesthesia group. Conversion to general anesthesia occurred only with spinal anesthesia. There was no difference in intraoperative pain between the groups, but postoperative pain, reestablishment of peristaltism or peristalsis, diet reintroduction and length of hospitalization were lower with local anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS: Local anesthesia plus sedation offers a safer and more effective method than spinal anesthesia for loop colostomy closure.CONTEXTO: Estudos recentes têm demonstrado que a anestesia local para o fechamento de colostomia em alça é tão segura quanto a raquianestesia para estes procedimentos. OBJETIVOS: Comparar os resultados do fechamento de colostomia em alça usando essas duas técnicas. MÉTODOS: Cinquenta pacientes foram randomizados para o fechamento de colostomia em alça sob raquianestesia (n = 25 e anestesia local (n = 25. No pré-operatório, o cólon foi avaliado por colonoscopia e o preparo intestinal foi realizado com solução oral de manitol a 10% e limpeza com solução salina fisiológica através do orifício distal da colostomia. Todos os

  2. Effects of Preoperative Serotonin-Receptor-Antagonist Administration in Spinal Anesthesia-Induced Hypotension: A Randomized, Double-blind Comparison Study of Ramosetron and Ondansetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Eun-Su; Lee, Gwan-Woo; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of spinal anesthesia (SA) include arterial hypotension and bradycardia. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 2 type 3 serotonin receptor antagonists in SA-induced adverse effects. Specifically, we assessed whether ramosetron was more effective than ondansetron in reducing SA-induced decreases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). A total of 117 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and receiving SA were intravenously administered 0.3 mg of ramosetron (n = 39, group R), 4 mg of ondansetron (n = 39, group O4), or 8 mg of ondansetron (n = 39, group O8). Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean BP (MBP), HR, and the lowest SBP, DBP, MBP, and HR values were measured preoperatively (baseline) and intraoperatively. The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, the need for rescue antiemetics, the amount of patient-controlled analgesia consumption, and pain score in the first 48 hours after surgery were determined. Baseline values did not significantly differ among the 3 groups. After SA, SBP, DBP, MBP, and HR were lower than their baseline values in all 3 groups. The differences between the baseline and the lowest values were significantly less in group R than in groups O4 and O8 with respect to SBP (P controlled analgesia consumption, or pain score. The administration of ramosetron (0.3 mg) significantly attenuated the SA-induced decrease in BP compared with 4 or 8 mg of ondansetron and HR compared with 4 mg of ondansetron.

  3. The addition of lidocaine to bupivacaine does not shorten the duration of spinal anesthesia: a randomized, double-blinded study of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jon; Husum, Bent; von Staffeldt, Henrik; Qvist, Thorkild F; Jensen, Peer Eske; Kledal, Susanne

    2011-11-01

    The duration of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine is often too long for day surgery. A recent study of patients presenting for transurethral surgery suggested that the addition of a small amount of lidocaine to intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine could shorten the duration of the sensory and motor blocks. In this prospective, randomized double-blind study we investigated these findings in patients undergoing unilateral knee arthroscopy. Fifty patients were randomized to receive 2 mL hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine plus either 0.6 mL 1% lidocaine (lidocaine group) or 0.6 mL saline (control group). The sensory and motor blocks were monitored until complete regression and the patient was ready for discharge. The patients were interviewed 2 and 7 days after the operation about any side effects and any signs of transient neurologic syndrome. Data on 45 patients were available for analysis (24 in the lidocaine group). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding time to readiness for surgery, maximum level of sensory block, total duration of sensory, and motor blocks or time to discharge from the postoperative care unit. Two patients in the control group and 1 patient in the study group had symptoms of transient neurologic syndrome for blocks or time to readiness for discharge from the postanesthesia care unit.

  4. Raquianestesia com morfina versus raquianestesia sem morfina associada a bloqueio do nervo pudendo: avaliação da analgesia e complicações em hemorroidectomias Spinal anesthesia with morphine versus spinal anesthesia without morphine associated to pudendal nerve block: evaluation of the analgesia and complications in hemorrhoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marques dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    , some authors have reported that the pudendal nerve block using ropivacaine provides good postoperative analgesia. Thus, we consider of interest to compare two anesthetic methods checking postoperative analgesia and adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: To compare two anesthetic techniques (spinal anesthesia with morphine versus spinal anesthesia without morphine associated with pudendal nerve block for hemorrhoidectomy in relation to postoperative analgesia and adverse effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 40 patients from Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul among March to October of 2008. All patients were randomized by lot immediately before surgery, distributed in two groups: Group 1: 20 patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with morphine 0.15µg associated with hyperbaric bupivacaine 10mg; - Group 2: 20 patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with heavy bupivacaine 10mg associated with bilateral pudendal nerve block with ropivacaine 10mg/ml diluted in 10ml of distilled water. RESULTS: Most patients were female (N = 21. The average age was 52 years, ranging from 21 to 72 years. The group 1 presented a higher prevalence of adverse effects (62.5%. Among the adverse effects of group 1 was higher prevalence of itch, urinary retention and migraine. Most patients who reported pain in the postoperative range from group 1 was male and prevailing in the first 12 hours, with the average level of pain of 1.55. In group 2 the pain was observed in equal proportion in both sexes and in the first six hours, with the average level of pain of 1.75. CONCLUSION: The hemorrhoidectomy accomplished with spinal anesthesia without morphine and blockade of the pudendal nerve using ropivacaine provided better analgesic effect in the period of 12 hours after the surgery and it didn't present complications in this casuistry, being shown superior to the spinal anesthesia with morphine.

  5. [Meningitis is a rare complication of spinal anesthesia. Good hygiene and face masks are simple preventive measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, V

    1998-02-11

    Although bacterial meningitis is a rare sequela of spinal anaesthesia, occasional case reports continue to appear in anaesthesiological literature. The article presents nine cases of iatrogenic meningitis reported to the treatment injury claims authority. Eight of these patients had undergone spinal anaesthesia, and one myelography. Alpha-haemolytic streptococci were isolated in cerebrospinal fluid culture in seven cases, the remaining two cases being culture-negative. Although alpha-haemolytic streptococci are normal commensals of the upper respiratory tract and mouth and rarely cause spontaneous meningitis, they have been implicated in several reported cases of iatrogenic meningitis. The risk of such infection raises the issue of the widespread habit of omitting face masks when performing dural puncture. As these bacteria are not known to cause infection in general surgery, the necessity of using face masks in the operating theatre has been questioned. However, the use of face masks has been shown to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination from the upper airway; and as available documentation on iatrogenic meningitis suggests oral commensals to be responsible, the use of face masks should be mandatory whenever any kind of lumbar puncture is performed.

  6. The effect of impregnated autogenous epidural adipose tissue with bupivacaine, methylprednisolone acetate or normal saline on postoperative radicular and low back pain in lumbar disc surgery under spinal anesthesia; A randomized clinical trial study FNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Abrishamkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back Pain (LBP and radicular leg pain (RLP after lumbar disc surgery are great challenges that prevent patients and neurosurgeons in making a surgical decision. By spinal anesthesia, LBP and RLP diminish up to 2 to 3 hours postoperatively. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of impregnated epidural adipose tissue (EAT with bupivacaine or methylprednisolone acetate on reduction of late postoperative pain after spinal anesthesia. Methods: This study was performed on lumbar disc herniation surgery under spinal anesthesia. Sixty six patients entered our study who were divided into three groups, EAT impregnated with bupivacaine (group 1, methylprednisolone acetate (group2 and normal saline (control group. The LBP and RLP were evaluated during the first 24 hours postoperatively and 14 days later by visual analogue scale (VAS. Results: Of 66 patients, 53% were female and 47% male. The average (SE LBP in the first 6 hours after surgery based on VAS were 1.59 ± 0.90 in group one, 2.36 ± 2.38 in group 2 and 3.09 ± 1.41 in control group but the VAS for RLP in this period were 1.95 ± 1.13, 1.31 ± 1.39 and 2.40 ± 1.09, respectively. The average LBP and RLP did not show any differences after 14 days postoperatively. Conclusions: According to our data bupivacaine was effective on LBP relief and steroid was effective on RLP relief during the first 12 hours after surgery.

  7. General anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally safe because of modern equipment, medicines, and safety standards. Most people recover completely and do not have any complications. Alternative Names Surgery - general anesthesia Patient Instructions Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult ...

  8. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  9. Effect of low dose of intrathecal pethidine on the incidence and intensity of shivering during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shami, Shoaleh; Nasseri, Karim; Shirmohammadi, Mousa; Sarshivi, Farzad; Ghadami, Negin; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Pouladi, Mokhtar; Barzanji, Arvin

    2016-01-01

    Shivering is among the unpleasant and potentially harmful side effects of spinal anesthesia. The aim of this randomized double-blind clinical trial was to compare the antishivering effect of two different doses of intrathecal pethidine on the incidence and intensity of shivering and other side effects in patients who underwent cesarean section. In this study, 150 parturient females scheduled for nonemergent cesarean section were randomly allocated to three groups. Spinal anesthesia was performed with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12.5 mg), plus 0.5 mL of 0.9% saline in the standard group (S group), and the same dose of bupivacaine with 5 mg (P5 group) or 10 mg of pethidine (P10 group). Demographic and surgical data, incidence and intensity of shivering (primary outcome), hemodynamic indices, forehead and core temperatures, maximum sensory level, Apgar scores, and adverse events were evaluated by a blinded observer. There were no significant differences between the three study groups regarding the demographic and surgical data, hemodynamic indices, core temperatures, and maximum sensory level ( P >0.05). The incidence and intensity of shivering were significantly less in the P5 and P10 groups ( P shivering during cesarean section, without having major side effects.

  10. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants after General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study - A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCANN, M.E.; Withington, Davinia E.; Arnup, Sarah J.; Davidson, Andrew J.; DISMA, N.; FRAWLEY, G.; Morton, Neil S.; BELL, G.; Hunt, Rodney W.; Bellinger, David C; Polaner, D. M.; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Absalom, Anthony R.; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Izzo, Francesca; Szmuk, Peter; Young, Vanessa; Soriano, S. G.; De Graaff, J. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/249966271

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  11. [The anesthesia of anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, G

    2005-03-01

    Viewed from a cultural-ethical perspective, anesthesiology can be understood as a comprehensive concept of medicine in general. As such it contains two dilemmas: very often pain must be inflicted in order to alleviate pain and this can only be done by somebody who is himself relatively free of pain. The necessary apathy or anesthesia of the anesthetist is correlated with a general twentieth century-type of perception: the cool observer. Nevertheless, it is also a modern variation of the original religious constellation of the priest in relationship to the sick person. Curing occurs by representation. The weak self of the sick person is able to take over the strong self, represented by the therapist. In twentieth century art and literature this process of self-therapy by representation was often illustrated. On the background of a phenomenological philosophy that process can be understood as the regaining of a balance between body and soul. In the psalms of the biblical Book of Job there a variety of fundamental forms of pain which may be helpful even in this secular age.

  12. Effects of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media ASA Member Toolkit Anesthesia 101 Effects of Anesthesia Explore this page: Effects of Anesthesia How can ... of anesthesia and their side effects? Effects of Anesthesia If you’re having surgery, you most likely ...

  13. Anesthesia for cesarean section in pregnancies complicated by placenta previa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imarengiaye, Charles O.; Osaigbovo, Etinosa P.; Tudjegbe, Sampson O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the factors affecting the choice of anesthetic technique for cesarean section in women with placenta previa. In this retrospective study, the records of the labor Ward Theatre of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria were examined from January 2000 to December 2004 to identify all the women who had cesarean section for placenta previa. The patient's socio-demographic characteristics, type of placenta previa, anesthesia technique, estimated blood loss, maternal and fetal outcomes were recorded. One hundred and twenty-six patients had cesarean section for placenta previa, however, only 81 patients 64.3% were available for analysis. General anesthesia was administered to 52/81 patients 64.2% and 29/81 patients 35.8% received spinal anesthesia. A history of antepartum bleeding was recorded in 61.7% n=50. Of 31 patients without antepartum hemorrhage APH, 15/31 had general anesthesia and 16/31 had spinal anesthesia. The patients who had APH, 37/50 had general anesthesia and 1/50 had spinal anesthesia. There was an increased chance of using general anesthesia and if APH were present p=0.03, odds ratio=3.1, 95% confidence interval=1.2-7.7. Spinal anesthesia may useful in patients with placenta previa. The presence of APH may encourage the use of general anesthesia for cesarean delivery. (author)

  14. Is Lumbosacral Plexus Block an Effective and Safe Alternative as Surgical Anesthesia for Total Hip Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    BACKGROUND An increasing number of patients for total hip replacement presents with cardiovascular comorbidities, that render them fragile to traditional methods of anesthesia. The aim of this intended study is to compare lumbosacral plexus blockade with continuous spinal anesthesia for surgical...... anesthesia in total hip replacement. We hypothesize that lumbosacral plexus blockade induces less hemodynamic impact compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. METHODS Thirty patients (ASA I-III, age ≥ 50 years) will be included for elective hip replacement after informed consent. Hemodynamics...... compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. This might favor the future use of lumbosacral plexus blockade for patients with severe cardiovascular comorbidities....

  15. Is lumbosacral plexus block an effective and safe alternative as surgical anesthesia for total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    BACKGROUND An increasing number of patients for total hip replacement presents with cardiovascular comorbidities, that render them fragile to traditional methods of anesthesia. The aim of this intended study is to compare lumbosacral plexus blockade with continuous spinal anesthesia for surgical...... anesthesia in total hip replacement. We hypothesize that lumbosacral plexus blockade induces less hemodynamic impact compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. METHODS Thirty patients (ASA I-III, age ≥ 50 years) will be included for elective hip replacement after informed consent. Hemodynamics...... compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. This might favor the future use of lumbosacral plexus blockade for patients with severe cardiovascular comorbidities....

  16. Comparação entre raquianestesia, bloqueio combinado raqui-peridural e raquianestesia contínua para cirurgias de quadril em pacientes idosos: estudo retrospectivo Comparación entre raquianestesia, bloqueo combinado raqui-peridural y raquianestesia continua para cirugías de cuadril en pacientes ancianos: estudio retrospectivo Comparison between spinal, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal anesthesias for hip surgeries in elderly patients: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2002-06-01

    pacientes ancianos durante cuatro años, para determinar las posibles ventajas y desventajas de las tres técnicas. MÉTODO: Fueron evaluadas 300 fichas siendo que: 100 pacientes recibieron raquianestesia simple (Grupo 1, 100 recibieron bloqueo combinado raqui-peridural (Grupo 2 y 100 recibieron raquianestesia continua (Grupo 3 en los últimos cuatro años. Todos los bloqueos fueron realizados en decúbito lateral izquierdo. Fueron evaluados: suceso de punción, nivel de analgesia, bloqueo motor de miembros inferiores, calidad de la anestesia, necesidad de complementación, incidencia de fallas, parestesias, cefalea pós-punción, alteraciones cardiovasculares, confusión mental y delirium, transfusión sanguínea y mortalidad. RESULTADOS: No existe diferencia significativa entre los grupos en relación a la edad, peso y sexo. Los pacientes del grupo 2 fueron menores de que los del grupo 1 y 3. Las dosis utilizadas fueron de 15,30 mg de bupivacaína en el grupo 1; 23,68 mg en el grupo 2 y 10,10 mg en el grupo 3. No fue encontrada diferencia significativa (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are still many questions involving study designs, data analyses and samples size which regard to the demonstration of the benefits of regional anesthesia on patients outcome. Database analysis and data acquisition in general cost less and require less time as compared to large randomized controlled trials. This retrospective study compares continuous spinal anesthesia, combined spinal-epidural and single shot spinal anesthesia for hip surgery in elderly patients during a 4-year period, to determine possible advantages and disadvantages of the three techniques. METHODS: Anesthetic records of 100 patients receiving spinal anesthesia (Group 1, 100 patients receiving combined spinal-epidural block (Group 2 and 100 patients receiving continuous spinal anesthesia (Group 3 over a 4-year period were analyzed. All blockades were performed with patients in the left lateral position. Evaluated

  17. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Anesthesia Anesthesia Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area En español ... Version (464 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is anesthesia? Anesthesia is a medical treatment that prevents patients ...

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  19. Inguinal hernioraphy under local anesthesia in the elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Kahramansoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The incidence of inguinal hernia and the frequencyof comorbidity increase in the elderly. Therefore,in operations of these patients, anesthesia methods areimportant. The aim of our study was to investigate the feasibilityof local anesthesia in the operation of the elderly.Materials and methods: The patients operated for inguinalhernia were analyzed retrospectively. They weredivided into two groups: the elderly (>60 years and theyounger. Anesthesia methods, additional anesthesia requirementand complications were compared.Results: Of totally 177 patients, 30.5% were elderly.Operation type, anesthesia method and score of operationalrisk differed between groups. The percentage of comorbidity (55.6% in the elderly was significantly high (p<0.001. Among elderly, the frequency of co morbidity wasslightly higher in patients who had local anesthesia comparedto spinal and general anesthesia. Patients in youngand middle ages preferred to be operated less under localanesthesia (34.1% compared to elderly (70.4%. Therewas one case (2.6% converted to general anesthesiaas an additional anesthesia in the elderly group. Postoperativecomplications were slight more frequent in elderly.These cases were five in number (31.3% and were operatedunder spinal or general anesthesia (p=0.002.Conclusions: The frequency of co morbidity and riskscore of operation (ASA category rise in the elderly.However, inguinal hernioraphy can be performed underlocal anesthesia without complication and conversion togeneral anesthesia.Key words: Inguinal hernia; aged; comorbidity; local anesthesia

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF 6% HYDROXYETHYL STARCH (450/0 . 7 AND RINGER’S LACTATE AS PRELOADING FLUID FOR PREVENTION OF HYPOTENSION DURING SPINAL ANESTHESIA IN ELECTIVE CESAREAN DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We compared the efficacy of volume preloading with Ringer’s Lactate and Hydroxyethyl starch (HEAS 6% 450/0 . 7 on the onset and incidence of spinal - induced hypotension in elective cesarean delivery . 60 healthy parturients scheduled for elective cesarean se ction under spinal anesthesia were selected for the study . Group A was preloaded with 1000ml of RL while as group B preloaded with 500ml of 6% HEAS (450/0 . 7 over a period of 10 minutes just prior to the administration of spinal anaesthesia . Immediately af ter the preloading period, subarachnoid block was instituted with 2 . 5ml of Bupivacaine 0 . 5% (heavy at L3 - L4 or L4 - L5 interspace using 26 Gauge Quinke’s spinal needle in sitting position . The patient were then positioned supine with left lateral tilt . Ade quate block was obtained and height of block was tested by pinprick method using blunt needle . Hypotension following spinal anaesthesia was treated with 6 mg bolus doses of Ephedrine and additional rapid infusion of Ringer’s lactate solution . All were admi nistered supplemental oxygen 5L/min by venturi mask throughout the period of surgery . Intraoperatively, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were monitored every 2 minutes for the first 20 minutes and eve ry 5 minutes thereafter till the end of surgery . Spo2 and ECG were monitored continuously throughout the period of surgery . In addition, height of the block, amount of blood loss, amount of vasopressor required, and amount of i . v fluids used intraoperative ly and any allergic reactions to i . v fluids were noted . All parturients received 10 IU of oxytocin i . v infusion after delivery of baby . These observations were analyzed to get information on the onset and incidence of hypotension, intraoperative requiremen ts of Ephedrine, and i . v fluids, and incidence of adverse effects like nausea and / or vomiting . The incidence of hypotension in group A was 60

  1. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants After General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study-A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Mary Ellen; Withington, D E; Arnup, S J; Davidson, A J; Disma, N; Frawley, G; Morton, N S; Bell, G; Hunt, R W; Bellinger, D C; Polaner, D M; Leo, A; Absalom, A R; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Izzo, F; Szmuk, P; Young, V; Soriano, S G; de Graaff, J C

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  2. [History of rachianesthesia and epidural anesthesia in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo Rodríguez, Victoria; Rivero Martínez, Ma Dolores; Pérez Albacete, Mariano; López López, Ana I; Maluff Torres, Alejandro

    2007-10-01

    To show the beginning of spinal and epidural anesthesia in our country and the contributions of Spanish urologists. We reviewed books and writings of History of Medicine, Urology and Anesthesia and Doctoral thesis about spinal and epidural anesthesia. In the 20th century, surgeons also gave the anesthetic drugs to the patients. Spinal and epidural anesthesia were used for the first time in 1900. A lot of Spanish urologists like F Rusca Doménech, J.M. Batrina, M. Barragán Bonet, R. Lozano Monzón, L. Guedea Calvo, Gil Vernet, Fidel Pagés Miravé, V Sagarra Lascurain, Gómez Ulla, etc, did research, writings in scientific journals and Doctoral thesis about anesthesia.

  3. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The most common side effect of epidural or spinal anesthesia is hypotension with functional hypovolemia prompting fluid infusions or administration of vasopressors. Short-term studies (20 min) in patients undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia suggest that plasma volume may increase wh...

  4. Is lumbosacral plexus blockade effective and safe for surgical anesthesia in total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    had lumbosacral plexus blockade (lumbar plexus block, sacral plexus block and fascia transversalis plane block) with ropivacaine. Group 2 had continuous spinal anesthesia with repeated bupivacaine-doses. Group 3 had single-dose spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine. Hemodynamic data were recorded during...

