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Sample records for anesthesia inhalation

  1. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of 86 Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with 141 Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO 2 ) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines

  2. Outcomes of cancer surgery after inhalational and intravenous anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltanizadeh, Sinor; Degett, Thea H; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative factors are probably essential for different oncological outcomes. This systematic review investigates the literature concerning overall mortality and postoperative complications after cancer surgery with inhalational (INHA) and intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). A search was conducted...

  3. Implicit memory for stimuli presented during inhalation anesthesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalff, A C; Bonke, B; Wolters, G; Manger, F W

    1995-10-01

    During general inhalation anesthesia, neutral phrases including either the color blue or yellow combined with one of two objects, ball or kite, were repeatedly presented to 36 children undergoing eye surgery. Postoperative testing with a coloring and two-choice task was performed to detect preferences for the colors and objects presented under anesthesia. No preference attributable to implicit memory could be demonstrated, and there was no explicit recollection of intraoperative events. Memory of intraoperative events occurring during inhalation anesthesia was not demonstrated with the present methodology in young children.

  4. [Postanesthetic agitation syndrome after inhalation anesthesia with sevofluorane in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, V V; Tsypin, L E

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes the publications dedicated to the problem of agitation after inhalation anesthesia with sevofluorane. A brief explanation of the conception "agitation" is given in the context of interpretation of explanatory and psychological dictionaries. According to most of the analyzed papers, it is concluded that the incidence of the postanesthetic agitation syndrome occurs after anesthesia with sevofluorane than after that with halothane. The leading risk factors of agitation are preschool age, significant psychoemotional lability in the preoperative period (difficult parting with parents), fear. The efficiency of the preventive measures given in the analyzed paper is disputable. These include opioids (fentanyl), benzodiazepines (midasolam), clonidine, ketamine, dexmedotomidine, nitrous oxide, propofol, etc. The authors conclude that this problem is of no high significance in the aspect of priority, the width and safety of sevofluorane use in the anesthetic maintenance of children although it by far needs further more detailed study.

  5. Inhalation anesthesia in dumeril´s monitor with isofluane, sevofluane, and nitrus oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Mosley, Craig; Crawshaw, Graham J.

    2005-01-01

    Induction and recovery from inhalation anesthesia of Dumeril´s monitors using isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrus oxide were characterized using a randomized crossover design.......Induction and recovery from inhalation anesthesia of Dumeril´s monitors using isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrus oxide were characterized using a randomized crossover design....

  6. CARDIOPULMONARY AND BLOOD GAS PARAMETERS IN SHEEP UNDER INHALATIONAL ANESTHESIA DURING DECUBITUS ALTERNATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Liana Villela Gouvea; João Gabriel César Palermo; José Renato Junqueira Borges; Ricardo Miyasaka Almeida; Fábio Henrique Bezerra Ximenes; Roberta Ferro de Godoy

    2016-01-01

    Sheep herds, especially Santa Ines breed, have grown in the Brazilian Midwest in recent years. Therefore, clinical cases have also grown, and along came the need of conducting major surgeries without pain associated with the use of inhalational anesthesia. This study evaluated the cardiopulmonary and blood gas parameters in sheep under inhalational anesthesia with controlled ventilation, and assessed the effect of decubitus alternations on the parameters. The animals were anesthetized with ac...

  7. Outcome following inhalation anesthesia in birds at a veterinary referral hospital: 352 cases (2004-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Amanda B; Hofmeister, Erik H; Divers, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the outcome in birds undergoing inhalation anesthesia and identify patient or procedure variables associated with an increased likelihood of anesthesia-related death. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 352 birds that underwent inhalation anesthesia. PROCEDURES Medical records of birds that underwent inhalation anesthesia from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single veterinary referral hospital were reviewed. Data collected included date of visit, age, species, sex, type (pet, free ranging, or wild kept in captivity), body weight, body condition score, diagnosis, procedure, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, premedication used for anesthesia, drug for anesthetic induction, type of maintenance anesthesia, route and type of fluid administration, volumes of crystalloid and colloid fluids administered, intraoperative events, estimated blood loss, duration of anesthesia, surgery duration, recovery time, recovery notes, whether birds survived to hospital discharge, time of death, total cost of hospitalization, cost of anesthesia, and nadir and peak values for heart rate, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide, concentration of inhaled anesthetic, and body temperature. Comparisons were made between birds that did and did not survive to hospital discharge. RESULTS Of 352 birds, 303 (86%) were alive at hospital discharge, 12 (3.4%) died during anesthesia, 15 (4.3%) died in the intensive care unit after anesthesia, and 22 (6.3%) were euthanatized after anesthesia. Overall, none of the variables studied were associated with survival to hospital discharge versus not surviving to hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results confirmed previous findings that indicated birds have a high mortality rate during and after anesthesia, compared with mortality rates published for dogs and cats.

  8. Randomized controlled trial of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol versus inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane-nitrous oxide: postoperative nausea with vomiting and economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K.; Hassink, E. A.; Bonsel, G. J.; Moen, J.; Kalkman, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting after total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol versus inhalational anesthesia with isoflurane-nitrous oxide, the authors performed a randomized trial in 2,010 unselected surgical patients in a Dutch academic institution. An

  9. Activated charcoal effectively removes inhaled anesthetics from modern anesthesia machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgenheier, Nathaniel; Stoker, Robert; Westenskow, Dwayne; Orr, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    If a malignant hyperthermia-susceptible patient is to receive an anesthetic, an anesthesia machine that has been used previously to deliver volatile anesthetics should be flushed with a high fresh gas flow. Conflicting results from previous studies recommend flush times that vary from 10 to 104 minutes. In a previously proposed alternative decontamination technique, other investigators placed an activated charcoal filter in the inspired limb of the breathing circuit. We placed activated charcoal filters on both the inspired and expired limbs of several contaminated anesthesia machines and measured the time needed to flush the machine so that the delivered concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane would be activated charcoal filters limit further exposure. Activated charcoal filters decrease the concentration of volatile anesthetic delivered by a contaminated machine to an acceptable level in charcoal filters in place, the current anesthesia machine may be used for at least 67 minutes before the inspired concentration exceeds 5 ppm. Activated charcoal filters provide an alternative approach to the 10 to 104 minutes of flushing that are normally required to prepare a machine that has been used previously to deliver a volatile anesthetic.

  10. Effects of catecholamines on microcirculation during general inhalation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarandini, Paolo; Pompei, Livia; Costa, Maria Gabriella; Vetrugno, Luigi; Ronga, Fortunato; Contin, Roberta; Rosa, Fabio; Della Rocca, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of clinical dosages of norepinephrine and dobutamine on sublingual microcirculation during general anesthesia with sevoflurane in minor surgical procedures. This prospective study was performed on patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery. Tertiary care university hospital. Twenty patients undergoing elective surgery. Patients received a continuous infusion of norepinephrine (0.1 μg/kg/min) and afterwards, following a 15-minute interval, a continuous infusion of dobutamine (5 μg/kg/min). Prior to and at the end of each drug infusion period, hemodynamic parameters were measured using an esophageal Doppler probe (ED), and 5 sidestream darkfield (SDF) sublingual microcirculation video recordings were taken. No significant changes to total vessel density (TVD)(mm/mm(2)), perfused vessel density (PVD) (mm/mm(2)), proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) (percentage), or microvascular flow index (MFI) (arbitrary units) were measured at the end of each drug infusion period versus pre-infusion data and no differences were observed between the effects of norepinephrine versus dobutamine. Mean arterial pressure (APm) (mmHg) was significantly greater following both norepinephrine and dobutamine infusions compared to pre-infusion values, while peak velocity (PV) (cm/sec) and the stroke volume index (SVI) (mL/m(2)) only showed a significant increase following the dobutamine infusion. No change in corrected flow time (FTc) (msec) was observed. During general anesthesia with sevoflurane, the infusion of clinical dosages of norepinephrine and dobutamine did not alter sublingual perfusion, although the expected systemic hemodynamic alterations were induced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Streamed video clips to reduce anxiety in children during inhaled induction of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Katherine A; Hackmann, Thomas; Chorney, Jill Maclaren

    2012-11-01

    Anesthesia induction in children is frequently achieved by inhalation of nitrous oxide and sevoflurane. Pediatric anesthesiologists commonly use distraction techniques such as humor or nonprocedural talk to reduce anxiety and facilitate a smooth transition at this critical phase. There is a large body of successful distraction research that explores the use of video and television distraction methods for minor medical and dental procedures, but little research on the use of this method for ambulatory surgery. In this randomized control trial study we examined whether video distraction is effective in reducing the anxiety of children undergoing inhaled induction before ambulatory surgery. Children (control = 47, video = 42) between 2 and 10 years old undergoing ambulatory surgery were randomly assigned to a video distraction or control group. In the video distraction group a video clip of the child's preference was played during induction, and the control group received traditional distraction methods during induction. The modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale was used to assess the children's anxiety before and during the process of receiving inhalation anesthetics. All subjects were similar in their age and anxiety scores before entering the operating rooms. Children in the video distraction group were significantly less anxious at induction and showed a significantly smaller change in anxiety from holding to induction than did children in the control group. Playing video clips during the inhaled induction of children undergoing ambulatory surgery is an effective method of reducing anxiety. Therefore, pediatric anesthesiologists may consider using video distraction as a useful, valid, alternative strategy for achieving a smooth transition to the anesthetized state.

  12. Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  13. Inhalational Induction and Maintenance of Sevoflurane-Based Anesthesia or Total Intravenous Anesthesia Using Propofol and Fentanyl in Patients with Concomitant Dyscirculatory Encephalopathy

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    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the results of treatment in patients with concomitant cerebrovascular diseases, by reducing the incidence of postoperative delirium due to neuroprotective properties of sevoflurane. Subjects and methods. Eighty2two patients with concomitant dyscirculatory encephalopathy were examined. The goals of the study included evaluating (a efficiency and safety of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA using propofol versus inhalational induction and (b maintenance of anesthesia (IIMA using sevoflurane in patients with atherosclerotic and hypertensive encephalopathy undergoing noncardiac surgery. Results. The patients from both groups were susceptible to episodes of unintentional cerebral desaturation (rSO2; however, only the TIVA group showed a high correlation between a decrease in rSO2 and increases in the blood levels of S100beta protein, a marker of neuronal damage, and in the incidence of postoperative delirium (r=0.7321; p=0.0000001 diagnosed in accordance to comprehensive clinical examination and MMSE scores. The IIMA group lacked a relationship of MMSE scores to the episodes of cerebral desaturation (r=0.1609; p=0.4860, which is regarded as a manifestation of the neuroprotective effect resulted from anesthetic preconditioning. Conclusion. sevafluran2based inhalational induction and maintenance of anesthesia in patients with atherosclerotic and hypertensive encephalopathy is preferable over intravenous anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl in patients with concomitatnt disregulatory enc encephalopathy. Key words: cerebral desaturation, postoperative delirium, anesthetic preconditioning, europrotection, sevoflurane.

  14. The Effect of Low Flow Inhalation Anesthesia on Operative Hemodynamic Condition in Comparison with High Flow Anesthesia

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    M Eidi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Low flow anesthesia technique in which the flow fresh gas is lower than minute volume of the patient results in improvement in the patient’s care such as reduction of operative hypothermia, reduction of postoperative shivering and leads to an increase in economical and enviornmental interests. The goal of the study was to investigate the patients’ operative hemodynamic variations using the high and low flow anesthesia techniques. Materials & Methods: This prospective, clincal and single blind study was carried out in Tbriz Emam Khomeini Hospital in 1384. In this study 97 patients in ASA class I or II after routine induction of G.A, during maintenance of anesthesia were randomly divided in two groups group I (high flow anesthesia and group II (low flow anesthesia. For all patients ECG, HR, SPO2, BP, B.T, ETCO2 and inspiratory, expiratory percentage of O2, N2O, halothane, postoprative shievring and duration of oprations were recorded. 46 patients underwent high flow anesthesia and 51 patients underwent low flow anesthesia. Results: The average blood pressure in group I was as follow: preoperative, systol=13820 mmHg and diastol=7815 mmHg, intraoperative, systol=10531 mmHg and diastol=6410 mmHg and in recovery systol=11615 mmHg and diastol=7013 mmHg. In group II who had low flow anesthesia the blood pressure was found to be systol=13922 mmHg and diastol=7922 mmHg preoperative, systol=12221 mmHg and diastol=7517 mmHg intraoperative and systol=11815 mmHg and diastol=7717 mmHg in recovery. The differences in blood pressure in both group were statiscally significant (p=0.01. The average heart rate in group I was 9018 beat/min preoperative, 7014 intraoperative and 126 in recovery. The avrage heart rate in group II was 87.921 preoperative, 8616 intraoperative and 10417 in recovery. The differences were statiscally significant but there was no significant difference between

  15. Isoflurane inhalation anesthesia should be a new requirement in intracavernosal pressure detection-the gold standard of erectile function assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhong; Wu, Changjing; Fu, Fudong; You, Xuanhe; Gao, Liang; Wazir, Romel; Qin, Feng; Han, Ping; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2017-11-02

    Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) is gold standard for the detection of erectile function in animals, but no consensus has yet been achieved on what kind of anesthetic protocol should be applied. A total of 16 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. In group A, chloral hydrate was injected intraperitoneally. Rats in group B were induced in 5% isoflurane for 3 min and then maintained in 1.0-1.5% isoflurane. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate were monitored during all experiments. After ICP detection, tail vein and carotid artery blood were collected. The maximum ICP value, MAP and ICP/MAP ratio in group B was significantly higher than in that of group A. The RR in group A was lower than in that of group B, but the heart rate in group A was higher than in group B. There were no significant differences in both pO 2 and pCO 2 between groups. While the data showed that animals in group A were relatively hypoxemic. Isoflurane inhalation anesthesia in detection of erectile function could offer a relatively more stable physical state than in that under the effect of chloral hydrate intraperitoneal anesthesia. Isoflurane inhalation anesthesia is more suitable for ICP test.

  16. Inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mood changes How can people get treatment for addiction to inhalants? Some people seeking treatment for use of inhalants have found behavioral therapy to be helpful: Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps patients recognize, avoid, and cope ...

  17. [Efficacy of bFGF atomization inhalation on postoperative sore throat following oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Jiang, Yin-Hua; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2016-08-01

    To observe the effect of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) atomization inhalation on postoperative sore throat following oral and maxillofacial operation under general anethesia. Forty patients in whom oral and maxillofacial operation trachea was removed under general anesthesia were randomly divided into treatment and control groups; the treatment group received bFGF 35000IU + normal saline 20 mL, compression inhalation, day 1, every 20min, continued for 3 d; the control group was given normal saline 5 mL + dexamethasone 5 mg + gentamicin 80000 U + chymotrypsin 4000 U, compression inhalation, twice a day, every 20 min, continued for 3 d. Occurrence of postoperative sore throat 12 h after operation was recorded and visual analog scale (VAS) of sore throat (swallowing) 12,24,48,72 h after operation was measured. SPSS l4.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The incidence of sore throat in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group (Poral and maxillofacial surgery after endotracheal intubation.

  18. Immunomodulatory effects of total intravenous and balanced inhalation anesthesia in patients with bladder cancer undergoing elective radical Cystectomy: preliminary results

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    Sofra Maria

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although surgery and anesthesia induce immunesuppression, remains largely unknown whether various anesthetic techniques have different immunosuppressive effects on cancer patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of total intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion (TIVA-TCI and balanced inhalation anesthesia (BAL on the peri-operative levels of inflammatory cytokines and regulatory T cells (Tregs in patients with bladder cancer undergoing surgery. Methods Twenty eight consecutive patients with bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy were prospectively randomized into two groups to receive TIVA-TCI (n = 14 or BAL (n = 14. Before the induction of anesthesia (T0, 6–8 hours (T1 post-surgery, and 5 days post-surgery (T2, Tregs and serum levels of interleukin -1beta (IL-1β, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin −2 (IL-2, interleukin −6 (IL-6, and interleukin −10 (IL-10 were measured. Results In the peri-operative period all cancer patients showed a marked and significant increase in IL-6. Moreover, TIVA-TCI patients also showed a higher increase in IFN-γ, whereas in BAL patients Tregs were reduced by approximately 30% during surgery. The incidence of infections, metastases, and death was similar in both groups. Conclusions The increase in the Th1 response in the TIVA-TCI group and the reduction in Tregs in the BAL group seem to balance the immunosuppressive effect induced by IL-6. Therefore TIVA-TCI and BAL can be both used in major surgery in patients with bladder cancer without worsening the outcome.

  19. Inhalational versus IV Induction of Anesthesia in Children with a High Risk of Perioperative Respiratory Adverse Events: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgolam, Anoop; Hall, Graham L; Zhang, Guicheng; Hegarty, Mary; von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S

    2018-03-26

    Limited evidence suggests that children have a lower incidence of perioperative respiratory adverse events when intravenous propofol is used compared with inhalational sevoflurane for the anesthesia induction. Limiting these events can improve recovery time as well as decreasing surgery waitlists and healthcare costs. This single center open-label randomized controlled trial assessed the impact of the anesthesia induction technique on the occurrence of perioperative respiratory adverse events in children at high risk of those events. Children (N = 300; 0 to 8 yr) with at least two clinically relevant risk factors for perioperative respiratory adverse events and deemed suitable for either technique of anesthesia induction were recruited and randomized to either intravenous propofol or inhalational sevoflurane. The primary outcome was the difference in the rate of occurrence of perioperative respiratory adverse events between children receiving intravenous induction and those receiving inhalation induction of anesthesia. Children receiving intravenous propofol were significantly less likely to experience perioperative respiratory adverse events compared with those who received inhalational sevoflurane after adjusting for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status and weight (perioperative respiratory adverse event: 39/149 [26%] vs. 64/149 [43%], relative risk [RR]: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2 to 2.3, P = 0.002, respiratory adverse events at induction: 16/149 [11%] vs. 47/149 [32%], RR: 3.06, 95% CI: 1.8 to 5.2, P events.

  20. Inhalants

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    ... one session can cause a person to lose consciousness and possibly even die . With repeated inhaling, many ... using right now, especially if you have immediate access to it. Choose your poison--stimulants like cocaine ...

  1. Allometric scaling of chemical restraint associated with inhalant anesthesia in giant anteaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carregaro, Adriano Bonfim; Gerardi, Patrícia Molina; Honsho, Daniel Kan

    2009-04-01

    This study describes the use of allometric scaling in five giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) submitted for osteosynthesis, gastrostomy, or treatment of burns. Chemical restraint was performed by allometric scaling using the dog as a reference; acepromazine (0.06 mg/kg), diazepam (0.3 mg/kg), ketamine (8.8 mg/kg), and buprenorphine (5.9 microg/kg) were combined, and the animals were maintained under isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, respiratory rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, temperature, and anesthetic depth were measured. Postoperative treatment consisted of ketoprofen, buprenorphine, and ceftiofur. Anesthetic induction was obtained in 10-15 min, achieving muscle relaxation and absence of excitement. Physiologic parameters were stable during the procedures, and postoperative treatment was effective. Allometric scaling was effective for chemical restraint and postoperative treatment.

  2. Decreased Power but Preserved Bursting Features of Subthalamic Neuronal Signals in Advanced Parkinson's Patients under Controlled Desflurane Inhalation Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Huang Lin; Sheng-Huang Lin; Hsin-Yi Lai; Yu-Chun Lo; Chin Chou; Yi-Ting Chou; Shih-Hung Yang; I Sun; Bo-Wei Chen; Ching-Fu Wang; Guan-Tze Liu; Fu-Shan Jaw; Shin-Yuan Chen; You-Yin Chen; You-Yin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) under general anesthesia (GA) had been used in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who are unable tolerate awake surgery. The effect of anesthetics on intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER) remains unclear. Understanding the effect of anesthetics on MER is important in performing STN DBS surgery with general anesthesia. In this study, we retrospectively performed qualitive and quantitative analysis of STN MER in PD pat...

  3. Decreased Power but Preserved Bursting Features of Subthalamic Neuronal Signals in Advanced Parkinson's Patients under Controlled Desflurane Inhalation Anesthesia

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    Sheng-Huang Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery of the subthalamic nucleus (STN under general anesthesia (GA had been used in Parkinson's disease (PD patients who are unable tolerate awake surgery. The effect of anesthetics on intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER remains unclear. Understanding the effect of anesthetics on MER is important in performing STN DBS surgery with general anesthesia. In this study, we retrospectively performed qualitive and quantitative analysis of STN MER in PD patients received STN DBS with controlled desflurane anesthesia or LA and compared their clinical outcome. From January 2005 to March 2006, 19 consecutive PD patients received bilateral STN DBS surgery in Hualien Tzu-Chi hospital under either desflurane GA (n = 10 or LA (n = 9. We used spike analysis (frequency and modified burst index [MBI] and the Hilbert transform to obtain signal power measurements for background and spikes, and compared the characterizations of intraoperative microelectrode signals between the two groups. Additionally, STN firing pattern characteristics were determined using a combined approach based on the autocorrelogram and power spectral analysis, which was employed to investigate differences in the oscillatory activities between the groups. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS before and after surgery. The results revealed burst firing was observed in both groups. The firing frequencies were greater in the LA group and MBI was comparable in both groups. Both the background and spikes were of significantly greater power in the LA group. The power spectra of the autocorrelograms were significantly higher in the GA group between 4 and 8 Hz. Clinical outcomes based on the UPDRS were comparable in both groups before and after DBS surgery. Under controlled light desflurane GA, burst features of the neuronal firing patterns are preserved in the STN, but power is reduced. Enhanced low

  4. Inhalation Conscious Sedation with Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen as Alternative to General Anesthesia in Precooperative, Fearful, and Disabled Pediatric Dental Patients: A Large Survey on 688 Working Sessions

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    Angela Galeotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness and the tolerability of the nitrous oxide sedation for dental treatment on a large pediatric sample constituting precooperative, fearful, and disabled patients. Methods. 472 noncooperating patients (aged 4 to 17 were treated under conscious sedation. The following data were calculated: average age; gender distribution; success/failure; adverse effects; number of treatments; kind of dental procedure undertaken; number of dental procedures for each working session; number of working sessions for each patient; differences between males and females and between healthy and disabled patients in relation to success; success in relation to age; and level of cooperation using Venham score. Results. 688 conscious sedations were carried out. The success was 86.3%. Adverse effects occurred in 2.5%. 1317 dental procedures were performed. In relation to the success, there was a statistically significant difference between healthy and disabled patients. Sex and age were not significant factors for the success. Venham score was higher at the first contact with the dentist than during the treatment. Conclusions. Inhalation conscious sedation represented an effective and safe method to obtain cooperation, even in very young patients, and it could reduce the number of pediatric patients referred to hospitals for general anesthesia.

  5. Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) in pediatric cardiac anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong , Grace Lai Sze

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Inhalational anesthesia with moderate to high-dose opioid analgesia has been the mainstay of pediatric cardiac anesthesia but the advances in understanding of pharmacology and availability of new fast-acting drugs coupled with the advanced concepts in pharmacokinetic modeling and computer technology have made total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) an attractive option. In this article, we review some of the TIVA techniques used in pediatric cardiac anesthesia. gracewong531...

  6. Inhalation anesthesia in Dumeril's monitor (Varanus dumerili) with isoflurane, sevoflurane, and nitrous oxide: effects of inspired gases on induction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Mosley, Craig; Crawshaw, Graham J; Dyson, Doris; Smith, Dale A

    2005-03-01

    Induction and recovery from inhalation anesthesia of Dumeril's monitors (Varanus dumerili) using isoflurane, sevoflurane, and nitrous oxide (N2O) were characterized using a randomized crossover design. Mean times to induction for isoflurane in 100% oxygen (O2), sevoflurane in 100% O2, sevoflurane in 21% O2:79% nitrogen (N2; room air), and sevoflurane in 66% N2O:34% O2 were 13.00 +/- 4.55, 11.20 +/- 3.77, 10.40 +/- 2.50, and 9.40 +/- 2.80 min, respectively, at 26 degrees C (n = 10). Mask induction with sevoflurane was significantly faster than with isoflurane. There was no significant difference between the induction time for sevoflurane in O2 or in room air, but sevoflurane combined with N2O resulted in significantly faster inductions than were obtained with sevoflurane in 100% O2. All treatments resulted in a significantly higher respiratory rate than in undisturbed animals. There were no significant differences in respiratory rate among lizards receiving O2, isoflurane in 100% O2, sevoflurane in room air, and sevoflurane combined with N2O, but animals receiving sevoflurane in O2 had a lower respiratory rate than those receiving pure O2. The sequence of complete muscle relaxation during induction was consistent and not significantly different among the four treatments: front limbs lost tone first, followed by the neck and the hind limbs; then the righting reflex was lost and finally tail tone. There were no significant differences in recovery times between isoflurane and sevoflurane or between sevoflurane in 100% O2 and sevoflurane combined with N2O. Similar recovery times were observed in animals recovering in 100 and 21% O2.

  7. Inhalation anesthesia equipment for rats with provision of simultaneous anesthetic and oxygen Equipamento para anestesia inalatória em ratos com oferta simultânea de anestésico e oxigênio

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    Edinaldo Gonçalves de Miranda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To introduce a model of equipment for inhalation anesthesia in rats that offers better control of both flow and losses of ether during induction, maintenance, and recuperation. METHODS: The equipment consists of an air compressor with two outlets, a closed glass induction chamber, a glass reservoir for the anesthetic agent, a pediatric inhalation mask, a three-way stopcock, a Y-connector, and urinary catheters. Three hundred Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus were given inhalation anesthesia. The evaluated parameters were equipment operation, duration of each phase of anesthesia, corneal reflex, muscular tonus, respiration during induction and maintenance, and volume of anesthesia. RESULTS: The average time taken for induction was 7.3 minutes; the average anesthetic recuperation time was 6.4 minutes. The amount of anesthetic used varied according to the weight of the animal, with the average volume of ether used being 6.5ml/hour. The availability of oxygen (room air decreased the recuperation time and averted both respiratory depression and insufficient depth of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: The proposed equipment is practical, inexpensive, and allows for satisfactory control of anesthetic parameters during the entire procedure, making inhalation anesthesia in rats safe and essentially complication free.OBJETIVO: Apresentar modelo de equipamento para anestesia inalatória em ratos, com melhor controle do fluxo, das perdas de anestésico na indução, da manutenção e da recuperação anestésica. MÉTODOS: O equipamento é constituído por compressor de ar com saída dupla, câmara de vidro fechada para indução, reservatório de vidro para o agente anestésico, máscara de inalação pediátrica, torneira de três vias, conexão em "Y" e sondas uretrais. Trezentos ratos Wistar (Rattus norvegicus albinus foram anestesiados por via inalatória. Os parâmetros avaliados foram: viabilidade do equipamento, tempo de cada fase, reflexo

  8. Effects of halothane-nitrous oxide inhalation anesthesia and Inactin on overall renal and tubular function in Sprague-Dawley and Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Christensen, P; Leyssac, P P

    1982-01-01

    Real function, plasma renin concentration (PRC) and prostaglandin (PG) excretion rate was studied in groups of Sprague-Dawley (SPRD) and Wistar (WIST) rats anesthetized with either Halothane-N2O or Inactin. Conscious rats were used as controls. A. In Halothane-N2O anesthesia inulin clearance (CIN...

  9. General anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally safe because of modern equipment, medicines, and safety standards. Most people recover completely and do not have any complications. Alternative Names Surgery - general anesthesia Patient Instructions Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult ...

  10. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  11. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  12. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  13. [The anesthesia of anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, G

    2005-03-01

    Viewed from a cultural-ethical perspective, anesthesiology can be understood as a comprehensive concept of medicine in general. As such it contains two dilemmas: very often pain must be inflicted in order to alleviate pain and this can only be done by somebody who is himself relatively free of pain. The necessary apathy or anesthesia of the anesthetist is correlated with a general twentieth century-type of perception: the cool observer. Nevertheless, it is also a modern variation of the original religious constellation of the priest in relationship to the sick person. Curing occurs by representation. The weak self of the sick person is able to take over the strong self, represented by the therapist. In twentieth century art and literature this process of self-therapy by representation was often illustrated. On the background of a phenomenological philosophy that process can be understood as the regaining of a balance between body and soul. In the psalms of the biblical Book of Job there a variety of fundamental forms of pain which may be helpful even in this secular age.

  14. Effects of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media ASA Member Toolkit Anesthesia 101 Effects of Anesthesia Explore this page: Effects of Anesthesia How can ... of anesthesia and their side effects? Effects of Anesthesia If you’re having surgery, you most likely ...

  15. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  16. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Anesthesia Anesthesia Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area En español ... Version (464 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is anesthesia? Anesthesia is a medical treatment that prevents patients ...

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  18. Inhalation Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhalation injuries are acute injuries to your respiratory system and lungs. They can happen if you breathe in toxic substances, such as smoke (from fires), chemicals, particle pollution, and gases. Inhalation injuries can also be caused by extreme heat; these are a type of thermal injuries. ...

  19. Choice of a General Anesthesia Technique in the Surgical Treatment of Postinfarct Left Ventricular Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Karpun

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To choose the optimum technique of general anesthesia in the surgical treatment of patients with postinfarct left ventricular aneurysms (PLVA.Materials and methods. Fifty-four patients operated on for PLVA were examined. They were divided into 4 groups according to the basic technique of general anesthesia: 1 intravenous anesthesia based on propofol and fentanyl; 2 inhalation sevoflurane anesthesia with fentanyl enhancement of the analgesic component; 3 inhalation isoflurane anesthesia with fentanyl enhancement of the analgesic component; 4 general anesthesia in combination with epidural blockade. Central hemodynamics was investigated by the thermodilution technique and the perioperative period was also studied.Results and discussion. None of the general anesthesia techniques affected the development of perioperative complications. However, with decreased myocardial reserves, high thoracic epidural anesthesia should be applied with caution as it causes a significant desympathization, which may lead to impairments of the autoregulatory mechanisms of coronary blood flow and aggravate existing contractile disorders. Intravenous and inhalation anesthesia techniques provide a fair hemodynamic stability at all stages of surgical treatment. Inhalation anesthesia has a number of advantages: less cost and the possibility of rapid activation of patients in the early postoperative period.

  20. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental ... evaluate patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post- ...

  1. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  2. Obesity and Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely. How does being overweight affect surgery and anesthesia? If you are overweight, you may also have ... can lead to challenges with a number of anesthesia-related processes: Locating veins to deliver anesthesia and ...

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia ...

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... disease. Click here to find out more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ...

  5. Inhalant Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paper) paint thinner cleaning fluids nail polish remover rubber cement gasoline. Teenagers are the most common abusers ... severe cases, it can cause sudden death. Inhalants block oxygen flow to your brain and other organs. ...

  6. Topical anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  7. Topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mritunjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  8. Types of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Types of Anesthesia KidsHealth / For Teens / Types of Anesthesia What's in ... Get? Print en español Tipos de anestesia About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: ...

  9. Total Intravenous Anesthesia for Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Te Hsu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a cardiopulmonary anomaly that causes severe respiratory disorder. Traditionally, inhalational anesthetics with mechanical hyperventilation, opioids, and muscle relaxants are used in anesthesia for repair surgery. In this case, we used total intravenous anesthesia combined with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide for surgical repair of the diaphragm. After surgery, the patient recovered well and was discharged from hospital 1 month later.

  10. Anesthesia related Complications in Pediatric GI Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sabzevari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elective upper and lower GI endoscopy is usually performed in children on an outpatient basis with the child under sedation or general anesthesia (GA. The objective of this study was to describe Anesthesia related complications in   children undergoing elective GI endoscopy.   Materials and Methods: The study design was descriptive on 1388 patients undergoing elective GI endoscopy in Sheikh Hospital from 2009 to 2013. All patient received propofol or standard inhalational anesthesia. We examined patients’ demographic data  ,  location of GI endoscopy ,  perioperative vital singe ,  recovery time , respiratory and cardiac complications , post operative nausea and vomiting , agitation , diagnosis and outcome   Results: Pediatric patients aged 2 to 17 years. 29 % of elective GI endoscopy was upper GI endoscopy and 70.3 % was lower GI endoscopy and 0.7 was both of them. 47.7 % of Pediatric patients were female and 52.3 % was male. We haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related respiratory and cardiac complications (no apnea, no cardiac arrest. 8 patients (0.5% have transient bradicardia in post operative care Unit. 83 patients (5.9% have post operative nausea and vomiting controlled by medication.  6 patients (0.4% have post operative agitation controlled by medication.   Conclusions: General anesthesia and deep sedation in children undergoing elective GI endoscopy haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related complications. We suggest Anesthesia for infants, young children, children with neurologic impairment, and some anxious older children undergoing elective GI endoscopy. Keyword: Anesthesia, Complication, Endoscopy, Pediatric.

  11. O alvorecer da anestesia inalatória: uma perspectiva histórica El alborear de la anestesia inhaladora: una perspectiva histórica Dawning of inhalational anesthesia: a historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R icardo Jakson de Freitas Maia

    2002-11-01

    , is not something unchangeable and limited to the past. It is adapted according to conveniences of one or other ruling social class. Deliberately or accidentally hidden information, when unveiled may change current concepts, so far taken for granted. So, history, as any other science, is not totally impartial; it suffers influences and interferences of political, religious, economic and cultural thinking. The same is true for anesthesia. Some questions remain unanswered: Why did it take so long for the civilization to control pain? Who did in fact discover Anesthesia? How was the world when Anesthesia was officially discovered? To discuss such questions it is necessary to go back to the History of Anesthesia. CONTENTS: This paper addresses the surgical act, pain and anesthesia from the Hellenic culture to the first officially recognized anesthesia, often emphasizing forgotten names and historical peculiarities which have benefited or harmed one or other discoverer. It also focuses on values, culture and scientific developments of the 19th century, correlating them to events that marked the dawning of anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS: It would be unfair to attribute the merit of discovering anesthesia to a single person. Historical peculiarities that benefited or harmed one or other researcher cannot be forgotten. Morton was undoubtedly the most favored by the circumstances. He lived in a privileged time and place and has met the most adequate people to his intent. However there is still a question. After all, who is the most important: the father of the idea or who disclosed it? The answer will certainly remain in the field of subjectivity.

  12. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Part III The OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ( ...

  13. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  14. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  15. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office ... comfortable as possible when you get home. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  16. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ... complications and emergencies that may arise during the administration of anesthesia. Before your surgery, your OMS will ...

  19. Right-to-left shunt determination in dog lungs under inhalation anesthesia with rebreathing and non-rebreathing system Determinação de shunt venoso-arterial em pulmões de cães sob anestesia geral inalatória por sistemas com e sem reinalação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leguthe Rosa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigatge right-to-left shunt determination in dog lungs under inhalantion anesthesia with non-rebreathing and rebreathing systems and fraction of inspired oxygen (F I O2 of 0.9 and 0.4, respectively. METHODS: Two groups of 10 dogs each under inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane: GI in which it was utilized non-rebreathing semiclosed system and F I O2 = 0.9, and GII in which it was utilized rebreathing semiclosed system and F I O2 = 0.4. The study parameters were: heart rate, medium arterial pressure, right-to-left intrapulmonary shunt, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arterial partial pressure of oxygen, mixed venous partial pressure of oxygen, mixed venous oxygen saturation, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, partial pressure of water in the alveoli. RESULTS: Shunt results were significantly different between the two groups - GI data were higher than GII in all the evaluated moments. Hence, the group with nonrebreathing (GI developed a superior grade of intrapulmonary shunt when compared with the rebreathing group (GII. The partial pressure of water in the alveoli was significantly higher in GII. CONCLUSION: The inhalation anesthesia with non-rebreathing system and F I O2 = 0.9 developed a higher grade of intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt when compared with the rebreathing system and F I O2 = 0.4. The higher humidity in GII contributed to the result.OBJETIVO: Comparar a formação de shunt venoso-arterial em pulmões de cães submetidos a anestesia geral inalatória utilizando-se sistemas de anestesia com e sem reinalação, com fração inspirada de oxigênio de 0,4 e 0,9, respectivamente. MÉTODOS: Empregaram-se 20 cães induzidos com tiopental sódico (30mg/kg e mantidos com sevoflurano (3% e alocados em dois grupos (n=10; os animais de GI foram ventilados com modalidade controlada em sistema semifechado, sem reinalação, F I O2 = 0,9, e os de GII, com modalidade controlada, sistema semifechado, com reinalação e F I O2

  20. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS ... administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. They are ... your surgery, your OMS will review the type of anesthetic ...

  1. Effects of anesthesia on [11C]raclopride binding in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Simonsen, Mette; Møller, Arne

    Background Very often rats are anesthetized prior to micro positron emission tomography (microPET) brain imaging in order to prevent head movements. Anesthesia can be administered by inhalation agents, such as isoflurane, or injection mixtures, such as fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam. Unfortunately......, anesthesia affects a variety of physiological variables, including in the brain. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effects of inhalation and injection anesthesia on the binding potential of the dopaminergic D2/3 tracer [11C]raclopride used for PET brain imaging in human and animal studies....... Materials & Methods Nine male Lew/Mol rats were assigned to either inhalation (isoflurane; N=4) or injection (fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam; N=5) anesthesia. Catheters were surgically placed in femoral arteries and veins for blood sampling and tracer injection. After a short attenuation scan, the rats were...

  2. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  3. Substance use - inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of abused inhalants are: Aerosols, such as air freshener, deodorant, fabric protector, hair spray, vegetable oil spray, ... aerosol into the nose or mouth Glading. Inhaling air-freshener aerosols Huffing. Inhaling from a rag soaked with ...

  4. [Local and regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigel, W; Lengen, W

    1988-10-15

    Operations on the cutaneous surfaces are mainly performed under local anesthesia. Local infiltrative anesthesia is the most frequently used form in cutaneous surgery. Nerve or field block anesthesia can be used in areas like the external ear, nose, digits or penis. Local anesthesia is easy to administer, rapidly effective and relatively free of side effects. In contrast to general anesthesia it can be used in risk patients e.g. with ischemic heart disease or respiratory illnesses. Adverse reactions must be taken into account, especially toxic effects, allergy, drug interactions or traumatic lesions of nerves or blood vessels.

  5. Total intravenous anesthesia: advantages for intracranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Chad D; Gottfried, Oren N; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Couldwell, William T

    2007-11-01

    Although volatile anesthetics have been widely accepted in anesthetic management for neurosurgery, they reduce vascular resistance, resulting in increased cerebral blood flow and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). In patients with elevated ICP who undergo craniotomy, the increase in ICP during surgery from inhaled anesthetics can make the surgery more difficult, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic cerebral insults. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and analgesic drugs (remifentanil or fentanyl) and excluding simultaneous administration of any inhaled drugs is being used in patients undergoing craniotomy because of its potential to reduce ICP and ease access to the operative site. We reviewed the literature and describe our experience with TIVA, with emphasis on hemodynamic stability, effects on ICP, emergence from anesthesia, extubation times, and return of cognitive function in patients undergoing craniotomy for space-occupying lesions. TIVA with propofol is similar to inhaled anesthetics with regard to hemodynamic stability, emergence times, extubation times, early cognitive function, and adverse events. In several prospective, randomized clinical trials, evidence suggests that ICP is decreased and cerebral perfusion pressure is increased in patients receiving TIVA when compared with those receiving volatile anesthetics during elective craniotomy procedures. The impact of TIVA on ICP, brain swelling, and access to the operative site in patients with severely elevated ICP has yet to be evaluated and is the subject of a future study at our institution.

  6. More effective induction of anesthesia using midazolam-butorphanol-ketamine-sevoflurane compared with ketamine-sevoflurane in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-01

    The common marmoset has been increasingly used for research in the biomedical field; however, there is little information available regarding effective methods of anesthesia in this species. This study retrospectively analyzed 2 regimens of anesthesia induction: intramuscular injection of ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane, and intramuscular injection of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane. Anesthetic depth did not reach the surgical anesthesia stage in 7 out of 99 animals receiving the former regimen, whereas there were only 2 such animals out of 273 receiving the latter regimen. The latter regimen, when followed by maintenance anesthesia with 3% sevoflurane inhalation, was successfully used in various nociceptive procedures. These results indicate that the injection of a combination of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of a high concentration of sevoflurane is effective for anesthesia induction in marmosets.

  7. [The dynamics of the state of higher mental functions after surgical reconstruction of carotid stenosis using different types of anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, V V; Neimark, M I

    2013-01-01

    It was studied 238 patients after the reconstructive surgeries of atherosclerotic stenosing lesions of carotid arteries using different types of anesthesia. Neuropsychological testing included MMSE, the Frontal Assessment battery and the Clock drawing test. Regional anesthesia in the combination with reduced general anesthesia caused the less pronounced cognitive deficits in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic stenoses. Inhalation anesthesia with sevofluorane led to the more pronounced cognitive impairment compared to total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Ceraxon was used for the correction of cognitive impairments. This treatment increased the recovery of brain functions and quality of life of patients.

  8. [Anesthesia for a pediatric patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakami, Gotaro; Tazuke-Nishimura, Misako; Hirakata, Hideo; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with Coffin-Siris syndrome was scheduled to undergo diagnostic laparoscopy, inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiopexy at an ambulatory setting and same-day admission. Following anesthesia induction with inhalational sevoflurane, upper airway obstruction and hypoxemia developed. Hypoxemia was resolved immediately by manual positive pressure ventilation, although the stomach became bulged. Operation was finished uneventfully. However, he had massive bronchial secretion during anesthesia. He was admitted as planned and discharged on postoperative day 2. Since patients with Coffin-Siris syndrome have potential airway and pulmonary dysfunctions, careful perianesthesia airway and respiratory managements are essential.

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  10. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post-anesthetic patients. Your OMS trained alongside medical anesthesia ... of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of ...

  11. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  13. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methods Using adult rats we tested the effect of methylphenidate IV on time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then performed experiments to test separately for methylphenidate-induced changes in arousal and changes in minute ventilation. A dose-response study was performed to test for methylphenidate–induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. Surface electroencephalogram recordings were performed to observe neurophysiological changes. Plethysmography recordings and arterial blood gas analysis were performed to assess methylphenidate-induced changes in respiratory function. Droperidol IV was administered to test for inhibition of methylphenidate's actions. Results Methylphenidate decreased median time to emergence from 280 to 91 s. The median difference in time to emergence without compared to with methylphenidate was 200 [155, 331] s (median, [95% confidence interval]). During continuous inhalation of isoflurane, methylphenidate induced return of righting in a dose-dependent manner, induced a shift in electroencephalogram power from delta to theta, and induced an increase in minute ventilation. Administration of droperidol (0.5 mg/kg IV) prior to methylphenidate (5 mg/kg IV) largely inhibited methylphenidate-induced emergence behavior, electroencephalogram changes, and changes in minute ventilation. Conclusions Methylphenidate actively induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia by increasing arousal and respiratory drive, possibly through activation of dopaminergic and adrenergic arousal circuits. Our findings suggest that methylphenidate may be clinically

  14. Anesthesia and Pain Relief in the History of Islamic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Since diseases and surgeries could be very painful, the annihilation of pain has been the most important goal of physicians. The history of Iranian-Islamic medicine includes distinguished physicians that attempted to find different methods of anesthesia. This research aims at reviewing approaches for anesthesia throughout the history of the Iranian-Islamic medicine, in order to identify a variety of drugs used during that period. In this research, the information was mainly collected from medical history, traditional literature and various search engines (e.g. Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Scopus, SIDS and NoorMags). The search keywords were Anesthetic, Tbnj (sedation), Tnvym (sedative), and Hypnotic. Finally, a detailed analytical study was performed on all notes and the results were presented. Mohammad Ibn-Zakaria Al-Razi (known to the Western world as Razes) in the 10th century was the first physician who used general inhalation for anesthesia in surgeries. Drugs used to relieve pain and anesthesia can be divided into two categories: (i) single drug and (ii) compound drugs. Usually, these are consumed by eating, drinking, inhalation, or as topical. Drugs such as Hemlock, Mandrake, Henbane, Hyocyamus, Mandragora, Loiseuria, Opium Poppy, and Black Nightshade were used. Beyond these herbs, Aghili (18 th century) in his book "Makhzan al-adviyah" also explained the topical application of ice for pain management. The choice for the type of medication and its form of consumption is commensurate to pain and the speed by which the drug has an effect. Anesthesia was usually done in two ways: (i) using a substance called "Mokhader" which was consumed via the mouth or nose, and (ii) "Tnvym" which means putting a patient to sleep to block the sensation of pain. Typically, anesthesia methods and drug recipes were kept as secret to prevent misuse and abuse by unauthorized people. Based on our study, Islamic physicians proposed inspiring methods in using drugs for anesthesia

  15. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use ciclesonide inhalation.Ciclesonide inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Do not use ciclesonide ...

  16. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use flunisolide inhalation.Flunisolide inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Do not use flunisolide ...

  17. Awakening from anesthesia using propofol or sevoflurane with epidural block in radical surgery for senile gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Chen; Wang, Lin; Cheng, Gao; Wu, Wei-Wei; Li, Yuan-Hai

    2015-01-01

    To study the awakening of the elderly patients from propofol intravenous general anesthesia or sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block after radical gastric cancer surgery. Eighty cases receiving selective radical surgery for gastric cancer were included. They were aged 65-78 years and classified as ASA grade I-II. Using a random number table, the cases were divided into 4 groups (n = 20): propofol intravenous general anesthesia (P group), sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia (S group), propofol intravenous general anesthesia combined with epidural block (PE group), and sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block (SE group). For P and PE group, target controlled infusion of propofol was performed; for S and SE group, sevoflurane was inhaled to induce and maintain general anesthesia; for PE and SE group, before general anesthesia induction, epidural puncture and catheterization at T7-8 was performed. After surgery, perform patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) or patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), and maintain VAS ≤ 3. The recorded indicators were as follows: time to recovery of spontaneous respiration, time to awakening, time of endotracheal tube removal, time to orientation, time to achieve modified Aldrete scores ≥ 9, modified OAA/S and Aldrete scores upon endotracheal tube removal (T1), 5 min after removal (T2), 15 min after removal (T3) and 30 min after removal (T4), dose of intraoperative remifentanil, intraoperative hypotension, and emergence agitation. Time to awakening, time of endotracheal tube removal, time to orientation, and time to achieve modified Aldrete scores ≥ 9 in PE and SE group were obviously shortened compared with P and S group (P sevofluorane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block achieved a more stable hemodynamics and a shortened time to awakening.

