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Sample records for anesthesia a case

  1. Brainstem Anesthesia after Retrobulbar Block: A Case Report and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Retro-bulbar anesthesia is one of the most common regional blocks used for intraocular surgeries. Complications associated with regional blocks may be limited to the eye or may be systemic. CASE REPORT: After a retro-bulbar block for glaucoma surgery, a 60-year-old man developed loss of ...

  2. Osteonecrosis related to intraosseous anesthesia: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmansey, Karl F; White, Robert K; He, Jianing

    2009-02-01

    Intraosseous anesthesia is an effective and increasingly used technique with few reported complications. The technique uses a specialized drill to perforate the osseous cortex where local anesthetic can then be deposited to anesthetize teeth. It has been reported that separation of the perforation drills from their plastic bases can occur because of the friction generated during osseous perforation. Prolonged rotation of the perforator drills in the bone can also cause excessive heat, which can lead to bone necrosis. This report describes a case of focal osteonecrosis subsequent to intraosseous anesthesia and discusses possible etiologies of this sequela.

  3. [Anaphylactic reaction to latex during spinal anesthesia: a case report].

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    Ueda, Narumi; Kitamura, Rie; Wakamori, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kumi; Konishi, Keisuke

    2008-05-01

    A 46-year-old man, with a history of atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma, underwent surgery for an inguinal hernia. Forty-three minutes subsequent to spinal anesthesia, the patient complained suddenly of dyspnea with wheezing. Blood pressure decreased and skin eruption was observed on his chest. Postoperative laboratory tests revealed high IgE concentration, and a skin test confirmed an allergy to latex. The patient's allergic reaction was easily overlooked because of his history of bronchial asthma and the possibility that the hypotension was caused by the high spinal anesthesia. Latex allergy should be considered in any suspicious case presenting with these symptoms during surgery. After recovery, a skin test should be used to confirm the allergy to avoid repeated allergic episodes.

  4. Case report: Anesthesia management for emergency cesarean section in a patient with dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Duan, Hongjun; Zuo, Mingzhang

    2015-04-28

    Dwarfism is characterized by short stature. Pregnancy in women with dwarfism is uncommon and cesarean section is generally indicated for delivery. Patients with dwarfism are high-risk population for both general and regional anesthesia, let alone in an emergency surgery. In this case report we present a 27-year-old Chinese puerpera with dwarfism who underwent emergency cesarean section under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia. It is an original case report, which provides instructive significance for anesthesia management especially combined spinal and epidural anesthesia in this rare condition. There was only one former article that reported a puerpera who underwent combined spinal and epidural anesthesia for a selective cesarean section.

  5. Nonopioid anesthesia for awake craniotomy: a case report.

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    Wolff, Diane L; Naruse, Robert; Gold, Michele

    2010-02-01

    Awake craniotomy is becoming more popular as a neurosurgical technique that allows for increased tumor resection and decreased postoperative neurologic morbidity. This technique, however, presents many challenges to both the neurosurgeon and anesthetist. An ASA class II, 37-year-old man with recurrent oligodendroglioma presented for repeated craniotomy. Prior craniotomy under general anesthesia resulted in residual neurologic deficits. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow for intraoperative testing for maximum tumor resection and avoidance of neurologic morbidity. The patient was sedated with propofol, and bupivacaine was infiltrated for placement of Mayfield tongs and skin incision. Following exposure of brain tissue, propofol infusion was discontinued to allow for patient cooperation during the procedure. Speech, motor, and sensory testing occurred during tumor resection until resection stopped after onset of weakness in the right arm. The propofol infusion was resumed while the cranium was closed and Mayfield tongs removed. The patient was awake, alert, oriented, and able to move all extremities but had residual weakness in the right forearm. Awake craniotomy requires appropriate patient selection, knowledge of the surgeon's skill, and a thorough anesthesia plan. This case report discusses the clinical and anesthetic management for awake craniotomy and reviews the literature.

  6. Anesthesia management for a case of laryngeal keel placement

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    Kundan Gosavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital laryngeal web is a rare anomaly with incidence of 1 in 10,000 births. Its clinical presentation may range from an asymptomatic patient or mild hoarseness of voice to severe respiratory stridor. The primary goals of surgical intervention for congenital laryngeal web are to establish a patent airway and to achieve a good voice quality. As recurrence rate after plain excision of laryngeal web is very high, its removal may be coupled by placement of a silastic keel in between vocal cords. Endolaryngeal placement of a keel is definitely less invasive than laryngofissure, but little is known about its anesthesia management. Frequent ventilatory adjustment and endotracheal tube (ETT manipulations are needed along with vigilant monitoring. Risk of perforation or accidental dislodgment of the ETT and laryngeal edema are other concerns in management. We report a case.

  7. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, Joe; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kusukawa, Jingo; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the...

  8. Outcome following inhalation anesthesia in birds at a veterinary referral hospital: 352 cases (2004-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Amanda B; Hofmeister, Erik H; Divers, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the outcome in birds undergoing inhalation anesthesia and identify patient or procedure variables associated with an increased likelihood of anesthesia-related death. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 352 birds that underwent inhalation anesthesia. PROCEDURES Medical records of birds that underwent inhalation anesthesia from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single veterinary referral hospital were reviewed. Data collected included date of visit, age, species, sex, type (pet, free ranging, or wild kept in captivity), body weight, body condition score, diagnosis, procedure, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, premedication used for anesthesia, drug for anesthetic induction, type of maintenance anesthesia, route and type of fluid administration, volumes of crystalloid and colloid fluids administered, intraoperative events, estimated blood loss, duration of anesthesia, surgery duration, recovery time, recovery notes, whether birds survived to hospital discharge, time of death, total cost of hospitalization, cost of anesthesia, and nadir and peak values for heart rate, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide, concentration of inhaled anesthetic, and body temperature. Comparisons were made between birds that did and did not survive to hospital discharge. RESULTS Of 352 birds, 303 (86%) were alive at hospital discharge, 12 (3.4%) died during anesthesia, 15 (4.3%) died in the intensive care unit after anesthesia, and 22 (6.3%) were euthanatized after anesthesia. Overall, none of the variables studied were associated with survival to hospital discharge versus not surviving to hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results confirmed previous findings that indicated birds have a high mortality rate during and after anesthesia, compared with mortality rates published for dogs and cats.

  9. Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil in a patient with MELAS syndrome -A case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Suk; Baek, Chong Wha; Kang, Hyun; Cha, Su Man; Park, Jung Won; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young-Cheol

    2010-04-01

    A 23-year-old woman with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) underwent a laparoscopy-assisted appendectomy. MELAS syndrome is a multisystemic disease caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. General anesthesia has several potential hazards to patients with MELAS syndrome, such as malignant hyperthermia, hypothermia, and metabolic acidosis. In this case, anesthesia was performed with propofol, remifentanil TCI, and atracurium without any surgical or anesthetic complications. We discuss the anesthetic effects of MELAS syndrome.

  10. Generalized seizures and transient contralateral hemiparesis following retrobulbar anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettoraki, Maria; Dimitropoulou, Chrisafoula; Nomikarios, Nikolaos; Moschos, Marilita M; Brοuzas, Dimitrios

    2015-07-28

    Retrobulbar block is a local anesthetic technique widely used for intraocular surgery. Although retrobulbar anesthesia is considered to be relatively safe, a number of serious adverse events have been reported. To our knowledge, immediate onset of generalized seizures with contralateral hemiparesis after retrobulbar anesthesia has not been reported. A 62-year-old Caucasian healthy male with a right eye retinal detachment was admitted for pars plana vitrectomy. During retrobulbar anesthesia with ropivacaine and before needle withdrawal, the patient developed twitching of the face which rapidly progressed to generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Arterial oxygen saturation decreased to 75 %. Chin lift was performed and 100 % oxygen was administrated via face mask, which increased saturation to 99 %. Midazolam 2 mg was administrated intravenously to control seizures. After cessation of seizures, left-sided hemiparesis was evident. Brain computed tomography and electroencephalogram were normal 3 h later. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy under general anesthesia 4 days later. Serious complications of local anesthesia for ophthalmic surgery are uncommon. We present a case in which generalized tonic-clonic seizures developed during retrobulbar anesthesia, followed by transient contralateral hemiparesis. The early onset of seizures indicated intra-arterial injection of the anesthetic. Our case suggested the need for close monitoring during the performance of retrobulbar anesthesia and the presence of well-trained personnel for early recognition and immediate management of the complications.

  11. Ketofol for monitored anesthesia care in shoulder arthroscopy and labral repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kevin C Lee,1 Hanyuan Shi,2 Brian C Lee3 1Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, New York, NY, 2Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: A 21-year-old male (body mass index: 28.3 with a history of asthma and reactive airway disease since childhood underwent left shoulder arthroscopy and labral repair surgery under monitored anesthesia care. Because the procedure was performed in the beach chair position, access to the patient’s airway was limited throughout. To avoid general anesthesia and to limit potential complications associated with monitored anesthesia care, a ketofol admixture was used. This case demonstrates that, in conjunction with regional anesthesia, ketofol may be an acceptable alternative to propofol for maintenance in outpatient orthopedic procedures. Keywords: ketamine, propofol, ketofol, sedation, case report

  12. Bilateral corneal denting after surgery under general anesthesia: A case report

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    Satsuki Obata

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of temporary bilateral corneal denting in a patient who underwent cardiovascular surgery under general anesthesia. Observations: A 71-year-old male with no history of ophthalmological disease experienced bilateral corneal denting immediately after undergoing surgery for aneurysm of the thoracic aorta under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with rocuronium bromide and remifentanil hydrochloride. The initial examination revealed significant denting on the surface of both the corneas and ocular hypotension. Visual evaluation could not be performed due to the patient's low level of consciousness resulting from delayed emergence from anesthesia. After applying tropicamide and phenylephrine ophthalmic solution for fundus examination, the ocular morphology improved. Ocular pressure was normal on the day after surgery, and creasing on the surface of the corneas had disappeared. Conclusions: and Importance: We experienced a patient with bilateral corneal denting following a cardiovascular surgery under general anesthesia. The dents could be attributed to augmentation of ocular hypotension using several types of anesthesia at relatively high doses. Keywords: General anesthesia, Cornea denting, Complication, Cardiovascular surgery

  13. Anesthesia for Lobectomy in a Pediatric Patient` with Cystic Fibrosis: A Case Report

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    Seyedhejazi Mahin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive disease which causes a lot of complications and there are some needed operations in lifelong of such patients. Anesthesia in these patients requires particular attention and a full cooperation of surgeon, anesthetist and pediatrician .We reported a case of lobectomy with lung separation in a 4.5 years old child with cystic fibrosis which was performed with minor complications in the hope that an awareness of such situations may turn up similar cases of study. Keywords: Cystic Fibrosis, Anesthesia, Pulmonic Lobectomy

  14. Spinal anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in infants: a feasible and safe method even in emergency cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, A; Schälte, G; Winter, J; Röth, A; Busch, D; Ulmer, T F; Steinau, G; Neumann, U P; Klink, C D

    2014-10-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is the most frequently performed surgical procedure in infants and children. Especially in premature infants, prevalence reaches up to 30% in coincidence with high rates of incarceration during the first year of life. These infants carry an increased risk of complications due to general anesthesia. Thus, spinal anesthesia is a topic of growing interest for this group of patients. We hypothesized that spinal anesthesia is a feasible and safe option for inguinal hernia repair in infants even at high risk and cases of incarceration. Between 2003 and 2013, we operated 100 infants younger than 6 months with inguinal hernia. Clinical data were collected prospectively and retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups depending on anesthesia procedure (spinal anesthesia, Group 1 vs. general anesthesia, Group 2). Spinal anesthesia was performed in 69 infants, and 31 infants were operated in general anesthesia, respectively. In 7 of these 31 infants, general anesthesia was chosen because of lumbar puncture failure. Infants operated in spinal anesthesia were significantly smaller (54 ± 4 vs. 57 ± 4 cm; p = 0.001), had a lower body weight (4,047 ± 1,002 vs. 5,327 ± 1,376 g; p emergent incarcerated hernia repairs were performed in spinal anesthesia (p = 0.429). Spinal anesthesia is a feasible and safe option for inguinal hernia repair in infants, especially in high-risk premature infants and in cases of hernia incarceration.

  15. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Iwanaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the TMJ. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 93 years. Bilateral eminectomy of the TMJ was performed for two patients, and unilateral eminectomy was performed for three patients. Two were examined under intravenous propofol sedation and local anesthesia, while three patients were examined under general anesthesia. One patient died from ileus one month after surgery. The follow-up period except for the case that died from ileus ranged from 12 to 33 months. No recurrent dislocation of the TMJ has been identified. Based on our experience and two other series in the literature, eminectomy with sedation and local anesthesia can be considered and might be a good option in elderly patients.

  16. A case of malignant hyperthermia captured by an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, Michael D; Patel, Rajesh A; Blum, James M; Tremper, Kevin K

    2011-04-01

    Many cases of malignant hyperthermia triggered by volatile anesthetic agents have been described. However, to our knowledge, there has not been a report describing the precise changes in physiologic data of a human suffering from this process. Here we describe a case of malignant hyperthermia in which monitoring information was frequently and accurately captured by an anesthesia information management system.

  17. Intraosseous anesthesia using a computer-controlled system during non-surgical periodontal therapy (root planing): Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keumah; Kim, Jongbin

    2018-02-01

    Local anesthesia is administered to control pain, but it may induce fear and anxiety. Root planing is a non-surgical periodontal therapy; however, when it is performed in an extensive manner, some tissue removal is inevitable. Notably, this removal may be so painful that local anesthesia is required to be administered to the area scheduled for the treatment. Although patients tend to accept root planing easily, they frequently express a fear of local anesthesia. Intraosseous anesthesia (IA) is an intraosseous injection technique, whereby local anesthetic is injected into the cancellous bone supporting the teeth. A computer-controlled IA system (CIAS) exhibits multiple benefits, such as less painful anesthesia, reduced soft tissue numbness, and the provision of palatal or lingual, as well as buccal, anesthesia via single needle penetration. In this report, we present two cases of root planing that were performed under local anesthesia, using a CIAS.

  18. Delayed Detection of Esophageal Intubation in Anesthesia Malpractice Claims: Brief Report of a Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honardar, Marzieh R; Posner, Karen L; Domino, Karen B

    2017-12-01

    This retrospective case series analyzed 45 malpractice claims for delayed detection of esophageal intubation from the Anesthesia Closed Claims Project. Inclusion criteria were cases from 1995 to 2013, after adoption of identification of CO2 in expired gas to verify correct endotracheal tube position as a monitoring standard by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. Forty-nine percent (95% confidence interval 34%-64%) occurred in the operating room or other anesthesia location where CO2 detection equipment should have been available. The most common factors contributing to delayed detection were not using, ignoring, or misinterpreting CO2 readings. Misdiagnosis, as with bronchospasm, occurred in 33% (95% confidence interval 20%).

  19. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

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    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  20. Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  1. An Experience of General Anesthesia in a Case of Parkinson's Disease

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    Sinan Yılmaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disease which is resulted from loss of dopaminergic neurones in the substantia nigra of the basal ganglia and is a characterized by the triad of resting tremor, muscle rigidity, and bradykinesia. PD is an important cause of perioperative morbidity and a major risk factor for postoperative complications in the elderly surgical patients. In these patients, the postoperative risks are determined with the presence of additional diseases, interaction of antiparkinsonian medication and anesthesic drugs. In the patients with PD, general anesthesia may mask neurological symptoms in the intraoperative period so the general anesthesia is preferred in these patients. Randomized clinical trials about the preference of anesthetic technique in the PD are not enough. Premedication, induction and continuation of anesthesia, and drugs for postoperative pain must not affect the dopamine senthesis. Treated for PD for 8 year at the age of 73, a female patient and with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical classification III (chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive lung disease was planned for undergoing operation of L4 fracture. In this case, we aimed to report a patient with PD who underwent general anesthesia. During the operation hemodynamic data was stable and the operation was successfully carried out without any complication.

  2. Gestational obesity as a determinant of general anesthesia technique for caesarean delivery: a case report.

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    José Ricardo Navarro Vargas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of obesity has undergone a dramatic increase around the world during the last few years. Such epidemic behavior has been associated with obstetric patient’s frequent presentation of different stages of obesity when undergoing anesthetic procedure. Obesity in pregnant women involves the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Hypertension and preeclampsia, diabetes, fetal macrosomia, caesarean delivery, difficult airway management and neuroaxial techniques are more likely to be performed in this group of patients. Materials and methods. This is a case report of a morbid obese patient scheduled for caesarean delivery and tubal ligation. Regional, spinal and epidural techniques were attempted for surgery with unsuccessful results; this entails general anesthesia for surgery. The literature on complications due to obesity during pregnancy was reviewed, emphasising relevance for the anesthesiologist. Conclusion. Obesity, especially morbid obesity in pregnant women, represents a challenge for anesthesia management. Updated knowledge of physiology and the conditions related to obesity in pregnancy is necessary; medical services must be prepared to provide optimum and safe obstetric anesthesia, analgesia and post-operation care.

  3. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report

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    Márcio Luiz Benevides

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50 kg/m2, who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Case report: Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m2. Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 min and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day.

  4. Surgical excision of the breast giant fibroadenoma under regional anesthesia by Pecs II and internal intercostal plane block: a case report and brief technical description: a case report.

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    Kim, Hyungtae; Shim, Junho; Kim, Ikthae

    2017-02-01

    A 22-years-old female patient at 171 cm and 67 kg visited the Department of Breast Surgery of the hospital with a mass accompanied with pain on the left side breast as chief complaints. Since physical examination revealed a suspected huge mass, breast surgeon decided to perform surgical excision and requested anesthesia to our department. Surgery of breast tumor is often under local anesthesia. However, in case of big size tumor, surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. The patient feared general anesthesia. Unlike abdominal surgery, there is no need to control visceral pain for breast and anterior thoracic wall surgery. Therefore, we decided to perform resection under regional anesthesia. Herein, we report a successful anesthetic and pain management of the patient undergoing excision of a huge breast fibroadenoma under regional anesthesia using Pecs II and internal intercostal plane block.

  5. Anesthesia-related and perioperative mortality: An audit of 8493 cases at a tertiary pediatric teaching hospital in South Africa.

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    Meyer, Heidi M; Thomas, Jenny; Wilson, Graeme S; de Kock, Marianna

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to quantify the incidence of anesthesia-related and perioperative mortality at a large tertiary pediatric hospital in South Africa. This study included all children aged anesthesia caused the death; (ii) anesthesia may have contributed to or influenced the timing of death; or (iii) anesthesia was entirely unrelated to the death. There were 47 deaths within 30 days of anesthesia prior to discharge from hospital during this 12-month period. The in-hospital mortality within 24 h of administration of anesthesia was 16.5 per 10 000 cases (95% confidence intervals [CI]=7.8-25.1) and within 30 days of administration of anesthesia was 55.3 per 10 000 cases (95% CI=39.5-71.2). Age under 1 year (OR 4.5; 95% CI=2.5-8.0, P=.012) and cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology procedures (OR 2.5; 95% CI=1.2-5.2, Prisk of perioperative mortality. The overall 24-h and 30-day anesthesia-related and in-hospital perioperative mortality rates in our study are comparable with other similar studies from tertiary pediatric centers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Anesthesia Management for Pheochromocytoma Removal in a 17-Year-Old Girl: Case Report

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    Gulsen Keskin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A rare tumor of the chromaffin tissue, pheochromocytoma is characterized by increased secretion of catecholamines. Pediatric cases represent only 5% of all pheochromocytomas. In this report, we presented anesthesia management of a 17-year-old girl who would undergo right suprarenal mass excision due to pheochromocytoma accompanied with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF. Preoperative blood pressure control was achieved with phenoxybenzamine. General anesthesia was established with thiopental, vecuronium, fentanyl, and sevoflurane. Sodium nitroprusside and phentolamine was used for perioperative blood pressure control. Tramadol and diclofenac were administered for postoperative pain. The patient was discharged after a good preoperative preparation and perioperative management with uneventful treatment period. [J Contemp Med 2018; 8(1.000: 70-73

  7. Prolonged Exposure Therapy Following Awareness under Anesthesia: A Case Study

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    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Bertelson, Amy D.

    2013-01-01

    Awareness during surgery is estimated to effect between 40,000 to 140,000 patients per year in the United States, and there is a growing literature suggesting that this event can lead to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current article describes treatment implemented from a manualized protocol of a woman diagnosed with…

  8. [A case of emergency surgery in a patient with bronchial asthma under continuous spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Keiichi; Ryo, Kenshu; Nakamoto, Ai

    2003-10-01

    A 78-year-old male, observed for bronchial asthma, underwent two emergency operations within eight days. The first operation was performed under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane-oxygen and continuous infusion of propofol in combination with epidural injection of lidocaine. During the operation, respiratory sound was almost clear. But wheezing occurred as he awoke after discontinuation of the anesthetics. He needed ventilatory support for three days for status asthmatics. The second operation was performed under continuous spinal anesthesia using hypobaric tetracaine and hyperbaric bupivacaine. No ventilatory support was necessary after the operation and he was discharged uneventfully.

  9. Intraosseous anesthesia: a review.

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    Brown, R

    1999-10-01

    The recent introduction of intraosseous injection devices has renewed interest in the modality of local anesthesia. Three devices currently available are the Stabident System, the Hypo Brand Intraosseous Needle, and the Cyberjet System. The Stabident System is the most popular and the only one for which published research is available. Primary intraosseous anesthesia is 45 percent to 93 percent effective but of short duration. Supplemental intraosseous anesthesia is 80 percent to 90 percent effective and provides profound anesthesia of long duration (60 minutes or longer). It is used when a prior conventional infiltration or nerve block is inadequate. During use of an anesthetic solution with a vasoconstrictor for intraosseous anesthesia, 46 percent to 100 percent of patients reported an increase in heart rate. There was a 2 percent to 27 percent incidence of moderate and sometimes severe pain during the intraosseous procedure. Postoperative complications occurred in 2 percent to 15 percent of patients and lasted one to 14 days.

  10. Postoperative neurological aggravation after anesthesia with sevoflurane in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum: a case report.

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    Fjouji, Salaheddine; Bensghir, Mustapha; Yafat, Bahija; Bouhabba, Najib; Boutayeb, Elhoucine; Azendour, Hicham; Kamili, Nordine Drissi

    2013-03-14

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal recessive disease that causes changes in skin pigmentation, precancerous lesions and neurological abnormalities. It is a defect in the nucleotide excision repair mechanism. It has been reported that volatile anesthetics has a possible genotoxic side effect and deranged nucleotide excision repair in cells obtained from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum.We report an unusual case of postoperative neurological aggravation in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum anesthetized with sevoflurane. A 24-year-old African woman, who has had xeroderma pigmentosum since childhood, was admitted to our hospital for a femoral neck fracture. A preoperative physical examination revealed that she had a resting tremor with ataxia. She had cutaneous lesions such as keratosis and hyperpigmentation on her face and both hands. There was no major alteration of cognitive function, muscular strength was maintained and her osteotendinous reflexes were preserved. Surgical fixation was performed under general anesthesia after the failure of spinal anesthesia. All parameters were stable during surgery. When she woke up four hours later, the patient presented with confusion and psychomotor agitation, sharpened reflexes and the Babinski reflex was present. Her postoperative test results and a magnetic resonance imaging scan were unremarkable. It was suggested that sevoflurane had had a probable deleterious effect on the neurological status of this patient. The anesthetizing of a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum is associated with a risk of worsening neurological disorders. At present, there are no clear recommendations to avoid the use of volatile agents in the anesthetic management of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. More clinical and experimental research is needed to confirm the sensitivity of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum to sevoflurane and other halogenated anesthetics.

  11. Tamsulosin-induced severe hypotension during general anesthesia: a case report

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    Khan Fauzia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tamsulosin, a selective α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR antagonist, is a widely prescribed first-line agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH. Its interaction with anesthetic agents has not been described. Case presentation We report the case of 54-year-old Asian man undergoing elective left thyroid lobectomy. The only medication the patient was taking was tamsulosin 0.4 mg for the past year for BPH. He developed persistent hypotension during the maintenance phase of anesthesia while receiving oxygen, nitrous oxide and 1% isoflurane. The hypotension could have been attributable to a possible interaction between inhalational anesthetic and tamsulosin. Conclusion Vigilance for unexpected hypotension is important in surgical patients who are treated with selective α1-AR blockers. If hypotension occurs, vasopressors that act directly on adrenergic receptors could be more effective.

  12. Robotic anesthesia - A vision for the future of anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmerling, Thomas M.; Taddei, Riccardo; Wehbe, Mohamad; Morse, Joshua; Cyr, Shantale; Zaouter, Cedrick

    2011-01-01

    Summary This narrative review describes a rationale for robotic anesthesia. It offers a first classification of robotic anesthesia by separating it into pharmacological robots and robots for aiding or replacing manual gestures. Developments in closed loop anesthesia are outlined. First attempts to perform manual tasks using robots are described. A critical analysis of the delayed development and introduction of robots in anesthesia is delivered.

  13. Anesthesia in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis - is general anesthesia a requisite? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook Hui Chaw

    Full Text Available Abstract Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a recently described neurological disorder and an increasingly recognized cause of psychosis, movement disorders and autonomic dysfunction. We report 20-year-old Chinese female who presented with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, recent memory loss, visual hallucinations and abnormal behavior. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis was diagnosed and a computed tomography scan of abdomen reviewed a left adnexal tumor. We describe the first such case report of a patient with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis who was given a bilateral transversus abdominis plane block as the sole anesthetic for removal of ovarian tumor. We also discuss the anesthetic issues associated with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. As discovery of tumor and its removal is the focus of initial treatment in this group of patients, anesthetists will encounter more such cases in the near future.

  14. [Anesthesia in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis - is general anesthesia a requisite? A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaw, Sook Hui; Foo, Li Lian; Chan, Lucy; Wong, Kang Kwong; Abdullah, Suhailah; Lim, Boon Kiong

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a recently described neurological disorder and an increasingly recognized cause of psychosis, movement disorders and autonomic dysfunction. We report 20-year-old Chinese female who presented with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, recent memory loss, visual hallucinations and abnormal behavior. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis was diagnosed and a computed tomography scan of abdomen reviewed a left adnexal tumor. We describe the first such case report of a patient with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis who was given a bilateral transversus abdominis plane block as the sole anesthetic for removal of ovarian tumor. We also discuss the anesthetic issues associated with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis. As discovery of tumor and its removal is the focus of initial treatment in this group of patients, anesthetists will encounter more such cases in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Anesthesia for a patient with Fanconi anemia for developmental dislocation of the hip: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Dogan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with congenital and hematological abnormalities. Literature regarding the anesthetic management in these patients is limited. A management of a developmental dislocation of the hip was described in a patient with fanconi anemia. Because of the heterogeneous nature, a patient with fanconi anemia should be established thorough preoperative evaluation in order to diagnose on clinical features. In conclusion, we preferred caudal anesthesia in this patient with fanconi anemia without thrombocytopenia, because of avoiding from N2O, reducing amount of anesthetic, existing microcephaly, hypothyroidism and elevated liver enzymes, providing postoperative analgesia, and reducing amount of analgesic used postoperatively. Keywords: Fanconi anemia, Caudal anesthesia, Developmental dislocation of the hip

  16. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during colon surgery in a high-risk patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Fornasari, Marcos; Fialho, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has advantages over single injection epidural or subarachnoid blockades. The objective of this report was to present a case in which segmental subarachnoid block can be an effective technique for gastrointestinal surgery with spontaneous respiration. Patient with physical status ASA III, with diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was scheduled for resection of a right colon tumor. Combined spinal epidural block was performed in the T5-T6 space and 8 mg of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine with 50 microg of morphine were injected in the subarachnoid space. The epidural catheter (20G) was introduced four centimeters in the cephalad direction. Sedation was achieved with fractionated doses of 1 mg of midazolam (total of 6 mg). A bolus of 25 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine was administered through the catheter two hours after the subarachnoid block. Vasopressors and atropine were not used. This case provides evidence that segmental spinal block can be the anesthetic technique used in gastrointestinal surgeries with spontaneous respiration.

  17. Anesthesia for a patient with Fanconi anemia for developmental dislocation of the hip: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Dogan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with congenital and hematological abnormalities. Literature regarding the anesthetic management in these patients is limited. A management of a developmental dislocation of the hip was described in a patient with fanconi anemia. Because of the heterogeneous nature, a patient with fanconi anemia should be established thorough preoperative evaluation in order to diagnose on clinical features. In conclusion, we preferred caudal anesthesia in this patient with fanconi anemia without thrombocytopenia, because of avoiding from N2O, reducing amount of anesthetic, existing microcephaly, hypothyroidism and elevated liver enzymes, providing postoperative analgesia, and reducing amount of analgesic used postoperatively.

  18. Total spinal anesthesia in an achondroplasic patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri H R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total spinal anesthesia is a complication of lumbar epidural anesthesia following undiagnosed subarachnoid or subdural injection of local anesthetic. Although many achondroplastic dwarfs have a normal spine, catheter insertion may be more problematic with a narrow epidural space making a subarachnoid tap more probable.  Other malformations associated with achondroplasia, such as prolapsed intervertebral discs, reduced interpedicular distance, shortened pedicles, and osteophyte formation, combined with a narrow epidural space may make identification of the space difficult and increases the risk of dural puncture. Furthermore, subarachnoid tap or dural puncture may be hard to recognize if a free flow of CSF is difficult to achieve due spinal stenosis. Yet, for those who meet the criteria, epidural regional anesthesia is frequently preferred over other forms, which often have more or more dangerous side effects in this type of patient.Case report: A 22-year-old achondroplastic male dwarf patient was scheduled for pelvic mass resection and was considered a candidate for continuous epidural anesthesia. The anesthesia became complicated by total spinal anesthesia, which was reversed following supportive management for about two hours.Conclusion: There is significant debate over the composition and volume of the test dose, especially for patients with achondroplasia. We nevertheless recommend repeated test-doses during the accomplishment of epidural anesthesia to exclude unintended intravascular, intrathecal or subdural injection, keeping in mind that a test dose of local anesthetic does not completely prevent complications.

  19. General Anesthesia Time for Pediatric Dental Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Anna R.; Seminario, Ana Lucia; Scott, JoAnna; Berg, Joel; Ivanova, Iskra; Lee, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the use of operating room (OR) time for pediatric dental procedures performed under general anesthesia (GA) at a regional children’s hospital over a 2-year period. Methods A cross-sectional review of a pediatric dental GA records was performed at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Data were collected for 709 0- to 21-year-old patients from January 2008 to December 2009. Demographic data, dental and anesthesia operator types, and procedures were recorded. Utilization of OR time was analyzed. Results The mean age of patients was 7.1 years (±4.2 SD), and 58% were male. Distribution by American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) classifications were: ASA I 226 (32%); ASA II 316 (45%); ASA III 167 (24%). Cases finished earlier than the scheduled time by an average of 14 minutes (±28). Overrun time was significantly associated with: patient age (P=.01); ASA classification (P=.006); treatment type (P<.001); number of teeth treated (P<.001); and dentist operator type (P=.005). Conclusions Overall, 73% of dental procedures under GA finished early or on time. Significant variables included patient age, medical status, treatment type and extent, and dentist operator type. Assessing factors that impact the time needed in GA may enhance efficiency for pediatric dental procedures. PMID:23211897

  20. Ketofol for monitored anesthesia care in shoulder arthroscopy and labral repair: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kevin C; Shi, Hanyuan; Lee, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Kevin C Lee,1 Hanyuan Shi,2 Brian C Lee3 1Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, New York, NY, 2Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: A 21-year-old male (body mass index: 28.3) with a history of asthma and reactive airway disease since childhood underwent left shoulder arthroscopy and labral repair surgery under monitored anesthesia care. Because the procedure was perform...

  1. Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases

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    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder

  2. Case Study of Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation Causing a Systemic Inflammatory Response Under Total Intravenous Anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalte, Gereon; Waning, Christian; Rossaint, Rolf; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Henzler, Dietrich; Tacke, Josef

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effects of hepatic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with malignant liver disease with respect to inflammation activation and stress response. In an observational trial, we investigated the physiologic parameters of 17 patients (20 interventions) who underwent percutaneous RFA under general anesthesia after applying total intravenous anesthesia. TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, adrenaline and noradrenaline, liver enzymes, lactate and creatine kinase were determined pre-interventionally after induction of anesthesia (T1), 90 minutes after initiation of RFA (T2), immediately after the conclusion of the procedure (T3), and 24 hours after the procedure (T4). A significant increase in body temperature (p < 0.001), and mean arterial pressure (p = 0.001) were measured intraoperatively (T2) and the day after the procedure (T4). Increased levels of IL-6 were measured at T3 and T4 (p = 0.001). IL-10 increased immediately after the procedure (T3; p = 0.007). IL-6 levels correlated well with the total energy applied (γ = 0.837). Significant increases in the levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline were present at T3 and T4 (p < 0.001). The RFA-induced destruction of hepatic tissue was associated with increased levels of AST, ALT, GLDH and LDH. Percutaneous RFA of hepatic malignancies causes an inflammatory and endocrine activation, similar to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. These effects have to be taken in account when dealing with patients susceptible to sepsis or multi-organ failure

  3. Case Study of Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation Causing a Systemic Inflammatory Response Under Total Intravenous Anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalte, Gereon; Waning, Christian; Rossaint, Rolf; Mahnken, Andreas H. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, (Germany); Henzler, Dietrich [Dalhousie University, Queen Elisabeth II Health Sciences Center, Halifax (Canada); Tacke, Josef [Interventional Radiology, Klinikum Passau, Passau (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    To investigate the effects of hepatic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with malignant liver disease with respect to inflammation activation and stress response. In an observational trial, we investigated the physiologic parameters of 17 patients (20 interventions) who underwent percutaneous RFA under general anesthesia after applying total intravenous anesthesia. TNF{alpha}, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, adrenaline and noradrenaline, liver enzymes, lactate and creatine kinase were determined pre-interventionally after induction of anesthesia (T1), 90 minutes after initiation of RFA (T2), immediately after the conclusion of the procedure (T3), and 24 hours after the procedure (T4). A significant increase in body temperature (p < 0.001), and mean arterial pressure (p = 0.001) were measured intraoperatively (T2) and the day after the procedure (T4). Increased levels of IL-6 were measured at T3 and T4 (p = 0.001). IL-10 increased immediately after the procedure (T3; p = 0.007). IL-6 levels correlated well with the total energy applied ({gamma} = 0.837). Significant increases in the levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline were present at T3 and T4 (p < 0.001). The RFA-induced destruction of hepatic tissue was associated with increased levels of AST, ALT, GLDH and LDH. Percutaneous RFA of hepatic malignancies causes an inflammatory and endocrine activation, similar to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. These effects have to be taken in account when dealing with patients susceptible to sepsis or multi-organ failure

  4. Severe Bradycardia Possibly due to a Local Anesthetic Oral Mucosal Injection during General Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Kenichi; Ohashi, Ayako; Kumagai, Miho; Hoshi, Hideki; Otaka, Kousei; Joh, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthesia may induce systemic complications leading to parasympathetic activity leading to bradycardia and hypotension. We report a case of a 50-year-old man undergoing dental surgery under general anesthesia who experienced severe bradycardia and hypotension after local anesthesia infiltration. Concerns regarding the utilization of a relatively large lumen injection needle for local anesthesia during general anesthesia are discussed.

  5. Hyperkalemia by Euro-Collins solution in anesthesia for renal transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Eunice Sizue; Pereira, Rosa Inês Costa; Filho, Gentil Alves; Braga, Angélica de Fátima Assunção

    2013-01-01

    To describe anesthesia for renal transplantation that progressed to a sharp potassium increase after kidney reperfusion with Euro-Collins' solution in the operative field. We will also report on diagnosis and treatment used. The use of infusion solutions in the surgical field requires careful monitoring, such as electrocardiography, measurement of serum potassium, and availability of calcium gluconate, insulin, and albuterol for immediate use. The replacement of Euro-Collins' solution for saline solution immediately before the implant may be a useful option in patients with high levels of potassium.

  6. Improving Patient Safety with X-Ray and Anesthesia Machine Ventilator Synchronization: A Medical Device Interoperability Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, David; Goldman, Julian M.; Whitehead, Susan F.; Lee, Insup

    When a x-ray image is needed during surgery, clinicians may stop the anesthesia machine ventilator while the exposure is made. If the ventilator is not restarted promptly, the patient may experience severe complications. This paper explores the interconnection of a ventilator and simulated x-ray into a prototype plug-and-play medical device system. This work assists ongoing interoperability framework development standards efforts to develop functional and non-functional requirements and illustrates the potential patient safety benefits of interoperable medical device systems by implementing a solution to a clinical use case requiring interoperability.

  7. Proximal Tibial Bone Harvesting Under Local Anesthesia Without Intravenous Sedation in the Dental Office: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary sinus enlargement often occurs in the maxillary posterior edentulous area and reduces the available bone height for implantation. Therefore, maxillary sinus lift and bone graft procedures are necessary to provide sufficient available bone. Autogenous bone grafting is the best base for implant osseointegration. Recently, tibial bone has been recognized as an alternative extraoral donor site. We present a case in which we used a proximal tibia bone graft for maxillary sinus augmentation under local anesthesia without sedation in the dental office. During a 4-year postoperative follow-up, gait was not disturbed and the scar on the donor site remained unremarkable.

  8. Ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia for a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system undergoing cesarean delivery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo LL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available LinLi Luo,* Juan Ni,* Lan Wu, Dong Luo Department of Anesthesiology, West China Second Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China  *These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered co-first authors Abstract: Anesthetic management of patients with preexisting diseases is challenging and individualized approaches need to be determined based on patients' complications. We report here a case of ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia in combination with low-dose ketamine during cesarean delivery on a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system and airway problems. The ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia was performed in the L1–L2 space, followed by an intravenous administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg for sedation and analgesia. Satisfactory anesthesia was provided to the patient and spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the surgery. The mother and the baby were discharged 5 days after surgery, no complications were reported for either of them. Our work demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia combined with low-dose ketamine can be used to successfully maintain spontaneous ventilation and provide effective analgesia during surgery and reduce the risk of postoperative anesthesia-related pulmonary infection. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, cesarean delivery, ketamine, ultrasound-guided

  9. Developing effective web-based regional anesthesia education: a randomized study evaluating case-based versus non-case-based module design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Sandra L; Smith, Hugh M

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the use of Web-based education in regional anesthesia training. Benefits of Web-based education include the ability to standardize learning material quality and content, build appropriate learning progressions, use interactive multimedia technologies, and individualize delivery of course materials. The goals of this investigation were (1) to determine whether module design influences regional anesthesia knowledge acquisition, (2) to characterize learner preference patterns among anesthesia residents, and (3) to determine whether learner preferences play a role in knowledge acquisition. Direct comparison of knowledge assessments, learning styles, and learner preferences will be made between an interactive case-based and a traditional textbook-style module design. Forty-three Mayo Clinic anesthesiology residents completed 2 online modules, a knowledge pretest, posttest, an Index of Learning Styles assessment, and a participant satisfaction survey. Interscalene and lumbar plexus regional techniques were selected as the learning content for 4 Web modules constructed using the Blackboard Vista coursework application. One traditional textbook-style module and 1 interactive case-based module were designed for each of the interscalene and lumbar plexus techniques. Participants scored higher on the postmodule knowledge assessment for both of the interscalene and lumbar plexus modules. Postmodule knowledge performance scores were independent of both module design (interactive case-based versus traditional textbook style) and learning style preferences. However, nearly all participants reported a preference for Web-based learning and believe that it should be used in anesthesia resident education. Participants did not feel that Web-base learning should replace the current lecture-based curriculum. All residents scored higher on the postmodule knowledge assessment, but this improvement was independent of the module design and individual learning styles

  10. Transient left ventricular dysfunction due to coronary spasm after spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Małek-Elikowska, Małgorzata; Słomczyński, Marek; Horbacka, Karolina; Bartkowski, Jarosław; Kalawski, Bartosz

    2017-10-23

    Bupivacaine is a long-acting local anesthetic (LA) used for cutaneous infiltration, peripheral nerve blocks, epidural and spinal anesthesia. However, its application may result in cardiovascular complications such as: hypotension, bradycardia, cardiac arrest and toxic myocardial injury. The authors describe a 53-year-old male with a history of cigarette smoking, admitted for an elective inguinal hernia surgery. Before surgery, the patient received subarachnoid injection of bupivacaine (20 mg). After the operation, he developed transient hypotension. Blood pressure returned to normal after gelofusine infusion; no sympathomimetics were administered. The male denied chest pain; however, ECG showed ST segment elevation coexisting with left ventricular anterolateral hypokinesia and decreased longitudinal strain in echocardiography. A significant increase in troponin I level was suggestive rather of myocardial infarction than of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Urgent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery spasm, which remitted after intracoronary nitroglycerin injection. Normalization of ECG and echocardiography was observed within a few days. The authors indicate that the presented atypical adverse effect of bupivacaine manifested itself with delay and that coronary spasm proceeded without angina. A close observation of the patient after anesthetic procedure with LA should be extended over the postoperative period.

  11. Anesthesia for left ventricular assist device insertion: a case series and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, David; Donaldson, Emilie; Falterman, Jason; Bates, Michael

    2011-01-01

    From October 2008 to June 2010, a total of 42 patients had the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device inserted surgically at Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans, LA. A retrospective electronic record review was conducted on this series of patients to analyze elements of perioperative anesthetic care, including general anesthetic care, echocardiographic considerations, and blood product usage. Etomidate was used to induce anesthesia for 34 of 42 patients (81%) in this series, with an average dose of 16.5 mg (±6 mg). The average intraoperative fentanyl dose was 1,318 µg (±631 µg). On average, patients were extubated 91 hours (±72 hours) after arrival to the intensive care unit and left on day 9 (±5 days). The average left ventricular ejection fraction of the patients in this series was 13% (±5%). Sixteen patients were evaluated as having severe right-heart dysfunction preoperatively. Two of 42 patients required surgical closure of echocardiographically identified patent foramen ovale. Twelve of 42 patients underwent surgical correction of tricuspid regurgitation. On average, 3 units (±2.6 units) of fresh frozen plasma were transfused intraoperatively and 10 units postoperatively. Intraoperative red blood cell usage averaged 1.1 units (maximum, 7 units), with an average 9.3 units administered in the first 48 hours postoperatively.

  12. ANESTHESIA MANAGEMENT OF 775 GRAMS PREMATURE PATIENT DURING PDA LIGATION-A CASE REPORT

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    Gulsen KESKiN

    2016-03-01

    We believe that VLBW preterm infants by having multiple system failure may have PDA ligation in operating room if there is no optimum conditions in ICU by obtaining safe transport, performing ketamine in anesthesia induction and maintenance. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(1.000: 47-50

  13. Propofol drip infusion anesthesia for MRI scanning: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasao-Takano, Mami; Misumi, Kan; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kamiya, Yoko; Noguchi, Izumi; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) room is a special environment. The required intense magnetic fields create unique problems with the use of standard anesthesia machines, syringe pumps, and physiologic monitors. We have recently experienced 2 oral maxillofacial surgery cases requiring MRI: a 15-year-old boy with developmental disability and a healthy 5-year-old boy. The patients required complete immobilization during the scanning for obtaining high-quality images for the best diagnosis. Anesthesia was started in the MRI scanning room. An endotracheal intubation was performed after induction with intravenous administration of muscle relaxant. Total intravenous anesthesia via propofol drip infusion (4-7 mg/kg/h) was used during the scanning. Standard physiologic monitors were used during scan pauses, but special monitors were used during scanning. In MRI scanning for oral maxillofacial surgery, general anesthesia, with the added advantage of having a secured airway, is recommended as a safe alternative to sedation especially in cases of patients with disability and precooperative chidren.

  14. Use of Local Anesthesia During Dental Rehabilitation With General Anesthesia: A Survey of Dentist Anesthesiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A.; Hagan, Joseph L.; Smiley, Megann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document current practices of dentist anesthesiologists who are members of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists regarding the supplemental use of local anesthesia for children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. A survey was administered via e-mail to the membership of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists to document the use of local anesthetic during dental rehabilitations under general anesthesia and the rationale for its use. Seventy-seven (42.1%) of the 183 members responded to this survey. The majority of dentist anesthesiologists prefer use of local anesthetic during general anesthesia for dental rehabilitation almost always or sometimes (90%, 63/70) and 40% (28/70) prefer its use with rare exception. For dentist anesthesiologists who prefer the administration of local anesthesia almost always, they listed the following factors as very important: “stabilization of vital signs/decreased depth of general anesthesia” (92.9%, 26/28) and “improved patient recovery” (82.1%, 23/28). There was a significant association between the type of practice and who determines whether or not local anesthesia is administered during cases. The majority of respondents favor the use of local anesthesia during dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. PMID:24697820

  15. Intermuscular pterygoid-temporal abscess following inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia-A computer tomography based navigated surgical intervention: Case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Jürgen; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthesia is a common local anesthetic procedure. Although IANB anesthesia is known for its safety, complications can still occur. Today immediately or delayed occurring disorders following IANB anesthesia and their treatment are well-recognized. We present a case of a patient who developed a symptomatic abscess in the pterygoid region as a result of several inferior alveolar nerve injections. Clinical symptoms included diffuse pain, reduced mouth opening and jaw's hypomobility and were persistent under a first step conservative treatment. Since image-based navigated interventions have gained in importance and are used for various procedures a navigated surgical intervention was initiated as a second step therapy. Thus precise, atraumatic surgical intervention was performed by an optical tracking system in a difficult anatomical region. A symptomatic abscess was treated by a computed tomography-based navigated surgical intervention at our department. Advantages and disadvantages of this treatment strategy are evaluated.

  16. “Manually Ventilating Test” in Anesthesia Management of Children with Massive Anterior Mediastinal Masses Requiring Tracheal Intubation.A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharavi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The risk of life-threatening complications during induction of anesthesia in patients with anterior mediastinal mass is well recognized. Maintenance of spontaneous ventilation during anesthesia is an accepted standard goal in all published reports. However, the decision to paralyze the patient, which is really needed in most surgical procedures, is still a challenging event. In this study, “manually ventilating test” as a predictive test was assessed to make the decision to paralyze children with massive anterior mediastinal masses who needed tracheal intubation. . It seems that manually ventilating test may at least be a simple and reliable test to identify cases that could be paralyzed successfully

  17. Propofol Drip Infusion Anesthesia for MRI Scanning: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Sasao-Takano, Mami; Misumi, Kan; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kamiya, Yoko; Noguchi, Izumi; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) room is a special environment. The required intense magnetic fields create unique problems with the use of standard anesthesia machines, syringe pumps, and physiologic monitors. We have recently experienced 2 oral maxillofacial surgery cases requiring MRI: a 15-year-old boy with developmental disability and a healthy 5-year-old boy. The patients required complete immobilization during the scanning for obtaining high-quality images for the best diagnosis. A...