  5. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental ... evaluate patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post- ...

  6. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  7. Obesity and Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely. How does being overweight affect surgery and anesthesia? If you are overweight, you may also have ... can lead to challenges with a number of anesthesia-related processes: Locating veins to deliver anesthesia and ...

  8. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia ...

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease. Click here to find out more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ...

  10. How to teach regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröking, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2006-10-01

    The demand for peripheral nerve blocks and neuroaxial blocks from both patients and surgeons has increased over the last few years. This change in attitude towards regional anesthesia is prompted by the insight that adequate perioperative pain management leads to earlier ambulation, shorter hospital stay, reduced cost and increased patient satisfaction. To avoid serious complications of these techniques structured residency programs need to be available. Until 2004, the Residency Review Committee for Anesthesiology in the United States required a minimum of 50 epidurals, 40 spinals and 40 peripheral nerve blocks during residency. Similarly, the German Society for Anesthesia and Intensive Care required 100 neuroaxial blocks and 50 peripheral nerve blocks. In 2004 the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine endorsed standardized guidelines for regional anesthesia fellowships which regulate the administrative, equipment and educational demands. This review introduces the reader to the different teaching methods available, including cadaver workshops, three-dimensional videoclips, video filming, ultrasound guidance and acoustic assist devices as well as demonstrating their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, an overview is given of future residency training programs, which integrate administrative, material and educative demands as well as the teaching means into the daily clinical routine.

  11. Reducing by 50% the incidence of maternal hypotension during elective caesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia: Effect of prophylactic ondansetron and/or continuous infusion of phenylephrine - a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gómez, Jose Ramon; Palacio-Abizanda, Francisco Javier; Morillas-Ramirez, Francisco; Fornet-Ruiz, Inocencia; Lorenzo-Jiménez, Ana; Bermejo-Albares, Maria Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    Prophylactic administrations of ondansetron or phenylephrine have been reported to provide a protective effect against hypotension in women undergoing cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia (SA). The main hypothesis is that ondansetron improves the hemodynamic response, especially combined with phenylephrine infusion. This prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 265 healthy pregnant women scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under SA. Women were randomly allocated into four groups to receive either placebo (control), ondansetron (O) 8 mg intravenously before induction of SA, phenylephrine infusion (50 mcg/min) (P) or ondansetron plus phenylephrine (OP). Demographic, obstetric, intraoperative timing, and anesthetic variables were assessed at 16 time points. Anesthetic variables assessed included blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, nausea, vomiting, electrocardiographic changes, skin flushing, discomfort or pruritus, and vasopressor requirements. There were differences ( P = 0.0001) in the number of patients with hypotension (50.8% control, 44.6% O, 20.9% P, 25.0% OP), the percentage of time points ( P = 0.0001) with systolic hypotension per patient (17.4% control, 8.7% O, 2.1% P, 6.7% OP) and the number of patients requiring supplementary boluses of ephedrine ( P = 0.003), phenylephrine ( P = 0.017) or atropine ( P = 0.0001). A 50 μg/min phenylephrine infusion reduces by 50%, the incidence of maternal hypotension compared with placebo, but infusions of phenylephrine are still not routine in our environment. Prophylactic ondansetron 8 mg might be considered in this situation, because it does not reduce the incidence of maternal hypotension but diminishes its severity, reducing the number of hypotensive events per patient by 50%.

  12. Effects of propofol or sevoflurane anesthesia induction on hemodynamics in patients undergoing fiberoptic intubation for cervical spine surgery: A randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Robba

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Anesthesia induction with both propofol or sevoflurane is safe and effective. However, total IV anesthesia induction is associated with more pronounced MAP drop which can worsen spinal cord hypoperfusion.

  13. Topical anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  14. Topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mritunjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  15. Types of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Types of Anesthesia KidsHealth / For Teens / Types of Anesthesia What's in ... Get? Print en español Tipos de anestesia About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: ...

  16. A comparison of myogenic motor evoked responses to electrical and magnetic transcranial stimulation during nitrous oxide/opioid anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubags, L. H.; Kalkman, C. J.; Been, H. D.; Koelman, J. H.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Transcranial motor evoked potentials (tc-MEPs) are used to monitor spinal cord integrity intraoperatively. We compared myogenic motor evoked responses with electrical and magnetic transcranial stimuli during nitrous oxide/opioid anesthesia. In 11 patients undergoing spinal surgery, anesthesia was

  17. Análise de custos entre a raquianestesia e a anestesia venosa com propofol associada ao bloqueio perianal local em operações anorretais Cost analysis between spinal and venous anesthesia with propofol associated with local perianal block in anorectal procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gustavo Kotze

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Atualmente cerca de 90% das operações anorretais podem ser realizadas em regime ambulatorial. A técnica anestésica é fator fundamental na busca de menor tempo de internamento e redução de custos nestes procedimentos. Não há consenso na literatura sobre qual o melhor tipo de anestesia para essas operações. OBJETIVO: Comparar os custos da técnica de raquianestesia com bupivacaína 0,5% isobárica com a técnica de anestesia venosa com propofol associada ao bloqueio perianal local com lidocaína a 2% e bupivacaína 0,5% (anestesia combinada em pacientes submetidos a operações anorretais. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados dados de 99 pacientes submetidos à operações anorretais, divididos em dois grupos: grupo I (raquianestesia, composto por 50 pacientes e grupo II (anestesia combinada, composto por 49 pacientes. Foram estudados os procedimentos cirúrgicos, tempo de procedimento anestésico-cirúrgico, tempo de internamento e custos globais de cada paciente. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença estatística significativa entre os grupos estudados em relação ao tipo de procedimento cirúrgico, sexo, idade e complicações. O tempo médio do procedimento anestésico-cirúrgico, no grupo I foi de 53,1 minutos e de 44,08 minutos no grupo II (P=0,034. O tempo médio de internamento foi de 19,68 horas no grupo I e de 7,08 horas no grupo II (PBACKGROUND: Approximately ninety percent of anorectal surgical procedures are performed in ambulatory basis. The choice of a proper anesthetic technique is important to achieve shorter hospital stay and low costs. There's no evidence in the literature that an ideal type of anesthesia for these procedures exists. AIM: To compare the costs of patients operated with spinal anesthesia (0,5% bupivacaine with combined anesthesia (propofol and local perineal block with 2% lidocaine and 0,5% bupivacaine in anorectal surgical procedures. METHODS: Data from 99 patients submitted to anorectal operations were

  18. Thyroid and parathyroid surgery performed with patient under regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, A W; Brown, E; Hamburger, S W

    1988-04-01

    Thyroid and parathyroid surgery is usually performed with the patient under general anesthesia; however, for selected patients regional anesthesia may be preferable. Between September 1977 and March 1986 regional anesthesia was used successfully as the sole anesthetic technique in 17 patients who underwent thyroid surgery and two patients who underwent parathyroid surgery. Procedures included two total thyroidectomies, 14 lobectomies or lobectomies with isthmusectomies, and one isthmusectomy. These 17 operations represent approximately 5% of the thyroid operations performed by the senior surgeon over the corresponding time. One patient underwent combined completion thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy, and another patient underwent successful parathyroidectomy under regional anesthesia. In two additional patients, procedures could not be completed under regional anesthesia alone. In one of these two patients regional anesthesia appeared to effect a transient recurrent nerve paralysis. The indications for use of regional anesthesia have been primarily patient preference and associated cardiac or pulmonary disease. We now consider as contraindications to regional anesthesia patient apprehension about the technique, deafness, high spinal cord injury, recurrent laryngeal or phrenic nerve palsy, and allergy to local anesthesia. During this period, from 1977 to 1986, our administration of regional anesthesia has evolved from bilateral deep and superficial cervical plexus blocks to bilateral superficial blocks alone using bupivacaine with epinephrine, 1:200,000.

  19. Anesthesia for minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Mahajan, Charu; Kapoor, Indu

    2017-10-01

    With an ultimate aim of improving patients overall outcome and satisfaction, minimally invasive surgical approach is becoming more of a norm. The related anesthetic evidence has not expanded at the same rate as surgical and technological advancement. This article reviews the recent evidence on anesthesia and perioperative concerns for patients undergoing minimally invasive neurosurgery. Minimally invasive cranial and spinal surgeries have been made possible only by vast technological development. Points of surgical interest can be precisely located with the help of stereotaxy and neuronavigation and special endoscopes which decrease the tissue trauma. The principles of neuroanethesia remain the same, but few concerns are specific for each technique. Dexmedetomidine has a favorable profile for procedures carried out under sedation technique. As the new surgical techniques are coming up, lesser known anesthetic concerns may also come into light. Over the last year, little new information has been added to existing literature regarding anesthesia for minimally invasive neurosurgeries. Neuroanesthesia goals remain the same and less invasive surgical techniques do not translate into safe anesthesia. Specific concerns for each procedure should be taken into consideration.

  20. Raquianestesia posterior para cirurgias anorretais em regime ambulatorial: estudo piloto Raquianestesia posterior para cirugías anorrectales en régimen ambulatorial: estudio piloto Restricted dorsal spinal anesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgery: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2004-12-01

    sometidos a la raquianestesia con solución hipobárica de bupivacaína a 0,15% a través de aguja 27G Quincke para cirugías anorrectales. La punción subaracnóidea fue realizada con el paciente en decúbito ventral con auxilio de un cojin en su abdomen para corregir la lordosis lumbar y el espacio intervertebral. RESULTADOS: El bloqueo sensitivo fue logrado en todos los pacientes. Su dispersión varió de T10 a L2 con moda en T12. Apenas tres pacientes presentaron algún grado de bloqueo motor. La duración del bloqueo fue de 122,17 ± 15,35 minutos. Estabilidad hemodinámica fue observada en todos los pacientes. Ningún paciente desarrolló cefalea después de punción de la dura-máter. CONCLUSIONES: Seis miligramos de bupivacaína a 0,15% en solución hipobárica proporcionaron un bloqueo predominantemente sensitivo, cuando inyectados en decúbito ventral. Las principales ventajas son la rápida recuperación, estabilidad hemodinámica y satisfacción del paciente, siendo una buena indicación para anestesia ambulatorial.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The increasing number of ambulatory procedures requires anesthetic methods allowing patients to be discharged soon after surgery completion. Currently, anorectal procedures are performed in inpatient settings. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of performing these procedures in outpatient settings with low hypobaric bupivacaine doses. METHODS: Participated in this study 30 patients physical status ASA I and II, submitted to spinal anesthesia with 0.15% hypobaric bupivacaine with 27G Quincke needle for anorectal procedures. Spinal puncture was performed with patients in the prone position with the help of a pad under the abdomen to correct lumbar lordosis and the vertebral interspace. RESULTS: Sensory block was obtained in all patients. Sensory block spread varied T10 to L2 (mode = T12. Only three patients presented motor block. Blockade length was 122.17 ± 15.35 minutes. No hemodynamic changes were observed in

  1. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Part III The OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ( ...

  2. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office ... comfortable as possible when you get home. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  5. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  6. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ... complications and emergencies that may arise during the administration of anesthesia. Before your surgery, your OMS will ...

  8. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS ... administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. They are ... your surgery, your OMS will review the type of anesthetic ...

  9. [Anesthesia for cesarean section in a patient with isolated unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Tomonori; Iida, Ryoji; Konishi, Jyumpei; Kato, Jitsu; Suzuki, Takahiro

    Congenital unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare anomaly. Although there are several reports regarding pregnancy in patients with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery, there are no case reports describing anesthesia for Cesarean section in a patient with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery. We present a patient with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery who underwent Cesarean sections twice at the ages of 24 and 26 years under spinal anesthesia for surgery and epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief. Both times, spinal anesthesia and epidural analgesia enabled successful anesthesia management without the development of either pulmonary hypertension or right heart failure. Spinal anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia is a useful anesthetic method for a Cesarean section in patients with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Anesthesia for cesarean section in a patient with isolated unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Tomonori; Iida, Ryoji; Konishi, Jyumpei; Kato, Jitsu; Suzuki, Takahiro

    Congenital unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare anomaly. Although there are several reports regarding pregnancy in patients with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery, there are no case reports describing anesthesia for Cesarean section in a patient with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery. We present a patient with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery who underwent Cesarean sections twice at the ages of 24 and 26 years under spinal anesthesia for surgery and epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief. Both times, spinal anesthesia and epidural analgesia enabled successful anesthesia management without the development of either pulmonary hypertension or right heart failure. Spinal anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia is a useful anesthetic method for a Cesarean section in patients with unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Raquianestesia contínua com altas doses de anestésicos locais Raquianestesia continua con altas dosis de anestésicos locales Continuous spinal anesthesia with high dose of local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2010-10-01

    éteres intermediarios (catéter por fuera de la aguja y por su baja incidencia de cefalea y síntomas neurológicos, la técnica ha venido ganando credibilidad. El objetivo de este caso es relatar la posible seguridad del uso del nuevo catéter con una gran dosis de bupivacaína hiperbárica al 0,5% con glucosa al 1,6% asociada a la lidocaína al 2% hiperbárica y con glucosa al 1,6%. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente masculino, de 78 años, 85 kg, 168 cm, estado físico ASA III, hipertenso, con coronariopatía e insuficiencia renal crónica. Candidato a cirugía de voluminosas hernias inguinales bilateral y umbilical, siendo sometido durante una semana a neumoperitoneo para crear espacio. Posteriormente a la venoclisis con catéter 18G, monitorización con cardioscopio, presión arterial no invasiva y oximetria de pulso, fue sedado con 1 mg de midazolam y fentanil 100 µg por vía venosa y colocado en decúbito lateral izquierdo. Sometido a la raquianestesia continua por vía mediana en L3-L4, y conjunto de aguja cortante 27G con catéter 22G. La dosis total de anestésico utilizada en el procedimiento fue 25 mg de bupivacaína al 0,5% (hiperbárica con glucosa al 1,6% y 160 mg de lidocaína al 2% (hiperbárica con glucosa al 1,6% y morfina (100 µg. Paciente con seguimiento hasta el 30º día sin quejidos neurológicos. CONCLUSIONES: Recientemente, la mala distribución del anestésico local a través de microcatéter, se atribuyó a una causa del síndrome de cola de caballo. Este relato de caso mostró que, con la administración de altas dosis de anestésicos hiperbáricos a través del nuevo catéter, no hubo una mala distribución ni el riesgo de síndrome de cola de caballoBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Better control of the level, intensity, and duration of spinal analgesia represents the greatest advantages of continuous spinal anesthesia. With the advent of intermediate catheters (over-the-needle catheter and its low incidence of headaches and neurological symptoms, the technique has

  12. [Local and regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigel, W; Lengen, W

    1988-10-15

    Operations on the cutaneous surfaces are mainly performed under local anesthesia. Local infiltrative anesthesia is the most frequently used form in cutaneous surgery. Nerve or field block anesthesia can be used in areas like the external ear, nose, digits or penis. Local anesthesia is easy to administer, rapidly effective and relatively free of side effects. In contrast to general anesthesia it can be used in risk patients e.g. with ischemic heart disease or respiratory illnesses. Adverse reactions must be taken into account, especially toxic effects, allergy, drug interactions or traumatic lesions of nerves or blood vessels.

  13. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Simpson, Colleen; Roof, James; Arthurs, Sandy; Korssjoen, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  14. Controlled hypotension for spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled, deliberate hypotension during anesthesia for major spinal surgery reduces intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement. Hypotension may be achieved with increased doses of volatile anesthetic agents or by continuous infusion of vasodilating drugs. Safe application of this technique requires knowledge of the physiology of hemorrhagic shock and close intraoperative monitoring to avoid vasoconstriction and end-organ ischemia.

  15. Raquianestesia unilateral com baixa dose de bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica Raquianestesia unilateral con baja dosis de bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica Unilateral spinal anesthesia with low 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2004-10-01

    punta cortante, lenta velocidad de inyección y la posición lateral han sido relatados como facilitadores de la producción de raquianestesia unilateral. El presente estudio longitudinal investiga el grado de raquianestesia unilateral utilizando 5 mg de bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica inyectada a través de aguja 27G tipo Quincke en el paciente en decúbito lateral, con miembro a ser operado vuelto para abajo. MÉTODO: Raquianestesia con 0,5% de bupivacaína fue realizada a través de aguja 27G Quincke en 30 pacientes estado físico ASA I y II sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas. La punción subaracnóidea fue realizada con el paciente previamente colocado con el lado a ser operado vuelto para abajo y fueron inyectados 5 mg de bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica en la velocidad de 1 ml.15s-1. Bloqueos sensitivo y motor (picada de aguja y escala de 0 a 3 fueron comparados entre los lados a ser operados y el contralateral. RESULTADOS: Los bloqueos motor y sensitivo entre el lado operado y el contralateral fueron significativamente diferentes en todos los momentos. Raquianestesia unilateral fue obtenida en 85,7% de los pacientes. Estabilidad hemodinámica fue observada en todos los pacientes. Ningún paciente desenvolvió cefalea pós-raquianestesia. CONCLUSIONES: En las condiciones de este estudio la bupivacaína hiperbárica a 0,5% (5 mg proporcionó un predominante bloqueo unilateral. Veinte minutos fueron suficientes para la instalación del bloqueo. Las principales ventajas de la raquianestesia unilateral son la estabilidad hemodinámica, la satisfacción del paciente y recuperación mas rápida de la anestesia.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Unilateral spinal anesthesia may be advantageous, especially for outpatient procedures. Low anesthetic doses, pencil point or cutting point needles, slow injection rate and the lateral position have been reported as helping unilateral spinal anesthesia technique. This longitudinal study aimed at investigating the depth of unilateral

  16. Comparison of Sedation With Local Anesthesia and Regional Anesthesia in Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamohammadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP is usually performed under regional or general anesthesia. An alternative to conventional anesthesia is performing of TURP under local anesthetic infiltration with sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication of sedoanalgesia in TURP. Material & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial from September 2006 to December 2007, 60 patients (30 in each group with prostate hypertrophy, candidate for TURP, were randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group, standard spinal anesthesia was done. In the second group, five minutes before the operation, 25 mgs of diazepam plus 25-50 mgs of pethedine was intravenously administered followed by injection of 10 ml lidocaine 2% gel in the urethra and the skin in the suprapubic area was anesthetized with 2 ml of 1% lidocaine. Using a 22 gauge nephrostomy needle, the suprapubic skin was punctured and the needle was directed toward prostate apex and 10-20ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at the serosal aspect of the rectal wall. For dorsal nerve block, 5-10ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at penopubic junction, and then a standard TURP was performed. Patients were switched to another anesthetic technique if the selected technique failed. Severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results: The average prostate size was 25 grs (range10-50grs in the local anesthetic group (group 1 and 27.5 grs (range 10-50 grs in the spinal group (group2. In the local anesthetic group, 82.3% had no or mild pain while moderate to severe pain was reported in 16, 7% of the patients. In the group with spinal anesthesia, these were 93.1% and 6.9% respectively. Intolerable pain was observed in 23.3% and 13.8% of groups 1 and 2 respectively (p>0.05. Two patients in spinal group and 5 in local anesthetic group (3 due to severe pain and 2 for unsatisfaction required conversion to general anesthesia or receiving

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post-anesthetic patients. Your OMS trained alongside medical anesthesia ... of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of ...

  19. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I ... Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are ...

  20. Guideline implementation: local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    It is not uncommon in perioperative settings for patients to receive local anesthesia for a variety of procedures. It is imperative for patient safety that the perioperative RN has a comprehensive understanding of best practices associated with the use of local anesthesia. The updated AORN "Guideline for care of the patient receiving local anesthesia" provides guidance on perioperative nursing assessments and interventions to safely care for patients receiving local anesthesia. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel become knowledgeable regarding best practice as they care for this patient population. The key points address patient assessment, the importance of having an overall understanding of the local agent being used, recommended monitoring requirements, and potential adverse events, including life-threatening events. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disma, Nicola; Hansen, Tom G.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a neurodegenerative effect of anesthetic drugs in cubs and young animals, raising the concern that similar effects can happen in children, and that the administration of anesthesia in young children undergoing surgical or diagnostic procedures may cause long- Term...... neurocognitive impairment. Thus, several epidemiological studies have been performed with the aim to find a possible association between early anesthesia exposure and poor long- Term outcome, like learning disabilities or worse school grading and two prospective trials are currently running, the GAS...... and the PANDA study. Interim results from the GAS study, which compared infants undergoing general and regional anesthesia for hernia repair, have demonstrated that a single exposure of about one hour of anesthesia does not affect the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Nowadays, most of the knowledge...

  2. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

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    ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Your OMS trained alongside medical anesthesia residents. Extensive Training and Experience As a result of their extensive training, every Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon is well-prepared ...

  5. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety ... and jaw surgery Contact Us Sitemap Terms of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter ...

  6. Anesthesia information management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feri Štivan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS is on the increase. This is particularly true for academic anesthesia departments. The main reasons for slow adoption of these systems in the past are financial barriers associated with implementation of these systems and their not so traditionally obvious potential to improve patient care. In addition, a major obstacle to acceptance of this technology is the concern of users over the impact of the electronic anesthesia record on malpractice exposure.Conclusions: The experience reported by departments using AIMS indicates that these systems are useful for managing malpractice risk. AIMS can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative anesthesia care. However, AIMS are able to increase the quality of care and improve operating room efficiency only with careful planning, installation, and customization. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT analysis performed for AIMS could help departments in making better decisions when implementing AIMS.