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I ... Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are ...

  19. Guideline implementation: local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    It is not uncommon in perioperative settings for patients to receive local anesthesia for a variety of procedures. It is imperative for patient safety that the perioperative RN has a comprehensive understanding of best practices associated with the use of local anesthesia. The updated AORN "Guideline for care of the patient receiving local anesthesia" provides guidance on perioperative nursing assessments and interventions to safely care for patients receiving local anesthesia. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel become knowledgeable regarding best practice as they care for this patient population. The key points address patient assessment, the importance of having an overall understanding of the local agent being used, recommended monitoring requirements, and potential adverse events, including life-threatening events. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disma, Nicola; Hansen, Tom G.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a neurodegenerative effect of anesthetic drugs in cubs and young animals, raising the concern that similar effects can happen in children, and that the administration of anesthesia in young children undergoing surgical or diagnostic procedures may cause long- Term...... neurocognitive impairment. Thus, several epidemiological studies have been performed with the aim to find a possible association between early anesthesia exposure and poor long- Term outcome, like learning disabilities or worse school grading and two prospective trials are currently running, the GAS...... and the PANDA study. Interim results from the GAS study, which compared infants undergoing general and regional anesthesia for hernia repair, have demonstrated that a single exposure of about one hour of anesthesia does not affect the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Nowadays, most of the knowledge...

  1. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  2. Administration of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Your OMS trained alongside medical anesthesia residents. Extensive Training and Experience As a result of their extensive training, every Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon is well-prepared ...

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety ... and jaw surgery Contact Us Sitemap Terms of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter ...

  5. Anesthesia information management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feri Štivan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS is on the increase. This is particularly true for academic anesthesia departments. The main reasons for slow adoption of these systems in the past are financial barriers associated with implementation of these systems and their not so traditionally obvious potential to improve patient care. In addition, a major obstacle to acceptance of this technology is the concern of users over the impact of the electronic anesthesia record on malpractice exposure.Conclusions: The experience reported by departments using AIMS indicates that these systems are useful for managing malpractice risk. AIMS can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative anesthesia care. However, AIMS are able to increase the quality of care and improve operating room efficiency only with careful planning, installation, and customization. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT analysis performed for AIMS could help departments in making better decisions when implementing AIMS.

  6. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and ... 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons American Association ...

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth or become ... I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS ...

  8. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS residents serve on the medical anesthesiology service, ... during and after the operation. This is the time to discuss any concerns you may have about ...

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth or become ... Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I ...

  10. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Anesthesia Download ...

  11. Anesthesia and analgesia for caesaren section in dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiljević Maja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a case of a pregnant female dog, of English bulldog breed, three years old, which was brought to Belgrade Faculty of Veterinary Medicine because of inability for normal parturition. Cesarean section is an urgent intervention both in human and in veterinary medicine. Anesthesia of a pregnant dog should be carried out very carefully, because of all the physiological changes that appear during pregnancy, as well as the impact of anesthetics on embryos themselves. Anesthetics, analgesics and sedatives pass through blood brain barrier, but also their transport goes through placenta to embryo, so for that reason it is not possible to anesthetize only mother and to avoid anesthesia effects on the embryo. Therefore, anesthetics with short time of action which metabolize quickly and have minimal negative effect on embryos are recommended. When choosing the right analgesics and anesthetics, there should be known that female dogs in which it is necessary to do Cesarean section belong to the group of high risk patients. Pregnant female dogs are exposed to hypoventilation, hypoxia, hypercapnia, intense heart work, vomiting and regurgitation as well. Reversible anesthetics are recommended to provide shorter duration time of anesthesia, and in accordance, inhalation anesthetics doses are minimal. Application of α2- agonist in premedication, propophol in induction, as well as maintaining general inhalation anesthesia with sevofluran, along with local analgesia, proved to be the ideal combination in this case of cesarean section.

  12. Anesthesia training in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Angela

    2007-11-01

    In 2006 a program leading to a Master's degree in Anesthesia (MMed) was established in Rwanda as a joint venture between the National University of Rwanda (NUR), the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society International Education Fund (CASIEF) and the American Society of Anesthesiologists Overseas Teaching Programme (ASAOTP). A MMed in Anesthesia is similar to a Fellowship in Canada and is common in many African countries. Most training programs are of three years duration. Rwanda has decided on a four-year program. The background, organization and problems of the program are described. Challenges exist in recruiting residents and in developing an academic culture and evaluation system. Inadequate equipment and drug shortages limit the types of anesthesia provided. There is need for improvement in biomedical support. Volunteer Canadian and American anesthesiologists visit Rwanda to teach for a minimum period of one month. They instruct in the operating room and also in the classroom. While the focus of the program is on residents in anesthesia, the volunteers also teach the nurse anesthetists. The program has been in existence for only one year but progress has been made. The CASIEF will devote special attention to improving the management of pain. In time, it is hoped that Rwanda will become self-sufficient in training its own anesthesiologists and in retaining them to provide anesthesia services throughout the country. As anesthesia and surgery evolve, there will be a need for subspecialty training in anesthesia. It is hoped that, with continued assistance from the CASIEF and ASAOTP, the goal of the NUR will be achieved.

  13. Optimization of Initial Anesthesia in a One-Day Surgical Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to modify initial sevorane anesthesia so that the incidence of excitement and apnoea should be reduced. Subjects and methods. Seven hundred and sixty-three patients were examined and divided into 4 groups: total intravenous anesthesia (TIA with propofol and fentanyl and 3 inhalational sevorane-based anesthesia modes; one of them was modified by the authors. Initial anesthesia modes were compared by the following criteria: the time of consciousness loss (sec; that of creating the favorable conditions for laryngeal mask airway instillation (sec; the incidence of apnoea (% of the number of patients in this group; the duration of assisted ventilation (sec; excitement (% of the number of patients in this group; cough (% of the number of patients in this group. Results. The use of sevorane excludes the need for successive induction or breathing circuit prefilling. However, initial sevorane anesthesia is somewhat longer than intravenous induction with propofol and fentanyl and is more frequently accompanied by episodes of excitement, although the latter is insignificant. TIA in turn results in the development of apnoea more frequently, which is undesirable if anesthesia with preserved spontaneous breathing is to be further performed. The use of the subnarcotic doses of propofol (0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl (50-^g bolus during inhalation induction permits excitement to be prevented and a patient’s spontaneous breathing to be maintained. TIA modes and the authors’ modified inhalation induction procedure are comparable in the time of falling asleep and creating the optimal conditions for laryngeal mask airway instillation. Key words: inhalational anesthesia, sevofluorane, induction.

  14. Historical development of modern anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel H; Toledo, Alexander H

    2012-06-01

    Of all milestones and achievements in medicine, conquering pain must be one of the very few that has potentially affected every human being in the world. It was in 1846 that one of mankind's greatest fears, the pain of surgery, was eliminated. This historical review article describes how the various elements of anesthesiology (gasses, laryngoscopes, endotracheal tubes, intravenous medications, masks, and delivery systems) were discovered and how some brilliant entrepreneurs and physicians of the past two centuries have delivered them to humanity. One name stands out amongst all others when the founder of modern anesthesia is discussed, William T.G. Morton (1819-1868). A young Boston Dentist, Dr. Morton had been in the search for a better agent than what had been used by many dentists: nitrous oxide. With Dr. Morton's tenacity driven by enthusiasm and discovery, he and renowned surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, John Collins Warren (1778-1856) made history on October 16, 1846 with the first successful surgical procedure performed with anesthesia. Dr. Morton had single-handedly proven to the world that ether is a gas that when inhaled in the proper dose, provided safe and effective anesthesia. One of the first accounts of an endotracheal tube being used for an airway comes from the pediatrician Joseph O'Dwyer (1841-1898). He used the metal "O'dwyer" tubes in diphtheria cases and passed them into the trachea blindly. Adding a cuff to the tube is credited to Arthur Guedel (1883-1956) and Ralph M. Waters (1883-1979) in 1932. This addition suddenly gave the practitioner the ability to provide positive pressure ventilation. The anesthesiologist Chevalier Jackson (1865-1958) promoted his handheld laryngoscope for the insertion of endotracheal tubes and its popularity quickly caught hold. Sir Robert Reynolds Macintosh's (1897-1989) breakthrough technique of direct laryngoscopy came after being appointed Nuffield professor of anesthetics at the University of Oxford

  15. Risk management in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, L; Levati, A

    2009-11-01

    Anesthesia is considered a leading discipline in the field of patient safety. Nevertheless, complications still occur and can be devastating. A substantial portion of anesthesia-related adverse events are preventable since risk factors can be detected and eliminated. Risk management (RM) in anesthesia includes preventive and remedial measures to minimize patient anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. RM involves all aspects of anesthesia care. Classically, the following four steps are needed to prevent critical incidents or to learn from them: (1) detection of problems, (2) assessment, (3) implementation of solutions, and (4) verification of effectiveness. Problems and solutions can be identified into the fields of structures, processes and personnel. Authoritative agencies like the World Health Organization, the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists, the Section and Board of Anesthesiology of the European Union of Medical Specialties and the Italian Scientific Society of Anesthesiologists (Società Italiana di Anestesia, Analgesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Intensiva SIAARTI) have proposed initiatives addressing safety in the operating room. The central role of a well-trained, constantly present anesthesiologist and the usefulness of checklists have been highlighted. Cost cutting and production pressure in medical care are potential threats to safety. A shared knowledge of the best standards of care and of the potential consequences of unscrupulous actions could make the daily management of conflicting interests easier. A correctly applied RM can be a powerful, highly beneficial aid to our practice.

  16. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  17. Inhalant allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  19. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur sahin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia procedure in obesity were assessed with current literatures. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 234-236

  20. [Respiratory complications in patients with cerebral palsy undergoing general anesthesia.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Sérgio Silva de; Marques, Ronaldo Soares; Saraiva, Renato Angelo

    2007-10-01

    Anesthesia in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist. The objective of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence and risk of respiratory complications in children with CP undergoing general inhalational anesthesia for computed tomography. Patients with ages ranging from 1 to 17 years, physical status ASA I to III, undergoing general inhalational anesthesia with sevoflurane and laryngeal mask for a CT scan from June 2002 to June 2003, participated in this study. Patients were divided in 3 groups: quadriplegic CP (CPQ), other types of CP (CPO), and patients without CP (NCP). Parents or guardians answered a questionnaire that assessed the past medical history of the patient, upper respiratory infections (URI), asthma, seizures, oropharyngeal dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, etc. Data on the incidence and severity of respiratory complications were gathered prospectively (cough, bronchospasm, laryngeal spasm, hypoxemia, aspiration, etc). The size of the study group was calculated for an expected 5% incidence in the NCP group, with a 15% difference among groups (alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.1), using the Chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and test t Student. Two hundred and ninety patients, divided in three groups, participated in this study. Groups were composed of: CPQ = 100 patients, CPO = 79 patients, and NCP = 111 patients. There were no differences on the prevalence of respiratory infections among the CPQ (4%), CPO (8.9%), and NCP (7.3%) groups. There was a correlation between the presence of URI and the development of complications (relative risk of 10.71). Children with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia do not seem to have an increased risk of respiratory complications during general inhalational anesthesia with sevoflurane and laryngeal mask. This study confirms URI as a risk factor for the development of those complications.

  1. Objective measurement of inhaler inhalation flow profile using acoustic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacalle, H.; Taylor, T.E.; Marco, S.; Reilly, R.B.

    2016-07-01

    Patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are mostly treated with inhalers that deliver medication directly to their airways. Drug delivery from dry powder inhalers (DPIs) is very much reliant on the inhalation manoeuvre, specifically the peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), inspiratory capacity (IC) and inhalation rise time (IRT) of the inhalation. It has been widely reported that patients may not follow correct inhalation technique while using their inhaler. In this study, a novel acoustic method is proposed to accurately estimate inhalation flow profile using only one inhalation recording for calibration. An Ellipta DPI was placed inside an airtight container with a spirometer connected in order to measure inhalation flow parameters. An acoustic recording device (Inhaler Compliance Assessment (INCA)) was also attached to the DPI. Inhalation audio and flow signals were recorded simultaneously. The data were collected from 20 healthy subjects while performing inhaler inhalations at a range of inspiratory flow rates. A power law regression model was computed to obtain the relationship between the acoustic envelope of the inhalation and flow profile of each recording. Each model was tested on the remaining audio signals to estimate flow profile. The average estimation error was found to be 10.5±0.3% for estimating flow profile from audio signals. Inhalation flow profile parameters (PIFR, IC and IRT) could then be measured from the estimated flow profile with high accuracy giving information on user inhalation technique. This method may assist in improving patient inhaler adherence and overall disease control. (Author)

  2. The Develoment of Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Audrey B.

    1982-01-01

    Until the eighteenth century, doctors were reluctant to use chemicals to alleviate pain because they accepted the religious/moral beliefs of their day, claiming that pain was beneficial for the body. Traces technical developments in the control of pain, discussing relationships of anesthesia to social, cultural, and scientific factors and…

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  4. Reasons for Inhalant Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, George W.; Simpson, D. Dwayne

    1991-01-01

    Among 110 Mexican-American adolescents in a Texas drug abuse program, initial use of toxicant inhalants was related to availability and sensation-seeking, followed by psychological problems, parental and home problems, and peer influence. Quitting inhalant use was related to social pressures, attitude change, and perceived health risks. (Author/SV)

  5. Pediatric inhalation injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Soman

    2017-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury can cause severe physiologic perturbations. In pediatric patients, these perturbations cause profound changes in cardiac and pulmonary physiology. In this review, we examine the pathology, early management options, ventilator strategy, and long-term outcomes in pediatric patients who have suffered a smoke inhalation injury.

  6. [Anesthesia and Angelman syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, W; Nobel, C; Hilpert, J

    2011-07-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with an incidence of 1:10,000-1:40,000 caused by deficient genetic imprinting in the chromosomal segment 15q11-q13. Experimental data suggest that the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor as well as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors may be affected by this condition. The first description of the syndrome goes back to 1965 when the British pediatrician Harry Angelman (1915-1996) recognized similar clinical features in three children. Angelman's description of puppet children was changed to happy puppet syndrome 2 years later before this euphemistic denotation was replaced by the concept Angelman syndrome over the years. Angelman syndrome is characterized by ataxia, jerky movements especially hand flapping, a seizure disorder with a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG), severe learning difficulties, a happy disposition, lack of verbal communication and dysmorphic facial features. Most hospitalizations are caused by epilepsy and the most common indications for surgical procedures are in dental medicine. The first anesthesiology case report to be published dates back to 2001. A total of 13 cases have now been published and in 11 cases the age was registered (mean age 11.6 years, standard deviation 11.7 and 2 outliers aged 27 and 40 years). In this paper, the published case reports are contrasted with 15 cases of anesthesia in 6 patients with AS who underwent surgery during 14 years of routine operations at a Berlin anesthesiology clinic (mean age 15.9 years, standard deviation 4.2 with no outliers). Besides neurosurgical and orthopedic operations most were dental interventions. Summarized, these cases of anesthesia and the results of the published case reports allow the formulation of guidelines for administration of anesthesia in AS cases but do not permit conclusions on which method of anesthesia is the safest for AS

  7. Dose model for inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, J.; Ninkovic, M.; Merkle, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with calculation of doses in the environment. There are in general five exposure pathways which are customarily considered within such calculations: cloud shine, ground shine, inhalation after resuspension and ingestion. Since in fact each of these exposure pathways is represented by an independent mechanism, it is usual to consider these environmental dose models separately for each exposure pathway. As one example, the inhalation of the material from the radioactive passing cloud, as well as the inhalation of the radioactive material resuspended in the air are considered, giving the same formulas which are used in the new european accident consequence assessment code system COSYMA. (author)

  8. Anesthesia and cor triatriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Yeoh, Tze Yeng; Welch, Tasha L; Weingarten, Toby N; Sprung, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS) and cor triatriatum dextrum (CTD) are rare congenital anomalies characterized by the presence of a perforated septum which divides the respective atrium into a proximal and distal chamber. This report reviews the perioperative course of patients with uncorrected cor triatriatum (CT) undergoing procedures requiring anesthesia. In addition, we performed a literature search that examines the experience of others regarding the peri-operative course of patients with CT. A computerized search of a medical record database was conducted to identify patients with a clinical diagnosis of uncorrected CTD and CTS undergoing surgical procedures. Descriptive statistics were used. We identified 12 adult patients with asymptomatic CTS (n = 7) and CTD (n = 5) who underwent 23 anesthetics. There were no perioperative complications which could be attributed directly to the anatomy of CT. Our observation and review of the literature suggest that patients with asymptomatic CT typically tolerate anesthesia and surgical procedures well.

  9. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  10. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  11. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corgard), and propranolol (Inderal); digoxin (Lanoxin); diuretics ('water pills'); epinephrine (Epipen, Primatene Mist); other inhaled medications used to relax the air passages such as metaproterenol and levalbuterol (Xopenex); and ...

  12. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipratropium oral inhalation is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs and airways) such as chronic bronchitis (swelling of ...

  13. Insulin Human Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin inhalation is used in combination with a long-acting insulin to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar ...

  14. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  15. Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Markus; Vutskits, Laszlo; Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'safe use of anesthesia in children is ill-defined and requires definition of and focus on the 'safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia'. RECENT FINDINGS: The Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot initiative (www.safetots.org) has been set up during the last year to focus...... on the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia. This initiative aims to provide guidance on markers of quality anesthesia care. The introduction and implementation of national regulations of 'who, where, when and how' are required and will result in an improved perioperative outcome in vulnerable children....... The improvement of teaching, training, education and supervision of the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia are the main goals of the safetots.org initiative. SUMMARY: This initiative addresses the well known perioperative risks in young children, perioperative causes for cerebral morbidity as well as gaps...

  16. Radioactive gas inhalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMon, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    An ''inhalator'', or more particularly an apparatus for permitting a patient to inhale a radioactive gas in order to provide a diagnostic test of the patient's lung area, is described. The disclosed apparatus provides a simple, trouble-free mechanism for achieving this result; and, furthermore, provides an improved testing method. Moreover, the disclosed apparatus has the capability of gradually introducing the test condition in a manner that makes it easy for the patient to become acclimated to it. (U.S.)

  17. Acute Paraplegia After General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Ghaedi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute paraplegia is a rare but catastrophic complication of surgeries performed on aorta and corrective operations of vertebral column. Trauma to spinal cord after spinal anesthesia and ischemia of spinal cord also may lead to acute paraplegia. Acute paraplegia as a complication of general anesthesia in surgeries performed on sites other than aorta and vertebral column is very rare. Here we present a 56 year old woman with acute paraplegia due to spinal cord infarction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia probably caused by atherosclerosis of feeding spinal arteries and ischemia of spinal cord after reduction of blood flow possibly due to hypotension during general anesthesia.

  18. Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Risks Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery Explore this page: ... do you reduce the risk of anesthesia awareness? Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery If you’re ...

  19. Anesthesia -- What to Expect (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia - What to Expect KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia - What ... Operating Room After Surgery Print Different Kinds of Anesthesia If you're having any kind of procedure ...

  20. Anesthesia: What to Expect (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or any blood relative has had to anesthesia any allergies (especially to foods, medicines, or latex) your child ... from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used? Will my child feel pain and/ ...

  1. Effectiveness of Inhalant Abuse Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batis, Jeffery C

    2017-01-28

    Since peaking in the 1990s, inhalant abuse has steadily decreased over the past two decades. Concurrently, nearly every state has passed legislation aimed at minimizing inhalant abuse. While males have historically been more likely to abuse inhalants than females, there is no longer a sex effect in self-reported rates of inhalant abuse. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of anti-inhalant abuse legislation on self-reported rates of inhalant abuse, in high school age males and females. Beginning in 1993, the CDC's biannual Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey asked respondents if they have ever used inhalants to get high. Data from these surveys were collected, along with the date of passage of anti-inhalant abuse legislation in 46 of 50 states. ANOVAs were conducted to assess the effect of legislation on self-reported inhalant abuse rates. There were no significant main effects or interactions that demonstrated that inhalant abuse rates decreased in males or females following passage of legislation aimed at decreasing inhalant abuse. Conclusion/Importance: To date, 46 of 50 states have passed laws aimed at minimizing inhalant abuse, and while inhalant abuse rates have been decreasing for the past two decades, there is no evidence that this decline is related to enactment of these laws. Further research is needed to determine the cause of the decrease in inhalant abuse. The laws may benefit from amendments to include options for treatment.

  2. Fucosidosis and anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Alireza E.; Moharari, Reza S.; Ghaffari, R.; Zahedi, H.; Hajmahmoodi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare, autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a severe deficiency of alpha -L-fucosidase. Patients usually have some problems with glycoprotein storage in the brain and other organs and some structural abnormalities that need special consideration in anesthesia. It has 2 types, the early onset or infantile and the juvenile. Here we present 8-year-old girl with deformities in the maxillofacial region, with big tongue, small and retracted chin, saddle nose and short neck that could not be extended, causing difficult intubation and congenital cardiac problems requiring a special anesthetic strategy. (author)

  3. Anesthesia for intellectually disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetizing an intellectually disabled patient is a challenge due to lack of cognition and communication which makes perioperative evaluation difficult. The presence of associated medical problems and lack of cooperation further complicates the anesthetic technique. An online literature search was performed using keywords anesthesia, intellectually disabled, and mentally retarded and relevant articles were included for review. There is scarcity of literature dealing with intellectually disabled patients. The present review highlights the anesthetic challenges, their relevant evidence-based management, and the role of caretakers in the perioperative period. Proper understanding of the associated problems along with a considerate and unhurried approach are the essentials of anesthetic management of these patients.

  4. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  5. [Anesthesia and bodybuilding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokema, Frank; Pietsch, Uta-Carolin; Führer, Dagmar; Kaisers, Udo

    2008-05-01

    A strong tendency toward body enhancement and body forming in western industrial societies makes it more likely for each anesthesiologist to get involved in the care of bodybuilders. These patients quite frequently consume androgenic anabolic steroids, human growth hormone and other drugs or substances which are believed to accelerate muscle gain. Cardiovascular, hepatic, psychiatric, hormonal and infectious side effects or complications are common and rarely monitored by health care professionals. The anesthesia risk is not exactly known but seems to be determined mainly by cardiovascular events like myocardial ischemia and dysrhythmias.

  6. Food and Drug Administration warning on anesthesia and brain development: implications for obstetric and fetal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olutoye, Olutoyin A; Baker, Byron Wycke; Belfort, Michael A; Olutoye, Oluyinka O

    2018-01-01

    There has been growing concern about the detrimental effects of certain anesthetic agents on the developing brain. Preclinical studies in small animal models as well as nonhuman primates suggested loss or death of brain cells and consequent impaired neurocognitive function following anesthetic exposure in neonates and late gestation fetuses. Human studies in this area are limited and currently inconclusive. On Dec. 14, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning regarding impaired brain development in children following exposure to certain anesthetic agents used for general anesthesia, namely the inhalational anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, and the intravenous agents propofol and midazolam, in the third trimester of pregnancy. Furthermore, this warning recommends that health care professionals should balance the benefits of appropriate anesthesia in young children and pregnant women against potential risks, especially for procedures that may last >3 hours or if multiple procedures are required in children fetal exposure to general anesthesia during cesarean delivery has not been associated with learning disabilities. However, the fetus can also be exposed to both intravenous and inhalation anesthetics during nonobstetric or fetal surgery in the second and third trimester; this exposure is typically longer than that for cesarean delivery. Very few studies address the effect of anesthetic exposure on the fetus in the second trimester when most nonobstetric and fetal surgical procedures are performed. It is also unclear how the plasticity of the fetal brain at this stage of development will modulate the consequences of anesthetic exposure. Strategies that may circumvent possible untoward long-term neurologic effects of anesthesia in the baby include: (1) use of nonimplicated (nongamma-aminobutyric acid agonist) agents for sedation such as opioids (remifentanil, fentanyl) or the alpha-2 agonist, dexmedetomidine, when appropriate; (2

  7. Descriptive Study: Anesthesia for Awake Craniotomy in Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saipin Muangman

    2016-03-01

    dexmedetomidine and fentanyl. Only one patient (1.7% received anesthesia via inhalation with LMA. Complicationsduringanesthesia were mostlyhypertension,hypotensionandupperairway obstruction, respectively.

  8. Inhaled americium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This project includes experiments to determine the effects of Zn-DTPA therapy on the retention, translocation and biological effects of inhaled 241 AmO 2 . Beagle dogs that received inhalation exposure to 241 AmO 2 developed leukopenia, clincial chemistry changes associated with hepatocellular damage, and were euthanized due to respiratory insufficiency caused by radiation pneumonitis 120 to 131 days after pulmonary deposition of 22 to 65 μCi 241 Am. Another group of dogs that received inhalation exposure to 241 AmO 2 and were treated daily with Zn-DTPA had initial pulmonary deposition of 19 to 26 μCi 241 Am. These dogs did not develop respiratory insufficiency, and hematologic and clinical chemistry changes were less severe than in the non-DTPA-treated dogs

  9. Inhalation of sevoflurane in the removal of post-labioplasty and palatoplasty stitches in uncooperative children patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ediyana Nuryadi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The technique of behaviour management in medical treatment, especially in dental treatment, is needed to eliminate uncooperative children behaviour. The main factor influencing children behaviour is fear of painful that usually related to dental treatment. Children patients who will have their post­labioplasty and palatoplasty stitches removed have more sensitive condition, they cry when the dentist gives treatment. Using general anesthesia is a method to manage uncooperative children behaviour. Inhalational anesthesia is often used in general anesthesia and sevoflurane is a drug of choice. Sevoflurane has low solubility in blood, pleasant odor, nonirritating airway, and has a rapid induction of and recovery from anesthesia. Some researches indicate that sevoflurane gives more calm condition and can be used as a sufficiently ideal induction and maintenance of anesthesia in children. Sevoflurane can therefore made as alternative procedure in the removal of post-labioplasty and palatoplasty stitches.

  10. Allergic reactions during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J H

    1988-01-01

    Any drug or blood product administered in the perioperative period has the potential to produce a life-threatening allergic (immune reaction) called anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic reactions represent adverse reactions mediated by immunospecific antibodies (IgE and IgG) that interact with mast cells, basophils, or the complement system to liberate vasoactive mediators and recruit other inflammatory cells. Activation of humoral and cellular pathways produces characteristic responses in the respiratory (bronchospasm and upper airway edema), cardiovascular (vasodilation and increased capillary permeability), and cutaneous systems (wheal and flare). Other predictable adverse drug reactions may mimic anaphylaxis to produce similar physiologic consequences independent of allergy (immune responses). Rapid and timely cardiopulmonary intervention with airway maintenance, epinephrine, and volume expansion is essential to avoid an adverse outcome. Severe reactions may be protracted, especially during anesthesia, requiring even larger doses of catecholamines and intensive care observation.

  11. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  12. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  13. Chlorine Gas Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carl W.; Martin, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, and might be present after exposures to a number of inhaled chemical irritants. Clinical signs, including hypoxemia, wheezes, rales, and/or abnormal chest radiographs may be present. More severely affected individuals may suffer acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Up to 1% of exposed individuals die. Humidified oxygen and inhaled β-adrenergic agents are appropriate therapies for victims with respiratory symptoms while assessments are underway. Inhaled bicarbonate and systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids also have been reported anecdotally to be beneficial. Chronic sequelae may include increased airways reactivity, which tends to diminish over time. Airways hyperreactivity may be more of a problem among those survivors that are older, have smoked, and/or have pre-existing chronic lung disease. Individuals suffering from irritant-induced asthma (IIA) due to workplace exposures to chlorine also tend to have similar characteristics, such as airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and to be older and to have smoked. Other workplace studies, however, have indicated that workers exposed to chlorine dioxide/sulfur dioxide have tended to have increased risk for chronic bronchitis and/or recurrent wheezing attacks (one or more episodes) but not asthma, while those exposed to ozone have a greater incidence of asthma. Specific biomarkers for acute and chronic exposures to chlorine gas are currently lacking. Animal models for chlorine gas

  14. Alzheimer disease and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Gözde; Özköse Satirlar, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and the most prevalent form of dementia. Some factors in the development of AD, age being the best-known one, have been suggested; however, no causes have been found yet. The pathophysiology of the disease is highly complex, current therapies are palliative, and a cure is still lacking. Adverse effects of anesthetics in the elderly have been reported since the 1950s; however, awareness of this old problem has recently gained inportance again. Whether exposure to surgery and general anesthesia (GA) is associated with the development of AD has been questioned. As the population is aging, many elderly patients will need to be anesthetized, and maybe some were already anesthetized before they were diagnosed. Exposure to anesthetics has been demonstrated to promote pathogenesis of AD in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to date, there have not been any clinical trials to address a link between exposure to GA and the development of AD in humans. Therefore, before making any conclusions we need further studies, but we should be aware of the potential risks and take cautions with vulnerable elderly patients.

  15. Turner syndrome and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a frequent and complex genetic abnormality affecting women, being associated with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological changes, especially related with the airways and cardiovascular system. The objective of this report was to review the anatomopathologic changes of this syndrome that concern the anesthesiologist the most, discuss the perioperative management and review the literature regarding the anesthetic conduct in those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by an abnormality in the number or morphology of the sex chromosome. The most frequent abnormality is the absence of a sex chromosome, resulting in the 45X karyotype and a phenotype composed of gonadal dysgenesis. The main anatomo-physiological changes pertaining the anesthesiologist include a short neck, and maxillary and mandibular hipoplasia, which might be responsible for difficult airways. The shorter length of the trachea, as well as the higher location of its bifurcation, can predispose to bronchial intubation and accidental endotracheal extubation when the tracheal cannula is under traction. The presence of cardiopathies, endocrine and gastrointestinal disorders, liver and kidney changes, as well as osteoarticular involvement, besides ophthalmologic and hearing impairments, are very frequent, and should be detected during the pre-anesthetic evaluation. General or regional anesthesia seems to be safe for those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic abnormality with important anatomo-physiological abnormalities important to the anesthesiologist. The knowledge of this disorder allows for a safer anesthetic management with low perioperative morbimortality.

  16. [Allergic reactions during anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, F; Sierra, P

    1996-01-01

    Anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia is a constant source of concern for anesthesiologists, given that the rates of death and serious complications are high and predicting which patients will be susceptible is impossible. All substances used in the perioperative period carry a certain risk of releasing histamine and triggering an allergic reaction, though muscle relaxants are the drugs usually implicated. The incidence of serious anaphylaxis ranges between 1:4,000 and 1:23,000 anesthetic procedures, with mortality set at 3-9% and morbidity 10 times higher. Clinical signs vary from mild symptoms to anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest. The diagnostic procedure to follow upon observing an allergic reaction is to first identify the responsible mechanism and later the responsible agent, as well as drugs that can be used safely. Prophylaxis is based mainly on recognizing predisposed patients before surgery and following recommendations and pharmacological protocols based on better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause anaphylactic reaction and on experience in managing them.

  17. Radioactive aerosol inhalation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, M.E.; Lieberman, E.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol inhalation apparatus for supplying an aerosol mist containing radioactive tagged particles to a subject is described comprising a reusable radiation-shielding container having lid means. The contents of the container are readily accessible. A radioactive aerosol inhalation device includes first and second conduit means in the container and passing therethrough, means for communicating with an air passageway of a subject connected to the first and second conduit means externally of the container. Valve means control exhalation from the second conduit means. A nebulizer is within the container connected to the first conduit means. Means are positioned at least in part within the container and in fluid communication with the nebulizer for allowing introduction of radioactive solution from outside the container into the nebulizer

  18. Inhalation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.; Jackson, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In previous studies the biological dispositions of individual long-lived alpha members of the uranium chain ( 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th) were determined during and following repeated inhalation exposures of rats to pitchblende (26 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore. Although finely dispersed ore in secular equilibrium was inhaled, 230 Th/ 234 U radioactivity ratios in the lungs rose from 1.0 to 2.5 during 8 weeks of exposures and increased to 9.2 by four months after cessation of exposures. Marked non-equilibrium levels were also found in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, kidneys, liver, and femur. Daily exposures of beagle dogs to high levels of this ore for 8 days resulted in lung 230 Th/ 234 U ratios of >2.0. Daily exposures of dogs to lower levels (0.1 mg/1) for 6 months, with sacrifice 15 months later, resulted in lung and thoracic lymph node 230 Th/ 234 U ratios ranging from 3.6 to 9 and nearly 7, respectively. The lungs of hamsters exposed to carnotite (4 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore in current lifespan studies show 230 Th/ 234 U ratios as high as 2.0 during daily inhalation of this ore in secular equilibrium. Beagle dogs sacrificed after several years of daily inhalations of the same carnotite ore plus radon daughters also showed marked non-equilibrium ratios of 230 Th/ 234 U, ranging from 5.6 to 7.4 in lungs and 6.2 to 9.1 in thoracic lymph nodes. This pattern of higher retention of 230 Th than 234 U in lungs, thoracic lymph nodes, and other tissues is thus consistent for two types of uranium ore among several species and suggests a reevaluation of maximum permissible air concentrations of ore, currently based only on uranium content

  19. Nonthermal Inhalation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    accessory muscles may be an important sign of respiratory distress and possible obstruction. An unstable pattern of breathing or apnea are ominous signs and... concepts in all areas of practice (Emergency Nurses Association, 1991). Direct care allows the emergency CNS to attain competency with new equipment...emergency physicians on protocols regarding smoke inhalation patients will aid in preventing premature discharge. In advance, the CNS develops algorithms

  20. Scoping review: Awareness of neurotoxicity from anesthesia in children in otolaryngology literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Marisa A; Pham, Liem T; April, Max M

    2017-08-01

    Review otolaryngology literature for awareness of neurotoxicity from general anesthesia in children. Recently, there has been increasing focus in anesthesia literature on the long-term effects of general anesthesia on neurodevelopment. Multiple animal models have demonstrated evidence of neurotoxicity from both inhalational and intravenous anesthetics. Cohort studies also have revealed modestly increased risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children exposed to a single episode of general anesthesia prior to 3 to 4 years of age, with stronger evidence for multiple exposures in this age range. Otolaryngologists may subject children to general anesthesia via procedures or tests, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and auditory brainstem response. PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science Review. A scoping review using the above databases was performed limited to January 2005 through December 2015. Articles were screened and reviewed based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Initial search generated 3,909 articles. After 72 full text articles were reviewed, only seven articles mentioned neurotoxicity as a risk of general anesthesia in pediatric patients. Despite the high volume of pediatric otolaryngologic procedures performed annually, there remains limited awareness in our literature discussing neurotoxicity as an outcome. Prospective data from anesthesia literature is still pending; therefore, specific recommendations cannot be made at this time. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the concerns and work toward defining elective procedures, combining surgical procedures with other procedures or imaging, and reassessing the timing and frequency of various interventions under general anesthesia in young children. Laryngoscope, 127:1930-1937, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Postoperative apnea in former preterm infants: prospective comparison of spinal and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welborn, L G; Rice, L J; Hannallah, R S; Broadman, L M; Ruttimann, U E; Fink, R

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-six former preterm infants undergoing inguinal hernia repair were studied. All were less than or equal to 51 weeks postconceptual age at the time of operation. Patients were randomly assigned to receive general or spinal anesthesia. Group 1 patients received general inhalational anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade. Group 2 patients received spinal anesthesia using 1% tetracaine 0.4-0.6 mg/kg in conjunction with an equal volume of 10% dextrose and 0.02 ml epinephrine 1:1000. In the first part of the study, infants randomized to receive spinal anesthesia also received sedation with im ketamine 1-2 mg/kg prior to placement of the spinal anesthetic (group 2 A). The remainder of group 2 patients did not receive sedation (group 2 B). Respiratory pattern and heart rate were monitored using an impedance pneumograph for at least 12 h postoperatively. Tracings were analyzed for evidence of apnea, periodic breathing and/or bradycardia by a pulmonologist unaware of the anesthetic technique utilized. None of the patients who received spinal anesthesia without ketamine sedation developed postoperative bradycardia, prolonged apnea, or periodic breathing. Eight of nine infants (89%) who received spinal anesthesia and adjunct intraoperative sedation with ketamine developed prolonged apnea with bradycardia. Two of the eight infants had no prior history of apnea. Five of the 16 patients (31%) who received general anesthesia developed prolonged apnea with bradycardia. Two of these five infants had no prior history of apnea. When infants with no prior history of apnea were analyzed separately, there was no statistically significant increased incidence of apnea in children receiving general versus spinal anesthesia with or without ketamine sedation. Because of the small numbers of patients studied, and the multiple factors that may influence the incidence of postoperative apnea (e.g., prior history of neonatal apnea), standard postoperative respiratory monitoring of these high

  2. Effects of anesthesia and blood sampling techniques on plasma metabolites and corticosterone in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Myrtha; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2010-04-19

    Blood is routinely sampled from laboratory animals in biomedical research, and many of the commonly applied sampling techniques require anesthesia. Acute effects of many sampling and anesthesia procedures may confound the results, but those effects are incompletely characterized. We here compare the effects of four common anesthesia procedures (inhalation anesthesia with ether (EA) or isoflurane (IA) and intraperitoneal injection anesthesia with xylazin/ketamine (XKA) or medetomidine/midazolam/fentanyl (MMFA)) on plasma concentrations of glucose, lactate, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), and corticosterone in blood obtained from a previously implanted jugular vein (JV) catheter with the effect of JV blood sampling from non-anesthetized, freely-moving rats (JV-NA). Also, we included in the comparison two other blood sampling procedures usually performed without anesthesia (NA), i.e., puncture of the saphenic vein (SV) and tail incision (TI). Whereas the control procedure (JV-NA) did not significantly affect any of the target parameters, plasma glucose increased from 14 (JV-IA) to 44 (JV-MMFA) % (all Ps=0.05 when compared with the control procedure) in all blood samples collected in anesthesia and was 12 and 14% lower (both Psprocedures except for JV-XKA and JV-MMF. Plasma NEFAs increased to 52% (Pprocedure and appeared to decrease with the JV-IA and JV-MMFA procedures (both Ps>0.05). Finally, only the JV-EA and the JV-MMFA procedures increased plasma corticosterone (+525 and +353%, respectively, both Psprocedures appeared to increase it as well, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. Thus, anesthesia and blood sampling procedures can have profound acute effects on plasma metabolite and hormone concentrations. This must be considered for the design and interpretation of blood sampling experiments in laboratory animals. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Orexin-A facilitates emergence of the rat from isoflurane anesthesia via mediation of the basal forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Na; Yang, Cen; Ouyang, Peng-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Ran, Ming-Zi; Tong, Li; Dong, Hai-Long; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that orexinergic neurons involve in promoting emergence from anesthesia of propofol, an intravenous anesthetics, while whether both of orexin-A and orexin-B have promotive action on emergence via mediation of basal forebrain (BF) in isoflurane anesthesia has not been elucidated. In this study, we observed c-Fos expressions in orexinergic neurons following isoflurane inhalation (for 0, 30, 60, and 120min) and at the time when the righting reflex returned after the cessation of anesthesia. The plasma concentrations of orexin-A and -B in anesthesia-arousal process were measured by radioimmunoassay. Orexin-A and -B (30 or 100pmol) or the orexin receptor-1 and -2 antagonist SB-334867A and TCS-OX2-29 (5 or 20μg) were microinjected into the basal forebrain respectively. The effects of them on the induction (loss of the righting reflex) and the emergence time (return of the righting reflex) under isoflurane anesthesia were observed. The results showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus decreased over time with continued isoflurane inhalation, but restored at emergence. Similar alterations were observed in changes of plasma orexin-A concentrations but not in orexin-B during emergence. Administration of orexins had no effect on the induction time, but orexin-A facilitated the emergence of rats from isoflurane anesthesia while orexin-B didn't. Conversely, microinjection of the orexin receptor-1 antagonist SB-334867A delayed emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. The results indicate that orexin-A plays a promotive role in the emergence of isoflurane anesthesia and this effect is mediated by the basal forebrain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anesthetic recovery and hemodynamic effects of continuous thiopental infusion versus halothane for maintenance anesthesia in patients undergoing ocular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoroghi, Mehrdad; Farahbakhsh, Farshid; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood; Abbasi, Ali; Talebi, Azam

    2011-06-01

    To investigate anesthesia recovery and hemodynamic status in patients under thiopental infusion or halothane maintenance anesthesia undergoing ocular surgery. Fifty-nine voluntary patients undergoing ocular surgery in Farabi hospital were allocated to one of two maintenance anesthesia groups: inhaled halothane, 0.8 to 1 per cent, (group I, n=37) and thiopental infusion, 10 to 12 mg/kg/hour, (group II, n=22). Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at the time of patient entrance to the operation room and at the 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 minutes following anesthesia. Anesthesia recovery variables were also compared between the two groups. In group I, arterial blood pressure at 10 to 40 min and heart rate at 1 and 25 min after the administration of anesthetics were significantly lower when compared with group II (W ²= 25.10, p= 0.005). Arterial oxygen saturation was similar in the two groups over the whole points of time. The time intervals between the end of surgery and beginning of the first body movements and respiratory efforts were significantly longer in group received halothane (p<0.001). Continuous infusion of thiopental can be applied effectively and safely for maintenance of anesthesia. In comparison with halothane, it is associated with lower changes of intraoperative hemodynamics and faster anesthesia recovery.

  5. Effects of pentobarbital, isoflurane, or medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol anesthesia on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood chemistry in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokura, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Toshio; Oshima, Yutaka; Hashizume, Naoki; Nakai, Makoto; Ajimi, Shozo; Imatanaka, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is commonly examined for pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. Two common means of anesthesia before euthanasia and bronchoalveolar lavage in rats are intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital and inhalation of isoflurane. Medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol is an alternative anesthesia to pentobarbital for animal welfare; however, the effect of this combination on BALF and blood chemistry is unknown. Here, we compared the effects of anesthesia by intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital or one of two combinations of medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol (dose, 0.375-2.0-2.5 or 0.15-2.0-2.5 mg/kg) or by inhalation of isoflurane on BALF and blood chemistry in rats with or without pulmonary inflammation. In BALF, we determined total protein, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase, total cell count and neutrophil count. In serum, we conducted a general chemistry screen. After anesthesia with pentobarbital or isoflurane, there were no significant differences between any of the BALF or blood chemistry parameters with or without inflammation. After anesthesia with either of the combinations of medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol, lactate dehydrogenase, total cell count, neutrophil count, and almost all of the blood chemistry parameters were comparable with those observed after pentobarbital or isoflurane; however, BALF albumin and serum glucose were significantly increased in rats without inflammation. After the combination of low-dose medetomidine in rats with inflammation, BALF parameters were comparable with those observed after pentobarbital or isoflurane. Our results show that, of the anesthetics examined, inhalation of isoflurane is the most appropriate means of anesthesia when examining BALF or serum for toxicity studies in rats.

  6. Estado neurológico e cardiorrespiratório de filhotes de cães nascidos de parto normal ou de cesariana sob anestesia geral inalatória com sevofluorano Neurological and cardiocirculatory investigation of dog neonates born by normal parturition or cesarean section on sevoflurane inhalation anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Tozadore Gabas

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A anestesia obstétrica possibilita um procedimento mais seguro para a mãe e para os fetos. Em medicina veterinária, no entanto, a literatura científica a respeito do assunto é deficiente. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o grau de depressão neurológica, hemodinâmica e respiratória fetais provocado pelo agente anestésico, em que as mães foram submetidas ao parto normal ou à cesariana, utilizando-se sevofluorano como agente de manutenção anestésica, comparando-o com o parto normal. Foram realizados seis partos normais (GN e seis cesarianas (GC, avaliando-se um total de 36 filhotes. As cesarianas foram realizadas utilizando-se acepromazina, propofol e sevofluorano (GC e os neonatos foram avaliados clinicamente ao primeiro, quinto e décimo minuto de nascimento, nos dois grupos. Observou-se maior depressão respiratória nos filhotes nascidos de cesariana. Contudo, apesar dessa depressão, o protocolo anestésico empregado não comprometeu de maneira importante a viabilidade e a saúde das mães e dos filhotes, demonstrando ser seguro em cadelas gestantes.The obstetric anesthesia must be safe for mother and puppies and about this, the literature is pour. This study was aimed at evaluating the neurological, hemodinamic and respiratory changes in neonates provoked by the anestesic agent as a result of normal parturition and cesarean section employing sevoflurane as the maintenance agent. Six deliveries (GN and six cesarean sections (GC were performed. The cesarean sections were performed under general anesthesia using acepromazina maleate, propofol and sevoflurane. Thirty six puppies were evaluated and the neurologic reflexes were worse in that were born through cesarean section. However, we concluded that despite the anesthetic depression, the protocol employed didn,t affect in any important way the viability and health of the mothers and puppies, being suitable for cesarean sections.

  7. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “ ...