  18. Anesthesia Quality and Patient Safety in China: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Gao, Huan; Zhou, Xiangyong; Huang, Jeffrey

    There has been no nationwide investigation into anesthesia quality and patient safety in China. The authors surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about anesthesia quality by sending a survey to all anesthesiologist members of the New Youth Anesthesia Forum via WeChat. The respondents could choose to use a mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. The overall response rate was 43%. Intraoperative monitoring: 77.9% of respondents reported that electrocardiogram monitoring was routinely applied for all patients; only 55% of the respondents reported that they routinely used end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring for their patients under general anesthesia. 10.3% of respondents admitted that they had at least one wrong medicine administration in the past 3 months; 12.4% reported that they had at least one case of cardiac arrest in the past year. This is the first anesthesia quality survey in China. The findings revealed potential anesthesia safety issues in China.

  19. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesiacase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luiz Benevides

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50 kg/m2, who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Case report: Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m2. Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 min and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: O aumento na prevalência da obesidade na população geral se estende para mulheres na idade reprodutiva. O objetivo deste estudo é relatar o controle perioperatório de uma gestante obesa mórbida com índice de massa corporal >50 Kg/m2, submetida a parto cesariano sob anestesia geral. Relato do caso: Gestante de 35 anos com índice de massa corporal

  20. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  1. Anesthesia management for pregnant patient with Arnold-Chiari malformation type I: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şaban Yalçın

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arnold-Chiari I malformation (ACM is a congenitalanomaly characterized by downward herniation of thecerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal. The anomaly maypresent in a variety of ways with vague symptoms suchas head and limb pains, vertigo, hypoesthesia, weaknessin the extremities. Diagnosis is often difficult and thereforedelayed. Measurement of intracranial pressure in thesepatients is an important measure thus precautions shoulbe taken for avoidance of increased intracranial pressure.In this case report, we discussed the anesthetic managementof a pregnant patient with Arnold Chiari I malformationwho underwent an emergency caesarean section.

  2. An 18-year-old patient with Prader-Willi syndrome: a case report on dental management under sedation and general anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ki Un; Nam, Ok Hyung; Kim, Mi Sun; Choi, Sung Chul; Lee, Hyo-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disorder reported rarely in dentistry. Dental practitioners should know the features of PWS because affected patients have a variety of dental symptoms. The current report describes a case of PWS. An 18-year-old male patient presented with traumatic injuries. Initial emergency treatments were performed under sedation, and further treatments were conducted under general anesthesia. After adequate healing, periodic follow-up and dietary management a...

  3. Management of a case of left tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy under cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthesia perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lung tumors with carinal involvement are frequently managed with tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy and tracheobronchial anastomosis without use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Various modes of ventilation have been described during tracheal resection and anastomosis. Use of CPB during this period allows the procedure to be conducted in a more controlled way. We performed tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy for adenoid cystic carcinoma of left lung involving carina. The surgery was performed in two stages. In the first stage, left pneumonectomy was performed and in the second stage after 48 h, tracheobronchial resection and anastomosis was performed under CPB. Second stage was delayed to avoid excessive bleeding (due to heparinization from the extensive vascular raw area left after pneumonectomy. Meticulous peri-operative planning and optimal post-operative care helped in successful management of a complex case, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  4. Cholecystectomy with local anesthesia as a resource in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Campo Abad, Roberto; Noel Mederos Curbelo, Orestes

    2011-01-01

    In the case of a patient presenting with acute cholescystectomy ideally is to remove the gallbladder. Sometimes there are special situations in malnourished elderlies with deterioration of its general status in whom a lengthy anesthesia intervention, even using not much invasive means as the videosurgery, put at risk the life of patient. In such cases the cholescystectomy with local anesthesia is an alternative that must to be taken into account. (author)

  5. Anesthesia in pregnant women with HELLP syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: HELLP syndrome, characterized by hemolysis, high levels of liver enzyme, and low platelet count, is an advanced clinical stage of pre-eclampsia, progressing to high maternal (24% and perinatal (up 40% mortality, despite childbirth care in a timely manner. The goal is to describe the anesthetic management of a case with indication to emergency cesarean. Case report: Female patient, 36 years old, gestational age of 24 weeks, with hypertensive crisis (BP 180/100 mmHg and severe headache, was admitted to the operating room for a cesarean section after diagnosis of HELLP syndrome. Indicated for general anesthesia, we opted for total intravenous with intubation after rapid sequence induction with propofol and remifentanil in continuous target-controlled infusion, and rocuronium at a dose of 1.2 mg/kg. Maintenance was achieved with propofol and remifentanil. The surgical procedure was uneventful, the child was born with APGAR 1/5 and transferred to the NICU. At the end of surgery, the patient was extubated in the operating room and taken to the ICU. The postoperative period was uneventful with no changes worthy of note and the patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day. Conclusion: When general anesthesia is the choice in parturient with HELLP syndrome, tracheal intubation with rapid sequence induction due to possible difficult airway, as well as the use of drugs to control the hemodynamic response can minimize the complications associated with the procedure, as occurred in this case.

  6. Anesthesia in a Combat Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    volunteers, 5. Horan BF, 1’rys-Roberts C, Hamilton WK, Roberts IG. Hie- I’ac2 rturnd t ner omalvalus, ut ardivas irodyftamic responses to enflurane anaesthesia...prolonged mainte- 77-81. nance of anesthesia. 19. Henry RI, Cannon DC., Winktlinail 1W, eds. (li ilheinitry,principles anid techiniques. 2nd ed. New York I...spinal cord injuries, particularly in the cervical or high thoracic regions, result in a "spinal shock" syndrome . Large volumes of intravenous fluid may

  7. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Narendran, Siddharth; Saravanan, V R; Pereira, Merlyn

    2016-01-01

    Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion.

  8. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion.

  9. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Siddharth; Saravanan, V R; Pereira, Merlyn

    2016-06-01

    Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion.

  10. Effects of opium addiction on level of sensory block in spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine for lower abdomen and limb surgery: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasy, Seyyed Hasan; Derakhshan, Pooya

    2014-12-01

    In clinical practice, the level of sensory block in spinal anesthesia in opium abusers is lower than that in non-abusers because of adaptive changes caused by opium use. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of sensory block resulting from the intrathecal administration of 0.5% bupivacaine in opium abuser patients undergoing lower extremity and lower abdominal surgeries. A total of 100 patients who were candidates of elective lower extremity orthopedic and lower abdominal surgeries were recruited and assigned to two groups based on their history of opium addiction (Case or control). Both groups underwent the same anesthesia procedure and pinprick test was used to assess the level of anesthesia. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups regarding age, duration of the surgery, and type of surgery. The frequency of addiction was higher in males than in females. The level of sensory block at three minutes was significantly lower in the opium abuser group (P = 0.006). The mean time to achieve T10 sensory block was 10.33 ± 5.79 minutes in the opium abusers and 6.89 ± 3.88 minutes in the controls (P = 0.001). The level of the highest sensory block was lower in the opium abuser group (P = 0.002). The findings of this study suggested that after induction of spinal anesthesia with intrathecal administration of bupivacaine, chronic opium abusers would have a lower level of sensory block in comparison with patients without a history of opium abuse.

  11. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  12. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers

  13. An 18-year-old patient with Prader-Willi syndrome: a case report on dental management under sedation and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ki Un; Nam, Ok Hyung; Kim, Mi Sun; Choi, Sung Chul; Lee, Hyo-Seol

    2015-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disorder reported rarely in dentistry. Dental practitioners should know the features of PWS because affected patients have a variety of dental symptoms. The current report describes a case of PWS. An 18-year-old male patient presented with traumatic injuries. Initial emergency treatments were performed under sedation, and further treatments were conducted under general anesthesia. After adequate healing, periodic follow-up and dietary management according to the patient's age and nutritional phase were recommended. Dental management of PWS patients consists of active preventive measures in addition to dietary consultation according to age and nutritional phase.

  14. Pharmacologic Considerations for Pediatric Sedation and Anesthesia Outside the Operating Room: A Review for Anesthesia and Non-Anesthesia Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Kraus, Molly; Trentman, Terrence

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the pharmacologic options for pediatric sedation outside the operating room will allow practitioners to formulate an ideal anesthetic plan, allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. The authors identified relevant medical literature by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases for English language publications covering a period from 1984 to 2017. Search terms included pediatric anesthesia, pediatric sedation, non-operating room sedation, sedation safety, and pharmacology. As a narrative review of common sedation/anesthesia options, the authors elected to focus on studies, reviews, and case reports that show clinical relevance to modern day sedation/anesthesia practice. A variety of pharmacologic agents are available for sedation/anesthesia in pediatrics, including midazolam, fentanyl, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, etomidate, and propofol. Dosing ranges reported are a combination of what is discussed in the reviewed literature and text books along with personal recommendations based on our own practice. Several reports reveal that ketofol (a combination of ketamine and propofol) is quite popular for short, painful procedures. Fospropofol is a newer-generation propofol that may confer advantages over regular propofol. Remimazolam combines the pharmacologic effects of remifentanil and midazolam. A variety of etomidate derivatives such as methoxycarbonyl-etomidate, carboetomidate, methoxycarbonyl-carboetomidate, and cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl metomidate are in development stages. The use of nitrous oxide as a mild sedative, analgesic, and amnestic agent is gaining popularity, especially in the ambulatory setting. Utilizing a dedicated and experienced team to provide sedation enhances safety. Furthermore, limiting sedation plans to single-agent pharmacy appears to be safer than using multi-agent plans.

  15. Acute hypotension in a patient undergoing posttraumatic cervical spine fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, David F

    2009-02-01

    Hypotension should be vigilantly prevented in patients with spinal cord injury. Recent advances in neurological, intraoperative monitoring techniques have allowed Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists to assess the effects of spinal cord ischemia and compression as they occur. This case report describes a young, healthy man who sustained a cervical spine fracture and was scheduled for anterior spinal fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia. This patient experienced a brief period of intraoperative hypotension with evidence of abnormal MEPs. A wake-up test was performed, which showed normal functioning, and the case resumed an uneventful course. Although this scenario resulted in no neurological sequelae, the effects of spinal cord ischemia due to hypotension can lead to permanent, devastating motor and sensory damage.

  16. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under epidural anesthesia: a clinical feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Huh, Jin; Kim, Duk Kyung; Gil, Jea Ryoung; Min, Sung Won; Han, Sun Sook

    2010-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has traditionally been performed under general anesthesia, however, owing in part to the advancement of surgical and anesthetic techniques, many laparoscopic cholecystectomies have been successfully performed under the spinal anesthetic technique. We hoped to determine the feasibility of segmental epidural anesthesia for LC. Twelve American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II patients received an epidural block for LC. The level of epidural block and the satisfaction score of patients and the surgeon were checked to evaluate the efficacy of epidural block for LC. LC was performed successfully under epidural block, with the exception of 1 patient who required a conversion to general anesthesia owing to severe referred pain. There were no special postoperative complications, with the exception of one case of urinary retention. Epidural anesthesia might be applicable for LC. However, the incidence of intraoperative referred shoulder pain is high, and so careful patient recruitment and management of shoulder pain should be considered.

  17. Regional anesthesia practice in China: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey; Gao, Huan

    2016-11-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia has been widely used in China. Recently, Chinese anesthesiologists have applied nerve stimulator and ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. Nationwide surveys about regional anesthesia practices in China are lacking. We surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about regional anesthesia techniques, preference, drug selections, complications, and treatments. A survey was sent to all anesthesiologist members by WeChat. The respondents can choose mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. Each IP address is allowed to complete the survey once. A total of 6589 members read invitations. A total of 2654 responses were received with fully completed questionnaires, which represented an overall response rate of 40%. Forty-one percent of the respondents reported that more than 50% of surgeries in their hospitals were done under regional anesthesia. Most of the participants used test dose after epidural catheter insertion. The most common drug for test dose was 3-mL 1.5% lidocaine; 2.6% of the participants reported that they had treated a patient with epidural hematoma after neuraxial anesthesia. Most anesthesiologists (68.2%) performed peripheral nerve blocks as blind procedures based on the knowledge of anatomical landmarks. A majority of hospitals (80%) did not stock Intralipid; 61% of the respondents did not receive peripheral nerve block training. The current survey can serve as a benchmark for future comparisons and evaluation of regional anesthesia practices in China. This survey revealed potential regional anesthesia safety issues in China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anesthesia for awake craniotomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Davi Bolzani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Some intracranial procedures are achievable with patients awake, however, there are challenges ranging from patient compliance to homeostasis. The aim of this study is to present a case of intracranial surgery for removal of a tumor in the left parietal lobe with the patient awake during the procedure. Case report: After patient selection and psychological preparation, the proposed excision of the left parietal lobe lesion in the waking state was clarified and accepted. Continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil was administered to maintain a Ramsay score of 2-3. The bilateral scalp blockade was performed with ropivacaine. The Mayfield head fixation device was installed and drapes adjusted to maintain the airway and eyes accessible for mapping with electrical stimulation and tumor excision. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes. The surgery was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the seventh day of hospitalization without presenting complication. Conclusion: Although the maintenance of analgesia and hemodynamic stability was a challenge with the patient awake, the target-controlled infusion of propofol provided the desired level of consciousness, remifentanil titrated analgesia and sedation without drug accumulation, and the blockade with ropivacaine provided satisfactory analgesia. We conclude that the anesthetic technique was satisfactory for our patient. Keywords: Craniotomy awake, Neurosurgery, Propofol, Remifentanil, Ropivacaine

  19. Tablet e-Logbooks: Four Thousand Clinical Cases and Complications e-Logged by 14 Nondoctor Anesthesia Providers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shristi; Ross, Oliver; Pickering, Stephen; Knoble, Stephen; Rai, Indra

    2017-10-01

    To meet the need for essential surgery across rural Nepal, anesthesia at district level is delivered by nondoctor anesthetists. They require support to maintain confidence and competence, and upgraded professional registration to secure their status. To meet these needs, a distance-blended learning course was pioneered and delivered. A core course requirement was to log all clinical cases; these were logged on a new e-logbook. Fourteen nondoctor anesthesia providers working in 12 different districts across Nepal were enrolled in the 1-year course. The course is based on self-completion on a tablet loaded with new learning modules, a resource library, and a case logbook. Continuous educational mentoring was provided by anesthesiologists by phone and email. The logbook included preanesthesia assessment and interventions, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grading, types of cases and anesthesia given, monitors used, complications, outcomes and free text remarks. Cases were uploaded monthly to a database, and mentors reviewed all logbook entries. The 14 nondoctor anesthesia providers were widely distributed across the country in district, zonal, community, and mission hospitals, and had different levels of clinical experience and caseloads. Logbooks and uploads were regularly completed without difficulty; 1% cases were entered incompletely with no case details provided. A total of 4143 cases were recorded. Annual caseload per nondoctor anesthesia provider ranged from 50 to 788, the majority of which were under spinal anesthesia; 34% of the total cases were cesarean deliveries, of which 99% received spinal anesthesia. Fifty gastrointestinal laparotomies (1% total) were recorded. Ninety-one percent of cases were ASA I, 0.8% ASA III/IV. Pulse oximetry was used in 98% of cases. Complications were recorded in 6% of cases; the most common were circulation problems (69%) including hypotension and occasional bradycardia after spinal anesthesia. Airway complications

  20. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Under Spinal Anesthesia with Low-Pressure Pneumoperitoneum - Prospective Study of 150 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunder Goyal

    2012-08-01

    Materials and Methods: In a private rural medical college, 150 patients were selected prospectively for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, under low-pressure (8mmHg pneumoperitoneum and under spinal anesthesia over a span of one and a half years. Injection bupivacaine (0.5% was used for spinal anesthesia. All ports were made in a head-down position to avoid hypotension. Shoulder pain was managed by reassurance as well as by diverting the attention and sedation in a few cases. Results: We successfully performed the operations in 145 patients without major complications. Spinal anesthesia was converted to general anesthesia in five patients due to severe shoulder pain. Age varied between 21 and 75 years. Duration of operation time (skin to skin was between 40 and 80 minutes. Twenty-nine patients complained of right shoulder pain. Most of them were managed by reassurance from the anesthetist and a few needed an injection of fentanyl along with midazolam. Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum is feasible and safe under spinal anesthesia. Incidence of postoperative shoulder pain and complications are comparable with laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(4.000: 224-228

  1. "Acupuncture anesthesia"--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, J H; Lee, P K; Bingham, H G; Greer, D M; Habal, M B

    1976-01-01

    Forty-two patients who were to undergo plastic surgical procedures were asked whether they would accept acupuncture as a substitute for local anesthesia. Eight patients agreed to acupuncture; one of these had 2 operative procedures with acupuncture. Five of the 9 procedures were successful; the remaining 4 required conversion to local anesthesia. After interviewing the patients, we felt that the success of "acupuncture anesthesia" was largely dependent on patient motivation, and that a patient may experience pain during surgical procedures without any change in facial expression or vital signs. We concluded that "acupuncture anesthesia" is of little value in our patient population at present. Its results are unpredictable; therefore, we anticipate that patient acceptance will be small.

  2. Anesthesia in a Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, C M; Lamberski, N; Kissel, D I; Quandt, J E

    1998-06-01

    A Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) was satisfactorily immobilized on two occasions with i.m. detomidine (0.065-0.13 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.13-0.2 mg/kg). On the second occasion, anesthesia was induced by i.v. administration of ketamine (2.2 mg/kg). Twenty minutes later, endotracheal intubation was performed after an additional i.v. injection of ketamine (1.5 mg/kg). Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane, which provided excellent conditions for radiology and surgery. Anesthesia was associated with hypoxemia when the tapir was allowed to breathe air and with hypoventilation. Mean arterial pressure remained satisfactory. No antagonist drugs were administered, and recovery from anesthesia was rapid and smooth.

  3. Thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an obese patient with asthma and multiple drug allergies: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Daszkiewicz Andrzej; Copik Maja; Misiolek Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Drug allergies, asthma, and obesity are more common in modern societies, and patients with these problems are often a challenge for anesthetists. Different techniques of regional anesthesia can be beneficial particularly for this group of patients. We present a patient who suffered from all of the above-mentioned conditions and successfully underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is still not a popular practice, and we would like to show a...

  4. Anesthesia for awake craniotomy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzani, Nelson Davi; Junqueira, Daisy de Oliveira Pollon; Ferrari, Paulo André Pinheiro Fernandes; Ferrari, Antonio Fernandes; Gaia, Felipe; Tapajós, Caroline Moraes; Junior, José Francisco Cursino de Moura; Neto, Edmundo Pereira de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Some intracranial procedures are achievable with patients awake, however, there are challenges ranging from patient compliance to homeostasis. The aim of this study is to present a case of intracranial surgery for removal of a tumor in the left parietal lobe with the patient awake during the procedure. After patient selection and psychological preparation, the proposed excision of the left parietal lobe lesion in the waking state was clarified and accepted. Continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil was administered to maintain a Ramsay score of 2-3. The bilateral scalp blockade was performed with ropivacaine. The Mayfield head fixation device was installed and drapes adjusted to maintain the airway and eyes accessible for mapping with electrical stimulation and tumor excision. For dura mater incision, a pad with 2% lidocaine was applied for 3 minutes. The surgery was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the seventh day of hospitalization without presenting complication. Although the maintenance of analgesia and hemodynamic stability was a challenge with the patient awake, the target-controlled infusion of propofol provided the desired level of consciousness, remifentanil titrated analgesia and sedation without drug accumulation, and the blockade with ropivacaine provided satisfactory analgesia. We conclude that the anesthetic technique was satisfactory for our patient. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an obese patient with asthma and multiple drug allergies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daszkiewicz Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug allergies, asthma, and obesity are more common in modern societies, and patients with these problems are often a challenge for anesthetists. Different techniques of regional anesthesia can be beneficial particularly for this group of patients. We present a patient who suffered from all of the above-mentioned conditions and successfully underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is still not a popular practice, and we would like to show another indication for using it.

  6. Integration of QR codes into an anesthesia information management system for resident case log management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Weissman, Charles; Levin, Phillip D

    2015-04-01

    Quick response (QR) codes containing anesthesia syllabus data were introduced into an anesthesia information management system. The code was generated automatically at the conclusion of each case and available for resident case logging using a smartphone or tablet. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use and usability/user-friendliness of such system. Resident case logging practices were assessed prior to introducing the QR codes. QR code use and satisfactions amongst residents was reassessed at three and six months. Before QR code introduction only 12/23 (52.2%) residents maintained a case log. Most of the remaining residents (9/23, 39.1%) expected to receive a case list from the anesthesia information management system database at the end of their residency. At three months and six months 17/26 (65.4%) and 15/25 (60.0%) residents, respectively, were using the QR codes. Satisfaction was rated as very good or good. QR codes for residents' case logging with smartphones or tablets were successfully introduced in an anesthesia information management system and used by most residents. QR codes can be successfully implemented into medical practice to support data transfer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical anesthesia with a combination of T12 paravertebral block and lumbar plexus, sacral plexus block for hip replacement in ankylosing spondylitis: CARE-compliant 4 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xijian; Li, Ji; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xi; Mei, Wei

    2017-06-26

    Anesthesia management for patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis scheduled for total hip arthroplasty is challenging due to a potential difficult airway and difficult neuraxial block. We report 4 cases with ankylosing spondylitis successfully managed with a combination of lumbar plexus, sacral plexus and T12 paravertebral block. Four patients were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. All of them were diagnosed as severe ankylosing spondylitis with rigidity and immobilization of cervical and lumbar spine and hip joints. A combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block was successfully used for the surgery without any additional intravenous anesthetic or local anesthetics infiltration to the incision, and none of the patients complained of discomfort during the operations. The combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block, which may block all nerves innervating the articular capsule, surrounding muscles and the skin involved in total hip arthroplasty, might be a promising alternative for total hip arthroplasty in ankylosing spondylitis.

  8. A survey of dental treatment under general anesthesia in a Korean university hospital pediatric dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bisol; Yoo, Seunghoon; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Jongbin

    2016-09-01

    In South Korea, the number of cases of dental treatment for the disabled is gradually increasing, primarily at regional dental clinics for the disabled. This study investigated pediatric patients at a treatment clinic for the disabled within a university hospital who received dental treatment under general anesthesia. This data could assist those that provide dental treatment for the disabled and guide future treatment directions and new policies. This study was a retrospective analysis of 263 cases in which patients received dental treatment under general anesthesia from January 2011 to May 2016. The variables examined were gender, age, reason for anesthesia, type of disability, time under anesthesia, duration of treatment, type of procedure, treatment details, and annual trends in the use of general anesthesia. Among pediatric patients with disabilities who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, the most prevalent age group was 5-8 years old (124 patients, 47.1%), and the primary reason for administering anesthesia was dental anxiety or phobia. The mean time under anesthesia was 132.7 ± 77.6 min, and the mean duration of treatment was 101.9 ± 71.2 min. The most common type of treatment was restoration, accounting for 158 of the 380 treatments performed. Due to increasing demand, the number of cases of dental treatment performed under general anesthesia is expected to continue increasing, and it can be a useful method of treatment in patients with dental anxiety or phobia.

  9. Cerebral venous thrombosis after spinal anesthesia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare but serious complication after spinal anesthesia. It is often related to the presence of predisposing factors, such as pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive use, and malignancies. Headache is the most common symptom. We describe a case of a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia and had postoperative headache complicated with CVT. Case report: Male patient, 30 years old, ASA 1, who underwent uneventful arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anesthesia. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, the patient showed frontal, orthostatic headache that improved when positioned supine. Diagnosis of sinusitis was made in the general emergency room, and he received symptomatic medication. In subsequent days, the headache worsened with holocranial location and with little improvement in the supine position. The patient presented with left hemiplegia followed by tonic–clonic seizures. He underwent magnetic resonance venography; diagnosed with CVT. Analysis of procoagulant factors identified the presence of lupus anticoagulant antibody. The patient received anticonvulsants and anticoagulants and was discharged on the eighth day without sequelae. Discussion: Any patient presenting with postural headache after spinal anesthesia, which intensifies after a plateau, loses its orthostatic characteristic or become too long, should undergo imaging tests to rule out more serious complications, such as CVT. The loss of cerebrospinal fluid leads to dilation and venous stasis that, coupled with the traction caused by the upright position, can lead to CVT in some patients with prothrombotic conditions. Resumo: Introdução: A trombose venosa cerebral (TVC é uma complicação rara, mas grave, após raquianestesia. Está frequentemente relacionada com a presença de fatores predisponentes, como gestação, puerpério, uso de contraceptivos orais e doenças malignas. O sintoma mais frequente é a cefaleia

  10. Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH is a rare but serious complication of spinal anesthesia. We report a case of intracranial SDH in a patient developing 11 days after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. The patient complained of headache on the 2nd post-operative day that was relieved by analgesics, bed rest and hydration. Later she presented with severe headache, vomiting, dizziness, dysarthria, irritability and somnolence. Diagnosis of the left sided SDH was confirmed radiologically and treated surgically. The patient recovered completely. The report highlights the need of considering the possibility of SDH in patients when postdural puncture headache is prolonged or recurs after a headache free period with neurological symptoms.

  11. [Case of tension pneumothorax associated with asthma attack during general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ueki, Ryusuke; Kusuyama, Kazuki; Okano, Yukari; Tatara, Tsuneo; Tashiro, Chikara

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of tension pneumothorax associated with asthma attack during general anesthesia. An 86-year-old woman with dementia underwent cataract surgery under general anesthesia. At 70 min after the start of operation, airway pressure suddenly increased from 19 to 28 cm HO2O. In spite of bag ventilation with 100% oxygen, Sp(O2) decreased to 81%. Chest-Xp showed typical image of tension pneumothorax. Chest drainage was immediately performed, after which Pa(O2) recovered soon. She was extubated on postoperative day 1 without any neurological disorder. Hyperinflation of fragile alveoli by mechanical ventilation was likely a cause of tension pneumothorax.

  12. Chest computed tomography in children under general anesthesia - cases of an atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowska, K.; Lasek, W.; Drewa, S.; Karolkiewicz, M.; Pogorzala, M.; Wysocki, M.

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography is a routine examination in children with diagnosed or suspected cancer. Despite the procedure is painless, it requires stillness for some time. Thus, general anesthesia is provided in selected cases. An aim of this paper was an evaluation of an atelectasis incidence in children referred to CT examination under general anesthesia. Material consisted of 11 children aged 2-61 months with neoplasmatic disease diagnosed or suspected. All of them had a regular chest CT exam under general anesthesia with lungs parenchyma, mediastinum and chest wall analyzed. In 4 of 11 children (36%) atelectasis was seen, located in supradiaphragmatic and paravertebral segments of the lungs. None of the children had clinical symptoms of atelectasis. In two of them control chest radiograms did not show any changes. In some patients general anesthesia may reduce the lungs pneumatization which can hide metastases in lungs. It could be summarized that in infants and young children sedation instead of general anesthesia in chest CT should be considered, which could improve the quality of the imaging and the safety of the examination. (author)

  13. The association of hypno-anesthesia and conventional anesthesia in a patient with multiple allergies at risk of anaphylactic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Carlo; Luchetti, Marco; De Trana, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    A male patient needed surgery for the ablation of 4 impacted maxillary molars that prevented chewing and had contributed to progressively worsening trigeminal neuralgia. Two previous anesthetic procedures led to episodes of severe anaphylactic shock with the need for a prolonged stay in the ICU. Hypnotic anesthesia was therefore selected as a safer option for this patient. After 4 preparative sessions, on the day of surgery, the hypnotist provided an induction followed by suggestions for mouth and face anesthesia. Intubation occurred following the introduction of remifentanil and sevoflurane. The surgery lasted about 90 minutes and proceeded uneventfully. This case report describes how conventional and hypnotic anesthesia may work synergistically and may be particularly advantageous in case of drug allergy.

  14. Anesthesia: A Topic for Interdisciplinary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary approach for teaching the topic of anesthesia as one aspect of a chemistry-oriented course for nonscience majors which focuses on timely topics such as the energy crisis and drugs. Historical treatment with the examination of literature is emphasized in teaching. (HM)

  15. The use of intraosseous anesthesia in a patient with myositis ossificans progressiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M D; Wilson, C

    1996-01-01

    The case of a pediatric patient with myositis ossificans progressiva in whom it became increasingly difficult to obtain local anesthesia is presented. Intraosseous anesthesia was successful in allowing pain-free dental treatment to be completed. This approach should be considered in other patients who have limited mouth-opening ability due to injury or disease.

  16. [Case of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) discovered during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Mika; Okura, Nahomi; Kashii, Tomoko; Matsushita, Mitsuji; Mori, Masanobu; Yoshida, Masayo; Tsujimura, Shigehisa

    2014-02-01

    We experienced a case of scheduled cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in a patient with LAM which had been missed in spite of preoperative medical examination and consultation with specialists but discovered because of perioperative hypoxia A 35-year-old woman, Gravida 1 Para 0, with breech presentation was scheduled to undergo cesarean section under spinal anesthesia at 38 weeks of gestation. She had no history of asthma or abnormal findings at annual medical examination. She had suffered from dry cough and nocturnal dyspnea for 7 weeks and an inhaled bronchodilator was administered with diagnosis of inflammatory airway disease by her respiratory physicians. Spinal anesthesia was performed with bupivacaine 12.5 mg. At the beginning of anesthesia SPO2 was 97% in supine position, but it rapidly decreased to less than 90% and 3 l x min(-1) oxygen was supplied with a facial mask. The anesthetic level was thoracal 4 bilaterally and her breathing was stable. The circulatory state, Apgar score and other vital signs were within normal ranges. Postoperative chest X-ray showed bilateral numerous grained spots and computed tomography scans showed multiple thin-walled cysts. The characteristic history and the fluoroscopic data gave her clinical diagnosis of LAM.

  17. The impact of service-specific staffing, case scheduling, turnovers, and first-case starts on anesthesia group and operating room productivity: a tutorial using data from an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Catherine; Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2006-12-01

    In this tutorial, we consider the impact of operating room (OR) management on anesthesia group and OR labor productivity and costs. Most of the tutorial focuses on the steps required for each facility to refine its OR allocations using its own data collected during patient care. Data from a hospital in Australia are used throughout to illustrate the methods. OR allocation is a two-stage process. During the initial tactical stage of allocating OR time, OR capacity ("block time") is adjusted. For operational decision-making on a shorter-term basis, the existing workload can be considered fixed. Staffing is matched to that workload based on maximizing the efficiency of use of OR time. Scheduling cases and making decisions on the day of surgery to increase OR efficiency are worthwhile interventions to increase anesthesia group productivity. However, by far, the most important step is the appropriate refinement of OR allocations (i.e., planning service-specific staffing) 2-3 mo before the day of surgery. Reducing surgical and/or turnover times and delays in first-case-of-the-day starts generally provides small reductions in OR labor costs. Results vary widely because they are highly sensitive both to the OR allocations (i.e., staffing) and to the appropriateness of those OR allocations.

  18. A psychometric evaluation of the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringblom, Jenny; Wåhlin, Ingrid; Proczkowska, Marie

    2018-04-01

    Emergence delirium and emergence agitation have been a subject of interest since the early 1960s. This behavior has been associated with increased risk of injury in children and dissatisfaction with anesthesia care in their parents. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale is a commonly used instrument for codifying and recording this behavior. The aim of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale, focusing on the factor structure, in a sample of children recovering from anesthesia after surgery or diagnostic procedures. The reliability of the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale was also tested. One hundred and twenty-two children younger than seven years were observed at postoperative care units during recovery from anesthesia. Two or 3 observers independently assessed the children using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale. The factor analysis clearly revealed a one-factor solution, which accounted for 82% of the variation in the data. Internal consistency, calculated with Cronbach's alpha, was good (0.96). The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, which was used to assess interrater reliability for the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale sum score, was 0.97 (P Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale for assessing emergence delirium in children recovering from anesthesia after surgery or diagnostic procedures. The kappa statistics for the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale items essentially indicated good agreement between independent raters, supporting interrater reliability. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Intraligamentary--intraosseous anesthesia. A radiographic demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfunkel, A A; Kaufman, E; Marmary, Y; Galili, D

    1983-10-01

    Intraligamentary dental anesthesia has become a widely accepted technique. The periodontal ligament seems to provide easy access to the tooth apex. In the present study, radiopaque material was injected into baboon monkeys. Serial radiographs during incremental injections showed clouding of the crestal bone. The material was seen gradually advancing through the alveolar bone crest, apically. The spread was noticed through the marrow spaces, unexpectedly avoiding the PDL route.

  20. Awake Craniotomy Anesthesia: A Comparison of the Monitored Anesthesia Care and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; ReFaey, Karim; Garcia, Oscar; John, Amballur; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Tripathi, Punita

    2017-08-01

    Commonly used sedation techniques for an awake craniotomy include monitored anesthesia care (MAC), using an unprotected airway, and the asleep-awake-asleep (AAA) technique, using a partially or totally protected airway. We present a comparative analysis of the MAC and AAA techniques, evaluating anesthetic management, perioperative outcomes, and complications in a consecutive series of patients undergoing the removal of an eloquent brain lesion. Eighty-one patients underwent awake craniotomy for an intracranial lesion over a 9-year period performed by a single-surgeon and a team of anesthesiologists. Fifty patients were treated using the MAC technique, and 31 were treated using the AAA technique. A retrospective analysis evaluated anesthetic management, intraoperative complications, postoperative outcomes, pain management, and complications. The MAC and AAA groups had similar preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Mean operative time was shorter in the MAC group (283.5 minutes vs. 313.3 minutes; P = 0.038). Hypertension was the most common intraoperative complication seen (8% in the MAC group vs. 9.7% in the AAA group; P = 0.794). Intraoperative seizure occurred at a rate of 4% in the MAC group and 3.2% in the AAA group (P = 0.858). Awake cases were converted to general anesthesia in no patients in the MAC group and in 1 patient (3.2%) in the AAA group (P = 0.201). No cases were aborted in either group. The mean hospital length of stay was 3.98 days in the MAC group and 3.84 days in the AAA group (P = 0.833). Both the MAC and AAA sedation techniques provide an efficacious and safe method for managing awake craniotomy cases and produce similar perioperative outcomes, with the MAC technique associated with shorter operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Resection of pulmonary nodule in a patient with subglottic stenosis under modified spontaneous ventilation anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jianfei; Chen, Xuewei; Liang, Lixia

    2017-01-01

    . Here we present a case of pulmonary nodule resection in a patient with subglottic stenosis using uniportal thoracoscopy under spontaneous ventilation anesthesia (SVA). Compared with traditional double lumen endotracheal intubation, we believe this modified technique can significantly reduce airway...

  2. [A 53-year-old man with herpes encephalitis showing acceleration of improvement in higher brain function after general anesthesia with sevoflurane: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Naohiko; Kaida, Kenichi; Hongo, Yu; Ogawa, Go; Ishikawa, Yukinobu; Takeda, Katsuhiko; Kamakura, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    We experienced a right-handed 53-year-old man who presented with disturbance of consciousness and fever. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) was diagnosed based on the detection of herpes simplex virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. The administration of acyclovir for 42 days improved his consciousness level. Drowsiness, fever and seizures reappeared 20 days after stopping acyclovir treatment (day 67) and he responded well to vidarabine and methylprednisolone pulse therapy. An assessment of aphasia on day 98 revealed transcortical sensory aphasia. Brain MRI showed lesion in the left temporal lobe, bilateral insular cortexes and bilateral frontal lobe. His higher brain dysfunction continued. On day 156, he underwent hip replacement arthroplasty under general anesthesia sevoflurane. His higher brain dysfunction rapidly improved thereafter. We concluded that the accelerated improvement in our patient's higher brain function was related to the protective effect of sevoflurane. Some reports also show the protective effects of sevoflurane in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by inhibition of T cell activation. These protective and anti-inflammatory effects may explain the accelerated improvement in higher brain function after general anesthesia.

  3. A Clinical Experience of Dental Treatment under Ambulatory General Anesthesia for A Disabled Patient Who Accepts Only One Favorite Dental Chair

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 潤; 川合, 宏仁; 山崎, 信也; 相澤, 徳久; 島村, 和宏; 鈴木, 康生; サトウ, ジュン; カワイ, ヒロヨシ; ヤマザキ, シンヤ; アイザワ, ノリヒサ; シマムラ, カズヒロ; スズキ, ヤスオ; Jun, SATO; Hiroyoshi, KAWAAI; Shinya, YAMAZAKI

    2007-01-01

    In our hospital, we have many cases of ambulatory general anesthesia in the dental treatment of disabled patients. However, if the disability patients have strong refusal to enter the general anesthesia room due to strong phobia, we can not apply the general anesthesia induction. We experienced a dental treatment under ambulatory general anesthesia of a disabled patient who could not sit on any dental chair except for his favorite one. The patient was a 16-year-old boy. He was diagnosed Down ...

  4. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  5. Catecholamine crisis during induction of general anesthesia : A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntagbauer, M; Koch, A; Strouhal, U; Zacharowski, K; Weber, C F

    2018-03-01

    Catecholamine crises associated with pheochromocytoma may cause life-threatening cardiovascular conditions. We report the case of a 75-year-old male who developed a hypertensive crisis during induction of general anesthesia for elective resection of a cervical neuroma due to an undiagnosed pheochromocytoma. Hemodynamic instability occurred immediately after the injection of fentanyl, propofol and rocuronium, prior to laryngoscopy and in the absence of any manipulation of the abdomen. In this case report, we present the management of this incident and discuss the underlying pathophysiology triggering a catecholamine crisis.

  6. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Anesthesia Anesthesia Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area En español ... Version (464 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is anesthesia? Anesthesia is a medical treatment that prevents patients ...

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  8. Parotitis after epidural anesthesia in plastic surgery: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosique, Marina Junqueira Ferreira; Rosique, Rodrigo Gouvea; Costa, Ilson Rosique; Lara, Brunno Rosique; Figueiredo, Jozé Luiz Ferrari; Ribeiro, Davidson Gomes Barbosa

    2013-08-01

    Acute swelling of the parotid glands after general anesthesia has become known as anesthesia mumps. Its cause is unknown. Only one case of postsurgical parotitis without general anesthesia is reported. This report describes three cases in this setting after plastic surgery. A 37-year-old women underwent breast surgery and abdominoplasty with a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block (bupivacaine 0.5 %). The operative time totaled almost 6 h. Subsequently, 4 h after surgery, the patient experienced painless bilateral parotid swelling without palpable crepitus. The edema resolved completely within 12 h under clinical observation and parenteral hydration. A 45-year-old patient received subglandular breast implants and body contouring with liposuction, all with the patient under a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block with 0.5 % marcaine. The total surgical time was 5 h. Subsequently, 3 h after surgery, the patient experienced a similar clinical presentation. The problem resolved completely in 36 h with clinical observation and parenteral hydration. CASE 3: A 30-year-old patient received a subglandular breast implant and underwent liposuction of the outer thighs using a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block with lidocaine 1 %. The duration of surgery was 1 h. Subsequently, 5 h postoperatively, the patient experienced a similar clinical presentation. Dexamethasone and parenteral hydration were administered. The problem resolved completely in 48 h without sequelae. The occurrence of parotitis in patients undergoing surgery under epidural anesthesia is a novel situation, which increases the range of possible etiologies for this little known condition. Dehydration leading to transient parotid secretion obstruction may play a significant role. Further reports of parotitis occurring in the regional anesthesia setting are expected to help elucidate its pathophysiology. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of

  9. [Characteristics of anesthesia in patients with MELAS syndrome: Case report of anesthesia in video-assisted thoracoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, A; Wappler, F

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a disease triggered by a disorder in energy production within mitochondria. The cause of this syndrome is a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA where in 80% of cases an A-to-G mutation is present at nucleotide 3243 and with a prevalence of 18.4/100,000 in the population. Predominantly affected are organ systems with a high energy metabolism, such as the heart, brain and musculature. During the premedication visit a thorough patient history and examination with respect to neurological impairments must be carried out. Epilepsy and the appropriate permanent medication lead to possible alterations in effectiveness of anesthetics and muscle relaxants which are difficult to predict. An extensive patient cardiac history and a preoperative electrocardiogram (ECG) for an appraisal of possible disorders in the cardiac conduction system and when necessary extended cardiac diagnostics, are recommended. The monitoring must be adapted depending on the functional limitations and the forthcoming intervention and when necessary a postoperative surveillance in an intensive care unit should be initiated. Knowledge of the special features of MELAS syndrome in association with a consideration of the characteristics of anesthesia in MELAS patients and an individually adapted intensified perioperative surveillance, can contribute to a reduction in perioperative morbidity in patients suffering from MELAS syndrome.

  10. A comparative evaluation of pain and anxiety levels in 2 different anesthesia techniques: locoregional anesthesia using conventional syringe versus intraosseous anesthesia using a computer-controlled system (Quicksleeper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özer, Senem; Yaltirik, Mehmet; Kirli, Irem; Yargic, Ilhan

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare anxiety and pain levels during anesthesia and efficacy of Quicksleeper intraosseous (IO) injection system, which delivers computer-controlled IO anesthesia and conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in impacted mandibular third molars. Forty subjects with bilateral impacted mandibular third molars randomly received IO injection or conventional IANB at 2 successive appointments. The subjects received 1.8 mL 2% articaine. IO injection has many advantages, such as enabling painless anesthesia with less soft tissue numbness and quick onset of anesthesia as well as lingual and palatal anesthesia with single needle penetration. Although IO injection is a useful technique commonly used during various treatments in dentistry, the duration of injection takes longer than conventional techniques, there is a possibility of obstruction at the needle tip, and, the duration of the anesthetic effect is inadequate for prolonged surgical procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fibromyalgia: A Primer for the Anesthesia Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Chad M.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Review The present review is intended to give an overview of fibromyalgia for the anesthesiologist. While the basics of the treatment of fibromyalgia are included, the intent is to provide context to discuss the potential implications in perioperative management. Recent Findings One of the most important changes in the last year is the new criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Instead of a combination of self-report and a tender point examination, there is a new self-report questionnaire that is now used diagnose fibromyalgia. This tool incorporates aspects of widespread body pain and some of the known comorbid symptoms. A score of 0-31 is given, which allows for the disease to be viewed as a continuum of sensitivity and symptomatology, instead of as a binary diagnosis. This continuum has been termed “fibromyalgia-ness.” This article also reviews the advances in understanding of the pathophysiology and emerging therapies. Little is known about the impact of fibromyalgia in the perioperative period. Summary The impact of fibromyalgia on anesthesia care is not known. Years of quality research have clearly demonstrated multiple pathophysiologic changes that could impact anesthesia care and future study is needed. PMID:21799404

  12. Meatotomy using topical anesthesia: A painless option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Use of topical anesthesia in form of Prilox (EMLA cream for meatotomy is safe and effective method that avoids painful injections and anxiety related to it and should be considered in most of such patients as an alternative of conventional penile blocks or general anesthesia.

  13. Assessing a Novel Method to Reduce Anesthesia Machine Contamination: A Prospective, Observational Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuck J. Biddle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anesthesia machines are known reservoirs of bacterial species, potentially contributing to healthcare associated infections (HAIs. An inexpensive, disposable, nonpermeable, transparent anesthesia machine wrap (AMW may reduce microbial contamination of the anesthesia machine. This study quantified the density and diversity of bacterial species found on anesthesia machines after terminal cleaning and between cases during actual anesthesia care to assess the impact of the AMW. We hypothesized reduced bioburden with the use of the AMW. Methods. In a prospective, experimental research design, the AMW was used in 11 surgical cases (intervention group and not used in 11 control surgical cases. Cases were consecutively assigned to general surgical operating rooms. Seven frequently touched and difficult to disinfect “hot spots” were cultured on each machine preceding and following each case. The density and diversity of cultured colony forming units (CFUs between the covered and uncovered machines were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Student’s t-tests. Results. There was a statistically significant reduction in CFU density and diversity when the AMW was employed. Conclusion. The protective effect of the AMW during regular anesthetic care provides a reliable and low-cost method to minimize the transmission of pathogens across patients and potentially reduces HAIs.

  14. Assessing a Novel Method to Reduce Anesthesia Machine Contamination: A Prospective, Observational Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Chuck J; George-Gay, Beverly; Prasanna, Praveen; Hill, Emily M; Davis, Thomas C; Verhulst, Brad

    2018-01-01

    Anesthesia machines are known reservoirs of bacterial species, potentially contributing to healthcare associated infections (HAIs). An inexpensive, disposable, nonpermeable, transparent anesthesia machine wrap (AMW) may reduce microbial contamination of the anesthesia machine. This study quantified the density and diversity of bacterial species found on anesthesia machines after terminal cleaning and between cases during actual anesthesia care to assess the impact of the AMW. We hypothesized reduced bioburden with the use of the AMW. In a prospective, experimental research design, the AMW was used in 11 surgical cases (intervention group) and not used in 11 control surgical cases. Cases were consecutively assigned to general surgical operating rooms. Seven frequently touched and difficult to disinfect "hot spots" were cultured on each machine preceding and following each case. The density and diversity of cultured colony forming units (CFUs) between the covered and uncovered machines were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Student's t -tests. There was a statistically significant reduction in CFU density and diversity when the AMW was employed. The protective effect of the AMW during regular anesthetic care provides a reliable and low-cost method to minimize the transmission of pathogens across patients and potentially reduces HAIs.