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and ... 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons American Association ...

  8. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth or become ... I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS ...

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS residents serve on the medical anesthesiology service, ... during and after the operation. This is the time to discuss any concerns you may have about ...

  10. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth or become ... Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I ...

  11. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Anesthesia Download ...

  12. Influence of different anesthesia methods on stress reaction and hemodynamics for elderly orthopedics patients during operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of general anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia method on stress reaction and hemodynamics for elderly orthopedics patients during operations. Methods: A total of 90 cases of elder patients who received orthopedic operations were randomly divided to group A, B and C, with 30 cases per group. Three groups of patients were separately given by general anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia for operations; The variations of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH, Cortisol (Cor, β-endorphin (β-EP, Angiotensin- Ⅱ(Ang-Ⅱ, heart rate (HR and blood pressure (SBP, DBP on patients in three groups before anesthesia (T0, during skin incision (T1, after skin incision (T2 and extubation after operation (T3 were compared and analyzed. Results: During T1, T2, ACTH, Cor, β-EP and Ang-Ⅱlevels in 3 groups of patients were significantly higher than those during T0; SBP and DBP were significantly lower than that during T0; HR during T2 was significantly lower than that during T0; During T3, every index in 3 groups were recovered to levels close to that during T0; During T1, T2, ACTH, Cor, β-EP, Ang-Ⅱ levels in group B and C were significantly lower than that in group A. And levels in C was lower than that in B; SBP and DBP in group B and C were significantly higher than A. No HR statistical significance appeared between each group. Conclusions: During clinical anesthesia, we should choose suitable anesthesia method combined with actual situations of patients. Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia had a slight influence on hemodynamics of elder orthopedics patients during operation, and it could effectively alleviate stress reaction during operation.

  13. Anesthesia training in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Angela

    2007-11-01

    In 2006 a program leading to a Master's degree in Anesthesia (MMed) was established in Rwanda as a joint venture between the National University of Rwanda (NUR), the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society International Education Fund (CASIEF) and the American Society of Anesthesiologists Overseas Teaching Programme (ASAOTP). A MMed in Anesthesia is similar to a Fellowship in Canada and is common in many African countries. Most training programs are of three years duration. Rwanda has decided on a four-year program. The background, organization and problems of the program are described. Challenges exist in recruiting residents and in developing an academic culture and evaluation system. Inadequate equipment and drug shortages limit the types of anesthesia provided. There is need for improvement in biomedical support. Volunteer Canadian and American anesthesiologists visit Rwanda to teach for a minimum period of one month. They instruct in the operating room and also in the classroom. While the focus of the program is on residents in anesthesia, the volunteers also teach the nurse anesthetists. The program has been in existence for only one year but progress has been made. The CASIEF will devote special attention to improving the management of pain. In time, it is hoped that Rwanda will become self-sufficient in training its own anesthesiologists and in retaining them to provide anesthesia services throughout the country. As anesthesia and surgery evolve, there will be a need for subspecialty training in anesthesia. It is hoped that, with continued assistance from the CASIEF and ASAOTP, the goal of the NUR will be achieved.

  14. Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert; Cremata, Edward; Hawk, Cheryl

    2014-02-03

    There are currently no widely accepted guidelines on standards for the practice of chiropractic or manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia, and the evidence base for this practice is composed primarily of lower-level evidence. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-informed and consensus-based guidelines on spinal manipulation under anesthesia to address the gaps in the literature with respect to patient selection and treatment protocols. An expert consensus process was conducted from August-October 2013 using the Delphi method. Panelists were first provided with background literature, consisting of three review articles on manipulation under anesthesia. The Delphi rounds were conducted using the widely-used and well-established RAND-UCLA consensus process methodology to rate seed statements for their appropriateness. Consensus was determined to be reached if 80% of the 15 panelists rated a statement as appropriate. Consensus was reached on all 43 statements in two Delphi rounds. The Delphi process was conducted from August-October 2013. Consensus was reached on recommendations related to all aspects of manipulation under anesthesia, including patient selection; diagnosis and establishing medical necessity; treatment and follow-up procedures; evaluation of response to treatment; safety practices; appropriate compensation considerations; and facilities, anesthesia and nursing standards. A high level of agreement was achieved in developing evidence-informed recommendations about the practice of chiropractic/manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia.

  15. Providing Anesthesia Care in Resource-limited Settings: A 6-year Analysis of Anesthesia Services Provided at Médecins Sans Frontières Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyo, Promise; Trelles, Miguel; Helmand, Rahmatullah; Amir, Yama; Hassani, Ghulam Haidar; Mftavyanka, Julien; Nzeyimana, Zenon; Akemani, Clemence; Ntawukiruwabo, Innocent Bagura; Charles, Adelin; Yana, Yanang; Moussa, Kalla; Kamal, Mustafa; Suma, Mohamed Lamin; Ahmed, Mowlid; Abdullahi, Mohamed; Wong, Evan G; Kushner, Adam; Latif, Asad

    2016-03-01

    Anesthesia is integral to improving surgical care in low-resource settings. Anesthesia providers who work in these areas should be familiar with the particularities associated with providing care in these settings, including the types and outcomes of commonly performed anesthetic procedures. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of anesthetic procedures performed at Médecins Sans Frontières facilities from July 2008 to June 2014. The authors collected data on patient demographics, procedural characteristics, and patient outcome. The factors associated with perioperative mortality were analyzed. Over the 6-yr period, 75,536 anesthetics were provided to adult patients. The most common anesthesia techniques were spinal anesthesia (45.56%) and general anesthesia without intubation (33.85%). Overall perioperative mortality was 0.25%. Emergent procedures (0.41%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 15.86; 95% CI, 2.14 to 115.58), specialized surgeries (2.74%; AOR, 3.82; 95% CI, 1.27 to 11.47), and surgical duration more than 6 h (9.76%; AOR, 4.02; 95% CI, 1.09 to 14.88) were associated with higher odds of mortality than elective surgeries, minor surgeries, and surgical duration less than 1 h, respectively. Compared with general anesthesia with intubation, spinal anesthesia, regional anesthesia, and general anesthesia without intubation were associated with lower perioperative mortality rates of 0.04% (AOR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.18), 0.06% (AOR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.92), and 0.14% (AOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.45), respectively. A wide range of anesthetics can be carried out safely in resource-limited settings. Providers need to be aware of the potential risks and the outcomes associated with anesthesia administration in these settings.

  16. Risk management in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, L; Levati, A

    2009-11-01

    Anesthesia is considered a leading discipline in the field of patient safety. Nevertheless, complications still occur and can be devastating. A substantial portion of anesthesia-related adverse events are preventable since risk factors can be detected and eliminated. Risk management (RM) in anesthesia includes preventive and remedial measures to minimize patient anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. RM involves all aspects of anesthesia care. Classically, the following four steps are needed to prevent critical incidents or to learn from them: (1) detection of problems, (2) assessment, (3) implementation of solutions, and (4) verification of effectiveness. Problems and solutions can be identified into the fields of structures, processes and personnel. Authoritative agencies like the World Health Organization, the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists, the Section and Board of Anesthesiology of the European Union of Medical Specialties and the Italian Scientific Society of Anesthesiologists (Società Italiana di Anestesia, Analgesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Intensiva SIAARTI) have proposed initiatives addressing safety in the operating room. The central role of a well-trained, constantly present anesthesiologist and the usefulness of checklists have been highlighted. Cost cutting and production pressure in medical care are potential threats to safety. A shared knowledge of the best standards of care and of the potential consequences of unscrupulous actions could make the daily management of conflicting interests easier. A correctly applied RM can be a powerful, highly beneficial aid to our practice.

  17. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoeck M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc SnoeckDepartment of Anaesthesia, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects were not generally significantly different from those of other short-acting local anesthetics like lidocaine, prilocaine, and chloroprocaine, and there is no conclusive evidence demonstrating above-average neurotoxicity. Articaine proved to be suitable and safe for procedures requiring a short duration of action in which a fast onset of anesthesia is desired, eg, dental procedures and ambulatory spinal anesthesia, in normal and in special populations.Keywords: articaine, regional anesthesia, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use, tolerability, neurotoxicity

  18. Efeitos da associação da clonidina à bupivacaína hiperbárica na anestesia subaracnóidea alta Efectos de la asociación de la clonidina a la bupivacaína hiperbárica en la anestesia subaracnoidea alta Effects of clonidine associated to hyperbaric bupivacaine during high-level spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reinaldo Cerqueira Braz

    2003-09-01

    sinergismo entre dosis diferentes de clonidina, de 45 y 75 µg, y bupivacaína hiperbárica en las características y en los efectos hemodinámicos del bloqueo subaracnoideo alto (T4. MÉTODO: En estudio aleatorio y duplamente encubierto, fueron evaluados 60 pacientes estado físico ASA I, sometidos a cirugía del abdomen inferior y miembros inferiores. Los pacientes fueron sometidos a anestesia subaracnoidea, con bupivacaína hiperbárica a 0,5% (17,5 mg - 3,5 ml más la asociación de las siguientes drogas: grupo Control (n = 20 - solución fisiológica (0,5 ml; grupo Clon 45 (n = 20 - clonidina, en la dosis de 45 µg (0,3 ml, asociada a la solución fisiológica (0,2 ml; grupo Clon 75 (n = 20 - clonidina, en la dosis de 75 µg (0,5 ml. La cirugía solamente fue realizada cuando el nivel del dermátomo atingido por el bloqueo analgésico fue de T4. RESULTADOS: A latencia de los bloqueos analgésico y motor de la anestesia subaracnóidea no discordó significativamente entre los grupos (p > 0,05. Ambas dosis de clonidina prolongaron, de manera significativa, la duración del bloqueo analgésico en T8 y del bloqueo motor grado 3 (determinado por la escala modificada de Bromage (p 0,05. Ambas dosis de clonidina prolongaron la analgesia pos-operatoria (intervalo de tiempo decorrido entre el bloqueo subaracnoideo y la primera solicitación de analgésico por el paciente en el pos-operatorio (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Published data suggest that clonidine, an alpha2-adrenergic agonist, in association with bupivacaine, may increase the incidence of intraoperative hypotension and bradycardia during high-level spinal anesthesia. This study aimed at determining the synergistic potential of two clonidine doses (45 and 75 µg and hyperbaric bupivacaine on characteristics and hemodynamic effects of high-level (T4 spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Participated in this randomized double-blind study, 60 ASA I patients scheduled for lower abdominal and limb surgery. Spinal anesthesia was

  19. Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) in pediatric cardiac anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong , Grace Lai Sze

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Inhalational anesthesia with moderate to high-dose opioid analgesia has been the mainstay of pediatric cardiac anesthesia but the advances in understanding of pharmacology and availability of new fast-acting drugs coupled with the advanced concepts in pharmacokinetic modeling and computer technology have made total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) an attractive option. In this article, we review some of the TIVA techniques used in pediatric cardiac anesthesia. gracewong531...

  20. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  1. Expansão volêmica em raquianestesia para cesariana: comparação entre cristalóide ou colóide Expansión volemica en raquianestesia para cesárea: comparación entre cristaloide y coloide Preload during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: comparison between crystalloid and colloid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Maria Siaulys Capel Cardoso

    2004-12-01

    media de tres valores sucesivos de presión arterial sistólica (PAS. La PS fue medida a cada minuto y se administró bolus de 0,2 mg de metaraminol, por vía venosa, para disminución de PS mayor que 10% y bolus de 0,4 mg para disminución de PS mayor que 20%. Al nacimiento se evaluó el índice de Apgar y se realizó gasometria de la arteria umbilical. El análisis estadístico fue hecho con los tests t de Student modificado y para igualdad de las variables (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Maternal hypotension is the most common complication following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. This study aimed at comparing the incidence of hypotension and the need for vasopressors in patients submitted to cesarean section under spinal anesthesia following preload with either crystalloid or colloid (modified fluid gelatin. METHODS: Participated in this prospective study 50 term pregnant patients, physical status ASA I, submitted to cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups receiving preload as follows: Crystalloid group, 10 mL.kg-1 lactated Ringer; Colloid group, 10 mL.kg-1 colloid (modified fluid gelatin. Control blood pressure was defined as the mean of three successive systolic blood pressure (SBP values. SBP was measured at 1-minute intervals and 0.2 mg intravenous bolus of metaraminol was administered for SBP decrease above 10% of control blood pressure, and 0.4 mg bolus of the same drug for SBP decrease above 20% of control. Apgar score was evaluated after delivery and umbilical artery blood was sent for analysis. Modified Student's t test was used for statistical analysis and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Hypotension 10% (100% and 100% of patients; hypotension 20% (72% and 72% of patients, nausea (4% and 8% of patients; vasopressor consumption (1.67± 0.89 mg and 1.88 ± 0.74 mg and umbilical artery pH (7.25 ± 0.04 and 7.26 ± 0.04, in Crystalloid and Colloid groups, respectively, were

  2. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  3. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur sahin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia procedure in obesity were assessed with current literatures. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 234-236

  4. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Spine surgery - discharge Surgical wound care - open Images Scoliosis Spinal ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  6. The Develoment of Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Audrey B.

    1982-01-01

    Until the eighteenth century, doctors were reluctant to use chemicals to alleviate pain because they accepted the religious/moral beliefs of their day, claiming that pain was beneficial for the body. Traces technical developments in the control of pain, discussing relationships of anesthesia to social, cultural, and scientific factors and…

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  8. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  9. The influence of various anesthesia techniques on postoperative recovery and discharge criteria among geriatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornek, Dilsen; Metin, Seyhan; Deren, Serpil; Un, Canan; Metin, Mustafa; Dikmen, Bayazit; Gogus, Nermin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aim to compare selective spinal anesthesia and general anesthesia with regard to postoperative recovery and fast‐track eligibility in day surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Sixty geriatric outpatient cases, with ASA II‐III physical status and requiring short‐duration transurethral intervention, were enrolled in the study. The cases were split into 2 groups: as general anesthesia (Group GA) and selective spinal anesthesia (Group SSA). Group GA (n = 30) received propofol 2 mg kg‐1 (until loss of eyelash reflex), remifentanil induction 0.5‐1 µg kg‐1, and laryngeal mask. Maintenance was achieved by 4‐6% desflurane in 60% N2O and 40% O2 along with remifentanil infusion at 0.05 µg /kg‐1 /min‐1. Drugs were discontinued after the withdrawal of the ureteroscope, and extubation was carried out with 100% O2. Group SSA (n = 30) received 0.5% spinal anesthesia via L4‐5 space by 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 5 mg. Anesthesia preparation time, time to surgical anesthesia level, postoperative fast‐tracking, and time to White‐Song recovery score of 12, were noted. In the operating room, we evaluated hemodynamics, nausea/vomiting, surgeon and patient satisfaction with anesthesia, perioperative midazolam‐fentanyl administration, postoperative pain, and discharge time. RESULTS: Anesthesia preparation time, length of surgery, anesthesia‐related time in the operating room, time to sit, and time to walk were significantly low in Group GA (p<0.05), whereas time to fast‐track eligibility, length of stay in the PACU, discharge time, and other parameters were similar in both of the groups. CONCLUSION: While anesthesia preparation time, length of surgery, start time of surgery, time to sit, and time to walk were shorter in the General Anesthesia group, time to fast‐track eligibility, phase 1 recovery time, and discharge time were similar among patients subjected to selective spinal anesthesia. PMID:21120291

  10. [Anesthesia in urology: notes on its history and development in Spain, 1847 to 1950].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A; Cortés, J; Hernández, B; Alvarez, J

    2007-01-01

    This review of the historical course of anesthesia performed in the context of urology in Spain relies on primary sources: doctoral theses, dissertations, published articles, inaugural addresses, conference proceedings, and books belonging to various archives and libraries. We collected a large number of documents relating to urology and of particular interest regarding anesthesia, classified them, and subjected them to critical analysis. This allowed us to carefully follow the development of anesthesia and urology itself, both of which attained notable clinical and scientific importance in Spain. Anesthesia with chloroform and incomplete anesthesia were the norm during the second half of the 19th century. However, during the first half of the 20th century, the most widely used techniques were the application of ether or spinal or local infusions, although epidural and intravenous techniques were also mentioned.

  11. [Anesthesia and Angelman syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, W; Nobel, C; Hilpert, J

    2011-07-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with an incidence of 1:10,000-1:40,000 caused by deficient genetic imprinting in the chromosomal segment 15q11-q13. Experimental data suggest that the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor as well as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors may be affected by this condition. The first description of the syndrome goes back to 1965 when the British pediatrician Harry Angelman (1915-1996) recognized similar clinical features in three children. Angelman's description of puppet children was changed to happy puppet syndrome 2 years later before this euphemistic denotation was replaced by the concept Angelman syndrome over the years. Angelman syndrome is characterized by ataxia, jerky movements especially hand flapping, a seizure disorder with a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG), severe learning difficulties, a happy disposition, lack of verbal communication and dysmorphic facial features. Most hospitalizations are caused by epilepsy and the most common indications for surgical procedures are in dental medicine. The first anesthesiology case report to be published dates back to 2001. A total of 13 cases have now been published and in 11 cases the age was registered (mean age 11.6 years, standard deviation 11.7 and 2 outliers aged 27 and 40 years). In this paper, the published case reports are contrasted with 15 cases of anesthesia in 6 patients with AS who underwent surgery during 14 years of routine operations at a Berlin anesthesiology clinic (mean age 15.9 years, standard deviation 4.2 with no outliers). Besides neurosurgical and orthopedic operations most were dental interventions. Summarized, these cases of anesthesia and the results of the published case reports allow the formulation of guidelines for administration of anesthesia in AS cases but do not permit conclusions on which method of anesthesia is the safest for AS

  12. Hematoma após raquianestesia tratado conservadoramente: relato de caso e revisão da literatura Hematoma después de raquianestesia tratado conservadoramente: relato de caso y revisión de la literatura Conservative treatment of hematoma after spinal anesthesia: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Segabinazzi

    2007-04-01

    objetivo de este trabajo fue describir un caso de hematoma después raquianestesia tratado de forma conservadora y revisar los trabajos en la literatura. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 73 años, 65 kg, 1,67 m, estado físico ASA III. Fue sometido a raquianestesia para retirada de catéter de diálisis peritoneal. Durante la realización de la punción hubo parestesias en el miembro inferior derecho. Se inyectaron 15 mg de bupivacaína hiperbárica a 0,5% sin vasoconstrictor. Veinte y cuatro horas después de la realización del bloqueo el paciente permanecía con anestesia en silla de montar y con dolor lumbar, y 48 horas después del procedimiento presentó una incontinencia urinaria. La resonancia nuclear magnética demostró la existencia de un proceso expansivo subaracnoideo, con compresión de raíces nerviosas (L4 a S1. Después de la evaluación del neurocirujano, se empieza el tratamiento conservador. El paciente recibió alta hospitalaria el 18° día de postoperatorio asintomático. CONCLUSIÓN: El caso presentado mostró una buena evolución con el tratamiento conservador.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Spinal anesthesia caries the risk of bleeding. Compression of nervous tissue secondary to the formation of a hematoma can cause neurological damage, which, if not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion, can be permanent. The identification of risk factors, diagnosis, and early treatment are important for the prognosis. The objective of this report was to describe the case of a hematoma after spinal anesthesia treated conservatively, and review the literature. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 73 years old, 65 kg, 1.67 m, and ASA physical status III, underwent spinal anesthesia for removal of a peritoneal dialysis catheter. During the puncture, the patient experienced paresthesia of the right lower limb. Fifteen milligrams of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine without vasoconstrictor were administered. Twenty-four hours later, saddle anesthesia and lumbar pain

  13. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, R.; Wolff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system

  14. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, R; Wolff, A P

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system

  15. Anesthesia and cor triatriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Yeoh, Tze Yeng; Welch, Tasha L; Weingarten, Toby N; Sprung, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS) and cor triatriatum dextrum (CTD) are rare congenital anomalies characterized by the presence of a perforated septum which divides the respective atrium into a proximal and distal chamber. This report reviews the perioperative course of patients with uncorrected cor triatriatum (CT) undergoing procedures requiring anesthesia. In addition, we performed a literature search that examines the experience of others regarding the peri-operative course of patients with CT. A computerized search of a medical record database was conducted to identify patients with a clinical diagnosis of uncorrected CTD and CTS undergoing surgical procedures. Descriptive statistics were used. We identified 12 adult patients with asymptomatic CTS (n = 7) and CTD (n = 5) who underwent 23 anesthetics. There were no perioperative complications which could be attributed directly to the anatomy of CT. Our observation and review of the literature suggest that patients with asymptomatic CT typically tolerate anesthesia and surgical procedures well.

  16. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  17. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  18. Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Markus; Vutskits, Laszlo; Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'safe use of anesthesia in children is ill-defined and requires definition of and focus on the 'safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia'. RECENT FINDINGS: The Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot initiative (www.safetots.org) has been set up during the last year to focus...... on the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia. This initiative aims to provide guidance on markers of quality anesthesia care. The introduction and implementation of national regulations of 'who, where, when and how' are required and will result in an improved perioperative outcome in vulnerable children....... The improvement of teaching, training, education and supervision of the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia are the main goals of the safetots.org initiative. SUMMARY: This initiative addresses the well known perioperative risks in young children, perioperative causes for cerebral morbidity as well as gaps...