  8. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  9. Epidural Combined with General Anesthesia versus General Anesthesia Alone in Patients Undergoing Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Feifei; Sun, Zhirong; Huang, Naisi; Hu, Zhen; Cao, Ayong; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Yu, Peirong; Miao, Changhong; Wu, Jiong

    2016-03-01

    Addition of epidural anesthesia may have several benefits. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of epidural anesthesia combined with general anesthesia in patients undergoing free flap breast reconstruction. A retrospective chart review identified 99 patients who underwent free flap breast reconstruction under general anesthesia alone (46 patients) or general anesthesia plus epidural anesthesia (53 patients) between 2011 and 2014. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured before induction, after flap elevation but before flap transfer, 15 minutes after flap revascularization, and at the end of surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. The incidence of flap thrombosis was 3.8 percent in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group versus 4.3 percent in the general anesthesia group (p = 1). Flap failure was 0 percent in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group versus 4.3 percent in the general anesthesia group (p = 0.213). Patients in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group had lower visual analogue scale scores at 2 hours (0.76 ± 0.62 versus 2.58 ± 0.99; p surgery. Epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia combination improves postoperative pain and side effects without increasing the risk of flap thrombosis. Therapeutic, III.

  10. Effect of General Anesthesia Compared to Regional Anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: cesarean section (CS) is one of the common operations performed in obstetric practice worldwide; it can be conducted as elective or emergency operation. Objective: to assess the effect of different types of anesthesia used during conducting elective cesarean sections (CS) on the health of neonates by using ...

  11. Respiratory management of inhalation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcak, Ronald P; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2007-02-01

    Advances in the care of patients with major burns have led to a reduction in mortality and a change in the cause of their death. Burn shock, which accounted for almost 20 percent of burn deaths in the 1930s and 1940s, is now treated with early, vigorous fluid resuscitation and is only rarely a cause of death. Burn wound sepsis, which emerged as the primary cause of mortality once burn shock decreased in importance, has been brought under control with the use of topical antibiotics and aggressive surgical debridement. Inhalation injury has now become the most frequent cause of death in burn patients. Although mortality from smoke inhalation alone is low (0-11 percent), smoke inhalation in combination with cutaneous burns is fatal in 30 to 90 percent of patients. It has been recently reported that the presence of inhalation injury increases burn mortality by 20 percent and that inhalation injury predisposes to pneumonia. Pneumonia has been shown to independently increase burn mortality by 40 percent, and the combination of inhalation injury and pneumonia leads to a 60 percent increase in deaths. Children and the elderly are especially prone to pneumonia due to a limited physiologic reserve. It is imperative that a well organized, protocol driven approach to respiratory care of inhalation injury be utilized so that improvements can be made and the morbidity and mortality associated with inhalation injury be reduced.

  12. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving an...

  13. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  14. Insulin inhalation: NN 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Aradigm Corporation has developed an inhaled form of insulin using its proprietary AERx drug delivery system. The system uses liquid insulin that is converted into an aerosol containing very small particles (1-3 micro in diameter), and an electronic device suitable for either the rapid transfer of molecules of insulin into the bloodstream or localised delivery within the lung. The AERx insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS), AERx iDMS, instructs the user on breathing technique to achieve the best results. Aradigm Corporation and Novo Nordisk have signed an agreement to jointly develop a pulmonary delivery system for insulin [AERx iDMS, NN 1998]. Under the terms of the agreement, Novo Nordisk has exclusive rights for worldwide marketing of any products resulting from the development programme. Aradigm Corporation will initially manufacture the product covered by the agreement, and in return will receive a share of the overall gross profits from Novo Nordisk's sales. Novo Nordisk will cover all development costs incurred by Aradigm Corporation while both parties will co-fund final development of the AERx device. Both companies will explore the possibilities of the AERx platform to deliver other compounds for the regulation of blood glucose levels. Additionally, the agreement gives Novo Nordisk an option to develop the technology for delivery of agents outside the diabetes area. In April 2001, Aradigm Corporation received a milestone payment from Novo Nordisk related to the completion of certain clinical and product development stages of the AERx drug delivery system. Profil, a CRO in Germany, is cooperating with Aradigm and Novo Nordisk in the development of inhaled insulin. Aradigm and Novo Nordisk initiated a pivotal phase III study with inhaled insulin formulation in September 2002. This 24-month, 300-patient trial is evaluating inhaled insulin in comparison with insulin aspart. Both medications will be given three times daily before meals in addition to basal

  15. Respiratory Complications during General Anesthesia in Children Exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Albaalbaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Exposure to the environmental Tobacco smoke is associated with detrimental effects on pulmonary function in the children. This study investigated the relation between airway complications in children receiving general anesthesia with the passive inhalation of smoke and those who were not.Materials & Methods: 223 children scheduled to receive general anesthesia care were enrolled in this case-control study. The anesthesiologist and the residents, unaware of the smoke exposure history, recorded the occurrence of airway complications. A history of passive smoking was assessed by measuring the numbers of cigarettes smoked by their parents per day. The data was analyzed by 2statistical test.Results: Respiratory complications occurred in 54.3% of the patients who were exposed to smoke and 32.4% of those who were not and the difference was statistically significant. Respiratory complications in daughters exposed to tobacco smoke was seen in 57.5% and in boys 51.2% (P=0.012. Respiratory events in children exposed to tobacco smoke was seen in 76.7% children with mother without education, 46.5% children of mothers with low educated level, and 12.5% children of mother with high educational level (P=0.002. This correlation was seen between respiratory events and educational level of fathers (P=0.006. Moreover, our study showed positive correlation between the number of cigarettes smoked per day with respiratory complications during general anesthesia (P<0.05. Conclusion: There is a strong association between passive inhalation of tobacco smoke and respiratory complications in children receiving general anesthesia. The relationship was greatest for the daughters and those whose parents had a lower level of education. Passive smoking should be regarded as a risk factor for the children undergoing general anesthesia.

  16. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  17. Anesthesia and the developing brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Becke, Karin; de Graaff, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that many general anesthetics have a variety of effects on the developing brain in animal models. In contrast, human cohort studies show mixed evidence for any association between neurobehavioural outcome and anesthesia exposure in early childhood. In spite of large...

  18. How to teach regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröking, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2006-10-01

    The demand for peripheral nerve blocks and neuroaxial blocks from both patients and surgeons has increased over the last few years. This change in attitude towards regional anesthesia is prompted by the insight that adequate perioperative pain management leads to earlier ambulation, shorter hospital stay, reduced cost and increased patient satisfaction. To avoid serious complications of these techniques structured residency programs need to be available. Until 2004, the Residency Review Committee for Anesthesiology in the United States required a minimum of 50 epidurals, 40 spinals and 40 peripheral nerve blocks during residency. Similarly, the German Society for Anesthesia and Intensive Care required 100 neuroaxial blocks and 50 peripheral nerve blocks. In 2004 the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine endorsed standardized guidelines for regional anesthesia fellowships which regulate the administrative, equipment and educational demands. This review introduces the reader to the different teaching methods available, including cadaver workshops, three-dimensional videoclips, video filming, ultrasound guidance and acoustic assist devices as well as demonstrating their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, an overview is given of future residency training programs, which integrate administrative, material and educative demands as well as the teaching means into the daily clinical routine.

  19. [Complications of peripheral regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuburger, M; Büttner, J

    2011-11-01

    Peripheral regional anesthesia is a commonly used and safe procedure and eneral complications or side effects are generally rare. Nerve damage has an incidence allergies, dislocation of catheters and knotting or loops in catheters. Besides the general complications, there are some specific complications depending on the puncture site, such as pneumothorax or renal puncture.

  20. Providing value in ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnot, Caroline D; Fleisher, Lee A; Keogh, John

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss current practices and changes in the field of ambulatory anesthesia, in both hospital and ambulatory surgery center settings. New trends in ambulatory settings are discussed and a review of the most current and comprehensive guidelines for the care of ambulatory patients with comorbid conditions such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus are reviewed. Future direction and challenges to the field are highlighted. Ambulatory anesthesia continues to be in high demand for many reasons; patients and surgeons want their surgical procedures to be swift, involve minimal postoperative pain, have a transient recovery time, and avoid an admission to the hospital. Factors that have made this possible for patients are improved surgical equipment, volatile anesthetic improvement, ultrasound-guided regional techniques, non-narcotic adjuncts for pain control, and the minimization of PONV. The decrease in time spent in a hospital also decreases the risk of wound infection, minimizes missed days from work, and is a socioeconomically favorable model, when possible. Recently proposed strategies which will allow surgeons and anesthesiologists to continue to meet the growing demand for a majority of surgical cases being same-day include pharmacotherapies with less undesirable side-effects, integration of ultrasound-guided regional techniques, and preoperative evaluations in appropriate candidates via a telephone call the night prior to surgery. Multidisciplinary communication amongst caregivers continues to make ambulatory settings efficient, safe, and socioeconomically favorable.It is also important to note the future impact that healthcare reform will have specifically on ambulatory anesthesia. The enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will allow 32 million more people to gain access to preventive services that will require anesthesia such as screening

  1. Exubera. Inhale therapeutic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Sanjit; Cefalu, William T

    2002-05-01

    Inhale, in colaboration with Pfizer and Aventis Pharma (formerly Hoechst Marion Roussel; HMR), is developing an insulin formulation utilizing its pulmonary delivery technology for macromolecules for the potential treatment of type I and II diabetes. By July 2001, the phase III program had been completed and the companies had begun to assemble data for MAA and NDA filings; however, it was already clear at this time that additional data might be required for filing. By December 2001, it had been decided that the NDA should include an increased level of controlled, long-term pulmonary safety data in diabetic patients and a major study was planned to be completed in 2002, with the NDA filed thereafter (during 2002). US-05997848 was issued to Inhale Therapeutic Systems in December 1999, and corresponds to WO-09524183, filed in February 1995. Equivalent applications have appeared to date in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Europe, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Poland and South Africa. This family of applications is specific to pulmonary delivery of insulin. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers gave this inhaled insulin a 60% probability of reaching market, with a possible launch date of 2001. The analysts estimated peak sales at $3 billion in 2011. In May 2000, Aventis predicted that estimated peak sales would be in excess of $1 billion. In February 2000, Merrill Lynch expected product launch in 2002 and predicted that it would be a multibillion-dollar product. Analysts Merril Lynch predicted, in September and November 2000, that the product would be launched by 2002, with sales in that year of e75 million, rising to euro 500 million in 2004. In April 2001, Merrill Lynch predicted that filing for this drug would occur in 2001. Following the report of the potential delay in regulatory filing, issued in July 2001, Deutsche Banc Alex Brown predicted a filing would take place in the fourth quarter of 2002 and launch would take place in the first

  2. Effects of bispectral index monitoring on isoflurane consumption and recovery profiles for anesthesia in an elderly asian population

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiq, Faraz; Naqvi, Hamid Iqil; Ahmed, Aliya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Age related limited physiological reserves and associated co-morbidities in elderly patients require careful titration of inhalational anesthetic agents to minimize their side effects. The use of Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring may be helpful in this regard. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of BIS monitoring on Isoflurane consumption during maintenance and recovery profile at the end of anesthesia. This Quasi experimental study was conducted for a 1 year ...

  3. Passive narcosis for anesthesia induction in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jarod M; Anderson, Lydia J; Williams, Colin M; Jorquera, Patricia; Tripp, Ralph A

    2016-08-23

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) are widely used as animal models for infectious disease and immunological research. They emulate many aspects of human disease pathogenesis, and the introduction of cotton rat-specific immunological reagents, cell lines and sequencing of relevant genes have all helped to increase the popularity of this disease model. However, the use of cotton rats is problematic owing to their propensity for aggressive responses when handled, which can lead to escape, increased stress to the animals, and bites to staff. When cotton rats are co-housed, which is recommended under current social housing guidelines, these risks are increased. Here, we describe a method of isoflurane anesthesia induction in the home cage that reduces the risk of animal escape, minimizes stress during induction, and provides additional safety for staff. The method uses inexpensive materials that are widely available and can be easily disinfected. Our method also eliminates the need for expensive and cumbersome machines traditionally used with anesthetic chambers, and uses a minimal amount of inhalant anesthetic, saving resources and protecting staff from inhalation of leaked gas.

  4. Sevoflurane-Based Inhalation Induction in High-Risk Elderly Patients During Noncardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Grebenchikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the hemodynamic effects of sevoflurane during the induction of anesthesia in elderly patients at high risk for cardiac events. Subjects and methods. This study enrolled 32 patients who had a left ventricular ejection fraction of <30% during preoperative examination. According to the presumptive type of anesthesia, the patients were randomized to one of the study groups: In the sevoflurane group receiving infusion of fentanyl (1 ig^kg”‘^hr”‘, anesthesia was induced by sevoflurane at the maximum concentration of 8 vol% at first inspiration, without the respiratory circuit being prefilled. After loss of consciousness, further saturation was carried out using Fianesth, 5 vol%. Combination anesthesia (CA was that which was induced by successive administration of dormicum, ketamine, propo-fol, and fentanyl. The trachea was intubated during total myoplegia under the control of TOF (TOF-Watch, Organon, the Netherlands. Results. In all the patients under CA, its induction was made during infusion of dopamine (5 lg^kg”‘^min”‘, the dose of which had to be increased up to 10 ig • kg-1 • min-1 in 6 (75% patients. Nevertheless, there were decreases in mean blood pressure (BPmean to 46±6 mm Hg and in cardiac index (CI to 1.5±0.3 fig • kg-1 • min-1 (by 32% of the outcome value. In the sevoflurane inhalation induction group, only 3 (12.5% patients needed dopamine. Its dose producing a cardiotonic effect was near-minimal; its average maintenance infusion rate was 5.3±0.3 ig^kg”‘^min”‘. The reduction in CI was statistically insignificant; despite a 9% decrease in BPmean, this indicator in the sevoflurane group remained within acceptable ranges. Conclusion. The use of a sevoflurane-based inhalation induction technique permits higher hemodynamic stability in patients at high risk for cardiac events. Key words: inhalation induction, sevoflurane, ketamine, elderly patients.

  5. The elderly and general anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2010-01-01

    Due to the aging population, the number of elderly patients taking advantage of healthcare services is increasing. A general physical decline of all organ systems and a high frequency of chronic disease accompanying aging.Comorbidity and polypharmacy are therefore common in the elderly. Hence, th......, the administration of general anesthesia to the elderly can be a very challenging task. This paper aims to highlight some of the important issues presented to the elderly undergoing surgery and to suggest some strategies for management....

  6. Mathematical modeling of inhalation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiserova-Bergerova, V.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of inhalation exposure in which uptake, distribution and excretion are described by exponential functions, while rate constants are determined by tissue volumes, blood perfusion and by the solubility of vapors (partition coefficients). In the model, tissues are grouped into four pharmokinetic compartments. The model is used to study continuous and interrupted chronic exposures and is applied to the inhalation of Forane and methylene chloride.

  7. Anesthesia for minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Mahajan, Charu; Kapoor, Indu

    2017-10-01

    With an ultimate aim of improving patients overall outcome and satisfaction, minimally invasive surgical approach is becoming more of a norm. The related anesthetic evidence has not expanded at the same rate as surgical and technological advancement. This article reviews the recent evidence on anesthesia and perioperative concerns for patients undergoing minimally invasive neurosurgery. Minimally invasive cranial and spinal surgeries have been made possible only by vast technological development. Points of surgical interest can be precisely located with the help of stereotaxy and neuronavigation and special endoscopes which decrease the tissue trauma. The principles of neuroanethesia remain the same, but few concerns are specific for each technique. Dexmedetomidine has a favorable profile for procedures carried out under sedation technique. As the new surgical techniques are coming up, lesser known anesthetic concerns may also come into light. Over the last year, little new information has been added to existing literature regarding anesthesia for minimally invasive neurosurgeries. Neuroanesthesia goals remain the same and less invasive surgical techniques do not translate into safe anesthesia. Specific concerns for each procedure should be taken into consideration.

  8. Fatal anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidor Kern

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of anaphylactic reactions occuring during anesthesia is not known. They occur most often in the induction  phase and can present with different levels of severity, also as an anaphylactic shock. Neuromuscular blocking drugs are the most frequently involved substances.Case presentation: We  report a case of a 77-year old female patient with granulomatous inflammation of unknown etiology. Surgical  biopsy of a neck lymph node was indicated. During the induction of anesthesia using propofol and succinylcholine she developed severe anaphylactic reaction presented with bronchospasm and cardiac arrest. Despite 80 min continous cardiopulmonary resuscitation the patient died. Elevated tryptase level in the patient’s blood sample taken before death confirmed anaphylactic reaction. On autopsy we confirmed the tuberculous etiology of generalized granulomatous inflammation.Conclusions: It is important to recognize anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia early and to take adequate measures in order to prevent unfavorable outcome. Tryptase assay of a blood sample taken during life or postmortem may help to identify anaphylactic reaction.

  9. Anesthesia for pediatric day-case dental surgery: a study comparing the classic laryngeal mask airway with nasal trachea intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Deng, Feng; Yu, Cong

    2014-05-01

    To study sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and nasal endotracheal (ET) intubation to maintain the airway in pediatric day-case dental surgery. A total of 171 children aged 2 to 7 years received elective day-case dental surgical procedure under general anesthesia. Children were randomly grouped into LMA groups (L) and nasal ET intubation group (N). In L groups, LMA was inserted after induction of anesthesia using 8% sevoflurane and were allowed to breathe spontaneously. Rocuronium and remifentanil were given intravenously during 8% sevoflurane induction by nasal ET intubation in the N group . The time of anesthetic induction, maintenance, recovery, surgical access, and bispectral index score were recorded. Postoperative nausea and vomiting and the incidence of adverse events during induction and recovery period were also recorded. The insertion time of LMA was significantly shorter than nasal ET (P airway complications, the surgeons' access, and bispectral index were not different between the 2 groups. However, recovery time was significantly shorter in group L (P < 0.05). The incidence of sore throat and postoperative nausea and vomiting (P < 0.01) were much less in group L as well. Sevoflurane inhalation anesthesia through LMA is a safe and reliable method for pediatric day-case dental surgery.

  10. Preventing and managing awareness during general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Berger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: General anesthesia is a reversible state of a temporary loss of consciousness, analgesia, muscle paralysis, blunted autonomic responses and amnesia. To achieve this, an adequate depth of anesthesia should be maintained throughout the surgery. Awareness is a serious complication of general anesthesia, which occurs when the depth of anesthesia is not appropriate due to various causes.In this paper the underlying neurobiology of intraoperative awareness is presented, as well as risk factors for awareness and methods for assessing the depth of anesthesia. Possible psychological consequences of awareness and their management are also discussed. At the end, the recommendations for preventing intraoperative awareness are given.Conclusions: Awareness during general anesthesia may have adverse psychological sequelae in individual patients, therefore guidelines for preventing and managing of intraoperative awareness need to be adopted. In case of a possible awareness, the recommendations for offering a psychological support should also be followed.

  11. Cause analysis, prevention, and treatment of postoperative restlessness after general anesthesia in children with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Mei, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Li-Xian

    2017-03-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital malformations of the oral and maxillofacial region, with an incidence rate of around 0.1%. Early surgical repair is the only method for treatment of a cleft lip and palate. However, because of the use of inhalation anesthesia in children and the physiological characteristics of the cleft palate itself combined with the particularities of cleft palate surgery, the incidence rate of postoperative emergence agitation (EA) in cleft palate surgery is significantly higher than in other types of interventions. The exact mechanism of EA is still unclear. Although restlessness after general anesthesia in children with cleft palate is self-limiting, its effects should be considered by clinicians. In this paper, the related literature on restlessness after surgery involving general anesthesia in recent years is summarized. This paper focuses on induction factors as well as prevention and treatment of postoperative restlessness in children with cleft palate after general anesthesia. The corresponding countermeasures to guide clinical practice are also presented in this paper.

  12. Combined spinal and general anesthesia is better than general anesthesia alone for laparoscopic hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam S Ghodki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Spinal anesthesia (SA was combined with general anesthesia (GA for achieving hemodynamic stability in laparoscopic hysterectomy. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of SA combined with GA in maintaining hemodynamic stability in laparoscopic hysterectomy. The secondary outcomes studied were requirement of inhaled anesthetics, vasodilators, and recovery profile. Settings and Design: We conducted a prospective, randomized study in ASAI/II patients posted for laparoscopic hysterectomy, who were willing to participate in the study. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive SA with GA (group SGA or plain GA (group GA. Group SGA received 10 mg bupivacaine (heavy for SA. GA was administered using conventional balanced technique. Maintenance was carried out with nitrous oxide, oxygen, and isoflurane. Comparison of hemodynamic parameters was carried out during creation of pneumoperitoneum and thereafter. Total isoflurane requirement, need of vasodilators, recovery profile, and regression of SA were studied. Statistical analysis used: Descriptive statistics in the form of mean, standard deviation, frequency, and percentages were calculated for interval and categorical variables, respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied for noting significant difference between the two groups, with chi-square tests for categorical variables and post-hoc Bonferroni test for interval variables. Comparison of heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, SPO2, and etCO2 was done with Student′s t-test or Mann-Whitney test, wherever applicable. Results: Patients in group SGA maintained stable and acceptable MAP values throughout pneumoperitoneum. The difference as compared to group GA was statistically significant (P < 0.01. Group GA showed additional requirement of metoprolol (53.33% and higher concentration of isoflurane (P < 0.001 to combat the increased MAP. Recovery was early and quick in group SGA as

  13. Low fresh gas flow balanced anesthesia versus target controlled intravenous infusion anesthesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a cost-minimization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Predrag D; Petrova, Guenka; Miljkovic, Branislava; Scepanovic, Radisav; Perunovic, Radoslav; Stojanovic, Dragos; Dobrasinovic, Janja

    2008-09-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is widely recognized as a well-tolerated and effective method for cholecystectomy. It is also considered cost saving because it has been associated with a decreased hospital length of stay. Variables that might lead to increased costs in laparoscopic surgery are the technique and drugs used in anesthesia. The goal of this study was to compare the costs of 2 anesthetic techniques used in laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC)--balanced versus IV anesthesia--from the standpoint of an outpatient surgical department, with a time horizon of 1 year. Patients scheduled to undergo elective LC were enrolled in this prospective case study. Patients were randomly allocated to receive balanced anesthesia, administered as low fresh gas flow (LFGF) with inhalational sevoflurane and IV sufentanil in a target controlled infusion (LFGF SS group), or IV anesthesia, administered as IV propofol/sufentanil in a target controlled infusion (TCI group). We used a microcosting procedure to measure health care resource utilization in individual patients to detect treatment differences. The costs of medications used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgery were considered for LFGF SS and TCI. Other end points included duration of anesthesia; mean times to early emergence, tracheal extubation, orientation, and postanesthesia discharge (PAD); pain intensity before first analgesia; number of analgesics required in the first 24 hours after surgery; and prevalences of nausea, vomiting, and agitation. A total of 60 patients were included in this analysis (male/female ratios in the LFGF SS and TCI groups: 11/19 and 12/18, respectively; mean [SD] ages, 48 [7.9] and 47 [8.6] years; and mean [SD] body mass indexes, 26 [2.0] and 26 [3.0] kg/m2). The costs of anesthetics were significantly lower with LFGF SS compared with TCI (euro17.40 [euro2.66] vs euro22.01 [euro2.50] [2006 euros]). Times to early emergence and tracheal extubation were significantly shorter with

  14. Dexmedetomidine: Expanding role in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna S Paranjpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential uses of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a highly selective α2 - adrenoceptor agonist are very diverse. DEX appears to mimic many of the actions of mythical ′ideal′ sedative/analgesic agent. Although not orally active, DEX shows good bioavailability when administered via various other routes like intranasal, buccal, IM than intra-venous. DEX has similar pharmacokinetics in all age groups. Its side effects are predictable and easily treatable, hence it has found place as a part of fast-tracking anesthesia regimens in children. DEX is the sedative of choice for peri-operative use in high risk patients, since it is cardioprotective, neuroprotective and renoprotective. Premedication with DEX obtunds the autonomic pressor responses due to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation when used as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. DEX in high doses offers another approach to managing morbidly obese patients and patients with a compromised airway; without causing any cardio-respiratory depression. It is near ideal hypotensive agent used for controlled hypotension. Its value as a primary sedative and analgesic is becoming more accepted and evident in critically ill patients; in adult and paediatric intensive care units. Besides use in locoregional anesthesia, it is also used as an opioid substitute, for treatment of substance withdrawal, as an anti-shivering agent, for treatment of delirium and as an end of life medication. Availability of an antidote (Atipamezole with similar elimination half life is taking the drug into new frontiers. However, use of DEX is contraindicated in patients with hepatic failure, hypovolemic shock, advanced heart block or ventricular dysfunction.

  15. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Simpson, Colleen; Roof, James; Arthurs, Sandy; Korssjoen, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  16. Presbycusis: reversible with anesthesia drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Carl A

    2009-02-01

    Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is a degenerative condition not currently treatable by medication. It is therefore significant that the author, as a patient, experienced a reversal of high-frequency hearing loss during a 2-day period following abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. This report documents the surgery and the subsequent restoration of hearing, which was bilateral and is estimated to have exceeded 50dB at 4kHz. A possible role is noted for anesthetic agents such as lidocaine, propofol, or fentanyl. This experience may hold a clue for research toward the development of medical treatments for presbycusis.

  17. Chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Kübra Mehel; Güzel, Is Il; Oskovi, Aslı; Guzel, Ali Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia is a rare and life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is the postdural puncture headache. When severe and persistent headache after spinal anesthesia occur, differential diagnosis can be explored. In this report, we aimed to evaluate a patient with persistent headache following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a 31-year-old woman ,and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma.

  18. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; De Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Lee, Katherine; Sheppard, Suzette; Hartmann, Penelope; Ragg, Philip; Backstrom, Marie; Costi, David; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Knottenbelt, Graham; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mameli, Leila; Giribaldi, Gaia; Prato, Alessio Pini; Mattioli, Girolamo; Wolfler, Andrea; Izzo, Francesca; Sonzogni, Valter; Van Gool, Jose T D G; Numan, Sandra C.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Hagenaars, J. H M; Absalom, Anthony R.; Hoekstra, Frouckje M.; Volkers, Martin J.; Furue, Koto; Gaudreault, Josee; Berde, Charles; Soriano, Sulpicio; Young, Vanessa; Sethna, Navil; Kovatsis, Pete; Cravero, Joseph P.; Bellinger, David; Marmor, Jacki; Lynn, Anne; Ivanova, Iskra; Hunyady, Agnes; Verma, Shilpa; Polaner, David; Thomas, Joss; Meuller, Martin; Haret, Denisa; Szmuk, Peter; Steiner, Jeffery; Kravitz, Brian; Suresh, Santhanam; Hays, Stephen R.; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Williams, Robert K.; Bell, Graham T.; Dorris, Liam; Adey, Claire; Bagshaw, Oliver; Chisakuta, Anthony; Eissa, Ayman; Stoddart, Peter; Davis, Annette; Myles, Paul; Wolf, Andy; McIntosh, Neil; Carlin, John; Leslie, Kate; De Lima, Jonathan; Hammer, Greg; Field, David; Gebski, Val; Tibboel, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  19. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  20. Effects of bispectral index monitoring on isoflurane consumption and recovery profiles for anesthesia in an elderly asian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Faraz; Naqvi, Hamid Iqil; Ahmed, Aliya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Age related limited physiological reserves and associated co-morbidities in elderly patients require careful titration of inhalational anesthetic agents to minimize their side effects. The use of Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring may be helpful in this regard. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of BIS monitoring on Isoflurane consumption during maintenance and recovery profile at the end of anesthesia. This Quasi experimental study was conducted for a 1 year period at the main operating units of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Total 60 patients of age 60 years and above were enrolled in either standard practice (SP) or (BIS) group. In the SP group, the anesthesia depth was maintained as a routine clinical practice, while in BIS group it was maintained by monitoring the BIS score between 45 and 55. Standard anesthesia care was provided to all of the patients. Data including demographics, isoflurane consumption, hemodynamic variables and recovery profiles were recorded in both groups. Results: The mean isoflurane consumption was lower (P = 0.001) in the BIS group. The time to eye opening, extubation and ready to shift was shorter (P = 0.0001) in BIS group. The patients in BIS group had higher Post anesthesia recovery score (P = 0.0001) than the SP group. Conclusion: The use of BIS in an elderly Asian population resulted in 40% reduction of isoflurane usage. The patients having BIS monitoring awoke earlier and had better recovery profiles at the end of anesthesia. PMID:22869943

  1. Providing anesthesia in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohlman, Lena E

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews the reality of anesthetic resource constraints in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Understanding these limitations is important to volunteers from high-income countries who desire to teach or safely provide anesthesia services in these countries. Recently published information on the state of anesthetic resources in LMICs is helping to guide humanitarian outreach efforts from high-income countries. The importance of using context-appropriate anesthesia standards and equipment is now emphasized. Global health experts are encouraging equal partnerships between anesthesia health care providers working together from different countries. The key roles that ketamine and regional anesthesia play in providing well tolerated anesthesia for cesarean sections and other common procedures is increasingly recognized. Anesthesia can be safely given in LMICs with basic supplies and equipment, if the anesthesia provider is trained and vigilant. Neuraxial and regional anesthesia and the use of ketamine as a general anesthetic appear to be the safest alternatives in low-resource countries. Environmentally appropriate equipment should be encouraged and pulse oximeters should be in every anesthetizing location. LMICs will continue to need support from outside sources until capacity building has made more progress.

  2. Simulation for Nurse Anesthesia Program Selection: Redesigned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, John Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This project is meant to answer the research question: What applicant character traits do Nurse Anesthesia Program Directors and Faculty identify as favorable predictors for successful completion of a nurse anesthesia program, and what evaluation methods are best to evaluate these traits in prospective students? Methods: A prospective…

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Profile Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical Information Prevalence Tables BRFSS Prevalence Data NHIS Prevalence ... inhaler with a spacer Your browser does not support iframes Using a metered dose inhaler with a ...

  4. Inhalant Abuse: Is Your Child at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be valuable as well. With help, your child can end inhalant use and learn how to make healthy choices for a lifetime. Perry H. Inhalant abuse in children and adolescents. https://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  5. Asthma Inhalers: Which One's Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... containing medication that fits into a boot-shaped plastic mouthpiece. With most metered dose inhalers, medication is ... org/diseases-conditions/asthma/in-depth/asthma-inhalers/ART-20046382 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  6. Do misconceptions hinder effective inhalation therapy with dry powder inhalers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, A.H.; Hagedoorn, P.H.; Frijlink, H.W.F.

    Purpose: It is widely believed that high resistance dry powder inhalers (DPI's) can not be operated adequately by patients with reduced vital capacity and that a constant lung deposition requires a flow rate independent fine particle output (FPF). These beliefs may result in incorrect use and

  7. A comparison of the immunological effects of propofol and isoflurane for maintenance of anesthesia in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomihari, Mizuki; Nishihara, Akira; Shimada, Terumasa; Yanagawa, Masashi; Miyoshi, Masafumi; Miyahara, Kazurou; Oishi, Akihiro

    2015-10-01

    Most anesthetics have an immuno-suppressive effect on cellular and neurohumoral immunity, and research shows that total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol has a greater immuno-protective effect than inhalational anesthesia in human medicine. However, in veterinary clinics, these effects remain ambiguous. To clarify the details, we focused on propofol and isoflurane, investigating clinical blood hematology and immunological profiles drawn from healthy dogs under and after two anesthesia techniques. Twelve healthy adult beagles were included in this study, randomly assigned to the propofol anesthesia group (group P: n=6) or the isoflurane anesthesia group (group I: n=6). In both groups, the number of lymphocytes in peripheral blood decreased after 2 hr of anesthesia (2 hr), but group P showed significantly less decrease than group I. For T-lymphocyte subsets examined by flowcytometry, the ratio of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) of group P at 2 hr also exhibited a high level compared to group I. Moreover, for mRNA expression of cytokines measured by real-time PCR, the IL2 (pro-inflammatory cytokine) of group P showed no decrease like group I. The IL10 (anti-inflammatory cytokine) of group P also showed no increase like group I, while both cytokines maintained nearly the same level until 2 hr. These results suggest that, compared to propofol, isoflurane had more strongly immuno-suppression caused by anesthesia, and propofol itself might have some immuno-protective effects. Thus, TIVA with propofol might benefit immunological support in the perioperative period of dogs.

  8. Comparative immunohistochemical assessment of the effect of repetitive anesthesia with isoflurane and sevoflurane on rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Ruxanda

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Inhalation anesthetics are used in human, as well as veterinary medical practice. In the present study we investigated the effect of isoflurane and sevoflurane on rat hepatocytes. Methods: A total of 40 Wistar female rats were used in this study. Animals were divided in groups of 5 rats. Groups IM, SM served as control groups. Groups I1, I2, I3 were used to study isoflurane and S1, S2, S3 for sevoflurane study. They were anesthetized 3 times, for 2 h long, at 2 days interval with a concentration of: 1.5% isoflurane (I1, I2, I3 and 2% sevoflurane (S1, S2, S3. The oxygen supply throughout the anesthesia was 1 L O2/min. Groups IM, IS, I1, S1 were sacrificed immediately after the last anesthesia. Groups I2, S2 were sacrificed 6 h after the last anesthesia, and groups I3, S3, 24 h post-anesthesia. Liver samples were harvested to highlight caspase-3 in apoptotic hepatocytes. Results: Following isoflurane administration, there were less than 1% cells in apoptosis highlighted in rat livers from groups IM, I1 and I2. At 24 h post-anesthesia (group I3, a small number of apoptotic hepatocytes was highlighted (around 3.23% cells in apoptosis, with a strictly periacinar disposition, randomly distributed in a small number of hepatic lobules. After sevoflurane administration, less than 1% apoptotic hepatocytes were identified at all control moments throughout the study. Conclusions: The results suggest that the anesthetics do not present a considerable hepatotoxicity. The comparative assessment of the two anesthetics shows that sevoflurane is superior to isoflurane.

  9. The Humidity in a Low-Flow Dräger Fabius Anesthesia Workstation with or without Thermal Insulation or a Heat and Moisture Exchanger: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Sergius A R; Lucio, Lorena M C; Modolo, Norma S P; Hayashi, Yoko; Braz, Mariana G; de Carvalho, Lídia R; Braz, Leandro G; Braz, José Reinaldo C

    2017-01-01

    During anesthesia, as compared with intensive care, the time of the tracheal intubation is much shorter. An inhaled gas minimum humidity of 20 mgH2O.L-1 is recommended to reduce the deleterious effects of dry gas on the airways during anesthesia with tracheal intubation. The Fabius GS Premium® anesthesia workstation (Dräger Medical, Lübeck, Germany) has a built-in hotplate to heat gases in the breathing circuit. A heat and moisture exchanger (HME) is used to further heat and humidify the inhaled gas. The humidity of the gases in the breathing circuit is influenced by the ambient temperature. We compared the humidity of the inhaled gases from a low-flow Fabius anesthesia workstation with or without thermal insulation (TI) of the breathing circuit and with or without an HME. We conducted a prospective randomized trial in 41 adult female patients who underwent elective abdominal surgery. The patients were allocated into four groups according to the devices used to ventilate their lungs using a Dräger Fabius anesthesia workstation with a low gas flow (1 L.min-1): control, with TI, with an HME or with TI and an HME (TIHME). The mean temperature and humidity of the inhaled gases were measured during 2-h after connecting the patients to the breathing circuit. The mean inhaled gas temperature and absolute humidity were higher in the HME (29.2±1.3°C; 28.1±2.3 mgH2O·L-1) and TIHME (30.1±1.2°C; 29.4±2.0 mgH2O·L-1) groups compared with the control (27.5±1.0°C; 25.0±1.8 mgH2O·L-1) and TI (27.2±1.1°C; 24.9±1.8 mgH2O·L-1) groups (P = 0.003 and Phumidity level of inhaled gases to avoid damage to the tracheobronchial epithelia during anesthesia. TI of the breathing circuit does not increase the humidity of the inhaled gases, whereas inserting an HME increases the moisture of the inhaled gases closer to physiological values.

  10. Estimation of inhalation flow profile using audio-based methods to assess inhaler medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Terence E; Lacalle Muls, Helena; Costello, Richard W; Reilly, Richard B

    2018-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are required to inhale forcefully and deeply to receive medication when using a dry powder inhaler (DPI). There is a clinical need to objectively monitor the inhalation flow profile of DPIs in order to remotely monitor patient inhalation technique. Audio-based methods have been previously employed to accurately estimate flow parameters such as the peak inspiratory flow rate of inhalations, however, these methods required multiple calibration inhalation audio recordings. In this study, an audio-based method is presented that accurately estimates inhalation flow profile using only one calibration inhalation audio recording. Twenty healthy participants were asked to perform 15 inhalations through a placebo Ellipta™ DPI at a range of inspiratory flow rates. Inhalation flow signals were recorded using a pneumotachograph spirometer while inhalation audio signals were recorded simultaneously using the Inhaler Compliance Assessment device attached to the inhaler. The acoustic (amplitude) envelope was estimated from each inhalation audio signal. Using only one recording, linear and power law regression models were employed to determine which model best described the relationship between the inhalation acoustic envelope and flow signal. Each model was then employed to estimate the flow signals of the remaining 14 inhalation audio recordings. This process repeated until each of the 15 recordings were employed to calibrate single models while testing on the remaining 14 recordings. It was observed that power law models generated the highest average flow estimation accuracy across all participants (90.89±0.9% for power law models and 76.63±2.38% for linear models). The method also generated sufficient accuracy in estimating inhalation parameters such as peak inspiratory flow rate and inspiratory capacity within the presence of noise. Estimating inhaler inhalation flow profiles using audio based methods may be

  11. Bispectoral index scores of pediatric patients under dental treatment and recovery conditions: Study of children assigned for general anesthesia under propofol and isofloran regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Tahririan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was planned to determine the relationship between bispectoral index (BIS during dental treatment and recovery conditions in children undergoing two regimes of anesthesia of propofol and isoflurane. Materials and Methods: In this single-blind clinical trial study, 57 4-7-year-old healthy children who had been referred for dental treatment under general anesthesia between 60 and 90 min were selected by convenience sampling and assigned to two groups, after obtaining their parents′ written consent. The anesthesia was induced by inhalation. For the first group, the anesthesia was preserved by a mixture of oxygen (50%, nitrous oxide (50%, and isoflurane (1%. For the second group, the anesthesia was preserved by a mixture of oxygen (50%, nitrous oxide (50%, and propofol was administered intravenously at a dose of 100 Ng/kg/min. The patients′ vital signs, BIS, and agitation scores were recorded every 10 min. The data were analyzed by repeated measure ANOVA and t-tests at a significance level of α = 0.05 using SPSS version 20. Results: The results of independent t-test for anesthesia time showed no statistically significant difference between isoflurane and propofol (P = 0.87. Controlling age, the BIS difference between the two anesthetic agents was not significant (P > 0.05; however, it was negatively correlated with the duration of anesthesia and the discharge time (P = 0.001, r = -0.308 and (P < 0.001, r = -0.55. Conclusion: The same depth of anesthesia is produced by propofol and isoflurane, but lower recovery complications from anesthesia are observed with isoflurane.

  12. [Spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia in the surgical treatment of inguinal hernia. Cost-effectiveness analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ordóñez, M; Tenías, J M; Picazo-Yeste, J

    2014-05-01

    To compare the costs related to the clinical effectiveness of general anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in inguinal hernioplasty ambulatory surgery. An observational, retrospective cohort study measurement and analysis of cost-effectiveness, in the ambulatory surgery unit of a general hospital. All patients over 18 years of age diagnosed with primary inguinal hernia and scheduled for unilateral hernioplasty between January 2010 and December 2011 were included. Duration of anesthetic induction, length of stay in both the operating room, and in the post-anesthesia care unit, the anesthetic effectiveness (the incidence of adverse effects and the patient's comfort level), and variable economic costs associated with the use of drugs, as well as the use of human resources, were compared. The final analysis included 218 patients, 87.2% male, with a mean age of 53 years (range: 18-85 years). Of these, 139 (63.76%) received subarachnoid anesthesia and 79,(36.2%) general anesthesia. The length of time a patient remained in the post-anesthesia care unit was 337.6±160.2min in the subarachnoid anesthesia group, and 210.0±97.5min for the general anesthesia group (P<.001). Costs of drugs for general anesthesia were higher than that for subarachnoid anesthesia (86.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±7.2). The total cost difference between the 2 techniques was €115.8 more for subarachnoid anesthesia (P<.001). Both techniques showed similar effectiveness. The overall costs for subarachnoid anesthesia were greater than for the general. The cost-effectiveness of general anesthesia is better for outpatient inguinal hernia repair surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Regional anesthesia practice in China: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey; Gao, Huan

    2016-11-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia has been widely used in China. Recently, Chinese anesthesiologists have applied nerve stimulator and ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. Nationwide surveys about regional anesthesia practices in China are lacking. We surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about regional anesthesia techniques, preference, drug selections, complications, and treatments. A survey was sent to all anesthesiologist members by WeChat. The respondents can choose mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. Each IP address is allowed to complete the survey once. A total of 6589 members read invitations. A total of 2654 responses were received with fully completed questionnaires, which represented an overall response rate of 40%. Forty-one percent of the respondents reported that more than 50% of surgeries in their hospitals were done under regional anesthesia. Most of the participants used test dose after epidural catheter insertion. The most common drug for test dose was 3-mL 1.5% lidocaine; 2.6% of the participants reported that they had treated a patient with epidural hematoma after neuraxial anesthesia. Most anesthesiologists (68.2%) performed peripheral nerve blocks as blind procedures based on the knowledge of anatomical landmarks. A majority of hospitals (80%) did not stock Intralipid; 61% of the respondents did not receive peripheral nerve block training. The current survey can serve as a benchmark for future comparisons and evaluation of regional anesthesia practices in China. This survey revealed potential regional anesthesia safety issues in China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clonidine in pediatric caudal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, S; Monin, S; Begon, C; Dubousset, A M; Ecoffey, C

    1994-04-01

    Extradural clonidine produces analgesia in adults. To assess its efficacy in children, we randomized 45 pediatric patients aged 1-7 yr presenting for a subumbilical surgery into three groups of 15 each. After halothane and N2O/O2 induction, and with a double-blind protocol, caudal anesthesia was performed with 1 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. Epinephrine 1/200,000 was added in one group (EG), 1 microgram/kg of clonidine in another group (CG), and no additional medication in the last group (BG). Postoperative analgesia was evaluated using the Broadman "objective pain/discomfort scale" (OPS) at 1-h intervals until the first analgesic administration. There were no differences among the groups in age, weight, duration of surgery, baseline systolic arterial pressure, and heart rate. The mean (+/- SD) duration of analgesia was longer in the CG (987 +/- 573 min) than in the EG (377 +/- 341 min) and BG (460 +/- 439 min); P < 0.01. The maximal OPS scores were lower in the CG than in the EG and BG (2.3 +/- 1.6 vs 3.4 +/- 1.4 and 3.4 +/- 1.8, respectively; P < 0.05). More patients in the CG (n = 7) than in the EG (n = 1) and BG (n = 2) required no postoperative analgesia; P < 0.05. No differences were found among the groups for the minimal respiratory rate and minimal Spo2 values in the postoperative phase, and there were no differences among the groups for heart rate and systolic arterial pressure during the 3 h after caudal anesthesia. We conclude that the duration of postoperative analgesia with caudal bupivacaine was significantly increased by the addition of 1 microgram/kg of clonidine.

  15. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  16. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the effect of anesthesia and surgery on serum tryptase in the absence of anaphylaxis....

  17. Supplemental pulpal anesthesia for mandibular teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel Boopathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pulpal anesthesia is dependent on the interaction of three major factors. (1 the dentist (2 the patient and (3 local anesthesia. Many patients fear endodontic treatment due to a concern about pain. Although pain treatment is well managed in many endodontic patients, there exists a group of patients who do not receive adequate local anesthesia. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the possible reasons for pulpal anesthetic failures and also to focus on the measures for developing effective approaches for the same.

  18. Anesthesia for tracheal resection and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Chhangani, Sanjeev V; Alfille, Paul H

    2012-12-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) is the treatment of choice for most patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheal tumors. Anesthesia for TRR offers distinct challenges, especially for the less experienced practitioner. This article explores the preoperative assessment, strategies for induction and emergence from anesthesia, the essential coordination between the surgical and anesthesia teams during airway excision and anastomosis, and postoperative care. The most common complications are reviewed. Targeted readership is practitioners with less extensive experience in managing airway surgery cases. As such, the article focuses first on the most common proximal tracheal resection. Final sections discuss specific considerations for more complicated cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alzheimer’s disease and anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Amélie ePapon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive disorders such as post-operative cognitive dysfunction, confusion, and delirium, are common following anesthesia in the elderly, with symptoms persisting for months or years in some patients. Alzheimer's disease (AD patients appear to be particularly at risk of cognitive deterioration following anesthesia, and some studies suggest that exposure to anesthetics may increase the risk of AD. Here, we review the literature linking anesthesia to AD, with a focus on the biochemical consequences of anesthetic exposure on AD pathogenic pathways.

  20. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Godara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same.

  1. Hypotensive Anesthesia versus Normotensive Anesthesia during Major Maxillofacial Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoav, Leiser; Abu el-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Steady blood pressure within normal limits during surgery is one of the markers of the ideal and skillful anesthesia. Yet, reduced blood pressure is advantageous in some settings because it can contribute to a reduction in overall blood loss and improve the surgical field conditions. Controlled hypotension during anesthesia or hypotensive anesthesia is often used in major maxillofacial operations. Since hypotensive anesthesia carries the risk of hypoperfusion to important organs and tissues, mainly the brain, heart, and kidneys, it cannot be applied safely in all patients. In this paper we review the medical literature regarding hypotensive anesthesia during major maxillofacial surgery, the means to achieve it, and the risks and benefits of this technique, in comparison to normotensive anesthesia. PMID:25811042

  2. Modern technologies of local injection anesthesia in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohov S.Т.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the importance of using the new system Quick Sleeper for local anesthesia, to highlight benefits of quick and comfortable anesthesia. Material and Methods. The examination of effectiveness, convenience of this kind of anesthesia has been carried out. Results. All patients, taking part in this examination, confirmed more comfortable condition after this anesthesia than conductor and infiltration methods of anesthesia. The effect of anesthesia is better than after conductor anesthesia. Conclusion. This technology guarantees equal introduction and spread of anesthetic, independently of tissue density, eliminating the risk of carpule breakage.