  15. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  16. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  17. Penile anesthesia in Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction (PSSD) responds to low-power laser irradiation : A case study and hypothesis about the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, Marcel D.; van Coevorden, Ruben S.; Schweitzer, Dave H.; Georgiadis, Janniko

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of paroxetine-induced penile anesthesia in Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction (PSSD) by Low-power Laser Irradiation (PLO is unknown in medical literature. The aim of the current article is to report partial efficacy of LPLI for paroxetine-induced persistent penile anesthesia. We report on a male

  18. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botney, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  19. Anesthesia-related mortality in pediatric patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Leopoldo Palheta; Pignaton, Wangles; Kusano, Priscila Sayuri; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Braz, Leandro Gobbo

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review of the Brazilian and worldwide literature aimed to evaluate the incidence and causes of perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality in pediatric patients. Studies were identified by searching EMBASE (1951-2011), PubMed (1966-2011), LILACS (1986-2011), and SciElo (1995-2011). Each paper was revised to identify the author(s), the data source, the time period, the number of patients, the time of death, and the perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality rates. Twenty trials were assessed. Studies from Brazil and developed countries worldwide documented similar total anesthesia-related mortality rates (anesthesia-related mortality rates in the past decade. Higher anesthesia-related mortality rates (2.4-3.3 per 10,000 anesthetics) were found in studies from developing countries over the same time period. Interestingly, pediatric perioperative mortality rates have increased over the past decade, and the rates are higher in Brazil (9.8 per 10,000 anesthetics) and other developing countries (10.7-15.9 per 10,000 anesthetics) compared with developed countries (0.41-6.8 per 10,000 anesthetics), with the exception of Australia (13.4 per 10,000 anesthetics). The major risk factors are being newborn or less than 1 year old, ASA III or worse physical status, and undergoing emergency surgery, general anesthesia, or cardiac surgery. The main causes of mortality were problems with airway management and cardiocirculatory events. Our systematic review of the literature shows that the pediatric anesthesia-related mortality rates in Brazil and in developed countries are similar, whereas the pediatric perioperative mortality rates are higher in Brazil compared with developed countries. Most cases of anesthesia-related mortality are associated with airway and cardiocirculatory events. The data regarding anesthesia-related and perioperative mortality rates may be useful in developing prevention strategies.

  20. Low-dose spinal-epidural anesthesia for Cesarean section in a parturient with uncontrolled hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhimin; Xiong, Yaqin; Luo, Linli

    2016-08-01

    A 29-year-old woman at 34 weeks' gestation with uncontrolled hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxic heart disease was admitted to urgency Cesarean section. After preoperative sedation and good communication, low-dose spinal anesthesia (7.5 mg 0.5 % bupivacaine) combined with epidural anesthesia (6 ml 2 % lidocaine) was performed through L3-4 inter-vertebral. Opioids were given intravenously to the mother for sedation after delivery of the baby. Satisfactory anesthesia and sedation was provided during surgery. The mother and the neonate were safe and no special complication was found after surgery. Our case demonstrated that low-dose spinal anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia with intravenous opioids can provide satisfactory anesthesia and sedation, and reduce the risk of heart failure and thyroid storm.

  1. Delayed Awakening from Anesthesia Following Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disorders, Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Delayed awakening from anesthesia remains one of the biggest challenges that involve anesthesiologists. Most commonly, delayed awakening is due to drugs effects persistence. Metabolic (like hypo- hyperglycemia, electrolyte, acid-base disorders and hypothermia may cause delayed emergence from anesthesia. Structural disorders of cerebral nervous system (like increase in intracranial pressure, brain ischemia and psychological disorders can be regarded as other uncommon causes of this condition. Hypokalemia is induced by low potassium intake, excessive excretion from gastrointestinal (GI and kidneys (like using diuretics or a shift from extracellular space into intracellular space. Cases:  In these two reported cases, although proper measures had been taken to reverse the effects of anesthetic drugs, the patients did not regain their consciousness as fast as expected. The only significant finding in postoperative tests, along with respiratory alkalosis, was low serum potassium level (K=2.5 and K=2.9 in the first and the second patients, respectively. Correction of serum potassium (to K=3.3 and K=3.2 in the first and the second, respectively improved patients level of consciousness, and they were discharged from intensive care unit (ICU with good general condition. Conclusion: During surgery; pain, stress, sympathetic increase, catecholamine release and the consequent β-stimulation, certain drugs, and respiratory alkalosis due to hyperventilation may cause acute shift of potassium into the cells, which will be intensified in the patients with preoperative hypokalemia. Hypokalemia induces consciousness impairment and increases muscle relaxation, both of which affect patient awakening. Serum potassium evaluation is recommended in cases of delayed emergence from anesthesia.

  2. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  3. A holistic view of anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in children

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    Clausen NG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Clausen, Tom G Hansen Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Introduction: Animal studies (including in nonhuman primates have shown that most general anesthetics cause enhanced neuroapoptosis in the immature brain with subsequent long-term neurocognitive deficits later in life. Whether human neurons are equally affected is yet unknown, but a final answer to this issue is still pending. To date, most human studies within the field are of observational nature and the results are conflicting. Some studies indicate an association between exposure to anesthesia and surgery while others do not. Objective: This review summarizes results from preclinical and observational studies. Controversies and challenges regarding the interpretation of these results are presented. Crucial aspects of neurocognitive safety during pediatric anesthesia and surgery are highlighted. International initiatives aiming to improve the safe conductance of pediatric anesthesia are introduced. Conclusion: So far, anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in humans remains an area of concern but it cannot be completely excluded. Clinical practice should not be changed until there are definite proofs that anesthetic exposure causes neurocognitive impairment later in life. Withholding necessary and timely surgeries as a consequence of any such concerns could result in worse harm. Focus of current research should also be redirected to include other factors, than merely anesthetics and surgery, that influence the neurocognitive safety of children perioperatively. Keywords: pediatric anesthesia, neurotoxicity, anesthesia safety, neurocognitive development 

  4. Anesthesia-related mortality in pediatric patients: a systematic review

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    Leopoldo Palheta Gonzalez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review of the Brazilian and worldwide literature aimed to evaluate the incidence and causes of perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality in pediatric patients. Studies were identified by searching EMBASE (1951-2011, PubMed (1966-2011, LILACS (1986-2011, and SciElo (1995-2011. Each paper was revised to identify the author(s, the data source, the time period, the number of patients, the time of death, and the perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality rates. Twenty trials were assessed. Studies from Brazil and developed countries worldwide documented similar total anesthesia-related mortality rates (<1 death per 10,000 anesthetics and declines in anesthesia-related mortality rates in the past decade. Higher anesthesia-related mortality rates (2.4-3.3 per 10,000 anesthetics were found in studies from developing countries over the same time period. Interestingly, pediatric perioperative mortality rates have increased over the past decade, and the rates are higher in Brazil (9.8 per 10,000 anesthetics and other developing countries (10.7-15.9 per 10,000 anesthetics compared with developed countries (0.41-6.8 per 10,000 anesthetics, with the exception of Australia (13.4 per 10,000 anesthetics. The major risk factors are being newborn or less than 1 year old, ASA III or worse physical status, and undergoing emergency surgery, general anesthesia, or cardiac surgery. The main causes of mortality were problems with airway management and cardiocirculatory events. Our systematic review of the literature shows that the pediatric anesthesia-related mortality rates in Brazil and in developed countries are similar, whereas the pediatric perioperative mortality rates are higher in Brazil compared with developed countries. Most cases of anesthesiarelated mortality are associated with airway and cardiocirculatory events. The data regarding anesthesia-related and perioperative mortality rates may be useful in developing prevention

  5. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) in an infant with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Resende, Marco Antonio Cardoso; da Silva, Elizabeth Vaz; Nascimento, Osvaldo José Moreira; Gemal, Alberto Esteves; Quintanilha, Giseli; Vasconcelos, Eliana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Werdnig-Hoffmann disease is the most common cause of hypotonia in infants and its prognosis is worse if it is present shortly after delivery. Symmetrical muscular weakness, areflexia, and fasciculations of the tongue are characteristic. The majority of the infants die before two years of age as a consequence of respiratory failure. The present report presents a case in which total intravenous anesthesia was used. This is a 1 year old white female weighing 10 kg, physical status ASA III, with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease diagnosed at two months of age. The patient was a candidate for open gastrostomy, fundus gastroplication, and tracheostomy. After venoclysis, the patient was monitored with cardioscope, non-invasive blood pressure, pulse oximeter, precordial stethoscope, and rectal temperature. She was oxygenated and, after bolus administration of atropine (0.3 mg), boluses of remifentanil (20 microg) and propofol (30 mg) were administered for anesthetic induction. After tracheal intubation, she was ventilated with manual controlled system without CO(2) absorber, Baraka (Mapleson D system), FGF of 4 L.min(-1), and FiO(2) 0.5 (O(2)/N(2)O). Anesthesia was maintained with continuous manual infusion of propofol, 250 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1), and remifentanil, 0.3 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1). The surgery lasted 150 minutes. The patient regained consciousness 8 minutes after the end of the infusion, ventilating spontaneously. Two hours later, she was transferred to the pediatric unit, being discharged from the hospital on the fourth postoperative day. The choice of anesthetic technique gives priority to the safety associated with the familiarity of handling available drugs. In children with neuromuscular diseases, due to the extremely short duration, total intravenous anesthesia with remifentanil and propofol in infusion systems can have a favorable influence on disease evolution.

  6. Comparison between general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia in attenuation of stress response in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized prospective trial

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    Writuparna Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy though minimally invasive produces significant hemodynamic surge and neuroendocrine stress response. Though general anesthesia (GA is the conventional technique, now-a-days, regional anesthesia has been accepted for laparoscopic diagnostic procedures, and its use is also being extended to laparoscopic surgeries. Objective: The aim was to compare the hemodynamic surge and neuroendocrine stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC under GA and spinal anesthesia (SA in American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA PS 1 patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty ASA physical status I patients, aged 18-65 years were randomly allocated into two equal groups of 15 each. Group A received GA with controlled ventilation. Patients were preoxygenated for 5 min with 100/5 oxygen, premedicated with midazolam 0.03 mg/kg intravenous (i.v, fentanyl 2 mcg/kg i.v; induction was done with thiopentone 3-5 mg/kg i.v; intubation was achieved after muscle relaxation with 0.5 mg/kg atracurium besylate i.v. Anesthesia was maintained with 1-2% sevoflurane and N2O:O2 (60:40 and intermittent i.v injection of atracurium besylate. Group B SA with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 25 μg fentanyl along with local anesthetic instillation in the subdiaphragmatic space. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate (HR, oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon-dioxide were recorded. Venous blood was collected for cortisol assay before induction and 30 min after pneumoperitoneum. All data were collected in Microsoft excel sheet and statistically analyzed using SPSS software version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. All numerical data were analyzed using Student′s t-test and paired t-test. Any value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: Mean arterial pressure and mean HR and postpneumoperitoneum cortisol level were lower in group B than group A though the difference was not statistically significant in hemodynamic parameters but significant in case of cortisol

  7. A prospective study on the association between spinal anesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obese patients. Methods: In this study, 199 patients who underwent total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA) were categorized into obesity group (n = 61) and non-obesity group (n = 138). Anesthesia was considered successful if a bilateral T12 ...

  8. Percutaneous planter fasciitis release under local anesthesia: A prospective study

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    Ramji Lal Sahu

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Percutaneous planter fasciitis release under local anesthesia is a minimally invasive procedure that can be performed in the outpatient setting. It is easy, quick, effective and moreover with few complications.

  9. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  10. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with peritonitis: Is it safe??

    OpenAIRE

    Kako, H; Hakim, M; Kundu, A; Tobias, TD

    2016-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia combined with general anesthesia has become a widely accepted method of providing effective postoperative analgesia and decreasing intraoperative anesthetic needs in the pediatric population. In clinical practice, there still appears to be hesitancy for the use of a neuraxial technique (spinal or epidural) in patients at risk for bacteremia or with an on-going systemic infection. However, evidence-based medicine lacks any data to support an increase in the risk of infecti...

  11. Administration of Anesthesia in a Patient with Allgrove Syndrome

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    Ayse B. Ozer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to report the anesthesia administration to a patient who was planned to undergo Heller myotomy for achalasia. There wasnot property in the patient whom allgrove syndrome was excepted any steroid treatment in preoperative period. The night before the operation 18 mg of prednisolone was administered intravenously. Induction of anesthesia was performed with thiopental sodium, vecuronium and fentanyl and the patient received endotracheal intubation. Eyes were taped closed and protected with ointment during surgery. Maintenance of anesthesia was achieved with 2% sevoflurane concentration in 50% O2-50% N2O. 25 mg of prednisolone was infused preoperatively, and intervention with insulin treatment was initiated when blood glucose level rose to 18 mmol/L at 2 hours. Safe anesthesia can be achieved by observing the preoperative development of tracheal aspiration, adrenal insufficiency and, autonomic dysfunction carefully and maintaining eye protection.

  12. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier; Peñarrocha, María

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. Design: A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent trea...

  13. Training anesthesiology residents in providing anesthesia for awake craniotomy: learning curves and estimate of needed case load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, Federico; Titi, Luca; Lanni, Fabiana; Stazi, Elisabetta; Rosa, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    To measure the learning curves of residents in anesthesiology in providing anesthesia for awake craniotomy, and to estimate the case load needed to achieve a "good-excellent" level of competence. Prospective study. Operating room of a university hospital. 7 volunteer residents in anesthesiology. Residents underwent a dedicated training program of clinical characteristics of anesthesia for awake craniotomy. The program was divided into three tasks: local anesthesia, sedation-analgesia, and intraoperative hemodynamic management. The learning curve for each resident for each task was recorded over 10 procedures. Quantitative assessment of the individual's ability was based on the resident's self-assessment score and the attending anesthesiologist's judgment, and rated by modified 12 mm Likert scale, reported ability score visual analog scale (VAS). This ability VAS score ranged from 1 to 12 (ie, very poor, mild, moderate, sufficient, good, excellent). The number of requests for advice also was recorded (ie, resident requests for practical help and theoretical notions to accomplish the procedures). Each task had a specific learning rate; the number of procedures necessary to achieve "good-excellent" ability with confidence, as determined by the recorded results, were 10 procedures for local anesthesia, 15 to 25 procedures for sedation-analgesia, and 20 to 30 procedures for intraoperative hemodynamic management. Awake craniotomy is an approach used increasingly in neuroanesthesia. A dedicated training program based on learning specific tasks and building confidence with essential features provides "good-excellent" ability. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier; Peñarrocha, María

    2012-05-01

    To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent treatment of a tooth with one of the techniques, and treatment of the homologous contralateral tooth with the other technique. The treatments consisted of restorations, endodontic procedures and simple extractions. The study series comprised 12 females and 18 males with a mean age of 36.8 years. The 30 subjects underwent a total of 60 anesthetic procedures. Intraosseous and conventional oral anesthesia caused discomfort during administration in 46.3% and 32.1% of the patients, respectively. The latency was 7.1±2.23 minutes for the conventional technique and 0.48±0.32 for intraosseous anesthesia--the difference being statistically significant. The depth of the anesthetic effect was sufficient to allow the patients to tolerate the dental treatments. The duration of the anesthetic effect in soft tissues was 199.3 minutes with the conventional technique versus only 1.6 minutes with intraosseous anesthesia--the difference between the two techniques being statistically significant. Most of the patients (69.7%) preferred intraosseous anesthesia. The described intraosseous anesthetic system is effective, with a much shorter latency than the conventional technique, sufficient duration of anesthesia to perform the required dental treatments, and with a much lesser soft tissue anesthetic effect. Most of the patients preferred intraosseous anesthesia.

  15. Clinical outcomes after external cephalic version with spinal anesthesia after failure of a first attempt without anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massalha, Manal; Garmi, Gali; Zafran, Noah; Carmeli, Julia; Gimburg, Genady; Salim, Raed

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether repeat external cephalic version (ECV) with spinal anesthesia affects clinical outcomes and cesarean delivery rates. A retrospective study was conducted using data collected at one hospital in Israel between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2015. Women with non-vertex singleton pregnancies (≥37 weeks) who had a failed ECV attempt without spinal anesthesia were included in the analysis. All women were offered a repeat ECV with spinal anesthesia. Outcomes assessed were rates of vertex presentation at delivery, successful repeat ECV, and cesarean delivery. Overall, 145 of 213 ECV attempts without spinal anesthesia were successful. Of the 68 women with a failed attempt, 5 (7%) experienced spontaneous version and 18 (26%) delivered at another institution or went into spontaneous labor. Among the remaining 45 women, 28 (62%) agreed to a repeat ECV with spinal anesthesia; 11 (39%) of these procedures were successful. All 11 women experienced vertex presentation at delivery versus none of the 17 women who refused repeat ECV (P=0.003). The cesarean delivery rate was 64% (18/28) versus 100% (17/17), respectively (P=0.007). Repeat ECV with spinal anesthesia after a failed first attempt without spinal anesthesia increased vertex presentation at birth and decreased the rate of cesarean delivery. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  16. Status of problem based learning in postgraduate anesthesia teaching: A cross-sectional survey

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    Geetanjali Chilkoti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesia is a specialized branch of medicine with a very narrow margin of error. Incorporation of problem-based learning (PBL in anesthesia post-graduate (PG teaching enhances the critical thinking and problem-solving skills. It also helps in developing a broader prospective of clinical case scenarios. Case based discussions (CBD are most widely practiced out of all PBL methods in anesthesia PG teaching. Materials and Methods: We conducted an anonymous questionnaire based, cross-sectional survey among 62 anesthesia residents from various medical institutions in a city of Delhi, India. We aimed to assess the current status of PBL by assessing the student satisfaction with CBD in anesthesia PG teaching, educational objectives accomplished with CBD and effectiveness of teaching curriculum in PG teaching with suggested modifications, if any. Result and Conclusion: We observed that CBD is lacking in many important key areas of PBL e.g., formulation of objectives, communication on the content and direction of PBL, facilitation skills, supplementation of inadequacies of CBD. However, CBD seems to be a valid method of PBL in terms of the educational objectives accomplished with it but increased motivation for learning is required. Majority of the students felt that PG teaching curriculum should be centralized, with increased emphasis on open interactive sessions regarding its effectiveness.

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral ... of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery ...

  18. Anesthesia for a child with Walker–Warburg syndrome

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    Emine Arzu Kose

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Walker–Warburg Syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy manifested by central nervous system, eye malformations and possible multisystem involvement. The diagnosis is established by the presence of four criteria: congenital muscular dystrophy, type II lissencephaly, cerebellar malformation, and retinal malformation. Most of the syndromic children die in the first three years of life because of respiratory failure, pneumonia, seizures, hyperthermia and ventricular fibrillation. Case report: The anesthetic management of a two-months-old male child listed for elective ventriculo-peritoneal shunt operation was discussed. Conclusions: A careful anesthetic management is necessary due to the multisystem involvement. We reported anesthetic management of a two-months-old male child with Walker–Warburg Syndrome who was listed for elective ventriculo-peritoneal shunt operation. Keywords: Walker–Warburg Syndrome, Congenital muscular dystrophy, General anesthesia

  19. X-tip intraosseous injection system as a primary anesthesia for irreversible pulpitis of posterior mandibular teeth: A randomized clinical trail

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Kazemi, Shantia; Khazaei, Saber; Jahromi, Maryam Zare

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful anesthesia during root canal therapy may be difficult to obtain. Intraosseous injection significantly improves anesthesia′s success as a supplemental pulpal anesthesia, particularly in cases of irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in primary anesthesia for mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods: Forty emergency patients wi...

  20. Case report 388: Transient paralysis of the left hemidiaphragm secondary to blocking anesthesia of the intrascalene brachial plexus

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    Brogdon, B.G.; Arcement, L.J.

    1986-08-01

    Radiologists and clinicians should be aware of the phenomenon of transient, unilateral paralysis of the phrenic nerve, secondary to anesthesia performed in a block of the brachial plexus used in surgical procedures of the upper extremity and in manipulation of fractures and dislocations. The disorder is self-limited and requires no further investigation or treatment. This entity is well-illustrated and fully described in this case report.

  1. Case report 388: Transient paralysis of the left hemidiaphragm secondary to blocking anesthesia of the intrascalene brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogdon, B.G.; Arcement, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiologists and clinicians should be aware of the phenomenon of transient, unilateral paralysis of the phrenic nerve, secondary to anesthesia performed in a block of the brachial plexus used in surgical procedures of the upper extremity and in manipulation of fractures and dislocations. The disorder is self-limited and requires no further investigation or treatment. This entity is well-illustrated and fully described in this case report. (orig.)

  2. eLearning among Canadian anesthesia residents: a survey of podcast use and content needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matava, Clyde T; Rosen, Derek; Siu, Eric; Bould, Dylan M

    2013-04-23

    Podcasts are increasingly being used in medical education. In this study, we conducted a survey of Canadian anesthesia residents to better delineate the content needs, format preferences, and usage patterns among anesthesia residents. 10/16 Canadian anesthesia program directors, representing 443/659 Canadian anesthesia residents, allowed their residents to be included in the study. 169/659 (24%) residents responded to our survey. A 17-item survey tool developed by the investigators was distributed by email eliciting information on patterns of podcast use, preferred content, preferred format, and podcast adjuncts perceived to increase knowledge retention. 60% (91/151) had used medical podcasts with 67% of these users spending up to 1 hour per week on podcasts. 72.3% of respondents selected 'ability to review materials whenever I want' was selected by the majority of respondents (72%) as the reason they found podcasts to be valuable. No clear preference was shown for audio, video, or slidecast podcasts. Physiology (88%) and pharmacology (87%) were the most requested basic science topics while regional anesthesia (84%), intensive care (79%) and crisis resource management (86%) were the most requested for procedural, clinical and professional topics respectively. Respondents stated they would most likely view podcasts that contained procedural skills, journal article summaries and case presentations and that were between 5-15 minutes in duration A significantly greater proportion of senior residents (81%) requested podcasts on 'pediatric anesthesia' compared to junior residents 57% (P = 0.007). The majority of respondents are using podcasts. Anesthesia residents have preferred podcast content, types, length and format that educators should be cognizant of when developing and providing podcasts.

  3. [Anesthesia unrelated triggering of a fatal malignant hyperthermia crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthoff, D; Vonderlind, C

    1997-12-01

    For incidents of malignant hyperthermia (MH) outside the hospital, a high number of unrecorded cases must be reckoned with because of an insufficient knowledge of emergency services and poor identification and documentation that make it impossible to classify acute situations under the diagnosis of malignant hyperthermia crisis. As a result, there are no statistical data in this field, and only case reports with a broad spectrum of suspected trigger mechanisms have been published. The case described in this report is a proved example of a non-anesthesia-related triggering of MH in a 21-year-old man who had had an anesthetic-induced MH manifestation in childhood, which was confirmed with an in vitro contracture test. After visiting a restaurant, he became unconscious and convulsive after consuming a high level of alcohol (2.9/1000). The first cardiocirculatory arrest occurred directly before hospitalization. After admission, the patient showed a full-blown MH episode whose subsequent fatality was unavoidable in spite of adapted and optimal therapy. Suspected trigger mechanisms seem to be multifactoral (excessive alcohol consumption, over-heating, mental stress) as a forensic investigation did not point to any particular signs of typical trigger substances. The case demonstrates again that an MH attack might be triggered under certain non-anaesthesia-related situations. For patients with an MH disposition, additional information on their behavior outside the hospital is required.

  4. Efficacy of a separate informed consent for anesthesia services: A prospective study from the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavi Rampersad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: A separate written consent for anesthesia improved the efficacy of the informed consent process with respect to better information about the nature and purpose of anesthesia, common side effects, and rare but serious complications.

  5. X-tip intraosseous injection system as a primary anesthesia for irreversible pulpitis of posterior mandibular teeth: A randomized clinical trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Hamid; Kazemi, Shantia; Khazaei, Saber; Jahromi, Maryam Zare

    2013-03-01

    Successful anesthesia during root canal therapy may be difficult to obtain. Intraosseous injection significantly improves anesthesia's success as a supplemental pulpal anesthesia, particularly in cases of irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in primary anesthesia for mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Forty emergency patients with an irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth were randomly assigned to receive either intraosseous injection using the X-tip intraosseous injection system or IAN block as the primary injection method for pulpal anesthesia. Pulpal anesthesia was evaluated using an electric pulp tester and endo ice at 5-min intervals for 15 min. Anesthesia's success or failure rates were recorded and analyzed using SPSS version 12 statistical software. Success or failure rates were compared using a Fisher's exact test, and the time duration for the onset of anesthesia was compared using Mann-Whitney U test. P Intraosseous injection system resulted in successful anesthesia in 17 out of 20 patients (85%). Successful anesthesia was achieved with the IAN block in 14 out of 20 patients (70%). However, the difference (15%) was not statistically significant (P = 0.2). Considering the relatively expensive armamentarium, probability of penetrator separation, temporary tachycardia, and possibility of damage to root during drilling, the authors do not suggest intraosseous injection as a suitable primary technique.

  6. [General anesthesia for a patient with pulmonary hypertension, bronchial asthma and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinji; Nishiyama, Tomoki; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2005-10-01

    The management of the patient with pulmonary hypertension is a challenge for the anesthesiologists because the risk of right-sided heart failure is markedly increased. We experienced a case of general anesthesia for a patient with pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary arterial pressure 39 mmHg), bronchial asthma and obesity. A 31-year-old woman was scheduled for arytenoid rotation for left recurrent nerve palsy. We applied routine monitors (noninvasive blood-pressure, five-lead electrocardiogram, pulse oximeter), and direct blood pressure monitoring through the radial artery. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam 4 mg, fentanyl 100 microg and sevoflurane 5%, and maintained with sevoflurane (1-2%) and nitrous oxide in oxygen. Surgery was completed in 100 minutes without any complications. We could successfully perform general anesthesia in a patient complicated by pulmonary hypertension, bronchial asthma and obesity, without invasive right-sided heart catheterization.

  7. Simplified local anesthesia technique for external dacryocystorhinostomy without nasal packing: a new technique and pilot study outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik HA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hatem A Tawfik,1 Osama R Youssef21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptBackground: The purpose of this paper is to describe a simplified local anesthesia technique for external dacryocystorhinostomy (EXT-DCR.Methods: In this pilot, retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series, 448 patients (480 eyes underwent EXT-DCR using a simplified local anesthesia technique. Nasal mucosal anesthesia was achieved using combined application of 6 mL of oxymetazoline 0.025% nasal spray and lidocaine 1% in the same spray bottle, without any packing of the nose with either pledgets or ribbon gauze. Local infiltration anesthesia consisted of subcutaneous injection of a 7 mL mixture of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine injected on the flat side of the nose beneath the incision site, in addition to a second medial peribulbar injection (3 mL, 2% lidocaine without epinephrine.Results: Successful unilateral or bilateral EXT-DCR was achieved in 432/448 patients (96.4%. Four patients could not tolerate the procedure under local anesthesia and were converted to general anesthesia. Four patients required additional local anesthetic injections because of intolerable pain. Heavy sedation was essential in eight uncooperative patients because surgical manipulation was impossible. The remaining patients tolerated the procedure well. The intraoperative bleeding rate was very low except in one patient. Mean operative time was 16 minutes. Severe postoperative epistaxis was observed in four patients. Temporary anosmia developed in one patient.Conclusion: Our simplified local anesthesia approach of EXT-DCR is convenient for the patient because it avoids unnecessary nasal packing. It is also safe and effective, as evidenced by the high rate of successful completion of the procedure without conversion to general anesthesia or the need for supplemental local anesthesia.Keywords: local anesthesia, external

  8. Assessment of current undergraduate anesthesia course in a Saudi University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tarek; El-Masry, Ragaa; Al Wadani, Hamed; Amr, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of the anesthesia course in our university comprises Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), in conjunction with portfolio and multiple-choice questions (MCQ). The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of different forms of anesthesia course assessment among 5(th) year medical students in our university, as well as study the influence of gender on student performance in anesthesia. We examined the performance of 154, 5(th) year medical students through OSCE, portfolios, and MCQ. The score ranges in the portfolio, OSCE, and MCQs were 16-24, 4.2-28.9, and 15.5-44.5, respectively. There was highly significant difference in scores in relation to gender in all assessments other than the written one (P=0.000 for Portfolio, OSCE, and Total exam, whereas P=0.164 for written exam). In the generated linear regression model, OSCE alone could predict 86.4% of the total mark if used alone. In addition, if the score of the written examination is added, OSCE will drop to 57.2% and the written exam will be 56.8% of the total mark. This study demonstrates that different clinical methods used to assess medical students during their anesthesia course were consistent and integrated. The performance of female was superior to male in OSCE and portfolio. This information is the basis for improving educational and assessment standards in anesthesiology and for introducing a platform for developing modern learning media in countries with dearth of anesthesia personnel.

  9. A unique anesthesia approach for carotid endarterectomy: Combination of general and regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhen Samanta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid endarterectomy (CEA, a preventable surgery, reduces the future risks of cerebrovascular stroWke in patients with marked carotid stenosis. Peri-operative management of such patients is challenging due to associated major co-morbidities and high incidence of peri-operative stroke and myocardial infarction. Both general anesthesia (GA and local regional anesthesia (LRA can be used with their pros and cons. Most developing countries as well as some developed countries usually perform CEA under GA because of technical easiness. LRA usually comprises superficial, intermediate, deep cervical plexus block or a combination of these techniques. Deep block, particularly, is technically difficult and more complicated, whereas intermediate plexus block is technically easy and equally effective. We did CEA under a combination of GA and LRA using ropivacaine 0.375% with 1 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine (DEX infiltration. In LRA, we gave combined superficial and intermediate cervical plexus block with infiltration at the incision site and along the lower border of mandible. We observed better hemodynamics in intraoperative as well as postoperative periods and an improved postoperative outcome of the patient. So, we concluded that combination of GA and LRA is a good anesthetic technique for CEA. Larger randomized prospective trials are needed to support our conclusion.

  10. Ophthalmologic complications after administration of local anesthesia in dentistry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamanos, Christos; Raab, Philipp; Gamulescu, Andreea; Behr, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate the association between the occurrence of ocular adverse events and dental local anesthesia, the most plausible anatomic mechanisms, and the measures that offer patients a restitutio ad integrum. This systematic review adopted a structured protocol to access available publications and followed the PRISMA statement. Eighty-nine cases of patients experiencing ocular adverse events after administration of dental local anesthesia have been reported in the literature. Most of the complications manifested as double vision. Only 8% of the complications caused permanent functional damage, either as vision deficit or anisocoria. Complete permanent blindness was not reported. Ocular complications as a result of dental local anesthesia may be seen as rare occurrences with usually low intensity. However, visual function may become permanently impaired and serious medical conditions may obscure ocular dysfunction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

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    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  12. Management of mediastinal syndromes in pediatrics: a new challenge of ultrasound guidance to avoid high-risk general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Chrystelle; Choquet, Olivier; Prodhomme, Olivier; Capdevila, Xavier; Dadure, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Adverse events associated with anesthetic management of anterior mediastinal masses in pediatrics are common. To avoid an extremely hazardous general anesthesia, the use of real-time ultrasonography offers an effective alternative in high-risk cases. We report the anesthetic management including a light sedation and ultrasound guidance for regional anesthesia, surgical node biopsy, and placement of a central venous line in two children with an anterior symptomatic mediastinal mass. For pediatric patients with clinical and/or radiologic signs of airway compression, ultrasound guidance provides safety technical assistance to avoid general anesthesia and should be performed for the initial diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Anesthesia-induced epilepsy: causes and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xuefeng

    2014-09-01

    Epilepsy is a type of chronic brain disease that results from an abnormally high synchronization of neuronal discharge. The typical clinical features of epilepsy are paroxysms and transient and stereotyped brain dysfunction. Many cases of epileptic seizures occurring during anesthesia have been reportedx. Recently, risk assessment of epileptic seizures during surgery and anesthesia has gained increasing attention. In this review, we systematically summarize the influence of anesthesia on epileptic seizures; the types, durations and frequencies of seizures related to anesthesia; and the epidemiology, prevention, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy. We also explore the possible mechanism of epilepsy and provide guidance for anesthesia during surgeries.

  14. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with peritonitis: Is it safe??

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    H Kako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuraxial anesthesia combined with general anesthesia has become a widely accepted method of providing effective postoperative analgesia and decreasing intraoperative anesthetic needs in the pediatric population. In clinical practice, there still appears to be hesitancy for the use of a neuraxial technique (spinal or epidural in patients at risk for bacteremia or with an on-going systemic infection. However, evidence-based medicine lacks any data to support an increase in the risk of infectious complications following neuraxial anesthesia. We present two pediatric patients with intra-abdominal infectious processes who received caudal epidural blockade for postoperative operative analgesia. The use of neuraxial techniques in patients at risk for bacteremia is reviewed, evidence-based medicine regarding the risks of infection discussed, and the potential favorable effects of neuraxial blockade on the neurohumoral response to sepsis and the systemic inflammatory responses presented.

  15. Manual ward reduction of gastroschisis without anesthesia, a safe procedure – 8 years experience

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    Kamal Nain Rattan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroschisis is the most common type of abdominal wall defect at birth. Various modalities of treatment have been proposed ranging from primary closure to the staged closure using prosthetic materials under general anesthesia. One of the modalities is manual ward reduction with primary repair of gastroschisis without anesthesia. We are reporting our 8 years of experience with manual ward reduction of gastroschisis with primary repair without anesthesia.Materials and methods: It is a retrospective analysis of all patients of gastroschisis who presented in our institution from January 2008 to June 2016. The data were analyzed for antenatal diagnosis, sex, day of presentation, weight of baby, associated anomalies, management by manual reduction without anesthesia and post reduction morbidity and mortality.Results: Out of a total of 68 patients, 28 were females and 40 were males. Fifty-five cases (80.8% were antenatally diagnosed. Fifty-nine patients (86.7% presented within 24 hours of birth while the rest had delayed presentation. Preterms (< 37 weeks were 18 (26.4%. Cases of simple gastroschisis were 22 while those complicated were 46. The average birth weight was 1.88 kg with the lowest weight of 1 kg who was a 27-week preterm. In 60 patients (88.2%, bedside manual reduction without anesthesia and primary closure was possible while in 8 patients it could not be done owing to delayed presentation and complications. The mortality in these patients was 40%.Conclusion: Manual reduction and primary closure of gastroschisis without anesthesia is a safe procedure. It requires no ventilator support and can be managed with antibiotics, total parenteral nutrition (TPN and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP in the post-reduction period.

  16. Use of sodium nitroprusside in neurosurgical cases during anesthesia with enflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandesteene, A; Mouawad, E; Noterman, J; Deloof, T; Ewalenko, P; Genette, F

    1980-01-01

    In patients operated for cerebral aneurysm or angioma, the same basic method of anesthesia has been used. Premedication consisted of Thalamonal or diazepam. After induction with thiopentone, curarisation with pancuronium and tracheal intubation, anesthesia was maintained with N2O 70%, O2 30% and enflurane 1%. Small doses of fentanyl or Thalamonal were given at the beginning of anesthesia, but no more within 30 minutes before starting controlled hypotension. Adjuvant drugs and methods to reduce intracranial pressure were also used, such as dexamethasone, mannitol and cerebro-spinal fluid subtraction. The approach and dissection of the vascular lesion was done under controlled hypotension with sodium nitroprusside 0.01% solution. The mean dose of sodium nitroprusside to maintain a mean blood pressure at about 50 Torr was 1.37 mcg/kg/min.

  17. Percutaneous full endoscopic lumbar foraminoplasty for adjacent level foraminal stenosis following vertebral intersegmental fusion in an awake and aware patient under local anesthesia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kazuta; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Fumio; Tezuka, Fumitake; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Chikawa, Takashi; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic surgery for the lumbar spine has become established in the last decade. It requires only an 8 mm skin incision, causes minimal damage to the paravertebral muscles, and can be performed under local anesthesia. With the advent of improved equipment, in particular the high-speed surgical drill, the indications for percutaneous endoscopic surgery have expanded to include lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy has been used to treat intervertebral stenosis. However, it has been reported that adjacent level disc degeneration and foraminal stenosis can occur following intervertebral segmental fusion. When this adjacent level pathology becomes symptomatic, additional fusion surgery is often needed. We performed minimally invasive percutaneous full endoscopic lumbar foraminoplasty in an awake and aware 50-year-old woman under local anesthesia. The procedure was successful with no complications. Her radiculopathy, including muscle weakness and leg pain due to impingement of the exiting nerve, improved after the surgery. J. Med. Invest. 64: 291-295, August, 2017.

  18. [Anesthesia for a pediatric patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakami, Gotaro; Tazuke-Nishimura, Misako; Hirakata, Hideo; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with Coffin-Siris syndrome was scheduled to undergo diagnostic laparoscopy, inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiopexy at an ambulatory setting and same-day admission. Following anesthesia induction with inhalational sevoflurane, upper airway obstruction and hypoxemia developed. Hypoxemia was resolved immediately by manual positive pressure ventilation, although the stomach became bulged. Operation was finished uneventfully. However, he had massive bronchial secretion during anesthesia. He was admitted as planned and discharged on postoperative day 2. Since patients with Coffin-Siris syndrome have potential airway and pulmonary dysfunctions, careful perianesthesia airway and respiratory managements are essential.

  19. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes among patients undergoing cesarean section under general and spinal anesthesia: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anıl İçel Saygı

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: As the rates of cesarean births have increased, the type of cesarean anesthesia has gained importance. Here, we aimed to compare the effects of general and spinal anesthesia on maternal and fetal outcomes in term singleton cases undergoing elective cesarean section.DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary-level public hospital.METHODS: Our study was conducted on 100 patients who underwent cesarean section due to elective indications. The patients were randomly divided into general anesthesia (n = 50 and spinal anesthesia (n = 50 groups. The maternal pre and postoperative hematological results, intra and postoperative hemodynamic parameters and perinatal results were compared between the groups.RESULTS: Mean bowel sounds (P = 0.036 and gas discharge time (P = 0.049 were significantly greater and 24th hour hemoglobin difference values (P = 0.001 were higher in the general anesthesia group. The mean hematocrit and hemoglobin values at the 24th hour (P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively, urine volume at the first postoperative hour (P < 0.001 and median Apgar score at the first minute (P < 0.0005 were significantly higher, and the time that elapsed until the first requirement for analgesia was significantly longer (P = 0.042, in the spinal anesthesia group.CONCLUSION: In elective cases, spinal anesthesia is superior to general anesthesia in terms of postoperative comfort. In pregnancies with a risk of fetal distress, it would be appropriate to prefer spinal anesthesia by taking the first minute Apgar score into account.

  20. Neuraxial anesthesia in patients with multiple sclerosis - a systematic review

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    Helmar Bornemann-Cimenti

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Current guidelines for neuraxial analgesia in patients with multiple sclerosis are ambiguous and offer the clinician only a limited basis for decision making. This systematic review examines the number of cases in which multiple sclerosis has been exacerbated after central neuraxial analgesia in order to rationally evaluate the safety of these procedures. Methods: A systematic literature search with the keywords "anesthesia or analgesia" and "epidural, peridural, caudal, spinal, subarachnoid or intrathecal" in combination with "multiple sclerosis" was performed in the databases PubMed and Embase, looking for clinical data on the effect of central neuraxial analgesia on the course of multiple sclerosis. Results and conclusions: Over a period of 65 years, our search resulted in 37 reports with a total of 231 patients. In 10 patients multiple sclerosis was worsened and nine multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica was first diagnosed in a timely context with central neuraxial analgesia. None of the cases showed a clear relation between cause and effect. Current clinical evidence does not support the theory that central neuraxial analgesia negatively affects the course of multiple sclerosis.

  1. Anesthesia Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamings, Patricia A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe development of a collaborative graduate concentration in anesthesia nursing involving North Carolina Baptist Hospital and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Project components included (1) developing a cohesive faculty work group, (2) developing the curriculum, and (3) combining resources through an administrative…

  2. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased remarkably.

  3. Critical Thinking in Nurse Anesthesia Education: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari; Mendel, Shaun; Fisher, Rodney; Cooper, Kimball; Fisher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking is pivotal for student success in health professions education. Knowing the critical thinking ability of the learner helps educators tailor curriculum to enhance critical thinking. A quantitative comparative pilot study assessed critical thinking ability for students at two distinct points in a nurse anesthesia program…

  4. Breastfeeding after Anesthesia: A Review for Anesthesia Providers Regarding the Transfer of Medications into Breast Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Benjamin; Liu, Renyu; Valentine, Elizabeth; Onuoha, Onyi

    Doctors, nurses, and midwives often inform mothers to "pump and dump" their breast milk for 24 hours after receiving anesthesia to avoid passing medications to the infant. This advice, though cautious, is probably outdated. This review highlights the more recent literature regarding common anesthesia medications, their passage into breast milk, and medication effects observed in breastfed infants. We suggest continuing breastfeeding after anesthesia when the mother is awake, alert, and able to hold her infant. We recommend multiple types of medications for pain relief while minimizing sedating medications. Few medications can have sedating effects to the infant, but those medications are specifically outlined. For additional safety, anesthesia providers and patients may screen medications using the National Institute of Health' LactMed database.

  5. Appropriate practice of anesthesia: A plea for better training

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    O P Adudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of the anesthesiologist is often unknown among patients. But, the situation where the anesthesiologist is uncertain of his/her function gives more cause for concern. Methods: A questionnaire survey on the appraisal of anesthetic practices was carried out over 5 months using the style of clinical practice. Results: One-third of the anesthesiologists who responded to the survey attached little importance to the work they did by not communicating the same to their patients while 45.2% did not discuss the intraoperative findings with the surgeons. Although 57 (59.4% of the respondents usually visit their patients on the ward preoperatively, only 16 (21.6% discussed the proposed anesthetic procedure with the patients. Thirty-nine (40.2% respondents claimed that they do not wear ward coats to the ward at the preoperative visit. Less than 20% consistently conducted a postoperative visit. The majority of the respondents would treat all patients as important, irrespective of social status, while 74.5% of them considered obtaining informed consent for anesthesia from patients as significantly important. Conclusion: The current practice of anesthesia has been found wanting in several aspects. Knowledgeable discussion by anesthesiologists with surgeons as well as enlightenment of patients and their relatives about their work will improve the quality of anesthesia care remarkably. Changes in the anesthesia training curriculum to reflect these deficiencies would be helpful.

  6. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  7. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  8. Transthoracic Arteriovenous Graft Repair With the Pectoralis (PECS) II Nerve Block for Primary Intraoperative Anesthesia and Postoperative Analgesia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gabriel; Weber, Garret; Miller, Jonathon; Xu, Jeff

    2018-05-07

    The PECS II nerve block is a relatively new regional anesthetic technique that targets the medial and lateral pectoral nerves, as well as the lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerves. It has been described for surgical cases involving the breast, as an adjunct or alternative to neuraxial or paravertebral techniques. This case report describes the first successful use of the PECS II nerve block placed using ultrasound guidance as the primary anesthetic and postoperative analgesic in a non-breast-related chest wall surgery.

  9. Satisfactory spinal anesthesia with a total of 1.5 mg of bupivacaine for transurethral resection of bladder tumor in an elderly patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Yoshimichi; Yamakage, Michiaki; Tanaka, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Spinal anesthesia is popular for endoscopic urological surgery. Many patients undergoing urological surgery are elderly. It is important to limit the dose to reduce any resultant hemodynamic effect. We present a case in which incremental administration of 0.1 % bupivacaine up to 1.5 mg was sufficient to produce satisfactory spinal anesthesia for transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT).

  10. Automatic updating of times remaining in surgical cases using bayesian analysis of historical case duration data and "instant messaging" updates from anesthesia providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Lee, John D; Ledolter, Johannes

    2009-03-01

    Operating room (OR) whiteboards (status displays) communicate times remaining for ongoing cases to perioperative stakeholders (e.g., postanesthesia care unit, anesthesiologists, holding area, and control desks). Usually, scheduled end times are shown for each OR. However, these displays are inaccurate for predicting the time that remains in a case. Once a case scheduled for 2 h has been on-going for 1.5 h, the median time remaining is not 0.5 h but longer, and the amount longer differs among procedures. We derived the conditional Bayesian lower prediction bound of a case's duration, conditional on the minutes of elapsed OR time. Our derivations make use of the posterior predictive distribution of OR times following an exponential of a scaled Student t distribution that depends on the scheduled OR time and several parameters calculated from historical case duration data. The statistical method was implemented using Structured Query Language (SQL) running on the anesthesia information management system (AIMS) database server. In addition, AIMS workstations were sent instant messages displaying a pop-up dialog box asking for anesthesia providers' estimates for remaining times. The dialogs caused negotiated interruptions (i.e., the anesthesia provider could reply immediately, keep the dialog displayed, or defer response). There were no announcements, education, or efforts to promote buy-in. After a case had been in the OR longer than scheduled, the median remaining OR time for the case changes little over time (e.g., 35 min left at 2:30 pm and also at 3:00 pm while the case was still on-going). However, the remaining time differs substantially among surgeons and scheduled procedure(s) (16 min longer [10th percentile], 35 min [50th], and 86 min [90th]). We therefore implemented an automatic method to estimate the times remaining in cases. The system was operational for >119 of each day's 120 5-min intervals. When instant message dialogs appearing on AIMS workstations

  11. The impact of a postponed operation due to an anesthesia obstacle to the cost in children

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    Tamer Sekmenli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate causesof delay in elective surgical interventions and its additionaleconomic burden.Methods: Cases were chosen among the patients requiredan elective surgery and had no obstacle duringdiagnosis for the anesthesia, in a two-year period in theAtatürk University Faculty of Medicine Pediatric SurgeryClinic. All patients appointed to a date. The study groupconsists of 100 patients whose intervention was delayedbecause of an anesthesia obstacle at the appointmentday. Control group consists of 50 patients whose surgicalintervention was not delayed.Results: In study group 41% of patients were admittedfrom district of Erzurum province, 59% from other provincesor cities. In control group, 80% of appointments onthe day of surgery and district of Erzurum, 20% from otherprovinces. Delay in operations was more common for patientsadmitting from other provinces. The percentage ofdelayed operations were significantly higher within theage range of 2-4 years. 227 TL average cost per patientin our study group and 70 TL in the control group hasbeen recorded.Conclusion: In east Anatolia, upper respiratory tract infectionsare important problems causing delay in operationespecially for patients admitting from other providences.Elective surgical interventions should be performedin patient’s hometown or patients who will be directed toother provinces should have routine examination in theirhometown for a contraindication of general anesthesia.In conclusion, this simple attempt could have a positiveimpact on the family budget and the country’s economy.Key words: Elective surgery, child, anesthesia, cost

  12. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  13. Anestesia em paciente com síndrome de Gilbert: relato de caso Anestesia en paciente con síndrome de Gilbert: relato de caso Anesthesia in a patient with Gilbert's syndrome: case report

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    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2004-06-01

    forma segura sin el aparecimiento de toxicidad desde que sean evitados los factores que puedan llevar a la diminución de la actividad de la glicuroniltransferasis.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Gilbert's syndrome is a chronic benign disease leading to recurrent jaundice and major unconjugated bilirubin increase that may be toxic after the use of routine medication. This report aimed at describing the anesthetic approach in Gilbert's syndrome patient submitted to videolaparoscopic surgery. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 22 years old with Gilbert's syndrome, submitted to videolaparoscopic surgery under general anesthesia with propofol, alfentanil, succinylcholine, atracurium and isoflurane. There were no evidences of toxicity during anesthesia. Postoperative recovery was satisfactory and patient was discharged three days later. CONCLUSIONS: Gilbert's syndrome patients may be safely submitted to general anesthesia without toxicity, provided factors leading to glucuronosyltransferase activity decrease are avoided.