  19. Laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) cholecystectomy with epidural vs. general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sharona B; Mangar, Devanand; Karlnoski, Rachel; Camporesi, Enrico; Downes, Katheryne; Luberice, Kenneth; Haines, Krista; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2013-05-01

    Laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery involves a single umbilical incision, lending itself to epidural anesthesia. This prospective, randomized study was undertaken to evaluate epidural anesthesia for patients undergoing LESS cholecystectomy, to assess the feasibility, and to analyze all intraoperative and postoperative complications. The secondary objectives were to determine differences in postoperative pain and time until PACU discharge-to-home readiness between patients. With institutional review board approval, 20 patients with chronic cholecystitis, cholelithiasis, and/or biliary dyskinesia were randomized to receive spinal epidural anesthesia (n = 10) or general anesthesia (n = 10). Postoperative pain at rest was recorded in the PACU every 10 min, and at rest and walking at discharge using the visual analog scale (VAS). Operative time and time until PACU discharge-to-home readiness were recorded. Results are expressed as mean ± SD. Patient age, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and body mass index were similar. There were no additional ports/incisions, conversions to "open" operations, or conversions to general anesthesia. There were no differences in operative duration. Time until postanesthesia care unit discharge-to-home ready was not significantly different. The most common postoperative adverse event was urinary retention (1 epidural and 3 general anesthesia patients). Resting postoperative VAS pain score at discharge was 4.7 ± 2.5 vs. 2.2 ± 1.6 (p = 0.02, general versus epidural anesthesia respectively); the stressed VAS pain score at discharge was 6.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.1 ± 2.8 (p = 0.02, general versus epidural anesthesia respectively). LESS cholecystectomy with epidural anesthesia was completed with no operative or anesthetic conversions, and less postoperative pain at discharge. Epidural anesthesia appears to be a preferable alternative to general anesthesia for patients undergoing LESS cholecystectomy.

  20. Prophylactic Use of Intravenous Clonidine Compared to Tramadol in Prevention of Intraoperative Shivering under Regional Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha (Banerjee), Sarmila; Nath, Pallab Kumar; Halder, Rita; Bandyopadhyay, Ujjwal

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the relative efficacy of prophylactic intravenous (IV) clonidine and tramadol for control of intraoperative shivering following spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: After institutional ethical clearance, 142 patients were chosen from either gender, aged 20–60 years, physical status American Society of Anesthesiology Class I and II scheduled for elective infraumbilical surgery under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomized into two groups: Group C (n = 71) received injection clonidine 50 μg) IV in 100 ml normal saline (NS) over 10 min and Group T (n = 71) received injection tramadol 50 mg IV. In 100 ml NS over 10 min after spinal anesthesia. Results: Incidence of shivering was not significant when compared between the two groups (P > 0.05). The axillary temperatures fell significantly in Group C from the baseline and remained at a significantly lower level up to 60 min after rescue drug was administered in patients who shivered. There was a similar fall in axillary temperature in Group T in patients having shivering, but the difference was not significant. When compared between the two groups among patients who shivered, the difference in fall of temperature was not significant. Side effects such as hypotension, bradycardia, and sedation were significantly more common in clonidine group, whereas nausea was significantly more common patients of tramadol group. Conclusion: Prophylactic administration of both tramadol and clonidine is effective for controlling shivering under spinal anesthesia. However, tramadol is better because of higher response rate, less sedation, and lesser hemodynamic alterations. PMID:28663645

  1. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeck, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects were not generally significantly different from those of other short-acting local anesthetics like lidocaine, prilocaine, and chloroprocaine, and there is no conclusive evidence demonstrating above-average neurotoxicity. Articaine proved to be suitable and safe for procedures requiring a short duration of action in which a fast onset of anesthesia is desired, eg, dental procedures and ambulatory spinal anesthesia, in normal and in special populations. PMID:22915899

  2. Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Risks Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery Explore this page: ... do you reduce the risk of anesthesia awareness? Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery If you’re ...

  3. Anesthesia -- What to Expect (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia - What to Expect KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia - What ... Operating Room After Surgery Print Different Kinds of Anesthesia If you're having any kind of procedure ...

  4. Anesthesia: What to Expect (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or any blood relative has had to anesthesia any allergies (especially to foods, medicines, or latex) your child ... from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used? Will my child feel pain and/ ...

  5. Fucosidosis and anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Alireza E.; Moharari, Reza S.; Ghaffari, R.; Zahedi, H.; Hajmahmoodi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare, autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a severe deficiency of alpha -L-fucosidase. Patients usually have some problems with glycoprotein storage in the brain and other organs and some structural abnormalities that need special consideration in anesthesia. It has 2 types, the early onset or infantile and the juvenile. Here we present 8-year-old girl with deformities in the maxillofacial region, with big tongue, small and retracted chin, saddle nose and short neck that could not be extended, causing difficult intubation and congenital cardiac problems requiring a special anesthetic strategy. (author)

  6. Anesthesia for intellectually disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetizing an intellectually disabled patient is a challenge due to lack of cognition and communication which makes perioperative evaluation difficult. The presence of associated medical problems and lack of cooperation further complicates the anesthetic technique. An online literature search was performed using keywords anesthesia, intellectually disabled, and mentally retarded and relevant articles were included for review. There is scarcity of literature dealing with intellectually disabled patients. The present review highlights the anesthetic challenges, their relevant evidence-based management, and the role of caretakers in the perioperative period. Proper understanding of the associated problems along with a considerate and unhurried approach are the essentials of anesthetic management of these patients.

  7. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  8. [Anesthesia and bodybuilding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokema, Frank; Pietsch, Uta-Carolin; Führer, Dagmar; Kaisers, Udo

    2008-05-01

    A strong tendency toward body enhancement and body forming in western industrial societies makes it more likely for each anesthesiologist to get involved in the care of bodybuilders. These patients quite frequently consume androgenic anabolic steroids, human growth hormone and other drugs or substances which are believed to accelerate muscle gain. Cardiovascular, hepatic, psychiatric, hormonal and infectious side effects or complications are common and rarely monitored by health care professionals. The anesthesia risk is not exactly known but seems to be determined mainly by cardiovascular events like myocardial ischemia and dysrhythmias.

  9. Analgesia de parto: estudo comparativo entre anestesia combinada raquiperidural versus anestesia peridural contínua Analgesia de parto: estudio comparativo entre anestesia combinada raqui-peridural versus anestesia peridural continua Labor analgesia: a comparative study between combined spinal-epidural anesthesia versus continuous epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Figueiredo Côrtes

    2007-02-01

    proporcionado un rápido e inmediato alivio del dolor. Estudios clínicos con mayor número de casos son necesarios para evaluar diferencia en la incidencia de cesarianas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain relief during labor is a permanent concern, aiming at the maternal well being, decreasing the stress secondary to pain, and reducing its consequences on the fetus. Several analgesia techniques can be used during labor. The aim of this study was to compare continuous and combined epidural analgesia, both of them using 0.25% bupivacaine with 50% enantiomeric excess and fentanyl. METHODS: Forty pregnant women, in labor, with cervical dilation between 4 and 5 cm, were randomly divided in two groups. Group I received continuous epidural anesthesia. Group II received combined anesthesia. The following parameters were evaluated: anthropometric measurements, gestational age, cervical dilation, length of time between the blockade and absence of pain according to the visual analogic scale, ability to walk, length of time between analgesia and complete cervical dilation, duration of the expulsive phase, maternal hemodynamic parameters, and vitality of the newborn. Possible complications, such as respiratory depression, maternal hypotension, pruritus, nausea, and vomiting were also evaluated. The Student t test was used to compare the means and the Chi-square test was used to compare the number of pregnancies and type of labor. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between both groups regarding the length of time between the beginning of analgesia and complete cervical dilation, as well as regarding the duration of the expulsive phase, incidence of cesarean section related to the analgesia, maternal hemodynamic parameters, and vitality of the newborn. CONCLUSIONS: Both techniques are effective and safe for labor analgesia, although the combined technique provided fast and immediate pain relief. Clinical studies with a larger number of patients are necessary to

  10. Efeito da clonidina associada à bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica na anestesia subaracnóidea Efecto de la clonidina asociada a la bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica en la anestesia subaracnóidea Effects of combined clonidine and 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine on spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuber Martins Fonseca

    2001-12-01

    los otros grupos. No hubo diferencia en relación a la sedación y a los parámetros hemodinámicos entre los grupos. El grupo I presentó analgesia prolongada en relación a los demás grupos, confirmado por la menor necesidad de analgésicos en función del tiempo. CONCLUSIONES: La clonidina no alteró la dispersión cefálica y los efectos hemodinámicos del bloqueo subaracnóideo con bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbárica; sin embargo, fue efectiva en una mejor analgesia observada con cuatro horas después del bloqueo, bien como prolongó el tiempo de anestesia.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Clonidine is an imidazolynic compound which exhibits partial alpha2-receptor agonist action, with anxiolytic and hypnotic properties. When spinally administered, it produces selective effects in pain modulation and may prolong surgical anesthesia and motor block. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of combined clonidine and 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine on spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Thirth ASA I or II patients off both genders, aged between 16 and 57 years and scheduled to undergo surgical inguinal hernia repair were randomly divided into three groups in this prospective double blind study. After monitoring, patients were sedated with 2 mg venous midazolam 10 minutes before surgery, followed by paramedian spinal puncture (L3-L4 in the left lateral position with a 25G Quincke needle. After CSF confirmation, 1 ml of one of the proposed solutions were injected with 15 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine: Group I - 150 µg clonidine; Group II - 75 µg clonidine + 0.5 ml bi-distilled water; and Group III - 1 ml bi-distilled water. The following parameters were evaluated: sensory block level at 5, 20 and 30 minutes, time for two metamers regression, sedation scores through a 0 to 3 scale, motor block by a modified Bromage’s scale, postoperative pain and analgesics requirement. RESULTS: Demographics and maximum sensory level (mode were similar for all groups. Anesthesia regression and muscle

  11. Regional or general anesthesia for fast-track hip and knee replacement - what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia for knee and hip arthroplasty may have favorable outcome effects compared with general anesthesia by effectively blocking afferent input, providing initial postoperative analgesia, reducing endocrine metabolic responses, and providing sympathetic blockade with reduced bleeding...... and less risk of thromboembolic complications but with undesirable effects on lower limb motor and urinary bladder function. Old randomized studies supported the use of regional anesthesia with fewer postoperative pulmonary and thromboembolic complications, and this has been supported by recent large non......-randomized epidemiological database cohort studies. In contrast, the data from newer randomized trials are conflicting, and recent studies using modern general anesthetic techniques may potentially support the use of general versus spinal anesthesia. In summary, the lack of properly designed large randomized controlled...

  12. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and non-pharmacological methods of pain relief during normal childbirth and maternal satisfaction: a randomized clinical trial Anestesia combinada e métodos não farmacológicos para alívio da dor durante o trabalho de parto e satisfação materna: ensaio clínico randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Augusta de Orange

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare maternal satisfaction with childbirth according to whether or not combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE of pain relief was used during labor. METHODS: A randomized, open clinical trial was performed with 70 pregnant women, 35 of whom received CSE anesthesia while 35 received only non-pharmacological forms of pain relief during labor. The variables evaluated were visual analogue scale (VAS pain score, maternal satisfaction with the technique of pain relief used during childbirth and with delivery, the patient's intention to request the same technique in a subsequent delivery, and loss of control during delivery. RESULTS: VAS pain score decreased significantly in patients receiving CSE during vaginal delivery. Furthermore, maternal satisfaction with the technique of pain relief and with delivery was higher in the CSE group, and around 97% of the patients would repeat the same technique at future deliveries compared to 82.4% of the women in the group using only non-pharmacological methods. With respect to the women's impressions of their control during delivery, approximately half the women in both groups felt that they had lost control at some point during the process. CONCLUSION: The use of CSE was associated with a significant reduction in VAS pain scores during delivery and with greater maternal satisfaction with the pain relief method and with the childbirth process.OBJETIVOS: Comparar a satisfação materna com o processo do nascimento de acordo com a realização ou não de métodos farmacológicos para alívio da dor do trabalho de parto. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se um ensaio clínico randomizado com 70 parturientes, 35 das quais receberam anestesia combinada (raquidiana e peridural associadas e 35 receberam métodos não farmacológicos para alívio da dor durante o parto vaginal. As variáveis estudadas foram: escores de dor pela Escala Visual Analógica (EVA, satisfação materna com a t

  13. [Contribution of Berlin clinics and especially the Charité to the development of modern anesthesia in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauer, H J; Kühne, H; Kox, W J

    2000-01-01

    Soon after announcement of the first American ether anesthesias in 1846 one started to anesthetize with ether in Europe. The first ether anesthesia in Germany took place on January 24th, 1947, and was given by Johann Ferdinand Heyfelder in Erlangen. Two weeks later the first ether anesthesia in Berlin was given on February 6th, 1847, by the orthopaedic surgeon Heimann-Wolff Berend. On February 12th, 1847, the surgeon Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach used ether to anesthetize a patient in the Berlin university hospital. Still in 1847 he published his book "The Ether against Pain" which used to be the standard textbook of anesthesia in Germany for many years to come. On February 15th, 1847, Johann Christian Jüngken operated his first patient under ether anesthesia in the surgical department of the Charité hospital assisted by Rudolf Virchow. Since then several famous Berlin surgeons influenced the development of modern anesthesia until the middle of the 20th century. The nitrous oxide bottle was introduced into practice by the Barth company in cooperation with the dentist Carl Sauer and Kurt Schimmelbusch introduced his mask for ether anesthesia. Carl Ludwig Schleich reported at the German congress of surgery in 1894 about his first experience with infiltration anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia developed by August Bier in Kiel was improved during his time in Berlin.

  14. Allergic reactions during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J H

    1988-01-01

    Any drug or blood product administered in the perioperative period has the potential to produce a life-threatening allergic (immune reaction) called anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic reactions represent adverse reactions mediated by immunospecific antibodies (IgE and IgG) that interact with mast cells, basophils, or the complement system to liberate vasoactive mediators and recruit other inflammatory cells. Activation of humoral and cellular pathways produces characteristic responses in the respiratory (bronchospasm and upper airway edema), cardiovascular (vasodilation and increased capillary permeability), and cutaneous systems (wheal and flare). Other predictable adverse drug reactions may mimic anaphylaxis to produce similar physiologic consequences independent of allergy (immune responses). Rapid and timely cardiopulmonary intervention with airway maintenance, epinephrine, and volume expansion is essential to avoid an adverse outcome. Severe reactions may be protracted, especially during anesthesia, requiring even larger doses of catecholamines and intensive care observation.

  15. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  16. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ... by bacteria or fungal organisms. Spinal infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. ...

  17. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... images of the back and spinal canal A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the spine to ... trigger or worsen pain and disability such as lifting heavy objects or walking long distances. Talk to ...

  18. Delayed Neuraxial Hematoma in Parturient With Fontan Circulation Following Neuraxial Anesthesia for Cesarean Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaghana, Chukwudi O; Bremer, Justin M; Sappenfield, Joshua W; Wendling, Adam L

    Neuraxial hematoma is a rare complication of spinal or epidural anesthesia. However, variable coagulation factor defects are relatively common in patients with Fontan circulation, and may predispose such patients to either increased risk of thrombosis or coagulopathy. These defects may indirectly increase their risk of neuraxial hematoma. We report a case of delayed neuraxial hematoma after the start of full-dose anticoagulation for pulmonary embolus on a postpartum patient with Fontan physiology who had continuous spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery 4 days earlier. Parturients with single ventricle physiology present numerous challenges to balance, including pregnancy-related physiologic alterations in blood volume, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, oxygen consumption, and coagulation. Although neuraxial anesthesia is common in this population, it is not without risks. We report the circumstances surrounding a parturient with single ventricle physiology who experienced neuraxial hematoma 4 days after continuous spinal anesthesia despite adherence to accepted guidelines. Eighteen months after undergoing a cesarean section, she had a full recovery and returned to her baseline medical status.

  19. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  20. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  1. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  2. Cesarean under general or epidural anesthesia: does it differ in terms of regional cerebral oxygenation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Zehra Serpil Ustalar; Toraman, Fevzi; Erkek, Esin; Sungur, Tuba; Guclu, Pınar; Durmaz, Samime; Bilgili, Canan Okuyucu

    2014-12-01

    It is aimed to evaluate whether there is a difference in regional cerebral saturation of newborns measured by near infrared spectroscopy born either by general anesthesia or combined spinal epidural anesthesia during elective cesarean deliveries. After approval from the ethics committee of our hospital, and informed consents of the parturients were taken, 68 patients were included in the study. The regional cerebral oxygen saturations (RcSO2) of newborns were measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements at 1st, 5th min after birth. In group I (n=32), general anesthesia was performed for the cesarean operation and in group II (n=36), combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) was the anesthetic management. The age of the mother, gestation, the problems related to the pregnancy, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation (SpO2) of the mother had been recorded. The measurements of the newborn were; SpO2 of right hand, RcSO2 measured by NIRS, the delivery time (from incision to the cessation of circulation in the placental cord), Apgar score. Data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 5.0 (GraphPad Software, La Jolla, California) and presented as mean +/- SD. Results obtained in different groups were compared using upaired t-test. Differences were statistically significant at p newborns were significantly higher in Group II. Regional cerebral oxygenation measured by NIRS were significantly higher in CSEA group. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia, besides other known advantages, had been shown to be superior to general anesthesia as a means of regional cerebral oxygenation of the newborns. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Effect of electroacupuncture in postanesthetic shivering during regional anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Bo-Yan; Hsu, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jyun-Yan; Shih, I-Ting; Zhuo, Wei-Jia; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Chee-Jen; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2012-11-27

    Shivering during regional anesthesia is a common complication and is related to a decrease in the patient's core body temperature. Previous studies have shown that acupuncture on specific acupoints can preserve core body temperature. The present study evaluated the effect of electroacupuncture in preventing the shivering caused by regional anesthesia. This prospective and randomized controlled study analyzed the data from 80 patients undergoing urological surgery, who were classified as ASA I or II. Spinal anesthesia was performed in all patients using 15 mg of bupivacaine. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either placebo acupuncture (Group P, n=40) or electroacupuncture (Group A, n=40) for 30 min before administration of spinal anesthesia. Shivering score was recorded at 5 min intervals, with 0 representing no shivering and 4 representing the most severe shivering possible. Heart rate, blood pressure, and tympanic temperature were recorded before the intrathecal injection, and again every 5 min thereafter until 30 min. After spinal anesthesia, the decrease in tympanic temperature was less for Group A patients than Group P, with the difference being statistically significant. After 15 min, 13 patients in Group P attained a shivering score of 3 or more, compared with 3 patients in Group A. Significantly more patients in Group P attained a shivering score of at least 1. The prophylactic use of electroacupuncture might maintain core body temperature, and may effectively prevent the shivering that commonly develops during regional anesthesia. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000096853.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  7. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  8. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  9. Raquianestesia para cesariana: estudo comparativo entre bupivacaína isobárica e hiperbárica associadas à morfina Raquianestesia para cesárea: estudio comparativo entre bupivacaína isobárica e hiperbárica asociadas a la morfina Spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: comparative study between isobaric and hyperbaric bupivacaine associated to morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Nunes Pereira das Neves

    2003-09-01

    (14,17 mg, sin diferencia estadística. La evaluación estadística en la SRPA mostró diferencia significativa para bloqueo motor. CONCLUSIONES: El estudio permitió concluir que la bupivacaína isobárica e hiperbárica en dosis de 12,5 mg, asociados a la morfina (100 µg en raquianestesia para cesárea en gestante a término, son eficientes y presentan perfiles semejantes.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bupivacaine preparations, plain or with glucose, are frequently used in the clinical practice. Blockade upper level is determined by local anesthetic spread in the CSF. This study aimed at comparing isobaric and hyperbaric bupivacaine in patients submitted to spinal anesthesia for Cesarean section. METHODS: In this prospective, randomized and double-blind study 60 patients submitted to spinal anesthesia for Cesarean section were distributed in two groups: IB - (0.5% isobaric bupivacaine, 12.5 mg and HB - (0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, 12.5 mg. After monitoring, venous puncture was performed followed by hydration with lactated Ringer’s solution. Spinal puncture was paramedially performed at L3-L4 interspace with 27G Quincke needle. Following the CSF dripping, morphine (100 µg and bupivacaine were separately injected at the speed of 1 ml.15 s-1. With the patient back to supine position, two parameters were recorded: onset time (absence of sensitivity in L3 at 1-minute intervals as well as motor and sensory block after 20 minutes. All patients were kept with preanesthetic blood pressure levels until umbilical cord clamping, and if necessary, ephedrine was administered. Neonates were evaluated by Apgar’s score at 1 and 5 minutes. Sensory and motor blocks were also evaluated at PACU 120 minutes after local anesthetic injection. RESULTS: Groups were homogeneous. Onset time: Group IB (1’, 50" and HB (1’,33", with no statistical difference. Motor and sensory block at twenty minutes showed no significant difference. Ephedrine consumption: IB (11.83 mg and HB (14.17 mg

  10. Alzheimer disease and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Gözde; Özköse Satirlar, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and the most prevalent form of dementia. Some factors in the development of AD, age being the best-known one, have been suggested; however, no causes have been found yet. The pathophysiology of the disease is highly complex, current therapies are palliative, and a cure is still lacking. Adverse effects of anesthetics in the elderly have been reported since the 1950s; however, awareness of this old problem has recently gained inportance again. Whether exposure to surgery and general anesthesia (GA) is associated with the development of AD has been questioned. As the population is aging, many elderly patients will need to be anesthetized, and maybe some were already anesthetized before they were diagnosed. Exposure to anesthetics has been demonstrated to promote pathogenesis of AD in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to date, there have not been any clinical trials to address a link between exposure to GA and the development of AD in humans. Therefore, before making any conclusions we need further studies, but we should be aware of the potential risks and take cautions with vulnerable elderly patients.