  3. [Effects of Instruction on Inhalation Techniques Using iPads - Web Application "Inhalation Lessons"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawa, Noriko; Ito, Reiko; Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Hashimoto, Shu

    2015-12-01

    Instruction on inhalation techniques for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)and asthma patients being treated with inhalants have sufficient therapeutic effects and are important to maintain adherence. However, problems continue to exist, including time constraints of medical staff that have a large number of patients and a lack of knowledge on inhalation instruction methods. A web application,"Inhalation Lessons,'for the iPad has been developed. It explains inhalation methods, and consists of videos and review tests. Instruction on inhalation techniques was performed using this application for patients that use Diskus, and the effects were examined. As a result, there are significant improvements in the inhalation techniques of patients after viewing the"Inhalation Lessons'application. Uniform instruction on inhalation techniques can be performed even in the field of homecare.

  4. Are Anesthesia Providers Ready for Hypnosis? Anesthesia Providers' Attitudes Toward Hypnotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Alexander B; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Bertram, Amanda; Seymour, Anastasia Rowland

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to measure current attitudes toward hypnosis among anesthesia providers using an in-person survey distributed at a single grand rounds at a single academic teaching hospital. One hundred twenty-six anesthesia providers (anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists) were included in this study. A 10-question Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved questionnaire was developed. One hundred twenty-six (73% of providers at the meeting) anesthesia providers completed the survey. Of the respondents, 54 (43%) were anesthesiologists, 42 (33%) were trainees (interns/residents/fellows) in anesthesia, and 30 (24%) were nurse anesthetists. Over 70% of providers, at each level of training, rated their knowledge of hypnosis as either below average or having no knowledge. Fifty-two (42%) providers agreed or strongly agreed that hypnotherapy has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia, while 103 (83%) believed that positive suggestion has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia (p hypnosis were that it is too time consuming (41%) and requires special training (34%). Only three respondents (2%) believed that there were no reasons for using hypnosis in their practice. These data suggest that there is a self-reported lack of knowledge about hypnosis among anesthesia providers, although many anesthesia providers are open to the use of hypnosis in their clinical practice. Anesthesia providers are more likely to support the use of positive suggestion in their practice than hypnosis. Practical concerns should be addressed if hypnosis and therapeutic verbal techniques are to gain more widespread use.

  5. Conscious awareness and memory during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, K

    1994-10-01

    Conscious awareness is an infrequent complication of general anesthesia. All methods of anesthesia have been implicated, and no method guarantees amnesia. This article examines implicit and explicit memory and discusses factors associated with awareness. Common methods of detection are unreliable, and symptoms resembling post-traumatic stress disorder may result if awareness goes unrecognized and untreated. Patients who experience awareness may sue on grounds of malpractice, breach of contract, and lack of consent. Overhearing negative stimuli may affect patient outcome, because learning and language comprehension can occur during what appears to be clinically adequate anesthesia. Strategies to block threatening auditory stimuli include use of earphones, music tapes, white noise, reassuring statements, or positive suggestion. Behavioral anesthesia decreases patient stress to enhance recovery. Evidence of patient benefit resulting from therapeutic suggestion is inconclusive.

  6. Open hemorrhoidectomy under local anesthesia for symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    standard treatment for prolapsed hemorrhoids. The procedure is commonly done under general or regional anesthesia. This study is aimed to assess the feasibility and tolerability of open – hemorrhoidectomy under local anaesthesia in our setting.

  7. Successful pulpal anesthesia for symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara

    2017-04-01

    Profound pulpal anesthesia after a successful inferior alveolar nerve block can be difficult to achieve when the clinical condition is a pulpal diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors reviewed the literature as it relates to the anesthesia necessary for endodontic therapy of patients with painful, vital, mandibular teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Supplemental anesthetic techniques and medications are available that can be used to improve pulpal anesthesia for patients with the clinical condition of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors identified treatment recommendations for anesthesia in the case of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis based on a review of the available evidence. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. "Acupuncture anesthesia"--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, J H; Lee, P K; Bingham, H G; Greer, D M; Habal, M B

    1976-01-01

    Forty-two patients who were to undergo plastic surgical procedures were asked whether they would accept acupuncture as a substitute for local anesthesia. Eight patients agreed to acupuncture; one of these had 2 operative procedures with acupuncture. Five of the 9 procedures were successful; the remaining 4 required conversion to local anesthesia. After interviewing the patients, we felt that the success of "acupuncture anesthesia" was largely dependent on patient motivation, and that a patient may experience pain during surgical procedures without any change in facial expression or vital signs. We concluded that "acupuncture anesthesia" is of little value in our patient population at present. Its results are unpredictable; therefore, we anticipate that patient acceptance will be small.

  9. Passive inhalation of cannabis smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B.; Mason, P.A.; Moffat, A.C.; King, L.J.; Marks, V.

    1984-09-01

    Six volunteers each smoked simultaneously, in a small unventilated room (volume 27 950 liter), a cannabis cigarette containing 17.1 mg delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A further four subjects - passive inhalers - remained in the room during smoking and afterwards for a total of 3 h. Blood and urine samples were taken from all ten subjects and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for THC metabolites. The blood samples from the passive subjects taken up to 3 h after the start of exposure to cannabis smoke showed a complete absence of cannabinoids. In contrast, their urine samples taken up to 6 h after exposure showed significant concentrations of cannabinoid metabolites (less than or equal to 6.8 ng ml-1). These data, taken with the results of other workers, show passive inhalation of cannabis smoke to be possible. These results have important implications for forensic toxicologists who are frequently called upon to interpret cannabinoid levels in body fluids.

  10. Inhaled corticosteroids for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; Welch, Karen

    2016-08-23

    Reduction of lung inflammation is one of the goals of cystic fibrosis therapy. Inhaled corticosteroids are often used to treat children and adults with cystic fibrosis. The rationale for this is their potential to reduce lung damage arising from inflammation, as well as their effect on symptomatic wheezing. It is important to establish the current level of evidence for the risks and benefits of inhaled corticosteroids, especially in the light of their known adverse effects on growth. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of taking regular inhaled corticosteroids, compared to not taking them, in children and adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We requested information from pharmaceutical companies manufacturing inhaled corticosteroids and authors of identified trials.Date of most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 15 August 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials, published and unpublished, comparing inhaled corticosteroids to placebo or standard treatment in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Two independent authors assessed methodological quality and risk of bias in trials using established criteria and extracted data using standard pro formas. The searches identified 34 citations, of which 26 (representing 13 trials) were eligible for inclusion. These 13 trials reported the use of inhaled corticosteroids in 506 people with cystic fibrosis aged between six and 55 years. One was a withdrawal trial in individuals who were already taking inhaled corticosteroids. Methodological quality and risk of bias were difficult to assess from published information. Many of the risk of bias judgements were unclear due to a lack of available information. Only two trials specified how

  11. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  12. Inhaled plutonium oxide in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This project is concerned with long-term experiments to determine the lifespan dose-effect relationships of inhaled 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 in beagles. Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for lifespan dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that died of pulmonary-fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12μCi. Nineteen of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu haved died during the first 7-1/2 yr after exposure due to bone and/or lung tumors; their body burdens at death ranged from 0.7 to 10μCi. Chronic lymphopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2

  13. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a t...

  14. Anesthesia for Pediatric Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Sebeo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients refractory to medical therapy, deep brain stimulations (DBSs have emerged as the treatment of movement disorders particularly Parkinson's disease. Their use has also been extended in pediatric and adult patients to treat epileptogenic foci. We here performed a retrospective chart review of anesthesia records from 28 pediatric cases of patients who underwent DBS implantation for dystonia using combinations of dexmedetomidine and propofol-based anesthesia. Complications with anesthetic techniques including airway and cardiovascular difficulties were analyzed.

  15. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  16. Chloroform anesthesia and the Saville Kent murder in 1860.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, Duncan E

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of the anesthetic properties of chloroform by Sir James Simpson is one of the therapeutic triumphs of the 19th century. Queen Victoria requested chloroform anesthesia for the birth of her second son, Prince Leopold, and from then until the end of century chloroform was the most popular general anesthetic for obstetrics and surgery. Chloroform was so pleasant to inhale that it became a drug of abuse and was involved in all sorts of criminal activity. Despite its wide usage, chloroform was not thought to be part of the brutal murder of 3-year-old Saville Kent on the night of June 30, 1860, outside his manor house in southwest England. The events surrounding and after the murder have recently been documented by Kate Summerscale in a book entitled, "The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher," the Detective Inspector assigned to the case by Scotland Yard. According to Ms Summerscale's records, Mr Whicher ignored the possibility that chloroform was involved in Saville's death. However, evidence supports the view that chloroform played a critical role in the crime and indicates that the guilty plea by Samuel Kent's daughter, Constance, for which she spent 20 years to the day in prison, was as inaccurate as it was incomplete.

  17. Potential anesthesia protocols for space exploration missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Matthieu; Watkins, Sharmila D; Lebuffe, Gilles; Clark, Jonathan B

    2013-03-01

    In spaceflight beyond low Earth's orbit, medical conditions requiring surgery are of a high level of concern because of their potential impact on crew health and mission success. Whereas surgical techniques have been thoroughly studied in spaceflight analogues, the research focusing on anesthesia is limited. To provide safe anesthesia during an exploration mission will be a highly challenging task. The research objective is thus to describe specific anesthesia procedures enabling treatment of pre-identified surgical conditions. Among the medical conditions considered by the NASA Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability element, those potentially necessitating anesthesia techniques have been identified. The most appropriate procedure for each condition is thoroughly discussed. The substantial cost of training time necessary to implement regional anesthesia is pointed out. Within general anesthetics, ketamine combines the unique advantages of preservation of cardiovascular stability, the protective airway reflexes, and spontaneous ventilation. Ketamine side effects have for decades tempered enthusiasm for its use, but recent developments in mitigation means broadened its indications. The extensive experience gathered in remote environments, with minimal equipment and occasionally by insufficiently trained care providers, confirms its high degree of safety. Two ketamine-based anesthesia protocols are described with their corresponding indications. They have been designed taking into account the physiological changes occurring in microgravity and the specific constraints of exploration missions. This investigation could not only improve surgical care during long-duration spaceflights, but may find a number of terrestrial applications in isolated or austere environments.

  18. Cancer hazard from inhaled plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The best estimate of the lung cancer potential in humans for inhaled insoluble compounds of plutonium (such as PuO 2 particles) has been grossly underestimated by such authoritative bodies as the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the British Medical Research Council. Calculations are presented of lung cancer induction by 239 Pu as insoluble particles and for deposited reactor-grade Pu. The reason for the gross underestimate of the carcinogenic effects of Pu by ICRP or the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) is their use of a totally unrealistic idealized model for the clearance of deposited Pu from the lungs and bronchi plus their non-recognition of the bronchi as the true site for most human lung cancers. The erroneous model used by such organizations also fails totally to take into account the effect of cigarette-smoking upon the physiological function of human lungs. Plutonium nuclides, such as 239 Pu, or other alpha particle-emitting nuclides, in an insoluble form represent an inhalation cancer hazard in a class some 100,000 times more potent than the potent chemical carcinogens, weight for weight. The already-existing lung cancer data for beagle dogs inhaling insoluble PuO 2 particles is clearly in order of magnitude agreement with calculations for humans

  19. [Effects of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation combined with general anesthesia on changes of gastric dynamics in controlled hypotension dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Le-Le; Shao, Xiao-Mei; Lian, Lin-Li; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Dong, Zhen-Hua; Mo, Ya-Di

    2011-12-01

    To observe the effect of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) combined with general anesthesia on gastric dynamics in controlled hypotension dogs, so as to provide experimental evidence for compound acupuncture anesthesia. Eighteen male beagle dogs were randomly divided into general anesthesia group (GA group, n = 6), general anesthesia + controlled hypotension group (GA + OHT group, n = 6) and general anesthesia combined with TEAS + controlled hypotension group (TEAS group, n = 6). The latter two groups were administered with the same anesthetics [isofluane inhalation and intravenous sodium nitroprusside (SNP)] for inducing controlled hypotension (being the 40% of the baseline level). Beagles of the GA group were not treated with controlled hypotension (the initial concentration of SNP = 1 microg/kg x min(-1), and with an increase rate of 1 microg/kg x min(-1) until the controlled hypotension phase). In the TEAS group, TEAS [2 Hz/100 Hz, (4 +/- 1) mA]was applied to "Quchi" (LI 11) , "Zusanli" (ST 36), "Hegu" (LI 4), and "Sanyinjiao" (SP 6) from the beginning of the stable physiological condition phase to the end of the controlled-low mean arterial pressure (MAP) phase. Electrogastrogram (EGG) was recorded, and serum gastrin (GAS) and motilin (MTL) contents were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with the basic level, the amplitude value of EGG at 60 mm after controlled hypotension in the GA + CHT group was significantly lower (P 0.05), and serum GAS level at the time-point of 2 h after MAP recovery in the TEAS group was considerably higher than those in the GA and GA + CHT groups (P 0.05). TEAS combining with general anesthesia for controlled hypotension can improve the amplitude of EGG, and serum MTL and GAS contents, favoring the recovery of gastric dynamics and the functional protection of stomach.

  20. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive

  1. Anesthesia care for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaman, Michael J; Hevesi, Zoltan G

    2011-01-01

    Intraoperative transfusion practices for liver transplantation have evolved dramatically since the first transplants of the 1960s. It is important for today's clinicians to be current in their understanding of how transplant patients should be managed with regard to their coagulation profile, volume status, and general hemodynamic state. The anesthesia team is presented with the unique task of manipulating this tenuous balance in a rapid and precise manner when managing patients undergoing liver transplantation. Although significant progress has been made in reducing blood product administration, it is still common to encounter large volume blood loss in these cases. Increasingly, clinicians are challenged to justify transfusion practices with a stronger evidentiary base. The current state of the literature for transfusion guidelines and blood product management in this particular patient subset will be discussed, as well as a variety of means (both pharmacologic and otherwise) used to reduce the need for transfusion. The aim was to review the latest evidence on these topics, as well as to highlight areas that need further clarification regarding their role in the optimal care of these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nausea and Vomiting following Balanced Xenon Anesthesia Compared to Sevoflurane: A Post-Hoc Explorative Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid V Fahlenkamp

    Full Text Available Like other inhalational anesthetics xenon seems to be associated with post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV. We assessed nausea incidence following balanced xenon anesthesia compared to sevoflurane, and dexamethasone for its prophylaxis in a randomized controlled trial with post-hoc explorative analysis.220 subjects with elevated PONV risk (Apfel score ≥2 undergoing elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive xenon or sevoflurane anesthesia and dexamethasone or placebo after written informed consent. 93 subjects in the xenon group and 94 subjects in the sevoflurane group completed the trial. General anesthesia was maintained with 60% xenon or 2.0% sevoflurane. Dexamethasone 4mg or placebo was administered in the first hour. Subjects were analyzed for nausea and vomiting in predefined intervals during a 24h post-anesthesia follow-up.Logistic regression, controlled for dexamethasone and anesthesia/dexamethasone interaction, showed a significant risk to develop nausea following xenon anesthesia (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.02-5.19, p = 0.044. Early-onset nausea incidence was 46% after xenon and 35% after sevoflurane anesthesia (p = 0.138. After xenon, nausea occurred significantly earlier (p = 0.014, was more frequent and rated worse in the beginning. Dexamethasone did not markedly reduce nausea occurrence in both groups. Late-onset nausea showed no considerable difference between the groups.In our study setting, xenon anesthesia was associated with an elevated risk to develop nausea in sensitive subjects. Dexamethasone 4mg was not effective preventing nausea in our study. Group size or dosage might have been too small, and change of statistical analysis parameters in the post-hoc evaluation might have further contributed to a limitation of our results. Further trials will be needed to address prophylaxis of xenon-induced nausea.EU Clinical Trials EudraCT-2008-004132-20 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00793663.

  3. The Skeletal Effects of Inhaled Glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Stephanie A; Stein, Emily M

    2016-06-01

    The skeletal effects of inhaled glucocorticoids are poorly understood. Children with asthma treated with inhaled glucocorticoids have lower growth velocity, bone density, and adult height. Studies of adults with asthma have reported variable effects on BMD, although prospective studies have demonstrated bone loss after initiation of inhaled glucocorticoids in premenopausal women. There is a dose-response relationship between inhaled glucocorticoids and fracture risk in asthmatics; the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is greater in subjects treated with the highest doses in the majority of studies. Patients with COPD have lower BMD and higher fracture rates compared to controls, however, the majority of studies have not found an additional detrimental effect of inhaled glucocorticoids on bone. While the evidence is not conclusive, it supports using the lowest possible dose of inhaled glucocorticoids to treat patients with asthma and COPD and highlights the need for further research on this topic.

  4. Anesthesia Induction With Sevoflurane and Propofol: Evaluation of P-wave Dispersion, QT and Corrected QT Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the effects of anesthesia induction with sevoflurane and propofol on hemodynamics, P-wave dispersion (Pwd, QT interval and corrected QT (QTc interval. A total of 72 adult patients were included in this prospective study. All patients had control electrocardiograms (ECGs before anesthesia induction. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane inhalation or intravenous propofol. Electrocardiography for all patients was performed during the 1st and 3rd minutes of induction, 3 minutes after administration of muscle relaxant, and at 5 minutes and 10 minutes after intubation. Pwd and QT intervals were measured on all ECGs. QTc intervals were determined using the Bazett formula. There was no significant difference in Pwd and QT and QTc intervals on control ECGs. In the sevoflurane group, except for control ECGs, Pwd and QTc interval on all ECGs were significantly longer than those in the propofol group (p < 0.05. We conclude that propofol should be used for anesthesia induction in patients with a predisposition to preoperative arrhythmias, and in those whose Pwd and QTc durations are prolonged on preoperative ECGs.

  5. Anesthesia information management system-based near real-time decision support to manage intraoperative hypotension and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bala G; Horibe, Mayumi; Newman, Shu-Fang; Wu, Wei-Ying; Peterson, Gene N; Schwid, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative hypotension and hypertension are associated with adverse clinical outcomes and morbidity. Clinical decision support mediated through an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) has been shown to improve quality of care. We hypothesized that an AIMS-based clinical decision support system could be used to improve management of intraoperative hypotension and hypertension. A near real-time AIMS-based decision support module, Smart Anesthesia Manager (SAM), was used to detect selected scenarios contributing to hypotension and hypertension. Specifically, hypotension (systolic blood pressure 1.25 minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) of inhaled drug and hypertension (systolic blood pressure >160 mm Hg) with concurrent phenylephrine infusion were detected, and anesthesia providers were notified via "pop-up" computer screen messages. AIMS data were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the effect of SAM notification messages on hypotensive and hypertensive episodes. For anesthetic cases 12 months before (N = 16913) and after (N = 17132) institution of SAM messages, the median duration of hypotensive episodes with concurrent high MAC decreased with notifications (Mann Whitney rank sum test, P = 0.031). However, the reduction in the median duration of hypertensive episodes with concurrent phenylephrine infusion was not significant (P = 0.47). The frequency of prolonged episodes that lasted >6 minutes (sampling period of SAM), represented in terms of the number of cases with episodes per 100 surgical cases (or percentage occurrence), declined with notifications for both hypotension with >1.25 MAC inhaled drug episodes (δ = -0.26% [confidence interval, -0.38% to -0.11%], P 1.25 MAC inhaled drug episodes. However, since phenylephrine infusion is manually documented in an AIMS, the impact of notification messages was less pronounced in reducing episodes of hypertension with concurrent phenylephrine infusion. Automated data capture and a higher frequency of

  6. Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Julian David

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation explores the relationship between motor vehicle emissions and the human inhalation intake of these emissions. Motor vehicles are ubiquitous to urban areas throughout the world. In most urban areas, vehicle emission are a significant contributor to air pollution problems. Inhalation of vehicle emissions has been shown to cause a number of adverse health effects. Better understanding of the relationship between emissions and inhalation will aid in designing effective strategie...

  7. [Effects of nitrous oxide on electroencephalographic activity during sevoflurane anesthesia: a zero-crossing analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, T; Ochiai, R; Takeda, J; Fukushima, K

    1995-11-01

    We have investigated the influence of nitrous oxide (N2O) on central nervous system (CNS) during sevoflurane anesthesia by using zero-crossing method of EEG in 31 patients. The study was divided into three parts: Study 1 (n = 18), Study 2 (n = 6) and Study 3 (n = 7). (Study 1) After induction of anesthesia, sevoflurane 1.0 % in oxygen (O2), and sevoflurane 1.0 % with 67 % N2O in O2 were given to the patients sequentially in a random fashion, and EEG was recorded. (Study 2) Sevoflurane 1.7 % in O2, and sevoflurane 0.7 % with 67 % N2O in O2, which were considered to be the same anesthetic depth (= sevoflurane 1 MAC), were inhaled, and EEG was recorded in the same manner as in the study 1. (Study 3) We compared the effects of N2O on EEG during intravenous administration of fentanyl and midazolam with 67 % N2O, and without N2O, and EEG was recorded in the same manner. In all studies, percentage of each frequency range (delta, theta, alpha, beta) and average frequency were calculated by zero-crossing method. During sevoflurane anesthesia, the EEG activity was decelerated with N2O, depending on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). But there were no significant changes in EEG activity of the patient with and those without N2O during intravenous anesthesia. We concluded that the influences of N2O on CNS can be evaluated by quantitative analysis of EEG.

  8. New Progress in the Cause Analysis and Nursing of Respiratory Tract Infection after Abdominal Surgery under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Congxian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a review of the causes of respiratory tract infection after abdominal surgery. These causes include general anesthesia, intubation factors, factors inherent to the patient, surgical factors, the injudicious use of antimicrobial agents, and the environmental factors of the ward. The perioperative management of the respiratory tract should be strengthened. Health education, respiratory function training, oral nursing intervention, atomization inhalation, and personalized expectoration methods should receive more attention to decrease the complications and promote the early rehabilitation of patients after abdominal surgery.

  9. Fine particle mass from the Diskus inhaler and Turbuhaler inhaler in children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B; Sumby, B S

    1998-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate dose consistency and particle distribution from the dry powder inhalers Diskus and Turbuhaler. Full profiles of inhalation pressure versus time were recorded in 18 4 yr old and 18 8 yr old asthmatic children through Diskus and Turbuhaler inhalers. These data were us...

  10. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  11. Legal abortion mortality and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrash, H K; Cheek, T G; Hogue, C J

    1988-02-01

    Legal abortion-related mortality as reported to the Centers for Disease Control declined eightfold between 1972 and 1981. However, the causes of legal abortion mortality have changed over time. We reviewed all legal abortion-related deaths that occurred between 1972 and 1985 in the United States. We found that, although the absolute number of legal abortion-related deaths caused by general anesthesia complications did not increase, the proportion of such deaths increased significantly, from 7.7% between 1972 and 1975 to 29.4% between 1980 and 1985. Women who died of general anesthesia complications did not differ by age, presence of preexisting medical conditions, or type of facility from women who died of other causes. However, the proportion of deaths from general anesthesia complications was significantly higher among women of black and other races, women obtaining abortions during the first trimester, and women obtaining abortions in the Northeast. Our results indicate that at least 23 of the 27 deaths were due to hypoventilation and/or loss of airway resulting in hypoxia. Persons administering general anesthesia for abortion must be skilled in airway management as well as the provision of general anesthesia.

  12. Inhalation anaesthetics and climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Sander, S P; Nielsen, O J

    2010-01-01

    Although the increasing abundance of CO(2) in our atmosphere is the main driver of the observed climate change, it is the cumulative effect of all forcing agents that dictate the direction and magnitude of the change, and many smaller contributors are also at play. Isoflurane, desflurane......, and sevoflurane are widely used inhalation anaesthetics. Emissions of these compounds contribute to radiative forcing of climate change. To quantitatively assess the impact of the anaesthetics on the forcing of climate, detailed information on their properties of heat (infrared, IR) absorption and atmospheric...

  13. Anesthesia related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of intraoperative anesthesia-related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: One hundred patients with male to female ratio of 1:8.09 in the age range of 20-80 years (mean 39 years) underwent general anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The duration of operation in 94 laparoscopic cholecystectomy was from 20 to 80 minutes (mean 60.63 minutes). The incidence of intraoperative hypotension was 9%. Four percent of the patients developed arrhythmias. Increase in end-tidal-carbon dioxide (ETCO/sub 2/) was observed in 3% of cases. Conversion rate to open cholecystectomy was 6%. Damage to intraabdominal vessels with trocar insertion occurred in 1% of cases. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has major surgical and anesthetic advantages, there are anesthesia related complications requiring specific anesthetic interventions to improve patients outcome without compromising their safety. (author)

  14. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  15. Pulmonary Hypertensive Crisis on Induction of Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schisler, Travis; Marquez, Jose M; Hilmi, Ibtesam; Subramaniam, Kathirvel

    2017-03-01

    Anesthesia for lung transplantation remains one of the highest risk surgeries in the domain of the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist. End-stage lung disease, pulmonary hypertension, and right heart dysfunction as well as other comorbid disease factors predispose the patient to cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic dysfunction during general anesthesia. Perhaps the highest risk phase of surgery in the patient with severe pulmonary hypertension is during the induction of anesthesia when the removal of intrinsic sympathetic tone and onset of positive pressure ventilation can decompensate a severely compromised cardiovascular system. Severe hypotension, cardiac arrest, and death have been reported previously. Here we present 2 high-risk patients for lung transplantation, their anesthetic induction course, and outcomes. We offer suggestions for the safe management of anesthetic induction to mitigate against hemodynamic and respiratory complications.

  16. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  17. [Allergic reaction during anesthesia: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shinji; Futagawa, Koichi; Sugiura, Junko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Okuda, Takahiko; Koga, Yoshihisa

    2009-10-01

    We experienced two cases of serious and potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. The first patient was a 28-year-old male patient scheduled for surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations and another patient was a 66-year-old male patient scheduled for hepatic resection. After uneventful anesthetic induction, anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, air and oxygen. Both patients developed allergic reactions characterized by cardiovascular failure during anesthesia. Resuscitative treatment included rapid fluid infusion, administration of adrenaline and steroid. Both patients were successfully resuscitated without any lasting sequelae. The causative agent in one of these cases was probably a prophylactically used antibiotic, while that of the other case was a reaction to latex. Both patients showed elevated histamine and tryptase concentrations in blood samples. Recently, the incidence of allergic reactions to antibiotics and latex during anesthesia is increasing. Anesthesiologists should, therefore, be aware of the possibility of allergic reactions to all drugs and substances, especially to latex, during the perioperative period.

  18. The optimal anesthetic depth for interventional neuroradiology: comparisons between light anesthesia and deep anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo Sun; Han, Ye-Reum; Choi, Eun-Su; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal anesthetic depth for the maintenance and recovery in interventional neuroradiology. Eighty-eight patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology were randomly allocated to light anesthesia (n = 44) or deep anesthesia (n = 44) groups based on the value of the bispectral index (BIS). Anesthesia was induced with propofol, alfentanil, and rocuronium and maintained with 1-3% sevoflurane. The concentration of sevoflurane was titrated to maintain BIS at 40-49 (deep anesthesia group) or 50-59 (light anesthesia group). Phenylephrine was used to maintain the mean arterial pressure within 20% of preinduction values. Recovery times were recorded. The light anesthesia group had a more rapid recovery to spontaneous ventilation, eye opening, extubation, and orientation (4.1 ± 2.3 vs. 5.3 ± 1.8 min, 6.9 ± 3.2 min vs. 9.1 ± 3.2 min, 8.2 ± 3.1 min vs. 10.7 ± 3.3 min, 10.0 ± 3.9 min vs. 12.9 ± 5.5 min, all P neuroradiology were associated with a more rapid recovery and favorable hemodynamic response, but also with more patient movement. We suggest that maintaining BIS values between 40 and 49 is preferable for the prevention of patient movement during anesthesia for interventional neuroradiology.

  19. Inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... affect the body in many ways. () En Español View all related publications Related NIDA Notes Articles Adolescent ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Evaluation Roadblocks 1A. Focus On: Walking Through the Steps and Standards 2. Getting Started 3. Describing and Focusing 3A. Focus ... your metered dose inhaler. Print the step-by-step instructions and keep them with your ... dose inhaler one to two inches from mouth Your browser does not support ...

  1. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Spinal Anesthesia with Marcaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.R. Rabani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The efficacy of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL in the treatment of renal stones has been proven in its indications. The main method of anesthesia in this procedure is general anesthesia. We used spinal anesthesia (SA as an alternative method of anesthesia with many benefits. This study was intended to show the possibility of SA as a more comfortable method of anesthesia for the surgeon , the anesthesiologist and the patient via more cooperation of the patient during changing the position and prevention of some complications mostly in upper extremities and neck. Materials & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial study, a total of 112 patients underwent PCNL under SA with marcaine , from Nov 2004 till Feb 2009. Their mean age was 36 years (22-48, at first the syringe was stained by epinephrine and then 2 -3.5 ml marcaine was used for SA and addition of analgesics , sedatives or both., if needed. The rest of the procedure was done as routine.Results: Stone clearance was achieved in 82% of the patients and the rest were managed by ESWL. The mean operation time was 126 minutes (90-220, 36% of the patients needed sedation, analgesia, or both, specially those with bigger stones. 6% of the patients had upper pole stones .Blood transfusion was needed only in one patient. No significant complication was observed in this study.Conclusion: PCNL under SA afforded the surgeon and the anesthesiologist the opportunity of more patient cooperation during position changes and precludes some morbidities that may happen under general anesthesia because the patient is awake and able to portend.

  2. Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics and sedation. ... Libyan Journal of Medicine ... evaluated the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, sedpain, and compared them with those of saline infusion.

  3. 76 FR 16796 - Pediatric Anesthesia Safety Initiative (PASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... central nervous system, as well as memory and learning deficits. Anesthetic agents that have been... of anesthesia and sedation, including stakeholders from industry, professional organizations... aforementioned experts in the fields of anesthesia and sedation, including stakeholders from industry...

  4. Inhalant Dependence and its Medical Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hamid Boztaş

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The term of inhalants is used for matters easily vapors. Inhalants are preferred for rapid, positive reinforcement and mild high effects. Products including inhalants are cheap, accessible, legal substances and are prevalently used in community. The prevalence of inhalant use in secondary schools in Turkey is about 5.1%. Inhalant substance dependence is generally observed within 14-15 age group. Age at first use could be as low as 5 to 6 years of age. Substance dependence is more probable in adults working in substance existing places. Inhalant usage is common in disadvantaged groups, children living in street, people with history of crimes, prison, depression, suicide, antisocial attitudes and conflict of family, history of abuse, violence and any other drug dependence and isolated populations. Inhalants are absorbed from lungs, after performing their quick and short effect metabolized by cytochrom P450 enzyme system except inhalant nitrites group which has a depressing effect like alcohol. In chronic use general atrophy, ventricular dilatation and wide sulcus were shown in cerebrum, cerebellum and pons by monitoring brain. Defects are mostly in periventricular, subcortical regions and in white matter. Demyelinization, hyperintensity, callosal slimming and wearing off in white and gray matter margins was also found. Ravages of brain shown by brain monitorisation are more and serious in inhalant dependence than in other dependences. It is important to decrease use of inhalants. Different approaches should be used for subcultures and groups in prevention. Prohibiting all the matters including inhalant is not practical as there are too many substances including inhalants. Etiquettes showing harmful materials can be used but this approach can also lead the children and adolescents recognize these substances easily.. Despite determintal effects of inhalant dependence, there are not yet sufficient number of studies conducted on prevention and

  5. Spinal Anesthesia in a Patient with Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Simsek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma, a multisystem connective tissue disease and etiology is still unclear. In the pathogenesis, it is charcterized by increased fibroblast proliferation with activation of immunological mechanisms and accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Patients might have anesthesia-related potential problems because many systems affected and have functional disorders due to accumulation of collagen. For this reason, anesthetic management is extremely important. A careful preoperative evaluation is essential. In this article, we will be discuss in the light of the literature a cachectic 60-year-old female patient who had urethral polyp excision with scleroderma applied spinal anesthesia.

  6. Effect of wood combustion smoke inhalation on angiotensin-1-converting enzyme in the dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizio-Molteni, L.; Piano, G.; Rice, P.L.; Warpeha, R.; Fresco, R.; Solliday, N.H.; Molteni, A.

    One lung of each dog was exposed to smoke from burning pine wood, while the other was subjected to acute hypoxia. Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in biopsied tissue of the smoke-exposed lung was markedly increased immediately after the injury and even higher 30 minutes later. No change in ACE activity was observed in the hypoxic contralateral lung. Serum ACE activity did not change significantly following anesthesia and before smoke inhalation. Serum aldosterone and cortisol levels increased at this juncture. Smoke inhalation caused intra-alveolar hemorrhages and edema. Pulmonary and systolic, diastolic and mean pressures, pulmonary capillary, wedge pressure, cardiac output and systemic and pulmonary arteriolar resistances remained unchanged throughout the experiment. The changes of ACE activity are presumably a direct effect of smoke inhalation. They are seen as an early response of the lung endothelial cells to many types of injury (chronic hypoxia, bleomycin or monocrotaline administration) and may represent an important step in the development of the organ's response to the injury.

  7. PERIPHERAL BLOCK ANESTHESIA OF UPPER EXTREMITY AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Tapar; Mustafa Suren; Ziya Kaya; Semih Arici; Serkan Karaman; Mursel Kahveci

    2012-01-01

    Successful peripheral blocks and selection of appropriate technique according to surgery is possible with a good knowledge of anatomy. Regional peripheral block anesthesia of upper extremity which applied by single injection to plexus brachialis is the most recommended method of anesthesia in daily surgical procedures. The most important advantages of peripheral nerve blocks which are type of regional anesthesia according to general anesthesia and central blocks are less effect ...

  8. Comparison of three different inhalant anesthetic agents (isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane) in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granone, Tiffany D; de Francisco, Olga N; Killos, Maria B; Quandt, Jane E; Mandsager, Ron E; Graham, Lynelle F

    2012-01-01

    To compare isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane for inhalant anesthesia in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) in terms of the speed and characteristics of induction; cardiovascular and respiratory parameters while anesthetized; and speed and quality of recovery. Prospective, cross over, randomized experimental study. 12 healthy adult red-tailed hawks. Anesthesia was induced with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane in oxygen via face mask in a crossover, randomized design with a 1 week washout period between each treatment. Hawks were tracheally intubated, allowed to breathe spontaneously, and instrumented for cardiopulmonary monitoring. Data collected included heart rate, respiratory rate, end-tidal CO(2) , inspired and expired agent, SpO(2,) temperature, systolic blood pressure, time to intubation and time to recovery (tracking). Recovery was subjectively scored on a 4 point scale as well as a summary evaluation, by a single blinded observer. No significant difference in time to induction and time to extubation was noted with the administration of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Time to the ability of the bird to follow a moving object with its eyes (tracking) was significantly faster with the administration of sevoflurane and desflurane. All recoveries were scored 1 or 2 and were assessed as good to excellent. No significant difference was noted in heart rate, blood pressure and temperature among the three inhalants. Administration of isoflurane resulted in lower respiratory rates. Overall, although isoflurane remains the most common inhaled anesthetic in avian practice, sevoflurane and desflurane both offer faster time to tracking, while similar changes in cardiopulmonary function were observed with each agent during anesthesia of healthy red-tailed hawks. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  9. Single-tooth anesthesia: pressure-sensing technology provides innovative advancement in the field of dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Mark N

    2007-04-01

    This article will review standard techniques for intraligamentary injection and describe the technology and technique behind a new single-tooth anesthesia system. This system and technique represents a technological advancement and a greater understanding of intraligamentary anesthesia.

  10. Inguinal hernioraphy under local anesthesia in the elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Kahramansoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The incidence of inguinal hernia and the frequencyof comorbidity increase in the elderly. Therefore,in operations of these patients, anesthesia methods areimportant. The aim of our study was to investigate the feasibilityof local anesthesia in the operation of the elderly.Materials and methods: The patients operated for inguinalhernia were analyzed retrospectively. They weredivided into two groups: the elderly (>60 years and theyounger. Anesthesia methods, additional anesthesia requirementand complications were compared.Results: Of totally 177 patients, 30.5% were elderly.Operation type, anesthesia method and score of operationalrisk differed between groups. The percentage of comorbidity (55.6% in the elderly was significantly high (p<0.001. Among elderly, the frequency of co morbidity wasslightly higher in patients who had local anesthesia comparedto spinal and general anesthesia. Patients in youngand middle ages preferred to be operated less under localanesthesia (34.1% compared to elderly (70.4%. Therewas one case (2.6% converted to general anesthesiaas an additional anesthesia in the elderly group. Postoperativecomplications were slight more frequent in elderly.These cases were five in number (31.3% and were operatedunder spinal or general anesthesia (p=0.002.Conclusions: The frequency of co morbidity and riskscore of operation (ASA category rise in the elderly.However, inguinal hernioraphy can be performed underlocal anesthesia without complication and conversion togeneral anesthesia.Key words: Inguinal hernia; aged; comorbidity; local anesthesia

  11. Nurse Anesthetists' Perceptions Regarding Utilization of Anesthesia Support Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Mary Bryant

    2010-01-01

    Anesthesia support personnel (ASP) provide direct support to health care providers administering anesthesia (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists [CRNAs] and anesthesiologists). Because these anesthesia providers are caring for a patient whom they cannot legally or ethically leave unattended, ASP are employed to bring them extra supplies or…

  12. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to a...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5170 - Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator. 868... topical anesthesia applicator. (a) Identification. A laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator is a device used to apply topical anesthetics to a patient's laryngotracheal area. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  15. Outcome after regional anesthesia: weighing risks and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Regional anesthesia has become a widely used method to provide intraoperative anesthesia, and postoperative analgesia. This review seeks to address the question whether patient outcomes are improved to an extent that justifies using regional anesthesia as a routine method. During the past decade, a

  16. 21 CFR 868.5130 - Anesthesia conduction filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction filter. 868.5130 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5130 Anesthesia conduction filter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction filter is a microporous filter used while administering to a patient...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional, or...

  18. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral, and...

  19. 42 CFR 482.52 - Condition of participation: Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Anesthesia services... Optional Hospital Services § 482.52 Condition of participation: Anesthesia services. If the hospital furnishes anesthesia services, they must be provided in a well-organized manner under the direction of a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5150 - Anesthesia conduction needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction needle. 868.5150 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5150 Anesthesia conduction needle. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction needle is a device used to inject local anesthetics into a patient to...

  1. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study was to inve...

  2. Experience with caudal block regional anesthesia for transurethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that caudal anesthesia with 2% xylocaine with 1 in 80,000 adrenaline gives adequate anesthesia for transurethral resection of the prostate gland. Keywords: Caudal regional anesthesia, Turp. Résumé Quatre vingt quinze patients consécutifs avec lobliteration hypertrophie prostatique exigent d' être opéré ont ...

  3. [YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgar, Serkan; Selvi, Onur; Serifsoy, Talat Ercan; Senturk, Ozgur; Ozer, Zeliha

    Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1) evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2) was designed for evaluating patient information. After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p>0.05). Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87±4.28 vs. 5.84±2.90, p=0.044 and 3.89±5.43 vs. 1.19±3.35, p=0.01 respectively). Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Tulgar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. Material and method A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1 evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2 was designed for evaluating patient information. Results After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p > 0.05. There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p > 0.05. Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87 ± 4.28 vs. 5.84 ± 2.90, p = 0.044 and 3.89 ± 5.43 vs. 1.19 ± 3.35, p = 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions.

  5. Quality and Safety of General Anesthesia with Propofol and Sevoflurane in Children Aged 1-14 Based on Laboratory Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanis-Vatrenjak, Selma; Mesic, Amira; Abdagic, Ines; Mujezinovic, Djenita; Zvizdic, Zlatan

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of anatomic, physiological, biochemical and physical characteristics of children of all age groups, the existing illness and possible pathological response of the organism to the existing situation, require a pediatric anesthesiologist to participate in the preparation of a child for surgical treatment, to choose the best anesthesia technique and medications, and manipulative techniques to enable the scheduled surgical treatment with minimum anesthesia risks. The aim of this clinical study was to prove reliability and quality of propofol or sevoflurane general anesthesia in children in the age group of 1-14 years from the ASA I group and in the elective surgical treatments in duration of 60 minutes, based on preoperative and postoperative levels of laboratory findings (transaminases, blood sugar, urea and creatinine). the study included 160 patients randomized in two groups based on different approaches: total intravenous anesthesia was used for the propofol group (n=80) (TIVA) and the inhalation technique was used for the sevoflurane group (n=80). statistical evaluation of the obtained results indicates stability of laboratory findings in the immediate postoperative course (after 24 hours) in respect to the preoperative period. Based on the Mann Whitney test (P), preoperative and postoperative blood sugar levels in the sevoflurane vs. propofol group were P=0.152 vs. 0.021; creatinine levels P=0.113 vs. 0.325; urea levels P= 0.016 vs. 0.900; AST levels P=0,031 vs. 0,268 and ALT levels P=0.021 vs. 0.058. Level of significance was Psecurity and quality of general anesthesia in children age group 1-14 years, from the ASA I group. All analyzed laboratory levels in the postoperative course remained in their referential values in both groups of participants.

  6. Tamsulosin-induced severe hypotension during general anesthesia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Fauzia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tamsulosin, a selective α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR antagonist, is a widely prescribed first-line agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH. Its interaction with anesthetic agents has not been described. Case presentation We report the case of 54-year-old Asian man undergoing elective left thyroid lobectomy. The only medication the patient was taking was tamsulosin 0.4 mg for the past year for BPH. He developed persistent hypotension during the maintenance phase of anesthesia while receiving oxygen, nitrous oxide and 1% isoflurane. The hypotension could have been attributable to a possible interaction between inhalational anesthetic and tamsulosin. Conclusion Vigilance for unexpected hypotension is important in surgical patients who are treated with selective α1-AR blockers. If hypotension occurs, vasopressors that act directly on adrenergic receptors could be more effective.

  7. [Choice of components and a method of anesthesia in geriatric cancer patients with high cardiovascular risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoronenko, V E; Osipova, N A; Shemetova, M M; Edeleva, N V

    2009-01-01

    Investigations were made at surgical treatment stages in 102 cancer patients (mean age 72 +/- 5.8 years) at high cardiovascular risk, who received continuous therapy that reduced heart rate and blood pressure, in order to compensate for the course of coronary heart disease and arterial hypertension. The time course of changes in the major circulatory and metabolic parameters was analyzed in patients during operations on the abdomen and small pelvis while using three different multimodal anesthetic techniques (general intravenous anesthesia-based diazepam, propofol, fentanyl, ketamine; sevofluorane-based inhalational; combined epidural and intravenous one). The advantages and limitations of the above methods were shown in patients on cardio- and vasotropic therapies. Correcting modes (transesophageal atrial pacing, morning-dose drug withdrawal) for its possible related bradycardiac and hypotensive disorders, which reduce a risk of perioperative cardiovascular complications, are set forth.

  8. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  9. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding...

  10. Anesthesia: A Topic for Interdisciplinary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary approach for teaching the topic of anesthesia as one aspect of a chemistry-oriented course for nonscience majors which focuses on timely topics such as the energy crisis and drugs. Historical treatment with the examination of literature is emphasized in teaching. (HM)

  11. Syringe-delivered tumescent anesthesia made easier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapid, Oren

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for the infiltration of tumescent anesthesia is presented. An assembly is made using an infusion set, a three-way tap, and two unidirectional valves. The assembly and use of this system are straightforward and easy. The addition of unidirectional valves prevents the risk of reverse

  12. Testing haptic sensations for spinal anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    Having identified key determinants of teaching and learning spinal anesthesia, it was necessary to characterize and render the haptic sensations (feeling of touch) associated with needle insertion in the lower back. The approach used is to match recreated sensations (eg, "pop" through skin or dura mater) with experts\\' perceptions of the equivalent clinical events.

  13. The Biochemical Impact of Surgery and Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Hol (Jaap Willem)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ General anesthesia has been considered by some medical historians as one of the most important contributions to modern medicine second to perhaps the concept of antiseptic medicine and hygiene. The first historical mention of a deep unnatural sleep so that surgery

  14. [Anesthesia and Alzheimer disease - Current perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ana Filipa Vieira da Silva Ferreira; Lapa, Teresa Alexandra Santos Carvalho

    It has been speculated that the use of anesthetic agents may be a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer disease. The objective of this review is to describe and discuss pre-clinical and clinical data related to anesthesia and this disease. Alzheimer disease affects about 5% of the population over 65 years old, with age being the main risk factor and being associated with a high morbidity. Current evidence questions a possible association between anesthesia, surgery, and long-term cognitive effects, including Alzheimer disease. Although data from some animal studies suggest an association between anesthesia and neurotoxicity, this link remains inconclusive in humans. We performed a review of the literature in which we selected scientific articles in the PubMed database, published between 2005 and 2016 (one article from 1998 due to its historical relevance), in English, which address the possible relationship between anesthesia and Alzheimer disease. 49 articles were selected. The possible relationship between anesthetic agents, cognitive dysfunction, and Alzheimer disease remains to be clarified. Prospective cohort studies or randomized clinical trials for a better understanding of this association will be required. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimizing anesthesia techniques in the ambulatory setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Galvin (Eilish)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAmbulatory surgery refers to the process of admitting patients, administering anesthesia and surgical care, and discharging patients home following an appropriate level of recovery on the same day. The word ambulatory is derived from the latin word ambulare, which means ''to walk''. This

  16. Human mediotemporal EEG characteristics during propofol anesthesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fell, J.; Widman, G.; Rehberg, B.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for a response-control-related kind of declarative memory during deep propofol anesthesia has recently been reported. Connectivity within the mediotemporal lobe (MTL), and in particular rhinal-hippocampal synchronization within the gamma band, has been shown to be crucial for declarative

  17. General anesthesia for horses with specific problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, D.S.; Dunlop, C.I.