  14. Different Aspects of General Anesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani, Nahid

    2016-04-01

    Most child population is able to undergo dental treatment in the conventional setting. However, some children fail to cope with in-office conscious state and cannot respond to usual management modalities. This review aims to discuss the topic further. A computerized search in databases PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar and Google were performed using dental general anesthesia related keywords. Original and review English-written articles that were limited to child population were retrieved without any limitation of publication date. The suitable papers were selected and carefully studied. A data form designed by author was used to write relevant findings. Preoperative oral examination and comprehensive evaluation of treatment needs is only possible after clinical and radiographic oral examination. Effective collaboration in dental GA team should be made to minimize psychological trauma of children who undergo dental GA. Before conducting comprehensive dental treatment under GA, the general health of the child and the success rate of procedures provided needs to be accurately evaluated. It is noteworthy that determination of the optimal timing for GA dental operation is of great importance. Providing safety with pediatric dental rehabilitation under GA is critical. Besides criteria for case selection of dental GA, some degree of dental practitioner's judgment is required to make decision. Pre- and post-operative instructions to parents or caregiver decrease the risk of complications. However, trained resuscitation providers, careful monitoring and advanced equipment minimize adverse outcomes.

  15. Safe spinal anesthesia in a woman with chronic renal failure and placenta previa

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    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit ZencirciKahramanmaras, TurkeyBackground: Chronic renal failure is strongly associated with poor pregnancy outcome. Women dependent on hemodialysis before conception rarely achieve a successful live birth.Case presentation: A 31-year-old multiparous Turkish woman was scheduled for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia at 37 weeks and five days’ gestation because of hemorrhage due to secondary placenta previa. Spinal anesthesia with 8 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine was successfully performed. Invasive blood pressure, central venous pressure, and heart rate were stable during the surgery. The mother returned to regular hemodialysis on the first postoperative day.Conclusion: Pregnancy is uncommon in women with chronic renal failure requiring chronic dialysis. Rates of maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia, anemia, and infection in the pregnant chronic dialysis patient are high. However, our findings suggest that with careful, close, and effective monitoring preoperatively and intraoperatively, spinal anesthesia can be safely performed for cesarean section in patients undergoing hemodialysis.Keywords: chronic renal failure, pregnancy, spinal anesthesia, hemodialysis, placenta previa

  16. Phrenic nerve blocage with spinal anesthesia for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication

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    Murat Dursun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case, we describe a patient having laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF under spinal anesthesia with phrenic nerve blockade. It’s emphasized that in this type of operations, spinal anesthesia may be an alternative method rather the general anesthesia and the resulting shoulder pain in laparoscopic surgery performed under spinal anesthesia can be prevented by phrenic nerve blockade. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 186-188

  17. Anesthesia for thoracic surgery: A survey of middle eastern practice

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    Eldawlatly, Abdelazeem; Turkistani, Ahmed; Shelley, Ben; El-Tahan, Mohamed; Macfie, Alistair; Kinsella, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this survey is to describe the current practice of thoracic anesthesia in the Middle Eastern (ME) region. Methods: A prospective online survey. An invitation to participate was e-mailed to all members of the ME thoracic-anaesthesia group. A total of 58 members participated in the survey from 19 institutions in the Middle East. Questions concerned ventilation strategies during one-lung ventilation (OLV), anesthesia regimen, mode of postoperative analgesia, use of lung isolation techniques, and use of i.v. fluids. Results: Volume-controlled ventilation was favored over pressure-controlled ventilation (62% vs 38% of respondents, Panesthesia practice. Failure to pass a DLT and difficult airway are the most commonly cited indications for BB use. Regarding postoperative analgesia, the majority 61.8% favor thoracic epidural analgesia over other techniques (P<0.05). Conclusions: Our survey provides a contemporary snapshot of the ME thoracic anesthetic practice. PMID:23162388

  18. Anesthesia for a patient of acromesomelic dysplasia with associated hydrocephalus, Arnold Chiari malformation and syringomyelia

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    Rudrashish Haldar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromesomelic dysplasias are autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasias. Acromesomelic dysplasia Maroteaux-type (AMDM, also known as St Helena dysplasia, is of two types: The classical and the mild variety. About 50 cases of AMDM have been reported till date, most of them being the classical variety. There is scarcity of literature on anesthesia for such patients. We are reporting a case of general anesthetic management of AMDM, associated with hydrocephalus, Arnold Chiari malformation type-1 and syringomyelia. The patient was a 10-year-old short-statured boy who presented with symptomatic thoracic kyphoscoliosis, gibbus deformity and back pain. On examination, there was no neurological deficit. Radiology revealed thoracic kyphoscoliosis, mild ventriculomegaly and upper cervical syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior fossa decompression in the prone position under general anesthesia. We will discuss the anesthetic considerations for such patients and review the pertinent literature.

  19. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative

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    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml?1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 ?g ml?1. Other drugs we...

  20. Dental Treatments under the General Anesthesia in a Child with Keratitis, Ichthyosis, and Deafness Syndrome

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    Sera Sımsek Derelioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available KID syndrome is a rare genodermatosis characterized by keratitis, ichthyosis, and sensorineural deafness. Although the dermatological, ophthalmologic, and sensorineural defects are emphasized in the literature, oral and dental evaluations are so superficial. In this case report, dental and oral symptoms of a three year and five months old boy with KID syndrome, suffering severe Early Childhood Caries (s-ECC and dental treatments done under General Anesthesia (GA were reported.

  1. A low-dose bupivacaine: a comparison of hyperbaric and hypobaric solutions for unilateral spinal anesthesia.

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    Kaya, Menşure; Oğuz, Selma; Aslan, Kemal; Kadioğullari, Nihal

    2004-01-01

    The injection of small doses of local anesthetic solutions through pencil-point directional needles and maintaining the lateral decubitus position for 15 to 30 minutes after the injection have been suggested to facilitate the unilateral distribution of spinal anesthesia. We evaluated the effects of hypobaric and hyperbaric bupivacaine in attempting to achieve unilateral spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgery. Fifty patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups to receive either 1.5 mL hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% (7.5 mg; n = 25) or 4.2 mL hypobaric bupivacaine 0.18% (7.5 mg; n = 25). Drugs were administered at the L3-4 interspace with the patient in the lateral position. Patients remained in this position for 15 minutes before turning supine for the operation. Spinal block was assessed by pinprick and modified Bromage scale on both sides. Unilateral spinal block was observed in 20 patients in the hyperbaric group (80%) and in 19 patients in the hypobaric group (76%) while in the lateral position. However, 15 minutes after patients were turned supine, unilateral spinal anesthesia decreased to 68% of cases in the hyperbaric group and 24% of cases in the hypobaric group (P hyperbaric and hypobaric bupivacaine provided a rapid motor and sensory recovery and good hemodynamic stability, but more unilateral spinal block was achieved in patients in the hyperbaric group when compared with patients in the hypobaric group.

  2. Anesthesia and Poliomyelitis: A Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstine, Luke W; Gunn, Paul W; Schroeder, Darrell R; Hanson, Andrew C; Sorenson, Eric J; Martin, David P

    2016-06-01

    Poliomyelitis is a viral infectious disease caused by 1 of the 3 strains of poliovirus. The World Health Organization launched an eradication campaign in 1988. Although the number of cases of poliomyelitis has drastically declined, eradication has not yet been achieved, and there are a substantial number of survivors of the disease. Survivors of poliomyelitis present a unique set of challenges to the anesthesiologist. The scientific literature regarding the anesthetic management of survivors of poliomyelitis, however, is limited and primarily experiential in nature. Using a retrospective, matched cohort study, we sought to more precisely characterize the anesthetic implications of poliomyelitis and to determine what risks, if any, may be present for patients with a history of the disease. Using the Mayo Clinic Life Sciences System Data Discovery and Query Builder, study subjects were identified as those with a history of paralytic poliomyelitis who had undergone major surgery at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2005 and 2009. For each case, 2 sex- and age-matched controls that underwent the same surgical procedure during the study period were randomly selected from a pool of possible controls. Medical records were manually interrogated with respect to demographic variables, comorbid conditions, operative and anesthetic course, and postoperative course. We analyzed 100 cases with 2:1 matched controls and found that the peri- and postoperative courses were very similar for both groups of patients. Pain scores, postanesthesia care unit admission, length of postanesthesia care unit stay, intensive care unit admission, length of intensive care unit stay, and initial extubation location were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Looking at pulmonary complications in our primary outcome, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (17% vs 14% for polio versus control, respectively; conditional logistic regression odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence

  3. The State of Anesthetic Services in Korea: A National Survey of the Status of Anesthesia Provider in the 2011-2013 Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Active involvement of anesthesiologists in perioperative management is important to ensure the patients' safety. This study aimed to investigate the state of anesthetic services in Korea by identifying anesthetic service providers. From the insurance claims data of National Health Insurance for 3 yr, the Korean state of anesthetic services was analyzed. The claims for anesthesia from the medical institutions which hire their own anesthesiologist or with an anesthesiologist invitation fee are assumed to be the anesthesia performed by anesthesiologists. The annual anesthetic data were similar during the study period. In 2013, total counts of 2,129,871 were composed with general anesthesia (55%), regional anesthesia (36%) and procedural sedation with intravenous anesthetics (9%). About 80% of total cases of general anesthesia were performed in general hospitals, while more than 60% of the regional anesthesia and sedation were performed in the clinics and hospitals under 100 beds. Non-anesthesiologists performed 273,006 cases of anesthesia (13% of total) including 36,008 of general anesthesia, 143,134 of regional anesthesia, and 93,864 of sedation, mainly in the clinics and hospitals under 100 beds. All procedural sedations in the institutions without direct employed anesthesiologist were performed by non-anesthesiologists. Significant numbers of anesthesia are performed by non-anesthesiologist in Korea. To promote anesthetic services that prioritize the safety of patients, the standard to qualify anesthetic service is required. Surgeons and patients need to enhance their perception of anesthesia, and the payment system should be revised in a way that advocates anesthesiologist-performed anesthetic services. PMID:26770049

  4. Propofol Anesthesia and Sleep: A High-Density EEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Riedner, Brady A.; Boveroux, Pierre; Noirhomme, Quentin; Landsness, Eric C.; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Phillips, Christophe; Massimini, Marcello; Laureys, Steven; Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The electrophysiological correlates of anesthetic sedation remain poorly understood. We used high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG) and source modeling to investigate the cortical processes underlying propofol anesthesia and compare them to sleep. Design: 256-channel EEG recordings in humans during propofol anesthesia. Setting: Hospital operating room. Patients or Participants: 8 healthy subjects (4 males) Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Initially, propofol induced increases in EEG power from 12–25 Hz. Loss of consciousness (LOC) was accompanied by the appearance of EEG slow waves that resembled the slow waves of NREM sleep. We compared slow waves in propofol to slow waves recorded during natural sleep and found that both populations of waves share similar cortical origins and preferentially propagate along the mesial components of the default network. However, propofol slow waves were spatially blurred compared to sleep slow waves and failed to effectively entrain spindle activity. Propofol also caused an increase in gamma (25–40 Hz) power that persisted throughout LOC. Source modeling analysis showed that this increase in gamma power originated from the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. During LOC, we found increased gamma functional connectivity between these regions compared to the wakefulness. Conclusions: Propofol anesthesia is a sleep-like state and slow waves are associated with diminished consciousness even in the presence of high gamma activity. Citation: Murphy M; Bruno MA; Riedner BA; Boveroux P; Noirhomme Q; Landsness EC; Brichant JF; Phillips C; Massimini M; Laureys S; Tononi G; Boly M. Propofol anesthesia and sleep: a high-density EEG study. SLEEP 2011;34(3):283-291. PMID:21358845

  5. X-tip intraosseous injection system as a primary anesthesia for irreversible pulpitis of posterior mandibular teeth: A randomized clinical trail

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    Hamid Razavian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful anesthesia during root canal therapy may be difficult to obtain. Intraosseous injection significantly improves anesthesia′s success as a supplemental pulpal anesthesia, particularly in cases of irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN block in primary anesthesia for mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods: Forty emergency patients with an irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth were randomly assigned to receive either intraosseous injection using the X-tip intraosseous injection system or IAN block as the primary injection method for pulpal anesthesia. Pulpal anesthesia was evaluated using an electric pulp tester and endo ice at 5-min intervals for 15 min. Anesthesia′s success or failure rates were recorded and analyzed using SPSS version 12 statistical software. Success or failure rates were compared using a Fisher′s exact test, and the time duration for the onset of anesthesia was compared using Mann-Whitney U test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Intraosseous injection system resulted in successful anesthesia in 17 out of 20 patients (85%. Successful anesthesia was achieved with the IAN block in 14 out of 20 patients (70%. However, the difference (15% was not statistically significant ( P = 0.2. Conclusion: Considering the relatively expensive armamentarium, probability of penetrator separation, temporary tachycardia, and possibility of damage to root during drilling, the authors do not suggest intraosseous injection as a suitable primary technique.

  6. Anestesia ambulatorial para radioterapia em paciente portador de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Anestesia ambulatorial para radioterapia en paciente portador de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Outpatient anesthesia for radiotherapy in a patient with myasthenia gravis: case report

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    Raquel Marcondes Bussolotti

    2006-08-01

    , 87 años, 87 kg, estado físico ASA III, con historial de miastenia gravis; accidente vascular encefálico previo (AVE; marcapaso por bloqueo atrio-ventricular total; hipertensión arterial sistémica (HAS. Fueron programadas siete sesiones de radioterapia de 20 minutos para tratamiento del tumor de parótida bajo anestesia general. En la sala de radioterapia fue monitorizado con cardioscopio, monitor de presión arterial no invasiva, oxímetro de pulso y sometido a anestesia general con propofol y sevoflurano. Después de la inducción, se mantuvo en ventilación espontánea con cánula de Guedel y catéter nasofaríngeo con O2 /sevoflurano, para acomodación de la máscara de inmovilización. En la sala de recuperación postanestésica, no presentó complicaciones. CONCLUSIONES: La elección de los anestésicos y el acompañamiento clínico de criterio permitieron la buena evolución del paciente, con AVE previo, cardiopata y anciano, sometido a la anestesia general balanceada para procedimiento de aplicación de radioterapia, en régimen ambulatorial.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a rare autoimmune disease, characterized by the reduction in the number of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular junction, with an incidence of 14/100,000. The objective of this report is to describe the case of a patient with myasthenia gravis who underwent balanced general anesthesia for radiotherapy of a spinocellular carcinoma of the parotid gland as an outpatient. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 87 years old, 87 kg, physical status ASA III, with a prior history of myasthenia gravis; stroke; pacemaker for a third-degree AV block; and hypertension. He was scheduled for seven 20-minutes radiotherapy sessions under general anesthesia. In the radiotherapy room he was monitored with a cardioscope, noninvasive blood pressure, pulse oxymeter, and underwent general anesthesia with propofol and sevoflurane. After the induction, he maintained spontaneous ventilation with a

  7. Dreaming in sedation during spinal anesthesia: a comparison of propofol and midazolam infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk-Kyung; Joo, Young; Sung, Tae-Yun; Kim, Sung-Yun; Shin, Hwa-Yong

    2011-05-01

    Although sedation is often performed during spinal anesthesia, the details of intraoperative dreaming have not been reported. We designed this prospective study to compare 2 different IV sedation protocols (propofol and midazolam infusion) with respect to dreaming during sedation. Two hundred twenty adult patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups and received IV infusion of propofol or midazolam for deep sedation during spinal anesthesia. Patients were interviewed on emergence and 30 minutes later to determine the incidence, content, and nature of their dreams. Postoperatively, patient satisfaction with the sedation was also evaluated. Two hundred fifteen patients (108 and 107 in the propofol and midazolam groups, respectively) were included in the final analysis. The proportion of dreamers was 39.8% (43/108) in the propofol group and 12.1% (13/107) in the midazolam group (odds ratio=4.78; 95% confidence interval: 2.38 to 9.60). Dreams of the patients receiving propofol were more memorable and visually vivid than were those of the patients receiving midazolam infusion. The majority of dreams (36 of 56 dreamers, 64.3%) were simple, pleasant ruminations about everyday life. A similarly high level of satisfaction with the sedation was observed in both groups. In cases of spinal anesthesia with deep sedation, dreaming was almost 5 times more common in patients receiving propofol infusion than in those receiving midazolam, although this did not influence satisfaction with the sedation. Thus, one does not need to consider intraoperative dreaming when choosing propofol or midazolam as a sedative drug in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. © 2011 International Anesthesia Research Society

  8. Preventing and managing awareness during general anesthesia

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    Jelena Berger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: General anesthesia is a reversible state of a temporary loss of consciousness, analgesia, muscle paralysis, blunted autonomic responses and amnesia. To achieve this, an adequate depth of anesthesia should be maintained throughout the surgery. Awareness is a serious complication of general anesthesia, which occurs when the depth of anesthesia is not appropriate due to various causes.In this paper the underlying neurobiology of intraoperative awareness is presented, as well as risk factors for awareness and methods for assessing the depth of anesthesia. Possible psychological consequences of awareness and their management are also discussed. At the end, the recommendations for preventing intraoperative awareness are given.Conclusions: Awareness during general anesthesia may have adverse psychological sequelae in individual patients, therefore guidelines for preventing and managing of intraoperative awareness need to be adopted. In case of a possible awareness, the recommendations for offering a psychological support should also be followed.

  9. The use of alfaxalone and remifentanil total intravenous anesthesia in a dog undergoing a craniectomy for tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Leon N; Beths, Thierry; Fogal, Sandra; Bauquier, Sébastien H

    2014-11-01

    A 7-year-old castrated border collie dog was anesthetised for surgical resection of a hippocampal mass. Anesthesia was maintained using a previously unreported TIVA protocol for craniectomy consisting of alfaxalone and remifentanil. Recovery was uneventful, and the patient was discharged from hospital. We describe the anesthetic management of this case.

  10. [Prader-Willi syndrome case with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in both eyes treated by early vitrectomy under local anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hideyuki; Sato, Yukihiro; Nakashima, Motohiro; Nakajima, Motohiro

    2012-02-01

    Although patients with Prader-Willi syndrome have a high rate of diabetes, to date, there have been only 4 reported cases (6 eyes) undergoing vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we report a case of Prader-Willi syndrome with proliferative diabetic retinopathy that was treated by early vitrectomy OU under local anesthesia. A 30-year-old man was diagnosed as having Prader-Willi syndrome at the age of 2 years and diabetes at age 17. He was referred to our hospital as diabetic retinopathy had been detected in his first ophthalmological examination at age 29. Visual acuity was 0.6 bilaterally. Proliferative retinopathy, with cataract and macular edema, was identified in both eyes. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed on both eyes. However, proliferative membranes developed bilaterally, and vitreous hemorrhage occurred OS. Visual acuity decreased to 0.3 OU. The patient was hospitalized at our internal medicine department for blood glucose control. Subsequently, with an anesthesiologist on standby, a hypnotic sedative was injected intramuscularly, achieving retro-bulbar anesthesia. Combined cataract and vitreous surgery was performed on the left eye. One week later, a similar operation was performed on the right eye. The patient was discharged four days later. In the two years since these operation, visual acuity has been maintained at 0.8 OU. Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome should be examined for early detection and treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Espondilodiscitis secundaria a anestesia peridural Spondilodiscitis secondary to peridural anesthesia

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    Yvei González Orlandi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente con espondilodiscitis secundaria al uso de anestesia peridural lumbar para la resección transuretral de una hiperplasia fibroadenomatosa de la próstata. El cuadro clínico estuvo determinado por lumbalgia aguda con incremento progresivo que llevó al confinamiento en cama del paciente. En el examen físico del sistema osteomioarticular predominó la contractura paravertebral lumbar, así como en la palpación de esta región. En el examen neurológico no se encontraron alteraciones. La tomografía axial computarizada multicorte, así como la gammagrafía ósea de columna lumbar, confirmaron el diagnóstico. Se indicó tratamiento médico basado en los síntomas, antibioticoterapia combinada y ortesis externa. La recuperación total del paciente ocurrió a los 6 meses del inicio de la enfermedad.This is the case of a patient presenting with spondilodiscitis secondary to use of lumbar peridural anesthesia for transurethral resection of a prostatic fibroadenoma hyperplasia The clinical picture was determined by a acute lumbar pain with a progressive increase leading to put to bed the patient. In physical examination of osteomyoarticular system there was predominance of lumbar paravertebral contracture, as well as in palpation of this region. In neurological examination there weren't alterations. The multi-scan computed axial tomography and the spine column bone scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis. Medical treatment was prescribed based on symptoms, combined antibiotic drug therapy and external orthesis. The total recovery of patient occurred at 6 months from the onset of disease.

  12. Choice of a General Anesthesia Technique in the Surgical Treatment of Postinfarct Left Ventricular Aneurysms

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    N. A. Karpun

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To choose the optimum technique of general anesthesia in the surgical treatment of patients with postinfarct left ventricular aneurysms (PLVA.Materials and methods. Fifty-four patients operated on for PLVA were examined. They were divided into 4 groups according to the basic technique of general anesthesia: 1 intravenous anesthesia based on propofol and fentanyl; 2 inhalation sevoflurane anesthesia with fentanyl enhancement of the analgesic component; 3 inhalation isoflurane anesthesia with fentanyl enhancement of the analgesic component; 4 general anesthesia in combination with epidural blockade. Central hemodynamics was investigated by the thermodilution technique and the perioperative period was also studied.Results and discussion. None of the general anesthesia techniques affected the development of perioperative complications. However, with decreased myocardial reserves, high thoracic epidural anesthesia should be applied with caution as it causes a significant desympathization, which may lead to impairments of the autoregulatory mechanisms of coronary blood flow and aggravate existing contractile disorders. Intravenous and inhalation anesthesia techniques provide a fair hemodynamic stability at all stages of surgical treatment. Inhalation anesthesia has a number of advantages: less cost and the possibility of rapid activation of patients in the early postoperative period.

  13. [Anaphylaxis needing adrenaline administration during anesthesia: a 7-year single-institution study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayashima, Kenji; Sozen, Reiko

    2013-10-01

    Adrenaline is the key treatment for acute anaphylaxis; however, it is difficult to use it appropriately in terms of dosage and timing. If used incorrectly, adrenaline can cause cardiac infarction, stroke, recurrence and other problems. We collected data of suspected anaphylaxis from records in our anesthesia department between April 2005 and March 2012. All cases where the skin of patients turned red and blood pressure decreased continuously were included. We analyzed the usage of adrenaline in these cases. Six (0.034%) suspected anaphylaxis cases were analyzed from a total of 27,597 anesthesia cases. Adrenaline was administered subcutaneously in 2 cases, intravenously in 3 cases, and with and infused in 1 case. In the 4 cases with intravenous administration, the median dose was 0.52 (range : 0.02-1.6) mg. Following decreased and unstable blood pressure, adrenaline was initiated after a median of 12.5 (5-25) min, and blood pressure returned to normal after 20 (5-95) min. Patients were extubated 19 (4-24) hours after observation of anomalous blood pressure. No aftereffects or recurrences were observed. Adrenaline was administered appropriately in terms of dosage, but timing should have been earlies in 3 of 6 cases.

  14. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

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    Dabu-Bondoc S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 patients are rapidly fading into the past. To remain competitive and economically viable, the modern ambulatory surgery center needs to expand its practice to include patients with medical comorbidities. In an environment where production and economic pressures exist, maintaining safety and good outcomes in high-risk patients for ambulatory surgery can be arduous. Adding to the complexity of this challenge is the rapid evolution of the therapeutic approaches to a variety of medical issues. For example, there has been a significant increase in the number and types of insulin a diabetic patient might be prescribed in recent years. In the case of the patient with coronary artery disease, the variety of both drug and nondrug eluding stents or new antithrombotic agents has also increased the complexity of perioperative management. Complex patients need careful, timely, and team-based preoperative evaluation by an anesthesia provider who is knowledgeable of outpatient care. Optimizing comorbidities preoperatively is a crucial initial step in minimizing risk. This paper will examine a number of common medical issues and explore their impact on managing outpatient surgical procedures.Keywords: ambulatory surgery, medical comorbidities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, respiratory disease, obesity

  15. Hypnosis and Local Anesthesia for Dental Pain Relief-Alternative or Adjunct Therapy?-A Randomized, Clinical-Experimental Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Callaway, Angelika; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This prospective randomized clinical crossover trial was designed to compare hypnosis and local anesthesia for experimental dental pain relief. Pain thresholds of the dental pulp were determined. A targeted standardized pain stimulus was applied and rated on the Visual Analogue Scale (0-10). The pain threshold was lower under hypnosis (58.3 ± 17.3, p local anesthesia. The pain stimulus was scored higher under hypnosis (3.9 ± 3.8) than with local anesthesia (0.0, p Local anesthesia was superior to hypnosis and is a safe and effective method for pain relief in dentistry. Hypnosis seems to produce similar effects observed under sedation. It can be used in addition to local anesthesia and in individual cases as an alternative for pain control in dentistry.

  16. Use of propofol for anesthesia in cats with primary hepatic lipidosis: 44 cases (1995-2004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Lysa P; Asakawa, Makoto; Erb, Hollis N

    2008-06-15

    OBJECTIVE-To determine morbidity and fatalities in cats with hepatic lipidosis that received propofol to facilitate placement of a feeding tube. STUDY DESIGN-Retrospective case series. ANIMALS-44 Cats with presumed primary hepatic lipidosis anesthetized for placement of a feeding tube. PROCEDURES-Medical records from January 1995 through December 2004 were reviewed to identify cats that matched the inclusion criteria (histologic confirmation of hepatic lipidosis, anesthetized for placement of feeding tube, complete intensive care unit [ICU] records, and recorded outcome). Data extracted included age, body weight, sex, anesthetic drugs, drug dosages, type of feeding tube, duration of anesthesia, number of hours in ICU, administration of blood products, and survival until discharge from ICU. RESULTS-44 Cats (21 females and 23 males) were included in the analysis. Age range was 3 to 15 years (median, 8 years), and body weight ranged from 1.8 to 9.0 kg (4.0 to 19.8 lb), with a median of 4.8 kg (10.6 lb). Twenty-seven cats were administered propofol. There was no significant association between the use of propofol or the dosage of propofol and any risk factor, need for blood products, number of hours in the ICU, or survival. There was no significant difference between cats that received propofol and cats that did not receive propofol with regard to interval until discharge from the ICU. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-The use of propofol did not increase morbidity or fatalities in cats with primary hepatic lipidosis. Thus, propofol can be used in these cats for placement of a feeding tube.

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS residents serve on the medical anesthesiology service, where they evaluate patients for anesthesia, ...

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  19. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office ... comfortable as possible when you get home. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  20. Audiovisual distraction as a useful adjunct to epidural anesthesia and sedation for prolonged lower limb microvascular orthoplastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Wallis, Anna; Galitzine, Svetlana

    2015-11-01

    Lower limb orthopedic operations are frequently performed under regional anesthesia, which allows avoidance of potential side effects and complications of general anesthesia and sedation. Often though, patients feel anxious about being awake during operations. To decrease intraoperative anxiety, we use multimedia equipment consisting of a tablet device, noise-canceling headphones, and a makeshift frame, where patients can listen to music, watch movies, or occupy themselves in numerous ways. These techniques have been extensively studies in minimally invasive, short, or minor procedures but not in prolonged orthoplastic operations. We report 2 cases where audiovisual distraction was successfully applied to 9.5-hour procedures, proved to be a very useful adjunct to epidural anesthesia + sedation, and made an important contribution to positive patients' outcomes and overall patients' experience with regional anesthesia for complex limb reconstructive surgery. In the era when not only patients' safety and clinical outcomes but also patients' positive experiences are of paramount importance, audiovisual distraction may provide a simple tool to help improve experience of appropriately informed patients undergoing suitable procedures under regional anesthesia. The anesthetic technique received a very positive appraisal by both patients and encouraged us to study further the impact of modern audiovisual technology on anxiolysis for major surgery under regional anesthesia. The duration of surgery per se is not a contraindication to the use of audiovisual distraction. The absolute proviso of successful application of this technique to major surgery is effective regional anesthesia and good teamwork between the clinicians and the patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anesthesia for hemicolectomy in a known porphyric with cecal malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B K Naithani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative management of a known acute intermittent porphyria patient is a challenge requiring awareness of factors, which trigger an acute crisis, clinical features of a porphyric attack, knowledge of safe pharmacologic intervention, and preparedness for reintubation and ventilatory support. The classical signs of a porphyric crisis such as pain abdomen, vomiting and neuropsychiatric symptoms are masked under general anesthesia and can be confused with postoperative pain and vomiting and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, especially for intra-abdominal surgeries. Eternal vigilance for onset of an acute crisis is imperative. After a crisis of acute intermittent porphyria, residual paresis may persist for years in the absence of further attacks.

  2. General Anesthesia in Cardiac Surgery: A Review of Drugs and Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Alwardt, Cory M.; Redford, Daniel; Larson, Douglas F.

    2005-01-01

    General anesthesia is defined as complete anesthesia affecting the entire body with loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation. There is a wide spectrum of agents able to partially or completely induce general anesthesia. Presently, there is not a single universally accepted technique for anesthetic management during cardiac surgery. Instead, the drugs and combinations of drugs used are derived from the pathophysiologic state of the patient and individual preference and ...

  3. Severe tracheobronchial compression in a patient with Turner′s syndrome undergoing repair of a complex aorto-subclavian aneurysm: Anesthesia perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C .C. Hudson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of severe tracheobronchial compression from a complex aorto-subclavian aneurysm in a patient with Turner′s syndrome undergoing open surgical repair. Significant airway compression is a challenging situation and requires careful preoperative preparation, maintenance of spontaneous breathing when possible, and consideration of having an alternative source of oxygenation and circulation established prior to induction of general anesthesia. Cardiopulmonary monitoring is essential for safe general anesthesia and diagnosis of unexpected intraoperative events.

  4. 1,000 consecutive cases of laser-assisted liposuction and suction-assisted lipectomy managed with local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Christopher T; Theodorou, Spero J

    2012-08-01

    Advances in suction-assisted lipectomy (SAL) include improved instrumentation, better understanding of fluid dynamics, and an improved concept of appropriate indications. The tumescent technique uses subcutaneous injection of isotonic fluid containing vasoconstrictive and analgesic agents and is proved to be safe, with low morbidity and mortality rates. Laser-assisted liposuction (LAL) using local infiltration of an anesthetic and no general anesthesia or sedation has been developed, with claims of fat destruction and skin tightening. This study aimed to review 1,000 consecutive cases of LAL and SAL performed with the patient under local anesthesia and to determine whether this represents a safe technique with few complications. During a period of 22 months, 581 consecutive patients (486 females and 95 males) underwent 1,000 LAL/SAL operations, 545 of whom had multiple procedures performed. None of the patients had a body mass index (BMI) higher than 30 kg/m2. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 62 years. The fat aspirate ranged from 50 to 1,400 ml. Patients were given an oral sedative, an antibiotic, and an analgesic. Ringer's lactate solution containing lidocaine and epinephrine was injected into the subcutaneous space. The 1,064-nm and/or 1,320-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used for laser lipolysis followed by SAL using standard and/or power-assisted liposuction (PAL) cannulas. The treated areas included the neck, triceps, male breast, midback, flanks, axilla, abdomen, mons pubis, thighs, presacrum, and knees. No patient was administered intravenous sedation or general anesthesia. The average number of areas treated was 1.8, and no major complications or mortalities were observed. There were three burns, two infections, one hematoma, and one seroma. A total of 73 secondary procedures were performed (7.3%). No tertiary procedures were required. For appropriately selected patients, comparable results can be obtained with an excellent

  5. Obesity is independently associated with spinal anesthesia outcomes: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jin Kim

    Full Text Available The influence of body-mass index (BMI on spinal anesthesia is still controversial, with discrepant results reported in previous studies. To compare spinal anesthesia in obese and non-obese subjects, the anesthesia profiles in patients who underwent spinal anesthesia using intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine were compared. A total of 209 patients undergoing elective total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA surgery under spinal anesthesia were divided into an NO (non-obese group (BMI < 30 kg/m2, n = 141 and an O (obese group (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, n = 68. Anesthesia was deemed successful if a bilateral T12 sensory block occurred within 15 minutes of intrathecal drug administration, and if the level of sensory block was higher than T12 when the surgery ended. Logistic regression analysis with multiple variables known to influence spinal anesthesia was performed to identify which parameters independently determined the spinal anesthesia outcome. Similar doses of bupivacaine were administered to the NO and O groups. The incidence of anesthesia failure was significantly lower in the O group [n = 43 (30.5% in the NO group vs. n = 10 (18.9% in the O group, p = 0.014]. The independent predictors for successful anesthesia in all patients were dose of hyperbaric bupivacaine [odds ratio (OR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.64-2.73] and obese status (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, OR 2.86, 95% CI: 1.25-6.52. Time to first report of postoperative pain and time to first self-void were significantly longer in the O group. These results suggest that the duration of block with hyperbaric bupivacaine is prolonged in obese patients and obesity is independently associated with spinal anesthesia outcomes, as is bupivacaine dosage. A further study enrolling patients with morbid obesity and using a fixed bupivacaine dosage is required to confirm the effect of obesity on spinal anesthesia.

  6. A prospective randomized study comparing percutaneous nephrolithotomy under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with percutaneous nephrolithotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Sankhwar, S N; Malik, Anita

    2011-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was executed to compare the surgical parameters and stone clearance in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) versus those who underwent PNL under general anesthesia (GA). Between January 2008 to December 2009, 64 patients with renal calculi were randomized into 2 groups and evaluated for the purpose of this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under CSEA and Group 2 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under GA. The operative time, stone clearance rate, visual pain analog score, mean analgesic dose and mean hospital stay were compared amongst other parameters. The difference between visual pain analog score after the operation and the dose of analgesic requirement was significant on statistical analysis between both groups. PNL under CSEA is as effective and safe as PNL under GA. Patients who undergo PNL under CESA require lesser analgesic dose and have a shorter hospital stay. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Acceleration and persistence of neurofibrillary pathology in a mouse model of tauopathy following anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planel, Emmanuel; Bretteville, Alexis; Liu, Li; Virag, Laszlo; Du, Angela L.; Yu, Wai Haung; Dickson, Dennis W.; Whittington, Robert A.; Duff, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies are characterized by the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated, insoluble tau. General anesthesia has been shown to be associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and we have previously demonstrated that anesthesia induces hypothermia, which leads to overt tau hyperphosphorylation in the brain of mice regardless of the anesthetic used. To investigate whether anesthesia enhances the long-term risk of developing pathological forms of tau, we exposed a mouse model with tauopathy to anesthesia and monitored the outcome at two time points—during anesthesia, or 1 wk after exposure. We found that exposure to isoflurane at clinically relevant doses led to increased levels of phospho-tau, increased insoluble, aggregated forms of tau, and detachment of tau from microtubules. Furthermore, levels of phospho-tau distributed in the neuropil, as well as in cell bodies increased. Interestingly, the level of insoluble tau was increased 1 wk following anesthesia, suggesting that anesthesia precipitates changes in the brain that provoke the later development of tauopathy. Overall, our results suggest that anesthesia-induced hypothermia could lead to an acceleration of tau pathology in vivo that could have significant clinical implications for patients with early stage, or overt neurofibrillary tangle pathology.—Planel, E., Bretteville, A., Liu, L., Virag, L., Du, A. L., Yu, W. Y., Dickson, D. W., Whittington, R. A., Duff, K. E. Acceleration and persistence of neurofibrillary pathology in a mouse model of tauopathy following anesthesia. PMID:19279139

  8. A System for Anesthesia Drug Administration Using Barcode Technology: The Codonics Safe Label System and Smart Anesthesia Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelacic, Srdjan; Bowdle, Andrew; Nair, Bala G; Kusulos, Dolly; Bower, Lynnette; Togashi, Kei

    2015-08-01

    Many anesthetic drug errors result from vial or syringe swaps. Scanning the barcodes on vials before drug preparation, creating syringe labels that include barcodes, and scanning the syringe label barcodes before drug administration may help to prevent errors. In contrast, making syringe labels by hand that comply with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies is tedious and time consuming. A computerized system that uses vial barcodes and generates barcoded syringe labels could address both safety issues and labeling recommendations. We measured compliance of syringe labels in multiple operating rooms (ORs) with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies before and after the introduction of the Codonics Safe Label System (SLS). The Codonics SLS was then combined with Smart Anesthesia Manager software to create an anesthesia barcode drug administration system, which allowed us to measure the rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration in 2 cardiothoracic ORs before and after introducing a coffee card incentive. Twelve attending cardiothoracic anesthesiologists and the OR satellite pharmacy participated. The use of the Codonics SLS drug labeling system resulted in >75% compliant syringe labels (95% confidence interval, 75%-98%). All syringe labels made using the Codonics SLS system were compliant. The average rate of scanning barcodes on syringe labels using Smart Anesthesia Manager was 25% (730 of 2976) over 13 weeks but increased to 58% (956 of 1645) over 8 weeks after introduction of a simple (coffee card) incentive (P < 0.001). An anesthesia barcode drug administration system resulted in a moderate rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration. Further, adaptation of the system will be required to achieve a higher utilization rate.

  9. Hyperparathyroidism in octogenarians: A plea for ambulatory minimally invasive surgery under local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fui, Stéphanie Li Sun; Bonnichon, Philippe; Bonni, Nicolas; Delbot, Thierry; André, Jean Pascal; Pion-Graff, Joëlle; Berrod, Jean-Louis; Fontaine, Marine; Brunaud, Catherine; Cocagne, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    With the current aging of the world's population, diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is being reported in increasingly older patients, with the associated functional symptomatology exacerbating the vicissitudes of age. This retrospective study was designed to establish functional improvements in older patients following parathyroid adenomectomy under local anesthesia as outpatient surgery. Data were collected from 53 patients aged 80 years or older who underwent a minimally invasive parathyroid adenomectomy. All patients underwent a preoperative ultrasound, scintigraphy, and were monitored for the effectiveness of the procedure according to intra- and postdosage of parathyroid hormone (PTH) at 5min, 2h and 4h. Mean preoperative serum calcium level was 2.8mmol/L (112mg/L) and mean PTH was 180pg/ml. Thirty-eight patients were operated under local anesthesia using minimally invasive surgery and 18 patients were operated under general anesthesia. In 26 cases, the procedure was planned on an outpatient basis but could only be carried out in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had normal serum calcium and PTH levels during the immediate postoperative period. Two patients were reoperated under general anesthesia, since immediate postoperative PTH did not return to normal. Four patients died due to reasons unrelated to hyperparathyroidism. Five patients were lost to follow-up six months to two years postsurgery. Of the 44 patients (83%) with long-term monitoring for PTH, none had recurrence of biological hyperparathyroidism. Excluding the three asymptomatic patients, 38 of the 41 symptomatic patients (93%) with long-term follow-up were considering themselves as "improved" or "strongly improved" after the intervention, notably with respect to fatigue, muscle and bone pain. Two patients (4.9%) reported no difference and one patient (2.4%) said her condition had worsened and regretted having undergone surgery. In patients 80 years or older, minimally invasive surgery as an

  10. Epidural anesthesia as a cause of acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklar, E.M.L.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Post, M.J.D.; Montalvo, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Six patients with acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts secondary to epidural anesthesia were evaluated with MR imaging (seven patients) and intraoperative US (three patients). The cysts were located in the lower cervical and thoracic spine. Adhesions and irregularity of the cord surface were frequently noted. Associated intramedullary lesions, including intramedullary cysts and myelomalacia, were seen in two of the patients. Arachnoiditis was unsuspected clinically in three patients, and MR imaging proved to be the diagnostic examination that first suggested the cause of the patients symptoms. The underlying mechanism for the formation of these cysts is a chemically induced arachnoiditis

  11. A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosoda Y

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yoshikatsu Hosoda, Shoji Kuriyama, Yoko Jingami, Hidetsugu Hattori, Hisako Hayashi, Miho Matsumoto Department of Ophthalmology, Otsu Red-Cross Hospital, Otsu, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1–0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0–2.Results: There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively. In 250 eyes without high myopia (<-6D, there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417. No additional anesthesia was required in all groups.Conclusion: Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia. Keywords: cataract, anesthesia, topical, intracameral, sub-Tenon

  12. Clinical evaluation of total intravenous anesthesia using a combination of propofol and medetomidine following anesthesia induction with medetomidine, guaifenesin and propofol for castration in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Kazuomi; Kakizaki, Masashi; Ono, Keiichi; Ohta, Minoru

    2011-12-01

    Seven Thoroughbred horses were castrated under total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and medetomidine. After premedication with medetomidine (5.0 µg/kg, intravenously), anesthesia was induced with guaifenesin (100 mg/kg, intravenously) and propofol (3.0 mg/kg, intravenously) and maintained with constant rate infusions of medetomidine (0.05 µg/kg/min) and propofol (0.1 mg/kg/min). Quality of induction was judged excellent to good. Three horses showed insufficient anesthesia and received additional anesthetic. Arterial blood pressure changed within an acceptable range in all horses. Decreases in respiratory rate and hypercapnia were observed in all horses. Three horses showed apnea within a short period of time. Recovery from anesthesia was calm and smooth in all horses. The TIVA-regimen used in this study provides clinically effective anesthesia for castration in horses. However, assisted ventilation should be considered to minimize respiratory depression.

  13. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    R S Khokhar; J Baaj; M U Khan; F A Dammas; N Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta) is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  14. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Khokhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  15. A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Kuriyama, Shoji; Jingami, Yoko; Hattori, Hidetsugu; Hayashi, Hisako; Matsumoto, Miho

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine. This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1-0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0-2). There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively). In 250 eyes without high myopia (< -6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). No additional anesthesia was required in all groups. Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia.

  16. Asthma, surgery, and general anesthesia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumalasetty, Jyothi; Grammer, Leslie C

    2006-05-01

    Over 20 million Americans are affected with asthma. Many will require some type of surgical procedure during which their asthma management should be optimized. Preoperative assessment of asthma should include a specialized history and physical as well as pulmonary function testing. In many asthmatic patients, treatment with systemic corticosteroids and bronchodilators is indicated to prevent the inflammation and bronchoconstriction associated with endotracheal intubation. The use of corticosteroids has not been shown to adversely affect wound healing or increase the rate of infections postoperatively. Preoperative systemic corticosteroids may be used safely in the majority of patients to decrease asthma-related morbidity.

  17. Delayed recovery from anesthesia: A postgraduate educational review

    OpenAIRE

    Misal, Ullhas Sudhakarrao; Joshi, Suchita Annasaheb; Shaikh, Mudassir Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Delayed awakening from anesthesia remains one of the biggest challenges that involve an anesthesiologist. With the general use of fast-acting anesthetic agents, patients usually awaken quickly in the postoperative period. The time to emerge from anesthesia is affected by patient factors, anesthetic factors, duration of surgery, and painful stimulation. The principal factors responsible for delayed awakening following anesthesia are anesthetic agents and medications used in the perioperative p...

  18. Spinal anesthesia after intraoperative cardiac arrest during general anesthesia in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitaker EE

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Emmett E Whitaker,1,2 Veronica Miler,1,2 Jason Bryant,1,2 Stephanie Proicou,1 Rama Jayanthi,3,4 Joseph D Tobias1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Division of Pediatric Urology, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Urology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Although generally safe and effective, severe perioperative complications, including cardiac arrest, may occur during general anesthesia in infants. With the emergence of evidence that specific anesthetic agents may affect future neurocognitive outcomes, there has been an increased focus on alternatives to general anesthesia, including spinal anesthesia. We present a case of cardiac arrest during general anesthesia in an infant who required urologic surgery. During the subsequent anesthetic care, spinal anesthesia was offered as an alternative to general anesthesia. The risks of severe perioperative complications during general anesthesia are reviewed, etiologic factors for such events are presented, and the use of spinal anesthesia as an alternative to general anesthesia is discussed. Keywords: child, pediatric anesthesia, complications

  19. Providing Anesthesia Care in Resource-limited Settings: A 6-year Analysis of Anesthesia Services Provided at Médecins Sans Frontières Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyo, Promise; Trelles, Miguel; Helmand, Rahmatullah; Amir, Yama; Hassani, Ghulam Haidar; Mftavyanka, Julien; Nzeyimana, Zenon; Akemani, Clemence; Ntawukiruwabo, Innocent Bagura; Charles, Adelin; Yana, Yanang; Moussa, Kalla; Kamal, Mustafa; Suma, Mohamed Lamin; Ahmed, Mowlid; Abdullahi, Mohamed; Wong, Evan G; Kushner, Adam; Latif, Asad

    2016-03-01

    Anesthesia is integral to improving surgical care in low-resource settings. Anesthesia providers who work in these areas should be familiar with the particularities associated with providing care in these settings, including the types and outcomes of commonly performed anesthetic procedures. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of anesthetic procedures performed at Médecins Sans Frontières facilities from July 2008 to June 2014. The authors collected data on patient demographics, procedural characteristics, and patient outcome. The factors associated with perioperative mortality were analyzed. Over the 6-yr period, 75,536 anesthetics were provided to adult patients. The most common anesthesia techniques were spinal anesthesia (45.56%) and general anesthesia without intubation (33.85%). Overall perioperative mortality was 0.25%. Emergent procedures (0.41%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 15.86; 95% CI, 2.14 to 115.58), specialized surgeries (2.74%; AOR, 3.82; 95% CI, 1.27 to 11.47), and surgical duration more than 6 h (9.76%; AOR, 4.02; 95% CI, 1.09 to 14.88) were associated with higher odds of mortality than elective surgeries, minor surgeries, and surgical duration less than 1 h, respectively. Compared with general anesthesia with intubation, spinal anesthesia, regional anesthesia, and general anesthesia without intubation were associated with lower perioperative mortality rates of 0.04% (AOR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.18), 0.06% (AOR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.92), and 0.14% (AOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.45), respectively. A wide range of anesthetics can be carried out safely in resource-limited settings. Providers need to be aware of the potential risks and the outcomes associated with anesthesia administration in these settings.