  11. Turner syndrome and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a frequent and complex genetic abnormality affecting women, being associated with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological changes, especially related with the airways and cardiovascular system. The objective of this report was to review the anatomopathologic changes of this syndrome that concern the anesthesiologist the most, discuss the perioperative management and review the literature regarding the anesthetic conduct in those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by an abnormality in the number or morphology of the sex chromosome. The most frequent abnormality is the absence of a sex chromosome, resulting in the 45X karyotype and a phenotype composed of gonadal dysgenesis. The main anatomo-physiological changes pertaining the anesthesiologist include a short neck, and maxillary and mandibular hipoplasia, which might be responsible for difficult airways. The shorter length of the trachea, as well as the higher location of its bifurcation, can predispose to bronchial intubation and accidental endotracheal extubation when the tracheal cannula is under traction. The presence of cardiopathies, endocrine and gastrointestinal disorders, liver and kidney changes, as well as osteoarticular involvement, besides ophthalmologic and hearing impairments, are very frequent, and should be detected during the pre-anesthetic evaluation. General or regional anesthesia seems to be safe for those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic abnormality with important anatomo-physiological abnormalities important to the anesthesiologist. The knowledge of this disorder allows for a safer anesthetic management with low perioperative morbimortality.

  12. [Allergic reactions during anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, F; Sierra, P

    1996-01-01

    Anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia is a constant source of concern for anesthesiologists, given that the rates of death and serious complications are high and predicting which patients will be susceptible is impossible. All substances used in the perioperative period carry a certain risk of releasing histamine and triggering an allergic reaction, though muscle relaxants are the drugs usually implicated. The incidence of serious anaphylaxis ranges between 1:4,000 and 1:23,000 anesthetic procedures, with mortality set at 3-9% and morbidity 10 times higher. Clinical signs vary from mild symptoms to anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest. The diagnostic procedure to follow upon observing an allergic reaction is to first identify the responsible mechanism and later the responsible agent, as well as drugs that can be used safely. Prophylaxis is based mainly on recognizing predisposed patients before surgery and following recommendations and pharmacological protocols based on better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause anaphylactic reaction and on experience in managing them.

  13. Meningitis tras anestesia espinal Meningitis after a spinal anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Vázquez-Martínez; F. Castro; G. Illodo; E. Freiré; M. A. Camba

    2008-01-01

    La meningitis post-punción es una importante complicación de la anestesia espinal. Describimos el caso de un varón de cuarenta y seis años que ingresó para tratamiento quirúrgico de una hernia umbilical, la cirugía se realizó bajo anestesia intradural. Tras la intervención el paciente comenzó con un cuadro clínico compatible con meningitis, que se confirmó tras examen del líquido cefalorraquídeo. Se trató con antibióticos a pesar de la no identificación de gérmenes, siendo la evolución favora...

  14. Presentation of occult Chiari I malformation following spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan P Ankichetty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiari I malformation (CM-I manifests with tonsillar herniation below foramen magnum. These patients are at high risk of respiratory depression and bulbar dysfunction in the perioperative period with underlying obstructive sleep apnea. However, the safe use of both general and regional anaesthesia has been documented in a known CM-I parturients. We describe the successful management of a patient who had hypercapnic respiratory failure in the post-anaesthetic care unit following an uneventful subarachnoid block for left knee replacement surgery. This patient was retrospectively diagnosed with occult CM-I and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea in the postoperative period.

  15. Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebru Tarıkçı Kılıç

    2018-02-19

    Feb 19, 2018 ... deep hypnotic state, 40-60 as mild hypnotic, 60-80 as lower limit of awareness, and 80-100 as awareness [7]. VAS was used to assess pain. The leftmost value on the. 10-cm horizontal line represented no pain, and the rightmost value represented severe pain. The subjects indicated their levels of pain ...

  16. Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Libyan Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 13, No 1 (2018) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Vasovagal syncope developed after spinal anesthesia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Alparslan, Mustafa Muhlis; Ekim, Mustafa Şevki; Yılmaz, Adem

    2015-01-01

    AbstractSyncope is a transient loss of consciousness that is associated with the sudden loss of muscle tone and often resolved spontaneously. It is developed as a result of cardiac, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological causes. Vasovagal syncope is the most common type of syncope that is seen in healthy individuals and is frequently related to emotional stress. It is usually induced by a fear, panic attack, pain or an exercise. In this case report, an approach to vasovagal syncope will be d...

  18. Arrhythmias following spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery - Is Wenckebach common?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmias in pregnancy are common and may cause concern for the well-being of both mother and fetus. Generally, no previous history of heart disease is elicited and majority of the arrhythmias are benign. Bradycardia is commonly seen following subarachnoid block for cesarean section. However, the incidence of subsequent heart block is low. This case report highlights the occurrence of perioperative arrhythmias following sympathetic blockade in pregnant patients and their early detection by vigilant monitoring.

  19. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  20. Uso do bloqueio combinado raqui-peridural durante cirurgia de cólon em paciente de alto risco: relato de caso Uso del bloqueo combinado raquiepidural durante cirugía de colon en paciente de alto riesgo: relato de caso Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during colon surgery in a high-risk patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2009-12-01

    éter epidural (20G fue introducido cuatro centímetros en dirección cefálica. La sedación se obtuvo con dosis fraccionadas de 1 mg de midazolam (total de 6 mg. La bupivacaína a 0,5% se administró en bolo de 25 mg a través del catéter dos horas después de la anestesia subaracnoidea. No hubo necesidad de aplicar vasopresor ni atropina. CONCLUSIONES: Este caso nos demuestra que la raquianestesia segmentaria puede ser una técnica anestésica para la operación gastrointestinal con respiración espontánea.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA has advantages over single injection epidural or subarachnoid blockades. The objective of this report was to present a case in which segmental subarachnoid block can be an effective technique for gastrointestinal surgery with spontaneous respiration. CASE REPORT: Patient with physical status ASA III, with diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was scheduled for resection of a right colon tumor. Combined spinal epidural block was performed in the T5-T6 space and 8 mg of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine with 50 µg of morphine were injected in the subarachnoid space. The epidural catheter (20G was introduced four centimeters in the cephalad direction. Sedation was achieved with fractionated doses of 1 mg of midazolam (total of 6 mg. A bolus of 25 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine was administered through the catheter two hours after the subarachnoid block. Vasopressors and atropine were not used. CONCLUSIONS: This case provides evidence that segmental spinal block can be the anesthetic technique used in gastrointestinal surgeries with spontaneous respiration.

  1. Estudo comparativo entre bupivacaína (S75-R25 e ropivacaína em bloqueio peridural para analgesia de parto Estudio comparativo entre la bupivacaína (S75-R25 y la ropivacaína en bloqueo epidural para analgesia de parto A comparative study between bupivacaine (S75-R25 and ropivacaine in spinal anesthesia for labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Schmalfuss Nogueira

    2010-10-01

    las repercusiones maternas y fetales con el uso de la bupivacaína (S75-R25 y de la ropivacaína cuando se usan para la analgesia de parto por bloqueo epidural. MÉTODOS: Realizamos un ensayo clínico prospectivo, encubierto y randomizado, con 49 pacientes gestantes a término, que presentaban bajo riesgo, con indicación de parto vaginal, y una edad entre los 15 y los 35 años, ASA I o II distribuidas en dos grupos: GI - bupivacaína (S75-R25 0,25%; GII - ropivacaína a 0,20%. RESULTADOS: Quedó evidenciada la diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los dos grupos, 30 minutos después de la administración de la epidural, siendo que las puntuaciones de dolor fueron más elevadas en el grupo que utilizó la ropivacaína. No se encontraron diferencias estadísticas significativas en cuanto a la latencia de la analgesia, nivel sensorial del bloqueo, volumen del anestésico local, dosis de rescate, duración del parto y de la analgesia, frecuencia de parto instrumental, alteraciones hemodinámicas, puntuaciones de Apgar o pH del cordón umbilical e incidencia de eventos adversos. CONCLUSIONES: El uso de la bupivacaína (S75-R25 y la ropivacaína para la analgesia de parto, proporcionó buenas condiciones para la realización de la anestesia epidural con pequeñas incidencias de eventos adversosBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Spinal anesthesia is used for relief of pain during labor and it is associated with low indices of complications. Studies with levorotatory enantiomers of local anesthetics demonstrate higher safety due to the lower cardiotoxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the latency and duration of analgesia and maternal and fetal repercussions with bupivacaine (S75-R25 and ropivacaine in spinal anesthesia for labor analgesia. METHODS: A prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical assay was undertaken with 49 labouring parturients with low risk, with indication of vaginal delivery, ages 15 to 35 years, ASA I or II, divided into two groups

  2. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  3. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “ ...

  4. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  5. Estudo comparativo entre efedrina e etilefrina como vasopressor para correção da hipotensão arterial materna em cesarianas eletivas com raquianestesia Estudio comparativo entre efedrina y etilefrina como vasopresor para correción de la hipotensión materna en cesáreas electivas con raquianestesia Ephedrine and etilefrine as vasopressor to correct maternal arterial hypotension during elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio D. Belzarena

    2006-06-01

    grupos iguales. Todas recibieron raquianestesia con bupivacaína, fentanil y morfina. Se les midió la presión arterial no invasiva y la frecuencia cardiaca. Los recién nacidos fueron evaluados con el índice de Apgar. La incidencia de hipotensión arterial, la cantidad de vasopresor necesaria para corrección y los efectos adversos fueron registrados. RESULTADOS: Ocurrió hipotensión arterial materna con frecuencia en los dos grupos, siendo un 68% del grupo etilefrina y un 63% del grupo efedrina. En la mayoría de las embrazadas, se corrigió con la primera dosis del vasopresor, sin diferencia entre los grupos (66% etilefrina, 58% efedrina. La hipotensión arterial necesitó dos o más dosis de vasopresor para ser corregida o se registró hipertensión reactiva en pocas pacientes (un 24% y un 10% del grupo etilefrina y 34% y 8% del grupo efedrina, respectivamente, sin diferencia estadística significativa. No hubo diferencia en los efectos adversos y en las pruebas de los recién nacidos. CONCLUSIONES: Con el método de administración empleado y con las dosis de vasopresor seleccionadas no hubo diferencia entre la efedrina y la etilefrina cuando se utilizaron para corregir la hipotensión arterial materna en cesáreas con raquianestesia.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ephedrine is the most popular vasopressor for obstetrics and etilefrine is widely used in regional anesthesia. This study aimed at comparing ephedrine and etilefrine to correct maternal arterial hypotension during elective Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Participated in this study 120 pregnant patients who were randomly distributed in two equal groups. All patients received spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine, fentanyl and morphine. Noninvasive blood pressure and heart rate were monitored. Neonates were evaluated by the Apgar score. The incidence of hypotension, the amount of vasopressor needed to correct it and adverse effects were recorded. RESULTS: Maternal hypotension was similar in

  6. Epidural Combined with General Anesthesia versus General Anesthesia Alone in Patients Undergoing Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Feifei; Sun, Zhirong; Huang, Naisi; Hu, Zhen; Cao, Ayong; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Yu, Peirong; Miao, Changhong; Wu, Jiong

    2016-03-01

    Addition of epidural anesthesia may have several benefits. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of epidural anesthesia combined with general anesthesia in patients undergoing free flap breast reconstruction. A retrospective chart review identified 99 patients who underwent free flap breast reconstruction under general anesthesia alone (46 patients) or general anesthesia plus epidural anesthesia (53 patients) between 2011 and 2014. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured before induction, after flap elevation but before flap transfer, 15 minutes after flap revascularization, and at the end of surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. The incidence of flap thrombosis was 3.8 percent in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group versus 4.3 percent in the general anesthesia group (p = 1). Flap failure was 0 percent in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group versus 4.3 percent in the general anesthesia group (p = 0.213). Patients in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group had lower visual analogue scale scores at 2 hours (0.76 ± 0.62 versus 2.58 ± 0.99; p surgery. Epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia combination improves postoperative pain and side effects without increasing the risk of flap thrombosis. Therapeutic, III.

  7. Effect of General Anesthesia Compared to Regional Anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: cesarean section (CS) is one of the common operations performed in obstetric practice worldwide; it can be conducted as elective or emergency operation. Objective: to assess the effect of different types of anesthesia used during conducting elective cesarean sections (CS) on the health of neonates by using ...

  8. The minimum dose of dexmedetomidine required for cessation of postspinal anesthesia shivering: A prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Kundra, Tanveer Singh; Kaur, Parminder

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Shivering is a common postanesthesia adverse event with multiple etiologies. Dexmedetomidine, a centrally acting alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, is known to reduce the shivering threshold. However, the minimum dose at which dexmedetomidine causes cessation of shivering is unknown. The aim of this prospective observational study was to find the minimum dosage of dexmedetomidine required for abolition of post-spinal anesthesia (SA) shivering. Material and Methods: Thirty patien...

  9. The minimum dose of dexmedetomidine required for cessation of postspinal anesthesia shivering: A prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Tanveer Singh Kundra; Parminder Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Shivering is a common postanesthesia adverse event with multiple etiologies. Dexmedetomidine, a centrally acting alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, is known to reduce the shivering threshold. However, the minimum dose at which dexmedetomidine causes cessation of shivering is unknown. The aim of this prospective observational study was to find the minimum dosage of dexmedetomidine required for abolition of post-spinal anesthesia (SA) shivering. Material and Methods: Thirty pat...

  10. Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia and Plasma Homocysteine in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Peter; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Sharma, Anshuman; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nitrous oxide inactivates vitamin B12, inhibits methionine synthase and consequently increases plasma total homocysteine (tHcy). Prolonged exposure to nitrous oxide can lead to neuropathy, spinal cord degeneration and even death in children. We tested the hypothesis that nitrous oxide anesthesia causes a significant increase in plasma tHcy in children. Methods Twenty-seven children (age 10-18 years) undergoing elective major spine surgery were enrolled and serial plasma samples from 0 – 96 hours after induction were obtained. The anesthetic regimen, including the use of nitrous oxide, was at the discretion of the anesthesiologist. Plasma tHcy was measured using standard enzymatic assays. Results The median baseline plasma tHcy concentration was 5.1 μmol/L (3.9 – 8.0 μmol/L, interquartile range) and increased in all patients exposed to nitrous oxide (n=26) by an average of +9.4 μmol/L (geometric mean; 95% CI 7.1 – 12.5 μmol/L) or +228% (mean; 95% CI 178% - 279%). Plasma tHcy peaked between 6-8 hours after induction of anesthesia. One patient who did not receive nitrous oxide had no increase in plasma tHcy. Several patients experienced a several-fold increase in plasma tHcy (max. +567%). The increase in plasma tHcy was strongly correlated with the duration and average concentration of nitrous oxide anesthesia (r= 0.80; pnitrous oxide anesthesia develop significantly increased plasma tHcy concentrations. The magnitude of this effect appears to be greater compared to adults; however, the clinical relevance is unknown. PMID:21680854

  11. Managing anesthesia for cesarean section in obese patients: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamon, Agnes M; Habib, Ashraf S

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic. It is associated with increased comorbidities and increased maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications. The risk of cesarean delivery is also increased in obese parturients. Anesthetic management of the obese parturient is challenging and requires adequate planning. Therefore, those patients should be referred to antenatal anesthetic consultation. Anesthesia-related complications and maternal mortality are increased in this patient population. The risk of difficult intubation is increased in obese patients. Neuraxial techniques are the preferred anesthetic techniques for cesarean delivery in obese parturients but can be technically challenging. An existing labor epidural catheter can be topped up for cesarean delivery. In patients who do not have a well-functioning labor epidural, a combined spinal epidural technique might be preferred over a single-shot spinal technique since it is technically easier in obese parturients and allows for extending the duration of the block as required. A continuous spinal technique can also be considered. Studies suggest that there is no need to reduce the dose of spinal bupivacaine in the obese parturient, but there is little data about spinal dosing in super obese parturients. Intraoperatively, patients should be placed in a ramped position, with close monitoring of ventilation and hemodynamic status. Adequate postoperative analgesia is crucial to allow for early mobilization. This can be achieved using a multimodal regimen incorporating neuraxial morphine (with appropriate observations) with scheduled nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. Thromboprophylaxis is also important in this patient population due to the increased risk of thromboembolic complications. These patients should be monitored carefully in the postoperative period, since there is increased risk of postoperative complications in the morbidly obese parturients. PMID:27574464

  12. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving an...

  13. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  14. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  15. Anesthesia and the developing brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Becke, Karin; de Graaff, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that many general anesthetics have a variety of effects on the developing brain in animal models. In contrast, human cohort studies show mixed evidence for any association between neurobehavioural outcome and anesthesia exposure in early childhood. In spite of large...

  16. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of 86 Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with 141 Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO 2 ) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines

  17. [Complications of peripheral regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuburger, M; Büttner, J

    2011-11-01

    Peripheral regional anesthesia is a commonly used and safe procedure and eneral complications or side effects are generally rare. Nerve damage has an incidence allergies, dislocation of catheters and knotting or loops in catheters. Besides the general complications, there are some specific complications depending on the puncture site, such as pneumothorax or renal puncture.

  18. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Ketelaars, R.; Wolff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline ...

  19. Providing value in ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnot, Caroline D; Fleisher, Lee A; Keogh, John

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss current practices and changes in the field of ambulatory anesthesia, in both hospital and ambulatory surgery center settings. New trends in ambulatory settings are discussed and a review of the most current and comprehensive guidelines for the care of ambulatory patients with comorbid conditions such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus are reviewed. Future direction and challenges to the field are highlighted. Ambulatory anesthesia continues to be in high demand for many reasons; patients and surgeons want their surgical procedures to be swift, involve minimal postoperative pain, have a transient recovery time, and avoid an admission to the hospital. Factors that have made this possible for patients are improved surgical equipment, volatile anesthetic improvement, ultrasound-guided regional techniques, non-narcotic adjuncts for pain control, and the minimization of PONV. The decrease in time spent in a hospital also decreases the risk of wound infection, minimizes missed days from work, and is a socioeconomically favorable model, when possible. Recently proposed strategies which will allow surgeons and anesthesiologists to continue to meet the growing demand for a majority of surgical cases being same-day include pharmacotherapies with less undesirable side-effects, integration of ultrasound-guided regional techniques, and preoperative evaluations in appropriate candidates via a telephone call the night prior to surgery. Multidisciplinary communication amongst caregivers continues to make ambulatory settings efficient, safe, and socioeconomically favorable.It is also important to note the future impact that healthcare reform will have specifically on ambulatory anesthesia. The enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will allow 32 million more people to gain access to preventive services that will require anesthesia such as screening

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  1. Spinal Muscular Atrophy FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SMA: Frequently Asked Questions What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy? Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neuromuscular ... future trials in SMA. What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress (SMARD)? SMARD and SMA are ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  6. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  12. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  13. Memantine elicits spinal blockades of motor function, proprioception, and nociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-12-01

    Although memantine blocks sodium currents and produces local skin anesthesia, spinal anesthesia with memantine is unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of memantine in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with a widely used local anesthetic lidocaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of memantine and lidocaine were constructed. The potencies of the drugs and durations of spinal anesthetic effects on motor function, proprioception, and nociception were compared with those of lidocaine. We showed that memantine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency was lidocaine greater than memantine (P < 0.05 for the differences). At the equipotent doses (ED25 , ED50 , ED75 ), the block duration produced by memantine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P < 0.05 for the differences). Memantine, but not lidocaine, displayed more sensory/nociceptive block than motor block. The preclinical data demonstrated that memantine is less potent than lidocaine, whereas memantine produces longer duration of spinal anesthesia than lidocaine. Memantine shows a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. Avaliação da bupivacaína hipobárica a 0,5% na raquianestesia Evaluación de la bupivacaína hipobárica a 0,5% en la anestesia espinal Evaluation of 0.5% hypobaric bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cursino Pinto dos Santos

    2007-08-01

    paciente o no. Uno de los factores es la densidad del anestésico con relación al líquor, interfiriendo en el número de dermátomos bloqueados y consecuentemente en el nivel del bloqueo simpático y la disminución de la presión arterial (PA. El objetivo del estudio fue el de evaluar la dispersión de la bupivacaína hipobárica a 0,5%, preparada asépticamente en laboratorio y con una densidad controlada y uniforme. MÉTODO: Treinta pacientes, ASA I, II o III, con edad entre 18 y 60 anos, sin comorbidades circulatorias, sometidos a operaciones ortopédicas en el miembro inferior participaron en el estudio. Se sedaron con diazepam 0,03 mg.kg-1, posicionados en decúbito lateral con el lado a ser operado para arriba, y puncionados entre L3-L4, con aguja de Quincke 27G, siendo estandarizados con bisel y a velocidad de inyección. Se evaluaron los niveles sensitivos y motor (escala modificada de Bromage. RESULTADOS: Al final de la operación, de los pacientes (6,6% no presentaron bloqueo motor clasificado como 3 en la escala de Bromage, con el bloqueo sensitivo variando entre T4 y T12. Solamente 12,9% de los pacientes presentaron nivel sensitivo considerado "alto" para la operación propuesta (por encima de T6. La disminución de la presión arterial fue significativa bajo el punto de vista estadístico, sin llegar al 20% por debajo de los valores basales, por tanto sin significancia clínica. La variación de la frecuencia cardiaca no fue significativa. CONCLUSIONES: La bupivacaína hipobárica a 0,5% mostró ser una opción segura, y con pocas repercusiones hemodinámicas para operaciones ortopédicas en los miembros inferiores. La duración promedio observada, de 250 minutos, posibilita la realización de procedimientos ortopédicos de medio porte.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Spinal anesthesia may cause hemodynamic changes due to factors related or not to the patient. The density of the anesthetic compared to the CSF, which interferes with the number of dermatomes

  15. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  16. Decerebrate mouse model for studies of the spinal cord circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Mayr, Kyle A; Manuel, Marin

    2017-01-01

    The adult decerebrate mouse model (a mouse with the cerebrum removed) enables the study of sensory-motor integration and motor output from the spinal cord for several hours without compromising these functions with anesthesia. For example, the decerebrate mouse is ideal for examining locomotor...... behavior using intracellular recording approaches, which would not be possible using current anesthetized preparations. This protocol describes the steps required to achieve a low-blood-loss decerebration in the mouse and approaches for recording signals from spinal cord neurons with a focus on motoneurons...