    1990-01-01

    We have discussed anesthetic techniques, special considerations, and expected complications involved in anesthetizing horses for abdominal, orthopedic, and head and neck surgery, and myelography and have described expected physiologic dysfunction that may require changes in anesthetic technique or supportive measures. The objective is high-quality patient care and reduction in anesthesia-related morbidity and death

  18. Side effects and complications of intraosseous anesthesia and conventional oral anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier; Oltra-Moscardó, María J.; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the side effects and complications following intraosseous anesthesia (IA), comparing them with those of the conventional oral anesthesia techniques. Material and method: A simple-blind, prospective clinical study was carried out. Each patient underwent two anesthetic techniques: conventional (local infiltration and locoregional anesthetic block) and intraosseous, for respective dental operations. In order to allow comparison of IA versus conventional anesthesia, the two operations were similar and affected the same two teeth in opposite quadrants. Heart rate was recorded in all cases before injection of the anesthetic solution and again 30 seconds after injection. The complications observed after anesthetic administration were recorded. Results: A total of 200 oral anesthetic procedures were carried out in 100 patients. Both IA and conventional anesthesia resulted in a significant increase in heart rate, though the increase was greater with the latter technique. Incidents were infrequent with either anesthetic technique, with no significant differences between them. Regarding the complications, there were significant differences in pain at the injection site, with more intense pain in the case of IA (x2=3.532, p=0.030, Φ2=0.02), while the limitation of oral aperture was more pronounced with conventional anesthesia (x2=5.128, p<0.05, Φ2=0.014). Post-anesthetic biting showed no significant differences (x2=4.082, p=0.121, Φ2=0.009). Conclusions: Both anesthetic techniques significantly increased heart rate, and IA caused comparatively more pain at the injection site, while limited oral aperture was more frequent with conventional anesthesia. Post-anesthetic biting showed no significant differences between the two techniques. Key words:Intraosseous anesthesia, oral anesthesia, mandibular block, heart rate, adrenalin, complications. PMID:22143716

  19. Anesthesia Providers’ Perspectives Regarding Parental Presence During Anesthesia Induction: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    was to ascertain anesthesia providers’ perspectives regarding parental presence during anesthesia induction. The work of Dr. John Bowlby (1973) laid...their parental surrogates. Bowlby looked at how orphans bonded with nurses and staff members. He found that children of all ages formed strong...during episodes of extreme stress only amplifies that stress ( Bowlby , 1973). Bowlby studied post World War II orphans in England and observed the

  20. Correlation of bupivacaine 0.5% dose and conversion from spinal anesthesia to general anesthesia in cesarean sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seljogi, D; Wolff, A P; Scheffer, G J; van Geffen, G J; Bruhn, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Failed spinal anesthesia for cesarean sections may require conversion to general anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administered spinal bupivacaine dose for performing a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia was related to the conversion rate to general

  1. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants after General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study - A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCANN, M.E.; Withington, Davinia E.; Arnup, Sarah J.; Davidson, Andrew J.; DISMA, N.; FRAWLEY, G.; Morton, Neil S.; BELL, G.; Hunt, Rodney W.; Bellinger, David C; Polaner, D. M.; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Absalom, Anthony R.; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Izzo, Francesca; Szmuk, Peter; Young, Vanessa; Soriano, S. G.; De Graaff, J. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/249966271

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  2. Inhaler devices for patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, James B; Colice, Gene L; Hodder, Rick

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) continues to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality risk in spite of updated guidelines and a better understanding of this condition. Progressive airflow limitation and resultant hyperinflation-the respiratory hallmarks of this complex and often under-diagnosed disease-can be treated with pharmacotherapies emitted via nebulizers, pressurized metered-dose inhalers, dry powder inhalers, or a Soft Mist inhaler. Pharmaceutical company proprietary issues, technological innovations, and societal pressure have expanded the list of available inhalers, with a limited range of medications available for any one device. Each device has different operating and maintenance instructions, and successful use of a given drug/device combination requires that patients understand, maintain, and use each of their devices properly in order to ensure consistent and optimal pulmonary drug delivery. Clinicians are faced with a range of physical and psychosocial issues unique to each patient with COPD that must be overcome in order to match a suitable inhaler to the individual. Improved drug delivery afforded by next-generation inhalers, coupled with an awareness of device-specific and patient-specific variables affecting inhaler use, may improve clinical outcomes in the treatment of COPD.

  3. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  4. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  5. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alister U.; Sanchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Collado, Paloma; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odors and whether they can be investigated under anesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odor smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odor under anesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes) electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odor was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odor during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odor. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50%) of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odors prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odor many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odors as well as in evoked glutamate and GABA

  6. Spinal anesthesia in children: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even after a vast safety record, the role of spinal anesthesia (SA as a primary anesthetic technique in children remains contentious and is mainly limited to specialized pediatric centers. It is usually practiced on moribund former preterm infants (<60 weeks post-conception to reduce the incidence of post-operative apnea when compared to general anesthesia (GA. However, there is ample literature to suggest its safety and efficacy for suitable procedures in older children as well. SA in children has many advantages as in adults with an added advantage of minimal cardio-respiratory disturbance. Recently, several reports from animal studies have raised serious concerns regarding the harmful effects of GA on young developing brain. This may further increase the utility of SA in children as it provides all components of balanced anesthesia technique. Also, SA can be an economical option for countries with finite resources. Limited duration of surgical anesthesia in children is one of the major deterrents for its widespread use in them. To overcome this, several additives like epinephrine, clonidine, fentanyl, morphine, neostigmine etc. have been used and found to be effective even in neonates. But, the developing spinal cord may also be vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, though this has not been systematically evaluated in children. So, adjuvants and drugs with widest therapeutic index should be preferred in children. Despite its widespread use, incidence of side-effects is low and permanent neurological sequalae have not been reported with SA. Literature yields encouraging results regarding its safety and efficacy. Technical skills and constant vigilance of experienced anesthesia providers is indispensable to achieve good results with this technique.

  7. Using digital media to keep anesthesia history alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rafael A; Rengasamy, Sundara K

    2005-01-01

    Multimedia applications have been developed to explain many aspects of anesthesiology, including anesthesia machines, cardiopulmonary bypass systems, airway management, anesthetic pharmacology, regional anesthesia, and more recently, the history of the specialty. This article describes how computer-assisted instruction and multimedia have made it possible for an anesthesia department in a teaching hospital to become involved in the preservation, publication, and distribution of historically related anesthesia materials. The production of a digital video disc (DVD) based on the career of Leroy D. Vandam is discussed to illustrate the value of digital media in preserving, rejuvenating, and distributing anesthesia-related historical materials.

  8. Postoperative Visual Analog Pain Scores and Overall Anesthesia Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tony; Seipel, Scott J; Coyle, Nina; Ortega, Keri H; DeJesus, Ozzie

    2017-12-01

    Patient satisfaction is evolving into an important measure of high-quality health care and anesthesia care is no exception. Pain management is an integral part of anesthesia care and must be assessed to determine patient satisfaction; therefore, it is a measure for quality of care. One issue is how patients reflect individual experiences into their overall anesthesia experience. There is a need to identify how postoperative pain scores correlate with anesthesia patient satisfaction survey results. Postoperative pain is not a dominant measure in determining anesthesia patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effective bolus dose of remifentanil to facilitate laryngeal mask airway insertion during inhalation induction of sevoflurane in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuckgoo; Jung, Sung Mee; Park, Sang-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The additional administration of remifentanil during inhalation induction with sevoflurane could provide better conditions for laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion than sevoflurane alone. This study was designed to evaluate the 50 % effective bolus dose (ED50) and 95 % effective bolus dose (ED95) of remifentanil required for LMA insertion in children during inhalation induction with sevoflurane. Pediatric patients aged 3-12 years requiring general anesthesia were recruited. A predetermined dose of remifentanil was injected over 30 s after the induction of general anesthesia with sevoflurane. LMA insertion was attempted 60 s after remifentanil injection. The dose of remifentanil was determined using the Dixon's up-and-down method, starting from 0.5 μg/kg (step size of 0.05 μg/kg). The study was conducted until seven cross-over points and 29 children were collected. The ED50 of remifentanil for successful LMA insertion during sevoflurane inhalation induction in children was 0.168 ± 0.035 μg/kg using Dixon's method. In addition, the ED50 and ED95 of remifentanil from the probit analysis were 0.176 μg/kg (95 % confidence limits, 0.102-0.216 μg/kg) and 0.268 μg/kg (95 % confidence limits, 0.223-0.659 μg/kg), respectively. The ED50 and ED95 of remifentanil for successful LMA insertion in children were estimated to be 0.176 (0.168) and 0.268 μg/kg during inhalation induction with 2.1 % sevoflurane.

  10. Inhaled actinides: some safety issues and some research problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: limited research funds; risk coefficients for inhaled particles; the hot particle hypothesis; the Gofman-Martell contention; critical tissues for inhaled actinides inhalation hazards associated with future nuclear fuel cycles; and approach to be used by the inhalation panel

  11. Robotic anesthesia: not the realm of science fiction any more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Terrasini, Nora

    2012-12-01

    Robots are present in surgery, to a much lesser extent in the field of anesthesia. The purpose of this review is to show the latest and most important findings in robotic anesthesia. Moreover, this review argues the importance and utility of robots in anesthesia. Over the years, many closed-loop systems have been developed; they were able to control only one or two of the three components of anesthesia: hypnosis, analgesia, or muscle relaxation. McSleepy controls all three components of anesthesia, from induction to emergence of anesthesia. Telemedical applications have not only led to remote monitoring but even to remotely controlled anesthesia, such as transcontinental anesthesia. A new closed-loop system for sedation, called Sedasys, could revolutionize the field of nonoperating room sedation. 'Manual robots' are used to help and replace anesthesiologists performing anesthesia procedures. Specific robots for intubation and nerve blocks have been developed and tested in humans. Robots can improve performance in anesthesia and healthcare. Closed-loop systems are the basis for pharmacological robots. Safe anesthetic care might be delivered through teleanesthesia whenever qualified personnel are not available or need support. Mechanical robots are being developed for anesthesia care.

  12. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, G; Fareed, W M; Zafar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003), and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine), and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine) are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  13. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gazal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003, and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine, and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  14. When Only Buccal Anesthesia Was Done for Maxillary Teeth Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay Isik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Recently, some authors reported that maxillary teeth could be extracted without using palatal anesthesia, but they did not clearly specify the extracted teeth. This is important, because apparently the local anesthetic solution infiltrates the maxilla and achieves a sufficient anesthesia in the palatal side. Thus, thickness of the bone may affect the depth of anesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare the depth of anesthesia in different parts of the maxilla when only a buccal infiltration anesthesia was done. Patients and Method. The maxilla was divided into anterior, premolar, and molar regions. In each region, 15 teeth were extracted with a single buccal infiltration. The patient marked the pain level on a numerical rating scale. Results. Anesthesia depth was sufficient and was not significantly different (>0.05 among three maxillary regions. Conclusion. Except for surgical interventions, all maxillary teeth can be extracted using only a buccal infiltration anesthesia.

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by ... you to do and by avoiding things that can cause an attack. Watch a video to follow ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Facts Guidance on Spirometry Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers ... Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community Guide—Evidence-based Potentially Effective Interventions Background ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Facts Guidance on Spirometry Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers ... Breathing Easier Success Stories State Contacts and Programs Evaluation Evaluation Guide Evaluation Webinars 1. Avoiding Evaluation Roadblocks ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent Asthma Data Most Recent Asthma State ... 1 Table 4-2 Reports and Publications Asthma Surveillance Summaries MMWR Publications NCHS Reports and Publications Related ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control ...

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Controlling Tools for Control Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers ... Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma Care Training Wee Wheezers Adventures of Puff Inner City Asthma ...

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Asthma & Community Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent Asthma Data Most Recent ... care for people with asthma NACP Grantee Profile Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical Information ...

  4. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook ... Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, ...

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional tells you ... keep them with your Asthma Action Plan. Using a metered dose inhaler with a spacer Your browser ...

  6. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . ... Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ...

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... on Spirometry Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... Mixed Methods 5. Purpose Informs Design Other Evaluation Resources Multimedia ... USA.gov TOP

  8. Health risks associated with inhaled nasal toxicants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, VJ; Arts, JHE; Kuper, CF; Slootweg, PJ; Woutersen, RA

    2001-01-01

    Health risks of inhaled nasal toxicants were reviewed with emphasis on chemically induced nasal lesions in humans, sensory irritation, olfactory and trigeminal nerve toxicity, nasal immunopathology and carcinogenesis, nasal responses to chemical mixtures, in vitro models, and nasal dosimetry- and

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... and Publications Related Articles, Publications, and Links Asthma’s Impact on the Nation Fact Sheet State Data Profiles ( ... How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma ...

  10. Pharmacologic Considerations for Pediatric Sedation and Anesthesia Outside the Operating Room: A Review for Anesthesia and Non-Anesthesia Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Kraus, Molly; Trentman, Terrence

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the pharmacologic options for pediatric sedation outside the operating room will allow practitioners to formulate an ideal anesthetic plan, allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. The authors identified relevant medical literature by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases for English language publications covering a period from 1984 to 2017. Search terms included pediatric anesthesia, pediatric sedation, non-operating room sedation, sedation safety, and pharmacology. As a narrative review of common sedation/anesthesia options, the authors elected to focus on studies, reviews, and case reports that show clinical relevance to modern day sedation/anesthesia practice. A variety of pharmacologic agents are available for sedation/anesthesia in pediatrics, including midazolam, fentanyl, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, etomidate, and propofol. Dosing ranges reported are a combination of what is discussed in the reviewed literature and text books along with personal recommendations based on our own practice. Several reports reveal that ketofol (a combination of ketamine and propofol) is quite popular for short, painful procedures. Fospropofol is a newer-generation propofol that may confer advantages over regular propofol. Remimazolam combines the pharmacologic effects of remifentanil and midazolam. A variety of etomidate derivatives such as methoxycarbonyl-etomidate, carboetomidate, methoxycarbonyl-carboetomidate, and cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl metomidate are in development stages. The use of nitrous oxide as a mild sedative, analgesic, and amnestic agent is gaining popularity, especially in the ambulatory setting. Utilizing a dedicated and experienced team to provide sedation enhances safety. Furthermore, limiting sedation plans to single-agent pharmacy appears to be safer than using multi-agent plans.

  11. Single tooth anesthesia versus conventional anesthesia: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Vincenzo; Libonati, Antonio; Nardi, Roberto; Angotti, Vincenzo; Gallusi, Gianni; Montemurro, Edoardo; D'Amario, Maurizio; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2018-03-10

    The aim of the present study was to compare an electronic device, the Wand Injection System (Milestone Scientific Livingstone), with conventional anesthesia in terms of the following: pain sensation during anesthetic injection; effectiveness in achieving adequate anesthesia for a complete painless dental treatment; post-operative discomfort; and patient's anxiety toward dental treatment. Eighty adults from 18 to 70 years were enrolled in this cross-over study. Each patient served as his/her own control being subject to two anesthesia techniques: conventional and Single Tooth Anesthesia (STA) performed with the Wand. A split-mouth design was adopted in which each tooth undergoing conservative restorative or endodontic treatment received anesthesia with both techniques at 1-week interval. Before anesthetic administration, the patients' anxiety levels were determined. Physiological parameteres were measured before, during, and after the two injection procedures, and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to assess pain of injection, discomfort, and anesthetic efficacy. Differences in assessment of pain's injection, discomfort, anesthetic efficacy, vital parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation), and state anxiety levels were analyzed using Student's t test (p value < 0.001). The mean injection pain and post-operative discomfort ratings with Wand were lower than those with conventional syringe (p = 0.022 and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were found in the assessment of anesthetic efficacy. Blood pressure and heart rate mean values were lower during the anesthesia performed with the Wand than with the conventional syringe (p < 0.001). The anxiety level was higher during the first appointment, independently from the device used for the injections. The STA technique resulted in lower pain, discomfort, and lower intensity of physiological parameters. Single Tooth Anesthesia could be an efficacious alternative to

  12. Comparative study between manual injection intraosseous anesthesia and conventional oral anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Oltra-Moscardó, María J.; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare intraosseous anesthesia (IA) with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques. Materials and methods: A simple-blind, prospective clinical study was carried out. Each patient underwent two anesthetic techniques: conventional (local infiltration and locoregional anesthetic block) and intraosseous, for res-pective dental operations. In order to allow comparison of IA versus conventional anesthesia, the two operations were similar and affected the same two teeth in opposite quadrants. Results: A total of 200 oral anesthetic procedures were carried out in 100 patients. The mean patient age was 28.6±9.92 years. Fifty-five vestibular infiltrations and 45 mandibular blocks were performed. All patients were also subjected to IA. The type of intervention (conservative or endodontic) exerted no significant influence (p=0.58 and p=0.62, respectively). The latency period was 8.52±2.44 minutes for the conventional techniques and 0.89±0.73 minutes for IA – the difference being statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding patient anesthesia sensation, the infiltrative techniques lasted a maximum of one hour, the inferior alveolar nerve blocks lasted between 1-3 hours, and IA lasted only 2.5 minutes – the differences being statistically significant (p≤0.0000, Φ=0.29). Anesthetic success was recorded in 89% of the conventional procedures and in 78% of the IA. Most patients preferred IA (61%) (p=0.0032). Conclusions: The two anesthetic procedures have been compared for latency, duration of anesthetic effect, anesthetic success rate and patient preference. Intraosseous anesthesia has been shown to be a technique to be taken into account when planning conservative and endodontic treatments. Key words: Anesthesia, intraosseous, oral anesthesia, Stabident®, infiltrative, mandibular block. PMID:22143700

  13. Visualization of murine intranasal dosing efficiency using luminescent Francisella tularensis: effect of instillation volume and form of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Miller

    Full Text Available Intranasal instillation is a widely used procedure for pneumonic delivery of drugs, vaccine candidates, or infectious agents into the respiratory tract of research mice. However, there is a paucity of published literature describing the efficiency of this delivery technique. In this report we have used the murine model of tularemia, with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (FTLVS infection, to evaluate the efficiency of pneumonic delivery via intranasal dosing performed either with differing instillation volumes or different types of anesthesia. FTLVS was rendered luminescent via transformation with a reporter plasmid that constitutively expressed the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon from a Francisella promoter. We then used an IVIS Spectrum whole animal imaging system to visualize FT dissemination at various time points following intranasal instillation. We found that instillation of FT in a dose volume of 10 µl routinely resulted in infection of the upper airways but failed to initiate infection of the pulmonary compartment. Efficient delivery of FT into the lungs via intranasal instillation required a dose volume of 50 µl or more. These studies also demonstrated that intranasal instillation was significantly more efficient for pneumonic delivery of FTLVS in mice that had been anesthetized with inhaled (isoflurane vs. parenteral (ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. The collective results underscore the need for researchers to consider both the dose volume and the anesthesia type when either performing pneumonic delivery via intranasal instillation, or when comparing studies that employed this technique.

  14. ARDS following inhalation of hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, D P; Ambegaonkar, Rahul; Radhika, P; Sharma, Manish

    2011-02-01

    The clinical spectrum of Inhalation injury can range from mild cough to a devastating ARDS. We herewith present a patient who is a goldsmith by occupation and his work consists of dissolving gold in Hydrochloric acid. He had accidentally inhaled fumes of Hydrochloric acid and presented with cough and breathlessness, later on required mechanical ventilation for ARDS and improved. This highlights the importance of not to neglect mild symptoms like cough and dyspnea in such a scenario which may have some hidden catastrophe.

  15. Inhaler devices - from theory to practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchis, Joaquin; Corrigan, Chris; Levy, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    This brief overview of the factors determining lung deposition of aerosols provides background information required by health care providers when instructing patients to use their prescribed inhalers. We discuss differences in the optimal inhalation manoeuvres for each type of aerosol generator...... and the difficulties patients face. Provision of short, clear instructions with demonstration of critical steps and checking technique during later clinical visits are necessary if these aerosolised medications are to be fully beneficial....

  16. The Toxicity of Inhaled Sulphur Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    investigated as a potential COTS treatment for HD-induced ALI. 30 Reportable Outcomes Manuscripts Fairhall SJ, Brown RFR , Jugg BJA, Smith AJ...countermeasures for inhaled sulfur mustard. CBD S&T 2011. Presentations Brown RFR . Preliminary studies of the effects of inhaled sulphur mustard in the...gelatinases in sulfur mustard-induced acute airway injury in guinea pigs. Am J Physiol. 276(5:1): L754-762. Fairhall SJ, Brown RFR , Jugg BJA, Smith

  17. Assessing inhalation injury in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract injuries caused by inhalation of smoke or chemical products are related to significant morbidity and mortality. While many strategies have been built up to manage cutaneous burn injuries, few logical diagnostic strategies for patients with inhalation injuries exist and almost all treatment is supportive. The goals of initial management are to ensure that the airway allows adequate oxygenation and ventilation and to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury and substances that may complicate subsequent care. Intubation should be considered if any of the following signs exist: respiratory distress, stridor, hypoventilation, use of accessory respiratory muscles, blistering or edema of the oropharynx, or deep burns to the face or neck. Any patients suspected to have inhalation injuries should receive a high concentration of supplemental oxygen to quickly reverse hypoxia and to displace carbon monoxide from protein binding sites. Management of carbon monoxide and cyanide exposure in smoke inhalation patients remains controversial. Absolute indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy do not exist because there is a low correlation between carboxyhemoglobin levels and the severity of the clinical state. A cyanide antidote should be administered when cyanide poisoning is clinically suspected. Although an ideal approach for respiratory support of patients with inhalation injuries do not exist, it is important that they are supported using techniques that do not further exacerbate respiratory failure. A well-organized strategy for patients with inhalation injury is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  18. Anesthesia for cesarean section in pregnancies complicated by placenta previa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imarengiaye, Charles O.; Osaigbovo, Etinosa P.; Tudjegbe, Sampson O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the factors affecting the choice of anesthetic technique for cesarean section in women with placenta previa. In this retrospective study, the records of the labor Ward Theatre of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria were examined from January 2000 to December 2004 to identify all the women who had cesarean section for placenta previa. The patient's socio-demographic characteristics, type of placenta previa, anesthesia technique, estimated blood loss, maternal and fetal outcomes were recorded. One hundred and twenty-six patients had cesarean section for placenta previa, however, only 81 patients 64.3% were available for analysis. General anesthesia was administered to 52/81 patients 64.2% and 29/81 patients 35.8% received spinal anesthesia. A history of antepartum bleeding was recorded in 61.7% n=50. Of 31 patients without antepartum hemorrhage APH, 15/31 had general anesthesia and 16/31 had spinal anesthesia. The patients who had APH, 37/50 had general anesthesia and 1/50 had spinal anesthesia. There was an increased chance of using general anesthesia and if APH were present p=0.03, odds ratio=3.1, 95% confidence interval=1.2-7.7. Spinal anesthesia may useful in patients with placenta previa. The presence of APH may encourage the use of general anesthesia for cesarean delivery. (author)

  19. Thyroid and parathyroid surgery performed with patient under regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, A W; Brown, E; Hamburger, S W

    1988-04-01

    Thyroid and parathyroid surgery is usually performed with the patient under general anesthesia; however, for selected patients regional anesthesia may be preferable. Between September 1977 and March 1986 regional anesthesia was used successfully as the sole anesthetic technique in 17 patients who underwent thyroid surgery and two patients who underwent parathyroid surgery. Procedures included two total thyroidectomies, 14 lobectomies or lobectomies with isthmusectomies, and one isthmusectomy. These 17 operations represent approximately 5% of the thyroid operations performed by the senior surgeon over the corresponding time. One patient underwent combined completion thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy, and another patient underwent successful parathyroidectomy under regional anesthesia. In two additional patients, procedures could not be completed under regional anesthesia alone. In one of these two patients regional anesthesia appeared to effect a transient recurrent nerve paralysis. The indications for use of regional anesthesia have been primarily patient preference and associated cardiac or pulmonary disease. We now consider as contraindications to regional anesthesia patient apprehension about the technique, deafness, high spinal cord injury, recurrent laryngeal or phrenic nerve palsy, and allergy to local anesthesia. During this period, from 1977 to 1986, our administration of regional anesthesia has evolved from bilateral deep and superficial cervical plexus blocks to bilateral superficial blocks alone using bupivacaine with epinephrine, 1:200,000.

  20. Preoperative anesthesia clinic in Japan: a nationwide survey of the current practice of preoperative anesthesia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Shimamoto, Saki; Matsuda, Megumi; Kageyama, Kyoko; Sawa, Teiji

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the current practice of preoperative anesthesia assessment in Japan, we conducted a nationwide survey of the preoperative anesthesia clinic (PAC). A written questionnaire was sent to anesthesia teaching hospitals certified by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists. Completed questionnaires were received from 789 hospitals (response rate 62.5 %). PACs were conducted in 52.0 % of these hospitals and were more frequently implemented in large hospitals. Services covered by the PAC included medical history taking, physical examination, review of laboratory data, and obtaining informed consent. Majority of the anesthesiologists at hospitals that did not have a PAC responded that although they acknowledged that a PAC is necessary, they were unable to set one up. The main obstacle preventing establishment of the PAC was shortage of human resources. Half the anesthesia teaching hospitals in Japan use a PAC for preoperative assessment. At such hospitals, all the procedures required before anesthesia are performed in the clinic. Lack of human resources is the major obstacle preventing establishment of PACs in all hospitals.

  1. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB versus spinal anesthesia (SA in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001 and at discharge (P < 0.001 in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001, with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients.

  2. Anesthesia for myelomeningocele surgery in fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Juan Carlos; Alcalde, Juan Luis; Otayza, Felipe; Sepulveda, Waldo

    2017-07-01

    Administering anesthesia for prenatal repair of myelomeningocele reveals several issues that are unique to this new form of treatment. This includes issues such as fetal well-being, surgical conditions and monitoring, among others. Exploring, analyzing, and understanding the different variables that are involved will help us reduce the high level of risk associated with this surgery. This review provides a systematic approach to the issues that are faced by anesthesiologists during fetal surgery.

  3. Evaluation of a computerized anesthesia report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamper, Raffael Pereira Cezar; Torres, Marcelo Luís Abramides; Ferraz, Janice Leão; Neto, Silvio Mori; Holzhacker, Rafael; Shimada, Vanessa; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil, the use of information systems that allows filling out anesthesia reports automatically is still in its initial stages. The objective of this study was to validate an automated anesthesia record. This study was approved by the Ethics Commission of the institution; an industry-university partnership (Dixtal, São Paulo, Brazil and Universidade de São Paulo) was developed, and the study received a grant from FINEP (Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos do Ministério de Ciência e Tecnologia). The integration of hospital information systems for recovery of data regarding identification, preoperative evaluation, and laboratorial exams was the premise of this study. The applicability of the final version of the prototype of the automated system was evaluated by applying a semi-structured tool to 33 physicians, residents, and/or anesthesiologists during surgery procedures in 66 patients. Descriptive evaluation of the data was undertaken. The computerized system was considered reliable even for large surgeries by 81% of the participants. The majority of the anesthesiologists considered the prototype of great value for future studies and capable of meeting the requirements of anesthesia reports, bringing benefits for anesthesiologists, patients, and hospitals. The full use of the system requires training and some of its aspects can be improved. Validation of this prototype of a computerized system for elaboration of anesthesia reports showed the viability of this type of solution to help anesthesiologists in their daily tasks, increasing the reliability of the data. Besides, when evaluating the applicability, anesthesiologists considered that the prototype could be useful for patients, physicians, and hospitals. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. ANESTHESIA AND INTENSIVE CARE IN HEART RETRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we describe our own experience of anesthetic management and early intensive care of two patients after heart retransplantation. As shown in this article, preretransplant clinical condition (severity of organs dys- function influences on character of intra- and postoperative periods including duration of anesthesia, surgery, postoperative ventilation and ICU stay, intra- and postoperative bleeding, volume of blood product transfusion, infection complications, need in renal replacement therapy, selective LPS-adsorption and other therapeutic op- tions. 

  5. HEMODYNAMIC EFFECTS OF XENON ANESTHESIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bykov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at hemodynamic effects of xenon on operative interventions in children. Patients and methods: the study involved 30 5-17-year-old children – 10 (33.3% girls and 20 (66.7% boys with ASA score 1-3 admitted for surgical treatment. The children underwent endotracheal anesthesia with xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe:O2 = 60-65:30% and fentanyl (2.5‑3.5  mcg/kg per hour for the following operations: appendectomy – 10 (33.3% patients, herniotomy – 8 (26.7% patients, Ivanissevich procedure – 6 (20.0% patients, plastic surgery of posttraumatic defects of skin and soft tissues – 4 (13.3% patients, abdominal adhesiotomy – 2 (6.7% patients. Central hemodynamics was studied echocardiographically (Philips HD 11, the Netherlands using the Teichholz technique along the cephalocaudal axis (parasternal access. Results: the anesthesia was notable for hemodynamic stability during the operation: as a result, a statistically significant (p < 0.05 increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure by 10, 18 and 17%, respectively, was observed. Conclusion: the analysis demonstrated that xenon anesthesia improves lusitropic myocardial function statistically significantly increasing cardiac output by 12% by way of increasing stroke volume by 30%. 

  6. Ultrasound-guided ophthalmic regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, Steven; Palte, Howard D

    2016-12-01

    Needle-based and cannula-based eye blocks are 'blind' techniques prone to rare but serious complications. Ultrasound, an established adjunct for peripheral nerve block, may be beneficial for ophthalmic anesthesia application. The present review details the evolution of ultrasound-guided eye blocks, outlines safety issues, and reviews recent studies and editorial opinions. Ultrasound-assisted ophthalmic regional anesthesia allows imaging of key structures such as the globe, orbit, and optic nerve. Recent findings reveal that needle path is not reliably predictable by clinical evaluation. Needle tips are frequently found to be intraconal, extraconal, or transfixed in the muscle cone independent of the intended type of block. In addition, contemporary human and animal studies confirm that real-time observation of local anesthetic spread inside of the muscle cone correlates directly with block success. Ultrasound-guided ophthalmic regional anesthesia is evolving beyond simple visualization of the anatomy. Recent research emphasizes the imprecision of needle tip location without ultrasound and the key role of imaging local anesthetic dispersion. There is ongoing debate in the literature regarding the utility of routine ultrasound for eye blocks.

  7. Anesthesia Practices for Interventional Radiology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vari, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.vari@uniroma1.it [University La Sapienza, Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine (Italy); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Les Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Chef de Pôle, Imagerie (France)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeThe Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) prompted an initiative to frame the current European status of anesthetic practices for interventional radiology, in consideration of the current variability of IR suite settings, staffing and anesthetic practices reported in the literature and of the growing debate on sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists, in Europe.MethodsAnonymous online survey available to all European CIRSE members to assess IR setting, demographics, peri-procedural care, anesthetic management, resources and staffing, pain management, data collection, safety, management of emergencies and personal opinions on the role CIRSE should have in promoting anesthetic care for interventional radiology.ResultsPredictable differences between countries and national regulations were confirmed, showing how significantly many “local” factors (type and size of centers, the availability of dedicated inpatient bed, availability of anesthesia staff) can affect the routine practice and the expansion of IR as a subspecialty. In addition, the perception of the need for IR to acquire more sedation-related skills is definitely stronger for those who practice with the lowest availability of anesthesia care.ConclusionSignificant country variations and regulations along with a controversial position of the anesthesia community on the issue of sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists substantially represent the biggest drawbacks for the expansion of peri-procedural anesthetic care for IR and for potential initiatives at an European level.

  8. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses.

  9. [Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conangla, G; Rodríguez, L; Alonso-Tarrés, C; Avila, A; de la Campa, A G

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a usual commensal of skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, oral cavity and paranasal sinuses. Although it is usually considered to have low virulence, S. salivarius may cause life-threatening infections, particularly endocarditis. On the other hand, bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia is very rare, there being some reported cases caused by S. salivarius, S. mitis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We report a 57 year old man who developed meningitis symptoms within 10 h of an uncomplicated inguinal herniorrhaphy performed during spinal anesthesia. Cerebrospinal cultures grew S. salivarius sensitive to penicillin. The patient was successfully treated with penicillin G and left the hospital without sequelae. In the literature, bacterial meningitis due to S. salivarius is rarely reported. Of the 28 cases, 18 occurred after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or for spinal anesthesia, 5 occurred following a bacteriemia for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or intestinal neoplasia, and the other 5 in patients who had dural defects. We discuss the possible etiological causes of the meningitis due to S. salivarius cases reports. The early recognition of this entity and the aseptic precautions likely to reduce the incidence of infectious complications after lumbar puncture are stressed.

  10. Anesthesia Practices for Interventional Radiology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Alessandra; Gangi, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) prompted an initiative to frame the current European status of anesthetic practices for interventional radiology, in consideration of the current variability of IR suite settings, staffing and anesthetic practices reported in the literature and of the growing debate on sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists, in Europe.MethodsAnonymous online survey available to all European CIRSE members to assess IR setting, demographics, peri-procedural care, anesthetic management, resources and staffing, pain management, data collection, safety, management of emergencies and personal opinions on the role CIRSE should have in promoting anesthetic care for interventional radiology.ResultsPredictable differences between countries and national regulations were confirmed, showing how significantly many “local” factors (type and size of centers, the availability of dedicated inpatient bed, availability of anesthesia staff) can affect the routine practice and the expansion of IR as a subspecialty. In addition, the perception of the need for IR to acquire more sedation-related skills is definitely stronger for those who practice with the lowest availability of anesthesia care.ConclusionSignificant country variations and regulations along with a controversial position of the anesthesia community on the issue of sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists substantially represent the biggest drawbacks for the expansion of peri-procedural anesthetic care for IR and for potential initiatives at an European level.

  11. [Shivering associated with general anesthesia using remifentanil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Kenichiro; Kitamura, Takayuki; Tagami, Megumi

    2014-09-01

    General anesthesia using remifentanil is accompanied with post-operative shivering at a high incidence. Post-operative shivering can be divided into thermoregulatory and non-thermoregulatory. Hypothermia causes thermoregulatory shivering. The interthreshold range is defined as the difference between the sweating threshold and the vasoconstriction threshold. Generally, the interthreshold range is shifted to higher temperatures immediately after surgery under general anesthesia. Thus, thermoregulatory shivering can be exaggerated in patients without hypothermia. The application of patient warming devices and the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as effective treatments for the prevention of thermoregulatory shivering. Remifentanil is an ultra-short acting agent. Pharmacological effects of remifentanil quickly disappear just after the discontinuing of remifentanil infusion, leading to a kind of opioid withdrawal syndrome resulting in non-thermoregulatory shivering. In addition, postoperative pain shifts the shivering threshold to higher temperatures, resulting in non-thermoregulatory shivering. Thus, opioid transition using fentanyl and/or morphine during anesthetic management is essential for the prevention of non-thermoregulatory shivering. It is also reported that magnesium, ketamine and pethidine have preventive effects on non-thermoregulatory shivering. The mechanism underlying post-operative shivering associated with general anesthesia using remifentanil is very complicated; therefore, we speculate that multimodal approach is required for its prevention.

  12. Influence of peak inspiratory flow rates and pressure drops on inhalation performance of dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Daiki; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ichihashi, Mika; Mizutani, Ayano; Ishizeki, Kazunori; Okada, Toyoko; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the relationship between human inspiratory flow patterns and the concomitant drops in pressure in different inhalation devices, and the influence of the devices on inhalation performance. As a model formulation for inhalers, a physically mixed dry powder composed of salbutamol sulfate and coarse lactose monohydrate was selected. The drops in pressure at 28.3 L/min of three inhalation devices, Single-type, Dual-type, and Reverse-type, was 1.0, 5.1, and 8.7 kPa, respectively. Measurements of human inspiratory patterns revealed that although the least resistant device (Single) had large inter- and intra-individual variation of peak flow rate (PFR), the coefficients of variation of PFR of the three devices were almost the same. In tests with a human inspiratory flow simulator in vitro, inhalation performance was higher, but the variation in inhalation performance in the range of human flow patterns was wider, for the more resistant device. To minimize the intra- and inter-individual variation in inhalation performance for the model formulation in this study, a formulation design that allows active pharmaceutical ingredient to detach from the carrier with a lower inhalation flow rate is needed.

  13. The comparison of anesthesia effect of lung surgery through video-assisted thoracic surgery: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Dong Ke

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicated that epidural anesthesia can save operating time and postoperative hospital stay time. But epidural anesthesia and general anesthesia have the same effect on complications.

  14. Severe Bradycardia Possibly due to a Local Anesthetic Oral Mucosal Injection during General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthesia may induce systemic complications leading to parasympathetic activity leading to bradycardia and hypotension. We report a case of a 50-year-old man undergoing dental surgery under general anesthesia who experienced severe bradycardia and hypotension after local anesthesia infiltration. Concerns regarding the utilization of a relatively large lumen injection needle for local anesthesia during general anesthesia are discussed.

  15. Assessing inhalation injury in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanizaki S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shinsuke Tanizaki Department of Emergency Medicine, Fukui Prefectural Hospital, Fukui, Japan Abstract: Respiratory tract injuries caused by inhalation of smoke or chemical products are related to significant morbidity and mortality. While many strategies have been built up to manage cutaneous burn injuries, few logical diagnostic strategies for patients with inhalation injuries exist and almost all treatment is supportive. The goals of initial management are to ensure that the airway allows adequate oxygenation and ventilation and to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury and substances that may complicate subsequent care. Intubation should be considered if any of the following signs exist: respiratory distress, stridor, hypoventilation, use of accessory respiratory muscles, blistering or edema of the oropharynx, or deep burns to the face or neck. Any patients suspected to have inhalation injuries should receive a high concentration of supplemental oxygen to quickly reverse hypoxia and to displace carbon monoxide from protein binding sites. Management of carbon monoxide and cyanide exposure in smoke inhalation patients remains controversial. Absolute indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy do not exist because there is a low correlation between carboxyhemoglobin levels and the severity of the clinical state. A cyanide antidote should be administered when cyanide poisoning is clinically suspected. Although an ideal approach for respiratory support of patients with inhalation injuries do not exist, it is important that they are supported using techniques that do not further exacerbate respiratory failure. A well-organized strategy for patients with inhalation injury is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality. Keywords: inhalation injury, burn, carbon monoxide poisoning, cyanide poisoning

  16. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair under spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia: a randomized prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donmez T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Turgut Donmez,1 Vuslat Muslu Erdem,2 Oguzhan Sunamak,3 Duygu Ayfer Erdem,2 Huseyin Imam Avaroglu1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Lutfiye Nuri Burat State Hospital, 3Department of General Surgery, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Background: Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP inguinal hernia repair is a well-known approach to inguinal hernia repair that is usually performed under general anesthesia (GA. To date, no reports compare the efficacy of spinal anesthesia (SA with that of GA for laparoscopic hernia repairs. The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcome of TEP inguinal hernia repair performed when the patient was treated under SA with that performed under GA. Materials and methods: Between July 2015 and July 2016, 50 patients were prospectively randomized to either the GA TEP group (Group I or the SA TEP group (Group II. Propofol, fentanyl, rocuronium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg and fentanyl (10 µg were used for SA to achieve a sensorial level of T3. Intraoperative events related to SA, operative and anesthesia times, postoperative complications, and pain scores were recorded. Each patient was asked to evaluate the anesthetic technique by using a direct questionnaire filled in 3 months after the operation. Results: All the procedures were completed by the allocated method of anesthesia as there were no conversions from SA to GA. Pain was significantly less for 1 h (P<0.0001 and 4 h (P=0.002 after the procedure for the SA and GA groups, respectively. There was no difference between the two groups regarding complications, hospital stay, recovery, or surgery time. Generally, patients were more satisfied with SA than GA (P<0.020. Conclusion: TEP inguinal hernia repair can be safely performed under SA, and SA was associated with less postoperative pain, better recovery, and better

  17. [History of anesthesia : "From narcosis to perioperative homeostasis"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, H; Goerig, M

    2016-10-01

    In the western World 16 October 1846 is often called "Ether Day", marking the beginning of anesthesia. Before that date, for physicians there was only a struggle against pain. In the following 170 years all fields of general anesthesia as well as regional and local anesthesia were continuously developed. Pharmacological developments and technical innovations made this evolution possible. The complexity of this field of medicine requires a specialist: the anesthesiologist, whose selection of the most suitable form of anesthesia for the patient makes the surgical intervention painless. In addition, the history of anesthesia was characterized by personalities who were responsible for the progress of this medical field. Anesthesia is one part of the discipline of anesthesiology, which also includes resuscitation, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy.

  18. [Percutaneous maxillary nerve block anesthesia in maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1999-01-01

    Personal experience in percutaneous maxillary nerve block anesthesia in association with transmucosal anesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in oral and maxillofacial surgery, is presented. Six Caldwell-Luc, 9 anthrotomies and biopsies of maxillary sinus, 8 removals of extensive odontogenic cysts and 12 surgical maxillary expansions were performed from 1994 to 1996 at our Department. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block in association with transmucosal anesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion were performed. Carbocaine without adrenaline in association with NaCO3 1/10 for maxillary nerve block anesthesia and lidocaineoprilocaine cream (EMLA) for transmucosal anesthesia were employed. Intra- and post-operative pain were evaluated by visual analogue scale in all the patients. Anesthesiological procedures revealed to be effective in all surgical interventions and postoperative analgesia allowed easier pain control. The simplicity of execution, the effective pre- and postoperative anesthesia and the absence of side effects make this procedure particularly indicated in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Anesthesia Quality and Patient Safety in China: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Gao, Huan; Zhou, Xiangyong; Huang, Jeffrey

    There has been no nationwide investigation into anesthesia quality and patient safety in China. The authors surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about anesthesia quality by sending a survey to all anesthesiologist members of the New Youth Anesthesia Forum via WeChat. The respondents could choose to use a mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. The overall response rate was 43%. Intraoperative monitoring: 77.9% of respondents reported that electrocardiogram monitoring was routinely applied for all patients; only 55% of the respondents reported that they routinely used end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring for their patients under general anesthesia. 10.3% of respondents admitted that they had at least one wrong medicine administration in the past 3 months; 12.4% reported that they had at least one case of cardiac arrest in the past year. This is the first anesthesia quality survey in China. The findings revealed potential anesthesia safety issues in China.

  20. The humidity in a Dräger Primus anesthesia workstation using low or high fresh gas flow and with or without a heat and moisture exchanger in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, Gustavo P; Braz, Leandro G; de Jesus, Larissa S B; Pedigone, Cesar M C; de Carvalho, Lídia R; Módolo, Norma S P; Braz, José R C

    2014-10-01

    An inhaled gas absolute humidity of 20 mg H2O·L is the value most considered as the threshold necessary for preventing the deleterious effects of dry gas on the epithelium of the airways during anesthesia. Because children have small minute ventilation, we hypothesized that the humidification of a circle breathing system is lower in children compared with adults. The Primus anesthesia workstation (Dräger Medical, Lübeck, Germany) has a built-in hotplate to heat the patient's exhaled gases. A heat and moisture exchanger (HME) is a device that can be used to further humidify and heat the inhaled gases during anesthesia. To evaluate the humidifying properties of this circle breathing system during pediatric anesthesia, we compared the temperature and humidity of inhaled gases under low or high fresh gas flow (FGF) conditions and with or without an HME. Forty children were randomly allocated into 4 groups according to the ventilation of their lungs by a circle breathing system in a Dräger Primus anesthesia workstation with low (1 L·min) or high (3 L·min) FGF without an HME (1L and 3L groups) or with an HME (Pall BB25FS, Pall Biomedical, East Hills, NY; HME1L and HME3L groups). The temperature and absolute humidity of inhaled gases were measured at 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 minutes after connecting the patient to the breathing circuit. The mean inhaled gas temperature was higher in HME groups (HME1L: 30.3°C ± 1.1°C; HME3L: 29.3°C ± 1.2°C) compared with no-HME groups (1L: 27.0°C ± 1.2°C; 3L: 27.1°C ± 1.5°C; P humidity was higher in HME than no-HME groups and higher in low-flow than high-flow groups ([HME1L: 25 ± 1 mg H2O·L] > [HME3L: 23 ± 2 mg H2O·L] > [1L: 17 ± 1 mg H2O·L] > [3L: 14 ± 1 mg H2O·L]; P humidity level of the inhaled gases thought to reduce the risk of dehydration of airways. Insertion of an HME increases the humidity and temperature of the inhaled gases, bringing them closer to physiological values. The use of a low FGF enhances the

  1. Inhaled mannitol for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Thornton, Judith; Murray, Clare S; Dwyer, Tiffany

    2018-02-09

    Several agents are used to clear secretions from the airways of people with cystic fibrosis. Mannitol increases mucociliary clearance, but its exact mechanism of action is unknown. The dry powder formulation of mannitol may be more convenient and easier to use compared with established agents which require delivery via a nebuliser. Phase III trials of inhaled dry powder mannitol for the treatment of cystic fibrosis have been completed and it is now available in Australia and some countries in Europe. This is an update of a previous review. To assess whether inhaled dry powder mannitol is well tolerated, whether it improves the quality of life and respiratory function in people with cystic fibrosis and which adverse events are associated with the treatment. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic databases, handsearching relevant journals and abstracts from conferences.Date of last search: 28 September 2017. All randomised controlled studies comparing mannitol with placebo, active inhaled comparators (for example, hypertonic saline or dornase alfa) or with no treatment. Authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, carried out data extraction and assessed the risk of bias in included studies. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE. Six studies (reported in 50 publications) were included with a total of 784 participants.Duration of treatment in the included studies ranged from 12 days to six months, with open-label treatment for an additional six months in two of the studies. Five studies compared mannitol with control (a very low dose of mannitol or non-respirable mannitol) and the final study compared mannitol to dornase alfa alone and to mannitol plus dornase alfa. Two large studies had a similar parallel design and provided data for 600 participants, which could be pooled where data for a particular outcome and time point were

  2. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  3. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Abe, Madoka; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  4. The application of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Liang; Qin Zenghui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the management and feasibility of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy. Methods: A total of 80 pediatric patients were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in group A received sacral block anesthesia together with basic anesthesia with propofol, while patients in group B received intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Small amount of ketamine as maintaining dose was used in both groups when needed. Results: The interventional management was successfully completed in all patients. A marked decrease in blood pressure occurred in three patients of group A receiving sacral block anesthesia. In group B receiving intravenous anesthesia, a decrease of SpO 2 to below 90 percent was seen in 8 cases, and obvious bradycardia developed in 12 cases. All these patients were treated with intravenous medication or by reducing the dose of propofol. Additional small dose of ketamine was needed in 4 patients during the procedure. Conclusion: Sacral block anesthesia combined with intravenous anesthesia is one of the effective anesthesia management schemes for pediatric interventional therapy. (authors)

  5. [General anesthesia for two patients taking methylphenidate (Ritalin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Takaho; Meno, Aki; Honda, Masahiro; Momoeda, Kanako; Nagase, Masaki; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    We experienced anesthesia care for two patients taking methylphenidate (Ritalin), which is a central nervous system stimulant of amphetamine analogues, usually administered for narcolepsy or refractory depression. The proper dose of methylphenidate is 20-60 mg per day. General anesthesia with epidural anesthesia was administered to both cases for total hip replacement. One patient could discontinue taking methylphenidate five days before the operation, but the other patient could not. Both cases needed more anesthetics than usual on induction, but very stable condition could be maintained during and after the operations. We consider that it is possible to perform general anesthesia safely for patients taking a usual dose of methylphenidate.