  20. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml -1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 μg ml -1 . Other drugs were only given (systemically) to manage patient anxiety, pain, nausea, hypotension, or pruritus during or after surgery. The patient was reviewed 2 days postoperatively in ward. The thoracic spinal anesthetia was performed easily in the patient. Some discomfort which was readily treated with 1mg midazolam and 20 mg ketamine intravenously. There was no neurological deficit and hemodynamic parameters were in normal range intra and post-operatively and recovery was uneventful. We used a narrow gauze (26G) spinal needle which minimized the trauma to the patient and the chances of PDPH, which was more if 16 or 18G epidural needle had been used and could have increased further if there have been accidental dura puncture. Also using spinal anesthesia was economical although it should be done cautiously as we are giving spinal anesthesia above the level of termination of spinal cord.

  1. Spinal anesthesia: a comparison of procaine and lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Truong, H H; Girard, M; Drolet, P; Grenier, Y; Boucher, C; Bergeron, L

    2001-05-01

    To compare spinal procaine to spinal lidocaine with regard to their main clinical characteristics and incidence of transient radicular irritation (TRI). In this randomized, double-blind, prospective study, patients (two groups, n=30 each) received either 100 mg of lidocaine 5% in 7.5% glucose (Group L) or 100 mg of procaine 10% diluted with 1 ml cerebrospinal fluid (Group P). After spinal anesthesia, segmental level of sensory block was assessed by pinprick. Blood pressure and the height of the block were noted each minute for the first ten minutes, then every three minutes for the next 35 min and finally every five minutes until regression of the block to L4. Motor blockade was evaluated using the Bromage scale. To evaluate the presence of TRI, each patient was questioned 48 hr after surgery. Time to highest sensory level and to maximum number of segments blocked showed no difference between groups. Mean time for sensory regression to T10 and for regression of the motor block were shorter in Group P. Eighty minutes following injection, sensory levels were lower in Group P. Five patients had inadequate surgical anesthesia in Group P and only one in Group L. No patient in Group P had TRI (95% CI 10-12%) while eight (27%) in Group L did (95% CI 12-46%). Procaine 10% was associated with a clinical failure rate of 14.2%. This characteristic must be balanced against an absence of TRI, which occurs more frequently with the use of lidocaine 5%.

  2. Perspectives on Canadian core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia: a survey of graduate fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Crawford, Mark W

    2015-10-01

    Educators in anesthesia have an obligation to ensure that fellowship programs are training anesthesiologists to meet the highest standards of performance in clinical and academic practice. The objective of this survey was to characterize the perspectives of graduates of Canadian core fellowship programs in pediatric anesthesia (during a ten-year period starting in 2003) on the adequacies and inadequacies of fellowship training. We conducted an electronic survey of graduates from eight departments of pediatric anesthesia in Canada who completed one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia from 2003 to 2013. A novel survey design was implemented, and the content and structure of the design were tested before distribution. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, details of training and practice settings, perceived self-efficacy in subspecialty practices, research experience, and perspectives on one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were determined. The survey was sent to 132 anesthesiologists who completed core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia in Canada. Sixty-five (49%) completed and eligible surveys were received. Most of the anesthesiologists surveyed perceived that 12 months of core fellowship training are sufficient to acquire the knowledge and critical skills needed to practice pediatric anesthesia. Subspecialty areas most frequently perceived to require improved training included pediatric cardiac anesthesia, chronic pain medicine, and regional anesthesia. This survey reports perceived deficiencies in domains of pediatric anesthesia fellowship training. These findings should help guide the future development of core and advanced fellowship training programs in pediatric anesthesia.

  3. Robust predictive control strategy applied for propofol dosing using BIS as a controlled variable during anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Clara A.; De Keyser, Robin; Torrico, Bismark Claure; De Smet, Tom; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Normey-Rico, Julio E.

    This paper presents the application of predictive control to drug dosing during anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery. The performance of a generic predictive control strategy in drug dosing control, with a previously reported anesthesia-specific control algorithm, has been evaluated. The

  4. The use of sugammadex in a patient with Kennedy′s disease under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kennedy′s disease (KD, also known as spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive, neurodegenerative disorder of the lower motor neurons characterized by progressive bulbar and appendicle muscular atrophy. Here we report a case of a 62-year-old male patient with KD, weighing 70 kg and 173 cm tall, was scheduled for frontal sinusectomy due to sinusitis. General anesthesia was induced through propofol 80 mg, remifentanil 0.25 μg/kg/min and 40 mg rocuronium. We were successfully able to use a sugammadex on a patient suffering from KD in order to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade.

  5. [The anesthesia of anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, G

    2005-03-01

    Viewed from a cultural-ethical perspective, anesthesiology can be understood as a comprehensive concept of medicine in general. As such it contains two dilemmas: very often pain must be inflicted in order to alleviate pain and this can only be done by somebody who is himself relatively free of pain. The necessary apathy or anesthesia of the anesthetist is correlated with a general twentieth century-type of perception: the cool observer. Nevertheless, it is also a modern variation of the original religious constellation of the priest in relationship to the sick person. Curing occurs by representation. The weak self of the sick person is able to take over the strong self, represented by the therapist. In twentieth century art and literature this process of self-therapy by representation was often illustrated. On the background of a phenomenological philosophy that process can be understood as the regaining of a balance between body and soul. In the psalms of the biblical Book of Job there a variety of fundamental forms of pain which may be helpful even in this secular age.

  6. The use of intraosseous anesthesia among endodontists: results of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Chad; Mines, Pete; Sweet, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of supplemental intraosseous (IO) anesthesia among endodontists in the United States. The study also looked at the types of anesthetic solutions commonly used for IO anesthesia and in which diagnostic conditions IO anesthesia is used. A Web-based survey of 2,528 active members of the American Association of Endodontists was sent out by e-mail. Data from 833 respondents were collected with a response rate of 33%. It was discovered that 94.77% of the respondents used some form of IO anesthesia, with the periodontal ligament injection (PDL) being the most commonly administered (49.78%). Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is the pulpal diagnosis for which respondents most often use some form of IO anesthesia (61.99%), and 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:100,000 is the most common anesthetic solution used in IO anesthesia (37.62%). Although more than half of the respondents use some form of IO anesthesia more than twice a week, newer IO anesthesia delivery systems such as Stabident (Fairfax Dental, San Francisco, CA) and X-Tip (Dentsply International, Johnson City, TN) are used less often than the PDL injection.

  7. Anesthesia report card - a customizable tool for performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccora, Christian D; Gimlich, Robert; Cornell, Richard P; Vacanti, Charles A; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2014-09-01

    Measuring and providing performance feedback to physicians has gained momentum not only as a way to comply with regulatory requirements, but also as a way to improve patient care. Measurement of structural, process, and outcome metrics in a reliable, evidence-based, specialty-specific manner maximizes the probability of improving physician performance. The manner in which feedback is provided influences whether the measurement tool will be successful in changing behavior. We created an innovative reporting tool template for anesthesiology practitioners designed to provide detailed, continuous feedback covering many aspects of clinical practice. The literature regarding quality metric measurement and feedback strategies was examined to design a reporting tool that could provide high quality information and result in improved performance of clinical and academic tasks. A committee of department leaders and information technology professionals was tasked with determining the measurement criteria and infrastructure needed to generate these reports. Data was collected in a systematic, unbiased manner, and reports were populated with information from multiple databases and software systems. Feedback would be based on frequently updated information and allow for analysis of historical performance as well as comparison amongst peers. A template for an anesthesia report card was created. Categories included compliance, credentialing and qualifications, education, clinical and operating room responsibilities, and academic achievements. Physicians were able to choose to be evaluated in some of the categories and had to meet a minimum number of criteria within each category. This allowed for customization to each practitioner's practice. Criteria were derived from the measures of academic and clinical proficiency, as well as quality metrics. Criteria were objective measures and data gathering was often automated. Reports could be generated that were updated daily and provided

  8. A holistic approach to anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity and its implications for future mechanistic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghi, Christine N; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    The year 2016 marked the 15th anniversary since anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity and its resulting cognitive dysfunction were first described. Since that time, multiple scientific studies have supported these original findings and investigated possible mechanisms behind anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity. This paper reviews the existing mechanistic literature on anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity in the context of a holistic approach that emphasizes the importance of both neuronal and non-neuronal cells during early postnatal development. Sections are divided into key stages in early neural development; apoptosis, neurogenesis, migration, differentiation, synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination and blood brain barrier/cerebrovasculature. In addition, the authors combine the established literature in the field of anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity with literature from other related scientific fields to speculate on the potential role of non-neuronal cells and to generate new future hypotheses for understanding anesthetic toxicity and its application to the practice of pediatric anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Opioid Epidemic: Cellular & Molecular Anesthesia as a Key Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are one of the most important arsenals armamentarium of physicians for fighting against pain. During the decades, opioids have been used in a wide range of indications; both for treatment of acute and chronic pain; as natural and synthetic compounds and in a variety of delivery forms from intravenous infusion to intrathecal adjuvants of local anesthetics or as transdermal patches. There is no doubt that we are in an opioid misuse epidemic status; whether in the US or other countries; but if we want to resolve this miserable multilateral complication, there is no doubt that Cellular and Molecular aspects of Anesthesia has a key role in resolving the problem; through creating an opioid free pain management era.

  10. [Anesthesia for medical students : A brief guide to practical anesthesia in adults with a web-based video illustration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, S; Schlafer, O; Abram, J; Kreutziger, J; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2016-12-01

    In Germany, Austria and Switzerland, anesthesiologists are the second largest group of physicians in hospitals, but this does not correspond to the amount of anesthesiology teaching that medical students receive in medical schools. Accordingly, the chances of medical students recognizing anesthesiology as a promising personal professional career are smaller than in other disciplines with large teaching components. Subsequent difficulties to recruit anesthesiology residents are likely, although many reasons support anesthesiology as a professional career.Traditional strategies to teach medical students in anesthesiology in medical school consist of airway management or cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts in manikins. Anesthesiology is a complex interaction consisting of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, clinical evaluation, experience, knowledge, and manual skills. While some medical schools offer teaching in high fidelity simulators, clinical teaching in the operating room is often limited. When medical students opt for a clinical rotation in anesthesiology, there is a chance to demonstrate the fascinating world of anesthesiology, but this chance has to be utilized carefully by anesthesiologists, as young talents have to be discovered, supported, and challenged.We have put together a short guide for medical students for a clinical rotation in anesthesiology in adults in order to generate basic knowledge and interest in anesthesiology as well as a sense of achievement. Basic knowledge about premedication, induction, maintenance and strategies for anesthesia is discussed. Further, the most important anesthesia drugs are discussed and manual skills, such as intravenous cannulation, mask ventilation, intubation, and regional anesthesia are featured with QR-code based video illustrations on a smartphone or personal computer. We did not discuss possible local mannerism and special patient groups (e. g., children, special medical history), local guidelines

  11. Anesthesia and Databases: Pediatric Cardiac Disease as a Role Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, David F; Pasquali, Sara K; Mossad, Emad B

    2017-02-01

    Large data sets have now become ubiquitous in clinical medicine; they are particularly useful in high-acuity, low-volume conditions such as congenital heart disease where data must be collected from many centers. These data fall into 2 categories: administrative data arising from hospital admissions and charges and clinical data relating to specific diseases or procedures. In congenital cardiac diseases, there are now over a dozen of these data sets or registries focusing on various elements of patient care. Using probabilistic statistic matching, it is possible to marry administrative and clinical data post hoc using common elements to determine valuable information about care patterns, outcomes, and costs. These data sets can also be used in a collaborative fashion between institutions to drive quality improvement (QI). Because these data may include protected health information (PHI), care must be taken to adhere to federal guidelines on their use. A fundamental principle of large data management is the use of a common language and definition (nomenclature) to be effective. In addition, research derived from these information sources must be appropriately balanced to ensure that risk adjustments for preoperative and surgical factors are taken into consideration during the analysis. Care of patients with cardiac disease both in the United States and abroad consistently shows wide variability in mortality, morbidity, and costs, and there has been a tremendous amount of discussion about the benefits of regionalization of care based on center volume and outcome measurements. In the absence of regionalization, collaborative learning techniques have consistently been shown to minimize this variability and improve care at all centers, but before changes can be made it is necessary to accurately measure accurately current patient outcomes. Outcomes measurement generally falls under hospital-based QI initiatives, but more detailed analysis and research require

  12. A Contemporary Analysis of Medicolegal Issues in Obstetric Anesthesia Between 2005 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, Vesela P; Brovman, Ethan Y; Greenberg, Penny; Song, Ellen; Palanisamy, Arvind; Urman, Richard D

    2018-05-10

    Detailed reviews of closed malpractice claims have provided insights into the most common events resulting in litigation and helped improve anesthesia care. In the past 10 years, there have been multiple safety advancements in the practice of obstetric anesthesia. We investigated the relationship among contributing factors, patient injuries, and legal outcome by analyzing a contemporary cohort of closed malpractice claims where obstetric anesthesiology was the principal defendant. The Controlled Risk Insurance Company (CRICO) is the captive medical liability insurer of the Harvard Medical Institutions that, in collaboration with other insurance companies and health care entities, contributes to the Comparative Benchmark System database for research purposes. We reviewed all (N = 106) closed malpractice cases related to obstetric anesthesia between 2005 and 2015 and compared the following classes of injury: maternal death and brain injury, neonatal death and brain injury, maternal nerve injury, and maternal major and minor injury. In addition, settled claims were compared to the cases that did not receive payment. χ, analysis of variance, Student t test, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for comparison between the different classes of injury. The largest number of claims, 54.7%, involved maternal nerve injury; 77.6% of these claims did not receive any indemnity payment. Cases involving maternal death or brain injury comprised 15.1% of all cases and were more likely to receive payment, especially in the high range (P = .02). The most common causes of maternal death or brain injury were high neuraxial blocks, embolic events, and failed intubation. Claims for maternal major and minor injury were least likely to receive payment (P = .02) and were most commonly (34.8%) associated with only emotional injury. Compared to the dropped/denied/dismissed claims, settled claims more frequently involved general anesthesia (P = .03), were associated with delays in care (P = .005

  13. Anestesia para paciente portador da equência de moebius: relato de caso Anestesia para Paciente Portador de la Secuencia de Moebius: relato de Caso Anesthesia in a patient with moebius sequence: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bechara de Souza Hobaika

    2009-06-01

    y comunicación interventricular. Se realizó la inducción anestésica con sevoflurano en O2 a 100% y venoclisis. Se introdujo la máscara laríngea AMBU® número 2,5 y el fibrobroncoscopio fue introducido a través de ella. El procedimiento fue realizado sin complicaciones y la broncoscopia fue normal. El paciente recibió alta después de dos horas. CONCLUSIONES: El control de las vías aéreas es el gran reto para esos pacientes, habiendo relatos de falla o de dificultad de intubación en 13 pacientes de una serie de 41 casos analizados. Micrognatia, retrognatia, hipoplasia mandibular y la hendidura palatina, son algunas de las características de esos pacientes. En otra gran serie con 106 anestesias en pacientes con SM, hay una descripción del uso de la máscara laríngea en un caso. En régimen ambulatorial, parece no haber contraindicación para realizar el procedimiento. Existe un relato de aspiración pulmonar y obstrucción respiratoria en la sala de recuperación, a causa de la dificultad de deglutir y eliminar las secreciones de la boca y para ese caso se recomienda administrar antisialogogos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Moebius sequence (MS is a rare paralysis of the VI and VII cranial nerves. Craniofacial changes, which can hinder tracheal intubation considerably, are seen in approximately 90% of the patients. CASE REPORT: A male patient, 2 years and 5 months old, with MS, underwent flexible bronchoscopy for evaluation of laryngotracheomalacia. Comorbidities: bronchospasm and interventricular communication. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane in 100% O2, followed by venoclysis. A number 2.5 laryngeal AMBU™ mask was inserted and the fiberbronchoscope scope introduced through the mask. The procedure evolved without complications and bronchoscopy was normal. The patient was discharged home after two hours. CONCLUSIONS: Airways management is a great challenge in those patients with a report of failure or difficult intubation in 13 out of 41 patients

  14. Evidence of Virtual Patients as a Facilitative Learning Tool on an Anesthesia Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joseph Y. C.; Critchley, Lester A. H.; Yung, Alex L. K.; Kumta, Shekhar M.

    2015-01-01

    Virtual patients are computerised representations of realistic clinical cases. They were developed to teach clinical reasoning skills through delivery of multiple standardized patient cases. The anesthesia course at The Chinese University of Hong Kong developed two novel types of virtual patients, formative assessment cases studies and storyline,…

  15. Adverse respiratory events in a post-anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Adverse respiratory events (ARE) are a leading causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the incidence and determinants of postoperative ARE. This observational prospective study was conducted in a post anesthesia care unit (PACU). A total of 340 adult subjects were admitted consecutively, and AREs were measured after elective surgery. Population demographics, perioperative parameters, ARE occurrence, and length of stay in the postoperative PACU and in hospital were recorded. Data were analyzed descriptively using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Multivariate analyses were carried outusing logistic binary regression, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Postoperative AREs occurred in 67 subjects (19.7%). AREs were more frequent after high-risk procedures (42% vs 24%; P=.003), in patients undergoing major surgery (37% vs 25%; P=.041), those receiving general anesthesia (85% vs 67%; P=.004), and in patients administered intraoperative muscle relaxants (79% vs 55%; P<.001) and neostigmine (69% vs 49%; P=.002). Hypoactive emergence (13% vs 5%; P=.015) and residual neuromuscular blockade (46% versus 11%; P<.001) were more frequent in subjects with postoperative ARE. On multivariate analyses, residual neuromuscular blockade was an independent risk factor for ARE in the PACU (OR 6.4; CI 3.0-13.4; P<.001). ARE is an important and common postoperative complication. Residual neuromuscular blockade was an independent risk factor for ARE in the PACU. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Spinal anesthesia using Taylor′s approach helps avoid general anesthesia in short stature asthmatic patient

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    Amarjeet Dnyandeo Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The case history of a 35-year-old female patient with short stature is presented. She was posted for rectopexy in view of rectal prolapse. She was a known case of bronchial asthma. She had crowding of intervertebral spaces, which made administration of spinal anesthesia via the normal route very difficult. Taylor′s approach for administration of the same was tried and proved successful, thus saving the patient from receiving general anesthesia in the presence of bronchial asthma, for a perineal surgery. The possible cause for the difficulty in administration of spinal anesthesia and the Taylor′s approach are discussed, and reports of similar cases reviewed.

  17. Brief report: a cost analysis of neuraxial anesthesia to facilitate external cephalic version for breech fetal presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Brendan; Tan, Jonathan M; Macario, Alex; El-Sayed, Yasser Y; Sultan, Pervez

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we sought to determine whether neuraxial anesthesia to facilitate external cephalic version (ECV) increased delivery costs for breech fetal presentation. Using a computer cost model, which considers possible outcomes and probability uncertainties at the same time, we estimated total expected delivery costs for breech presentation managed by a trial of ECV with and without neuraxial anesthesia. From published studies, the average probability of successful ECV with neuraxial anesthesia was 60% (with individual studies ranging from 44% to 87%) compared with 38% (with individual studies ranging from 31% to 58%) without neuraxial anesthesia. The mean expected total delivery costs, including the cost of attempting/performing ECV with anesthesia, equaled $8931 (2.5th-97.5th percentile prediction interval $8541-$9252). The cost was $9207 (2.5th-97.5th percentile prediction interval $8896-$9419) if ECV was attempted/performed without anesthesia. The expected mean incremental difference between the total cost of delivery that includes ECV with anesthesia and ECV without anesthesia was $-276 (2.5th-97.5th percentile prediction interval $-720 to $112). The total cost of delivery in women with breech presentation may be decreased (up to $720) or increased (up to $112) if ECV is attempted/performed with neuraxial anesthesia compared with ECV without neuraxial anesthesia. Increased ECV success with neuraxial anesthesia and the subsequent reduction in breech cesarean delivery rate offset the costs of providing anesthesia to facilitate ECV.

  18. Anestesia em paciente portadora de doença de moyamoya: relato de caso Anestesia en paciente portadora de enfermedad de moyamoya: relato de caso Anesthesia in patient with moyamoya disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bechara de Souza Hobaika

    2005-06-01

    , la paciente fue mantenida en normocapnia y normotermia. La extubación fue realizada y la paciente transferida a la sala de recuperación pos-anestésica sin complicaciones. CONCLUSIONES: Este artículo presenta los cuidados anestésicos dados a una paciente portadora de la enfermedad de moyamoya.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Moyamoya disease is an uncommon progressive cerebral vasculopathy, more frequently diagnosed among Asian individuals, but which has also been described in Brazil. Moyamoya patients may be submitted to different surgical procedures throughout their lives. Anesthesiologists must understand the pathophysiology of the disease and institute adequate perioperative measures to improve patients' prognosis. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 22 yr-old, chronic renal failure, with moyamoya disease, scheduled for surgical arterial-venous fistula installation. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl, propofol and atracurium and maintained with sevoflurane. Patient was maintained in normocapnia and normothermia throughout the procedure. Patient was extubated and transferred to the post-anesthetic care unit without complications. CONCLUSIONS: This article describes the anaesthetic care of a moyamoya disease patient.

  19. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, Sonja; Grotzer, Michael A; Niggli, Felix K; Landolt, Markus A; Linsenmeier, Claudia; Ammann, Roland A; Bodmer, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A), 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B). This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4%) patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9%) patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT

  20. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsenmeier Claudia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. Methods To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A, 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B. This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Results Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4% patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9% patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. Conclusion We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT.

  1. A comparative study of pain following endodontic treatment under general anesthesia

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    Feizi Ghader

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Postoperativee endodontic pain is an outstanding problem for dental patients. Therefore, a successful management of endodontic pain has become as one of the main dental objectives. The aim of the present study was to compare the postoperative endodontic pain in patients under general anesthesia versus local anesthesia.   Materials and Methods: For conducting this clinical trial study, 50 patients having mandibular molars candidate for root canal therapy were selected. Twenty-five patients treated under general anesthesia because of their fear, anxiety or gag reflex. Other 25 patients treated under local anesthesia. All teeth were prepared using engine-driven rotary system in a crown-down technique and filled using lateral condensation technique. Heft- parker visual analog scale was used to measure the degree of pain at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the treatment. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, and T-tests were used to compare the intensity of postoperative pain between the groups.   Results: The mean intensity of postoperative pain in local and general anesthesia groups at 6, 12 and 24 hours had statistically significant difference (P<0.05.   Conclusion: Postoperative pain in patients who treated under general anesthesia was significantly less than the patients who treated under local anesthesia.

  2. Integrated lecturing within clerkship course, a new learning method in nurse-anesthesia teaching

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    Mahmood Akhlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Traditional lecture-based teaching has been long used to transit theoretical knowledge to the participants. Due to some problems of this didactic approach, some believe that integration within an active method is more valuable in nursing education. In this study, we hypothesized that integrating lecture-based teaching within clerkship course would enhance nurse-anesthesia students’ knowledge.Methods: A prospective randomized study was conducted. Twenty four students of two-year nurse-anesthesia participated in the study. All of the students received either didactic lectures or integrated lectures within clerkship course during a four-month semester of their educational curriculum. Their knowledge of anesthesia course was assessed at the end of the course using Wilcoxon Rank test.Results: The integrated method improved students’ final scores at the end of the semester (p=0.004. Moreover, their scores was much better when taxonomy-2 questions were compared (p=0.001.Conclusion: Incorporating didactic lecture within anesthesia clerkship course improves participants’ knowledge of anesthesia course.Keywords:  Anesthesia, Lecture, Knowledge, Anesthesia course, Clerkship course

  3. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia at the low thoracic level.

  4. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia ...

  5. Pediatric patients on ketogenic diet undergoing general anesthesia-a medical record review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Elif; Gries, Heike; Wray, Carter

    2016-12-01

    To identify guidelines for anesthesia management and determine whether general anesthesia is safe for pediatric patients on ketogenic diet (KD). Retrospective medical record review. Postoperative recovery area. All pediatric patients who underwent general anesthesia while on KD between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified 24 patients who underwent a total of 33 procedures. All children were on KD due to intractable epilepsy. The age of patients ranged from 1 to 15 years. General anesthesia for the scheduled procedures. Patients' demographics, seizure history, type of procedure; perioperative blood chemistry, medications including the anesthesia administered, and postoperative complications. Twenty-four patients underwent a total of 33 procedures. The duration of KD treatment at the time of general anesthesia ranged from 4 days to 8 years. Among the 33 procedures, 3 patients had complications that could be attributable to KD and general anesthesia. A 9-year-old patient experienced increased seizures on postoperative day 0. An 8-year-old patient with hydropcephalus developed metabolic acidosis on postoperative day 1, and a 7-year-old patient's procedure was complicated by respiratory distress and increased seizure activity in the postanesthesia care unit. This study showed that it is relatively safe for children on KD to undergo general anesthesia. The 3 complications attributable to general anesthesia were mild, and the increased seizure frequencies in 2 patients returned back to baseline in 24 hours. Although normal saline is considered more beneficial than lactated Ringer's solution in patients on KD, normal saline should also be administered carefully because of the risk of exacerbating patients' metabolic acidosis. One should be aware of the potential change of the ketogenic status due to drugs given intraoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Is general anesthesia a risk for myocardium? Effect of anesthesia on myocardial function as assessed by cardiac troponin-i in two different groups (isofluran+N2O inhalation and propofol+fentanyl iv anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Dogan Erol

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Demet Dogan Erol1, Ibrahim Ozen21Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, School of Medicine, Kocatepe University, Afyonkarahisar, Turkey; 2Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, Trabzon, TurkeyBackground and objectives: Peroperative myocardial infarction (MI is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality. What is the role of general anesthesia in this process? Is general anesthesia a risk for myocardial infarction? The present study was designed to determine whether the measurement of serum levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI, a highly sensitive and specific marker for cardiac injury, would help establish the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in two different types of anesthesia.Method: Elective abdominal hysterectomy was planned with the permission of the ethic committee in 40 patients who were 20–45 years range, in ASA-I group, and have a Goldman Cardiac Risk Index-0. The patients were divided into two groups. Isoflurane + N2O was administrated to first group, and Propofol + Fentanyl to second group. cTnI levels were determined before anesthesia, after induction before surgery and 9 hours after the second period respectively.Results: There was no significant difference between the groups by the means of demographic properties, hemodynamic parameters and cTnI levels, and the cTnI levels were determined under the basal levels in all samples.Conclusion: General anesthesia is not a risk for myocardial infarction to state eliminating risk factors and protection hemodynamia cardiac.Keywords: cardiac troponin-I, myocardial infarction, isofluran + N2O inhalation anesthesia, propofol + fentanyl intravenous anesthesia.

  7. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  8. Adverse events related to gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pediatric patients under anesthesia care and a predictive risk model (AEGEP Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, F; Montilla-Coral, D; Franco, O; González, L F; Lozano, L C; Torres, A M; Jordán, J; Blanco, L F; Suárez, L; Cruz, G; Cepeda, M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies have analyzed perioperative factors related to adverse events (AEs) in children who require gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures (GEP) in settings where deep sedation is the preferred anesthetic technique over general anesthesia (GA) but not for the opposite case. We reviewed our anesthesia institutional database, seeking children less than 12 years who underwent GEP over a 5-year period. A logistic regression was used to determine significant associations between preoperative conditions, characteristics of the procedure, airway management, anesthetic approaches and the presence of serious and non-serious AEs. GA was preferred over deep sedation [77.8% vs. 22.2% in 2178 GEP under anesthesia care (n=1742)]. We found 96 AEs reported in 77 patients, including hypoxemia (1.82%), bronchospasm (1.14%) and laryngospasm (0.91%) as the most frequent. There were 2 cases of severe bradycardia related to laryngospasm/hypoxemia and a case of aspiration resulting in unplanned hospitalization, but there were no cases of intra- or postoperative deaths. Final predictive model for perioperative AEs included age risk factors and ventilation by facial mask as a protector against these events (prisk factors for AEs in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. A matrix model for valuing anesthesia service with the resource-based relative value system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, David R; Lubarsky, David A; Vigoda, Michael M; Birnbach, David J; Harris, Eric A; Behrens, Vicente; Bazan, Richard E; Williams, Steve M; Arheart, Kristopher; Candiotti, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a new crosswalk using the resource-based relative value system (RBRVS) that preserves the time unit component of the anesthesia service and disaggregates anesthesia billing into component parts (preoperative evaluation, intraoperative management, and postoperative evaluation). The study was designed as an observational chart and billing data review of current and proposed payments, in the setting of a preoperative holing area, intraoperative suite, and post anesthesia care unit. In total, 1,195 charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status 1 through 5 patients were reviewed. No direct patient interventions were undertaken. Spearman correlations between the proposed RBRVS billing matrix payments and the current ASA relative value guide methodology payments were strong (r=0.94-0.96, Pbilling matrix yielded payments that were 3.0%±1.34% less than would have been expected from commercial insurers, using standard rates for commercial ASA relative value units and RBRVS relative value units. Compared with current Medicare reimbursement under the ASA relative value guide, reimbursement would almost double when converting to an RBRVS billing model. The greatest increases in Medicare reimbursement between the current system and proposed billing model occurred as anesthetic management complexity increased. The new crosswalk correlates with existing evaluation and management and intensive care medicine codes in an essentially revenue neutral manner when applied to the market-based rates of commercial insurers. The new system more highly values delivery of care to more complex patients undergoing more complex surgery and better represents the true value of anesthetic case management.

  10. Anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a patient with large anterior mediastinal tumor presenting as intrathoracic airway compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatish Bevinaguddaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior mediastinal mass is a rare pathology that presents considerable anesthetic challenges due to cardiopulmonary compromise. We present a case that was referred to us in the third trimester of pregnancy with severe breathlessness and orthopnea. An elective cesarean delivery was performed under combined spinal epidural anesthesia with a favorable outcome. We discuss the perioperative considerations in these patients with a review of the literature.

  11. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia.

  12. Anesthesia for ex utero intrapartum treatment: renewed insight on a rare procedure

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    Miguel Vieira Marques

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ex utero intrapartum treatment is a rare surgical procedure performed in cases of expected postpartum fetal airway obstruction. The technique lies on a safe establishment of a patent airway during labor in anticipation of a critical respiratory event, without interrupting maternal-fetal circulation. Anesthetic management is substantially different from that regarding standard cesarean delivery and its main goals include uterine relaxation, fetal anesthesia and preservation of placental blood flow. We present the case of an ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure performed on a fetus with a large cervical lymphangioma and prenatal evidence of airway compromise. Modifications to the classic ex utero intrapartum treatment management strategies were successfully adopted and will be discussed in the following report.

  13. A Technical Evaluation of Wireless Connectivity from Patient Monitors to an Anesthesia Information Management System During Intensive Care Unit Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Galvez, Jorge A; England, W Randall; Wartman, Elicia C; Scott, James H; Hamid, Michael M; Rehman, Mohamed A; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-02-01

    Surgical procedures performed at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were documented using paper anesthesia records in contrast to the operating rooms, where an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) was used for all cases. This was largely because of logistical problems related to connecting cables between the bedside monitors and our portable AIMS workstations. We implemented an AIMS for documentation in the NICU using wireless adapters to transmit data from bedside monitoring equipment to a portable AIMS workstation. Testing of the wireless AIMS during simulation in the presence of an electrosurgical generator showed no evidence of interference with data transmission. Thirty NICU surgical procedures were documented via the wireless AIMS. Two wireless cases exhibited brief periods of data loss; one case had an extended data gap because of adapter power failure. In comparison, in a control group of 30 surgical cases in which wired connections were used, there were no data gaps. The wireless AIMS provided a simple, unobtrusive, portable alternative to paper records for documenting anesthesia records during NICU bedside procedures.

  14. Anesthesia information management systems

    OpenAIRE

    Feri Štivan; Janez Benedik; Tomaž Lužar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) is on the increase. This is particularly true for academic anesthesia departments. The main reasons for slow adoption of these systems in the past are financial barriers associated with implementation of these systems and their not so traditionally obvious potential to improve patient care. In addition, a major obstacle to acceptance of this technology is the concern of users over the impact of the electronic anesthesia...

  15. When pharmacologic anesthesia is precluded: the value of hypnosis as a sole anesthetic agent in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhauz, M; Eli, I

    1993-01-01

    Occasionally, a dental patient presents his/her dentist with a history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetic agents. The symptoms may include immediate reactions to the injection procedure (dizziness, shortness of breath, tachycardia, etc), or delayed reactions to the anesthetic (swelling, urticaria, etc). Although the true incidence of local anesthetic allergy is low, such a history often involves the patient's anxiety regarding the use of the drug in question, and the dentist's apprehension to treat the "problematic" patient. In such cases, hypnosis can play a major role in controlling pain and the associated distress. In the present article, the method concerning the implementation of hypnosis to induce local anesthesia is described and illustrated through case demonstrations.

  16. Long-term psychosocial behavioral outcomes in children following anesthesia: A comparison of the effects of general versus regional anesthesia on term infants delivered by elective cesarean section

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    Aouni Alameddine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the effects of general anesthesia on the fetal and neonatal brain are limited. Animal studies demonstrated that anesthetic agents leave their consequences in the form of learning and memory deficits. The effects of propofol on the fetal neurodevelopment are not clear yet. Materials and Methods: This is a telephone-based questionnaire survey that addressed the effect of general anesthesia by propofol during cesarean section at term with no perinatal complications on the psychosocial behavior of children at 8-10 years of age compared with children having same characteristics except for delivery under neuraxial anesthesia using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist as a score. Results: A total of 187 children were born at term between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2004 with no perinatal distress under induction of general anesthesia by propofol. 66 children (35.3% were lost to follow-up and parents of two children (1.1% refused to participate. A total of 189 children were included in the study: 119 were born by cesarean section under general anesthesia and 70 were born by cesarean section under neuraxial block. The incidence of psychosocial behavior impairment at 8-10 years of age was not found to be affected by the mode of anesthesia during delivery by cesarean section nor by neonatal nor parental characteristics. Conclusion: Exposure to propofol as an induction agent for general anesthesia or cesarean section does not seem to increase the psychosocial behavior disorder development risk at 8-10 years of age.

  17. Impact of a Procedure for Anesthesia on the Postoperative Period in Children Operated on under Extracorporeal Circulation

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    Yu. A. Bakhareva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to show that patients’ accelerated activation in the use of combined anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl reduces the incidence of pulmonary complications in young age children after surgery under extracorporeal circulation. Subjects and methods. A randomized controlled study covering 127 patients aged 10 months to 3 years was performed. The study included the patients who had undergone surgery for congenital heart diseases. The patients were found to have atrial and ventricular septal defects and arteriovenous communication. The patients were divided into groups in the operating suite just before anesthesia. After standard premedication-preinduction, a child was taken to the operating room. Group 1 patients were given intubation anesthesia with a combination of the inhalation anesthetic halothane and intravenously infused fentanyl. In Group 2 (a study group, anesthesia was made via continuous fentanyl infusion and sevoflurane inhalation. The authors studied the duration of artificial ventilation, postanesthesia sleep, and antibacterial therapy, the frequency of antibiotic switching, as well as sudden sputum mobilization episodes, the duration and intensity of inotropic support, the rapidity of gastrointestinal passage recovery, and the length of intensive care unit stay. Results. Analysis of the findings showed that in Group 2 (a study group, the time of emergence from anesthesia was significantly shorter than that in Group 1 (a control group. The time of postoperative mechanical ventilation was shorter than that in the group of patients receiving the inhalation anesthetic sevoflurane. Anesthesia with the latter reduced the intraoperative dose of fentanyl when clinically adequate anesthesia was applied. There were no differences in the protocol of inotropic agents immediately after surgery, but the patients receiving sevoflurane as an inhalation component needed no inotropic agents 3 hours after surgery while in the controls

  18. Spinal anesthesia using Taylor's approach helps avoid general anesthesia in short stature asthmatic patient

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Amarjeet Dnyandeo; Bapat, Manasi; Patil, Sunita A.; Gogna, Roshan Lal

    2015-01-01

    The case history of a 35-year-old female patient with short stature is presented. She was posted for rectopexy in view of rectal prolapse. She was a known case of bronchial asthma. She had crowding of intervertebral spaces, which made administration of spinal anesthesia via the normal route very difficult. Taylor′s approach for administration of the same was tried and proved successful, thus saving the patient from receiving general anesthesia in the presence of bronchial asthma, for a perine...

  19. [Live-threatening bronchospasm during anesthesia induction : when pure routine becomes a nightmare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, A; Breckwoldt, J

    2011-10-01

    This article reports a case of live-threatening respiratory failure during induction of anesthesia. An 18-year-old female was admitted to hospital for an axillary abscess incision on a public holiday. The patient had a history of asthmatic episodes and an allergy to milk protein and 2 years previously an asthmatic attack had possibly been treated by mechanical ventilation. Retrospectively, this event turned out to be a cardiac arrest with mechanical ventilation for 24 h. During induction of anesthesia the patient suddenly developed massive bronchospasms and ventilation was impossible for minutes. Oxygen saturation fell below 80% over a period of 12 min with a lowest measurement of 13%. The patient was treated with epinephrine, prednisolone, antihistamine drugs, ß(2)-agonists, s-ketamine and methylxanthines and 15 min later the oxygen saturation returned to normal values. After mild therapeutic hypothermia for 24 h mechanical ventilation was still required for another 4 days. The patient recovered completely and was discharged home on day 19. Initially propofol was suspected of having caused an anaphylactic shock but in retrospect, the diagnosis of near fatal asthma was more likely. The onset of the event was facilitated by the patient playing down the history of asthmatic episodes due to a strong wish for independency and negation of the severity of the disease.

  20. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

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    Snoeck M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc SnoeckDepartment of Anaesthesia, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects were not generally significantly different from those of other short-acting local anesthetics like lidocaine, prilocaine, and chloroprocaine, and there is no conclusive evidence demonstrating above-average neurotoxicity. Articaine proved to be suitable and safe for procedures requiring a short duration of action in which a fast onset of anesthesia is desired, eg, dental procedures and ambulatory spinal anesthesia, in normal and in special populations.Keywords: articaine, regional anesthesia, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use, tolerability, neurotoxicity

  1. Anesthesia-related mortality in pediatric patients: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Leopoldo Palheta; Pignaton, Wangles; Kusano, Priscila Sayuri; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Braz, Leandro Gobbo

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review of the Brazilian and worldwide literature aimed to evaluate the incidence and causes of perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality in pediatric patients. Studies were identified by searching EMBASE (1951-2011), PubMed (1966-2011), LILACS (1986-2011), and SciElo (1995-2011). Each paper was revised to identify the author(s), the data source, the time period, the number of patients, the time of death, and the perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality rates. Twenty...

  2. Medication Errors in Pediatric Anesthesia: A Report From the Wake Up Safe Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobaugh, Lauren M Y; Martin, Lizabeth D; Schleelein, Laura E; Tyler, Donald C; Litman, Ronald S

    2017-09-01

    Wake Up Safe is a quality improvement initiative of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia that contains a deidentified registry of serious adverse events occurring in pediatric anesthesia. The aim of this study was to describe and characterize reported medication errors to find common patterns amenable to preventative strategies. In September 2016, we analyzed approximately 6 years' worth of medication error events reported to Wake Up Safe. Medication errors were classified by: (1) medication category; (2) error type by phase of administration: prescribing, preparation, or administration; (3) bolus or infusion error; (4) provider type and level of training; (5) harm as defined by the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention; and (6) perceived preventability. From 2010 to the time of our data analysis in September 2016, 32 institutions had joined and submitted data on 2087 adverse events during 2,316,635 anesthetics. These reports contained details of 276 medication errors, which comprised the third highest category of events behind cardiac and respiratory related events. Medication errors most commonly involved opioids and sedative/hypnotics. When categorized by phase of handling, 30 events occurred during preparation, 67 during prescribing, and 179 during administration. The most common error type was accidental administration of the wrong dose (N = 84), followed by syringe swap (accidental administration of the wrong syringe, N = 49). Fifty-seven (21%) reported medication errors involved medications prepared as infusions as opposed to 1 time bolus administrations. Medication errors were committed by all types of anesthesia providers, most commonly by attendings. Over 80% of reported medication errors reached the patient and more than half of these events caused patient harm. Fifteen events (5%) required a life sustaining intervention. Nearly all cases (97%) were judged to be either likely or certainly preventable. Our findings

  3. Local Anesthesia in Cataract Surgery-A Comparison of Different Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nolan; J; Aziz; M; Ahmad; M; Shehata; M; Iqbal; F

    1993-01-01

    Seven groups of thirty patients undergoing cataract extraction under local anesthesia were each given different combinations of local anesthesia. These varied from a maximum approach using supra-orbital, infra-orbital and facial blocks with Hyalase, orbital compression and pre-operative Acetazolamide down to a minimum group receiving purely an infra- orbital and supra-orbital block with a Ugnocaine/Bupivacaine mixture. There was no significant difference in local analgesia or in the complication rates b...

  4. Ambulatory phlebectomy under tumescent local anesthesia in a kidney-transplant patient

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    Bjelanović Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tumescent local anesthesia (TLA is widely used for ambulatory surgery. Patients with transplanted organs are on immunosuppressive therapy and with risk for organ rejection or severe infection. Case report. Saphenectomy with phlebectomy on the left leg under TLA was performed in a patient with kidney transplantation performed four years ago. A combination of 35 mg of 1% prilocaine-hydrochloride, 5 mL of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate and 500 μg of epinephrine in 460 mL of normal saline was used for TLA. Overall 750 mL of the solution was used. The patient had satisfactory postoperative analgesia and was discharged home on the same day. Blood levels of urea, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and tacrolimus concentration, measured preoperatively and on the second postoperative day, were in a regular range. Prilocaine blood concentrations determined on the 4th, 10th and 16th postoperative hours, were below toxic levels. Conclusion. TLA in a kidney-transplanted patient performed for saphenectomy with phlebectomy proved to be a safe and reliable anesthesia method.

  5. Depth of Anesthesia as a Risk Factor for Perioperative Morbidity

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    Argyro Petsiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prognostic value of age, physical status, and duration of surgery on perioperative course has been extensively studied. However, the impact of deep hypnotic time (time when Bispectral Index values are less than 40 has not been well evaluated. Methods. We designed an observational study to clarify the relative influence of deep hypnotic time (DHT on outcome. Eligible participants were mentally stable patients over 18 years old scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery. In total, 248 patients enrolled. Data were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test and multiple logistic regression. Results. Five variables (DHT, hypotension, age, comorbidity, and duration of surgery showed statistically significant association with complications, when examined independently. However, when all variables were examined together in a multiple logistic regression model, age and comorbidity were no longer associated with outcome. DHT, hypotension, and duration of surgery were significant predictors of “complications,” and “hypotension” was a significant predictor of prolonged hospital stay (P<0.001.  Conclusion. Deep hypnotic time emerged as a new factor associated with outcome, and its impact compared to other factors such as age, surgery duration, hypotension, and comorbidity is redefined. Monitoring and managing depth of anesthesia during surgery are important and should be part of careful operation planning.

  6. Patient's anxiety and fear of anesthesia: effect of gender, age, education, and previous experience of anesthesia. A survey of 400 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridou, Paraskevi; Dimitriou, Varvara; Manataki, Adamantia; Arnaoutoglou, Elena; Papadopoulos, Georgios

    2013-02-01

    Patients express high anxiety preoperatively, because of fears related to anesthesia and its implications. The purpose of this survey was to gain insight into these fears and to study whether they are affected by patients' sex, age, education, or previous experience of anesthesia. Questionnaires with fixed questions were distributed to consenting, consecutive surgical patients before the pre-anesthetic visit. The questionnaires included patients' demographics and questions related to their fears about anesthesia. Four-hundred questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Eighty-one percent of patients experience preoperative anxiety. The main sources of their anxiety were fear of postoperative pain (84 %), of not waking up after surgery (64.8 %), of being nauseous or vomiting (60.2 %), and of drains and needles (59.5 %). Patients are less concerned about being paralyzed because of anesthesia (33.5 %) or of revealing personal issues (18.8 %). Gender seems to affect patients fears, with women being more afraid (85.3 vs. 75.6 % of men, p = 0.014). The effects of patients' age, level of education, and previous experience of anesthesia are minor, except for individual questions. Sixty-three percent of our patients (mostly women 67.4 vs. 57.4 % of men, p = 0.039) talk about these fears with their relatives, although a vast majority of 95.5 % would prefer to talk with the anesthesiologist and be reassured by him. All patients, mostly women, express fears about anesthesia; this fear leads to preoperative anxiety. Slight differences are observed for some individual questions among patients of different sex, education level, and previous experience of anesthesia.

  7. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

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    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  8. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Minko Minkov; Maria Vankova; Radoslav Minkov; Stefaniya Terzieva; Toni Dimitrov; Iskren Velikov

    2012-01-01

    A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the c...

  9. Evidence of virtual patients as a facilitative learning tool on an anesthesia course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joseph Y C; Critchley, Lester A H; Yung, Alex L K; Kumta, Shekhar M

    2015-10-01

    Virtual patients are computerised representations of realistic clinical cases. They were developed to teach clinical reasoning skills through delivery of multiple standardized patient cases. The anesthesia course at The Chinese University of Hong Kong developed two novel types of virtual patients, formative assessment cases studies and storyline, to teach its final year medical students on a 2 week rotational course. Acute pain management cases were used to test if these two types of virtual patient could enhance student learning. A 2 × 2 cross over study was performed in academic year 2010-2011 on 130 students divided into four groups of 32-34. Performance was evaluated by acute pain management items set within three examinations; an end of module 60-item multiple choice paper, a short answer modified essay paper and the end of year final surgery modified essay paper. The pain management case studies were found to enhanced student performance in all three examinations, whilst the storyline virtual patient had no demonstrable effect. Student-teaching evaluation questionnaires showed that the case studies were favored more than the storyline virtual patient. Login times showed that students on average logged onto the case studies for 6 h, whereas only half the students logged on and used the storyline virtual patient. Formative assessment case studies were well liked by the students and reinforced learning of clinical algorithms through repetition and feedback, whereas the educational role of the more narrative and less interactive storyline virtual patient was less clear .