  17. Anestesia geral após falha da raquianestesia para procedimento de urgência em paciente com mucopolissacaridose: relato de caso Anestesia general después de la falla de la anestesia raquidea para procedimiento de urgencia en paciente con mucopolisacaridosis: relato de caso General anesthesia after failed spinal block for emergency surgery in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    in the sitting position. After identifying failure of the spinal block it was changed to general anesthesia. Anesthetic induction consisted of intravenous clonidine, fentanyl and propofol, followed by endotracheal intubation without intercurrences. After a 45-minute surgery, the patient was extubated and transferred to the postanesthetic care unit where he remained under observation for 12 hours, being discharged to the regular ward without intercurrences. CONCLUSIONS: In the case presented here we did not have any difficulties handling the airways. However, this is the main problem in this group of patients and it is up to the anesthesiologist to choose the better technique to guarantee adequate handling of the airways.

  18. The elderly and general anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2010-01-01

    Due to the aging population, the number of elderly patients taking advantage of healthcare services is increasing. A general physical decline of all organ systems and a high frequency of chronic disease accompanying aging.Comorbidity and polypharmacy are therefore common in the elderly. Hence, th......, the administration of general anesthesia to the elderly can be a very challenging task. This paper aims to highlight some of the important issues presented to the elderly undergoing surgery and to suggest some strategies for management....

  19. Ocorre alta incidência de células da pele na primeira e terceira gotas do líquido cefalospinal em raquianestesia Ocurre una alta incidencia de células de la piel en la primera y tercera gotas del líquido cefaloespinal en la raquianestesia There is high incidence of skin cells in the first and third drops of cerebrospinal fluid in spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Humberto Curado Taveira

    2013-04-01

    ídeo en 39 pacientes adultos sometidos a la raquianestesia con una aguja 25G Quincke, siendo confeccionadas cuatro láminas: de la primera gota, de la tercera gota, de la aguja y una cuarta lámina control con una gota de suero fisiológico. Las láminas fueron examinadas de forma aleatoria por el patólogo. RESULTADOS: Se identificaron células epiteliales escamosas en 35 (89,7% de las muestras de la primera gota, en 34 (87,2% de la tercera gota y en 24 (61,5% de las agujas espinales. La tercera gota tuvo como promedio un mayor número de células que la primera gota (p = 0,046. Las células epiteliales nucleadas fueron encontradas en una (2,56% de las muestras de la primera gota, en cuatro (10,25% de la tercera gota y en una (2,56% de las agujas espinales. La tercera gota presentó como promedio, un mayor número de células nucleadas que la primera gota sin diferencias estadísticas (p = 0,257. CONCLUSIONES: Encontramos un alto porcentaje de células epiteliales que refluyen en la primera (89,7% y en la tercera (87,2% gotas del líquido cefalorraquídeo y en las agujas utilizadas (61,5%. Y aunque hayamos usado agujas de pequeño calibre, desechables y con un mandril bien adaptado, se encontraron células de la piel.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Skin fragments during lumbar punctures may develop intraspinal epidermoid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of epithelial cells that reflow along with the first and third drops of CSF of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Samples of the first and third drops of cerebrospinal fluid were collected from 39 adult patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with a 25G Quincke needle. Four microscope slides were prepared: one for the first drop, one for third drop, one for the needle, and one with a drop of saline for control. A pathologist examined the slides randomly. RESULTS: Squamous epithelial cells were identified in 35 (89.7% samples from the first drop, 34 (87.2% from the third drop, and 24 (61

  20. Fatal anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidor Kern

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of anaphylactic reactions occuring during anesthesia is not known. They occur most often in the induction  phase and can present with different levels of severity, also as an anaphylactic shock. Neuromuscular blocking drugs are the most frequently involved substances.Case presentation: We  report a case of a 77-year old female patient with granulomatous inflammation of unknown etiology. Surgical  biopsy of a neck lymph node was indicated. During the induction of anesthesia using propofol and succinylcholine she developed severe anaphylactic reaction presented with bronchospasm and cardiac arrest. Despite 80 min continous cardiopulmonary resuscitation the patient died. Elevated tryptase level in the patient’s blood sample taken before death confirmed anaphylactic reaction. On autopsy we confirmed the tuberculous etiology of generalized granulomatous inflammation.Conclusions: It is important to recognize anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia early and to take adequate measures in order to prevent unfavorable outcome. Tryptase assay of a blood sample taken during life or postmortem may help to identify anaphylactic reaction.

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord ... by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  3. Preventing and managing awareness during general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Berger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: General anesthesia is a reversible state of a temporary loss of consciousness, analgesia, muscle paralysis, blunted autonomic responses and amnesia. To achieve this, an adequate depth of anesthesia should be maintained throughout the surgery. Awareness is a serious complication of general anesthesia, which occurs when the depth of anesthesia is not appropriate due to various causes.In this paper the underlying neurobiology of intraoperative awareness is presented, as well as risk factors for awareness and methods for assessing the depth of anesthesia. Possible psychological consequences of awareness and their management are also discussed. At the end, the recommendations for preventing intraoperative awareness are given.Conclusions: Awareness during general anesthesia may have adverse psychological sequelae in individual patients, therefore guidelines for preventing and managing of intraoperative awareness need to be adopted. In case of a possible awareness, the recommendations for offering a psychological support should also be followed.

  4. The Effect of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine on Spinal Block and Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Ekici

    2015-03-01

    Material and Methods: Our randomised, double-blind study was applied to ASA I-III, 18-75 years old 50 patients scheduled for transurethral surgery. The patients were divided into two groups and spinal anesthesia with 5% levobupivacaine 12.5 mg was administered to all patients. Intravenous dexmedetomidine was received 1 and micro;g/kg for loading dose before 0.5 and micro;g/kg/hour infusion to Group D (n=25. Saline infusion was given 1 and micro;g/kg for loading dose before 0.5 and micro;g/kg/hour infusion to Group S (n=25. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure, heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation values, pain and sedation score, the level and duration of motor and sensorial block, recovery and patient comfort score and side effects were recorded. Results: Time to reach maximum block level and duration of spinal anesthesia were longer in Group D than Group S. Sedation scores were significantly higher in Group D than Group S intraoperatively (except 1th minute and postoperatively 10th and 15th minutes. The incidence of side effects, postoperative recovery and patient comfort values were similar between the groups. Conclusion: We found that dexmedetomidine prolongs duration of motor block, provides safe and effective sedation without increasing the incidence of side effect in the patients under spinal anesthesia. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 55-62

  5. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  6. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  7. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  8. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  9. A case of bilateral visual loss after spinal cord surgery | Shifa | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual loss is a rare but potentially devastating postoperative complication of prone spinal surgery with a reported incidence of 0.017 to 0.1 percent. We present a case of post-operative bilateral visual loss in a patient who had a laminectomy in prone position under general anesthesia. A 17-year-old male patient with large ...

  10. Dexmedetomidine: Expanding role in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna S Paranjpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential uses of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a highly selective α2 - adrenoceptor agonist are very diverse. DEX appears to mimic many of the actions of mythical ′ideal′ sedative/analgesic agent. Although not orally active, DEX shows good bioavailability when administered via various other routes like intranasal, buccal, IM than intra-venous. DEX has similar pharmacokinetics in all age groups. Its side effects are predictable and easily treatable, hence it has found place as a part of fast-tracking anesthesia regimens in children. DEX is the sedative of choice for peri-operative use in high risk patients, since it is cardioprotective, neuroprotective and renoprotective. Premedication with DEX obtunds the autonomic pressor responses due to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation when used as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. DEX in high doses offers another approach to managing morbidly obese patients and patients with a compromised airway; without causing any cardio-respiratory depression. It is near ideal hypotensive agent used for controlled hypotension. Its value as a primary sedative and analgesic is becoming more accepted and evident in critically ill patients; in adult and paediatric intensive care units. Besides use in locoregional anesthesia, it is also used as an opioid substitute, for treatment of substance withdrawal, as an anti-shivering agent, for treatment of delirium and as an end of life medication. Availability of an antidote (Atipamezole with similar elimination half life is taking the drug into new frontiers. However, use of DEX is contraindicated in patients with hepatic failure, hypovolemic shock, advanced heart block or ventricular dysfunction.

  11. Presbycusis: reversible with anesthesia drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Carl A

    2009-02-01

    Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is a degenerative condition not currently treatable by medication. It is therefore significant that the author, as a patient, experienced a reversal of high-frequency hearing loss during a 2-day period following abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. This report documents the surgery and the subsequent restoration of hearing, which was bilateral and is estimated to have exceeded 50dB at 4kHz. A possible role is noted for anesthetic agents such as lidocaine, propofol, or fentanyl. This experience may hold a clue for research toward the development of medical treatments for presbycusis.

  12. Providing anesthesia in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohlman, Lena E

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews the reality of anesthetic resource constraints in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Understanding these limitations is important to volunteers from high-income countries who desire to teach or safely provide anesthesia services in these countries. Recently published information on the state of anesthetic resources in LMICs is helping to guide humanitarian outreach efforts from high-income countries. The importance of using context-appropriate anesthesia standards and equipment is now emphasized. Global health experts are encouraging equal partnerships between anesthesia health care providers working together from different countries. The key roles that ketamine and regional anesthesia play in providing well tolerated anesthesia for cesarean sections and other common procedures is increasingly recognized. Anesthesia can be safely given in LMICs with basic supplies and equipment, if the anesthesia provider is trained and vigilant. Neuraxial and regional anesthesia and the use of ketamine as a general anesthetic appear to be the safest alternatives in low-resource countries. Environmentally appropriate equipment should be encouraged and pulse oximeters should be in every anesthetizing location. LMICs will continue to need support from outside sources until capacity building has made more progress.

  13. Simulation for Nurse Anesthesia Program Selection: Redesigned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, John Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This project is meant to answer the research question: What applicant character traits do Nurse Anesthesia Program Directors and Faculty identify as favorable predictors for successful completion of a nurse anesthesia program, and what evaluation methods are best to evaluate these traits in prospective students? Methods: A prospective…

  14. Prevention of post-spinal hypotension using crystalloid, colloid and ephedrine with three different combinations: A double blind randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Jabalameli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The benefit of prophylactic combination therapy using crystalloid and colloid preload with ephedrine has not been cleared to prevent maternal hypotension after spinal anesthesia at cesarean delivery. This study evaluated the efficacy of three combinational methods to prevent hypotension following spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In this prospective double blind trial, 150 candidates of elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to three treatment groups; 1---Ringer′s Lactate (RL solution (15 ml/kg plus Hemaxel (7 ml/kg preload, 2---RL solution (15 ml/kg preload plus ephedrine (15 mg, IV, bolus, 3---Hemaxel (7 ml/kg preload plus ephedrine (15 mg, IV, bolus. Maternal hemodynamic changes during 60 min after spinal injection, nausea/vomiting, and neonatal condition were compared among the groups. Results: The cumulative incidence of hypotension was 44%, 40%, and 46% in groups 1 to 3, respectively. There were not significant differences in supplementary ephedrine requirement among groups which received or among groups which did not receive prophylactic ephedrine. Groups were not different in the incidence of hypertension and nausea or vomiting. There were no significant differences among groups in Apgar scores at 1 or 5 min and umbilical artery PH. Conclusion: Combination of preventive methods decreased the occurrence of hypotension following spinal anesthesia to an acceptable level. Overall, the most effective method was a combination of crystalloid preload with ephedrine.

  15. Anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a patient with large anterior mediastinal tumor presenting as intrathoracic airway compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatish Bevinaguddaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior mediastinal mass is a rare pathology that presents considerable anesthetic challenges due to cardiopulmonary compromise. We present a case that was referred to us in the third trimester of pregnancy with severe breathlessness and orthopnea. An elective cesarean delivery was performed under combined spinal epidural anesthesia with a favorable outcome. We discuss the perioperative considerations in these patients with a review of the literature.

  16. Regional anesthesia in difficult airway: The quest for a solution continues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Chatrath, Veena; Dhawan, Akshay; Attri, Joginder Pal

    2016-01-01

    Difficult airway, a scenario with potentially life threatening outcome, is routinely encountered by an anesthesiologist leaving him with the dilemma of whether to use regional anesthesia (RA) or general anesthesia. Our study aims to look into this problem. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words "regional anesthesia, difficult airway, pregnancy, ventilation, intubation, epidural anesthesia, nerve blocks." More than 38 free full articles and books published from the year 1987 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. At first sight, RA may appear to offer an ideal solution as it helps to avoid the problem of difficult airway. However, the possibility of a total spinal block, failed or incomplete RA, local anesthetic toxicity or unforeseen surgical complication may make it imperative that the airway is secured. The correct decision can only be made by the anesthetist when all the relevant clinical information is taken into account. It is also important to ensure that before considering RA in a patient of difficult airway, an anesthesiologist must have a preformulated strategy for intubation.

  17. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord ... SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  6. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ...

  12. Orbital exenteration under trigeminal block: An innovative method of regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath Timmappa Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital exenteration is a disfiguring operation involving the removal of the entire contents of the orbit, with or without the eyelids. It is widely felt that such extensive surgery can only be performed under general anesthesia. We report our experience with a patient who underwent orbitalexenteration under trigeminal block with intravenous sedation. A 68-year-old male patient was diagnosed to have orbital cellulitis (mucormycosis, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, dilated cardiomyopathy with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction with severe pulmonary artery hypertension, and nephropathy. We decided to avoid general anesthesia for such a high-risk patient with many co-morbid illnesses. We gave trigeminal block using a 22-G spinal needle with local anesthetic solution of bupivacaine 0.5% by classic approach. A standard exenteration was performed and the patient tolerated the procedure well with no complications.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  17. Historical development of modern anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel H; Toledo, Alexander H

    2012-06-01

    Of all milestones and achievements in medicine, conquering pain must be one of the very few that has potentially affected every human being in the world. It was in 1846 that one of mankind's greatest fears, the pain of surgery, was eliminated. This historical review article describes how the various elements of anesthesiology (gasses, laryngoscopes, endotracheal tubes, intravenous medications, masks, and delivery systems) were discovered and how some brilliant entrepreneurs and physicians of the past two centuries have delivered them to humanity. One name stands out amongst all others when the founder of modern anesthesia is discussed, William T.G. Morton (1819-1868). A young Boston Dentist, Dr. Morton had been in the search for a better agent than what had been used by many dentists: nitrous oxide. With Dr. Morton's tenacity driven by enthusiasm and discovery, he and renowned surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, John Collins Warren (1778-1856) made history on October 16, 1846 with the first successful surgical procedure performed with anesthesia. Dr. Morton had single-handedly proven to the world that ether is a gas that when inhaled in the proper dose, provided safe and effective anesthesia. One of the first accounts of an endotracheal tube being used for an airway comes from the pediatrician Joseph O'Dwyer (1841-1898). He used the metal "O'dwyer" tubes in diphtheria cases and passed them into the trachea blindly. Adding a cuff to the tube is credited to Arthur Guedel (1883-1956) and Ralph M. Waters (1883-1979) in 1932. This addition suddenly gave the practitioner the ability to provide positive pressure ventilation. The anesthesiologist Chevalier Jackson (1865-1958) promoted his handheld laryngoscope for the insertion of endotracheal tubes and its popularity quickly caught hold. Sir Robert Reynolds Macintosh's (1897-1989) breakthrough technique of direct laryngoscopy came after being appointed Nuffield professor of anesthetics at the University of Oxford

  18. Regional anesthesia practice in China: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey; Gao, Huan

    2016-11-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia has been widely used in China. Recently, Chinese anesthesiologists have applied nerve stimulator and ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. Nationwide surveys about regional anesthesia practices in China are lacking. We surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about regional anesthesia techniques, preference, drug selections, complications, and treatments. A survey was sent to all anesthesiologist members by WeChat. The respondents can choose mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. Each IP address is allowed to complete the survey once. A total of 6589 members read invitations. A total of 2654 responses were received with fully completed questionnaires, which represented an overall response rate of 40%. Forty-one percent of the respondents reported that more than 50% of surgeries in their hospitals were done under regional anesthesia. Most of the participants used test dose after epidural catheter insertion. The most common drug for test dose was 3-mL 1.5% lidocaine; 2.6% of the participants reported that they had treated a patient with epidural hematoma after neuraxial anesthesia. Most anesthesiologists (68.2%) performed peripheral nerve blocks as blind procedures based on the knowledge of anatomical landmarks. A majority of hospitals (80%) did not stock Intralipid; 61% of the respondents did not receive peripheral nerve block training. The current survey can serve as a benchmark for future comparisons and evaluation of regional anesthesia practices in China. This survey revealed potential regional anesthesia safety issues in China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clonidine in pediatric caudal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, S; Monin, S; Begon, C; Dubousset, A M; Ecoffey, C

    1994-04-01

    Extradural clonidine produces analgesia in adults. To assess its efficacy in children, we randomized 45 pediatric patients aged 1-7 yr presenting for a subumbilical surgery into three groups of 15 each. After halothane and N2O/O2 induction, and with a double-blind protocol, caudal anesthesia was performed with 1 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. Epinephrine 1/200,000 was added in one group (EG), 1 microgram/kg of clonidine in another group (CG), and no additional medication in the last group (BG). Postoperative analgesia was evaluated using the Broadman "objective pain/discomfort scale" (OPS) at 1-h intervals until the first analgesic administration. There were no differences among the groups in age, weight, duration of surgery, baseline systolic arterial pressure, and heart rate. The mean (+/- SD) duration of analgesia was longer in the CG (987 +/- 573 min) than in the EG (377 +/- 341 min) and BG (460 +/- 439 min); P < 0.01. The maximal OPS scores were lower in the CG than in the EG and BG (2.3 +/- 1.6 vs 3.4 +/- 1.4 and 3.4 +/- 1.8, respectively; P < 0.05). More patients in the CG (n = 7) than in the EG (n = 1) and BG (n = 2) required no postoperative analgesia; P < 0.05. No differences were found among the groups for the minimal respiratory rate and minimal Spo2 values in the postoperative phase, and there were no differences among the groups for heart rate and systolic arterial pressure during the 3 h after caudal anesthesia. We conclude that the duration of postoperative analgesia with caudal bupivacaine was significantly increased by the addition of 1 microgram/kg of clonidine.

  20. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  1. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the effect of anesthesia and surgery on serum tryptase in the absence of anaphylaxis....

  2. Supplemental pulpal anesthesia for mandibular teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel Boopathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pulpal anesthesia is dependent on the interaction of three major factors. (1 the dentist (2 the patient and (3 local anesthesia. Many patients fear endodontic treatment due to a concern about pain. Although pain treatment is well managed in many endodontic patients, there exists a group of patients who do not receive adequate local anesthesia. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the possible reasons for pulpal anesthetic failures and also to focus on the measures for developing effective approaches for the same.

  3. Anesthesia for tracheal resection and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Chhangani, Sanjeev V; Alfille, Paul H

    2012-12-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) is the treatment of choice for most patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheal tumors. Anesthesia for TRR offers distinct challenges, especially for the less experienced practitioner. This article explores the preoperative assessment, strategies for induction and emergence from anesthesia, the essential coordination between the surgical and anesthesia teams during airway excision and anastomosis, and postoperative care. The most common complications are reviewed. Targeted readership is practitioners with less extensive experience in managing airway surgery cases. As such, the article focuses first on the most common proximal tracheal resection. Final sections discuss specific considerations for more complicated cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer’s disease and anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Amélie ePapon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive disorders such as post-operative cognitive dysfunction, confusion, and delirium, are common following anesthesia in the elderly, with symptoms persisting for months or years in some patients. Alzheimer's disease (AD patients appear to be particularly at risk of cognitive deterioration following anesthesia, and some studies suggest that exposure to anesthetics may increase the risk of AD. Here, we review the literature linking anesthesia to AD, with a focus on the biochemical consequences of anesthetic exposure on AD pathogenic pathways.