  6. Plain chest radiographic findings of smoke inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Ho; Lee, Eil Weong; Kim, Hyun Suk; Park, Ju Youn; Kim, Soo Hyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hong Suk; Lee, Kwan Seop; Kang Ik Won

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the plain chest radiographic findings of smoke inhalation. Our study included 72 burn patients who had suffered smoke inhalation. On admission, all underwent serial portable chest AP radiography. We retrospectively reviewed the plain chest radiographs taken between admission and pootburn day five, evaluating the pattern, distribution, and time onset of direct injury to the respiratory system by smoke inhalation. The lesions were also assessed for change. In 16 of 72 patients (22%), abnormal findings of direct injury to the respiratory system by smoke inhalation were revealed by the radiographs. Abnormal findings were 15 pulmonary lesions and one subglottic tracheal narrowing. Findings of pulmonary lesions were multiple small patchy consolidations (10/15), peribronchial cuffing (8/15), and perivascular fuzziness (6/15). Patterns of pulmonary lesions were mixed alveolar and interstitial lesion (n=3D9), interstitial lesion (n=3D5), and alveolar lesion (n=3D1). No interlobular septal thickening was observed. Pulmonary edema was distributed predominantly in the upper lung zone and perihilar region, with asymmetricity. Its time of onset was within 24 hours in 13 cases, 24-48 hours in two cases, and 48-72 hours in one. Five of 16 patients progressed to ARDS. Chest radiographs showed that pulmonary lesions caused by inhalation injury were due to pulmonary edema, which the pattern of which was commonly mixed alveolar and interstitial. (author)

  7. Anesthesia for cesarean section in a parturient with acute varicella: Is general anesthesia better than neuraxial anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash R Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of varicella infection during pregnancy is low. However, it is associated with a significant risk of morbidity and mortality, both to the mother and the fetus. The risk for any complication is highest for the mother during the third trimester and pneumonia is the leading cause of maternal mortality. Anesthetic management in these patients depends upon the extent of involvement of the disease, associated complications of varicella, duration of antiviral therapy and natural course if the disease. We present the anesthetic management of a case of cesarean section in a patient with acute varicella infection, and discuss the various concerns regarding the choice of anesthesia.

  8. Prevalence of and risk factors for intraoperative gastroesophageal reflux and postanesthetic vomiting and diarrhea in dogs undergoing general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Carlos; Vigueras, Isabel; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Villaverde, Cecilia; Fresno, Laura; Carvajal, Bibiana; Fiñana, Marina; Costa-Farré, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of intraoperative gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and postanesthetic vomiting and diarrhea, and to evaluate risk factors associated with these gastrointestinal disorders (GID) in dogs undergoing general anesthesia. Prospective observational study. University teaching hospital. Two hundred thirty-seven client-owned dogs undergoing general inhalant anesthesia for diagnostic or surgical purposes. None MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patient, surgical, and anesthetic variables, and postanesthetic treatments administered in the immediate postanesthesia period were evaluated in relation to GID using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis (P < 0.05). Seventy-nine of the 237 (33.4%) dogs developed GID during the perianesthetic period. The prevalences of GER, vomiting, and diarrhea were 17.3%, 5.5%, and 10.5%, respectively. Intraabdominal surgery (P = 0.016; odds ratio [OR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-6.62), changes in body position (P = 0.003; OR 3.17, 95% CI: 1.47-6.85), and length of anesthesia (P = 0.052; OR 1.006, 95% CI: 1.000-1.013) were associated with GER. Changes in the ventilation mode during surgery (P = 0.011; OR 6.54, 95% CI: 1.8-23.8), length of anesthesia (P = 0.024; OR 1.001, 95% CI: 1.001-1.020), and rescue synthetic colloid support due to hypotension (P = 0.005; OR 6.9, 95% CI: 1.82-26.3) were positively associated with postanesthetic vomiting. On the contrary, dogs that received acepromazine as premedication were significantly less likely (P < 0.019; OR 12.3, 95% CI: 1.52-100) to vomit. Finally, length of anesthesia, changes in body position, changes in ventilation mode, or hypoxemia during the procedure tended to increase the risk (univariate model) of diarrhea during the recovery phase. GID are common in dogs undergoing general anesthesia. Duration and characteristics of the procedure, anesthetic management, and changes in certain patient variables are significant risk factors for the presence of

  9. Age dependent systemic exposure to inhaled salbutamol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Jespersen, Jakob Jessing; Bisgaard, Hans

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the effect of age on systemic exposure to inhaled salbutamol in children. METHODS: Fifty-eight asthmatic children, aged 3-16 years, inhaled 400 microg of salbutamol from a pressurized metered dose inhaler with spacer. The 20 min serum profile was analyzed. RESULTS: Prescribing...... a dose on a microg kg(-1) basis caused reduced systemic exposure in young children (Y) compared with older children (O) (C(max-microg kg(-1)-adjusted) Y : O ratio (95%CI) = 0.55 (0.47, 0.65)) whereas a fixed nominal dose irrespective of age caused increased exposure in young children (C(max) Y : O ratio...... (95%CI) = 1.7 (1.3, 2.2)). CONCLUSIONS: For similar systemic exposure, dosing should be adjusted to age or size but not on a fixed microg kg(-1) basis, which may lead to unnecessary suboptimal dosing....

  10. Use of inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations, improve lung function, and reduce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity more effectively than other treatments. However, inhaled corticosteroids may be unable to return lung function and bronchial hyperreactivity...... to normal when introduced for moderately severe asthma. This finding highlights the need to improve treatment strategy in pediatric asthma. The natural progression of persistent asthma may lead to loss of lung function and chronic bronchial hyperreactivity for children and adults. There is evidence...... to suggest that asthma acts via a chronic inflammatory process that causes remodeling of the airways with mucosal thickening and smooth muscle hypertrophy. An optimal treatment strategy would be one aimed at reducing the ongoing airway inflammation. Inhaled steroids ameliorate the inflammation, whereas...

  11. The Effectiveness of the Human Patient Simulator in Teaching Anesthesia Pharmacology to First Year Nurse Anesthesia Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Annie

    2002-01-01

    .... There is no substitute for case-based experience; however, recent innovations in computer technology provide high fidelity, realistic simulators, which are being used in many anesthesia programs...

  12. Emergence EEG pattern classification in sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Huang, Cheng; Li, Yongwang; Hight, Darren F; Voss, Logan J; Sleigh, Jamie W; Li, Xiaoli; Bai, Yang

    2018-03-07

    Objective. Significant spectral characteristics of electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns exist in individual patients during re-establishing consciousness after general anesthesia. However, these EEG patterns cannot be quantitatively identified using commercially available depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitors. This study proposed an effective classification method and indices to classify these patterns among patients. Approach. Four types of emergence EEG patterns were identified based on EEG data set from 52patients undergoing sevoflurane general anesthesia from two hospitals. Then, the relative power spectrum density (RPSD) of five frequency sub-bands of clinical interest (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma) were selected for emergence state analysis. Finally, the genetic algorithm support vector machine (GA-SVM) was used to identify the emergence EEG patterns. Performance was reported in terms of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and accuracy (AC). Main results. The combination of the mean and mode of RPSD in delta and alpha band (P (delta)/P (alpha) performed the best with the GA-SVM classification. AC indices obtained by GA-SVM across the four patterns were 90.64±7.61, 81.79±5.84, 82.14±7.99, and 72.86±11.11 respectively. Furthermore, the emergence time of the patients with EEG emergence pattern I and III increased with the increasing of patients' age. While for the patients with EEG emergence pattern IV, the emergence time positively correlates with the patients' age which less than 50, and negatively correlates with the patients' age which more than 50. Significance. The mean and mode of P (delta)/P (alpha) is a useful index to classify the different emergence EEG patterns. In addition, the EEG emergence patterns may correlate with underlying neural substrate which related with patients' age. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  13. Anatomy of an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav J; Tremper, Kevin K; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2011-09-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have become more prevalent as more sophisticated hardware and software have increased usability and reliability. National mandates and incentives have driven adoption as well. AIMS can be developed in one of several software models (Web based, client/server, or incorporated into a medical device). Irrespective of the development model, the best AIMS have a feature set that allows for comprehensive management of workflow for an anesthesiologist. Key features include preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative documentation; quality assurance; billing; compliance and operational reporting; patient and operating room tracking; and integration with hospital electronic medical records. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding...... on the use of premedication, choice of anesthetics, and management of postoperative pain. This review reflects on both general considerations concerning geriatric patients but also on the specific features of perioperatively used drugs and anesthetics that might have an impact on patients with Alzheimer...

  15. Toxicity and allergy to local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A H

    1998-09-01

    Considering the amount of local anesthetic administered on a daily basis, dental professionals must be familiar with the factors that influence the dose and type of local anesthetic that induces a toxic or allergic reaction. In addition to the route and rate of administration, the patient's physical condition and health may also influence the dose of local anesthetic that could be safely administered. This article reviews the different causes of local anesthesia toxicity and allergy. With prevention and early recognition of the warning signs, poor prognosis can be avoided.

  16. Oxidative Stress and Anesthesia in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peivandi Yazdi A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radical and peroxide production lead to intracellular damage. On the other hand, free radicals are used by the human immune system to defend against pathogens. The aging process could be limited by oxidative stress in the short term. Chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM are full-stress conditions in which remarkable metabolic functional destructions might happen. There is strong evidence regarding antioxidant impairment in diabetes. Performing a particular method for anesthesia in diabetic patients might prevent or modify excessive free radical formation and oxidative stress. It seems that prescribing antioxidant drugs could promote wound healing in diabetics.  

  17. Cow Dung Ingestion and Inhalation Dependence: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairkar, Praveen; Tiple, Prashant; Bang, Govind

    2009-01-01

    Although abuse of several unusual inhalants had been documented, addiction to cow dung fumes or their ashes has not been reported in medical literature as yet. We are reporting a case of cow dung dependence in ingestion and inhalational form.

  18. Social stigma stops adolescents from using inhalers for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Forgetfulness, poor routines, inadequate inhaler technique, organisational difficulties and families not understanding or accepting their children's asthma are described as barriers to the use of inhalers among adolescents with asthma.

  19. Inhaler Reminders Significantly Improve Asthma Patients' Use of Controller Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a third group received both interventions. A fourth group received active usual care alone; all GPs received brief action plan and inhaler technique training. For all patients, electronic inhaler monitors remotely uploaded ...

  20. Foreign body inhalation in Tunisian children: Experience of a pediatric respiratory diseases department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Berraies

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, radiological and endoscopic characteristics of pediatric foreign body aspiration in Tunisian children. Methods: This was a retrospective study of 76 children with foreign body aspiration who were admitted to our department for flexible and/or rigid bronchoscopy between January 2002 and January 2013. Results: The median age of the children was 2.8 years (range: 1.58-6 years. Of these, 61.6% were aged between one and three years. The aspirated foreign bodies were nuts and seeds in 44.64 % of cases, with sunflower seeds representing 19.64% of these cases. Scarf pins were the most frequent metallic foreign body in 7.9% of cases. Almost half of cases were presented within 72 hours of inhalation. Diagnosis of an inhaled foreign body was delayed by more than 30 days in 23.8% of cases. In 79.6% of subjects, a typical penetration syndrome was found on interviewing the parents. Chest X-ray was normal in 18.5% of cases. All children underwent flexible bronchoscopy first, or after rigid bronchoscopy. In 73 (96% children, the foreign body was seen during flexible bronchoscopy. Eleven foreign bodies (15.2% were removed safely in our department, via the flexible bronchoscope under general anesthesia. Surgery for foreign body extraction, or for treatment of complications, was necessary in 21.05% of children. Conclusions: Inhalation of seeds and nuts by children is a serious problem. Education by physicians, and especially parents, is the main guarantor to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in this pathology.

  1. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  2. The Effect of Neuraxial Anesthesia on Maternal Cerebral Hemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Ineke R.; van Veen, Teelkien R.; Mears, Scott L.; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Haeri, Sina; Belfort, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neuraxial anesthesia is known to reduce sympathetic tone and mean arterial pressure. Effects on cerebral hemodynamics in pregnancy are not well known. We hypothesize that cerebral hemodynamic parameters will change with respect to baseline following regional analgesia/anesthesia. Study

  3. Recent advances and perspectives in topical oral anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz-Montan, Michelle; Ribeiro, Lígia Nunes de Morais; Volpato, Maria Cristina; Cereda, Cintia Maria Saia; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Tofoli, Giovana Randomille; de Araújo, Daniele Ribeiro; Santi, Patrizia; Padula, Cristina; de Paula, Eneida

    2017-05-01

    Topical anesthesia is widely used in dentistry to reduce pain caused by needle insertion and injection of the anesthetic. However, successful anesthesia is not always achieved using the formulations that are currently commercially available. As a result, local anesthesia is still one of the procedures that is most feared by dental patients. Drug delivery systems (DDSs) provide ways of improving the efficacy of topical agents. Areas covered: An overview of the structure and permeability of oral mucosa is given, followed by a review of DDSs designed for dental topical anesthesia and their related clinical trials. Chemical approaches to enhance permeation and anesthesia efficacy, or to promote superficial anesthesia, include nanostructured carriers (liposomes, cyclodextrins, polymeric nanoparticle systems, solid lipid nanoparticles, and nanostructured lipid carriers) and different pharmaceutical dosage forms (patches, bio- and mucoadhesive systems, and hydrogels). Physical methods include pre-cooling, vibration, iontophoresis, and microneedle arrays. Expert opinion: The combination of different chemical and physical methods is an attractive option for effective topical anesthesia in oral mucosa. This comprehensive review should provide the readers with the most relevant options currently available to assist pain-free dental anesthesia. The findings should be considered for future clinical trials.

  4. Effects of combined general anesthesia and thoracic epidural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Severe postoperative pain is not often experienced in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Anesthesia, surgery, and pain are stressful and cause different reactions in neuro‑immuno‑endocrine systems. Many factors such as the pharmacological effect of the drugs used, as well as the type and depth of anesthesia, ...

  5. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The most common side effect of epidural or spinal anesthesia is hypotension with functional hypovolemia prompting fluid infusions or administration of vasopressors. Short-term studies (20 min) in patients undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia suggest that plasma volume may increase wh...

  6. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece while the apparatus is operated by a breathing...

  7. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition to...

  8. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with § 172.407, the background on the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label and the symbol must be white. The... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and...

  9. Teaching inhaler use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareau, Suzanne C; Hodder, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To review barriers to the successful use of inhalers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) in facilitating optimum inhaler use. Review of the national and international scientific literature. Pharmacologic treatment of COPD patients comprises mainly inhaled medications. Incorrect use of inhalers is very common in these individuals. Some of the consequences of poor inhaler technique include reduced therapeutic dosing, medication adherence, and disease stability, which can lead to increased morbidity, decreased quality of life, and a high burden on the healthcare system. Knowledgeable evaluation and frequent reassessment of inhaler use coupled with education of patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals can significantly improve the benefits COPD patients derive from inhaled therapy. Patient education is vital for correct use of inhalers and to ensure the effectiveness of inhaled medications. The NP has a critical role in assessing potential barriers to successful learning by the patient and improving inhaler technique and medication management. The NP can also facilitate success with inhaled medications by providing up-to-date inhaler education for other healthcare team members, who may then act as patient educators. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Anesthesia for subglottic stenosis in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid Essam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Any site in the upper airway can get obstructed and cause noisy breathing as well as dyspnea. These include nasal causes such as choanal atresia or nasal stenosis; pharyngeal causes including lingual thyroid; laryngeal causes such as laryngomalacia; tracheobronchial causes such as tracheal stenosis; and subglottic stenosis. Lesions in the oropharynx may cause stertor, while lesions in the laryngotracheal tree will cause stridor. Subglottic stenosis is the third leading cause of congenital stridors in the neonate. Subglottic Stenosis presents challenges to the anesthesiologist. Therefore, It is imperative to perform a detailed history, physical examination, and characterization of the extent and severity of stenosis. Rigid endoscopy is essential for the preoperative planning of any of the surgical procedures that can be used for correction. Choice of operation is dependent on the surgeon′s comfort, postoperative capabilities, and severity of disease. For high-grade stenosis, single-stage laryngotracheal resection or cricotracheal resection are the best options. It has to be borne in mind that the goal of surgery is to allow for an adequate airway for normal activity without the need for tracheostomy. Anesthesia for airway surgery could be conducted safely with either sevofl uraneor propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia.

  11. Anesthesia during and Immediately after Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, Christoph N.; Price, Catherine; Janelle, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing presence of humans in space and long-duration manned missions to the Moon or Mars pose novel challenges to the delivery of medical care. Even now, cumulative person-days in space exceed 80 years and preparations for a return to the Moon are actively underway. Medical care after an emergent de-orbit or an accident during a non-nominal landing must not only address the specific disease or injuries but also the challenges posed by physiologic adaptations to microgravity. In the highly autonomous situation of a long-term space mission the situation is even more complex, because personnel, equipment, specific training, and clinical experience are by definition limited. To summarize our current knowledge specifically for anesthetic care during and immediately after spaceflight, we will review physiologic adaptations to microgravity with particular emphasis on the resulting anesthetic risks, discuss veterinary experiences with anesthesia in weightlessness or in animals adapted to microgravity, describe current research that pertains to anesthesia and spaceflight and point out unresolved questions for future investigation.

  12. Fibromyalgia: A Primer for the Anesthesia Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Chad M.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Review The present review is intended to give an overview of fibromyalgia for the anesthesiologist. While the basics of the treatment of fibromyalgia are included, the intent is to provide context to discuss the potential implications in perioperative management. Recent Findings One of the most important changes in the last year is the new criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Instead of a combination of self-report and a tender point examination, there is a new self-report questionnaire that is now used diagnose fibromyalgia. This tool incorporates aspects of widespread body pain and some of the known comorbid symptoms. A score of 0-31 is given, which allows for the disease to be viewed as a continuum of sensitivity and symptomatology, instead of as a binary diagnosis. This continuum has been termed “fibromyalgia-ness.” This article also reviews the advances in understanding of the pathophysiology and emerging therapies. Little is known about the impact of fibromyalgia in the perioperative period. Summary The impact of fibromyalgia on anesthesia care is not known. Years of quality research have clearly demonstrated multiple pathophysiologic changes that could impact anesthesia care and future study is needed. PMID:21799404

  13. Intraoperative seizures during craniotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John; Lu, Xiaoying; Thompson, Zoe; Peterson, Gordon W; Losey, Travis E

    2016-05-01

    An acute symptomatic seizure is a clinical seizure occurring at the time of or in close temporal association with a brain insult. We report an acute symptomatic seizure occurring during a surgical procedure in a patient who did not have a prior history of epilepsy and who did not have a lesion associated with an increased risk of epilepsy. To characterize the incidence and clinical features of intraoperative seizures during craniotomy under general anesthesia, we reviewed cases where continuous EEG was acquired during craniotomy. Records of 400 consecutive cases with propofol as general anesthesia during craniotomy were reviewed. Demographic data, indication for surgery, clinical history, history of prior seizures, duration of surgery and duration of burst suppression were recorded. Cases where seizures were observed were analyzed in detail. Two out of 400 patients experienced intraoperative seizures, including one patient who appeared to have an acute symptomatic seizure related to the surgical procedure itself and a second patient who experienced two seizures likely related to an underlying diagnosis of epilepsy. This is the first report of an acute symptomatic seizure secondary to a neurosurgical procedure. Overall, 0.5% of patients monitored experienced seizures, indicating that intraoperative seizures are rare, and EEG monitoring during craniotomies is of low yield in detecting seizures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Anesthesia considerations in the obese gravida.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is associated with serious morbidity during pregnancy, and obese women also are at a high risk of developing complications during labor, leading to an increased risk for instrumental and Cesarean deliveries. The engagement of the obstetrical anesthetist in the management of this group of high-risk patients should be performed antenatally so that an appropriate management strategy can be planned in advance to prevent an adverse outcome. Good communication between all care providers is essential. The obese patient in labor should be encouraged to have a functioning epidural catheter placed early in labor. Apart from providing analgesia and alleviating physiological derangements during labor, the presence of a functioning epidural catheter can also be used to induce anesthesia quickly in the event of an emergency cesarean section, thus avoiding a general anesthesia, which has exceedingly high risks in the obese parturient. Successful management of the obese patient necessitates a comprehensive strategy that encompasses a multidisciplinary and holistic approach from all care-providers.

  15. Realistic and unrealistic direst costs in pharmacoeconomic anesthesia studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiplicity of anesthetic services and practice consume few resources individually, but collectively, they mean significant cost. Economic and pharmacoeconomic studies are done in order to rationalize resources. Aim: 1. To calculate the direct expense in anesthesia and reanimation; 2. To compare expenses to the price of anesthesia according to the unit prices of National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF; 3. To compare the duration of general anesthesia with costs in anesthesia departments. Methodology: This paper is a part of the retrospectively-prospective academic study of fourth phase carried out in the Clinical Center of Serbia. With permission of Ethical committee, we have set for 2005 and 2006, the direct cost of 148.876 anesthetic services in 11 departments of Clinical Center of Serbia as tertiary-type institution of medical health care. Research group included all patients of both sexes, children and adults. We compared the direct cost per minute of general anesthesia with average duration of anesthesia in every anesthesia department of surgical clinics. The direct cost was compared with the same, 'unit' prices of NHIF. The direct cost was compared with the same, 'unit' prices of RHIF. We have used linear and regression statistical product and service solutions model for component cost analysis /SPSS 15/. Results: Most budget resources are selected for the employees' sallaries (40%, then the medicines and supplies (31,80% and the other expenses including the analysis and analytic devices (28,20%. Direct costs indicate a linear correlation and statistically marked difference p=0,012, F=9,270 compared to anesthesia duration indicating the coefficient of correlation r=0,694. Direct costs are highest considering longest segment of anesthesia. We have obtained linear correlation R=0,706 for direct costs excluding the neurosurgical anesthesia with 'unit prices'of anesthesia and anesthetic services indicating F=9,951 and p=0

  16. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botney, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  17. [History of rachianesthesia and epidural anesthesia in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo Rodríguez, Victoria; Rivero Martínez, Ma Dolores; Pérez Albacete, Mariano; López López, Ana I; Maluff Torres, Alejandro

    2007-10-01

    To show the beginning of spinal and epidural anesthesia in our country and the contributions of Spanish urologists. We reviewed books and writings of History of Medicine, Urology and Anesthesia and Doctoral thesis about spinal and epidural anesthesia. In the 20th century, surgeons also gave the anesthetic drugs to the patients. Spinal and epidural anesthesia were used for the first time in 1900. A lot of Spanish urologists like F Rusca Doménech, J.M. Batrina, M. Barragán Bonet, R. Lozano Monzón, L. Guedea Calvo, Gil Vernet, Fidel Pagés Miravé, V Sagarra Lascurain, Gómez Ulla, etc, did research, writings in scientific journals and Doctoral thesis about anesthesia.

  18. Progress in simulation education: developing an anesthesia curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David J

    2014-12-01

    Simulation's role in anesthesia education is expanding to include more advanced skills and training for subspecialty practice. This review will provide an overview of many recent studies that expand the simulation curriculum for anesthesia education. Recent studies describe a curriculum that uses a range of simulation modalities, including part-task trainers, mannequin-based simulation, virtual reality, in-situ techniques, screen-based simulations as well as encounters with 'standardized' patients, nurses or physician colleagues. A variety of studies describe the use of task-training devises to more effectively acquire skills, such as fibre-optic intubation, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia and transthoracic echocardiography as well as expand on a variety of teamwork skills particularly in subspecialty anesthesia practice. A curriculum is emerging that utilizes a variety of simulation modalities as part of a more comprehensive educational strategy for anesthesia specialty training.

  19. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  20. Dry powder inhalers for pulmonary drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijlink, H.W.; De Boer, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    The pulmonary route is an interesting route for drug administration, both for effective local therapy (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cystic fibrosis) and for the systemic administration of drugs (e.g., peptides and proteins). Well-designed dry powder inhalers are highly efficient

  1. Fluid Mechanics of Inhalant Siphon Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, A. C.; Crimaldi, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Inhalant siphon and suction flows are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems. From biological flows in filter-feeding benthic bivalves and predation by planktivorous fishes, to engineered flows in water samplers and production of hydrodynamic stimuli for laboratory assays, inhalant siphon flows span much of the laminar range (Reynolds number 0.01 - 2,000) and fundamentally influence many transport and exchange processes. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of inhalant siphon flows with varying Reynolds numbers and geometries have informed design and construction of an index of refraction-matched flow facility (mineral oil, borosilicate glass tubing) in which we are employing particle image velocimetry (PIV) to quantify transient and steady-state flow fields outside and inside the siphon tube. Varying siphon diameter, flow rate, and extraction height allows us to evaluate effects of Reynolds number and siphon geometry on local hydrodynamics. This complementary experimental and numerical modeling investigation of siphon flow hydrodynamics was motivated recently by a colleague whose biologically inspired numerical modeling of inhalant siphons using a boundary condition of constant volumetric outflow (as opposed to the classically assumed uniform inlet velocity profile) revealed nontrivial departures from idealized flows: inviscid potential flows (i.e. point sink) and pipe flows (the classical pipe entry problem), particularly in the low Reynolds number regime. Reduced entrance lengths, larger radial inflows, and modifications to fluid capture zones seen numerically at low Reynolds number are being tested experimentally and may have important implications for both biological and engineered siphons.

  2. Report of the panel on inhaled actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: assessment of risks to man of inhaling actinides; use of estimates for developing protection standards; epidemiology of lung cancer in exposed human populations; development of respiratory tract models; and effects in animals: dose- and effect-modifying factors

  3. Computational modelling for dry-powder inhalers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröger, Ralf; Woolhouse, Robert; Becker, Michael; Wachtel, Herbert; de Boer, Anne; Horner, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a simulation tool used for modelling powder flow through inhalers to allow optimisation both of device design and drug powder. Here, Ralf Kröger, Consulting Senior CFD Engineer, ANSYS Germany GmbH; Marc Horner, Lead Technical Services Engineer, Healthcare,

  4. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor ... and by avoiding things that can cause an attack. Watch a video to follow ... keep them with your Asthma Action Plan. Using a metered dose inhaler with ...

  5. Pneumonitis after Inhalation of Mercury Vapours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JD Glezos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old man presented to hospital with pneumonia but only after discharge from hospital did he admit to deliberate prior inhalation of mercury. His pulmonary involvement appeared to resolve almost completely with antibiotics and supportive care. Nevertheless, persisting elevated urinary excretion of mercury required two courses of chelation therapy. No serious systemic sequelae were observed.

  6. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ibrahim, Rahul Verma, Lucila Garcia-ContrerasDepartment of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided.Keywords: pulmonary delivery, asthma, nebulizers, metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler

  7. Ozone inhalation modifies the rat liver proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney S. Theis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 is a serious public health concern. Recent findings indicate that the damaging health effects of O3 extend to multiple systemic organ systems. Herein, we hypothesize that O3 inhalation will cause downstream alterations to the liver. To test this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0.5 ppm O3 for 8 h/day for 5 days. Plasma liver enzyme measurements showed that 5 day O3 exposure did not cause liver cell death. Proteomic and mass spectrometry analysis identified 10 proteins in the liver that were significantly altered in abundance following short-term O3 exposure and these included several stress responsive proteins. Glucose-regulated protein 78 and protein disulfide isomerase increased, whereas glutathione S-transferase M1 was significantly decreased by O3 inhalation. In contrast, no significant changes were detected for the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 or cytochrome P450 2E1 and 2B in liver of O3 exposed rats compared to controls. In summary, these results show that an environmentally-relevant exposure to inhaled O3 can alter the expression of select proteins in the liver. We propose that O3 inhalation may represent an important unrecognized factor that can modulate hepatic metabolic functions.

  8. A breath actuated dry powder inhaler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anne; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hagedoorn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A breath actuated dry powder inhaler with a single air circulation chamber for de-agglomeration of entrained powdered medicament using the energy of the inspiratory air stream. The chamber has a substantially polygonal sidewall, a plurality of air supply channels entering the chamber substantially

  9. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway: Awake or Deep Anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Heidari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to study the influence of depth of anesthesia (awake or deep anesthesia and choice of anesthetic drug (halothane or propofol on the incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity associated with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA removal. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double blind study was done in 156 ASA physical status I and II patients, aged 18-65 years, who had under gone short time elective surgery (<1 hour. Patients were randomly assigned in one of the four subgroups: Hal-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in awaked state, Hal-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in deep anesthesia, Pro-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in awaked state, and Pro-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in deep anesthesia. The incidence of cough and straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, breathholding, vomiting, oxygen desaturation, and severity of airway hyperreactivity (mild, moderate, severe with LMA removal were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences in bronchospasm, larynchospasm, oxygen desaturation among four subgroups. Significant differences were in cough and straining, breath holding, vomiting, and finally severity of airway hyperreactivity among four subgroups. Depth of anesthesia didn’t have any effect on incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity but in those with propofol, they were lower than those with halothane. Conclusion: In short time surgery and with use of LMA, anesthesia with propofol is associated with lower incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity than halothane. Keywords: propofol, halothane, airway hyperreactivity, Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA.

  10. Memory Loss, Alzheimer's Disease and General Anesthesia: A Preoperative Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Adam; Siry, Read; Cai, Lufan; García, Paul S; Chen, Linda; Liu, Renyu

    2012-02-20

    The long-term cognitive effects of general anesthesia are under intense scrutiny. Here we present 5 cases from 2 academic institutions to analyze some common features where the patient's or the patient family member has made a request to address their concern on memory loss, Alzheimer's disease and general anesthesia before surgery. Records of anesthesia consultation separate from standard preoperative evaluation were retrieved to identify consultations related to memory loss and Alzheimer's disease from the patient and/or patient family members. The identified cases were extensively reviewed for features in common. We used Google® (http://www. google.com/) to identify available online information using "anesthesia memory loss" as a search phrase. Five cases were collected as a specific preoperative consultation related to memory loss, Alzheimer's disease and general anesthesia from two institutions. All of the individuals either had perceived memory impairment after a prior surgical procedure with general anesthesia or had a family member with Alzheimer's disease. They all accessed public media sources to find articles related to anesthesia and memory loss. On May 2 nd , 2011, searching "anesthesia memory loss" in Google yielded 764,000 hits. Only 3 of the 50 Google top hits were from peer-reviewed journals. Some of the lay media postings made a causal association between general anesthesia and memory loss and/or Alzheimer's disease without conclusive scientific literature support. The potential link between memory loss and Alzheimer's disease with general anesthesia is an important preoperative concern from patients and their family members. This concern arises from individuals who have had history of cognitive impairment or have had a family member with Alzheimer disease and have tried to obtain information from public media. Proper preoperative consultation with the awareness of the lay literature can be useful in reducing patient and patient family member

  11. Comparison of Sedation With Local Anesthesia and Regional Anesthesia in Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamohammadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP is usually performed under regional or general anesthesia. An alternative to conventional anesthesia is performing of TURP under local anesthetic infiltration with sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication of sedoanalgesia in TURP. Material & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial from September 2006 to December 2007, 60 patients (30 in each group with prostate hypertrophy, candidate for TURP, were randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group, standard spinal anesthesia was done. In the second group, five minutes before the operation, 25 mgs of diazepam plus 25-50 mgs of pethedine was intravenously administered followed by injection of 10 ml lidocaine 2% gel in the urethra and the skin in the suprapubic area was anesthetized with 2 ml of 1% lidocaine. Using a 22 gauge nephrostomy needle, the suprapubic skin was punctured and the needle was directed toward prostate apex and 10-20ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at the serosal aspect of the rectal wall. For dorsal nerve block, 5-10ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at penopubic junction, and then a standard TURP was performed. Patients were switched to another anesthetic technique if the selected technique failed. Severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results: The average prostate size was 25 grs (range10-50grs in the local anesthetic group (group 1 and 27.5 grs (range 10-50 grs in the spinal group (group2. In the local anesthetic group, 82.3% had no or mild pain while moderate to severe pain was reported in 16, 7% of the patients. In the group with spinal anesthesia, these were 93.1% and 6.9% respectively. Intolerable pain was observed in 23.3% and 13.8% of groups 1 and 2 respectively (p>0.05. Two patients in spinal group and 5 in local anesthetic group (3 due to severe pain and 2 for unsatisfaction required conversion to general anesthesia or receiving

  12. The dispersion behaviour of dry powder inhalation formulations cannot be assessed at a single inhalation flow rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasmeijer, Floris; de Boer, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    The dispersion performances of inhalation powders are often tested at only one inhalation flow rate in mechanistic formulation studies. This limited approach is challenged by studies showing that interactions exist between inhalation flow rate and the effects on dispersion performance of several

  13. Fate of inhaled azodicarbonamide in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Ayres, P.H.; Bechtold, W.E.; Dutcher, J.S.; Cheng, Y.S.; Bond, J.A.; Medinsky, M.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    Azodicarbonamide (ADA) is widely used as a blowing agent in the manufacture of expanded foam plastics, as an aging and bleaching agent in flour, and as a bread dough conditioner. Human exposures have been reported during manufacture as well as during use. Groups of male F344/N rats were administered ADA by gavage, by intratracheal instillation, and by inhalation exposure to determine the disposition and modes of excretion of ADA and its metabolites. At 72 hr following gavage, 30% of the administered ADA was absorbed whereas following intratracheal instillation, absorption was 90%. Comparison between groups of rats exposed by inhalation to ADA to achieve body burdens of 24 or 1230 micrograms showed no significant differences in modes or rates of excretion of [ 14 C]ADA equivalents. ADA was readily converted to biurea under physiological conditions and biurea was the only 14 C-labeled compound present in excreta. [ 14 C]ADA equivalents were present in all examined tissues immediately after inhalation exposure, and clearance half-times on the order of 1 day were evident for all tissues investigated. Storage depots for [ 14 C]ADA equivalents were not observed. The rate of buildup of [ 14 C]ADA equivalents in blood was linearly related to the lung content as measured from rats withdrawn at selected times during a 6-hr inhalation exposure at an aerosol concentration of 25 micrograms ADA/liter. In a study extending 102 days after exposure, retention of [ 14 C]ADA equivalents in tissues was described by a two-component negative exponential function. The results from this study indicate that upon inhalation, ADA is rapidly converted to biurea and that biurea is then eliminated rapidly from all tissues with the majority of the elimination via the urine

  14. Workplace Inhalant Abuse in Adult Female: Brief Report

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    Rohit Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalant abuse is the purposeful inhalation of intoxicating gases and vapors for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. With its propensity for being yet an under-recognized form of substance use, being gateway to hard substances, cross-cultural penetration crossing socioeconomic boundaries, and causing significant morbidity and mortality in early ages, the prevention of inhalant misuse is a highly pertinent issue. This clinical report identifies a newer perspective in the emergence of inhalant abuse initiation. We report a case of an adult female with late onset of inhalant dependence developing at workplace and recommend for greater awareness, prevention, and management of this expanding substance abuse problem.

  15. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

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    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  16. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. Design: A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent treatment of a tooth with one of the techniques, and treatment of the homologous contralateral tooth with the other technique. The treatments consisted of restorations, endodontic procedures and simple extractions. Results: The study series comprised 12 females and 18 males with a mean age of 36.8 years. The 30 subjects underwent a total of 60 anesthetic procedures. Intraosseous and conventional oral anesthesia caused discomfort during administration in 46.3% and 32.1% of the patients, respectively. The latency was 7.1±2.23 minutes for the conventional technique and 0.48±0.32 for intraosseous anesthesia – the difference being statistically significant. The depth of the anesthetic effect was sufficient to allow the patients to tolerate the dental treatments. The duration of the anesthetic effect in soft tissues was 199.3 minutes with the conventional technique versus only 1.6 minutes with intraosseous anesthesia – the difference between the two techniques being statistically significant. Most of the patients (69.7%) preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Conclusions: The described intraosseous anesthetic system is effective, with a much shorter latency than the conventional technique, sufficient duration of anesthesia to perform the required dental treatments, and with a much lesser soft tissue anesthetic effect. Most of the patients preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Key words:Anesthesia, intraosseous, oral anesthesia, infiltrating, mandibular block, Quicksleeper®. PMID

  17. [Quality management in regional anesthesia using the example of a Regional Anesthesia Surveillance System (RASS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stübner, S; Czaplik, M

    2013-02-01

    Regional anesthesia and regional analgesia techniques with or without a continuous catheter are frequently utilized in all areas of modern anesthesiology. There are individual and economic benefits but also risks involved with those techniques. While the incidence of severe complications is rare and preventive action not always possible, the consequences can be detrimental especially with hematoma or abscess formation associated with central neuraxial blocks. Therefore, it is important to create national and international databases with large case numbers utilizing standardized definitions of complications in order to allow realistic risk assessment and early discovery of potential dangers and preventive actions. This article shows the integration of standardized codes from the Regional Anesthesia Surveillance System with a software tool to allow high-quality data acquisition and the building of a foundation for national and international data collection and analysis as well as for feedback of institutional data for individual process optimization as part of a quality management system.

  18. Neuraxial anesthesia after local anesthesia for management of percutaneous vertebroplasty complication during vertebroplasty

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    Hüseyin Balkarlı

    Full Text Available Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a relatively safe, simple and commonly performed interventional procedure for the management of vertebral compression fractures. However, serious complications are rarely reported in the procedure. Those are pulmonary embolism, severe infection, paraplegia and an occurrence of a new fracture in an adjacent vertebra after vertebroplasty. Acute complications are generally associated with the procedure. We present the case of neuraxial anesthesia, developed after local anesthesia with 8 mL of 2% prilocaine, in a 68-year-old woman who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty after an osteoporotic collapsed fracture in the L1 vertebra due to trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature.

  19. SEVOFLURANE, DESFLURANE, AND XENON NEW INHALED ANESTHETICS IN VETERINARY MEDICINE SEVOFLURANO, DESFLURANO E XENÔNIO NOVOS ANESTÉSICOS INALATÓRIOS EM MEDICINA VETERINÁRIA

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    Cláudio Correa Natalini

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation anesthesia is widely used in veterinary medicine. New inhalation anesthetics that present less untoward effects, are more potent and produce a safe and easily changeable anesthetic plane are desirable over the older agents presently available. In this review some of the physical and chemical aspects of inhalation anesthesia is revisited. Because the agents used in inhalation anesthesia are gases or vapors, the physics of vaporization, delivery and administration of these agents should be understood. The two new inhalation anesthetics sevoflurane and desflurane, and the new anesthetic gas xenon have been used in human beings for some time. In veterinary medicine there is a lack of investigation and reports that assure the safety and clinical aspects of using them in animals. The information available on the use of these new agents in animals is revised in this article.A anestesia inalatória é amplamente utilizada em Medicina Veterinária. Novos anestésicos inalatórios que apresentem menos efeitos indesejáveis, que sejam mais potentes e que favoreçam a rápida modificação do plano anestésico com ampla margem de segurança, são desejáveis sobre os fármacos mais antigos disponíveis atualmente. Neste artigo de revisão, os aspectos físicos e químicos da anestesia inalatória foram revistos. Como, em geral, os fármacos anestésicos inalatórios são gases ou vapores, os aspectos físicos da volatização desses anestésicos, assim como os de sua administração devem ser entendidos. Os dois novos anestésicos inalatórios sevoflurano e desflurano e o novo gás anestésico xenônio têm sido usados em seres humanos já há algum tempo. Em medicina veterinária, ainda existe a necessidade de mais investigação e literatura publicada com relação ao uso clínico e a segurança do uso desses novos fármacos em animais. A literatura disponível sobre o uso desses anestésicos em animais está revisada neste artigo.

  20. Behavior Assessment in Children Following Hospital-Based General Anesthesia versus Office-Based General Anesthesia

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    LaQuia A. Vinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. This retrospective study examined records of a pediatric dental office over a 4 year period. Patients presenting before 48 months of age for an initial exam who were diagnosed with early childhood caries were included in the study. Following an initial exam, patients were treated under HBGA or OBGA. Patients were followed to determine their behavior at 6-, 12- and 18-month recall appointments. Fifty-four patients received treatment under HBGA and 26 were treated under OBGA. OBGA patients were significantly more likely to exhibit positive behavior at the 6- and 12-month recall visits p = 0.038 & p = 0.029. Clinicians should consider future behavior when determining general anesthesia treatment modalities in children with early childhood caries presenting to their office.

  1. Pulmonary complications in major burn patients: differences in radiologic and clinical findings between inhaled and non-inhaled burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Sook; Lee, Eil Seong

    2003-01-01

    To analyze differences in the radiologic and clinical findings of pulmonary complications between an inhalation and non-inhalation group of major burn patients, and to apply the findings to the specific diagnosis of pulmonary complications. This study involved 45 major burn patients (18 with inhalation injury, and 27 without) in whom pulmonary complications ensued. Follow-up studies were based on chest radiographs obtained between initial burn day and postburn (PB) 57 (mean, day 27). Types, times of onset, underlying causes, and changes at follow-up study of pulmonary complications between the inhalation and the non-inhalation group were assessed. In the inhalation group, the most frequent complication was air-borne pneumonia (n=7, 395); others were hydrostatic pulmonary edema (n=5, 28%), ARDS (n=5, 28%), atelectasis (n=5, 28%), inhalation pneumonitis (n=3, 17%), pleural effusion (n=3, 17%), and hematogenous pneumonia (n=1, 6%). In the non-inhalation group, airborne pneumonia (n=8, 30%) was also the most common complication; other were hydrostatic edema (n=6, 22%), ARDS (n=5, 19%), atelectasis (n=5, 19%), pleural effusion (n=5, 19%) and hematogenous pneumonia (n=2, 7%). The average times of onset were as follow: for airborne pneumonia, PB day 13.1 (range, 5-27) in the inhalation group, and PB day 21.7 (10-49) in the non-inhalation group; for hematogenous pneumonia, more than one month, regardless of inhalation; for ARDS, PB day 4.9 (2-15) and PB day 13 (7-20) in the inhalation and non-inhalation group, respectively; and for inhalation pneumonitis, PB day 1.7 (1-3). The most common probable cause of ARDS in the inhalation group was inhalation injury (3/5), and in the non-inhalation group, sepsis (4/5). In major burn patients, pulnonary complications differed in terms of their onset time and causes between the inhalation group and the non-inhalation group. In such cases, awareness of the presence or absence of inhalation injury and the onset time of pulmonary

  2. Pulmonary complications in major burn patients: differences in radiologic and clinical findings between inhaled and non-inhaled burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Sook; Lee, Eil Seong [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    To analyze differences in the radiologic and clinical findings of pulmonary complications between an inhalation and non-inhalation group of major burn patients, and to apply the findings to the specific diagnosis of pulmonary complications. This study involved 45 major burn patients (18 with inhalation injury, and 27 without) in whom pulmonary complications ensued. Follow-up studies were based on chest radiographs obtained between initial burn day and postburn (PB) 57 (mean, day 27). Types, times of onset, underlying causes, and changes at follow-up study of pulmonary complications between the inhalation and the non-inhalation group were assessed. In the inhalation group, the most frequent complication was air-borne pneumonia (n=7, 395); others were hydrostatic pulmonary edema (n=5, 28%), ARDS (n=5, 28%), atelectasis (n=5, 28%), inhalation pneumonitis (n=3, 17%), pleural effusion (n=3, 17%), and hematogenous pneumonia (n=1, 6%). In the non-inhalation group, airborne pneumonia (n=8, 30%) was also the most common complication; other were hydrostatic edema (n=6, 22%), ARDS (n=5, 19%), atelectasis (n=5, 19%), pleural effusion (n=5, 19%) and hematogenous pneumonia (n=2, 7%). The average times of onset were as follow: for airborne pneumonia, PB day 13.1 (range, 5-27) in the inhalation group, and PB day 21.7 (10-49) in the non-inhalation group; for hematogenous pneumonia, more than one month, regardless of inhalation; for ARDS, PB day 4.9 (2-15) and PB day 13 (7-20) in the inhalation and non-inhalation group, respectively; and for inhalation pneumonitis, PB day 1.7 (1-3). The most common probable cause of ARDS in the inhalation group was inhalation injury (3/5), and in the non-inhalation group, sepsis (4/5). In major burn patients, pulnonary complications differed in terms of their onset time and causes between the inhalation group and the non-inhalation group. In such cases, awareness of the presence or absence of inhalation injury and the onset time of pulmonary

  3. Photobiomodulation: Implications for Anesthesia and Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Roberta T; Armati, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    This review examines the evidence of neural inhibition as a mechanism underlying pain relief and anesthetic effect of photobiomodulation (PBM). PBM for pain relief has also been used for more than 30 years; however, the mechanism of its effectiveness has not been well understood. We review electrophysiological studies in humans and animal models and cell culture studies to examine neural responses to PBM. Evidence shows that PBM can inhibit nerve function in vivo, in situ, ex vivo, and in culture. Animal studies using noxious stimuli indicate nociceptor-specific inhibition with other studies providing direct evidence of local conduction block, leading to inhibited translation of pain centrally. Evidence of PBM-disrupted neuronal physiology affecting axonal flow, cytoskeleton organization, and decreased ATP is also presented. PBM changes are reversible with no side effects or nerve damage. This review provides strong evidence in neuroscience identifying inhibition of neural function as a mechanism for the clinical application of PBM in pain and anesthesia.