  10. Anestesia para cirurgia ortopédica em criança com susceptibilidade à hipertermia maligna: relato de caso Anestesia para cirugía ortopédica en niño con susceptibilidad a la hipertermia maligna: relato de caso Anesthesia for orthopedic surgery in a child susceptible to malignant hyperthermia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Santiago Gomez

    2003-02-01

    temperatura de la paciente fue monitorizada continuamente durante la cirugía y e el período pós-operatorio. La paciente presentó recuperación pós-operatoria sin intercurrencias y recibió alta hospitalar después de cinco días. CONCLUSIONES: La combinación de anestesia regional y venosa para el procedimiento quirúrgico propuesto en paciente con susceptibilidad a la hipertermia maligna permitió la conducción anestésica con seguridad.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Malignant hyperthermia is an autosomal dominant myopathy triggered by inhalational anesthetics and neuromuscular blockers, such as halothane and succinylcholine, which causes temperature increases that may be fatal if not promptly treated. This report aimed at describing anesthesia in a child susceptible to malignant hyperthermia submitted to orthopedic surgery. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 3 years of age, with congenital hip dislocation and susceptible to malignant hyperthermia, according to anesthetic history, who was submitted to corrective orthopedic surgery under general anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, combined with lumbar epidural anesthesia. Temperature was closely monitored during surgery and in the postoperative period. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and patient was discharged five days later. CONCLUSIONS: Combined regional and intravenous anesthesia for the surgical procedure proposed to a patient susceptible to malignant hyperthermia allowed a safe anesthetic approach.

  11. Anesthesia in a child operated for cleft lip associated with Patau's syndrome

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    Manoj Kamal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Patau's syndrome (Trisomy 13 have multiple craniofacial, cardiac, neurological and renal anomalies with very less life expectancy. Among craniofacial anomalies cleft lip and palate are common. These craniofacial and cardiac anomalies present difficulties with anesthesia. We therefore describe the anesthetic management in the case of a Trisomy 13 child for operated for cleft lip at 10 months of age. Resumo: Os pacientes com síndrome de Patau (trissomia 13 apresentam várias anomalias craniofaciais, cardíacas, neurológicas e renais, com expectativa de vida bem menor. Entre as anomalias craniofaciais, o lábio leporino e a fenda palatina são comuns. Essas anomalias craniofaciais e cardíacas apresentam dificuldades na anestesia. Portanto, descrevemos o manejo anestésico em uma criança de 10 meses de idade com Trissomia 13 submetida à cirurgia de lábio leporino. Keywords: Patau's syndrome, Cleft lip, Cleft palate, Paediatric anesthesia, Palavras-chave: Síndrome de Patau, Lábio leporino, Fenda palatina, Anestesia pediátrica

  12. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy after Spinal Anesthesia for a Minimally Invasive Urologic Procedure

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    Emmanuel Lilitsis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a patient who suffered from Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM immediately after the initiation of subarachnoid anesthesia for a minimally invasive urologic procedure (tension-free vaginal tape (TVT surgery for stress urine incontinence. TCM mimics acute coronary syndrome and is caused by an exaggerated sympathetic reaction to significant emotional or physical stress. Our patient suffered from chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, and hemodynamic instability immediately following subarachnoid anesthesia and later in the postanesthesia care unit. Blood troponin was elevated and new electrocardiographic changes appeared indicative of cardiac ischemia. Cardiac ultrasound indicated left ventricular apical akinesia and ballooning with severely affected contractility. The patient was admitted to coronary intensive care for the proper care and finally was discharged. TCM was attributed to high emotional preoperative stress for which no premedication had been administered to the patient. In conclusion, adequate premedication and anxiety management are not only a measure to alleviate psychological stress of surgical patients, but, more importantly, an imperative mean to suppress sympathetic nerve system response and its cardiovascular consequences.

  13. Fractional Microneedling: A Novel Method for Enhancement of Topical Anesthesia Before Skin Aesthetic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fakahany, Hasan; Medhat, Walid; Abdallah, Fahd; Abdel-Raouf, Hamza; Abdelhakeem, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Skin microneedling or fractional microneedle therapy is a recent approach used for skin rejuvenation or to enhance transdermal delivery of topical medications. The authors evaluated the efficacy of skin microneedling, using an automated device, to enhance the numbing effect of topical anesthesia, used before minimally invasive aesthetic approaches. Fifteen patients, looking for treatment of atrophic acne scars, were subjected to randomized split-face study comparing automated fractional skin microneedling (0.5 mm depth) followed by application of topical anesthetic cream (Lidocaine 2.5% + Prilocaine 2.5%) on one side of face, with topical anesthesia alone on the other side, followed by full face fractional microneedling treatment for postacne scars (2.5 mm depth). The treated sides (fractional needling + topical anesthesia) had significantly lower pain scores when compared with the nontreated sides (topical anesthesia alone). The scores of pain sensation, during the whole procedure, were statistically significantly (p aesthetic procedures can be enhanced with fractional microneedling pretreatment.

  14. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... comfort. Medication is sometimes helpful. What are the risks of anesthesia? Serious anesthesia complications, such as brain damage or ... hereditary conditions, which are associated with a greater risk. Although ... reactions to anesthesia are extremely rare. All precautions are taken to ...

  15. The impact of general anesthesia on child development and school performance: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneuer, Francisco J; Bentley, Jason P; Davidson, Andrew J; Holland, Andrew Ja; Badawi, Nadia; Martin, Andrew J; Skowno, Justin; Lain, Samantha J; Nassar, Natasha

    2018-04-27

    There has been considerable interest in the possible adverse neurocognitive effects of exposure to general anesthesia and surgery in early childhood. The aim of this data linkage study was to investigate developmental and school performance outcomes of children undergoing procedures requiring general anesthesia in early childhood. We included children born in New South Wales, Australia of 37+ weeks' gestation without major congenital anomalies or neurodevelopmental disability with either a school entry developmental assessment in 2009, 2012, or Grade-3 school test results in 2008-2014. We compared children exposed to general anesthesia aged <48 months to those without any hospitalization. Children with only 1 hospitalization with general anesthesia and no other hospitalization were assessed separately. Outcomes included being classified developmentally high risk at school entry and scoring below national minimum standard in school numeracy and reading tests. Of 211 978 children included, 82 156 had developmental assessment and 153 025 had school test results, with 12 848 (15.7%) and 25 032 (16.4%) exposed to general anesthesia, respectively. Children exposed to general anesthesia had 17%, 34%, and 23% increased odds of being developmentally high risk (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.07-1.29); or scoring below the national minimum standard in numeracy (aOR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.21-1.48) and reading (aOR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.12-1.36), respectively. Although the risk for being developmentally high risk and poor reading attenuated for children with only 1 hospitalization and exposure to general anesthesia, the association with poor numeracy results remained. Children exposed to general anesthesia before 4 years have poorer development at school entry and school performance. While the association among children with 1 hospitalization with 1 general anesthesia and no other hospitalization was attenuated, poor numeracy outcome remained. Further investigation of

  16. Implicit memory formation during routine anesthesia in children: a double-masked randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Xiuzhi; Smith, Katherine R; Sheppard, Suzette J; Bradshaw, Carolyn; Lo, Eric; Davidson, Andrew J

    2010-05-01

    Implicit memory cannot be consciously recalled but may be revealed by changes in behavior. There is evidence for implicit memory formation during anesthesia in adults, but several studies in children have found no evidence for implicit memory. This may be due to insensitive testing. Also many of these tests were undertaken under controlled conditions. It remains unknown whether implicit memory is formed during routine pediatric anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence of implicit memory formation during routine anesthesia in children, using a degraded auditory stimulus recognition task. Three hundred and twelve children, aged 5-12 yr, were randomly assigned to be played either a sheep sound or white noise continuously through headphones during general anesthesia. No attempt was made to standardize the anesthetic. On recovery, children were played a sheep sound degraded by a white noise mask that progressively decreased over 60 s, with the outcome being the time taken to correctly recognize the sheep sound. Three hundred children completed the task. A comparison of the distribution of recognition times between the two groups found little evidence that exposure to a sheep sound during anesthesia was associated with postoperative time to recognition of a degraded sheep sound (hazard ratio 1.14, 95% CI of 0.90-1.43, P = 0.28). No implicit memory formation during routine anesthesia was demonstrated in children. It is increasingly likely that the potential clinical implications of implicit memory formation are less of a concern for pediatric anesthetists.

  17. The application of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Liang; Qin Zenghui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the management and feasibility of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy. Methods: A total of 80 pediatric patients were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in group A received sacral block anesthesia together with basic anesthesia with propofol, while patients in group B received intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Small amount of ketamine as maintaining dose was used in both groups when needed. Results: The interventional management was successfully completed in all patients. A marked decrease in blood pressure occurred in three patients of group A receiving sacral block anesthesia. In group B receiving intravenous anesthesia, a decrease of SpO 2 to below 90 percent was seen in 8 cases, and obvious bradycardia developed in 12 cases. All these patients were treated with intravenous medication or by reducing the dose of propofol. Additional small dose of ketamine was needed in 4 patients during the procedure. Conclusion: Sacral block anesthesia combined with intravenous anesthesia is one of the effective anesthesia management schemes for pediatric interventional therapy. (authors)

  18. General anesthesia in cardiac surgery: a review of drugs and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwardt, Cory M; Redford, Daniel; Larson, Douglas F

    2005-06-01

    General anesthesia is defined as complete anesthesia affecting the entire body with loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation. There is a wide spectrum of agents able to partially or completely induce general anesthesia. Presently, there is not a single universally accepted technique for anesthetic management during cardiac surgery. Instead, the drugs and combinations of drugs used are derived from the pathophysiologic state of the patient and individual preference and experience of the anesthesiologist. According to the definition of general anesthesia, current practices consist of four main components: hypnosis, analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation. Although many of the agents highlighted in this review are capable of producing more than one of these effects, it is logical that drugs producing these effects are given in combination to achieve the most beneficial effect. This review features a discussion of currently used anesthetic drugs and clinical practices of general anesthesia during cardiac surgery. The information in this particular review is derived from textbooks, current literature, and personal experience, and is designed as a general overview of anesthesia during cardiac surgery.

  19. Non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse among anesthesia care providers: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta-Alarcón, Alix; Coffman, John C; Soghomonyan, Suren; Papadimos, Thomas J; Bergese, Sergio D; Moran, Kenneth R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the problem of non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse among anesthesia care providers (ACPs) and to describe current approaches to screening, therapy, and rehabilitation of ACPs suffering from non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse. We first performed a search of all literature available on PubMed prior to April 11, 2016. The search was limited to articles published in Spanish and English, and the following key words were used: anesthesiology, anesthesia personnel, AND substance-related disorders. We also searched Ovid MEDLINE ® databases from 1946-April 11, 2016 using the following search terms: anesthesiology OR anesthesia, OR nurse anesthetist OR anesthesia care provider OR perioperative nursing AND substance-related disorders. Despite an increased awareness of drug abuse among ACPs and improvements in preventive measures, the problem of non-opioid anesthetic drug abuse remains significant. While opioids are the most commonly abused anesthesia medications among ACPs, the abuse of non-opioid anesthetics is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, and professional demise. Early detection, effective therapy, and long-term follow-up help ACPs cope more effectively with the problem and, when possible, resume their professional activities. There is insufficient evidence to determine the ability of ACPs to return safely to anesthesia practice after rehabilitation, though awareness of the issue and ongoing treatment are necessary to minimize patient risk from potentially related clinical errors.

  20. A Comparison of Topical or Retrobulbar Anesthesia for 23-Gauge Posterior Vitrectomy

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    Hande Celiker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To compare the efficacy and safety of topical anesthesia versus retrobulbar anesthesia in 23-gauge vitreoretinal surgery. Materials and Methods. A total of 63 patients scheduled for 23 G posterior vitrectomy without scleral buckling procedures were included in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either topical (Group 1, n=31 or retrobulbar anesthesia (Group 2, n=32. Postoperatively, patients were shown a visual analogue pain scale (VAPS from 1 (no pain or discomfort to 4 (severe pain or discomfort to rate the levels of pain. Results. There was more discomfort in patients in Group 2 while anesthetic was administered (Group 1:  1.0±0, Group 2: 2.3±0.7, P=0.0001. Between the two groups the level of pain during surgery (Group 1: 1.4±0.5, Group 2: 1.5±0.5; P=0.85 was noted. There was also no significant difference between two groups postoperatively (Group 1: 1.2±0.4, Group 2: 1.3±0.4; P=0.28. There were no complications in either group related to the anesthetic technique. No patient needed sedation or anesthesia supplement during the surgery or postoperative period. Conclusion. Topical anesthesia in posterior vitrectomy procedures is an effective and safe method that is alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia.

  1. Comparison of patients with and without intellectual disability under general anesthesia: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitilci, T; Demirgan, S; Akcay, C; Kahraman, N; Koseoglu, B G; Erdem, M A; Cankaya, A B

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed and retrospectively compared patients with and without intellectual disability (ID) who underwent oral surgery under general anesthesia at Istanbul University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of General Anesthesia, between October 2012 and June 2013 with regard to the following categories: Demographic features, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, Mallampati score, type of anesthetic drug used during the operation, type of intubation used, any difficulties with tracheal intubation, presence of systemic diseases, and recovery times after ending general anesthesia. A total of 348 patients were selected from the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and the Department of Pedodontics who underwent surgery with general anesthesia. Medical histories of all patients were taken, and their electrocardiography, chest X-rays, complete blood count, and blood clotting tests were checked during a preoperative assessment. Mallampati evaluations were also performed. Patients were grouped into ASA I, II, or III according to the ASA classification and were treated under general anesthesia. There was no significant difference between normal and intellectually disabled patients in terms of gender, Mallampati scores, intubation difficulties, mean anesthetic period, time to discharge, or postoperative nausea and vomiting. Epilepsy and genetic diseases in intellectually disabled patients were significantly more common than in non-ID (NID) patients. However, the frequency of diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in NID patients was significantly higher than in the intellectually disabled patients. Dental treatment of intellectually disabled patients under general anesthesia can be performed just as safely as that with NID patients.

  2. Introduction of virtual patients onto a final year anesthesia course: Hong Kong experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph YC Leung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph YC Leung1, Lester AH Critchley1, Alex LK Yung2, Shekhar M Kumta21Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 2Department of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong KongAbstract: e-Learning has revolutionized the way in which undergraduate medical education is delivered. One e-learning tool of note is the virtual patient (VP, a type of computer software that simulates real-life clinical scenarios, in which the learner emulates the role of health care provider to obtain the history, conduct examination, and make diagnoses and management decisions. VPs have been in use since 1993. Early designs were based on serial screen-cards of patient history, examination, investigations, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome, which the learner explored. With the development of web technology, VPs can now be accessed via the Internet and are more versatile, supporting different structural designs to suit a variety of learning objectives, and they can branch via different routes through a case. Using VPs has a number of advantages: 1 VPs improve access to learning material, 2 VPs help learners to acquire higher order cognitive skills like strategic thinking and decision making, 3 VPs provide a safe environment to practice, 4 VPs help to teach interdisciplinary care, and 5 VPs can be used instead of patients for examination. A number of well-known VP player systems are in use today: CASUS, CAMPUS, web-based Simulation of Patients, OpenLabyrinth, and vpSim. At the Chinese University of Hong Kong, we have also developed a web-based VP authoring and player system called Formative Assessment Case Studies (FACS, which is run by our Teaching and Learning Resources Centre. FACS has been integrated into Year-5 Anesthesia teaching since 2006. Three VP products have been developed: Anaesthesia FACS (six cases that teaches preoperative assessment, Acute Pain Management FACS, and an

  3. Introduction of virtual patients onto a final year anesthesia course: Hong Kong experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joseph Yc; Critchley, Lester Ah; Yung, Alex Lk; Kumta, Shekhar M

    2011-01-01

    e-Learning has revolutionized the way in which undergraduate medical education is delivered. One e-learning tool of note is the virtual patient (VP), a type of computer software that simulates real-life clinical scenarios, in which the learner emulates the role of health care provider to obtain the history, conduct examination, and make diagnoses and management decisions. VPs have been in use since 1993. Early designs were based on serial screen-cards of patient history, examination, investigations, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome, which the learner explored. With the development of web technology, VPs can now be accessed via the Internet and are more versatile, supporting different structural designs to suit a variety of learning objectives, and they can branch via different routes through a case. Using VPs has a number of advantages: 1) VPs improve access to learning material, 2) VPs help learners to acquire higher order cognitive skills like strategic thinking and decision making, 3) VPs provide a safe environment to practice, 4) VPs help to teach interdisciplinary care, and 5) VPs can be used instead of patients for examination. A number of well-known VP player systems are in use today: CASUS, CAMPUS, web-based Simulation of Patients, OpenLabyrinth, and vpSim. At the Chinese University of Hong Kong, we have also developed a web-based VP authoring and player system called Formative Assessment Case Studies (FACS), which is run by our Teaching and Learning Resources Centre. FACS has been integrated into Year-5 Anesthesia teaching since 2006. Three VP products have been developed: Anaesthesia FACS (six cases) that teaches preoperative assessment, Acute Pain Management FACS, and an eight-part longitudinal VP which tells the story of a patient's stay, and anesthesia care, for routine gynecological surgery. Students spend about 3 hours on each during a 2-week clinical attachment. Our VPs have been well received and have overcome problems of providing adequate

  4. Anestesia peridural torácica para cirurgia plástica de mama em paciente portadora de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Anestesia peridural torácica para cirugía plástica de mama en paciente portadora de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Thoracic epidural anesthesia for mammaplasty in myasthenia gravis patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2005-06-01

    epidural anesthesia for cosmetic mammaplasty. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 51 years old, with myasthenia gravis and submitted to thoracic epidural anesthesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl. There was no respiratory depression. Patient was discharged 36 hours later. CONCLUSIONS: Our case suggests epidural anesthesia as a single technique for myasthenia gravis patients, without mandatory tracheal intubation.

  5. Sedation and Anesthesia in Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Catheterization: A Prospective Multicenter Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C Huie; Desai, Sanyukta; Nicolas, Ramzi; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Foerster, Susan; Sharma, Anshuman; Armsby, Laurie; Marshall, Audrey C; Odegard, Kirsten; DiNardo, James; Vincent, Julie; El-Said, Howaida; Spaeth, James; Goldstein, Bryan; Holzer, Ralf; Kreutzer, Jackie; Balzer, David; Bergersen, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    Sedation/anesthesia is critical to cardiac catheterization in the pediatric/congenital heart patient. We sought to identify current sedation/anesthesia practices, the serious adverse event rate related to airway, sedation, or anesthesia, and the rate of intra-procedural conversion from procedural sedation to the use of assisted ventilation or an artificial airway. Data from 13,611 patients who underwent catheterization at eight institutions were prospectively collected from 2007 to 2010. Ninety-four (0.69 %) serious sedation/airway-related adverse events occurred; events were more likely to occur in smaller patients (anesthesia, LMA, or tracheostomy, whereas 4232 (31 %) were managed with procedural sedation without an artificial airway, of which 75 (1.77 %) patients were converted to assisted ventilation/general anesthesia. Young age (risk procedure (category 4, OR 10.1, 95 % CI 6.5-15.6, p pediatric/congenital patients was associated with a low rate of serious sedation/airway-related adverse events. Smaller patients with non-cardiac comorbidities or low mixed venous oxygen saturation may be at higher risk. Patients under 1 year of age, undergoing high-risk procedures, or requiring continuous pressor/inotrope support may be at higher risk of requiring conversion from procedural sedation to assisted ventilation/general anesthesia.

  6. A Comparison of Satisfaction; Spinal versus General Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, S. A.; Siddique, S.; Meo, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the patients satisfaction with spinal and general anesthesia after cesarean section at CMH Lahore. Study Design: Randomized controlled trials. Study Setting: The study was conducted at the department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology combined military Hospital, Lahore, for 6 months from July to Dec 2011. Patients and Methods: Total 70 patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two groups of 35 each using random numbers table. All patients between ages of 20-40 years admitted for elective cesarean section and presented for following up at day 5-7 who never had any type of anesthesia in the past. There included in the study patients with complaints of migraine, low backaches, positive history or any other medical disorder were excluded from the study. Results: A total number of patients included were 70. Out of these selected patients, 35 procedures were carried out under spinal anesthesia and 35 under general anesthesia. Insignificant difference was found in satisfaction level of both the groups (p=0.220). There is significant difference for the future choice between two groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Spinal anesthesia provides equal satisfaction for patients of cesarean section than general anesthesia. (author)

  7. Procedural mishaps with trephine-based intraosseous anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Joel C; Witherspoon, David E; Regan, John D; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Failure to achieve profound anesthesia during dental treatment can be a significant problem for dental clinicians, especially for endodontic procedures on teeth in the mandibular arch with irreversible pulpitis. A number of supplemental local anesthesia techniques exist, the most effective of which may be the intraosseous injection. Two cases are presented demonstrating the dangers associated with the use of the intraosseous anesthesia technique. While the technique can provide profound anesthesia in otherwise difficult to anesthetize cases, care must be taken during its administration. Both cases show the damage done to the root and overlying bone by the injudicious use of the trephine. It is incumbent on the clinician to fully consider the anatomy in the area prior to insertion of the trephine. Intraosseous anesthesia techniques are a valuable addition to the clinicians' armamentarium. However careless administration can result in problems of endodontic or periodontal nature that may be difficult to rectify.

  8. Critical incidents and near misses during anesthesia: A prospective audit

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    Pamela Onorame Agbamu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A critical incident is any preventable mishap associated with the administration of anesthesia and which leads to or could have led to an undesirable patients' outcome. Patients' safety can be improved by learning from reported critical incidents and near misses. Materials and Methods: All perioperative critical incidents (excluding obstetrics occurring over 5 months were voluntarily documented in a pro forma. Age of patient, urgency of surgery, grade of anesthetist, and patients' outcome was noted. Results: Seventy-three critical incidents were recorded in 42 patients (incidence 6.1% of 1188 procedures with complete recovery in 88.1% (n = 37 and mortality in 11.9% (n = 5. The highest incidents occurred during elective procedures (71.4%, which were all supervised by consultants, and in patients aged 0–10 years (40.1%. Critical incident categories documented were cardiovascular (41.1%, respiratory (23.25%, vascular access (15.1%, airway/intubation (6.85%, equipment errors (6.85%, difficult/failed regional technique (4.11%, and others (2.74%. The monitors available were: pulse oximetry (100%, precordial stethoscope (90.5%, sphygmomanometer (90.5%, capnography (54.8%, electrocardiogram (31%, and temperature (14.3%. The most probable cause of critical incident was patient factor (38.7% followed by human error (22.5%. Equipment error, pharmacological factor, and surgical factor accounted for 12.9%. Conclusion: Critical incidents can occur in the hands of the highly skilled and even in the presence of adequate monitoring. Protocols should be put in place to avoid errors. Critical incident reporting must be encouraged to improve patients' safety and reduce morbidity and mortality.

  9. Use of a student support group to reduce student stress in a nurse anesthesia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kless, J R

    1989-02-01

    Stress in nurse anesthesia programs may be excessive at times, especially in new students. While some degree of stress is necessary to motivate learning, excessive or prolonged stress can interfere with the normal learning process, thereby prolonging a student's clinical and academic progress. In the extreme, excessive stress may even preclude a student's successful completion of the educational program. Active faculty intervention through a student support group is advocated as a method for controlling stress levels and facilitating student learning. The positive effects of such intervention also increase the overall productivity of a program and better prepare nurse anesthesia students for their future careers.

  10. [When a patient falls (asleep) and can't get up: conversion disorder - paraplegia following general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Chawla LaToya

    This case report describes the rare occurrence of paraplegia caused by conversion disorder in a woman who received general anesthesia for breast surgery. A 46-year-old healthy woman received general anesthesia for excision of a left breast fibroepithelial lesion. In the post-anesthesia care unit, she reported bilateral loss of both sensation and motor function below the knees. Physical signs and symptoms did not correlate with any anatomical or neurological patterns; imaging revealed no abnormalities. Psychiatric consultation was performed wherein familial stressor circumstances were identified, leading to diagnosis and management of conversion disorder. Conversion disorder is characterized by alteration of physical function due to expression of an underlying psychological ailment. Its diagnosis requires thorough evaluation including appropriate workup to exclude organic causes. The meshing together of anesthesiology and psychiatry - as demonstrated by this case report - offers an opportunity to highlight important information pertaining to the definition, diagnosis, and management of conversion disorder as it may be encountered in the postanesthesia recovery period. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Anestesia congênita de córnea associada à anestesia de ramo do trigêmio: relato de caso Congenital corneal anesthesia related to trigeminal anesthesia: case report

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    Miguel José Calix Netto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A anestesia corneana por ser uma condição rara, freqüentemente é confundida ou não diagnosticada durante o exame de rotina do segmento anterior. Relato de caso de um paciente de 18 anos encaminhado ao ambulatório de córnea e doenças externas com quadro clinico de síndrome de olho seco e com diagnóstico provável de síndrome de Sjögren. Era amblíope de olho direito devido à opacidade corneana no eixo visual secundária a trauma com unha na infância. Foi pesquisada sensibilidade corneana que era ausente em ambos os olhos; olho seco grave e com BUT (tempo de quebra do filme lacrimal menor que 4 segundos. Foi feito diagnóstico de anestesia corneana congênita associada a hipoestesia do nervo trigêmio pela avaliação neurológica da sensibilidade facial e movimentos bruscos do queixo que evidenciavam alterações sensoriais do nervo. O oftalmologista geral e principalmente o especialista em segmento anterior devem ter como rotina a pesquisa da sensibilidade corneana no exame do segmento anterior.Corneal anesthesia is a rare condition, therefore its diagnosis is frequently impaired or it is not noticed during the anterior segment examination. Case report of a 18-year-old patient referred to our Corneal and External Disease Department who complained of dry eye symptoms and with a suspicion of Sjögren's syndrome. She had amblyopia of the right eye, consequence of corneal leucoma over the visual axis secondary to a fingernail traumatism inflicted by herself in childhood. On the ophthalmologic examination corneal sensitivity was absent in both eyes. Severe dry eye and breakup time less than four seconds. Diagnosis of congenital corneal anesthesia was established, secondary to trigeminal anesthesia found on neurological evaluation of facial sensitivity. She also showed sudden movements of the chin which evidenced sensorial pathology of the trigeminal nerve. The general ophthalmologist and specially anterior segment specialists must

  12. Hypobaric spinal anesthesia in the operative management of orthopedic emergencies in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidi, A; Pollak, D; Floman, Y; Davidson, J T

    1984-07-01

    Hypobaric spinal anesthesia was administered to 40 patients undergoing lower limb surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients were debilitated geriatric patients who presented with orthopedic emergencies, in most cases a fractured hip. Hypobaric spinal anesthesia was found to be a simple and safe procedure that provided adequate analgesia. Due to its inherent nature, hypobaric spinal anesthesia does not necessitate positioning of the patient on the injured, painful side (unlike hyperbaric spinal or epidural anesthesia) and, therefore, facilitates a smooth and painless transfer of the patient to the operating table. Complications encountered were similar to those following hyperbaric anesthesia.

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation Training: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Xu; Trivedi, Vatsal; AlSaflan, AbdulHadi A; Todd, Suzanne Clare; Tricco, Andrea C; McCartney, Colin J L; Boet, Sylvain

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) has become the criterion standard of regional anesthesia practice. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia teaching programs often use simulation, and guidelines have been published to help guide URGA education. This systematic review aimed to examine the effectiveness of simulation-based education for the acquisition and maintenance of competence in UGRA. Studies identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC were included if they assessed simulation-based UGRA teaching with outcomes measured at Kirkpatrick level 2 (knowledge and skills), 3 (transfer of learning to the workplace), or 4 (patient outcomes). Two authors independently reviewed all identified references for eligibility, abstracted data, and appraised quality. After screening 176 citations and 45 full-text articles, 12 studies were included. Simulation-enhanced training improved knowledge acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) when compared with nonsimulation training. Seven studies measuring skill acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) found that simulation-enhanced UGRA training was significantly more effective than alternative teaching methods or no intervention. One study measuring transfer of learning into the clinical setting (Kirkpatrick level 3) found no difference between simulation-enhanced UGRA training and non-simulation-based training. However, this study was discontinued early because of technical challenges. Two studies examined patient outcomes (Kirkpatrick level 4), and one of these found that simulation-based UGRA training improved patient outcomes compared with didactic teaching. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia knowledge and skills significantly improved with simulation training. The acquired UGRA skills may be transferred to the clinical setting; however, further studies are required to confirm these changes translate to improved patient outcomes.

  14. Transnasal tracheobronchial stenting for malignant airway narrowing under local anesthesia: Our experience of treating three cases using this technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhi, Jayanta; Handique, Akash; Goyal, Amit; Lynser, Donbok; Phukan, Pranjal; Sarma, Kalyan; Padmanabhan, Aswin; Saikia, Manuj Kumar; Chutia, Happy

    2016-01-01

    To study the technical feasibility of tracheobronchial stenting via transnasal route under bronchoscopy and fluoroscopic guidance in severe malignant airway strictures using self-expandable nitinol stents. We describe three patients with malignant airway strictures, treated entirely via transnasal route under local anesthesia using bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. Nasal route allowed convenient access to the airway for the bronchoscope across the stricture and a guidewire was introduced through its working channel. The 18F tracheal stent and the 6F bronchial stent assembly could be easily introduced and deployed under bronchoscopic (reintroduced through the other nostril) and fluoroscopic guidance. We achieved technical success in all the three patients with immediate relief of dyspnea. Transnasal airway stenting with self-expandable nitinol stent using bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance under local anesthesia is a safe and effective method with minimal patient discomfort

  15. Transnasal tracheobronchial stenting for malignant airway narrowing under local anesthesia: Our experience of treating three cases using this technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Medhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the technical feasibility of tracheobronchial stenting via transnasal route under bronchoscopy and fluoroscopic guidance in severe malignant airway strictures using self-expandable nitinol stents. Materials and Methods: We describe three patients with malignant airway strictures, treated entirely via transnasal route under local anesthesia using bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. Nasal route allowed convenient access to the airway for the bronchoscope across the stricture and a guidewire was introduced through its working channel. The 18F tracheal stent and the 6F bronchial stent assembly could be easily introduced and deployed under bronchoscopic (reintroduced through the other nostril and fluoroscopic guidance. Results: We achieved technical success in all the three patients with immediate relief of dyspnea. Conclusion: Transnasal airway stenting with self-expandable nitinol stent using bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance under local anesthesia is a safe and effective method with minimal patient discomfort.

  16. End-tidal control vs. manually controlled minimal-flow anesthesia: a prospective comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetz, A J; Mueller, M M; Walliser, K; Foest, C; Wand, S; Brandes, I F; Waeschle, R M; Bauer, M

    2017-11-01

    To ensure safe general anesthesia, manually controlled anesthesia requires constant monitoring and numerous manual adjustments of the gas dosage, especially for low- and minimal-flow anesthesia. Oxygen flow-rate and administration of volatile anesthetics can also be controlled automatically by anesthesia machines using the end-tidal control technique, which ensures constant end-tidal concentrations of oxygen and anesthetic gas via feedback and continuous adjustment mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that end-tidal control is superior to manually controlled minimal-flow anesthesia (0.5 l/min). In this prospective trial, we included 64 patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia. We analyzed the precision of maintenance of the sevoflurane concentration (1.2-1.4%) and expiratory oxygen (35-40%) and the number of necessary adjustments. Target-concentrations of sevoflurane and oxygen were maintained at more stable levels with the use of end-tidal control (during the first 15 min 28% vs. 51% and from 15 to 60 min 1% vs. 19% deviation from sevoflurane target, P tidal oxygen (5, IQR 3-6). The target-concentrations were reached earlier with the use of end-tidal compared with manual controlled minimal-flow anesthesia but required slightly greater use of anesthetic agents (6.9 vs. 6.0 ml/h). End-tidal control is a superior technique for setting and maintaining oxygen and anesthetic gas concentrations in a stable and rapid manner compared with manual control. Consequently, end-tidal control can effectively support the anesthetist. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Development of a Head and Neck Regional Anesthesia Task Trainer for Emergency Medicine Learners

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    Diane L Gorgas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This innovation is designed for medical students through senior residents. Introduction: Regional anesthesia increases the EM physician’s ability to provide effective pain relief and to complete procedures within the Emergency Department (ED. Studies consistently demonstrate that emergency physicians undertreat pain when performing basic procedures such as suturing lacerations.1,2 Regional anesthesia allows for effective pain relief, while avoiding the risks associated with systemic analgesia/anesthesia or the tissue distortion of local anesthesia.3 Knowledge of the anatomy involved in various nerve blocks is crucial to the development of proper technique and successful performance of this skill. Three dimensional (3-D model simulation-based mastery of procedural skills has been demonstrated to decrease resident anxiety, improve success rates, and decrease complications during the resident’s transition into the clinical setting.5,6 Similarly, use of a 3-D head and neck model to practice application of facial regional anesthesia is hypothesized to improve provider confidence and competence which will in turn provide an improved patient experience. Objectives: In participating in the educational session associated with this task trainer, the learner will: 1 Identify landmarks for the following nerve blocks: Infraorbital, Supraorbital (V1, Mental, Periauricular 2 Demonstrate the appropriate technique for anesthetic injection for each of these nerve blocks 3 Map the distribution of regional anesthesia expected from each nerve block 4 Apply the indications and contraindications for each regional nerve block Method: This low-fidelity task trainer allows residents and medical students to practice various nerve blocks on the face in order to improve learner confidence and proficiency in performing facial regional anesthesia.

  18. Anesthesia Technique and Mortality after Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrospective, Propensity Score-matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlas, Anahi; Chan, Vincent W S; Beattie, Scott

    2016-10-01

    This propensity score-matched cohort study evaluates the effect of anesthetic technique on a 30-day mortality after total hip or knee arthroplasty. All patients who had hip or knee arthroplasty between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2014, were evaluated. The principal exposure was spinal versus general anesthesia. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were (1) perioperative myocardial infarction; (2) a composite of major adverse cardiac events that includes cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, or newly diagnosed arrhythmia; (3) pulmonary embolism; (4) major blood loss; (5) hospital length of stay; and (6) operating room procedure time. A propensity score-matched-pair analysis was performed using a nonparsimonious logistic regression model of regional anesthetic use. We identified 10,868 patients, of whom 8,553 had spinal anesthesia and 2,315 had general anesthesia. Ninety-two percent (n = 2,135) of the patients who had general anesthesia were matched to similar patients who did not have general anesthesia. In the matched cohort, the 30-day mortality rate was 0.19% (n = 4) in the spinal anesthesia group and 0.8% (n = 17) in the general anesthesia group (risk ratio, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.83; P = 0.0045). Spinal anesthesia was also associated with a shorter hospital length of stay (5.7 vs. 6.6 days; P anesthesia and lower 30-day mortality, as well as a shorter hospital length of stay, after elective joint replacement surgery.

  19. Effects of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Anesthesia 101 Effects of Anesthesia Explore this page: Effects of Anesthesia ... the types of anesthesia and their side effects? Effects of Anesthesia If you’re having surgery, you ...

  20. Comparing two anesthesia information management system user interfaces: a usability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Rao, Anoop V; Rothwell, Sarah H; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2012-11-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been developed by multiple vendors and are deployed in thousands of operating rooms around the world, yet not much is known about measuring and improving AIMS usability. We developed a methodology for evaluating AIMS usability in a low-fidelity simulated clinical environment and used it to compare an existing user interface with a revised version. We hypothesized that the revised user interface would be more useable. In a low-fidelity simulated clinical environment, twenty anesthesia providers documented essential anesthetic information for the start of the case using both an existing and a revised user interface. Participants had not used the revised user interface previously and completed a brief training exercise prior to the study task. All participants completed a workload assessment and a satisfaction survey. All sessions were recorded. Multiple usability metrics were measured. The primary outcome was documentation accuracy. Secondary outcomes were perceived workload, number of documentation steps, number of user interactions, and documentation time. The interfaces were compared and design problems were identified by analyzing recorded sessions and survey results. Use of the revised user interface was shown to improve documentation accuracy from 85.1% to 92.4%, a difference of 7.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] for the difference 1.8 to 12.7). The revised user interface decreased the number of user interactions by 6.5 for intravenous documentation (95% CI 2.9 to 10.1) and by 16.1 for airway documentation (95% CI 11.1 to 21.1). The revised user interface required 3.8 fewer documentation steps (95% CI 2.3 to 5.4). Airway documentation time was reduced by 30.5 seconds with the revised workflow (95% CI 8.5 to 52.4). There were no significant time differences noted in intravenous documentation or in total task time. No difference in perceived workload was found between the user interfaces. Two user interface

  1. Smartphone use habits of anesthesia providers during anesthetized patient care: a survey from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pınar, Hüseyin Ulaş; Karaca, Omer; Doğan, Rafi; Konuk, Ümmü Mine

    2016-10-06

    Smartphones are used in many areas of anesthesia practice. However, recent editorial articles have expressed concerns about smartphone uses in the operating room for non-medical purposes. We performed a survey to learn about the smartphone use habits and views of Turkish anesthesia providers. A questionnaire consisting of 14 questions about smartphone use habits during anesthesia care was sent anesthesia providers. In November-December 2015, a total of 955 participants answered our survey with 93.7 % of respondents responding that they used smartphones during the anesthetized patient care. Phone calls (65.4 %), messaging (46.4 %), social media (35.3 %), and surfing the internet (33.7 %) were the most common purposes. However, 96.7 % of respondents indicated that smartphones were either never or seldom used during critical stages of anesthesia. Most respondents (87.3 %) stated that they were never distracted because of smartphone use; however, 41 % had witnessed their collagues in such a situation at least once. According to the results of the survey, smartphones are used in the operating room often for non-medical purposes. Distraction remains a concern but evidence-based data on whether restrictions to smartphone use are required are not yet available.

  2. Chaos theory and the treatment of refractory status epilepticus: Who benefits from prolonged anesthesia, and is there a better way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Michael; Swanson, Phillip D

    2007-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (SE) is a condition of continuous seizure activity in which there is a regular, rapid, succession of spike discharges in the brain. It is incompatible with normal consciousness and is associated with an extremely high morbidity and mortality. Prior to 1990, prevailing opinion held that a brief period of anesthesia (up to two weeks) was to be recommended, but that if SE persisted this was a sign of irreversible brain damage. Therefore support of the patient in SE was not recommended beyond two weeks. On the basis of the theoretical constructs of chaos theory we hypothesized that, for selected cases, anesthesia should be continued indefinitely until the SE resolved. This became the standard of care at the University of Washington and at other institutions. After several years, the accumulating evidence lends support for this hypothesis and we are now able to propose which patients will benefit from such therapy. It is hypothesized that only those patients for whom there is no underlying brain disease, beyond epilepsy, are likely to benefit. Secondly, chaos theory suggests that a strong perturbation will cause a rapid transition from the stable attractor of SE to the stable attractor representing normal consciousness. In certain ways, SE is analogous to ventricular tachycardia, where the cardiac muscle has an abnormally fast rhythm incompatible with proper cardiac function. Therefore the second hypothesis is that a brain perturbation, analogous to defibrillation, may be even more useful than anesthesia in refractory SE.

  3. Thoracic epidural anesthesia and interscalene block for a pneumonectomized patient posted for modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridul Dua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic epidural anesthesia with ipsilateral brachial plexus block is emerging as an alternative to general anesthesia for oncologic breast surgery.1. A 31 year old, pneumonectomised female with a past history of MDR TB was diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma in left breast 2 months ago and was posted for MRM. She also had moderate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Thoracic epidural anesthesia was induced with 12 ml of 0.5% Ropivacaine at T6-T7 level. Interscalene block was given with 10 ml 0.5% Ropivacaine using peripheral nerve locator. Patient was comfortable throughout the procedure and remained vitally stable. Post-operative analgesia was given with 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine and patient was discharged the following week. Thoracic epidural anesthesia provides the advantage of superior intra and post-operative analgesia without the adverse effects of general anesthesia like postoperative nausea, vomiting, respiratory depression and sedation.2 Coupled with interscalene block for axillary lymph node dissection, it can be successfully used as an alternative to GA for MRM.

  4. A matrix model for valuing anesthesia service with the resource-based relative value system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair DR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available David R Sinclair,1 David A Lubarsky,1 Michael M Vigoda,1 David J Birnbach,1 Eric A Harris,1 Vicente Behrens,1 Richard E Bazan,1 Steve M Williams,1 Kristopher Arheart,2 Keith A Candiotti1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to propose a new crosswalk using the resource-based relative value system (RBRVS that preserves the time unit component of the anesthesia service and disaggregates anesthesia billing into component parts (preoperative evaluation, intraoperative management, and postoperative evaluation. The study was designed as an observational chart and billing data review of current and proposed payments, in the setting of a preoperative holing area, intraoperative suite, and post anesthesia care unit. In total, 1,195 charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA physical status 1 through 5 patients were reviewed. No direct patient interventions were undertaken. Results: Spearman correlations between the proposed RBRVS billing matrix payments and the current ASA relative value guide methodology payments were strong (r=0.94–0.96, P<0.001 for training, test, and overall. The proposed RBRVS-based billing matrix yielded payments that were 3.0%±1.34% less than would have been expected from commercial insurers, using standard rates for commercial ASA relative value units and RBRVS relative value units. Compared with current Medicare reimbursement under the ASA relative value guide, reimbursement would almost double when converting to an RBRVS billing model. The greatest increases in Medicare reimbursement between the current system and proposed billing model occurred as anesthetic management complexity increased. Conclusion: The new crosswalk correlates with existing evaluation and management and intensive care medicine codes in an

  5. [Incidence of asthmatic attack during anesthesia in patients with a history of bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, M; Sakanashi, Y; Sugahara, K; Terasaki, H

    1999-07-01

    We investigated retrospectively, the incidence of intraoperative asthmatic attack in patients with bronchial asthma, and compared the past 5-year period (Jan 1, 1979 to Dec 31, 1983) and the recent 5-year period (July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1994). The influence of anesthetic methods, induction agents, and intervals between the most recent attack and anesthesia were evaluated. The incidence of the attack during anesthesia in patients with asthma was similar in both period, 6.7% in the past and 7.8% in the recent period. Patients who had a history of recurrent attacks within 2 years prior to anesthesia tended to have higher incidence of intraoperative attack in both periods. Furthermore, the incidence of asthmatic attack was significantly greater in patients receiving inhalational anesthetics for induction of anesthesia than in those given intravenous anesthetics in the recent period. Although inhalational anesthetics are considered to be used safely for asthmatic patients, care should be taken when volatile anesthetics are administered to asthmatic patients during induction of anesthesia.

  6. Tattoos and administration of regional anesthesia: a comprehensive systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houhoulis, Kathryn; Lewis, Kevin; Fasone, Rachel; Benham, Brian E

    2016-10-01

    The review question is what is the impact of tattoos on the administration of regional anesthesia?The quantitative objective is to identify and quantify the risks to a patient when advancing a needle through tattooed skin for the purpose of administering a regional anesthetic.The qualitative objective is to investigate anesthesia providers' perceptions and experiences when presented with a patient and/or a surgeon requests for a regional anesthetic that would require needle trespass through tattooed skin. An additional qualitative objective is to identify the thoughts, opinions and biases related to the administration of a regional anesthetic through tattooed skin from the perspective of the patient, anesthesia provider, surgeon or other affected parties (e.g. patient families, hospital or clinic administrators or insurance providers).

  7. General Anesthesia versus Local Anesthesia in StereotaXY (GALAXY) for Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, R. A.; Verbaan, D.; de Bie, R. M. A.; Schuurman, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study is to investigate if deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for Parkinson's disease (PD) under general anesthesia further improves outcome by lessening postoperative cognitive, mood, and behavioral adverse effects; shorten surgical time and

  8. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeck, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects were not generally significantly different from those of other short-acting local anesthetics like lidocaine, prilocaine, and chloroprocaine, and there is no conclusive evidence demonstrating above-average neurotoxicity. Articaine proved to be suitable and safe for procedures requiring a short duration of action in which a fast onset of anesthesia is desired, eg, dental procedures and ambulatory spinal anesthesia, in normal and in special populations. PMID:22915899

  9. A Four-Year Monocentric Study of the Complications of Third Molars Extractions under General Anesthesia: About 2112 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guerrouani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess the complications resulting from third molar extraction under general anesthesia. Material and Methods. The retrospective study included all patients who underwent impacted third molars extraction from January 2008 until December 2011. 7659 third molars were extracted for 2112 patients. Postoperative complications were retrieved from medical files. Results. No complications were related to general anesthesia. The most frequent postoperative complication was infection (7.15%. Lingual nerve injuries affected 1.8% of the patients. All of them were transient and were not related to tooth section. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries were reported in 0.4% of the cases. 95.8% of these patients were admitted for one-day ambulatory care, and only two patients were readmitted after discharge from hospital. Discussion. This surgical technique offers comfort for both surgeons and patients. Risks are only linked to the surgical procedure as we observed no complication resulting from general anesthesia. One-day hospitalization offers a good balance between comfort, security, and cost. The incidence of complications is in agreement with the literature data, especially regarding pain, edema, and infectious and nervous complications. It is of utmost importance to discuss indications with patients, and to provide them with clear information.