  5. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hypotensive Anesthesia versus Normotensive Anesthesia during Major Maxillofacial Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoav, Leiser; Abu el-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Steady blood pressure within normal limits during surgery is one of the markers of the ideal and skillful anesthesia. Yet, reduced blood pressure is advantageous in some settings because it can contribute to a reduction in overall blood loss and improve the surgical field conditions. Controlled hypotension during anesthesia or hypotensive anesthesia is often used in major maxillofacial operations. Since hypotensive anesthesia carries the risk of hypoperfusion to important organs and tissues, mainly the brain, heart, and kidneys, it cannot be applied safely in all patients. In this paper we review the medical literature regarding hypotensive anesthesia during major maxillofacial surgery, the means to achieve it, and the risks and benefits of this technique, in comparison to normotensive anesthesia. PMID:25811042

  7. Modern technologies of local injection anesthesia in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohov S.Т.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the importance of using the new system Quick Sleeper for local anesthesia, to highlight benefits of quick and comfortable anesthesia. Material and Methods. The examination of effectiveness, convenience of this kind of anesthesia has been carried out. Results. All patients, taking part in this examination, confirmed more comfortable condition after this anesthesia than conductor and infiltration methods of anesthesia. The effect of anesthesia is better than after conductor anesthesia. Conclusion. This technology guarantees equal introduction and spread of anesthetic, independently of tissue density, eliminating the risk of carpule breakage.

  8. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  9. Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Provincial, District, and Mission Hospitals in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnée, Herman A; Madzimbamuto, Farai; Erlandsen, Ole R M; Vassenden, Astrid; Chikumba, Edson; Dimba, Rutenda; Myhre, Arne K; Ray, Sunanda

    2017-12-29

    Cesarean delivery is the most common surgical procedure in low- and middle-income countries, so provision of anesthesia services can be measured in relation to it. This study aimed to assess the type of anesthesia used for cesarean delivery, the level of training of anesthesia providers, and to document the availability of essential anesthetic drugs and equipment in provincial, district, and mission hospitals in Zimbabwe. In this cross-sectional survey of 8 provincial, 21 district, and 13 mission hospitals, anesthetic providers were interviewed on site using a structured questionnaire adapted from standard instruments developed by the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists and the World Health Organization. The anesthetic workforce for the hospitals in this survey constituted 22% who were medical officers and 77% nurse anesthetists (NAs); 55% of NAs were recognized independent anesthetic providers, while 26% were qualified as assistants to anesthetic providers and 19% had no formal training in anesthesia. The only specialist physician anesthetist was part time in a provincial hospital. Spinal anesthesia was the most commonly used method for cesarean delivery (81%) in the 3 months before interview, with 19% general anesthesia of which 4% was ketamine without airway intubation. The mean institutional cesarean delivery rate was 13.6% of live births, although 5 district hospitals were table tilt or wedge, and insufficient blood supplies. Postoperative analgesia management was reported inadequate. This study identified areas where anesthetic provision and care could be improved. Provincial hospitals, where district/mission hospitals refer difficult cases, did not have the higher level anesthesia expertise required to manage these cases. More intensive mentorship and supervision from senior clinicians is essential to address the shortcomings identified in this survey, such as the implementation of evidence-based safe practices, supply chain failures, high

  10. Are Anesthesia Providers Ready for Hypnosis? Anesthesia Providers' Attitudes Toward Hypnotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Alexander B; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Bertram, Amanda; Seymour, Anastasia Rowland

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to measure current attitudes toward hypnosis among anesthesia providers using an in-person survey distributed at a single grand rounds at a single academic teaching hospital. One hundred twenty-six anesthesia providers (anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists) were included in this study. A 10-question Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved questionnaire was developed. One hundred twenty-six (73% of providers at the meeting) anesthesia providers completed the survey. Of the respondents, 54 (43%) were anesthesiologists, 42 (33%) were trainees (interns/residents/fellows) in anesthesia, and 30 (24%) were nurse anesthetists. Over 70% of providers, at each level of training, rated their knowledge of hypnosis as either below average or having no knowledge. Fifty-two (42%) providers agreed or strongly agreed that hypnotherapy has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia, while 103 (83%) believed that positive suggestion has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia (p hypnosis were that it is too time consuming (41%) and requires special training (34%). Only three respondents (2%) believed that there were no reasons for using hypnosis in their practice. These data suggest that there is a self-reported lack of knowledge about hypnosis among anesthesia providers, although many anesthesia providers are open to the use of hypnosis in their clinical practice. Anesthesia providers are more likely to support the use of positive suggestion in their practice than hypnosis. Practical concerns should be addressed if hypnosis and therapeutic verbal techniques are to gain more widespread use.

  11. [Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Márcio Luiz; Brandão, Verônica Cristina Moraes; Lovera, Jacqueline Ivonne Arenas

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index > 50 kg/m(2), who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m(2). Caesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 minutes, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1(st) minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 minutes) and 8 in the 5(th) minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4(th) postoperative day. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Márcio Luiz; Brandão, Verônica Cristina Moraes; Lovera, Jacqueline Ivonne Arenas

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50kg/m(2), who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8kg/m(2). Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2min) and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luiz Benevides

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50 kg/m2, who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Case report: Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m2. Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 min and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day.

  14. Conscious awareness and memory during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, K

    1994-10-01

    Conscious awareness is an infrequent complication of general anesthesia. All methods of anesthesia have been implicated, and no method guarantees amnesia. This article examines implicit and explicit memory and discusses factors associated with awareness. Common methods of detection are unreliable, and symptoms resembling post-traumatic stress disorder may result if awareness goes unrecognized and untreated. Patients who experience awareness may sue on grounds of malpractice, breach of contract, and lack of consent. Overhearing negative stimuli may affect patient outcome, because learning and language comprehension can occur during what appears to be clinically adequate anesthesia. Strategies to block threatening auditory stimuli include use of earphones, music tapes, white noise, reassuring statements, or positive suggestion. Behavioral anesthesia decreases patient stress to enhance recovery. Evidence of patient benefit resulting from therapeutic suggestion is inconclusive.

  15. Open hemorrhoidectomy under local anesthesia for symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    standard treatment for prolapsed hemorrhoids. The procedure is commonly done under general or regional anesthesia. This study is aimed to assess the feasibility and tolerability of open – hemorrhoidectomy under local anaesthesia in our setting.

  16. Successful pulpal anesthesia for symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara

    2017-04-01

    Profound pulpal anesthesia after a successful inferior alveolar nerve block can be difficult to achieve when the clinical condition is a pulpal diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors reviewed the literature as it relates to the anesthesia necessary for endodontic therapy of patients with painful, vital, mandibular teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Supplemental anesthetic techniques and medications are available that can be used to improve pulpal anesthesia for patients with the clinical condition of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors identified treatment recommendations for anesthesia in the case of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis based on a review of the available evidence. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. "Acupuncture anesthesia"--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, J H; Lee, P K; Bingham, H G; Greer, D M; Habal, M B

    1976-01-01

    Forty-two patients who were to undergo plastic surgical procedures were asked whether they would accept acupuncture as a substitute for local anesthesia. Eight patients agreed to acupuncture; one of these had 2 operative procedures with acupuncture. Five of the 9 procedures were successful; the remaining 4 required conversion to local anesthesia. After interviewing the patients, we felt that the success of "acupuncture anesthesia" was largely dependent on patient motivation, and that a patient may experience pain during surgical procedures without any change in facial expression or vital signs. We concluded that "acupuncture anesthesia" is of little value in our patient population at present. Its results are unpredictable; therefore, we anticipate that patient acceptance will be small.

  18. Anesthesia related Complications in Pediatric GI Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sabzevari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elective upper and lower GI endoscopy is usually performed in children on an outpatient basis with the child under sedation or general anesthesia (GA. The objective of this study was to describe Anesthesia related complications in   children undergoing elective GI endoscopy.   Materials and Methods: The study design was descriptive on 1388 patients undergoing elective GI endoscopy in Sheikh Hospital from 2009 to 2013. All patient received propofol or standard inhalational anesthesia. We examined patients’ demographic data  ,  location of GI endoscopy ,  perioperative vital singe ,  recovery time , respiratory and cardiac complications , post operative nausea and vomiting , agitation , diagnosis and outcome   Results: Pediatric patients aged 2 to 17 years. 29 % of elective GI endoscopy was upper GI endoscopy and 70.3 % was lower GI endoscopy and 0.7 was both of them. 47.7 % of Pediatric patients were female and 52.3 % was male. We haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related respiratory and cardiac complications (no apnea, no cardiac arrest. 8 patients (0.5% have transient bradicardia in post operative care Unit. 83 patients (5.9% have post operative nausea and vomiting controlled by medication.  6 patients (0.4% have post operative agitation controlled by medication.   Conclusions: General anesthesia and deep sedation in children undergoing elective GI endoscopy haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related complications. We suggest Anesthesia for infants, young children, children with neurologic impairment, and some anxious older children undergoing elective GI endoscopy. Keyword: Anesthesia, Complication, Endoscopy, Pediatric.

  19. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a t...

  20. Anesthesia for Pediatric Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Sebeo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients refractory to medical therapy, deep brain stimulations (DBSs have emerged as the treatment of movement disorders particularly Parkinson's disease. Their use has also been extended in pediatric and adult patients to treat epileptogenic foci. We here performed a retrospective chart review of anesthesia records from 28 pediatric cases of patients who underwent DBS implantation for dystonia using combinations of dexmedetomidine and propofol-based anesthesia. Complications with anesthetic techniques including airway and cardiovascular difficulties were analyzed.

  1. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  2. Potential anesthesia protocols for space exploration missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Matthieu; Watkins, Sharmila D; Lebuffe, Gilles; Clark, Jonathan B

    2013-03-01

    In spaceflight beyond low Earth's orbit, medical conditions requiring surgery are of a high level of concern because of their potential impact on crew health and mission success. Whereas surgical techniques have been thoroughly studied in spaceflight analogues, the research focusing on anesthesia is limited. To provide safe anesthesia during an exploration mission will be a highly challenging task. The research objective is thus to describe specific anesthesia procedures enabling treatment of pre-identified surgical conditions. Among the medical conditions considered by the NASA Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability element, those potentially necessitating anesthesia techniques have been identified. The most appropriate procedure for each condition is thoroughly discussed. The substantial cost of training time necessary to implement regional anesthesia is pointed out. Within general anesthetics, ketamine combines the unique advantages of preservation of cardiovascular stability, the protective airway reflexes, and spontaneous ventilation. Ketamine side effects have for decades tempered enthusiasm for its use, but recent developments in mitigation means broadened its indications. The extensive experience gathered in remote environments, with minimal equipment and occasionally by insufficiently trained care providers, confirms its high degree of safety. Two ketamine-based anesthesia protocols are described with their corresponding indications. They have been designed taking into account the physiological changes occurring in microgravity and the specific constraints of exploration missions. This investigation could not only improve surgical care during long-duration spaceflights, but may find a number of terrestrial applications in isolated or austere environments.

  3. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy/American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Recommendations on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Santhanam; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Lonnqvist, Per-Anne; de Oliveira, Gildasio S; de Leon Casasola, Oscar; de Andrés, José; Ivani, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Dosage of local anesthetics (LAs) used for regional anesthesia in children is not well determined. In order to evaluate and come to a consensus regarding some of these controversial topics, The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) developed a Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia. Representatives from both ASRA and ESRA composed the joint committee practice advisory. Evidence-based recommendations were based on a systematic search of the literature. In cases where no literature was available, expert opinion was elicited. Spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine can be performed with a dose of 1 mg/kg for newborn and/or infant and a dose of 0.5 mg/kg in older children (>1 year of age). Tetracaine 0.5% is recommended for spinal anesthesia (dose, 0.07-0.13 mL/kg). Ultrasound-guided upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (eg, axillary, infraclavicular, interscalene, supraclavicular) in children can be performed successfully and safely using a recommended LA dose of bupivacaine or ropivacaine of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/kg. Dexmedetomidine can be used as an adjunct to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks in children. High-level evidence is not yet available to guide dosage of LA used in regional blocks in children. The ASRA/ESRA recommendations intend to provide guidance in order to reduce the large variability of LA dosage currently observed in clinical practice.

  4. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA) in an Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaars, R; Wolff, A P

    2012-01-01

    A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline in order to try to prevent post-dural-puncture headache. After arrival at the postanesthesia care unit and fifteen minutes after removal of the catheter the patient suffered an unexpected high thoracic sensory blockade and hypotension requiring treatment. The continuous spinal anesthesia technique can be used in selected cases to be able to administer local anesthetic agents in a slow and controlled manner to reach the desired effect. The risk of post-dural-puncture headache using this technique in elderly patients is very low and therefore precludes the need to try to prevent it. We have described a potentially dangerous complication of flushing a bupivacaine-filled system into the spinal canal of an elderly patient resulting in an undesirable high sensory blockade.

  5. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ketelaars

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline in order to try to prevent post-dural-puncture headache. After arrival at the postanesthesia care unit and fifteen minutes after removal of the catheter the patient suffered an unexpected high thoracic sensory blockade and hypotension requiring treatment. The continuous spinal anesthesia technique can be used in selected cases to be able to administer local anesthetic agents in a slow and controlled manner to reach the desired effect. The risk of post-dural-puncture headache using this technique in elderly patients is very low and therefore precludes the need to try to prevent it. We have described a potentially dangerous complication of flushing a bupivacaine-filled system into the spinal canal of an elderly patient resulting in an undesirable high sensory blockade.

  6. Anesthesia care for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaman, Michael J; Hevesi, Zoltan G

    2011-01-01

    Intraoperative transfusion practices for liver transplantation have evolved dramatically since the first transplants of the 1960s. It is important for today's clinicians to be current in their understanding of how transplant patients should be managed with regard to their coagulation profile, volume status, and general hemodynamic state. The anesthesia team is presented with the unique task of manipulating this tenuous balance in a rapid and precise manner when managing patients undergoing liver transplantation. Although significant progress has been made in reducing blood product administration, it is still common to encounter large volume blood loss in these cases. Increasingly, clinicians are challenged to justify transfusion practices with a stronger evidentiary base. The current state of the literature for transfusion guidelines and blood product management in this particular patient subset will be discussed, as well as a variety of means (both pharmacologic and otherwise) used to reduce the need for transfusion. The aim was to review the latest evidence on these topics, as well as to highlight areas that need further clarification regarding their role in the optimal care of these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction of Fos protein immunoreactivity by spinal cord contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Del-Bel

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to identify neurons in the central nervous system that respond to spinal contusion injury in the rat by monitoring the expression of the nuclear protein encoded by the c-fos gene, an activity-dependent gene, in spinal cord and brainstem regions. Rats were anesthetized with urethane and the injury was produced by dropping a 5-g weight from 20.0 cm onto the exposed dura at the T10-L1 vertebral level (contusion group. The spinal cord was exposed but not lesioned in anesthetized control animals (laminectomy group; intact animals were also subjected to anesthesia (intact control. Behavioral alterations were analyzed by Tarlov/Bohlman scores, 2 h after the procedures and the animals were then perfused for immunocytochemistry. The patterns of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI which were site-specific, reproducible and correlated with spinal laminae that respond predominantly to noxious stimulation or injury: laminae I-II (outer substantia gelatinosa and X and the nucleus of the intermediolateral cell column. At the brain stem level FLI was detected in the reticular formation, area postrema and solitary tract nucleus of lesioned animals. No Fos staining was detected by immunocytochemistry in the intact control group. However, detection of FLI in the group submitted to anesthesia and surgical procedures, although less intense than in the lesion group, indicated that microtraumas may occur which are not detected by the Tarlov/Bohlman scores. There is both a local and remote effect of a distal contusion on the spinal cord of rats, implicating sensory neurons and centers related to autonomic control in the reaction to this kind of injury.

  8. Estudo comparativo entre ropivacaína a 0,5% e bupivacaína a 0,5% ambas hiperbáricas, na raquianestesia Estudio comparativo entre ropivacaína a 0,5% y bupivacaína a 0,5% ambas hiperbáricas, en la raquianestesia Spinal anesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric ropivacaine and 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Cláudio dos Reis e Carvalho

    2002-11-01

    (50% de los pacientes en el grupo R vs 30% en el grupo B; tiempo para regresión completa del bloqueo sensorial (178,5 ± 65,2 vs 181 ± 26,9 minutos; tiempo para regresión completa del bloqueo motor (192 ± 50,7 vs 162,5 ± 37,8 min; tiempo para la primera queja espontánea de dolor (183,9 ± 37,1 vs 206,5 ± 46,6 minutos. CONCLUSIONES: En este estudio las características clínicas del bloqueo subaracnóideo con ropivacaína o bupivacaína hiperbáricas en dosis equipotentes fueron semejantes. Los datos parecen confirmar observaciones anteriores de que en estas condiciones la potencia de la ropivacaína es aproximadamente igual a la mitad de aquella de la bupivacaína.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine has been proven safe both in experimental and clinical studies. On the other hand, ropivacaine is approximately half as potent as bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia when both drugs are used in hyperbaric solutions. This study aimed at comparing clinical spinal block features obtained with hyperbaric ropivacaine or bupivacaine in equipotent doses. METHODS: Twenty ASA I or II patients, aged 20 to 60 years, scheduled for elective surgeries of lower limbs, perineum and inguinal hernioplasty, were randomly allocated into two groups . Group R (n = 10 were given 4 ml 0.5% hyperbaric ropivacaine and Group B (n = 10 were given 2 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine intratecally. Puncture was performed with a 25G needle in the sitting position. Monitoring consisted of SBP, DBP, MBP, HR, ECG and SpO2. Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times, hemodynamic and respiratory changes, and the incidence of adverse effects were recorded. RESULTS: There were no differences between groups in demographics data, sensory block onset (174.4 ± 75.9 vs. 191 ± 51.7 s, motor block onset (373.6 ± 214.6 vs. 240 ± 60 s, upper level of sensory block T8 - T10 (90% of group R patients vs. 70% of group B, motor block grade 3 (50% of group R patients vs. 30% of group B

  9. A Virtual Reality Simulation Model of Spinal Ultrasound: Role in Teaching Spinal Sonoanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlogan, Reva; Niazi, Ahtsham U; Jin, Rongyu; Johnson, James; Chan, Vincent W; Perlas, Anahi

    Ultrasound assessment of the lumbar spine improves the success of spinal and epidural anesthesia, especially for patients with underlying difficult anatomy. To assist with the teaching and learning of ultrasound-guided neuraxial anesthesia, we have created an online interactive educational model (http://www.usra.ca/vspine.php and http://pie.med.utoronto.ca/vspine). The aim of the current study was to determine whether the virtual spine model improved the knowledge of neuraxial anatomy and sonoanatomy. After obtaining ethics board approval and written participant consent, 14 anesthesia trainees with no prior experience with spine ultrasound imaging were included in this study. Construct validity was assessed using a pretest/posttest design to measure the knowledge acquired from self-study of the virtual spine simulation modules. Two tests (A and B) with 20 multiple-choice questions were used either for the pretest or posttest, at random in order to account for possible differences in difficulty between the 2 tests. These tests were administered immediately before and after a 1-hour training session using the spine ultrasound model. Fourteen anesthesia trainees completed the study. Seven used test A as the pretest (group A), and 7 used test B as the pretest (group B). Both groups showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05) in test scores after a 1-hour session with the spine ultrasound model. The mean scores were 55% (SD, 11.2%) on the pretest and 77% (SD, 8.7%) on the posttest. The study demonstrated that after 1 hour of self-study by the trainees on the spine ultrasound model test scores improved by 40%.

  10. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  11. The hematological effects of nitrous oxide anesthesia in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Andreas; Cartmill, Christopher; Blood, Jane; Sharma, Anshuman; Kharasch, Evan D; Nagele, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Prolonged administration of nitrous oxide causes an increase in plasma homocysteine in children via vitamin B12 inactivation. However, it is unclear whether nitrous oxide doses used in clinical practice cause adverse hematological effects in pediatric patients. This retrospective study included 54 pediatric patients undergoing elective spinal surgery: 41 received nitrous oxide throughout anesthesia (maintenance group), 9 received nitrous oxide for induction and/or emergence (induction/emergence group), and 4 did not receive nitrous oxide (nitrous oxide-free group). Complete blood counts obtained before and up to 4 days after surgery were assessed for anemia, macrocytosis/microcytosis, anisocytosis, hyperchromatosis/hypochromatosis, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. The change (Δ) from preoperative to the highest postoperative value was calculated for mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and red cell distribution width (RDW). No pancytopenia was present in any patient after surgery. All patients had postoperative anemia, and none had macrocytosis. Postoperative MCV (mean [99% confidence interval]) peaked at 86 fL (85-88 fL), 85 fL (81-89 fL), and 88 fL (80-96 fL) and postoperative RDW at 13.2% (12.8-13.5%), 13.3% (12.7-13.8%), and 13.0% (11.4-14.6%) for the maintenance group, the induction/emergence group, and the nitrous oxide-free group. Two patients in the maintenance group (5%) developed anisocytosis (RDW >14.6%), but none in the induction/emergence group or in the nitrous oxide-free group (P = 0.43). Both ΔMCV (P = 0.52) and ΔRDW (P = 0.16) were similar across all groups. Nitrous oxide exposure for up to 8 hours is not associated with megaloblastic anemia in pediatric patients undergoing major spinal surgery.