  4. Recent advances in neuromuscular block during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Martijn; Martini, Christian; Dahan, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Muscle relaxation is a routine part of anesthesia and has important advantages. However, the lingering effects of muscle relaxants in the postoperative period have historically been associated with postoperative adverse events. Neuromuscular reversal, together with neuromuscular monitoring, is a recognized strategy to reduce the rate of postoperative residual relaxation but has only marginally improved outcome in the past few decades. Sugammadex, a novel reversal agent with unique encapsulating properties, has changed the landscape of neuromuscular reversal and opened up new opportunities to improve patient care. By quickly and completely reversing any depth of neuromuscular block, it may reduce the rate of residual relaxation and improve respiratory recovery. In addition, sugammadex has made the use of deep neuromuscular block possible during surgery. Deep neuromuscular block may improve surgical working conditions and allow for a reduction in insufflation pressures during selected laparoscopic procedures. However, whether and how this may impact outcomes is not well established.

  5. Anesthesia in pregnancy with heart disease

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    Ankur Luthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pregnant women with heart disease remains challenging due to the advancement of innovations in cardiac surgery and correction of complex cardiac anomalies, and more recently, with the successful performance of heart transplants, cardiac diseases are not only likely to coexist with pregnancy, but will also increase in frequency over the years to come. In developing countries with a higher prevalence of rheumatic fever, cardiac disease may complicate as many as 5.9% of pregnancies with a high incidence of maternal death. Since many of these deaths occur during or immediately following parturition, heart disease is of special importance to the anesthesiologist. This importance arises from the fact that drugs used for preventing or relieving pain during labor and delivery exert a major influence – for better or for worse – on the prognosis of the mother and newborn. Properly administered anesthesia and analgesia can contribute to the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  6. Application effects of dexmedetomidine combined with sevoflurane for anesthesia in short operations in children with burn injury

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    Jin-xin WANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of dexmedetomidine combined with sevoflurane for anesthesia in short operations in pediatric burn patients. Methods  Forty hospitalized children undergoing short operation for burn injury were allocated to sevoflurane group (S group or sevoflurane combined dexmedetomidine group (group D(20 patients each. Children in group D inhaled 8% sevoflurane in the beginning until loss of eyelash reflex, and then the density of sevoflurane was reduced to 3% for maintenance, 5μg/(kg.h of dexmedetomidine was pumped for 10 mins, then the density was reduced to 0.5μg/(kg.h. Then operation was started herewith till to the end. Children in group S received sevoflurane anethesia alone, and dexmedetomidine was replaced by the same volume of physiological saline. Additional 3mg/kg propofol was injected when anesthesia was inadequate. During the procedure, HR, MAP, SpO2 and Ramsay scale were recorded at baseline (T1, loss of eyelash reflex (T2, 5min after the start of operation (T4, 10min (T5 and the end of operation (T6. The operation time, anethesia time, propofol consumption, case of respiratory depression and pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale (PAED in pediatric anesthesia care unit (PACU were recorded. Results  There was no significant difference in operation time between the two groups. Intraoperative SpO2 was higher in group D than in group S (P<0.05, respiratory inhibition occurred in 4 cases of group D and 10 cases of group S (P<0.05. Propofol consumption was less and the operation time was longer in group D than in group S (P<0.05. At T3-T6, the MAP and HR were lower, but the Ramsay scale was higher in group D than in group S (P<0.05. In PACU, PAED scale was lower in group D than in group S (P<0.05. Conclusions  Dexmedetomidine combined with sevoflurane for anesthesia for short burn surgery in children not only stabilize hemodynamic parameters but also reduce the impact to respiration

  7. Colonoscopic polypectomy of colorectal polyps in children under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Heng; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Lin, Wei-Ching; Wu, Shu-Fen; Chen, An-Chyi

    2009-02-01

    In many countries, general anesthesia is not routinely used for colonoscopic polypectomy in children because of either feasibility or cost-effectiveness issues. However, we have been using general anesthesia for colonoscopic polypectomy in pediatric patients in our hospital for the past 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of the procedure and the degree of satisfaction that the patients' parents and endoscopists had with the use of general anesthesia. We retrospectively analyzed the results of colonoscopic polypectomies under general anesthesia in 18 patients performed between January 2001 and December 2005. The removed polyps were examined histologically and the patients were observed to assess complications during the first 24-hour postoperative period. The patients' parents' and endoscopists' satisfaction with the use of general anesthesia was surveyed after the procedure. In our patient group, there were 10 boys and eight girls. The mean age was 5.5 +/- 3.4 years (range, 2-15 years). Seventeen of the 18 patients had rectal bleeding (mean duration, 3.7 months) as the main symptom. There were 12 patients with juvenile polyps, four with hyperplastic polyps, one with juvenile polyposis and one with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The majority (70.6%) of the polyps were located in the rectosigmoid colon. No significant complications related to colonoscopic polypectomy or anesthesia were observed. Satisfaction among parents and endoscopists ranged from good to excellent. General anesthesia is recommended for pediatric patients undergoing colonoscopic polypectomy.

  8. Colonoscopic Polypectomy of Colorectal Polyps in Children Under General Anesthesia

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    Chien-Heng Lin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, general anesthesia is not routinely used for colonoscopic polypectomy in children because of either feasibility or cost-effectiveness issues. However, we have been using general anesthesia for colonoscopic polypectomy in pediatric patients in our hospital for the past 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of the procedure and the degree of satisfaction that the patients' parents and endoscopists had with the use of general anesthesia. We retrospectively analyzed the results of colonoscopic polypectomies under general anesthesia in 18 patients performed between January 2001 and December 2005. The removed polyps were examined histologically and the patients were observed to assess complications during the first 24-hour postoperative period. The patients' parents' and endoscopists' satisfaction with the use of general anesthesia was surveyed after the procedure. In our patient group, there were 10 boys and eight girls. The mean age was 5.5 ± 3.4 years (range, 2–15 years. Seventeen of the 18 patients had rectal bleeding (mean duration, 3.7 months as the main symptom. There were 12 patients with juvenile polyps, four with hyperplastic polyps, one with juvenile polyposis and one with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The majority (70.6% of the polyps were located in the rectosigmoid colon. No significant complications related to colonoscopic polypectomy or anesthesia were observed. Satisfaction among parents and endoscopists ranged from good to excellent. General anesthesia is recommended for pediatric patients undergoing colonoscopic polypectomy.

  9. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli; Valentin, Niels; Wagner, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics during the 1950s initiated a combination of clinical development and technical innovations. Blood gas analyses technology and interpretation in combination with improved positive pressure ventilators were developed in Scandinavia contributing to general and pediatric anesthesia and intensive care practice. Scandinavian specialist training and accreditation includes both anesthesia and intensive care. Although pediatric anesthesia/intensive care is not a separate specialty, an 'informal accreditation' for a specialist position is obtained after training. The pleasure of working in a relatively small group of devoted colleagues and staff has persisted from the pioneering years. It is still one of the most inspiring and pleasant gifts for those working in this demanding specialty. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Total spinal anesthesia in an achondroplasic patient: case report

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    Amiri H R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total spinal anesthesia is a complication of lumbar epidural anesthesia following undiagnosed subarachnoid or subdural injection of local anesthetic. Although many achondroplastic dwarfs have a normal spine, catheter insertion may be more problematic with a narrow epidural space making a subarachnoid tap more probable.  Other malformations associated with achondroplasia, such as prolapsed intervertebral discs, reduced interpedicular distance, shortened pedicles, and osteophyte formation, combined with a narrow epidural space may make identification of the space difficult and increases the risk of dural puncture. Furthermore, subarachnoid tap or dural puncture may be hard to recognize if a free flow of CSF is difficult to achieve due spinal stenosis. Yet, for those who meet the criteria, epidural regional anesthesia is frequently preferred over other forms, which often have more or more dangerous side effects in this type of patient.Case report: A 22-year-old achondroplastic male dwarf patient was scheduled for pelvic mass resection and was considered a candidate for continuous epidural anesthesia. The anesthesia became complicated by total spinal anesthesia, which was reversed following supportive management for about two hours.Conclusion: There is significant debate over the composition and volume of the test dose, especially for patients with achondroplasia. We nevertheless recommend repeated test-doses during the accomplishment of epidural anesthesia to exclude unintended intravascular, intrathecal or subdural injection, keeping in mind that a test dose of local anesthetic does not completely prevent complications.

  11. [Rocuronium anesthesia induced anaphylactic shock: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Min; Zong, Ya-nan; Lu, Jian; Ma, Lu-lin; Zheng, Qing; Guo, Xiang-yang

    2015-10-18

    Anaphylaxis is an acute and fatal systemic allergic reaction to an allergen, and it could be an unpredictable and life-threatening cause during anesthesia. The main purpose of this paper is to report a case of anaphylactic shock during the anesthesia induction and to review the prophylaxis and treatment of anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactoid reactions during the anesthesia period. A 63-year-old man, with a mass on his adrenal, was scheduled to a laparoscopic adrenal tumor excision. During the anesthesia induction period, after administrated sulfentanil, propofol and rocuronium, the blood pressure was decreased and the heart rate was increased. Then, the patient had rash on his whole body and developed an anaphylactic shock. After being treated with the anti-allergic agents and norepinephrine, the rash disappeared and the vital sign become stable. The patient felt nothing uncomfortable during the two weeks'follow-up. Anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactoid reactions are not rare during the anesthesia period. The most common inducements are muscle relaxant, latex and antibiotics. Anaphylactic reactions in the perioperative period are often serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, involving multiple organ systems in which the clinical manifestations are the consequence of the release of preformed mediators from mast cells and basophils. Before anesthesia, we should acquire the allergic history. During the anesthesia period, the vital sign and the skin should be observed carefully.

  12. A holistic view of anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in children

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    Clausen NG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Clausen, Tom G Hansen Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Introduction: Animal studies (including in nonhuman primates have shown that most general anesthetics cause enhanced neuroapoptosis in the immature brain with subsequent long-term neurocognitive deficits later in life. Whether human neurons are equally affected is yet unknown, but a final answer to this issue is still pending. To date, most human studies within the field are of observational nature and the results are conflicting. Some studies indicate an association between exposure to anesthesia and surgery while others do not. Objective: This review summarizes results from preclinical and observational studies. Controversies and challenges regarding the interpretation of these results are presented. Crucial aspects of neurocognitive safety during pediatric anesthesia and surgery are highlighted. International initiatives aiming to improve the safe conductance of pediatric anesthesia are introduced. Conclusion: So far, anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in humans remains an area of concern but it cannot be completely excluded. Clinical practice should not be changed until there are definite proofs that anesthetic exposure causes neurocognitive impairment later in life. Withholding necessary and timely surgeries as a consequence of any such concerns could result in worse harm. Focus of current research should also be redirected to include other factors, than merely anesthetics and surgery, that influence the neurocognitive safety of children perioperatively. Keywords: pediatric anesthesia, neurotoxicity, anesthesia safety, neurocognitive development 

  13. Utilization of Smartphone Applications by Anesthesia Providers

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    Michael S. Green

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care-related apps provide valuable facts and have added a new dimension to knowledge sharing. The purpose of this study is to understand the pattern of utilization of mobile apps specifically created for anesthesia providers. Smartphone app stores were searched, and a survey was sent to 416 anesthesia providers at 136 anesthesiology residency programs querying specific facets of application use. Among respondents, 11.4% never used, 12.4% used less than once per month, 6.0% used once per month, 12.1% used 2-3 times per month, 13.6% used once per week, 21% used 2-3 times per week, and 23.5% used daily. Dosage/pharmaceutical apps were rated the highest as most useful. 24.6% of the participants would pay less than $2.00, 25.1% would pay $5.00, 30.3% would pay $5–$10.00, 9.6% would pay $10–$25.00, 5.1% would pay $25–$50.00, and 5.1% would pay more than $50.00 if an app saves 5–10 minutes per day or 30 minutes/week. The use of mobile phone apps is not limited to reiterating information from textbooks but provides opportunities to further the ever-changing field of anesthesiology. Our survey illustrates the convenience of apps for health care professionals. Providers must exercise caution when selecting apps to ensure best evidence-based medicine.

  14. Effect of Injection Pressure of Infiltration Anesthesia to the Jawbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    To obtain effective infiltration anesthesia in the jawbone, high concentrations of local anesthetic are needed. However, to reduce pain experienced by patients during local anesthetic administration, low-pressure injection is recommended for subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia. Currently, there are no studies regarding the effect of injection pressure on infiltration anesthesia, and a standard injection pressure has not been clearly determined. Hence, the effect of injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia on local anesthetic infiltration to the jawbone was considered by directly measuring lidocaine concentration in the jawbone. Japanese white male rabbits were used as test animals. After inducing general anesthesia with oxygen and sevoflurane, cannulation to the femoral artery was performed and arterial pressure was continuously recorded. Subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia was performed by injecting 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1/80,000 adrenaline, and injection pressure was monitored by a pressure transducer for 40 seconds. After specified time intervals (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), jawbone and blood samples were collected, and the concentration of lidocaine at each time interval was measured. The mean injection pressure was divided into 4 groups (100 ± 50 mm Hg, 200 ± 50 mm Hg, 300 ± 50 mm Hg, and 400 ± 50 mm Hg), and comparison statistical analysis between these 4 groups was performed. No significant change in blood pressure during infiltration anesthesia was observed in any of the 4 groups. Lidocaine concentration in the blood and jawbone were highest 10 minutes after the infiltration anesthesia in all 4 groups and decreased thereafter. Lidocaine concentration in the jawbone increased as injection pressure increased, while serum lidocaine concentration was significantly lower. This suggests that when injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia is low, infiltration of local anesthetic to the jawbone may

  15. Lack of effect of spinal anesthesia on drug metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, E.; Wood, A.J.; Shay, S.; Wood, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of spinal anesthesia on drug disposition was determined in six dogs with chronically implanted vascular catheters using propranolol as a model compound. On the first study day, 40 mg of unlabeled propranolol and 200 microCi of [3H]propranolol were injected into the portal and femoral veins respectively. Arterial blood samples were taken for 4 hr for measurement of plasma concentrations of labeled and unlabeled propranolol by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and of [3H]propranolol by liquid scintillation counting of the HPLC eluant corresponding to each propranolol peak. Twenty-four hr later, spinal anesthesia was induced with tetracaine (mean dose 20.7 +/- 0.6 mg) with low sacral to midthoracic levels and the propranolol infusions and sampling were then repeated. Spinal anesthesia had no significant effect on either the intrinsic clearance of propranolol (2.01 +/- 0.75 L/min before and 1.9 +/- 0.7 L/min during spinal anesthesia), or on mean hepatic plasma flow (2.01 +/- 0.5 L/min before and 1.93 +/- 0.5 L/min during spinal anesthesia). The systemic clearance and elimination half-life of propranolol were also unchanged by spinal anesthesia (0.9 +/- 0.23 L/min on the first day, 0.7 +/- 0.1 L/min during spinal anesthesia; and 101 +/- 21 min on the first day, 115 +/- 16 min during spinal anesthesia, respectively). The volume of distribution (Vd) of propranolol was similarly unaffected by spinal anesthesia

  16. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services furnished...

  17. 42 CFR 414.46 - Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.46 Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services. (a... each anesthesia code that reflects all activities other than anesthesia time. These activities include...

  18. Caffeine accelerates recovery from general anesthesia via multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Robert; Khokhar, Suhail; Chowdhury, Atif N; Xie, Kelvin G; Wong, Josiah Hiu-Yuen; Fox, Aaron P; Xie, Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Various studies have explored different ways to speed emergence from anesthesia. Previously, we have shown that three drugs that elevate intracellular cAMP (forskolin, theophylline, and caffeine) accelerate emergence from anesthesia in rats. However, our earlier studies left two main questions unanswered. First, were cAMP-elevating drugs effective at all anesthetic concentrations? Second, given that caffeine was the most effective of the drugs tested, why was caffeine more effective than forskolin since both drugs elevate cAMP? In our current study, emergence time from anesthesia was measured in adult rats exposed to 3% isoflurane for 60 min. Caffeine dramatically accelerated emergence from anesthesia, even at the high level of anesthetic employed. Caffeine has multiple actions including blockade of adenosine receptors. We show that the selective A 2a adenosine receptor antagonist preladenant or the intracellular cAMP ([cAMP] i )-elevating drug forskolin, accelerated recovery from anesthesia. When preladenant and forskolin were tested together, the effect on anesthesia recovery time was additive indicating that these drugs operate via different pathways. Furthermore, the combination of preladenant and forskolin was about as effective as caffeine suggesting that both A 2A receptor blockade and [cAMP] i elevation play a role in caffeine's ability to accelerate emergence from anesthesia. Because anesthesia in rodents is thought to be similar to that in humans, these results suggest that caffeine might allow for rapid and uniform emergence from general anesthesia in humans at all anesthetic concentrations and that both the elevation of [cAMP] i and adenosine receptor blockade play a role in this response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Currently, there is no method to accelerate emergence from anesthesia. Patients "wake" when they clear the anesthetic from their systems. Previously, we have shown that caffeine can accelerate emergence from anesthesia. In this study, we show that

  19. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity. What the radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Katherine; Nickerson, Joshua P.; Higgins, Timothy; Williams, Robert K.

    2018-01-01

    The use of cross-sectional imaging in the pediatric population continues to rise, particularly the use of MRI. Limiting motion artifact requires cooperative subjects who do not move during imaging, so there has been an increase in the need for pediatric sedation or anesthesia. Over the last decade, concern has increased that exposure to anesthesia might be associated with long-term cognitive deficits. In this review we report current understanding of the effects of anesthesia on the pediatric population, with special focus on long-term developmental and cognitive outcomes, and suggest how radiologists can use new technologies or imaging strategies to mitigate or minimize these potential risks. (orig.)

  20. Effects of leucovorin and methylcobalamin with N2O anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Y.; Sakamoto, S.; Sakuraya, K.; Kubota, T.; Taguchi, H.; Miura, Y.; Takaku, F.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the deoxyuridine suppression test, a good marker for defining biochemical megaloblastosis caused by deficiency of folate and vitamin B 12 , became abnormal (> 10%) after 6 hours of administration of nitrous oxide anesthesia. 5-Formyltetrahydrofolate and methylcobalamin administration during nitrous oxide anesthesia have no remarkable effect on the correction of deoxyuridine suppression test values. On the other hand, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate and methylcobalamin administrated at the end of nitrous oxide anesthesia corrected the abnormal deoxyuridine suppression test values nearly to normal range within 1 hour. 19 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  1. Controversies in Anesthesia for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brett J; Levine, Adam

    2017-11-01

    The future of office-based anesthesia for oral and maxillofacial surgery is at risk. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons have been on the forefront of providing safe and effective outpatient anesthesia for decades. Recent changes in Medicare policies have had, and will continue to have, a significant effect on the training of oral and maxillofacial surgery residents regarding anesthesia. The outcome of these changes can have a major effect on the specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery and a cornerstone of the profession. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Complications of local anesthesia used in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David R; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R; McAndrews, James P

    2011-08-01

    Local anesthetics are used routinely in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Local anesthetics are safe and effective drugs but do have risks that practitioners need to be aware of. This article reviews the complications of local anesthesia. A brief history is provided and the regional and systemic complications that can arise from using local anesthesia are discussed. These complications include paresthesia, ocular complications, allergies, toxicity, and methemoglobinemia. Understanding the risks involved with local anesthesia decreases the chances of adverse events occurring and ultimately leads to improved patient care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Ambulatory pediatric anesthesia: preanesthetic evaluation, anesthetic techniques, and immediate postoperative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pedrajas, F; Monedero, P

    1993-01-01

    The advantages of pediatric out-patient surgery are: 1) greater psychological ease; 2) lower rate of infection; 3) less impact on patient habits, and 4) lower cost. Surgery must not involve organs, must have a low rate of complications, and be short. The preanesthetic interview should include clinical history and complementary examinations, information on anesthetic technique, perioperative recommendations and psychological preparation of parents and child. Detailed information reassures parents and improves collaboration; their presence during induction may be useful. At this time complete fasting is not recommended; although solids are not permitted, clear liquids should be taken up to 2-3 hours before anesthesia. In this way the child is less irritable and hypoglycemia and hypotension during inhalational induction are prevented. Low doses of midazolam and ketamine have been used for premedication, which though possibly useful, is not recommended because recovery may be prolonged. Halogenated anesthetics are very useful, with nitrous oxide providing an excellent complement. The potentially toxic effect of halothane on the liver does not keep this agent from being the most popular. Recovery is fast with any of the usual hypnotics (etomidate, propofol, thiopentone). Although thiopentone continues to be the hypnotic drug of reference, propofol's versatility is causing it to gain wider acceptance. The use of atracurium or vecuronium is justified if the dose is adjusted in keeping with type of surgery and duration. Intraoperative analgesics include meperidine, fentanyl and alfentanyl; morphine is not recommended. Should tracheal intubation be necessary, laryngeal edema may be avoided by gentle, cautious laryngoscopy, the use of a tube without a balloon, and 3 h of postanesthetic observation. A laryngeal mask may serve as an alternative to tracheal intubation. Local-regional anesthesia, excepting epidural and spinal anesthesia, offers a number of advantages: blockade

  4. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  5. Airway tissue plasminogen activator prevents acute mortality due to lethal sulfur mustard inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veress, Livia A; Anderson, Dana R; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B; Houin, Paul R; Rioux, Jacqueline S; Garlick, Rhonda B; Loader, Joan E; Paradiso, Danielle C; Smith, Russell W; Rancourt, Raymond C; Holmes, Wesley W; White, Carl W

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439-447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life-saving rescue therapy after a significant SM

  6. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byeong Cheol; Kim, Seong Min; Jung, Dong Keun; Kim, Gi Ryon; Lee, He Jeong; Jeon, Gye Rock

    2005-01-01

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, ΔPTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, ΔPTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  7. Inhaled Antibiotics for Ventilator-Associated Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lucy B

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are creating a challenge for physicians treating the critically ill. As new antibiotics lag behind the emergence of worsening resistance, intensivists in countries with high rates of extensively drug-resistant bacteria are turning to inhaled antibiotics as adjunctive therapy. These drugs can provide high concentrations of drug in the lung that could not be achieved with intravenous antibiotics without significant systemic toxicity. This article summarizes current evidence describing the use of inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial ventilator-associated pneumonia and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Preliminary data suggest aerosolized antimicrobials may effectively treat resistant pathogens with high minimum inhibitory concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating inhaler use technique in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pothirat C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chaicharn Pothirat, Warawut Chaiwong, Nittaya Phetsuk, Sangnual Pisalthanapuna, Nonglak Chetsadaphan, Woranoot Choomuang Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: Poor inhalation techniques are associated with decreased medication delivery and poor disease control in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate techniques for using inhaler devices in COPD patients.Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted to assess patient compliance with correct techniques for using inhaler devices across four regimens, ie, the pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI, the pMDI with a spacer, the Accuhaler®, and the Handihaler®. The percentage of compliance with essential steps of correct device usage for each regimen was recorded without prior notification when COPD patients presented for a routine visit, and 1 month after receiving face-to-face training. We compared the percentage of compliance between the devices and risk factors related to incorrect techniques using logistic regression analysis. Percentage of patient compliance with correct techniques was compared between the two visits using the chi-square test. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05.Results: A total of 103 COPD patients (mean age 71.2±9.2 years, males 64.1%, low education level 82.5%, and percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second 51.9±22.5 were evaluated. Seventy-seven patients (74.8% performed at least one step incorrectly. Patients using the Handihaler had the lowest compliance failure (42.5%, and the odds ratio for failure with the other devices compared with the Handihaler were 4.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–11.8 for the pMDI, 3.1 (95% CI 1.2–8.2 for the pMDI with a spacer, and 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.2 for the Accuhaler. Low education level was the single most important factor related

  9. Insulin inhalation for diabetic patients: Nursing considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Mohammed Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific knowledge has advanced to enable the development of inhaled insulin. It is a form of diabetes medication administered via the pulmonary system that studies have shown to be efficacious in the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Inhaled insulin is a new, safe means to deliver insulin that may increase patient compliance with insulin therapy, helping them to achieve optimal glycemic control and possibly reducing their risk of developing cardiovascular complications. However, diabetes is a chronic illness requiring lifetime intervention. Empowering patients with the knowledge of the diabetes disease process may give them the confidence to be more autonomous in managing their diabetes. HIIP gives nurse practitioners a new option that may improve their patients’ acceptance of insulin therapy, and improve glycemic control.

  10. Effectiveness of gaseous and intravenous inductions on children′s anxiety and distress during extraction of teeth under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giath Gazal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Anxiety and distress regarding dental treatment is a major issue for dental patients and can be exaggerated in pediatric dental patients. Aims: The aim was to investigate how different methods of induction for general anesthesia affect children′s distress for dental procedures such as extraction of teeth. Subjects and Methods: This was an observational clinical study conducted at Manchester University Dental Hospital. The induction of anesthesia in children was achieved with either intravenous (I.V. or a gaseous induction. The Modified Child Smiley Faces Scales were completed for children at various times intervals. Statistical Analysis Used: There were statistically significant differences between the mean distress scores for the I.V. and inhalation groups (P values from independent t-test: P < 0.001 was applied. Results: In gaseous induction group, the number of children who scored severe and very severe distress was greater than those who were in I.V. group. Gaseous induction was used for 23 children. Preoperatively, 56.5% children were in very severe distress, 17.4% in severe distress, 13% in moderate distress, 8.7% in mild distress and only one (4.3% showed no distress. For I.V. induction, 11.2% children were in very severe distress, 9% in severe distress, and 9.6% in moderate distress, 24.2% in mild distress and 46.1% showed no distress. Conclusions: Gaseous induction anesthesia for extractions of teeth does produce high levels of distress than I.V. induction in children for dental extractions. There was no significant difference between both induction methods in terms of distress levels at the time of recovery and 15 min postoperatively.

  11. Evaluation of optimum time for intravenous cannulation after sevoflurane induction of anesthesia in different pediatric age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kanil Ranjith; Sinha, Renu; Chandiran, Ravindran; Pandey, Ravinder Kumar; Darlong, Vanlal; Chandralekha

    2017-01-01

    The ideal time for intravenous (IV) cannulation following inhalational induction in children is debatable. The effect of age on this time has not been studied. We evaluated the optimum time for IV cannulation after sevoflurane induction of anesthesia in different pediatric age groups. A prospective interventional study based on Dixon's sequential up and down method was conducted in children of age 1-10 years. They were grouped according to their age - Group 1: 1-3 years, Group 2: >3-7 years, and Group 3: >7-10 years. Anesthesia was induced with 8% sevoflurane in 5 L of 100% oxygen. IV cannulation was attempted at 3.5 min in the first child in each group. The time for cannulation in the next child was stepped up or down by 30 s depending on positive or negative response, respectively, in the previous child. Children were recruited till a minimum of six pairs of failure-success sequence which was obtained in each group. The mean of midpoints of the failure-success sequence was calculated to obtain the time for cannulation in 50% of the children in each group. Total number of children in Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 24, 23, and 24, respectively. The mean (95% confidence level) time for IV cannulation after sevoflurane induction in Groups 1, 2, and 3 was 53.6 (40.0-67.1), 105 (62.6-147.4), and 143.6 (108.8-178.4) s, respectively. This time was significantly shorter in Group 1 compared to those in Groups 2 and 3. The optimum time for IV cannulation in 50% of the children after sevoflurane induction of anesthesia was shorter in children of age 1-3 years than in older children.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of bispectral index-guided fast-track anesthesia using sevoflurane combined with dexmedetomidine for intracranial aneurysm embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-liang Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine has sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, anti-sympathetic, and anti-shivering effects. Dexmedetomidine might be effective in combination with sevoflurane for anesthesia, but prospective randomized controlled clinical trials with which to verify this hypothesis are lacking. In total, 120 patients who underwent embolization of an intracranial aneurysm were recruited from Anhui Provincial Hospital and Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University of China and randomly allocated to two groups. After intraoperative administration of 2% to 3% sevoflurane inhalation, one group of patients received pump-controlled intravenous injection of 1.0 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 15 minutes followed by maintenance with 0.3 μg/kg/h until the end of surgery; the other group of patients only underwent pump-controlled infusion of saline. Bispectral index monitoring revealed that dexmedetomidine-assisted anesthesia can shorten the recovery time of spontaneous breathing, time to eye opening, and time to laryngeal mask removal. Before anesthetic induction and immediately after laryngeal mask airway removal, the glucose and lactate levels were low, the S100β and neuron-specific enolase levels were low, the perioperative blood pressure and heart rate were stable, and postoperative delirium was minimal. These findings indicate that dexmedetomidine can effectively assist sevoflurane for anesthesia during surgical embolization of intracranial aneurysms, shorten the time to consciousness and extubation, reduce the stress response and energy metabolism, stabilize hemodynamic parameters, and reduce adverse reactions, thereby reducing the damage to the central nervous system. This trial was registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (http://www.chictr.org.cn/ (registration number: ChiCTR-IPR-16008113.

  13. Electrostatics in pharmaceutical aerosols for inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer; Chan, Hak-Kim; Kwok, Philip Chi Lip

    2013-08-01

    Electrostatics continues to play an important role in pharmaceutical aerosols for inhalation. Despite its ubiquitous nature, the charging process is complex and not well understood. Nonetheless, significant advances in the past few years continue to improve understanding and lead to better control of electrostatics. The purpose of this critical review is to present an overview of the literature, with an emphasis on how electrostatic charge can be useful in improving pulmonary drug delivery.

  14. Two /sup 238/Pu inhalation incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.R.; Hall, R.M.

    1978-06-01

    Two employees inhaled significant amounts of /sup 238/Pu in separate unrelated contamination incidents in 1977. Both acute exposure incidents are described and the urine, feces, and in-vivo chest count data for each employee. Case B (/sup 238/PuNO/sub 3/) received 24 DTPA treatments beginning the day of the incident while, for medical reasons, Case A (/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/) received no therapy.

  15. Inhalation of nanoplatelets - Theoretical deposition simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Primary objective of the contribution was the theoretical prediction of nanoplatelet deposition in the human respiratory tract. Modeling was founded on the hypothetical inhalation of graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) measuring 0.01 and 0.1μm in thickness and adopting a projected area diameter of 1-30μm. Particle uptake was assumed to take place with inhalation flow rates of 250, 500, 750, and 1000cm 3 s -1 , respectively. For an appropriate description of pulmonary particle behavior, transport of GNP in a stochastic lung structure and deposition formulae based on analytical and numerical studies were presupposed. The results obtained from the theoretical approach clearly demonstrate that GNP with a thickness of 0.01μm deposit in the respiratory tract by 20-50%, whereas GNP with a thickness of 0.1μm exhibit a deposition of 20-90%. Larger platelets deposit with higher probability than small ones. Increase of inhalation flow rate is accompanied by decreased deposition in the case of thin GNP, whilst thicker GNP are preferably accumulated in the extrathoracic region. Generation-specific deposition ranges from 0.05 to 7% (0.01μm) and from 0.05 to 9%, with maximum values being obtained in airway generation 20. In proximal airway generations (0-10), deposition is increased with inhalation flow rate, whereas in intermediate to distal generations a reverse effect may be observed. Health consequences of GNP deposition in different lung compartments are subjected to an intense debate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. [Ventricular fibrillation following deodorant spray inhalation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, F; Le Tacon, S; Maria, M; Pierrard, O; Monin, P

    2008-01-01

    We report one case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation following butane poisoning after inhalation of antiperspiration aerosol. An early management using semi-automatic defibrillator explained the success of the resuscitation. The mechanism of butane toxicity could be an increased sensitivity of cardiac receptors to circulating catecholamines, responsible for cardiac arrest during exercise and for resuscitation difficulties. The indication of epinephrine is discussed.

  17. Inhaled dry powder formulations for treating tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shyamal; Tucker, Ian; Stewart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the second leading cause of death from infectious diseases. Although antitubercular drugs have been traditionally administered orally, there is a growing interest in delivering drugs via the pulmonary route using nebulisers or dry powder inhalers. Drugs in dry powder inhalers (DPI) are stable and DPI are user-friendly compared to nebulisation which is time consuming, inconvenient and inefficient and requires special equipment. For tuberculosis treatment, drugs should target alveolar macrophages that harbour microorganisms and/or maintain high drug concentration at the infection site in the lung. Drug particles include micro-particles or nanoparticles. Powders can be engineered by micronisation, crystallisation, spray drying, freeze drying and particle coating approaches. The formulation may contain single or combination drugs. This paper will provide an update on current status of TB, its pathogenesis, current treatment strategies, shortcomings of current oral or parenteral delivery strategies, pulmonary delivery devices, advantages of pulmonary delivery of powder formulations, formulation approaches and pharmacokinetic studies of pulmonary delivery of powders for inhalation.

  18. Metabolism of inhaled methylethylketone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosnier, Frédéric; Grossmann, Stéphane; Nunge, Hervé; Brochard, Céline; Muller, Samuel; Lambert-Xolin, Anne-Marie; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Rieger, Benoît; Thomas, Aurélie; Décret, Marie-Josèphe; Burgart, Manuella; Gaté, Laurent; Cossec, Benoît; Campo, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Methylethylketone (MEK) is widely used in industry, often in combination with other compounds. Although nontoxic, it can make other chemicals harmful. This study investigates the fate of MEK in rat blood, brain and urine as well as its hepatic metabolism following inhalation over 1 month (at 20, 200 or 1400 ppm). MEK did not significantly accumulate in the organism: blood concentrations were similar after six-hour or 1-month inhalation periods, and brain concentrations only increased slightly after 1 month's exposure. Urinary excretion, based on the major metabolites, 2,3-butanediols (± and meso forms), accounted for less than 2.4% of the amount inhaled. 2-Butanol, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and MEK itself were only detectable in urine in the highest concentration conditions investigated, when metabolic saturation occurred. Although MEK exposure did not alter the total cytochrome P450 concentration, it induced activation of both CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 enzymes. In addition, the liver glutathione concentration (reduced and oxidized forms) decreased, as did glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity (at exposure levels over 200 ppm). These metabolic data could be useful for pharmacokinetic model development and/or verification and suggest the ability of MEK to influence the metabolism (and potentiate the toxicity) of other substances.

  19. Fragrance sensitisers: Is inhalation an allergy risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that some fragrance substances have the potential to cause skin sensitisation associated with the development of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Fragrances are invariably relatively volatile leading to the consideration that inhalation of fragrances might be a relevant route for either the induction of allergic sensitisation or the elicitation of allergic reactions. Moreover, there has been increasing recognition that allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract can be induced by topical exposure to certain chemical allergens. Here the central question addressed is whether inhalation exposure to fragrance allergens has the potential to cause skin and/or respiratory sensitisation via the respiratory tract, or elicit allergic symptoms in those already sensitised. In addressing those questions, the underlying immunobiology of skin and respiratory sensitisation to chemicals has been reviewed briefly, and the relevant experimental and clinical evidence considered. The essential mechanistic differences between skin and respiratory allergy appear consistent with other sources of information, including the phenomenon of ACD that can arise from topical exposure to airborne allergens, but in the absence of accompanying respiratory effects. The conclusion is that, in contrast to topical exposure (including topical exposure to airborne material), inhalation of fragrance sensitisers does not represent a health risk with respect to allergy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhaled iloprost for sarcoidosis associated pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, R P; Judson, M A; Lower, E E; Highland, K; Kwon, S; Craft, N; Engel, P J

    2009-07-01

    Patients with sarcoidosis associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) have responded to systemic prostacyclin therapy. To determine the rate of response to inhaled prostacyclin, iloprost, in SAPH. Sarcoidosis patients with pulmonary hypertension and no evidence for left ventricular dysfunction were enrolled in an open label, prospective study. Patients underwent right heart catheterization and six minute walk (6MW) test. Quality of life was evaluated using several instruments, including the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Patients received 5 mcg of inhaled iloprost every 2-3 hours while awake. After four months of therapy, patients underwent repeat cardiac catheterization, 6 MW test, and completed quality of life questionnaires. Of the 22 patients enrolled, 15 completed all 16 weeks of therapy. The most common reasons for study discontinuation included drug associated cough (3 patients) and compliance with the prescribed number of treatments per day (2 patients). Six patients experienced a 20% or greater decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) from baseline with five of these six patients also showing > or = 5 mm Hg reduction in PA mean. Although three patients improved the 6MW distance by at least 30 meters, only one had a decrease in PVR. At 16 weeks a significant decrease was reported in the SGRQ activity score (p = 0.0273), with seven patients having a 4 point or greater decrease. Inhaled iloprost as monotherapy was associated with an improvement in pulmonary hemodynamics and quality of life as assessed by the SGRQ activity score in some sarcoidosis patients with SAPH.

  1. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  2. Comparison of Hemodynamic Changes during General Anesthesia with Low-dose Isoflurane or Propofol in Elderly Patients Undergoing Upper Femoral Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mohammad Taghi Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Surgery of upper part of femor in elderly patients can be due to the fracture of femoral neck, shaft and arthroplasty. Hemodynamic changes and complications of the anesthesia are among the major concerns. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes in low dose isoflurane with propofol in upper femoral surgeries in elderly patients. Methods: This prospective clinical trial study was done on 60 patients over 65 year-old elderly patients with ASA physical status of I and II that were candidate for upper femoral surgery in two groups (inhalational: isoflurane 0.5-0.6 MAC and (total intravenous anesthesia with propofol 50-100 mic/kg/min. Hemodynamic changes were compared in these groups with the same anesthetic depth (HR-SBP-DBP-MBP-SaO₂. Results: There was no significant difference in heart rate, age or sex between two groups. In isoflurane group SBP on 20 and 25th minutes and DBP and MBP on 20, 25 and 35th minutes were significantly higher than propofol group. In propofol group SaO₂ was significantly more than isoflurane group on induction, start of surgery and on 5, 25, 35 and 45th minutes of surgery. Conclusion: In anesthesia with the same Bi-Spectral Index, isoflurane provides more stable hemodynamic parameters than propofol.

  3. Factors associated with Taiwan anesthesiologists' intention to leave anesthesia practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-O Wang

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Unfavorable working conditions were considered to lower the satisfaction of anesthesiologists in Taiwan. In particular, an inability to take care of the family and a low salary were major factors in deterring anesthesiologists in Taiwan from continuing in anesthesia.

  4. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli

    2015-01-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second...... World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were...... created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics...

  5. The febrile parturient: choice of anesthesia | Kuczkowski | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. No Abstratct. Key words: Pregnancy, Fever, Infection, Herpes simplex virus, Hepatitis, Human immunodeficiency virus, Urinary tract infections, Chorioamnionitis, Pneumonia, Septic shock, Anesthesia; regional, general, Epidural analgesia and maternal fever ...

  6. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shoko; Goto, Yukimi; Nagai, Michiyo; Hashiguchi, Chikako; Fujii, Osamu; Ota, Yosuke; Tsujino, Kayoko; Soejima, Toshinori; Kato, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  7. The effect of anesthesia on body temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Rainer

    2010-06-01

    The human thermoregulatory system usually maintains core body temperature near 37 degrees C. This homeostasis is accomplished by thermoregulatory defense mechanisms such as vasoconstriction and shivering or sweating and vasodilatation. Thermoregulation is impaired during general anesthesia. Suppression of thermoregulatory defense mechanisms during general anesthesia is dose dependant and mostly results in perioperative hypothermia. Several adverse effects of hypothermia have been identified, including an increase in postoperative wound infection, perioperative coagulopathy and an increase of postoperative morbid cardiac events. Perioperative hypothermia can be avoided by warming patients actively during general anesthesia. Fever is a controlled increase of core body temperature. Various causes of perioperative fever are given. Fever is usually attenuated by general anesthesia. Typically, patients develop a fever of greater magnitude in the postoperative phase. Postoperative fever is fairly common. The incidence of fever varies with type and duration of surgery, patient's age, surgical site and preoperative inflammation.

  8. [A case of conversion disorder (hysteria) after spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Makino, Shiho; Doi, Yumiko; Nishimura, Mitsuo; Baba, Miwa; Mizukawa, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Yoji

    2009-02-01

    We report a case of conversion disorder after spinal anesthesia. A 16-year-old healthy woman underwent arthroscopic surgery under spinal anesthesia. She showed tremor all over and it did not stop. We sedated her with propofol during the operation. After the operation, her involuntary tremble continued. We consulted with a pediatrician who diagnosed her as conversion disorder. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were performed to rule out some pathological changes and abnormality in her head. As a result, Rathke cleft cyst was suspected but it could not explain this episode. We consider that her stress for the operation under spinal anesthesia caused this episode. In a case of a younger patient, it is necessary to consider mental support. And we need to suspect conversion disorder when we see tremor during operation under regional anesthesia.

  9. [Development and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-yi; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Sheng-mei

    2010-09-21

    To study the design, implementation and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system. To record, process and store peri-operative patient data automatically, all kinds of bedside monitoring equipments are connected into the system based on information integrating technology; after a statistical analysis of those patient data by data mining technology, patient status can be evaluated automatically based on risk prediction standard and decision support system, and then anesthetist could perform reasonable and safe clinical processes; with clinical processes electronically recorded, standard record tables could be generated, and clinical workflow is optimized, as well. With the system, kinds of patient data could be collected, stored, analyzed and archived, kinds of anesthesia documents could be generated, and patient status could be evaluated to support clinic decision. The anesthesia information management system is useful for improving anesthesia quality, decreasing risk of patient and clinician, and aiding to provide clinical proof.

  10. PERIPHERAL BLOCK ANESTHESIA OF UPPER EXTREMITY AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tapar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful peripheral blocks and selection of appropriate technique according to surgery is possible with a good knowledge of anatomy. Regional peripheral block anesthesia of upper extremity which applied by single injection to plexus brachialis is the most recommended method of anesthesia in daily surgical procedures. The most important advantages of peripheral nerve blocks which are type of regional anesthesia according to general anesthesia and central blocks are less effect to respiration and hemodynamics and shortness of recovery time. If a plexus brachialis catheter is placed, control of pain is provided without using systemic narcotic analgesic. With these advantages; rare life threatening potential complications can be seen which are pneumothorax, hematoma, neuritis, allergy, systemic and neurologic complications. In this compilation we aimed to review again the complications of upper extremity nerve blocks according to block type. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(3.000: 195-200

  11. Fine particle mass from the Diskus inhaler and Turbuhaler inhaler in children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B; Sumby, B S

    1998-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate dose consistency and particle distribution from the dry powder inhalers Diskus and Turbuhaler. Full profiles of inhalation pressure versus time were recorded in 18 4 yr old and 18 8 yr old asthmatic children through Diskus and Turbuhaler inhalers. These data were used...... represents the changes in flow rate over time through the device than the constant flow rate usually applied with an impactor alone. The aerosol cloud was released before the peak inspiratory effort had been achieved and accordingly the early part and not the peak of the inspiratory performance...... the varying age groups and inspiratory flow performances when compared to the Turbuhaler in terms of the proportion of the dose emitted at each particle size. This improvement is at the expense of a low fine particle mass and a high proportion of coarse particles from the Diskus as compared...

  12. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers

  13. Rational use of oxygen in medical disease and anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Staehr, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2012-01-01

    Supplemental oxygen is often administered during anesthesia and in critical illness to treat hypoxia, but high oxygen concentrations are also given for a number of other reasons such as prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). The decision to use supplemental oxygen is, however, controversial......, because of large heterogeneity in the reported results and emerging reports of side-effects. The aim of this article is to review the recent findings regarding benefits and harms of oxygen therapy in anesthesia and acute medical conditions....