  10. Effect of electroacupuncture in postanesthetic shivering during regional anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Shivering during regional anesthesia is a common complication and is related to a decrease in the patient’s core body temperature. Previous studies have shown that acupuncture on specific acupoints can preserve core body temperature. The present study evaluated the effect of electroacupuncture in preventing the shivering caused by regional anesthesia. Methods This prospective and randomized controlled study analyzed the data from 80 patients undergoing urological surgery, who were classified as ASA I or II. Spinal anesthesia was performed in all patients using 15 mg of bupivacaine. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either placebo acupuncture (Group P, n = 40) or electroacupuncture (Group A, n = 40) for 30 min before administration of spinal anesthesia. Shivering score was recorded at 5 min intervals, with 0 representing no shivering and 4 representing the most severe shivering possible. Heart rate, blood pressure, and tympanic temperature were recorded before the intrathecal injection, and again every 5 min thereafter until 30 min. Results After spinal anesthesia, the decrease in tympanic temperature was less for Group A patients than Group P, with the difference being statistically significant. After 15 min, 13 patients in Group P attained a shivering score of 3 or more, compared with 3 patients in Group A. Significantly more patients in Group P attained a shivering score of at least 1. Conclusions The prophylactic use of electroacupuncture might maintain core body temperature, and may effectively prevent the shivering that commonly develops during regional anesthesia. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000096853. PMID:23181618

  11. Asleep-awake-asleep craniotomy: a comparison with general anesthesia for resection of supratentorial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shobana; Cata, Juan P; Nada, Eman; Weil, Robert; Pal, Rakhi; Avitsian, Rafi

    2013-08-01

    The anesthetic plan for patients undergoing awake craniotomy, when compared to craniotomy under general anesthesia, is different, in that it requires changes in states of consciousness during the procedure. This retrospective review compares patients undergoing an asleep-awake-asleep technique for craniotomy (group AW: n = 101) to patients undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia (group AS: n = 77). Episodes of desaturation (AW = 31% versus AS = 1%, p awake-asleep craniotomies with propofol-dexmedetomidine infusion had less hemodynamic response to pinning and emergence, and less overall narcotic use compared to general anesthesia. Despite a higher incidence of temporary episodes of desaturation and hypoventilation, no adverse clinical consequences were seen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fear of going under general anesthesia: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhaiyem, M E; Alshehri, A A; Saade, M; Shoabi, T A; Zahoor, H; Tawfeeq, N A

    2016-01-01

    Fears related to anesthesia have affected a considerable number of patients going for surgery. The purpose of this survey was to identify the most common concerns about general anesthesia during the preoperative anesthetic clinic in different healthcare settings, and whether they are affected by patients' sex, age, education, or previous experience of anesthesia or not. Structured questionnaires with consent forms were distributed to patients in their preanesthesia clinic visit in three tertiary hospitals (King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, and King Khalid University Hospital) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients' demographics and questions related to their fears regarding general anesthesia were included in the questionnaires. All categorical and interval variables were compared statically using a Chi-square test for independence and a t-test, respectively. All statistical tests were declared significant at α level of 0.05 or less. Among 450 questionnaires that were disturbed, 400 questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Eighty-eight percent experienced preoperative fear. The top three causes of their fears were fear of postoperative pain (77.3%), fear of intraoperative awareness (73.7%), and fear of being sleepy postoperatively (69.5%). Patients are less fearful of drains and needles in the operative theater (48%), of revealing personal issues under general anesthesia (55.2%), and of not waking up after surgery (56.4%). Age and gender were significant predictors of the overall fear among preanesthetic patients. Females are 5 times more likely to experience fear before surgery (P = 0.0009). Patients aged more than 40 years old are also at 75% higher risk of being afraid (P = 0.008). The majority of the patients going for surgery experienced a fear of anesthesia. Mostly females, especially those over 40, were at a higher risk of being afraid. Fear can bring anxiety which, in turn, might affect the patient's surgery.

  13. [Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a parturient with myotonic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kosuke; Mizuno, Ju; Nagaoka, Takehiko; Harashima, Toshiya; Morita, Sigeho

    2010-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is a muscle disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness, and is the most common form of muscular dystrophy that begins in adulthood, often after pregnancy. MD might be related to occurrence of malignant hyperthermia. Therefore, the cesarean section is often performed for the parturient with MD. We had an experience of combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a parturient complicated with MD. A 40-year-old woman had rhabdomyolysis caused by ritodrine at 15-week gestation and was diagnosed as MD by electromyography. Her first baby died due to respiratory failure fourth day after birth. She had hatchet face, slight weakness of her lower extremities, and easy fatigability. Her manual muscle test was 5/5 at upper extremities and 4/5 at lower extremities. She underwent emergency cesarean section for premature rupture of the membrane, weak pain during labor, and obstructed labor at 33-week gestation. We placed an epidural catheter from T12/L1 and punctured arachnoid with 25 G spinal needle. We performed spinal anesthesia using 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 1.5 ml and epidural anesthesia using 2% lidocaine 6 ml. Her anesthetic level reached bilaterally to T7 and operation started 18 minutes after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Her baby was born 23 minutes after the anesthesia. As her baby was 1/5 at Apgar score, the baby was tracheally intubated and artificially ventilated. The cesarean section was finished in 33 minutes uneventfully. She had no adverse events and was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. Later her baby was diagnosed as congenital MD by gene analysis. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with the amide-typed local anesthetic agents could be useful and safe for cesarean section in the parturient with MD.

  14. Anesthesia Methods in Laser Resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Sergio; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Laser resurfacing technology offers the ability to treat skin changes that are the result of the aging process. One of the major drawbacks of laser resurfacing technologies is the pain associated with the procedure. The methods of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to help minimize the pain include both noninvasive and invasive procedures. The noninvasive procedures can be divided into topical, cryoanesthesia, and a combination of both. The invasive methods of anesthesia include injected forms (infiltrative, nerve blocks, and tumescent anesthesia) and supervised anesthesia (monitored anesthesia care and general anesthesia). In this review, the authors summarize the types of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to aid the provider in offering the most appropriate method for the patient to have as painless a procedure as possible. PMID:23904819

  15. Does Faculty Follow the Recommended Structure for a New Classroom-based, Daily Formal Teaching Session for Anesthesia Residents?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Anjum; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias V

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A newly implemented 15-minute classroom-based, formal teaching session for anesthesia residents is given three times daily by the same faculty. The faculty member was provided a suggested template for the presentation. The template structure was developed by a group of residents......, and 31% used a clinical case vignette presentation to introduce the keyword. The most common visuals were the use of a picture (38%) and a chart or a graph (35%). We also saw that 65% of the sessions had active involvement of residents. With respect to time and slide limitations mentioned in the template...... of the residency curriculum more than two years after their implementation....

  16. Carotid endarterectomy: review of 10 years of practice of general and locoregional anesthesia in a tertiary care hospital in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercês Lobo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retrospective and prospective randomized studies have compared general and locoregional anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy, but without definitive results.OBJECTIVES: Evaluate the incidence of complications (medical, surgical, neurological, and hospital mortality in a tertiary center in Portugal and review the literature.METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endarterectomy between 2000 and 2011, using a software for hospital consultation.RESULTS: A total of 750 patients were identified, and locoregional anesthesia had to be converted to general anesthesia in 13 patients. Thus, a total of 737 patients were included in this analysis: 74% underwent locoregional anesthesia and 26% underwent general anesthesia. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding per operative variables. The use of shunt was more common in patients undergoing general anesthesia, a statistically significant difference. The difference between groups of strokes and mortality was not statistically significant. The average length of stay was shorter in patients undergoing locoregional anesthesia with a statistically significant difference.CONCLUSIONS: We found that our data are overlaid with the literature data. After reviewing the literature, we found that the number of studies comparing locoregional and general anesthesia and its impact on delirium, cognitive impairment, and decreased quality of life after surgery is still very small and can provide important data to compare the two techniques. Thus, some questions remain open, which indicates the need for randomized studies with larger number of patients and in new centers.

  17. Adding different doses of intrathecal magnesium sulfate for spinal anesthesia in the cesarean section: A prospective double blind randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Jabalameli

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: In patients undergoing the caesarean section under hyperbaric bupivacaine spinal anesthesia, the addition of 50, 75, or 100 mg magnesium sulfate provides safe and effective anesthesia, but 75 mg of this drug was enough to lead a significant delay in the onset of both sensory and motor blockade, and prolonged the duration of sensory and motor blockade, without increasing major side effects.

  18. Neuroprotective Anesthesia Regimen and Intensive Management for Pediatric Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: a Review and Initial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrson Guilherme Klamt

    Full Text Available Abstract This article describes our proposal for routine anesthesia, intraoperative medical management, cerebral and physiological monitoring during pediatric cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass that intend to provide appropriate anesthesia (analgesia, hypnosis, neuroprotection, adequate cerebral and systemic oxygen supply, and preventing against drugs neurotoxicity. A concise retrospective data is presented.

  19. Improving Clinical Feedback to Anesthesia Residents by Using an Optical Scanner and a Microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Mark A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    At the University of Iowa problems associated with managing evaluations of anesthesia residents led to a major backlog of unanalyzed evaluation forms. A system developed at the University that enables ongoing feedback to residents and provides a method to assess the clinical competence of residents is described. (Author/MLW)

  20. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  1. Providing value in ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnot, Caroline D; Fleisher, Lee A; Keogh, John

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss current practices and changes in the field of ambulatory anesthesia, in both hospital and ambulatory surgery center settings. New trends in ambulatory settings are discussed and a review of the most current and comprehensive guidelines for the care of ambulatory patients with comorbid conditions such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus are reviewed. Future direction and challenges to the field are highlighted. Ambulatory anesthesia continues to be in high demand for many reasons; patients and surgeons want their surgical procedures to be swift, involve minimal postoperative pain, have a transient recovery time, and avoid an admission to the hospital. Factors that have made this possible for patients are improved surgical equipment, volatile anesthetic improvement, ultrasound-guided regional techniques, non-narcotic adjuncts for pain control, and the minimization of PONV. The decrease in time spent in a hospital also decreases the risk of wound infection, minimizes missed days from work, and is a socioeconomically favorable model, when possible. Recently proposed strategies which will allow surgeons and anesthesiologists to continue to meet the growing demand for a majority of surgical cases being same-day include pharmacotherapies with less undesirable side-effects, integration of ultrasound-guided regional techniques, and preoperative evaluations in appropriate candidates via a telephone call the night prior to surgery. Multidisciplinary communication amongst caregivers continues to make ambulatory settings efficient, safe, and socioeconomically favorable.It is also important to note the future impact that healthcare reform will have specifically on ambulatory anesthesia. The enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will allow 32 million more people to gain access to preventive services that will require anesthesia such as screening

  2. Crisis Management Simulation: Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciporen, Jeremy; Gillham, Haley; Noles, Michele; Dillman, Dawn; Baskerville, Mark; Haley, Caleb; Spight, Donn; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P

    2018-01-01

    Simulation training has been shown to be an effective teaching tool. Learner management of an intraoperative crisis such as a major cerebrovascular bleed requires effective teamwork, communication, and implementation of key skill sets at appropriate time points. This study establishes a first of a kind simulation experience in a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident (learners) team working together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Using a cadaveric cavernous carotid injury perfusion model, 7 neurosurgery and 6 anesthesia learners, were trained on appropriate vascular injury management using an endonasal endoscopic technique. Learners were evaluated on communication skills, crisis management algorithms, and implementation of appropriate skill sets at the right time. A preanatomic and postanatomic examination and postsimulation survey was administered to neurosurgery learners. Anesthesia learners provided posttraining evaluation through a tailored realism and teaching survey. Neurosurgery learners' anatomic examination score improved from presimulation (33.89%) to postsimulation (86.11%). No significant difference between learner specialties was observed for situation awareness, decision making, communications and teamwork, or leadership evaluations. Learners reported the simulation realistic, beneficial, and highly instructive. Realistic, first of kind, clinical simulation scenarios were presented to a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident team who worked together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Learners were effectively trained on crisis management, the importance of communication, and how to develop algorithms for future implementation in difficult scenarios. Learners were highly satisfied with the simulation training experience and requested that it be integrated more consistently into their residency training programs.

  3. 42 CFR 414.61 - Payment for anesthesia services furnished by a teaching CRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching CRNA. 414.61 Section 414.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... teaching CRNA. (a) Basis for payment. Beginning January 1, 2010, anesthesia services furnished by a teaching CRNA may be paid under one of the following conditions: (1) The teaching CRNA, who is not under...

  4. Bronchial thermoplasty: a novel treatment for severe asthma requiring monitored anesthesia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jamille A; Rowen, David W; Rose, David D

    2011-12-01

    Dexmedetomidine used in monitored anesthesia care produces a safe and effective technique well documented in research. We report the successful use of dexmedetomidine for sedation during bronchial thermoplasty, a new treatment for patients with severe persistent asthma refractory to inhaled corticosteroids and long-term beta-2 agonists.

  5. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disma, Nicola; Hansen, Tom G.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a neurodegenerative effect of anesthetic drugs in cubs and young animals, raising the concern that similar effects can happen in children, and that the administration of anesthesia in young children undergoing surgical or diagnostic procedures may cause long- Term...... neurocognitive impairment. Thus, several epidemiological studies have been performed with the aim to find a possible association between early anesthesia exposure and poor long- Term outcome, like learning disabilities or worse school grading and two prospective trials are currently running, the GAS...... and the PANDA study. Interim results from the GAS study, which compared infants undergoing general and regional anesthesia for hernia repair, have demonstrated that a single exposure of about one hour of anesthesia does not affect the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Nowadays, most of the knowledge...

  6. Traumatic tracheal diverticulum corrected with resection and anastomosis during one-lung ventilation and total intravenous anesthesia in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Rebecca S; Lepiz, Mauricio; Wall, Corey; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley; Dobbin, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the clinical findings and diagnostic images of a traumatic intrathoracic tracheal avulsion with a tracheal diverticulum in a cat. Furthermore, a complete description of the tracheal resection and anastomosis using one-lung ventilation (OLV) with total and partial intravenous anesthesia is made. A 3-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat weighing 6.8 kg was presented to the University Teaching Hospital for evaluation of increased respiratory noise 3 months following unknown trauma. Approximately 12 weeks prior to presentation, the cat had been seen by the primary care veterinarian for respiratory distress. At that time, the cat had undergone a tracheal ballooning procedure for a distal tracheal stricture diagnosed by tracheoscopy. The tracheal ballooning had provided only temporary relief. At presentation to our institution, the cat had increased respiratory effort with harsh upper airway noise auscultated during thoracic examination. The remainder of the physical examination was normal. Diagnostics included a tracheoscopy and a thoracic computed tomographic examination. The cat was diagnosed with tracheal avulsion, pseudotrachea with a tracheal diverticulum, and stenosis of the avulsed tracheal ends. Surgical correction of the tracheal stricture via a thoracotomy was performed using OLV with total and partial intravenous anesthesia. The cat recovered uneventfully and at last follow-up was active and doing well. This case report describes OLV using standard anesthesia equipment that is available at most private practices. Furthermore, this case describes the computed tomographic images of the intrathoracic tracheal avulsion and offers a positive outcome for tracheal resection and anastomosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  7. Outcomes of a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for medication errors in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lizabeth D; Grigg, Eliot B; Verma, Shilpa; Latham, Gregory J; Rampersad, Sally E; Martin, Lynn D

    2017-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for development of strategies to prevent medication errors, which are one important cause of preventable harm. Although the field of anesthesiology is considered a leader in patient safety, recent data suggest high medication error rates in anesthesia practice. Unfortunately, few error prevention strategies for anesthesia providers have been implemented. Using Toyota Production System quality improvement methodology, a multidisciplinary team observed 133 h of medication practice in the operating room at a tertiary care freestanding children's hospital. A failure mode and effects analysis was conducted to systematically deconstruct and evaluate each medication handling process step and score possible failure modes to quantify areas of risk. A bundle of five targeted countermeasures were identified and implemented over 12 months. Improvements in syringe labeling (73 to 96%), standardization of medication organization in the anesthesia workspace (0 to 100%), and two-provider infusion checks (23 to 59%) were observed. Medication error reporting improved during the project and was subsequently maintained. After intervention, the median medication error rate decreased from 1.56 to 0.95 per 1000 anesthetics. The frequency of medication error harm events reaching the patient also decreased. Systematic evaluation and standardization of medication handling processes by anesthesia providers in the operating room can decrease medication errors and improve patient safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Regional anesthesia in difficult airway: The quest for a solution continues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Chatrath, Veena; Dhawan, Akshay; Attri, Joginder Pal

    2016-01-01

    Difficult airway, a scenario with potentially life threatening outcome, is routinely encountered by an anesthesiologist leaving him with the dilemma of whether to use regional anesthesia (RA) or general anesthesia. Our study aims to look into this problem. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words "regional anesthesia, difficult airway, pregnancy, ventilation, intubation, epidural anesthesia, nerve blocks." More than 38 free full articles and books published from the year 1987 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. At first sight, RA may appear to offer an ideal solution as it helps to avoid the problem of difficult airway. However, the possibility of a total spinal block, failed or incomplete RA, local anesthetic toxicity or unforeseen surgical complication may make it imperative that the airway is secured. The correct decision can only be made by the anesthetist when all the relevant clinical information is taken into account. It is also important to ensure that before considering RA in a patient of difficult airway, an anesthesiologist must have a preformulated strategy for intubation.

  9. The use of local anesthesia during dental rehabilitations: a survey of AAPD members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A; Martin, Ashla; Hagan, Joseph L; Needleman, Howard

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document current practices among pediatric and general dentists who are members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) regarding the use of local anesthesia (LA) on children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia (GA). A survey was administered via e-mail to AAPD members to document the use of LA during dental rehabilitations under GA and the rationales for its use. A total of 952 of 5,599 members responded to this survey; 79 percent of respondents use LA at least part of the time during dental rehabilitations under GA. "Improved patient recovery" was the most commonly cited rationale for administering LA. Extraction of permanent and primary teeth were the two most common procedures cited for the use of LA, respectively. There is no consensus among the respondents on the use of local anesthesia during dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia, but the majority responded that it does play a role in their perioperative patient management.

  10. Factors Influencing the Choice of Anesthesia as a Career by Undergraduates of the University of Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Denise M; Wong, Rex; Runnels, Sean; Muhizi, Epaphrodite; McClain, Craig D

    2016-08-01

    Rwanda currently faces a severe shortage of trained medical personnel, including physician anesthesiologists. The recruitment of residents into the anesthesia program has been consistently low. This study aimed at determining the factors that influence undergraduates' decision to pursue anesthesia as a career choice. A questionnaire was created and administered to final year undergraduate medical students at the University of Rwanda. The questionnaire was created based on factors identified from literature review and key informant interviews. The questionnaire was translated, field-tested, and refined. The final survey questionnaire contains 27 4-point Likert scale items and 4 free-text questions. Seventy-nine final year undergraduate medical students responded to the survey. Only 2 students (2.5%) chose anesthesia as their top choice for postgraduate training. The most frequently named factors for not choosing anesthesiology were long work hours and high stress level, insufficient mentorship, and low job opportunity. The issues identified by our survey must be considered when making efforts toward increasing anesthesia recruitment in Rwanda. Factors such as lack of material resources and high workload will not be easily addressed. Others can be addressed through changes in medical student anesthesiology rotations and better mentorship by anesthesiologists during formative years. Focusing on factors that can be changed now may increase enrollment into anesthesiology. Future studies will include broadening the survey population and further investigating the influencing factors elucidated by this study.

  11. Feasibility and safety of general anesthesia for bronchial thermoplasty: a description of early 10 treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Mariko; Ishihara, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Katayama, Katsuyuki

    2018-03-20

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a recently introduced bronchoscopic treatment for patients with asthma refractory to pharmacotherapy. Intraprocedural sedation management is important for successful performance of BT. However, the results of general anesthesia in patients undergoing BT have not been well described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of general anesthesia in patients undergoing BT. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 10 consecutive BT treatments performed under general anesthesia in 4 patients. The feasibility outcomes were coughing and body movement during the procedure, procedure abandonment, and the relative frequency of thermal activation failure. The safety outcomes were bronchospasm and hypoxemia during the procedure, respiratory symptoms, and the need for oxygen after the procedure. Coughing occurred in two treatments. Neither body movement nor procedure abandonment occurred in any treatments. Neither intraprocedural bronchospasm nor hypoxemia occurred in any treatments. Respiratory symptoms occurred in 7 of 10 treatments within 1 day after the procedure and resolved within 4 days, which is comparable with a previous report. These results indicate that general anesthesia is feasible and safe for patients undergoing BT.

  12. Modeling of Recovery Profiles in Mentally Disabled and Intact Patients after Sevoflurane Anesthesia; A Pharmacodynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Teo Jeon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong; Koo, Yong-Seo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentally disabled patients show different recovery profiles compared to normal patients after general anesthesia. However, the relationship of dose-recovery profiles of mentally disabled patients has never been compared to that of normal patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients (10 mentally disabled patients and 10 mentally intact patients) scheduled to dental surgery under general anesthesia was recruited. Sevoflurane was administered to maintain anesthesia during dental treatment. At the end of the surgery, sevoflurane was discontinued. End-tidal sevoflurane and recovery of consciousness (ROC) were recorded after sevoflurane discontinuation. The pharmacodynamic relation between the probability of ROC and end-tidal sevoflurane concentration was analyzed using NONMEM software (version VII). Results End-tidal sevoflurane concentration associated with 50% probability of ROC (C50) and γ value were lower in the mentally disabled patients (C50=0.37 vol %, γ=16.5 in mentally intact patients, C50=0.19 vol %, γ=4.58 in mentally disabled patients). Mentality was a significant covariate of C50 for ROC and γ value to pharmacodynamic model. Conclusion A sigmoid Emanx model explains the pharmacodynamic relationship between end-tidal sevoflurane concentration and ROC. Mentally disabled patients may recover slower from anesthesia at lower sevoflurane concentration at ROC an compared to normal patients. PMID:25323901

  13. Anesthesia Practice and Clinical Trends in Interventional Radiology: A European Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslam, Philip J.; Yap, Bernard; Mueller, Peter R.; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current European practice in interventional radiology regarding nursing care, anesthesia, and clinical care trends.Methods: A survey was sent to 977 European interventional radiologists to assess the use of sedoanalgesia, nursing care, monitoring equipment, pre- and postprocedural care, and clinical trends in interventional radiology. Patterns of sedoanalgesia were recorded for both vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Responders rated their preferred level of sedoanalgesia for each procedure as follows: (a) awake/alert, (b) drowsy/arousable, (c) asleep/arousable, (d) deep sedation, and (e) general anesthesia. Sedoanalgesic drugs and patient care trends were also recorded. A comparison was performed with data derived from a similar survey of interventional practice in the United States.Results: Two hundred and forty-three of 977 radiologists responded (25%). The total number of procedures analyzed was 210,194. The majority (56%) of diagnostic and therapeutic vascular procedures were performed at the awake/alert level of sedation, 32% were performed at the drowsy/arousable level, and 12% at deeper levels of sedation. The majority of visceral interventional procedures were performed at the drowsy/arousable level of sedation (41%), 29% were performed at deeper levels of sedation, and 30% at the awake/alert level. In general, more sedoanalgesia is used in the United States. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported the use of a full-time radiology nurse, 67% used routine blood pressure/pulse oximetry monitoring, and 46% reported the presence of a dedicated recovery area. Forty-nine percent reported daily patient rounds, 30% had inpatient hospital beds, and 51% had day case beds.Conclusion: This survey shows clear differences in the use of sedation for vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Many, often complex, procedures are performed at the awake/alert level of sedation in Europe, whereas deeper levels of sedation are

  14. A Comparative Study between Intramuscular Midazolam and Oral Clonidine As A Premedication For General Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Jignasa J Patel; Kalpana A Desai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most anesthesiologists agree on the need for efficient pre-medication. The pattern of desired effects of a pre-medication is however, complex and includes relief of anxiety, sedation and relaxation of the patient. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of Midazolam and clonidine as premedication. Methodology: A comparative study between midazolam and clonidine as a premedication for general anesthesia was conducted. Patients were divided in two groups: Group I: In...

  15. Communication between anesthesiologists, patients and the anesthesia team: a descriptive study of induction and emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew F; Pope, Catherine; Goodwin, Dawn; Mort, Maggie

    2005-11-01

    Although the importance of communication skills in anesthetic practice is increasingly recognized, formal communication skills training has hitherto dealt only with limited aspects of this professional activity. We aimed to document and analyze the informally-learned communication that takes place between anesthesia personnel and patients at induction of and emergence from general anesthesia. We adopted an ethnographic approach based principally on observation of anesthesia personnel at work in the operating theatres with subsequent analysis of observation transcripts. We noted three main styles of communication on induction, commonly combined in a single induction. In order of frequency, these were: (1) descriptive, where the anesthesiologists explained to the patient what he/she might expect to feel; (2) functional, which seemed designed to help anesthesiologists maintain physiological stability or assess the changing depth of anesthesia and (3) evocative, which referred to images or metaphors. Although the talk we have described is nominally directed at the patient, it also signifies to other members of the anesthetic team how induction is progressing. The team may also contribute to the communication behaviour depending on the context. Communication on emergence usually focused on establishing that the patient was awake. Communication at induction and emergence tends to fall into specific patterns with different emphases but similar functions. This communication work is shared across the anesthetic team. Further work could usefully explore the relationship between communication styles and team performance or indicators of patient safety or well-being.

  16. Palliative sedation in nursing anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a technique of providing a sedative for end-of-life care to patients with intractable pain. The literature discusses the techniques and use of palliative sedation. Numerous articles have been written regarding the issues surrounding its use, but no literature has discussed the prescription or administration of palliative sedation by a nurse anesthetist. By understanding the concept and ethics involved in its use and providing nursing care that is theory based, the author argues that the involvement of nursing anesthesia is appropriate and within the scope of practice. Few other healthcare disciplines can provide the patient care and empirical knowledge that is imperative in the care of the dying patient. This article discusses the concept and ethics of palliative sedation and presents a case of providing palliative sedation to a terminally ill patient by an experienced nurse anesthetist. Palliative sedation should be understood, embraced, and utilized as an area of expertise suited for nursing anesthesia.

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia ... OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, ...

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... extensively trained to appropriately administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to ... extensively trained to appropriately administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to ...

  19. The making of an anesthesia historian: lessons from a worldwide biographical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sukumar P; Buterbaugh, Jerry; Desai, Manisha S

    2011-08-01

    There are few, if any, training opportunities for individuals wishing to pursue a career as an anesthesia historian. We surveyed anesthesia historians to learn about their training and experience, with an emphasis on mentoring, obstacles faced, and opportunities for improvement. Questionnaires were sent to 34 anesthesia historians in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia seeking information about demographics, medical training, training related to history, mentoring, research funding, obstacles faced, and suggestions for improvement. The response rate exceeded 90%. The average age of respondents was 70 years, and 85% of the respondents were male. The majority of respondents resided in North America (68%). The rest were from Europe (21%), Australia (9%), and Asia (3%). Graduate training in history was reported by 6%. Thirty-eight percent considered themselves to be self-trained. Thirty-eight percent were recipients of fellowships from the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. Research guidance was obtained by 74% of respondents. Guidance came from a department chairman (24%), a member of the Wood Library-Museum staff (33%), or another source (43%). The 3 most common obstacles described were difficulty in obtaining funding for research activities (33%), academic recognition (20%), and availability of training and mentoring (18%). Areas identified as needing improvement were research funding (17%), exposure to anesthesia history during residency training (23%), academic recognition (26%), mentoring (17%), and promotion of anesthesia history (17%). A study of history does not necessarily produce changes in clinical practice, which may limit the perceived value of historical study. The suggestions by these historians should help preserve the history and heritage of anesthesiology.

  20. A Comparison of Multiscale Permutation Entropy Measures in On-Line Depth of Anesthesia Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cui; Liang, Zhenhu; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Duan; Li, Yongwang; Ursino, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Multiscale permutation entropy (MSPE) is becoming an interesting tool to explore neurophysiological mechanisms in recent years. In this study, six MSPE measures were proposed for on-line depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitoring to quantify the anesthetic effect on the real-time EEG recordings. The performance of these measures in describing the transient characters of simulated neural populations and clinical anesthesia EEG were evaluated and compared. Six MSPE algorithms-derived from Shannon permutation entropy (SPE), Renyi permutation entropy (RPE) and Tsallis permutation entropy (TPE) combined with the decomposition procedures of coarse-graining (CG) method and moving average (MA) analysis-were studied. A thalamo-cortical neural mass model (TCNMM) was used to generate noise-free EEG under anesthesia to quantitatively assess the robustness of each MSPE measure against noise. Then, the clinical anesthesia EEG recordings from 20 patients were analyzed with these measures. To validate their effectiveness, the ability of six measures were compared in terms of tracking the dynamical changes in EEG data and the performance in state discrimination. The Pearson correlation coefficient (R) was used to assess the relationship among MSPE measures. CG-based MSPEs failed in on-line DoA monitoring at multiscale analysis. In on-line EEG analysis, the MA-based MSPE measures at 5 decomposed scales could track the transient changes of EEG recordings and statistically distinguish the awake state, unconsciousness and recovery of consciousness (RoC) state significantly. Compared to single-scale SPE and RPE, MSPEs had better anti-noise ability and MA-RPE at scale 5 performed best in this aspect. MA-TPE outperformed other measures with faster tracking speed of the loss of unconsciousness. MA-based multiscale permutation entropies have the potential for on-line anesthesia EEG analysis with its simple computation and sensitivity to drug effect changes. CG-based multiscale permutation

  1. Reinforcement of spinal anesthesia by epidural injection of saline: a comparison of hyperbaric and isobaric tetracaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y; Mimura, M; Hazama, K; Namiki, A

    2000-04-25

    An epidural injection of saline was reported to extend spinal anesthesia because of a volume effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the baricity of spinal local anesthetics upon the extension of spinal anesthesia by epidural injection of saline. Forty patients undergoing elective lower-limb surgery were randomly allocated to four groups of 10 patients each. Group A received no epidural injection after the spinal administration of hyperbaric tetracaine (dissolved in 10% glucose). Group B received an epidural injection of 8 ml of physiological saline 20 min after spinal hyperbaric tetracaine. Group C received no epidural injection after spinal isobaric tetracaine (dissolved in physiological saline). Group D received an epidural injection of 8 ml of saline 20 min after spinal isobaric tetracaine. The level of analgesia was examined by the pinprick method at 5-min intervals. The levels of analgesia 20 min after spinal anesthesia were significantly higher in hyperbaric groups than in isobaric groups [T5 (T2-L2) vs. T7 (T3-12)]. After epidural injection of saline, the levels of analgesia in groups B and D were significantly higher than in groups A and C. The segmental increases after epidural saline injection were 2 (0-3) in group B and 2 (1-7) in group D. Sensation in the sacral area remained 20 min after spinal block in one patient in group D; however, it disappeared after epidural saline injection. In this study, 8 ml of epidural saline extended spinal analgesia. However, there was no difference between the augmenting effect in isobaric and hyperbaric spinal anesthesia. We conclude that the reinforcement of spinal anesthesia by epidural injection of saline is not affected by the baricity of the spinal anesthetic solution used.

  2. [Anesthesia for thoracoscopic laser ablation of bullae in a patient with severe bullous emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y; Hayashida, M; Arita, H; Hanaoka, K

    1995-05-01

    A 46-year-old male underwent laser-ablation of emphysematous bullae of the right lung via thoracoscope. For almost a year he had been bedridden because of severe dyspnea on exertion, in spite of medication and oxygen therapy. He also complained of orthopnea at rest and had suffered from body weight loss of 10 kg during the preceding year. Radiologic examination revealed emphysemotous lung with bilateral giant bullae. In spirogram, forced vital capacity in 1 second was markedly low (0.45 l, corresponding to 19% in %FVC1.0), vital capacity moderately depressed (2.41 l, 64%) and residual volume markedly elevated (5.85 l, 387%). Anesthesia was induced and maintained using the combination of thoracic-epidural anesthesia and intravenous anesthesia (midazolam and fentanyl). One lung ventilation (OLV) was used to facilitate thoracoscopic procedure. Mechanical ventilation was conducted at first with an anesthesia ventilator. As the duration of OLV was prolonged, however, the peak airway pressure increased, the tidal volume decreased and the value of percutaneous arterial hemoglobin saturation (SpO2) declined. In order to keep adequate oxygenation, brief periods of two lung ventilation (TLV) became necessary, in addition to the application of continuous positive airway pressure to the non-dependent lung. When ventilation was changed from volume-cycled ventilation to pressure-cycled and from using an anesthesia ventilator to a critical care type ventilator (Servo 900C), sufficient tidal volume was achieved with lower peak airway pressure, producing reasonable Spo2 value with much less frequent TLV. At the end of the surgery bronchopleural fistulae still persisted, with resultant air leak of about 50% of inspired tidal volume.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Comparison of different anesthesia techniques during esophagogastroduedenoscopy in children: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Mario; Glynn, Susan; Soberano, Mark; Putnam, Philip; Hossain, Md Monir; Hoffmann, Clifford; Samuels, Paul; Kibelbek, Michael J; Gunter, Joel

    2015-10-01

    Esophagogastroduedenoscopy (EGD) in children is usually performed under general anesthesia. Anesthetic goals include minimization of airway complications while maximizing operating room (OR) efficiency. Currently, there is no consensus on which anesthetic technique best meets these goals. We performed a prospective randomized study comparing three different anesthetic techniques. To evaluate the incidence of respiratory complications (primary aim) and institutional efficiency (secondary aim) among three different anesthetic techniques in children undergoing EGD. Subjects received a standardized inhalation induction of anesthesia followed by randomization to one of the three groups: Group intubated, sevoflurane (IS), Group intubated, propofol (IP), and Group native airway, nonintubated, propofol (NA). Respiratory complications included minor desaturation (SpO2 between 94% and 85%), severe desaturation (SpO2 < 85%), apnea, airway obstruction/laryngospasm, aspiration, and/or inadequate anesthesia during the endoscopy. Evaluation of institutional efficiency was determined by examining the time spent during the different phases of care (anesthesia preparation, procedure, OR stay, recovery, and total perioperative care). One hundred and seventy-nine children aged 1-12 years (median 7 years; 4.0, 10.0) were enrolled (Group IS N = 60, Group IP N = 59, Group NA N = 61). The incidence of respiratory complications was higher in the Group NA (0.459) vs Group IS (0.033) or Group IP (0.086) (P < 0.0001). The most commonly observed complications were desaturation, inadequate anesthesia, and apnea. There were no differences in institutional efficiency among the three groups. Respiratory complications were more common in Group NA. The use of native airway with propofol maintenance during EGD does not offer advantages with respect to respiratory complications or institutional efficiency. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Anesthesia for Pediatric Lung Transplantation: Case Presentation and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premal M Trivedi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The first pediatric lung transplant was performed in 1987 at the University of Toronto in a 15-year-old with familial pulmonary fibrosis. Since that time, over 2000 children have received lung transplants worldwide, with an annual number ranging between 99 and 137 over the past decade. For the anesthesiologist charged with managing these rare patients, an understanding of the indications that lead to transplantation, their pathophysiology, and the physiology of the transplanted lungs are critical. To provide a context for the anesthetic management of the child undergoing lung transplantation, we discuss the case of a 2-month-old who underwent bilateral lung transplantation for intractable respiratory failure. Both the unique aspects of this case and pediatric lung transplantation, in general, are presented. Then a review of the literature is discussed.

  5. How do You Select an Anesthesia Method Prior to Tympanostomy Tube Insertion for a Child?

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The use of general (face-mask inhalation and intravenous) anesthesia has been the method of choice for tympanostomy tube insertion in children. However, there is no exact guideline for the choice of anesthesia method and there is no evidence to support the use of one anesthesia method over another. Clinically, the anesthesia method used to be decided by old customs and the surgeon's blind faith that children cannot bear tympanostomy tube insertion under local anesthesia. Clinicians should kee...

  6. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nandita Mehta, Sunana Gupta, Atul Sharma, Mohd Reidwan Dar Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Acharya Shri Chander College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India Abstract: Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency. Keywords: geriatric anesthesia, bupivacaine, segmental anesthesia, laparoscopic surgery

  7. Comparison of stress and burnout among anesthesia and surgical residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, K; Sahni, N; Padhy, S K; Mathew, P J

    2017-10-23

    The residents undergoing training at hospitals in our country face challenges in terms of infrastructure and high workload with undefined working hours. The aim of the study was to compare the stress and burnout levels in trainee doctors doing residency in surgical fields and anesthesia at a tertiary care academic center in North India. A comparative, observational study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. After Ethics Committee approval, 200 residents (100 each from surgical branches and anesthesia) were required to fill a questionnaire with information about age, sex, year of residency, marital status, and the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire-12. Burnout and perceived stress were compared between residents of anesthesia and surgical specialties. Residents of both surgical and anesthesia branches scored high in perceived stress, namely 21 and 18, respectively. The score was significantly higher in surgical residents (P = 0.03) and increased progressively with the year of residency. The majority of residents (90% surgical, 80% anesthesia) felt that they were being overloaded with work. However, only 20%-30% of respondents felt that there was lack of development of individual skills and still fewer (<10%) reported giving up in view of difficulties. There is high level of stress and overload dimension of burnout among the residents of anesthesia and surgical branches at our tertiary care academic institution and the surgical residents score marginally higher than anesthesia residents.

  8. [Cranial nerve damage after neuroaxial methods of anesthesia in puerperas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floka, S E; Shifman, E M

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes cranial nerve damage, a rare complication of neuroaxial anesthesia in obstetric care. In the literature, there are summarized data on 17 cases of neurological deficit developing after subarachnoidal or epidural anesthesia in puerperas. The etiological and pathogenetic factors of the above complications may be suggested to be the high disposition of a local anesthetic, arterial hypotension due to neuroaxial anesthetics, the outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after pachymeningeal puncture (including after unintended puncture during epidural anesthesia), and ischemic injury after the blood packing performed to relieve postpuncture headache. Closer consideration of these risk factors seems to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve damage in puerperas.

  9. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  10. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  11. Radiation treatment for the right naris in a pediatric anesthesia patient using an adaptive oral airway technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sponseller, Patricia, E-mail: sponselp@uw.edu; Pelly, Nicole; Trister, Andrew; Ford, Eric; Ermoian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy for pediatric patients often includes the use of intravenous anesthesia with supplemental oxygen delivered via the nasal cannula. Here, we describe the use of an adaptive anesthesia technique for electron irradiation of the right naris in a preschool-aged patient treated under anesthesia. The need for an intranasal bolus plug precluded the use of standard oxygen supplementation. This novel technique required the multidisciplinary expertise of anesthesiologists, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists, medical physicists, and radiation oncologists to ensure a safe and reproducible treatment course.

  12. Radiation treatment for the right naris in a pediatric anesthesia patient using an adaptive oral airway technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponseller, Patricia; Pelly, Nicole; Trister, Andrew; Ford, Eric; Ermoian, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for pediatric patients often includes the use of intravenous anesthesia with supplemental oxygen delivered via the nasal cannula. Here, we describe the use of an adaptive anesthesia technique for electron irradiation of the right naris in a preschool-aged patient treated under anesthesia. The need for an intranasal bolus plug precluded the use of standard oxygen supplementation. This novel technique required the multidisciplinary expertise of anesthesiologists, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists, medical physicists, and radiation oncologists to ensure a safe and reproducible treatment course

  13. Spinal anesthesia: the Holy Grail?

    OpenAIRE

    Voet, Marieke; Slagt, Cornelis

    2017-01-01

    Marieke Voet, Cornelis SlagtDepartment of Anesthesiology, Pain and Palliative Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAfter reading the paper recently published in Local and Regional Anesthesia by Whitaker et al:1 “Spinal anesthesia after intraoperative cardiac arrest during general anesthesia in an infant,” we would like to share our thoughts. In a recently published paper by Habre et al,2 the incidence of severe critical events in pediatric anes...

  14. Failure of Ketamine Anesthesia in a Patient with Lamotrigine Overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kornhall

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is important to know which clinical situations prevent ketamine from working. Case Report. We present the case of the psychiatric inpatient who was admitted to our emergency department after ingesting a toxic dose of lamotrigine, unknown at that time. On admission, she was clearly in distress, displaying extreme agitation and violent ataxic movements. We opted to achieve sedation using intravenous ketamine boluses. Unexpectedly, after being injected with a total of 250 mg ketamine, our patient displayed no signs of dissociative anaesthesia. Discussion. There was no apparent reason for why ketamine failed, but an interaction between lamotrigine and ketamine was suspected. A literature search was performed. Very few articles describe interactions between lamotrigine and ketamine. Experimental studies, however, demonstrate how lamotrigine attenuates the neuropsychiatric effects of ketamine. Ketamine is classically described as an NMDA antagonist. Ketamine’s dissociative effects, however, are thought to be mediated by increased glutamate release via a pathway not dependent on NMDA receptors. Lamotrigine, on the other hand, is known to reduce cortical glutamate release. Conclusion. Lamotrigine reduces the glutamate release needed to mediate ketamine’s dissociative anaesthesia. This is important knowledge for anaesthesiologists in the emergency room where ketamine is often administered to unstable patients.

  15. Anesthesia Capacity in Ghana: A Teaching Hospital's Resources, and the National Workforce and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Mark A; Aidoo, Alfred J; Hondras, Maria A; Boateng, Nana A; Antwi-Kusi, Akwasi; Addison, William; Hermanson, Alec R

    2017-12-01

    Quality anesthetic care is lacking in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Global health leaders call for perioperative capacity reports in limited-resource settings to guide improved health care initiatives. We describe a teaching hospital's resources and the national workforce and education in this LMIC capacity report. A prospective observational study was conducted at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana, during 4 weeks in August 2016. Teaching hospital data were generated from observations of hospital facilities and patient care, review of archival records, and interviews with KATH personnel. National data were obtained from interviews with KATH personnel, correspondence with Ghana's anesthesia society, and review of public records. The practice of anesthesia at KATH incorporated preanesthesia clinics, intraoperative management, and critical care. However, there were not enough physicians to consistently supervise care, especially in postanesthesia care units (PACUs) and the critical care unit (CCU). Clean water and electricity were usually reliable in all 16 operating rooms (ORs) and throughout the hospital. Equipment and drugs were inventoried in detail. While much basic infrastructure, equipment, and medications were present in ORs, patient safety was hindered by hospital-wide oxygen supply failures and shortage of vital signs monitors and working ventilators in PACUs and the CCU. In 2015, there were 10,319 anesthetics administered, with obstetric and gynecologic, general, and orthopedic procedures comprising 62% of surgeries. From 2011 to 2015, all-cause perioperative mortality rate in ORs and PACUs was 0.65% or 1 death per 154 anesthetics, with 99% of deaths occurring in PACUs. Workforce and education data at KATH revealed 10 anesthesia attending physicians, 61 nurse anesthetists (NAs), and 7 anesthesia resident physicians in training. At the national level, 70 anesthesia attending physicians and 565 NAs cared for Ghana's population

  16. Anesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudaityte, Jūrate; Marchertiene, Irena; Pavalkis, Dainius

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of minor anorectal diseases is 4-5% of adult Western population. Operations are performed on ambulatory or 24-hour stay basis. Requirements for ambulatory anesthesia are: rapid onset and recovery, ability to provide quick adjustments during maintenance, lack of intraoperative and postoperative side effects, and cost-effectiveness. Anorectal surgery requires deep levels of anesthesia. The aim is achieved with 1) regional blocks alone or in combination with monitored anesthesia care or 2) deep general anesthesia, usually with muscle relaxants and tracheal intubation. Modern general anesthetics provide smooth, quickly adjustable anesthesia and are a good choice for ambulatory surgery. Popular regional methods are: spinal anesthesia, caudal blockade, posterior perineal blockade and local anesthesia. The trend in regional anesthesia is lowering the dose of local anesthetic, providing selective segmental block. Adjuvants potentiating analgesia are recommended. Postoperative period may be complicated by: 1) severe pain, 2) urinary retention due to common nerve supply, and 3) surgical bleeding. Complications may lead to hospital admission. In conclusion, novel general anesthetics are recommended for ambulatory anorectal surgery. Further studies to determine an optimal dose and method are needed in the group of regional anesthesia.

  17. Dermatological allergic reaction caused by dexmedetomidine in a patient administered intravenous regional anesthesia with dexmedetomidine–lignocaine combination

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    Ketaki Marodkar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine a highly selective α2 agonist has become a frequently used drug in anesthesiologists’s armamentarium due to its sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, neuroprotective and anesthetic sparing effects and a favorable side effect profile. Dexmedetomidine–lignocaine combination has been used recently to provide Bier’s block and was shown to improve quality of anesthesia, to reduce tourniquet pain and to reduce postoperative anesthetic requirement in patients undergoing forearm or hand surgeries. Hypotension and bradycardia are the commonly seen side effects. Only one case of dexmedetomidine skin allergy has been reported till date in literature. We present a case of dermatological allergy to dexmedetomidine, in a patient administered Bier’s block with dexmedetomidine–lignocaine combination for implant removal surgery of forearm.