  12. Success rates and complications of awake caudal versus spinal block in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Seyedhejazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inguinal hernia is a common disease in preterm infants necessitating surgical repair. Despite the increased risk of postoperative apnea in preterm infants, the procedure was conventionally performed under general anesthesia. Recently, regional anesthesia approaches, including spinal and caudal blocks have been proposed as safe and efficient alternative anesthesia methods in this group of patients. The current study evaluates awake caudal and spinal blocks in preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 66 neonates and infants (weight <5 kg undergoing inguinal hernia repair were recruited in Tabriz Teaching Children Hospital during a 12-month period. They were randomly divided into two equal groups; receiving either caudal block by 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group C or spinal block by 1 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 20 μg adrenaline (group S. Vital signs and pain scores were documented during operation and thereafter up to 24 h after operation. Results: Decrease in heart rate and systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in group C throughout the study period (P < 0.05. The mean recovery time was significantly higher in group S (27.3 ± 5.5 min vs. 21.8 ± 9.3 min; P = 0.03. Postoperative need for analgesia was significantly more frequent in group S (75.8% vs. 36.4%; P = 0.001. Failure in anesthesia was significantly higher in group S (24.4% vs. 6.1%; P = 0.04. Conclusion: More appropriate success rate, duration of recovery and postoperative need of analgesics could contribute to caudal block being a superior anesthesia technique compared to spinal anesthesia in awaked preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

  13. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

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    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  14. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  15. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  16. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  17. The safe spinal anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anticoagulation. Refusal. Severe hypovolaemia or shock. Localised sepsis .... Side-effects and complications of spinal anaesthesia. Side-effect/complication. Mechanism. Treatment. Hypotension. Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation.

  18. Acute hypotension in a patient undergoing posttraumatic cervical spine fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, David F

    2009-02-01

    Hypotension should be vigilantly prevented in patients with spinal cord injury. Recent advances in neurological, intraoperative monitoring techniques have allowed Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists to assess the effects of spinal cord ischemia and compression as they occur. This case report describes a young, healthy man who sustained a cervical spine fracture and was scheduled for anterior spinal fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia. This patient experienced a brief period of intraoperative hypotension with evidence of abnormal MEPs. A wake-up test was performed, which showed normal functioning, and the case resumed an uneventful course. Although this scenario resulted in no neurological sequelae, the effects of spinal cord ischemia due to hypotension can lead to permanent, devastating motor and sensory damage.

  19. The Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology Consensus Statement on the Anesthetic Management of Pregnant and Postpartum Women Receiving Thromboprophylaxis or Higher Dose Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffert, Lisa; Butwick, Alexander; Carvalho, Brendan; Arendt, Katherine; Bates, Shannon M; Friedman, Alex; Horlocker, Terese; Houle, Timothy; Landau, Ruth; Dubois, Heloise; Fernando, Roshan; Houle, Tim; Kopp, Sandra; Montgomery, Douglas; Pellegrini, Joseph; Smiley, Richard; Toledo, Paloma

    2018-03-01

    Venous thromboembolism is recognized as a leading cause of maternal death in the United States. Thromboprophylaxis has been highlighted as a key preventive measure to reduce venous thromboembolism-related maternal deaths. However, the expanded use of thromboprophylaxis in obstetrics will have a major impact on the use and timing of neuraxial analgesia and anesthesia for women undergoing vaginal or cesarean delivery and other obstetric surgeries. Experts from the Society of Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia, and hematology have collaborated to develop this comprehensive, pregnancy-specific consensus statement on neuraxial procedures in obstetric patients receiving thromboprophylaxis or higher dose anticoagulants. To date, none of the existing anesthesia societies' recommendations have weighed the potential risks of neuraxial procedures in the presence of thromboprophylaxis, with the competing risks of general anesthesia with a potentially difficult airway, or maternal or fetal harm from avoidance or delayed neuraxial anesthesia. Furthermore, existing guidelines have not integrated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants in the obstetric population. The goal of this consensus statement is to provide a practical guide of how to appropriately identify, prepare, and manage pregnant women receiving thromboprophylaxis or higher dose anticoagulants during the ante-, intra-, and postpartum periods. The tactics to facilitate multidisciplinary communication, evidence-based pharmacokinetic and spinal epidural hematoma data, and Decision Aids should help inform risk-benefit discussions with patients and facilitate shared decision making.

  20. Spinal dopaminergic involvement in the antihyperalgesic effect of antidepressants in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mi; Hoshino, Hajime; Saito, Shigeru; Yang, Yang; Obata, Hideaki

    2017-05-10

    Antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors are a first-line treatment for neuropathic pain. Here, we aimed to determine the involvement of the spinal dopaminergic system in the antihyperalgesic effects of antidepressants in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The right L5 spinal nerve of male Sprague-Dawley rats was ligated under inhalation anesthesia to induce hyperalgesia. Behavioral testing was performed by measuring ipsilateral hindpaw withdrawal thresholds after intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, duloxetine, milnacipran, and fluoxetine. D2-like receptors were blocked by intrathecal administration of sulpiride. We also determined the concentrations of dopamine in the spinal cord using microdialysis after injection of antidepressants. The dopamine contents in the spinal dorsal horn were also measured in normal and SNL rats at 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after SNL surgery. Intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, duloxetine, milnacipran, and fluoxetine (3-30mg/kg) produced antihyperalgesic effects, and prevented by intrathecal pre-injection of sulpiride (30μg). Microdialysis revealed the dopamine levels in the spinal cord were increased after intraperitoneal injection of each antidepressant (10mg/kg). Furthermore, the dopamine content in homogenized spinal cord tissue were increased at 2 weeks after SNL and then subsequently declined. Our results suggest that the effect of antidepressants against neuropathic pain is related to modulation of not only noradrenalin and serotonin but also dopamine levels in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gestational obesity as a determinant of general anesthesia technique for caesarean delivery: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Navarro Vargas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of obesity has undergone a dramatic increase around the world during the last few years. Such epidemic behavior has been associated with obstetric patient’s frequent presentation of different stages of obesity when undergoing anesthetic procedure. Obesity in pregnant women involves the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Hypertension and preeclampsia, diabetes, fetal macrosomia, caesarean delivery, difficult airway management and neuroaxial techniques are more likely to be performed in this group of patients. Materials and methods. This is a case report of a morbid obese patient scheduled for caesarean delivery and tubal ligation. Regional, spinal and epidural techniques were attempted for surgery with unsuccessful results; this entails general anesthesia for surgery. The literature on complications due to obesity during pregnancy was reviewed, emphasising relevance for the anesthesiologist. Conclusion. Obesity, especially morbid obesity in pregnant women, represents a challenge for anesthesia management. Updated knowledge of physiology and the conditions related to obesity in pregnancy is necessary; medical services must be prepared to provide optimum and safe obstetric anesthesia, analgesia and post-operation care.

  2. Dependent Prior: An Application in Spinal Anaesthesia Drug Therapy on SBP in Cesarean patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Bhattacharjee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean section is widely used operation procedure in the world. The regional anesthesia is preferred than general anesthesia. The risk of fetus is higher in general than in regional anesthesia. The drug treatment effect on regional anesthesia plays an important role to control the systolic blood pressure (SBP during the surgery. The goal of this work is to know the effective drug to control the SBP among cesarean anesthetic patients. The dependent prior with Bayesian approach is applied in the binary response data set. The secondary data in anesthesia has been applied to compare the two drug treatments, viz. (1 Phenylephrine and (2 Ephedrine, in cesarean patients with spinal anesthesia. In both drug groups the mean of SBP has been found controlled over the duration of the surgery. No rapid changes of SBP level among the patients are observed. At the end of study it is found that the means of SBP cesarean anesthetic patients are found higher in Phenylephrine group. The Bayesian dependent prior is found to offer effective tool for drug treatment effect comparison. The drug treatment effect Ephedrine is found to be more effective to control the SBP over the duration of surgery than Phenylephrine.

  3. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  4. Legal abortion mortality and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrash, H K; Cheek, T G; Hogue, C J

    1988-02-01

    Legal abortion-related mortality as reported to the Centers for Disease Control declined eightfold between 1972 and 1981. However, the causes of legal abortion mortality have changed over time. We reviewed all legal abortion-related deaths that occurred between 1972 and 1985 in the United States. We found that, although the absolute number of legal abortion-related deaths caused by general anesthesia complications did not increase, the proportion of such deaths increased significantly, from 7.7% between 1972 and 1975 to 29.4% between 1980 and 1985. Women who died of general anesthesia complications did not differ by age, presence of preexisting medical conditions, or type of facility from women who died of other causes. However, the proportion of deaths from general anesthesia complications was significantly higher among women of black and other races, women obtaining abortions during the first trimester, and women obtaining abortions in the Northeast. Our results indicate that at least 23 of the 27 deaths were due to hypoventilation and/or loss of airway resulting in hypoxia. Persons administering general anesthesia for abortion must be skilled in airway management as well as the provision of general anesthesia.

  5. Evaluation of prostaglandin D2 as a CSF leak marker: implications in safe epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondabolu S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirish Kondabolu, Rishimani Adsumelli, Joy Schabel, Peter Glass, Srinivas PentyalaDepartment of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USABackground: It is accepted that there is a severe risk of dural puncture in epidural anesthesia. Of major concern to anesthesiologists is unintentional spinal block. Reliable identification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the aspirate is crucial for safe epidural anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin D2 could be clinically used as a marker for the detection of CSF traces.Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent, CSF was obtained from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, and blood, urine, and saliva were obtained from normal subjects and analyzed for prostaglandin D2 (PGD. CSF (n=5 samples were diluted with local anesthetic (bupivacaine, normal saline and blood in the ratios of 1:5 and 1:10. PGD levels in the CSF samples were analyzed with a PGD-Methoxime (MOX EIA Kit (Cayman Chemicals, MI. This assay is based on the conversion of PGD to a stable derivative, which is analyzed with antiserum specific for PGD-MOX. Results: Different concentrations of pure PGD-MOX conjugate were analyzed by EIA and a standard curve was derived. PGD levels in CSF and CSF with diluents were determined and the values were extrapolated onto the standard curve. Our results show a well-defined correlation for the presence of PGD both in straight CSF samples and in diluted CSF (dilution factor of 1:5 and 1:10. Conclusion: Prostaglandin D2 was reliably identified in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when diluted with local anesthetic, saline, and serum, and can be used as a marker to identify the presence of CSF in epidural aspirates.Keywords: epidural, cerebrospinal fluid, leak, marker, prostaglandin D2

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is ... What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new ...

  7. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heather Taylor, PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, ... Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT Mary Jane Mulcahey, PhD, OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ... PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ...

  13. Humero-spinal dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, H; Vidal, J; Vallcanera, A; Alberto, C; Muro, D; Dominguez, F

    1979-07-24

    A 2 year old boy with humero-spinal dysostosis is described. This is the third case of this disease reported in the literature. Humero-spinal dysostosis is characterised radiologically by distal humeral bifurcation, elbow subluxation and coronal cleft vertebrae. Congenital, progressive heart disease, possibly with fatal outcome, is probably part of the syndrome.

  14. Anesthesia related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of intraoperative anesthesia-related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: One hundred patients with male to female ratio of 1:8.09 in the age range of 20-80 years (mean 39 years) underwent general anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The duration of operation in 94 laparoscopic cholecystectomy was from 20 to 80 minutes (mean 60.63 minutes). The incidence of intraoperative hypotension was 9%. Four percent of the patients developed arrhythmias. Increase in end-tidal-carbon dioxide (ETCO/sub 2/) was observed in 3% of cases. Conversion rate to open cholecystectomy was 6%. Damage to intraabdominal vessels with trocar insertion occurred in 1% of cases. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has major surgical and anesthetic advantages, there are anesthesia related complications requiring specific anesthetic interventions to improve patients outcome without compromising their safety. (author)

  15. Pulmonary Hypertensive Crisis on Induction of Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schisler, Travis; Marquez, Jose M; Hilmi, Ibtesam; Subramaniam, Kathirvel

    2017-03-01

    Anesthesia for lung transplantation remains one of the highest risk surgeries in the domain of the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist. End-stage lung disease, pulmonary hypertension, and right heart dysfunction as well as other comorbid disease factors predispose the patient to cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic dysfunction during general anesthesia. Perhaps the highest risk phase of surgery in the patient with severe pulmonary hypertension is during the induction of anesthesia when the removal of intrinsic sympathetic tone and onset of positive pressure ventilation can decompensate a severely compromised cardiovascular system. Severe hypotension, cardiac arrest, and death have been reported previously. Here we present 2 high-risk patients for lung transplantation, their anesthetic induction course, and outcomes. We offer suggestions for the safe management of anesthetic induction to mitigate against hemodynamic and respiratory complications.

  16. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  17. [Allergic reaction during anesthesia: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shinji; Futagawa, Koichi; Sugiura, Junko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Okuda, Takahiko; Koga, Yoshihisa

    2009-10-01

    We experienced two cases of serious and potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. The first patient was a 28-year-old male patient scheduled for surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations and another patient was a 66-year-old male patient scheduled for hepatic resection. After uneventful anesthetic induction, anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, air and oxygen. Both patients developed allergic reactions characterized by cardiovascular failure during anesthesia. Resuscitative treatment included rapid fluid infusion, administration of adrenaline and steroid. Both patients were successfully resuscitated without any lasting sequelae. The causative agent in one of these cases was probably a prophylactically used antibiotic, while that of the other case was a reaction to latex. Both patients showed elevated histamine and tryptase concentrations in blood samples. Recently, the incidence of allergic reactions to antibiotics and latex during anesthesia is increasing. Anesthesiologists should, therefore, be aware of the possibility of allergic reactions to all drugs and substances, especially to latex, during the perioperative period.

  18. The optimal anesthetic depth for interventional neuroradiology: comparisons between light anesthesia and deep anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo Sun; Han, Ye-Reum; Choi, Eun-Su; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal anesthetic depth for the maintenance and recovery in interventional neuroradiology. Eighty-eight patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology were randomly allocated to light anesthesia (n = 44) or deep anesthesia (n = 44) groups based on the value of the bispectral index (BIS). Anesthesia was induced with propofol, alfentanil, and rocuronium and maintained with 1-3% sevoflurane. The concentration of sevoflurane was titrated to maintain BIS at 40-49 (deep anesthesia group) or 50-59 (light anesthesia group). Phenylephrine was used to maintain the mean arterial pressure within 20% of preinduction values. Recovery times were recorded. The light anesthesia group had a more rapid recovery to spontaneous ventilation, eye opening, extubation, and orientation (4.1 ± 2.3 vs. 5.3 ± 1.8 min, 6.9 ± 3.2 min vs. 9.1 ± 3.2 min, 8.2 ± 3.1 min vs. 10.7 ± 3.3 min, 10.0 ± 3.9 min vs. 12.9 ± 5.5 min, all P neuroradiology were associated with a more rapid recovery and favorable hemodynamic response, but also with more patient movement. We suggest that maintaining BIS values between 40 and 49 is preferable for the prevention of patient movement during anesthesia for interventional neuroradiology.

  19. Perioperative spinal cord infarction in nonaortic surgery: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Bittner, Edward A; Grecu, Loreta

    2008-06-01

    Paraplegia caused by a spinal cord infarction (SCI) is a devastating perioperative complication, most often associated with aortic and spine surgery. We present two other clinical scenarios in which perioperative SCI may occur. They happened during surgical procedures performed with epidural anesthesia, in the presence of several specific risk factors such as spinal stenosis, vascular disease, intraoperative hypotension, or the use of epinephrine in the local anesthetic solution. Second, SCI may occur during episodes of postoperative hypotension in patients with a history of aortic aneurysms.

  20. 76 FR 16796 - Pediatric Anesthesia Safety Initiative (PASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... central nervous system, as well as memory and learning deficits. Anesthetic agents that have been... of anesthesia and sedation, including stakeholders from industry, professional organizations... aforementioned experts in the fields of anesthesia and sedation, including stakeholders from industry...

  1. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  2. Comparison of Bolus Phenylephrine, Ephedrine and Mephentermine for Maintenance of Arterial Pressure during Spinal Anesth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Bhattarai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hypotension is common following spinal anesthesia. Various vasopressors have been indicated to prevent it. The study compares three such agents namely phenylephrine, ephedrine and mephentermine. METHODS: The study included 90 patients undergoing elective and emergency cesarean section who developed hypotension following subarachnoid blockade. Parturient were randomly divided into three groups each group had 30 patients. Group P received bolus of Phenylephrine 25 microgram, where as group E received Ephedrine 5mg and Group M received Mephentermine 6mg. RESULTS: It was found that rise of blood pressure was significantly higher in case of phenylephrine group in first six minutes, after the bolus, there was significant reduction in the heart rate in phenylephrine group, but there was tachycardia following administration of bolus ephedrine and mephenteramine. Neonatal APGAR score were similar in all three groups. CONCLUSIONS: All three drugs maintained hemodynamics within 20 percent of the baseline values on intravenous administration. Keywords: APGAR, ephedrine, hypotension, mephentermine, phenylephrine, spinal anesthesia.

  3. PERIPHERAL BLOCK ANESTHESIA OF UPPER EXTREMITY AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Tapar; Mustafa Suren; Ziya Kaya; Semih Arici; Serkan Karaman; Mursel Kahveci

    2012-01-01

    Successful peripheral blocks and selection of appropriate technique according to surgery is possible with a good knowledge of anatomy. Regional peripheral block anesthesia of upper extremity which applied by single injection to plexus brachialis is the most recommended method of anesthesia in daily surgical procedures. The most important advantages of peripheral nerve blocks which are type of regional anesthesia according to general anesthesia and central blocks are less effect ...

  4. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  5. Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder

  6. Managing anesthesia  for cesarean section in obese patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamon AM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Agnes M Lamon, Ashraf S Habib Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Obesity is a worldwide epidemic. It is associated with increased comorbidities and increased maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications. The risk of cesarean delivery is also increased in obese parturients. Anesthetic management of the obese parturient is challenging and requires adequate planning. Therefore, those patients should be referred to antenatal anesthetic consultation. Anesthesia-related complications and maternal mortality are increased in this patient population. The risk of difficult intubation is increased in obese patients. Neuraxial techniques are the preferred anesthetic techniques for cesarean delivery in obese parturients but can be technically challenging. An existing labor epidural catheter can be topped up for cesarean delivery. In patients who do not have a well-functioning labor epidural, a combined spinal epidural technique might be preferred over a single-shot spinal technique since it is technically easier in obese parturients and allows for extending the duration of the block as required. A continuous spinal technique can also be considered. Studies suggest that there is no need to reduce the dose of spinal bupivacaine in the obese parturient, but there is little data about spinal dosing in super obese parturients. Intraoperatively, patients should be placed in a ramped position, with close monitoring of ventilation and hemodynamic status. Adequate postoperative analgesia is crucial to allow for early mobilization. This can be achieved using a multimodal regimen incorporating neuraxial morphine (with appropriate observations with scheduled nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. Thromboprophylaxis is also important in this patient population due to the increased risk of thromboembolic complications. These patients should be monitored carefully in the postoperative period, since there

  7. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  8. Single-tooth anesthesia: pressure-sensing technology provides innovative advancement in the field of dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Mark N

    2007-04-01

    This article will review standard techniques for intraligamentary injection and describe the technology and technique behind a new single-tooth anesthesia system. This system and technique represents a technological advancement and a greater understanding of intraligamentary anesthesia.

  9. Nurse Anesthetists' Perceptions Regarding Utilization of Anesthesia Support Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Mary Bryant

    2010-01-01

    Anesthesia support personnel (ASP) provide direct support to health care providers administering anesthesia (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists [CRNAs] and anesthesiologists). Because these anesthesia providers are caring for a patient whom they cannot legally or ethically leave unattended, ASP are employed to bring them extra supplies or…

  10. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5170 - Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator. 868... topical anesthesia applicator. (a) Identification. A laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator is a device used to apply topical anesthetics to a patient's laryngotracheal area. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  13. Outcome after regional anesthesia: weighing risks and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Regional anesthesia has become a widely used method to provide intraoperative anesthesia, and postoperative analgesia. This review seeks to address the question whether patient outcomes are improved to an extent that justifies using regional anesthesia as a routine method. During the past decade, a

  14. 21 CFR 868.5130 - Anesthesia conduction filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction filter. 868.5130 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5130 Anesthesia conduction filter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction filter is a microporous filter used while administering to a patient...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional, or...

  16. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral, and...

  17. 42 CFR 482.52 - Condition of participation: Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Anesthesia services... Optional Hospital Services § 482.52 Condition of participation: Anesthesia services. If the hospital furnishes anesthesia services, they must be provided in a well-organized manner under the direction of a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5150 - Anesthesia conduction needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction needle. 868.5150 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5150 Anesthesia conduction needle. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction needle is a device used to inject local anesthetics into a patient to...

  19. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study was to inve...

  20. Experience with caudal block regional anesthesia for transurethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that caudal anesthesia with 2% xylocaine with 1 in 80,000 adrenaline gives adequate anesthesia for transurethral resection of the prostate gland. Keywords: Caudal regional anesthesia, Turp. Résumé Quatre vingt quinze patients consécutifs avec lobliteration hypertrophie prostatique exigent d' être opéré ont ...