  14. Cholecystectomy with local anesthesia as a resource in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Campo Abad, Roberto; Noel Mederos Curbelo, Orestes

    2011-01-01

    In the case of a patient presenting with acute cholescystectomy ideally is to remove the gallbladder. Sometimes there are special situations in malnourished elderlies with deterioration of its general status in whom a lengthy anesthesia intervention, even using not much invasive means as the videosurgery, put at risk the life of patient. In such cases the cholescystectomy with local anesthesia is an alternative that must to be taken into account. (author)

  15. Anesthesia and Pain Relief in the History of Islamic Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since diseases and surgeries could be very painful, the annihilation of pain has been the most important goal of physicians. The history of Iranian-Islamic medicine includes distinguished physicians that attempted to find different methods of anesthesia. This research aims at reviewing approaches for anesthesia throughout the history of the Iranian-Islamic medicine, in order to identify a variety of drugs used during that period. Methods: In this research, the information was main...

  16. [General anesthesia for a patient with post-polio syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonobe, Shota; Imashuku, Yasuhiko; Inamori, Masayuki; Yabuta, Koichi; Hashimura, Toshiya; Kura, Masahiro; Otada, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    We gave anesthesia for a patient with post-polio syndrome undergoing laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy. She is a 68-year-old woman and had been diagnosed as post-polio syndrome since she was 55 years of age. Before the operation, paralysis was observed in her right leg. After inducing anesthesia using propofol, muscle relaxation was obtained by rocuronium bromide for intubation. Remifentanil was used during the operation, and good pain relief was obtained by iv-PCA (fentanyl) after operation.

  17. Subconjunctival hemorrhage and vision loss after regional ocular anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Umesh Chandra; Panda, Lapam; Gupta, Sumi; Modi, Rohit Ramesh

    2017-04-22

    To report two cases of retinal vascular occlusion and associated subconjunctival hemorrhage in needle optic nerve injury during local bulbar anesthesia. Surgical records of these two subjects who presented with acute vision loss after cataract extraction were studied, and systemic workup and ocular imaging were carried out to establish the cause. Computerized tomography showed evidence of optic nerve injury. Subconjunctival hemorrhage could be an associated clinical finding in hypodermic needle injury-related retinal vascular occlusion during ocular anesthesia.

  18. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  19. Surgery plus anesthesia induces loss of attention in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan eRen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop animal models to study postoperative delirium. Inattention is one of the symptoms of delirium. Increases in the levels of α-synuclein and S100β have been reported to be associated with delirium. Therefore, we set out to determine the effects of surgery plus general anesthesia on the behavioral changes (including loss of attention in mice and on the levels of α-synuclein and S100β in the brain tissues of these mice. C57BL/6J mice (2- to 8-months-old had a simple laparotomy plus isoflurane anesthesia. The behavioral changes, including attention level and the speed of movements, were determined 12, 24 and 48 hours after the surgery plus anesthesia in the mice. The levels of α-synuclein and S100β in the cortex of these mice following the surgery plus anesthesia were determined by Western blot analysis.We found that there was a loss of attention at 24, but not 12 or 48, hours following the surgery plus anesthesia (49%+5 versus 33%+2.9, P=0.011, N=12 in the mice without significantly affecting the speed of their movements. There were increases in the levels of total α-synuclein (139%+33.5 versus 100%+13.7, P=0.037, N=6 and S100β (142%+7.7 versus 100%+6, P=0.002, N=6 in the cortex of the mice 12 hours following the surgery plus anesthesia.These findings suggested that the surgery plus isoflurane anesthesia might induce behavioral and biochemical/biochemical/cellular changes associated with delirium. We could use the surgery plus anesthesia in mice to develop an animal model to study postoperative delirium.

  20. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Towe, Christopher; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  1. Gamma knife radiosurgery under general anesthesia in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Serizawa, Toru; Nagano, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) is an important treatment option for pediatric intracranial diseases, such as arteriovenous malformations and brain tumors. To perform GKS in children, general anesthesia is required for placing a stereotactic frame around the head of the patient, who must remain supine for the entire procedure. This report describes the anesthetic management of children who have undergone GKS at our institution. Fifty-one GKS procedures were performed in 43 patients (age range, 2-15 years). Twenty-one patients had arteriovenous malformations, and 14 patients had brain tumors. Twenty-nine patients (67.4%) received general anesthesia. All children 10 years or younger were treated under general anesthesia. General anesthesia for GKS is performed outside of the operating room and involves unique conditions. First, the patients must be transported to multiple sites in the hospital (the neuroangiography suite, the department of radiology for magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and the gamma knife unit). Second, general anesthesia must be maintained in a high magnetic field. Third, medical staff, including anesthesiologists, must remain outside the room during irradiation. Safe and efficient general anesthesia is essential for performing GKS in children. (author)

  2. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  3. SODIUM THIOPANTAL AND MIDAZOLAM USE IN NEUROLEPTIC ANESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAJEDI

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study amnesic and anesthetic effects of Midazolam used to reduce awarness and recall of neurolept Anesthesia. Methods: The study was clinical trial with simple random sampling. Patients were studied in four groups of 30 numbers. Each preparation and induction of anesthesia was identical in all groups. Bolous Thiopental (BT group received 0.3mg/kg NaThiopental during induction of Anesthesia. Infusion thiopental group (IT 0.3mg/kg Na thiopental was given during induction plus 100mg/kg/min for Maintaince of anesthesia. Bolous Midazolam (BM group recieved 0.1 mg/kg Midazolam during induction and Infusion Midazolam (lM groug 0.1 mg/kg during Induction plus 0.1mg/kg/h for maintainance of Anesthesia. All groups were observed for signs of awareness and recall. Also hemodynamic variables and duration of recovery were measured and compared between groups with analysis of variance and Chi square tests. Result: Signs of Awareness (tachycardia and Lacrimation in IM group was significantly less than other groups. (P<0.05 Percent of patients reported recall were significantly lower in IM group. (P<0.05 Discussion: Infusion of Midazolam can reduce signs of awareness and recall during neurolept anesthesia without increase in complications or duration of recovery period

  4. Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert; Cremata, Edward; Hawk, Cheryl

    2014-02-03

    There are currently no widely accepted guidelines on standards for the practice of chiropractic or manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia, and the evidence base for this practice is composed primarily of lower-level evidence. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-informed and consensus-based guidelines on spinal manipulation under anesthesia to address the gaps in the literature with respect to patient selection and treatment protocols. An expert consensus process was conducted from August-October 2013 using the Delphi method. Panelists were first provided with background literature, consisting of three review articles on manipulation under anesthesia. The Delphi rounds were conducted using the widely-used and well-established RAND-UCLA consensus process methodology to rate seed statements for their appropriateness. Consensus was determined to be reached if 80% of the 15 panelists rated a statement as appropriate. Consensus was reached on all 43 statements in two Delphi rounds. The Delphi process was conducted from August-October 2013. Consensus was reached on recommendations related to all aspects of manipulation under anesthesia, including patient selection; diagnosis and establishing medical necessity; treatment and follow-up procedures; evaluation of response to treatment; safety practices; appropriate compensation considerations; and facilities, anesthesia and nursing standards. A high level of agreement was achieved in developing evidence-informed recommendations about the practice of chiropractic/manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia.

  5. Smart marketing may improve public understanding of the anesthesia profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barak; Ogorek, Daniel; Oifa, Stanislav; Cattan, Anat; Matot, Idit

    2015-01-01

    A 2005 survey led by the Israeli Society of Anesthesiologists (ISA) found that large parts of the Israeli public are not familiar with the profession of anesthesia. The ISA has subsequently been conducting a public campaign for several years with the aim to enhance community knowledge regarding the anesthesiologists' training and their critical role in the perioperative period. The present study sought to evaluate the value of a campaign aiming to enhance public understanding of the importance of a medical profession; more specifically, a campaign to promote awareness of the community regarding the anesthesia profession. If proved to be successful, public campaigns may be considered in other countries and for other medical professions with similar difficulties. In 2013, five hundred participants from the general community were asked to answer a questionnaire focusing on the profession of anesthesia. Public knowledge has improved following the campaign. Specifically, improvement was demonstrated regarding the qualification of the anesthesiologist as an MD (92% vs. 64% in 2013 and 2005, respectively), and enhanced awareness of the anesthesia team's critical role in the operating room (OR) (48% vs. 30% in 2013 and 2005, respectively). The Israeli community is attentive to public campaigns that address the roles of a medical profession. Enhanced public knowledge regarding the importance of the anesthesia profession may have a significant impact on both the payment policy for anesthesiologists and on the recruitment of more physicians to the field of anesthesia. Public campaigns may be considered for other medical professions with similar difficulties.

  6. A technical description of a novel pharmacological anesthesia robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mohamad; Arbeid, Erik; Cyr, Shantale; Mathieu, Pierre A; Taddei, Riccardo; Morse, Joshua; Hemmerling, Thomas M

    2014-02-01

    To control the three components of general anesthesia (hypnosis, analgesia, and neuromuscular blockade), an automated closed-loop, anesthesia-drug delivery system (McSleepy) was developed. Bispectral index was used as the control variable for hypnosis, the analgoscore for analgesia, and phonomyography for neuromuscular blockade. McSleepy can be used to control the induction, maintenance and emergence from general anesthesia. To do so, a large touch screen is used to provide a user friendly interface, permitting bidirectional communication: the user giving information about the different stages of anesthesia, and the system prompting the anesthesiologist to perform certain actions such as mask ventilation, intubation or waking-up the patient using audio clips with voice commands. Several safety features were implemented to provide a secure and reliable anesthesia. Preliminary results of 15 patients are presented in this paper. Evaluation of McSleepy was done through an assessment of its clinical performance and using Varvel's performance indices. The system was found to be clinically useful by providing good precision in drug administration and reliable results for the duration of a general anesthesia.

  7. Penetrating keratoplasty for perforated corneal ulcers under topical anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Rashim; Sharma, Namrata; Pruthi, Archna; Maharana, Prafulla K; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the structural and functional outcomes of eyes with perforated corneal ulcers undergoing penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) under topical anesthesia. A prospective analysis of 17 consecutive cases that underwent PKP under topical anesthesia, where infiltrative anesthesia was contraindicated or general anesthesia could not be given for medical reasons or was not available for logistical reasons. Seventeen eyes of 15 patients with a mean age of 47.3 ± 16.2 years underwent a PKP for treating perforated corneal ulcers under topical anesthesia. Perforation involved the pupillary zone in 13 (76.5%) cases. Preoperatively, 8 patients (47.1%) were phakic, 8 (47.1%) were pseudophakic, and 1 (5.9%) was aphakic. The PKP was completed successfully in all the eyes. An anterior capsular tear occurred in 3 eyes (17.6%). A posterior chamber intraocular implant was put in 1 eye, and 2 eyes were found to be aphakic. The patients reported mild to moderate discomfort and tolerated the procedure well. At the final follow-up, 10 patients had clear grafts (58.8%), and 7 patients (41.2%) had partially clear grafts. The best-corrected visual acuity was better than 6/18 in 10 eyes and between 6/60 and 6/24 in 7 eyes. PKP can be performed successfully under topical anesthesia in cooperative patients who have perforated corneal ulcers.

  8. Workplace Inhalant Abuse in Adult Female: Brief Report

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Verma; Yatan Pal Singh Balhara; Smita N. Deshpande

    2011-01-01

    Inhalant abuse is the purposeful inhalation of intoxicating gases and vapors for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. With its propensity for being yet an under-recognized form of substance use, being gateway to hard substances, cross-cultural penetration crossing socioeconomic boundaries, and causing significant morbidity and mortality in early ages, the prevention of inhalant misuse is a highly pertinent issue. This clinical report identifies a newer perspective in the emergenc...

  9. Inhalant abuse in the youth : A reason for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Simlai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times Inhalant or Volatile substances are emerging as a major drug of abuse in the preadolescent and adolescent age group. Most of the children are from broken homes and poor backgrounds. Inhalants have serious immediate and longterm side-effects and can also cause sudden sniffing death syndrome. It is difficult to control this ever-growing problem because Inhalants or Solvents are widely available. Management issues have been discussed in the review.

  10. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants After General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study-A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Mary Ellen; Withington, D E; Arnup, S J; Davidson, A J; Disma, N; Frawley, G; Morton, N S; Bell, G; Hunt, R W; Bellinger, D C; Polaner, D M; Leo, A; Absalom, A R; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Izzo, F; Szmuk, P; Young, V; Soriano, S G; de Graaff, J C

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  11. Reactive Software Agent Anesthesia Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant H. Kruger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information overload of the anesthesiologist through technological advances have threatened the safety of patients under anesthesia in the operating room (OR. Traditional monitoring and alarm systems provide independent, spatially distributed indices of patient physiological state. This creates the potential to distract caregivers from direct patient care tasks. To address this situation, a novel reactive agent decision support system with graphical human machine interface was developed. The system integrates the disparate data sources available in the operating room, passes the data though a decision matrix comprising a deterministic physiologic rule base established through medical research. Patient care is improved by effecting change to the care environment by displaying risk factors and alerts as an intuitive color coded animation. The system presents a unified, contextually appropriate snapshot of the patient state including current and potential risk factors, and alerts of critical patient events to the operating room team without requiring any user intervention. To validate the efficacy of the system, a retrospective analysis focusing on the hypotension rules were performed. Results show that even with vigilant and highly trained clinicians, deviations from ideal patient care exist and it is here that the proposed system may allow more standardized and improved patient care and potentially outcomes.

  12. Ambulatory anesthesia for cosmetic surgery in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Diego Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Outpatient plastic surgery is growing around the world. This industry faces unique challenges in terms of patient selection and standards of practice to ensure safety and cost-effectiveness. This review will highlight information about anesthesia practice for outpatient cosmetic surgery in Brazil, especially regarding regulation, legislation, and medical tourism. Medical tourism is growing worldwide, with a flow of patients traveling from developed to developing countries where procedures can be done at a fraction of the cost as in the patient's home country. Though generally well tolerated, there are concerns about incomplete data on outcomes of office-based surgeries and lack of safety standards. Brazil is one of the world's leaders in cosmetic surgery. Strong legislation governing outpatient facilities and continued development of accrediting standards for healthcare facilities are indications of a commitment to patient safety and high quality of care. Although the market for medical tourism in this country is high, there are still barriers to overcome before Brazil reaches its full potential in this industry.

  13. The dispersion behaviour of dry powder inhalation formulations cannot be assessed at a single inhalation flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmeijer, Floris; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-04-25

    The dispersion performances of inhalation powders are often tested at only one inhalation flow rate in mechanistic formulation studies. This limited approach is challenged by studies showing that interactions exist between inhalation flow rate and the effects on dispersion performance of several formulation variables. In this note we explain that such interactions with inhalation flow rate are, in fact, always to be expected. Because these interactions may greatly affect conclusions concerning the effects of formulation variables and their underlying mechanisms, the utility of future dry powder inhalation formulation studies may benefit from an approach in which dispersion performance is by default tested over a range of inhalation flow rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of method of anesthesia on the reproductive and obstetric outcomes of heterotopic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Liu, Y F; Liu, J; Huang, Y; Xu, G F; Cai, J; Chen, Y; Wu, Y Q; Ying, Y Y; Zhang, R J; Zhang, D

    2017-12-07

    Anesthesia is commonly used for surgical termination of the extrauterine component of heterotopic pregnancy. We sought to evaluate the effects of general and regional anesthesia during salpingectomy on reproductive and obstetric outcomes of heterotopic pregnancies. A two-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted, and 49 heterotopic pregnancies were included. Baseline characteristics, reproductive and obstetric outcomes were compared between the general anesthesia and regional anesthesia groups. Baseline characteristics were comparable for age, weeks of gestation at diagnosis, and duration of anesthesia. No significant difference was found in pregnancy outcome, perinatal outcome or neonatal weight (P >0.05). The rate of miscarriage in the general anesthesia group was 23.5% versus the regional anesthesia group 15.6% (P >0.05). With respect to reproductive and obstetric outcomes, this retrospective study found no difference between general anesthesia and regional anesthesia used for early heterotopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A unique anesthesia approach for carotid endarterectomy: Combination of general and regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhen Samanta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid endarterectomy (CEA, a preventable surgery, reduces the future risks of cerebrovascular stroWke in patients with marked carotid stenosis. Peri-operative management of such patients is challenging due to associated major co-morbidities and high incidence of peri-operative stroke and myocardial infarction. Both general anesthesia (GA and local regional anesthesia (LRA can be used with their pros and cons. Most developing countries as well as some developed countries usually perform CEA under GA because of technical easiness. LRA usually comprises superficial, intermediate, deep cervical plexus block or a combination of these techniques. Deep block, particularly, is technically difficult and more complicated, whereas intermediate plexus block is technically easy and equally effective. We did CEA under a combination of GA and LRA using ropivacaine 0.375% with 1 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine (DEX infiltration. In LRA, we gave combined superficial and intermediate cervical plexus block with infiltration at the incision site and along the lower border of mandible. We observed better hemodynamics in intraoperative as well as postoperative periods and an improved postoperative outcome of the patient. So, we concluded that combination of GA and LRA is a good anesthetic technique for CEA. Larger randomized prospective trials are needed to support our conclusion.

  16. Pre-use anesthesia machine check; certified anesthesia technician based quality improvement audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Suhaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Al Dosary, Saad; Al Barmawi, Hanan; Pogoku, Mahdhav

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of providing a work ready machine in multiple theatre operating rooms in a tertiary modern medical center in Riyadh. The aim of the following study is to keep high quality environment for workers and patients in surgical operating rooms. Technicians based audit by using key performance indicators to assure inspection, passing test of machine worthiness for use daily and in between cases and in case of unexpected failure to provide quick replacement by ready to use another anesthetic machine. The anesthetic machines in all operating rooms are daily and continuously inspected and passed as ready by technicians and verified by anesthesiologist consultant or assistant consultant. The daily records of each machines were collected then inspected for data analysis by quality improvement committee department for descriptive analysis and report the degree of staff compliance to daily inspection as "met" items. Replaced machine during use and overall compliance. Distractive statistic using Microsoft Excel 2003 tables and graphs of sums and percentages of item studied in this audit. Audit obtained highest compliance percentage and low rate of replacement of machine which indicate unexpected machine state of use and quick machine switch. The authors are able to conclude that following regular inspection and running self-check recommended by the manufacturers can contribute to abort any possibility of hazard of anesthesia machine failure during operation. Furthermore in case of unexpected reason to replace the anesthesia machine in quick maneuver contributes to high assured operative utilization of man machine inter-phase in modern surgical operating rooms.

  17. Anesthesia and global warming: the real hazards of theoretic science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mychaskiw II George

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent speculative articles in the medical literature have indicted certain inhalational anesthetics as contributing to global warming. This unfounded speculation may have deleterious patient impact

  18. Toxicity of inhaled 90Sr in fused aluminosilicate particles in beagle dogs. VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on the metabolism, dosimetry and biological effects of 90 Sr inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by Beagle dogs have continued during the past year to define the biological consequences of inhaling this important radionuclide in a form which has a long retention time in the lung. One hundred and six dogs were exposed to a polydisperse aerosol of fused aluminosilicate particles labeled with 90 Sr. Initial lung burdens ranged from 0.21 to 94 μCi 90 Sr per kilogram of body weight (μCi/kg). Eighteen control dogs were exposed to an aerosol of stable strontium in fused aluminosilicate particles. These 124 dogs were assigned to the longevity study. An additional 26 dogs were exposed similarly to achieve lung burdens of approximately 1.5 to 12 μCi/kg and assigned for sacrifice at intervals after exposure to define metabolism and dosimetry of this aerosol in Beagle dogs. Of the longevity dogs, 33 dogs having initial lung burdens of 16 to 94 μCi 90 Sr/kg and cumulative doses to lung of 40,000 to 96,000 rads have died from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis from 159 to 2373 days after exposure. Thirty-one dogs with initial lung burdens of 3.7 to 36 μCi 90 Sr/kg and cumulative doses to lung of 13,000 to 68,000 rads have died from hemangiosarcomas in the lung or heart between 644 and 2565 days after exposure. In addition, one dog developed a bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, another developed epidermoid carcinoma of the lung, another died of pneumonia while recovering from anesthesia, one dog died at 1821 days after exposure with a hemangiosarcoma of the spleen and two dogs developed squamous cell carcinomas in the nasal cavity. The remaining exposed dogs and controls of the longevity study are surviving at 1022 to 2803 days after exposure

  19. Inhalation analgesia with nitrous oxide versus other analgesic techniques in hysteroscopic polypectomy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle Rubido, Cristina; Solano Calvo, Juan Antonio; Rodríguez Miguel, Antonio; Delgado Espeja, Juan José; González Hinojosa, Jerónimo; Zapico Goñi, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    To show the decrease in pain and better tolerance to inhalation analgesia with a 50% equimolar mixture of nitrogen protoxide and oxygen in hysteroscopic polypectomy compared with paracervical anesthesia and a control group. One hundred six patients scheduled for office hysteroscopy and polypectomy were divided into the following 3 groups: the control group, the nitrous oxide group, and the paracervical infiltration group. Patients were assigned sequentially (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). The study took place in a hysteroscopy outpatient clinic under the supervision of a gynecologist and 2 nurses trained to cooperate in the trial. One hundred six women from Area III of Madrid Community, Spain, who had been diagnosed with endometrial polyps at a gynecology office and were scheduled for office hysteroscopy and polypectomy agreed to participate in the study. Patients in group 1 (control group) received no treatment. Group 2 received inhaled nitrous oxide and group 3 paracervical infiltration with 1% lidocaine. Pain was assessed using the visual analog scale (0-10). Pain perceived by patients was lower in the nitrous Oxide group (mean: 3.55 ± 0.60, median: 3) versus the control group (mean: 5.49 ± 1.88, median: 6, p nitrous oxide group, and good for the paracervical infiltration group (p nitrous oxide group, whereas in the paracervical infiltration group, there were complications in more than 50% of the patients. No severe complications occurred. Nitrous oxide is a safe and effective analgesic technique for polipectomy office hysteroscopy compared with the paracervical infiltration and control groups. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. General anesthesia type does not influence serum levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin during the perioperative period in video laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Adriano; Ettinger, João; Amaral, Fabiano; Ramalho, Maria José; Alves, Rodrigo; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro

    2014-12-01

    Video laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the preferred surgical technique for treating morbid obesity. However, pneumoperitoneum can pose risks to the kidneys by causing a decrease in renal blood flow. Furthermore, as in other surgical procedures, laparoscopic bariatric surgery triggers an acute inflammatory response. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is an early and accurate biomarker of renal injury, as well as of the inflammatory response. Anesthetic drugs could offer some protection for the kidneys and could attenuate the acute inflammatory response from surgical trauma. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of two types of anesthetics, propofol and sevoflurane, on the serum levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin during the perioperative period in laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Sixty-four patients scheduled for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were randomized into two anesthesia groups and were administered either total intravenous anesthesia (propofol) or inhalation anesthesia (sevoflurane). In the perioperative period, blood samples were collected at three time points (before anesthesia, 6 hours after pneumoperitoneum and 24 hours after pneumoperitoneum) and urine output was measured for 24 hours. Acute kidney injuries were evaluated by examining both the clinical and laboratory parameters during the postoperative period. The differences between the groups were compared using non-parametric tests. ReBEC (http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/recruiting/): RBR-8wt2fy None of the patients developed an acute kidney injury during the study and no significant differences were found between the serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels of the groups during the perioperative period. The choice of anesthetic drug, either propofol or sevoflurane, did not affect the serum levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin during the perioperative period in laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

  1. Evaluation of a novel educational strategy, including inhaler-based reminder labels, to improve asthma inhaler technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheti, Iman A; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z; Reddel, Helen K

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a brief intervention about inhaler technique, delivered by community pharmacists to asthma patients. Thirty-one pharmacists received brief workshop education (Active: n=16, CONTROL: n=15). Active Group pharmacists were trained to assess and teach dry powder inhaler technique, using patient-centered educational tools including novel Inhaler Technique Labels. Interventions were delivered to patients at four visits over 6 months. At baseline, patients (Active: 53, CONTROL: 44) demonstrated poor inhaler technique (mean+/-S.D. score out of 9, 5.7+/-1.6). At 6 months, improvement in inhaler technique score was significantly greater in Active cf. CONTROL patients (2.8+/-1.6 cf. 0.9+/-1.4, p<0.001), and asthma severity was significantly improved (p=0.015). Qualitative responses from patients and pharmacists indicated a high level of satisfaction with the intervention and educational tools, both for their effectiveness and for their impact on the patient-pharmacist relationship. A simple feasible intervention in community pharmacies, incorporating daily reminders via Inhaler Technique Labels on inhalers, can lead to improvement in inhaler technique and asthma outcomes. Brief training modules and simple educational tools, such as Inhaler Technique Labels, can provide a low-cost and sustainable way of changing patient behavior in asthma, using community pharmacists as educators.

  2. Brief anesthesia, but not voluntary locomotion, significantly alters cortical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Michael J.; Kudlik, D'Anne E.; Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E.; Drew, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in brain temperature can alter electrical properties of neurons and cause changes in behavior. However, it is not well understood how behaviors, like locomotion, or experimental manipulations, like anesthesia, alter brain temperature. We implanted thermocouples in sensorimotor cortex of mice to understand how cortical temperature was affected by locomotion, as well as by brief and prolonged anesthesia. Voluntary locomotion induced small (∼0.1°C) but reliable increases in cortical temperature that could be described using a linear convolution model. In contrast, brief (90-s) exposure to isoflurane anesthesia depressed cortical temperature by ∼2°C, which lasted for up to 30 min after the cessation of anesthesia. Cortical temperature decreases were not accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the γ-band local field potential power, multiunit firing rate, or locomotion behavior, which all returned to baseline within a few minutes after the cessation of anesthesia. In anesthetized animals where core body temperature was kept constant, cortical temperature was still >1°C lower than in the awake animal. Thermocouples implanted in the subcortex showed similar temperature changes under anesthesia, suggesting these responses occur throughout the brain. Two-photon microscopy of individual blood vessel dynamics following brief isoflurane exposure revealed a large increase in vessel diameter that ceased before the brain temperature significantly decreased, indicating cerebral heat loss was not due to increased cerebral blood vessel dilation. These data should be considered in experimental designs recording in anesthetized preparations, computational models relating temperature and neural activity, and awake-behaving methods that require brief anesthesia before experimental procedures. PMID:25972579

  3. Inhaled nitric oxide improves systemic microcirculation in infants with hypoxemic respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Top, Anke P. C.; Ince, Can; Schouwenberg, Patrick H. M.; Tibboel, Dick

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of inhaled nitric oxide on the systemic microcirculation. We hypothesized that inhaled nitric oxide improves the systemic microcirculation. Inhaled nitric oxide improves outcome in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn diagnosed by improving

  4. Occupational stress of anesthesia: Effects on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanaty, Ola M; El Metainy, Shahira; Abdelmaksoud, Rania; Demerdash, Hala; Aliaa, Doaa Abo; El Wafa, Heba Abo

    2017-06-01

    Anesthesiology has been identified as a stressful specialty. Chronic psychological stress may lead to biological aging and skin aging. The primary outcome was to measure physical health and emotional well-being. Secondary outcomes include skin aging analysis, telomere shortening in anesthetists. This is a prospective observational study. University of Alexandria. Study was carried out on 366 ASA I-II physicians 30-50yr. Physicians were categorized into two equal groups, Group A (183) were anesthesia physicians and Group B (183) were physicians in less stressful specialties (laboratory specialties). Subgroup analysis was performed comparing 10years' intervals from (30-40) and from (40-50). Physical health and emotional well-being were evaluated. All physicians were exposed to validated assessment scales for the upper face and the lower face for skin aging analysis. Blood sampling were drowned from all physicians during their working hours for analysis of telomere length, markers of oxidative stress. The two studied groups showed comparable demographic data and years of work. Physical health score and emotional health score showed higher values in Group A than Group B. Upper and lower face aesthetic unit summary score showed higher values in Group A than Group B. Telomere (TTAGGG) repeats for terminal restriction fragments (TRF) of Group A individuals revealed a significant decrease of TRF compared to Group B (p=0.001*). Biological and skin aging is evident in anesthetists who are chronically exposed to occupational stress, with obvious shorter telomere length, higher lower and upper face scores, and free radicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Undivided attention improves postoperative anesthesia handover recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arenas A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Arenas,1 Burton J Tabaac,1 Galina Fastovets,2 Vinod Patil3 1Department of Clinical Sciences, American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Cupecoy, Sint Maarten; 2Department of Surgery, Broomfield Hospital, National Health Service, Chelmsford, UK; 3Department of Anesthesia, Queens Hospital, National Health Service, Romford, UK Background: For years, undivided attention during the presurgical “timeout” has been utilized as a precaution to ensure patient safety. The information relayed during the timeout is presented in a confirmatory nature rather than a delegation of new information. However, it is a standard of practice in which all members of the operating theater provide their full and undivided attention. Standards of patient care should be contiguous throughout the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative stages of surgery. In this manner, it is expected that the same undivided attention afforded during the timeout should be maintained when transferring the patient to the postanesthesia care unit. Methods: In this study, information was collected regarding handover of information during the transfer status postsurgical procedures. Data were collected via observing interactions between the anesthesiologist and the nurse during verbal patient transfers. Results: This study demonstrated that the presence of undivided attention during the handover of a surgical patient in the postanesthesia care unit has a direct correlation with improved recall of the information discussed during handover. Conclusion: Focus is on the quantity of information that can be recalled by the transferring nurse, and whether or not undivided attention affects the outcome. Analysis focuses on suggestions to better improve patient safety and recovery when being transferred in an anesthetic setting. The practice of patient handover should be standardized to better improve the safety and quality of medical care. Keywords: communication

  6. Medication errors in anesthesia: unacceptable or unavoidable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Dhawan

    Full Text Available Abstract Medication errors are the common causes of patient morbidity and mortality. It adds financial burden to the institution as well. Though the impact varies from no harm to serious adverse effects including death, it needs attention on priority basis since medication errors' are preventable. In today's world where people are aware and medical claims are on the hike, it is of utmost priority that we curb this issue. Individual effort to decrease medication error alone might not be successful until a change in the existing protocols and system is incorporated. Often drug errors that occur cannot be reversed. The best way to ‘treat' drug errors is to prevent them. Wrong medication (due to syringe swap, overdose (due to misunderstanding or preconception of the dose, pump misuse and dilution error, incorrect administration route, under dosing and omission are common causes of medication error that occur perioperatively. Drug omission and calculation mistakes occur commonly in ICU. Medication errors can occur perioperatively either during preparation, administration or record keeping. Numerous human and system errors can be blamed for occurrence of medication errors. The need of the hour is to stop the blame - game, accept mistakes and develop a safe and ‘just' culture in order to prevent medication errors. The newly devised systems like VEINROM, a fluid delivery system is a novel approach in preventing drug errors due to most commonly used medications in anesthesia. Similar developments along with vigilant doctors, safe workplace culture and organizational support all together can help prevent these errors.

  7. [Insulinoma and pregnancy: anesthesia and perioperative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Angélica de Fátima de Assunção; Braga, Franklin Sarmento da Silva; Junior, José Hélio Zen; Brandão, Maria José Nascimento; Marcondes, Giancarlo Antonio; Barbosa, Thales Daniel Alves

    Insulinoma is a functional neuroendocrine tumor derived from beta cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, usually solitary, benign, and curable with surgery (enucleation). It rarely occurs during pregnancy and is clinically manifested by hypoglycemia, particularly in the first trimester of pregnancy. During pregnancy, both conservative therapeutic measures (medication) and surgical treatment are challenging regarding the impossibility of studies on drug teratogenicity as well as the maternal-fetal repercussions during surgery, such as hypoglycemia and changes due to stress. A 33-year primiparous woman, 86kg, 1.62m, BMI 32.7kg.m -2 , at 15 weeks of gestation, physical status ASA III, investigated for a reduced level of consciousness. Laboratory tests showed: hypoglycemia (45mg.dL -1 ) associated with hyperinsulinemia (24 nUI.mL -1 ), glycosylated hemoglobin (4.1%); other laboratory findings and physical examination were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.1cm nodule in the pancreatic tail with suspected insulinoma. Due to the difficult glycemic control with bolus and continuous infusion of glucose, laparotomy was performed for tumor enucleation under total intravenous anesthesia combined with epidural block. Monitoring, central and peripheral venous access, radial artery catheterization, diuresis, and glucosimetry were recorded every 15minutes. Intraoperatively, there was severe hypoglycemia while handling the tumor and shortly before its enucleation, which was controlled through continuous infusion of 10% glucose balanced crystalloid solution (100-230ml.h -1 ). The patient's postoperative evolution was uneventful, with resolution of hypoglycemia and total withdrawal of glucose intravenous infusion. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of anesthesia on the response to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Aaron B; Faraguna, Ugo; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2010-12-01

    Slow wave activity (SWA) during NREM sleep is the best characterized marker of sleep homeostasis, and the occurrence of sleep slow waves is necessary to reduce sleep need. Recent evidence suggests that sleep slow waves may mediate several beneficial effects of sleep on performance, from the prevention of cognitive impairments to memory consolidation. However, slow waves are also triggered by low doses of many anesthetics, but very few reports have examined whether anesthesia-mediated slow waves affect the homeostatic regulation of sleep. Moreover, no study has examined how sleep is affected by higher doses of anesthetics, which lead to a predominantly "isoelectric" EEG tracing without slow waves. We studied in rats whether 1 hour of a dose of isoflurane or desflurane able to induce almost continuous slow waves (ISO-sw, DES-sw), and of a dose of desflurane resulting in a predominantly isoelectric EEG (DES-iso) reduces the sleep pressure caused by 4 h of sleep deprivation. Anesthesia was compared to a mock condition in which rats were only anesthetized for 2-3 min. Basic sleep research laboratory. Male WKY rats (n=31). Total sleep deprivation by exposure to novel objects starting at light onset, followed by one hour of anesthesia or mock anesthesia. One hour of anesthesia (sw or iso) did not affect either sleep duration or the overall sleep pattern. Anesthesia with ISO-sw or DES-sw, both associated with the occurrence of almost continuous slow waves, reduced the SWA rebound expected following 4 h of sleep deprivation. One hour of anesthesia with DES-iso, associated with isoelectric EEG and few slow waves, also reduced the SWA rebound after sleep deprivation, and did so to an extent similar to that observed after DES-sw. However, in contrast to DES-sw, SWA after DES-iso remained chronically lower than in baseline, resulting in reduced slow wave energy (SWE, SWA × time) for at least 2 days. The blunted SWA rebound after ISO-sw and DES-sw suggests that anesthesia slow

  9. Inhaled carbon dioxide causes dose-dependent paradoxical bradypnea in animals anesthetized with pentobarbital, but not with isoflurane or ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Yehuda; Nachmanson, Nathalie Corchia; Shapiro, Joel; Weissman, Charles; Abramovitch, Rinat

    2015-10-01

    In spontaneously breathing mice anesthetized with pentobarbital, we observed unexpected paradoxical bradypnea following 5% inhaled CO2. Observational study 7-8 week CB6F1/OlaHsd mice (n = 99), anesthetized with 30 mg/kg intraperitoneal pentobarbital. Interventional study: Adult male Wistar rats (n = 18), anesthetized either with 30 mg/kg intraperitoneal pentobarbital, 100 mg/kg intraperitoneal ketamine or 1.5% isoflurane. Rats had femoral artery cannulas inserted for hemodynamic monitoring and serial arterial blood gas measurements. Observational study: There was a marked reduction in respiratory rate following 4 min of normoxic hypercapnia; average reduction of 9 breaths/min (p pentobarbital (p = 0.046). Increasing inspired CO2 caused dose-dependent acidosis following pentobarbital and isoflurane (p = 0.013 and p = 0.017, respectively); but not following ketamine-xylazine (p = 0.58). Inhaled CO2 caused paradoxical dose-dependent bradypnea in animals anesthetized with pentobarbital, an observation not hitherto reported as a part of anesthesia-related respiratory depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jin Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia.Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods havebeen introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. Inparticular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI system maintains a relatively accurate level ofplasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conductedthis study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol andremifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation.Methods This study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgeryfrom February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mLpropofol and 50 μg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modulesof a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at2 μg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinicaleffect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status werecontinuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals.Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered duringsurgery, memory about surgery, and side effects.Results Intraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in threecases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratorydifficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotrachealintubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on theday of surgery and able to ambulate normally.Conclusions Our results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol andremifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breastaugmentation surgery.

  11. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jin Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPatients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol and remifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation.MethodsThis study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mL propofol and 50 µg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modules of a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at 2 µg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinical effect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status were continuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals. Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered during surgery, memory about surgery, and side effects.ResultsIntraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in three cases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratory difficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotracheal intubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on the day of surgery and able to ambulate normally.ConclusionsOur results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol and remifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breast

  12. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu-Jin; Cha, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Yong-Ha; Kim, Tae-Gon; Kim, Il-Guk

    2012-09-01

    Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI) system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol and remifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation. This study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mL propofol and 50 µg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modules of a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at 2 µg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinical effect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status were continuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals. Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered during surgery, memory about surgery, and side effects. Intraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in three cases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratory difficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotracheal intubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on the day of surgery and able to ambulate normally. Our results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol and remifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breast augmentation surgery.

  13. Outpatient hysteroscopy with combined local intracervical and intrauterine anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdi, Mohammed; Tulandi, Togas

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of pain during and after office hysteroscopy with combined intracervical and intrauterine anesthesia compared to intracervical anesthesia only. We evaluated the amount of pain experienced during office hysteroscopy using combined local intracervical and intrauterine anesthesia, 10, 30, and 60 min after, and during endometrial biopsy prospectively in 37 infertile women (study group). We used a visual analog scale ranging from 0 to 10. Seventy-six women who received only intracervical anesthesia served as historical controls. The mean ages of patients in the control and study groups were comparable. Patients' perception of pain was significantly higher during endometrial biopsy than during or after hysteroscopy in the study patients (p < 0.01, 95% CI 0-3). The mean pain score in the control group was significantly higher than that in the study group during hysteroscopy (3.3 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.3; p < 0.05, 95% CI 0-2). However, there was no significant difference in the pain scores between the control and study groups during endometrial biopsy and 10, 30, and 60 min after the procedure. Endometrial biopsy is associated with more pain than office hysteroscopy. Additional intrauterine anesthesia with 1% lidocaine significantly reduces pain sensation during office hysteroscopy. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Non-invasive anesthesia for children undergoing proton radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal; Grosshans, David; Arunkumar, Radha; Rebello, Elizabeth; Popovich, Shannon; Zavala, Acsa; Williams, Cynthia; Ruiz, Javier; Hernandez, Mike; Mahajan, Anita; Porche, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy is a newer modality of radiotherapy during which anesthesiologists face specific challenges related to the setup and duration of treatment sessions. Purpose: Describe our anesthesia practice for children treated in a standalone proton therapy center, and report on complications encountered during anesthesia. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of anesthetic records for patients ⩽18 years of age treated with proton therapy at our institution between January 2006 and April 2013 was performed. Results: A total of 9328 anesthetics were administered to 340 children with a median age of 3.6 years (range, 0.4–14.2). The median daily anesthesia time was 47 min (range, 15–79). The average time between start of anesthesia to the start of radiotherapy was 7.2 min (range, 1–83 min). All patients received Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with spontaneous ventilation, with 96.7% receiving supplemental oxygen by non-invasive methods. None required daily endotracheal intubation. Two episodes of bradycardia, and one episode each of; seizure, laryngospasm and bronchospasm were identified for a cumulative incidence of 0.05%. Conclusions: In this large series of children undergoing proton therapy at a freestanding center, TIVA without daily endotracheal intubation provided a safe, efficient, and less invasive option of anesthetic care

  15. Possibilities of creating meaningful encounters in anesthesia nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Karin

    Anesthesia nursing is performed in a highly technological environment with restricted time for interaction with patients. Patients are in a vulnerable position, which can be characterized by anxiety regarding the anesthetic and surgical procedure. The bedrock of effective nursing care is to facil......Anesthesia nursing is performed in a highly technological environment with restricted time for interaction with patients. Patients are in a vulnerable position, which can be characterized by anxiety regarding the anesthetic and surgical procedure. The bedrock of effective nursing care...... of nursing. In this dissertation, focused ethnography is used to explore the interactions between patients and nurse anesthetists before general anesthesia. Moreover, it will explore the professional identity of nurse anesthetists, in relation to the situation of preparing patients for general anesthesia....... A micro-substantive theory is developed regarding the opportunities for creating meaningful encounters between patients and nurse anesthetists. The theory is based on three dominant motivations for interaction in anesthesia nursing. The context of care is not committed and responsive to the core elements...

  16. A History of Intravenous Anesthesia in War (1656-1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Matthew; Jagdish, S

    2016-01-01

    The practice of anesthesia in war places significant restraints on the choice of anesthetic technique used; these include, but are not limited to, safety, simplicity, and portability. Ever since intravenous anesthesia became a practical alternative, there have been military doctors who felt that this technique was particularly suited to this environment. The challenge, as in civilian practice, has been to find the appropriate drugs as well as simple and safe delivery systems. The urgency of war has always stimulated innovation in medicine to counteract the ongoing development of weapons of war and their effects on the human body and to achieve improved survival as public expectations rise. This article traces the development of and the use of intravenous anesthesia by military physicians for battle casualties. The story starts long before the era of modern anesthesia, and the discussion concludes in the dog days of the cold war. The rapidly increasing interest in intravenous anesthesia in both civilian and military practice since the early 1990s is left for other authors to examine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia in achondroplastic dwarf for femur surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochana Girish Bakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia is the commonest form of short-limbed dwarfism and occurs in 1:26,000- 40,000 live births. This is an autosomal dominant disorder with abnormal endochondral ossification whereas periosteal and intramembranous ossification are normal. The basic abnormality is a disturbance of cartilage formation mainly at the epiphyseal growth plates and at the base of the skull. The anesthetic management of achondroplastic dwarfs is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Both regional as well as general anesthesia have their individual risks and consequences. We report a case of an achondroplastic dwarf in whom combined spinal epidural anesthesia was used for fixation of a fractured femur. The patient had undergone previous femur surgery under general anesthesia since he had been informed that spinal anesthesia could be very problematic. There was no technical difficulty encountered during the procedure and an adequate level was achieved with low-dose local anesthetics without any problem. Postoperative pain relief was offered for three consecutive postoperative days using epidural tramadol. We discuss the anesthetic issues and highlight the role of combined spinal epidural anesthesia with low-dose local anesthetics in this patient. This approach also helped in early ambulation and postoperative pain relief.

  18. Implementation of an Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, James R; Ritter, Melody J

    2011-01-01

    During the administration of anesthesia, the anesthesia provider has historically created a paper record, charted manually, that included extensive patient care-related data (vital signs, other parameters, etc) and commentaries. DocuSys, a proprietary anesthesia information management system (AIMS), creates an electronic version of the anesthesia record and provides additional information. It electronically captures data from clinical monitors and other sources, including scheduling applications and laboratory computers. The AIMS facilitates chart entries such as drug doses and case narratives. Benefits of an AIMS include improved legibility of the anesthesia record and greater efficiency in documentation efforts. Use of the AIMS assists the practitioner with decision support logic, such as the timing of antibiotic administration and the inclusion of legally required documentation. Upon case completion, the AIMS data are immediately available to other information systems, such as billing and medical records. Data can be made available from a single case or, more important, from thousands of cases to analyze variables such as efficiency of services, adherence to best practices, patient outcomes, and clinical research. The AIMS was deployed at the main campus of the Ochsner Health System on March 26, 2009. In this article, we discuss the issues involved in the AIMS implementation process: the successes, surprises, and continued challenges.

  19. Evaluation of anesthesia applications in interventional neuroradiology cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Kaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we aimed to evaluate anesthesiaapplications of the patients underwent invasive interventionalneuroradiology applications.Materials and methods: Between June 2004 and October2004, 152 emergency or elective adult patients whowere undergone general anesthesia were evaluated retrospectively.Information about the patients was taken fromradiology, anesthesia notes and university’s informationsystem. Patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender,American Society of Anesthesiologists score, indicationof application, the existence of concomitant diseases, anesthesiatechnique, anesthetic medications and the possibilityof whether patient were in intensive care unit.Results: Of all, 55.3% of the patients (n=84 were femaleand 44,7% (n=68 were male. General anesthesia wasapplied in all cases and propofol was preferred mostly ininduction and sevoflurane was preferred in maintenance.Surgically, 81,6% of the patients was elective and 18,4%was emergency patients. Diagnoses of patients were asfollow: Cerebral aneurysm 63,8%, arteriovenous malformation19,7%, thrombolytic therapy 8%, tumor embolization5,3% and carotid stenting 3,2%. Totally 58 patientswere taken into intensive care unit and 6 of these died.Conclusions: In order to provide a safe and efficient patientcare, we think that permanent anesthesia equipmentis necessary together with good physical conditions of theoperation room, proficiency of neuroradiologist, the closerelationship between the patient and anesthetist and agood knowledge of underlying neuropathology. J Clin ExpInvest 2012; 3(4: 493-499Key words: Interventional radiology, general anesthesia,cerebral aneurysm, arterio-venous malformations.

  20. Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng MR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R Eng,1 Paul F White1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2White Mountain Institute, The Sea Ranch, CA, USA Summary statement: Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia has become important for the anesthesiologist as the key perioperative physician in outpatient surgery. Key techniques and choices of anesthetics are important in accomplishing fast track goals of ambulatory surgery. Purpose of review: The anesthesiologist in the outpatient environment must focus on improving perioperative efficiency and reducing recovery times while accounting for patients' well-being and safety. This review article focuses on recent intravenous anesthetic techniques to accomplish these goals. Recent findings: This review is an overview of techniques in intravenous anesthesia for ambulatory anesthesia. Intravenous techniques may be tailored to accomplish outpatient surgery goals for the type of surgical procedure and individual patient needs. Careful anesthetic planning and the application of the plans are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Conclusion: Careful planning and application of intravenous techniques are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Keywords: intravenous anesthesia, outpatient anesthesia, fast-track surgery