  18. The Effect of Using a Written Preanesthetic Machine Checklist on Detection of Anesthesia Machine Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    Craik and Lockhart describes the various levels of information processing involved in memory (8). The preliminary level ...A prevalent malfunction. Anesthesia and Analg~esia, 1985, 64: 745-747. 8. Craik , F.I.M., Lockhart , R.S. Levels of processing : A framework for memory...research. Journal of Verbal Learning and Behavior, 1972, 11: 671-684. 9. Craik , F.I.M., Lockhart , R.S. Levels of processing : A * framework for

  19. Preliminary evaluation of a virtual reality-based simulator for learning spinal anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-12-27

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of a simulation-based program on the initial performance of dural puncture by medical interns, and to refine the design of simulator-based teaching and competence assessment. DESIGN: Prospective interventional study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: 27 medical interns inexperienced in the technique of spinal anesthesia or dural puncture and within 12 months of graduating from medical school, were randomly assigned to a conventional or a simulator-based teaching course of spinal anesthesia: 13 were recruited to the Conventional Group (CG) and 14 to the Simulator Group (SG). MEASUREMENTS: A SenseGraphic Immersive workbench and a modified Phantom desktop with shutter glasses were used to create a teaching environment. Outcomes of teaching were assessed in two phases within three weeks of the teaching course: Phase I consisted of a written examination followed by assessment on the simulator. A global rating scale and a task-specific checklist were used. Phase II (for those participants for whom a suitable opportunity arose to perform spinal anesthesia under supervision within three wks of the teaching course) consisted of structured observation of clinical performance of the procedure in the operating room. Participants were assessed by independent, study-blinded experts. Student\\'s two-tailed impaired t-tests were used to compare the parametric outcomes (P < 0.05 was considered significant). MAIN RESULTS: All participants completed the written test successfully with no difference between groups. Ten participants from CG and 13 from SG completed the simulator-based testing performing similarly in terms of the global rating scale. Five participants in CG and 6 in SG proceeded to clinical testing. On the global rating scale, interns in SG scored higher than those in CG. They performed similarly according to the task-specific checklist. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, no difference was measured between those taught with

  20. Doença de Moyamoya e anestesia com sevoflurano fora do centro cirúrgico: relato de caso Enfermedad de Moyamoya y anestesia con sevoflurano fuera del centro quirúrgico: relato de caso Moyamoya disease and sevoflurane anesthesia outside the surgery center: case report

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    Sheila Braga Machado

    2002-06-01

    causa de accidente vascular cerebral en individuos jóvenes. El objetivo de este relato es presentar el caso de un paciente con enfermedad de Moyamoya que fue sometido a anestesia general con sevoflurano para procedimiento diagnóstico fuera del centro quirúrgico. RELATO DEL CASO: Niño con 13 años, estado físico ASA IV, portador de enfermedad de Moyamoya con secuela neurológica después de tres accidentes vasculares cerebrales, insuficiencia renal crónica e hipertensión arterial sistémica, sometido a endoscopia digestiva alta. En decúbito dorsal y después monitorización, se realizó inducción inalatoria por la cánula de traqueostomía con sevoflurano (aumento gradual de la concentración inspiratoria hasta 6% y mezcla de oxígeno/óxido nitroso a 50%. Un catéter venoso fue introducido para infusión de solución glucosada a 5%. Fue realizada ventilación controlada manual, siendo la manutención de la anestesia hecha con sevoflurano a 4% y mezcla de oxígeno/óxido nitroso a 50%. Al final del procedimiento los agentes anestésicos fueron descontinuados simultáneamente y fue administrado oxígeno a 100%. La anestesia fue satisfactoria, con buena estabilidad hemodinámica, sin ocurrencia de complicaciones durante el procedimiento y con un precoz despertar. CONCLUSIONES: El sevoflurano puede ofrecer nuevas perspectivas para la anestesia inhalatoria en pacientes con enfermedad neurológica que realizan procedimiento ambulatorial, ya que permite buena estabilidad hemodinamica y despertar precoz, preservando la fisiología cerebral.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Moyamoya disease is a progressive cerebrovascular disorder implying anesthetic challenges due to patients’ poor brain perfusion, in addition to being a major cause for stroke in young people. This report aimed at describing a case of Moyamoya’s disease in a patient submitted to general anesthesia with sevoflurane for a diagnostic procedure outside the surgery center. CASE REPORT: Male child, 13 years

  1. Anesthesia in a pediatric patient with ROHADD syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza Isasa, E; Palomero Rodríguez, M A; Acebedo Bambaren, I; Medrano Viñas, C; Gil Mayo, D; Domínguez Pérez, F; Pestaña Lagunas, D

    2018-05-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) syndrome is a rare entity that is characterised by its onset in healthy children at 2-4 years of age. It is a complex syndrome that includes, among other symptoms, rapid weight gain with hyperphagia, hypothalamic dysfunction, central hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation. The case is presented of a 10-year-old boy with a diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome undergoing insertion of a port-a-cath under general anaesthesia, who developed complications during the anaesthetic procedure related to his illness. The peri-operative management of these patients represents a challenge for the anaesthetist, given the involvement of multiple systems and the frequent respiratory comorbidities associated with them. A summary is presented of some of the implications and anaesthetic considerations that must be taken into account in the management of these patients. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Snoeck, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Marc SnoeckDepartment of Anaesthesia, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects wer...

  3. A novel technique of anesthesia induction in supine position with impaled knife in the back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current technique of airway management for impaled knife in the back includes putting the patient in lateral position and intubation. We present here a novel technique of anesthesia induction (intubation and central line insertion in a patient with impaled knife in the back which is simple and easily reproducible. This technique can be used for single lung ventilation using double lumen tube or bronchial blocker also if desired.

  4. A novel technique to check the occlusion during the placement of stainless steel crowns under general anesthesia

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    Mohiddin Dimashkieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steel crowns are the restoration of choice for the treatment of badly decayed posterior teeth under general anesthesia. The evaluation of occlusion after the placement of these crowns, however, remains a difficult task. This paper outlines a technique to evaluate the occlusion of stainless steel crowns placed under general anesthesia using a specially designed tray and a fast setting polyvinyl siloxane bite registration material (Regisil® PB™, Dentsply, Surrey UK.

  5. Addition of ketamine or dexmedetomidine to lignocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia: A randomized controlled study

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    Alok Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Results: Shortened sensory and motor block onset times (69.17 min and 7.83 min respectively, P < 0.0001 and improved quality of anesthesia (satisfaction score = 3, P < 0.05 were found in ketamine group. Visual analog scale scores (3.21 ± 0.41 were comparable while time to first analgesic requirement (166.25 ± 25.89 min, P < 0.0001 was significantly longer in dexmedetomidine group after tourniquet release. Conclusion: We conclude that the addition of 1 mcg/kg of body weight dexmedetomidine or 0.5 mg/kg of body weight ketamine to lignocaine for IVRA improves quality of anesthesia and perioperative analgesia without causing side effects. We considered ketamine reduced the time for onset of block, delayed the onset of tourniquet pain, and reduced postoperative analgesic requirement and had a better patient satisfaction than placebo or dexmedetomidine.

  6. Use of a Combination of Regional and General Anesthesia during Emergency Thoracic Surgery

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    V. Kh. Sharipova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate multimodal anesthetic regimens and to evaluate their efficiency during emergency thoracic surgeries for varying injuries. Subjects and methods. A total of 116 patients emergently admitted to the Republican Research Center for Emergency Medical Care for chest traumatic injuries were examined and divided into 3 groups according to the mode of anesthesia. Results. Perioperative multimodal anesthetic regimens for emergency thoracic surgery, which involved all components of the pathogenesis of pain, were elaborated. Conclusion. The combination of regional and general anesthesia contributes to the smooth course of an intra operative period with minimal hemodynamic stress and it is cost effective in decreasing the use of narcotic anal gesics in the intraoperative period. 

  7. Side effects and complications of intraosseous anesthesia and conventional oral anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier; Oltra-Moscardó, María-José; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the side effects and complications following intraosseous anesthesia (IA), comparing them with those of the conventional oral anesthesia techniques. A simple-blind, prospective clinical study was carried out. Each patient underwent two anesthetic techniques: conventional (local infiltration and locoregional anesthetic block) and intraosseous, for respective dental operations. In order to allow comparison of IA versus conventional anesthesia, the two operations were similar and affected the same two teeth in opposite quadrants. Heart rate was recorded in all cases before injection of the anesthetic solution and again 30 seconds after injection. The complications observed after anesthetic administration were recorded. A total of 200 oral anesthetic procedures were carried out in 100 patients. Both IA and conventional anesthesia resulted in a significant increase in heart rate, though the increase was greater with the latter technique. Incidents were infrequent with either anesthetic technique, with no significant differences between them. Regarding the complications, there were significant differences in pain at the injection site, with more intense pain in the case of IA (x2=3.532, p=0.030, Φ2=0.02), while the limitation of oral aperture was more pronounced with conventional anesthesia (x2=5.128, panesthesia. Post-anesthetic biting showed no significant differences between the two techniques.

  8. Effects of opioids on local anesthesia in the rat: a codeine and tramadol study

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    Talita Girio Carnaval

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are central analgesics that act on the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system. We investigated the effects of codeine (COD and tramadol (TRAM on local anesthesia of the sciatic nerve. Eighty Wistar male rats received the following SC injections in the popliteal fossa: local anesthetic with epinephrine (LA; local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (LA WV; COD; TRAM; LA + COD; LA + TRAM; COD 20 minutes prior to LA (COD 20' + LA or TRAM 20 minutes prior to LA (TRAM 20' + LA. As a nociceptive function, the blockade was considered the absence of a paw withdraw reflex. As a motor function, it was the absence of claudication. As a proprioceptive function, it was the absence of hopping and tactile responses. All data were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA. Opioids showed a significant increase in the level of anesthesia, and the blockade duration of LA + COD was greater than that of the remaining groups (p < 0.05. The associated use of opioids improved anesthesia efficacy. This could lead to a new perspective in controlling dental pain.

  9. Conscious sedation vs general anesthesia in pediatric dentistry – a review

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Cátia Carvalho; Lavado, Carla; Areias, Cristina; Mourão, Joana; Andrade, David de

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Performing dental treatments on pediatric patients who present behavioral problems is usually a great clinical challenge. Depending on the patients’ emotional maturity and their physical, psychological and mental skills, the usual behavior control techniques may not offer adequate efficacy and safety when dental procedures are being carried out. In these circumstances, alternative and more invasive methods such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia may become necessary. ...

  10. Topical anesthesia: possible risk factor for endophthalmitis after cataract extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Arumi, Jose; Fonollosa, Alex; Sararols, Laura; Fina, Francesc; Martínez-Castillo, Vicente; Boixadera, Ana; Zapata, Miguel A; Campins, Magda

    2007-06-01

    To assess the relationship between the risk for acute endophthalmitis after cataract extraction and whether certain factors, such as surgeon qualification, numerical order, duration of surgery, operating theater, and type of anesthesia (topical or retrobulbar), could be modified to decrease the risk. Single-center academic practice. Two epidemiological studies were performed: a case-control study and a retrospective cohort study. The surgical records of all patients with clinically diagnosed endophthalmitis within 30 days after cataract surgery performed between February 2002 and September 2003 were reviewed. The endophthalmitis cases were compared with 108 randomly selected controls (4 controls per case). The global incidence of endophthalmitis and the incidence according to type of anesthesia were calculated. Of 5011 cataract extractions performed, 27 cases of endophthalmitis occurred. The incidence was 5.39 per 1000 procedures. An independent statistically significant relationship was found between endophthalmitis and the use of topical anesthesia (odds ratio [OR], 11.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-58.7) and surgery longer than 45 minutes (OR, 7.2; 95% CI, 1.7-29.7) but not between the other variables. The incidence of endophthalmitis was 1.8 per 1000 cataract extractions with retrobulbar anesthesia and 6.76 per 1000 with topical anesthesia (relative risk [RR], 3.76; 95% CI, 0.89-15.85). After the start of the study period was extended to May 2001, the incidence of endophthalmitis was 1.3 per 1000 cataract extractions with retrobulbar anesthesia and 8.7 per 1000 with topical anesthesia (RR, 6.72; 95% CI, 1.63-27.63). Results suggest that there may be an association between topical anesthesia and endophthalmitis after cataract extraction.

  11. A questionnaire study regarding local anesthesia in dentistry and safety measures in dental clinics among dental students

    OpenAIRE

    オオケ, ハナコ; クドウ, マサル; シンヤ, ノボル; Hanako, OHKE; Masaru, KUDO; Noboru, SHINYA

    2005-01-01

    This reports the results of a questionnaire study of dental students on the awareness of "local anesthesia" and "use of patient monitoring systems" in dental clinics. Subjects participated in the present study included 96 sixth year dental students (D6) and 93 first year dental students (D1). The results indicate that the majority of respondents including both D6 and D1 support the notion that a "dentist" is the most suitable person to perform local anesthesia in dental treatment. With respec...

  12. Spinal anesthesia is safe in laparoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. A retrospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dogan; Hut, Adnan; Uzman, Sinan; Kocakusak, Ahmet; Demiryas, Suleyman; Cakir, Mikail; Tatar, Cihad

    2017-12-01

    Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair is an effective and safe method for the treatment of inguinal hernia. There are very few studies on regional anesthesia methods in TEP surgery. To compare TEP inguinal hernia repair performed when the patient was treated under spinal anesthesia (SA) with that performed under general anesthesia (GA). All total of 80 patients were studied between December 2015 and March 2017. Hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl were used for SA, to achieve a sensorial level of T3. Propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, fentanyl, and tracheal intubation were used for GA. Intraoperative events related to SA, surgical times, intra- and postoperative complications, and pain scores were recorded. The mean operative time in the SA TEP group was 70.2 ±6.7 min, which was significantly longer than the mean operative time in the GA TEP group of 67.2 ±6.2 min (p < 0.038). The mean pain scores in the SA TEP group were 0.23 ±0.42 at the first hour, 1.83 ±0.64 at 6 h and 1.28 ±0.45 at 24 h. These scores were significantly lower than the corresponding scores of 5.18 ±0.84 (p < 0.001), 2.50 ±0.55 (p < 0.001) and 1.58 ±0.55 in the GA TEP group. Generally, patients were more satisfied with SA than GA (p < 0.004). Spinal anesthesia TEP is significantly less painful in the early postoperative period, leading to earlier ambulation than GA TEP. Additionally, SA TEP results in significantly less need for analgesics and better patient satisfaction results. SA TEP seems to be a better alternative than the existing GA TEP.

  13. A report of the anesthesia in posterior fossa operations in the sitting position in 55 patients

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    Jahanguiri B

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available In this survey, 55 patients were studied in a period of six years for having the anesthesia in the sitting position. In this position, the surgeon will had a better access to the location, whose damages have been sustained, so less damages would be given to the healthy tissues. For the patients, due to their critical general conditions, one week prior to giving anesthesia to the posterior fossa, operation in the sitting position the right ventriculoatiral shunt was placed. For preventing the fall of blood pressure, a bandage was placed in the lower limbs after inducing anesthesia and changing supine position to sitting position. Before the induction, central venous pressure was measured for treating the air embolism. The head of catheter was placed inside the right atrial. Premedications such as atropine, pethidine, and inductive agents like thiopenton, and muscle relaxants, maintained with halothane and nitrous oxide. All of the patients endured this condition without the fall of blood pressure and air embolism

  14. [Effects of nitrous oxide on electroencephalographic activity during sevoflurane anesthesia: a zero-crossing analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, T; Ochiai, R; Takeda, J; Fukushima, K

    1995-11-01

    We have investigated the influence of nitrous oxide (N2O) on central nervous system (CNS) during sevoflurane anesthesia by using zero-crossing method of EEG in 31 patients. The study was divided into three parts: Study 1 (n = 18), Study 2 (n = 6) and Study 3 (n = 7). (Study 1) After induction of anesthesia, sevoflurane 1.0 % in oxygen (O2), and sevoflurane 1.0 % with 67 % N2O in O2 were given to the patients sequentially in a random fashion, and EEG was recorded. (Study 2) Sevoflurane 1.7 % in O2, and sevoflurane 0.7 % with 67 % N2O in O2, which were considered to be the same anesthetic depth (= sevoflurane 1 MAC), were inhaled, and EEG was recorded in the same manner as in the study 1. (Study 3) We compared the effects of N2O on EEG during intravenous administration of fentanyl and midazolam with 67 % N2O, and without N2O, and EEG was recorded in the same manner. In all studies, percentage of each frequency range (delta, theta, alpha, beta) and average frequency were calculated by zero-crossing method. During sevoflurane anesthesia, the EEG activity was decelerated with N2O, depending on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). But there were no significant changes in EEG activity of the patient with and those without N2O during intravenous anesthesia. We concluded that the influences of N2O on CNS can be evaluated by quantitative analysis of EEG.

  15. [A prospective cohort study of the risk factors of emergence agitation in pediatric after general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hao; Tao, Fan; Wan, Hai-fang; Luo, Hong

    2012-05-08

    To evaluate risk factors associated with emergence agitation (EA) in pediatrics after general anesthesia. A prospective cohort study was conducted in 268 pediatric patients aged 2-9 years, who received general anesthesia for various operative procedures in our hospital between January 2008 and October 2011. The incidence of EA was assessed. Difficult parental-separation behavior, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions, and adverse events were also recorded. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to determine the factors associated with EA. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. One hundred and sixteen children (43.3%) had EA, with an average duration of 9.1 ± 6.6 minutes. EA associated with adverse events occurred in 35 agitated children (30.2%). From univariate analysis, factors associated with EA were difficult parental-separation behavior, preschool age (2 - 5 years), and general anesthesia with sevoflurane. However, difficult parental-separation behavior, and preschool age were the only factors significantly associated with EA in the multiple Logistic regression analysis with OR = 3.091 (95%CI: 1.688, 5.465, P < 0.01) and OR = 1.965 (95%CI: 1.112, 3.318, P = 0.024), respectively. The present study indicated that the incidence of EA was high in PACU. Preschool children and difficult parental-separation behavior were the predictive factors of emergence agitation.

  16. A retrospective comparison of dental treatment under general anesthesia on children with and without mental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, M E; Ozmen, B; Koyuturk, A E; Tokay, U

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the properties of the dental procedures performed on children with dental problems under general anesthesia and compared between the patterns of dental treatment provided for intellectual disability and non-cooperate healthy child. In this retrospective study, the records of patients between the ages of 4 and 18 who were treated under general anesthesia were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: Those with intellectual disability and healthy patients who had difficulty cooperating. A statistical analysis of the mean standard deviation was conducted with a focus on two factors: Age and dental treatment methods. In this study, it was observed that restorative treatment and tooth extraction was generally higher in intellectual disability children than in their healthy children. When evaluating the health status of teeth, the value of decayed missing and filled teeth (dmf-t) was observed to be close in healthy and intellectual disability individuals in the 4-6 age groups; it was higher in individuals with intellectual disability in the 7-12 age groups. There was no significant difference in terms of periodontal treatment and fissure sealants in the 12-18 age groups. By comparing the different patient groups who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, both the number of teeth extracted and DMF-T indices were higher in the disabled group. Therefore, especially more efforts should be made at encouraging these patients to visit the dentist earlier and receive primary preventive care.

  17. The efficacy of IntraFlow intraosseous injection as a primary anesthesia technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Todd; Glickman, Gerald; Spears, Robert; He, Jianing

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intraosseous injection and inferior alveolar (IA) nerve block in anesthetizing mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Thirty human subjects were randomly assigned to receive either intraosseous injection using the IntraFlow system (Pro-Dex Inc, Santa Ana, CA) or IA block as the primary anesthesia method. Pulpal anesthesia was evaluated via electric pulp testing at 4-minute intervals for 20 minutes. Two consecutive 80/80 readings were considered successful pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia success or failure was recorded and groups compared. Intraosseous injection provided successful anesthesia in 13 of 15 subjects (87%). The IA block provided successful anesthesia in 9 of 15 subjects (60%). Although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2148), the results of this preliminary study indicate that the IntraFlow system can be used as the primary anesthesia method in teeth with irreversible pulpitis to achieve predictable pulpal anesthesia.

  18. Effect of regional anesthesia on the success rate of external cephalic version: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzinger, Katherine R; Harper, Lorie M; Tuuli, Methodius G; Macones, George A; Colditz, Graham A

    2011-11-01

    To estimate whether the use of regional anesthesia is associated with increased success of external cephalic version. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and clinical trial registries. Electronic databases were searched from 1966 through April 2011 for published, randomized controlled trials in the English language comparing regional anesthesia with no regional anesthesia for external cephalic version. The primary outcome was external cephalic version success. Secondary outcomes included cesarean delivery, maternal discomfort, and adverse events. Pooled risk ratios (relative risk) were calculated using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran's Q statistic and quantified using the I Z method. Six randomized controlled trials met criteria for study inclusion. Regional anesthesia was associated with a higher external cephalic version success rate compared with intravenous or no analgesia (59.7% compared with 37.6%; pooled relative risk 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-1.93). This significant association persisted when the data were stratified by type of regional anesthesia (spinal compared with epidural). The number needed to treat with regional anesthesia to achieve one additional successful external cephalic version was five. There was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity (P=.32, I Z=14.9%) or publication bias (Harbord test P=.78). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of cesarean delivery comparing regional anesthesia with intravenous or no analgesia (48.4% compared with 59.3%; pooled relative risk 0.80; 95% CI 0.55-1.17). Adverse events were rare and not significantly different between the two groups. Regional anesthesia is associated with a higher success rate of external cephalic version.

  19. Anesthesia machine checkout and room setup: a randomized, single-blind, comparison of two teaching modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spofford, Christina M; Bayman, Emine O; Szeluga, Debra J; From, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Novel methods for teaching are needed to enhance the efficiency of academic anesthesia departments as well as provide approaches to learning that are aligned with current trends and advances in technology. A video was produced that taught the key elements of anesthesia machine checkout and room set up. Novice learners were randomly assigned to receive either the new video format or traditional lecture-based format for this topic during their regularly scheduled lecture series. Primary outcome was the difference in written examination score before and after teaching between the two groups. Secondary outcome was the satisfaction score of the trainees in the two groups. Forty-two students assigned to the video group and 36 students assigned to the lecture group completed the study. Students in each group similar interest in anesthesia, pre-test scores, post-test scores, and final exam scores. The median posttest to pretest difference was greater in the video groups (3.5 (3.0-5.0) vs 2.5 (2.0-3.0), for video and lecture groups respectively, p 0.002). Despite improved test scores, students reported higher satisfaction the traditional, lecture-based format (22.0 (18.0-24.0) vs 24.0 (20.0-28.0), for video and lecture groups respectively, p students in the video-based teaching group, however students rated traditional, live lectures higher than newer video-based teaching.

  20. Ventilator waveforms on anesthesia machine: a simple tool for intraoperative mapping of phrenic nerve and mid-cervical roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, George; Papagrigoriou, Eirini; Sindou, Marc

    2015-12-01

    A crucial aspect of surgery on the supraclavicular region, lateral neck, and mid-cervical vertebral region is the identification and sparing of the phrenic nerve and cervical (C4) root that are responsible for diaphragmatic innervation. Therefore intraoperative mapping of these nerve structures can be useful for difficult cases. Electrical stimulation with simultaneous observation of the ventilator waveforms of the anesthesia machine provides an effective method for the precise intraoperative mapping of these structures. In the literature, there is only one publication reporting the use of one of the waveforms (capnography) for this purpose. Capnography and pressure-time waveforms, two mandatory curves in anesthesiological monitoring, were studied under electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve (one patient) and the C4 root (eight patients). The aim was to detect changes that would verify diaphragmatic contraction. No modifications in anesthesia or surgery and no additional maneuvers were required. In all patients, stimulation was followed by identifiable changes in the two waveforms, compatible with diaphragmatic contraction: acute reduction in amplitude on capnography and repetitive saw-like elevations on pressure-time curve. Frequency of patterns on pressure-time curve coincided with the frequency of stimulation; therefore the two recordings were complementary. This simple method proved effective in identifying the neural structures responsible for diaphragmatic function. We therefore suggest that it should be employed in the various types of surgery where these structures are at risk.

  1. Anestesia venosa total (AVT em lactente com doença de Werdnig-Hoffmann: relato de caso Anestesia venosa total (AVT en lactante con enfermedad de Werdnig-Hoffmann: relato de caso Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA in an infant with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Otavio Esteves

    2010-10-01

    ías. Tal vez, ese paciente tenga más de 12 meses y entonces la definición de lactante sería inadecuada. El segundo y el más importante de mis cuestionamientos, versa sobre la técnica usada y sobre el título del artículo. En el título, se usó la expresión "anestesia venosa total", pero en el relato se dijo que, además del propofol y del remifentanil, la anestesia se mantuvo con oxígeno y N2O. Si fue usado un gas con propiedades anestésicas (N2O, no sería correcto clasificar esa técnica como venosa total. Además, él cita el artículo de Crawford y col. ², que definió dosis de remifentanil para la intubación en niños. Ese estudio fue realizado utilizando la oxigenación en la concentración de 100%, porque los autores probablemente entienden que la adición de los gases con propiedades anestésicas interferiría en los resultados obtenidosI read the article "Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIA in a Patient with Werdnig-Hoffman Disease. Case Report", of Resende et al.1, published in this journal with great interest. First, I would like to congratulate the authors for their initiative. However, two points called my attention. The first one refers to the definition of infant, which comprehends the period from 1 to 12 months of age. From 12 months on, it defines preschooler or just child. In the article, the author states the age of the patient as 1 year old, but he does not specify months or days. Probably, this patient has more than 12 months of age and, therefore, calling him an infant is inappropriate. The second and most important point refers to the technique used and to the title of the article. In the title, the expression "total intravenous anesthesia" was used, but in the report it was stated that besides propofol and remifentanil anesthesia was maintained with oxygen and N2O. If a gas with anesthetic properties (N2O was used, it would not be correct to call this technique total intravenous anesthesia. Besides, he mentioned the article of Crawford et

  2. Providing intraosseous anesthesia with minimal invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, K M

    1994-08-01

    A new variation of intraosseous anesthesia--crestal anesthesia--that is rapid, site-specific and minimally invasive is presented. The technique uses alveolar crest nutrient canals for anesthetic delivery without penetrating either bone or periodontal ligament.

  3. An Observational Assessment of Anesthesia Capacity in Madagascar as a Prerequisite to the Development of a National Surgical Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Linden S; Ravelojaona, Vaonandianina A; Rakotoarison, Hasiniaina N; Herbert, Alison; Bruno, Emily; Close, Kristin L; Andean, Vanessa; Andriamanjato, Hery H; Shrime, Mark G; White, Michelle C

    2017-06-01

    The global lack of anesthesia capacity is well described, but country-specific data are needed to provide country-specific solutions. We aimed to assess anesthesia capacity in Madagascar as part of the development of a Ministry of Health national surgical plan. As part of a nationwide surgical safety quality improvement project, we surveyed 19 of 22 regional hospitals, representing surgical facilities caring for 75% of the total population. The assessment was divided into 3 areas: anesthesia workforce density, infrastructure and equipment, and medications. Data were obtained by semistructured interviews with Ministry of Health officials, hospital directors, technical directors, statisticians, pharmacists, and anesthesia providers and through on-site observations. Interview questions were adapted from the World Health Organization Situational Analysis Tool and the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists International Standards for Safe Practice of Anaesthesia. Additional data on workforce density were collected from the 3 remaining regions so that workforce density data are representative of all 22 regions. Anesthesia physician workforce density is 0.26 per 100,000 population and 0.19 per 100,000 outside of the capital region. Less than 50% of hospitals surveyed reported having a reliable electricity and oxygen supply. The majority of anesthesia providers work without pulse oximetry (52%) or a functioning vaporizer (52%). All the hospitals surveyed had very basic pediatric supplies, and none had a pediatric pulse oximetry probe. Ketamine is universally available but more than 50% of hospitals lack access to opioids. None of the 19 regional hospitals surveyed was able to completely meet the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists' standards for monitoring. Improving anesthesia care is complex. Capacity assessment is a first step that would enable progress to be tracked against specific targets. In Madagascar, scale-up of the anesthesia

  4. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  5. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  6. Special Care Dentistry in a Patient with Prader-Willi Syndrome through the Use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment under General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Torres, Caio Vinícius Gonçalves; Kussaba, Sérgio Takashi; Bantim, Yasmin Comoti Vita; de Oliveira, Roberta de Barros Antunes Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome described in 1956 has a genetic origin, affecting both genders, varying in presence and intensity from individual to individual. A precocious diagnosis, before the manifestation of symptoms, has brought some improvement in the quality of life of the carriers in the last years. The objective of this case report was to describe the treatment realized in a 3-year-old boy who presented grade II obesity, difficulty of locomotion, hypotonia, and history of cardiopathy. A dental treatment under general anesthesia was defined, allowing an oral adequation in a single section, in which it was planned the extraction of the element 74 and atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique in the other teeth. The precocious intervention in this 3-year-old patient by the therapy realized with ART under general anesthesia was done with success, avoiding unnecessary extractions, preserving dental elements, and maintaining the oral cavity in adequate function.

  7. Special Care Dentistry in a Patient with Prader–Willi Syndrome through the Use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Vinícius Gonçalves Roman-Torres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader–Willi syndrome described in 1956 has a genetic origin, affecting both genders, varying in presence and intensity from individual to individual. A precocious diagnosis, before the manifestation of symptoms, has brought some improvement in the quality of life of the carriers in the last years. The objective of this case report was to describe the treatment realized in a 3-year-old boy who presented grade II obesity, difficulty of locomotion, hypotonia, and history of cardiopathy. A dental treatment under general anesthesia was defined, allowing an oral adequation in a single section, in which it was planned the extraction of the element 74 and atraumatic restorative treatment (ART technique in the other teeth. The precocious intervention in this 3-year-old patient by the therapy realized with ART under general anesthesia was done with success, avoiding unnecessary extractions, preserving dental elements, and maintaining the oral cavity in adequate function.

  8. Outcomes following implementation of a pediatric procedural sedation guide for referral to general anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwell, Jocelyn R; Marupudi, Neelima K; Gupta, Rohan V; Travers, Curtis D; McCracken, Courtney E; Williamson, Julie L; Stockwell, Jana A; Fortenberry, James D; Couloures, Kevin; Cravero, Joseph; Kamat, Pradip P

    2016-06-01

    Guidelines for referral of children to general anesthesia (GA) to complete MRI studies are lacking. We devised a pediatric procedural sedation guide to determine whether a pediatric procedural sedation guide would decrease serious adverse events and decrease failed sedations requiring rescheduling with GA. We constructed a consensus-based sedation guide by combining a retrospective review of reasons for referral of children to GA (n = 221) with published risk factors associated with the inability to complete the MRI study with sedation. An interrupted time series analysis of 11 530 local sedation records from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium between July 2008 and March 2013, adjusted for case-mix differences in the pre- and postsedation guide cohorts, evaluated whether a sedation guide resulted in decreased severe adverse events (SAE) and failed sedation rates. A significant increase in referrals to GA following implementation of a sedation guide occurred (P pediatric procedural sedation services. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Exposure to general anesthesia and risk of alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seitz Dallas P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is common among older adults and leads to significant disability. Volatile anesthetic gases administered during general anesthesia (GA have been hypothesized to be a risk factor for the development of AD. The objective of this study is to systematically review the association between exposure to GA and risk of AD. Methods We searched electronic databases including MEDLINE, Embase, and Google scholar for observational studies examining the association between exposure to GA and risk of AD. We examined study quality using a modified version of the Newcastle-Ottawa risk of bias assessment for observational studies. We used standard meta-analytic techniques to estimate pooled odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were undertaken to evaluate the robustness of the findings. Results A total of 15 case-control studies were included in the review. No cohort studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. There was variation in the methodological quality of included studies. There was no significant association between any exposure to GA and risk of AD (pooled OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.93 - 1.19, Z = 0.80, p = 0.43. There was also no significant association between GA and risk of AD in several subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions A history of exposure to GA is not associated with an increased risk of AD although there are few high-quality studies in this area. Prospective cohort studies with long-term follow-up or randomized controlled trials are required to further understand the association between GA and AD.

  10. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad ...

  11. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental ... evaluate patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post- ...

  12. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  13. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety ...

  14. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad ...

  15. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia ...

  16. Pediatric ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, David A; Everett, Lucinda L

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric patients often undergo anesthesia for ambulatory procedures. This article discusses several common preoperative dilemmas, including whether to postpone anesthesia when a child has an upper respiratory infection, whether to test young women for pregnancy, which children require overnight admission for apnea monitoring, and the effectiveness of nonpharmacological techniques for reducing anxiety. Medication issues covered include the risks of anesthetic agents in children with undiagnosed weakness, the use of remifentanil for tracheal intubation, and perioperative dosing of rectal acetaminophen. The relative merits of caudal and dorsal penile nerve block for pain after circumcision are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil; Waterhouse, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Risk in pediatric anesthesia can be conveniently classified as minor or major. Major morbidity includes cardiac arrest, brain damage and death. Minor morbidity can be assessed by clinical audits with small patient samples. Major morbidity is rare. It is best assessed by very large clinical studies and by review of closed malpractice claims. Both minor and major morbidity occur most commonly in infants and children under three, especially those with severe co-morbidities. Knowledge of risk profiles in pediatric anesthesia is a starting point for the reduction of risk. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur sahin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia procedure in obesity were assessed with current literatures. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 234-236

  19. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  20. Optimal Technique in Cardiac Anesthesia Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Svircevic, V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate fast-track cardiac anesthesia techniques and investigate their impact on postoperative mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The following topics will be discussed in the thesis. (1.) Is fast track cardiac anesthesia a safe technique for cardiac surgery? (2.) Does thoracic epidural anesthesia have an effect on mortality and morbidity after cardiac surgery? (3.) Does thoracic epidural anesthesia have an effect on quality of life after cardiac surgery? ...

  1. Anestesia venosa total para laringectomia parcial em paciente na 28ª semana de gestação: relato de caso Anestesia venosa total para laringectomía parcial en paciente en la 28ª semana de embarazo: relato de caso Total intravenous anesthesia for partial laryngectomy in 28 weeks pregnant patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Costa

    2005-04-01

    dolor y hemodinámicamente estable siendo entonces encaminada a la sala de recuperación pos-anestésica. CONCLUSIONES: La anestesia venosa total con propofol y remifentanil proporcionó estabilidad hemodinámica para la madre y el feto, con un suave y precoz despertar.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Anesthesia for pregnant patients is a challenge to the anesthesiologist because of the risks for mother and fetus. There are many complications described by the literature, such as fetal malformations, premature birth, maternal hemodynamic instability and even fetal death. The objective here is to show a 28 weeks pregnant patient submitted to partial laryngectomy under total intravenous general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and cisatracurium. CASE REPORT: Patient 29 years, 59 kg, primigravida of 28 weeks with previous diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma close to the right vocal chord, scheduled for laryngectomy. Initial monitoring consisted of noninvasive and invasive blood pressure, cardioscopy, oxicapnography and continuous cardiotocography accomplished by the obstetrician. Venous puncture in right and left arm with 16G and 18G catheter, respectively. Patient received intravenous midazolam (1 mg, cefazolin (1 g, metoclopramide (10 mg and dipirone (1 g. Patient was oxygenated with 100% O2 under mask for 3 minutes and intravenous anesthesia was induced with propofol in controlled target infusion (3 µg.mL-1 and continuous remifentanil (1 µg.kg-1 in bolus and 0.2 µg.kg-1.min-1 for maintenance. Cisatracurium (13 mg was administered for muscle relaxation and tracheal intubation was achieved with 6.5 mm spiral-reinforced cuffed tube. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and remifentanil in infusion pump, in addition to cisatracurium complementation. Fetus was continuously monitored with cardiotocography accomplished and analyzed by the obstetrician. Propofol and remifentanil infusion pumps were turned off at the end of completion and patient woke up 10 minutes later

  2. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving an...

  3. Association Between a Single General Anesthesia Exposure Before Age 36 Months and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Later Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lena S; Li, Guohua; Miller, Tonya L K; Salorio, Cynthia; Byrne, Mary W; Bellinger, David C; Ing, Caleb; Park, Raymond; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Hays, Stephen R; DiMaggio, Charles J; Cooper, Timothy J; Rauh, Virginia; Maxwell, Lynne G; Youn, Ahrim; McGowan, Francis X

    2016-06-07

    Exposure of young animals to commonly used anesthetics causes neurotoxicity including impaired neurocognitive function and abnormal behavior. The potential neurocognitive and behavioral effects of anesthesia exposure in young children are thus important to understand. To examine if a single anesthesia exposure in otherwise healthy young children was associated with impaired neurocognitive development and abnormal behavior in later childhood. Sibling-matched cohort study conducted between May 2009 and April 2015 at 4 university-based US pediatric tertiary care hospitals. The study cohort included sibling pairs within 36 months in age and currently 8 to 15 years old. The exposed siblings were healthy at surgery/anesthesia. Neurocognitive and behavior outcomes were prospectively assessed with retrospectively documented anesthesia exposure data. A single exposure to general anesthesia during inguinal hernia surgery in the exposed sibling and no anesthesia exposure in the unexposed sibling, before age 36 months. The primary outcome was global cognitive function (IQ). Secondary outcomes included domain-specific neurocognitive functions and behavior. A detailed neuropsychological battery assessed IQ and domain-specific neurocognitive functions. Parents completed validated, standardized reports of behavior. Among the 105 sibling pairs, the exposed siblings (mean age, 17.3 months at surgery/anesthesia; 9.5% female) and the unexposed siblings (44% female) had IQ testing at mean ages of 10.6 and 10.9 years, respectively. All exposed children received inhaled anesthetic agents, and anesthesia duration ranged from 20 to 240 minutes, with a median duration of 80 minutes. Mean IQ scores between exposed siblings (scores: full scale = 111; performance = 108; verbal = 111) and unexposed siblings (scores: full scale = 111; performance = 107; verbal = 111) were not statistically significantly different. Differences in mean IQ scores between sibling pairs were

  4. Isiris: A Novel Method of Removing Foreign Bodies from the Lower Urinary Tract to Avoid Unnecessary Hospitalization and Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter Mark; Harbias, Aman; Robinson, Richard; Palmer, Anne; Grey, Benjamin Robin

    2016-01-01

    Polyembolokoilamania refers to the practice of inserting foreign bodies (FBs) into natural orifices. A FB within the urethra is a relatively rare phenomenon with 646 cases recorded last year in the United Kingdom. Management of these patients presents technical challenges and complexities because of underlying psychiatric disorders that are often associated. This case illustrates a novel way of removing FBs from the genitourinary tract, requiring less resources, preventing hospital admission, and attempts to break the cycle of behavior, leading to recurrent attendance with polyembolokoilamania. A 38-year-old Caucasian male prisoner, with psychiatric history presented to the emergency department (ED) with a history of inserting FBs into his urethra on 12 different occasions over a 6-week period. Of these 12 attendances, 3 resulted in admission and 2 required emergency intervention in theater under general anesthesia. After the third attendance in 5 days, it was decided to use Isiris™, a single-use flexible cystoscopy device with a built-in ureteral stent grasper, to remove the FBs and check the integrity of the urethra. The procedure was performed within the ED, without the need for admission to a ward bed or general anesthesia. Furthermore, only two members of staff were required to remove all of the urethral FBs. Isiris, although marketed as a stent removal device, enabled us to remove all the patient's FBs in one procedure. Isiris is an easy to use device, similar to a flexible cystoscope, that a specialist nurse or resident would be familiar using. It allows efficient and safe removal of lower urinary tract FBs, even out of hours. It requires minimal staffing support and can be done in the ED. It has the potential to reduce associated sequela of urethral polyembolokoilamania, saving resources while preserving the availability of the emergency theater.

  5. Hand Surgery: Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Surgery Anesthesia Email to a friend * required ...

  6. A cohort study of the incidence and risk factors for negative behavior changes in children after general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stargatt, Robyn; Davidson, Andrew J; Huang, Grace H; Czarnecki, Caroline; Gibson, Margaret A; Stewart, Stephanie A; Jamsen, Kris

    2006-08-01

    Hospitalization and anesthesia can have a substantial psychological impact on children, which may be manifested by negative behavioral change. The primary aims of this study were to estimate the incidence of negative behavior change postanesthesia in a large cohort of children, and to identify the possible risk factors. One thousand two hundred and fifty children aged from 3 to 12 years scheduled for anesthesia for a variety of procedures were enrolled. The absolute version of the Vernon Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ) was used to assess behavior change at 3 and 30 days postanesthesia. Deterioration in seven or more items of behavior was defined to be a significant negative behavior change. Demographic data, anesthesia details, type and extent of preparation, details of procedure and length of hospitalization were recorded. Child temperament, child anxiety and parental anxiety were also measured. Twenty-four percent of children had significant negative behavior change at day 3 and 16% at day 30. After logistic regression, factors associated with significant negative behavior change at 3 days were increased parental state anxiety, younger age, overnight admission, lower birth order and preparation via having a discussion with the anesthetist. At day 30, longer hospitalization, younger age, reading the anesthesia preparation book and a previous difficult anesthesia experience were associated with significant negative behavior change. Also at day 30, reading the anesthesia preparation book was strongly associated with negative behavior change in children having short procedures, but not longer procedures. However, at both 3 and 30 days, the amount of variability explained by factors included in the models was low. Significant negative behavior change can occur in children after anesthesia. It is difficult to precisely predict in which children this will occur, however, some individual, family and procedural variables are associated with significant

  7. Association of Hospital-level Neuraxial Anesthesia Use for Hip Fracture Surgery with Outcomes: A Population-based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Daniel I; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Huang, Allen; Bryson, Gregory L; van Walraven, Carl

    2018-03-01

    There is consistent and significant variation in neuraxial anesthesia use for hip fracture surgery across jurisdictions. We measured the association of hospital-level utilization of neuraxial anesthesia, independent of patient-level use, with 30-day survival (primary outcome) and length of stay and costs (secondary outcomes). We conducted a population-based cohort study using linked administrative data in Ontario, Canada. We identified all hip fracture patients more than 65 yr of age from 2002 to 2014. For each patient, we measured the proportion of hip fracture patients at their hospital who received neuraxial anesthesia in the year before their surgery. Multilevel, multivariable regression was used to measure the association of log-transformed hospital-level neuraxial anesthetic-use proportion with outcomes, controlling for patient-level anesthesia type and confounders. Of 107,317 patients, 57,080 (53.2%) had a neuraxial anesthetic; utilization varied from 0 to 100% between hospitals. In total, 9,122 (8.5%) of patients died within 30 days of surgery. Survival independently improved as hospital-level neuraxial use increased (P = 0.009). Primary and sensitivity analyses demonstrated that most of the survival benefit was realized with increase in hospital-level neuraxial use above 20 to 25%; there did not appear to be a substantial increase in survival above this point. No significant associations between hospital neuraxial anesthesia-use and other outcomes existed. Hip fracture surgery patients at hospitals that use more than 20 to 25% neuraxial anesthesia have improved survival independent of patient-level anesthesia type and other confounders. The underlying causal mechanism for this association requires a prospective study to guide improvements in perioperative care and outcomes of hip fracture patients. An online visual overview is available for this article at http://links.lww.com/ALN/B634.

  8. Anestesia para ventriculostomia por via endoscópica para tratamento de hidrocefalia: relato de casos Anestesia para ventriculostomía por vía endoscópica para tratamiento de hidrocefalia: relato de casos Anesthesia for endoscopic ventriculostomy for the treatment of hydrocephalus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Wolff Valadares

    2007-02-01

    : La tercero-ventriculostomía presenta una baja incidencia de complicaciones incluso en pacientes con menos de 24 meses, siempre que sean adoptadas las técnicas anestésicas y quirúrgicas adecuadas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy is becoming routine among neurosurgical pediatric procedures. However, reports on anesthesia for children undergoing such procedures are rare. The aim of this series of cases was to demonstrate the precautions that should be taken and efficacy of the method used. CASE REPORT: Thirty-eight children younger than 2 years, who underwent neuroendoscopic third ventriculostomy for the treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus from 1999 to 2004 at the Biocor Instituto were evaluated retrospectively. The diagnosis, comorbidities, age, weight, anesthetic technique, monitoring, and intra- and postoperative complications were evaluated. Patients, ages 1 week to 20 months, presented obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to compression of the aqueduct of different etiologies. In thirty-five children anesthesia was induced by inhalational anesthetics and in 3 by intravenous anesthetics. Thirty-four patients were monitored with electrocardiogram, pulse oxymeter, capnograph, and esophageal thermometer, while in 4 children it included also continuous invasive blood pressure monitoring. Fifteen patients had balanced maintenance anesthesia with fentanyl and isoflurane, and 23 children received inhalational isoflurane. Thirty-five children were extubated after the procedure in the surgical room and three in the ICU. Six patients were transferred to the ICU after extubation. The following complications were observed: intraoperative cardiac arrhythmias without hemodynamic repercussions (6 cases; two patients presented intraoperative bleeding, but in only one the placement of an external derivation was necessary. The postoperative complications included: vomiting (6, fever (4, seizures (2, laryngeal spasm (1, and stridor (1. CONCLUSIONS

  9. Evaluation of prostaglandin D2 as a CSF leak marker: implications in safe epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondabolu S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirish Kondabolu, Rishimani Adsumelli, Joy Schabel, Peter Glass, Srinivas PentyalaDepartment of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USABackground: It is accepted that there is a severe risk of dural puncture in epidural anesthesia. Of major concern to anesthesiologists is unintentional spinal block. Reliable identification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the aspirate is crucial for safe epidural anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin D2 could be clinically used as a marker for the detection of CSF traces.Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent, CSF was obtained from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, and blood, urine, and saliva were obtained from normal subjects and analyzed for prostaglandin D2 (PGD. CSF (n=5 samples were diluted with local anesthetic (bupivacaine, normal saline and blood in the ratios of 1:5 and 1:10. PGD levels in the CSF samples were analyzed with a PGD-Methoxime (MOX EIA Kit (Cayman Chemicals, MI. This assay is based on the conversion of PGD to a stable derivative, which is analyzed with antiserum specific for PGD-MOX. Results: Different concentrations of pure PGD-MOX conjugate were analyzed by EIA and a standard curve was derived. PGD levels in CSF and CSF with diluents were determined and the values were extrapolated onto the standard curve. Our results show a well-defined correlation for the presence of PGD both in straight CSF samples and in diluted CSF (dilution factor of 1:5 and 1:10. Conclusion: Prostaglandin D2 was reliably identified in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when diluted with local anesthetic, saline, and serum, and can be used as a marker to identify the presence of CSF in epidural aspirates.Keywords: epidural, cerebrospinal fluid, leak, marker, prostaglandin D2

  10. Comparison of 3 different methods of anesthesia before transrectal prostate biopsy: a prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oebek, C.; Oezkan, B.; Tunc, B.; Can, G.; Yalcin, V.; Solok, V.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Periprostatic nerve block (PNB) is the most common anesthesia technique used before prostate biopsy. However, needle punctures for anesthetic infiltration may be painful and cause higher infectious complications. We assessed whether addition of rectal lidocaine gel would improve its efficacy. We also investigated the efficacy and safety of tramadol, a codeine derivative, as a noninvasive method. Materials and Methods: A total of 300 patients who underwent prostate biopsies were randomized into 4 groups of controls, PNB, perianal/intrarectal lidocaine gel plus PNB and tramadol. Pain was assessed with a numeric analog scale. Results: Each group consisted of 75 patients, and there was a statistically significant difference among pain scores (p = 0.001). Mean pain scores were 4.63 for controls, 2.57 for PNB, 2.03 for infiltration plus gel group and 3.11 for tramadol. Pain and discomfort were least in PNB plus gel arm. The difference of pain score between PNB alone and tramadol group did not reach statistical significance. Infectious complications were higher in the combination group, whereas there were no complications with tramadol. Conclusions: Any form of analgesia/anesthesia was superior to none. The combination of PNB plus gel provided significantly better analgesia compared to PNB alone or tramadol. If this can be duplicated in other trials, the combination may be accepted as the new gold standard of anesthesia for prostate biopsy. The efficacy of tramadol was similar to that of PNB, and was free of complications. Therefore, tramadol may have a role before prostate biopsy, which needs to be explored. (author)

  11. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in general surgery, anesthesia and ... of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of ...

  12. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Gamal T; Lasheen, Ahmed E

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery and analgesia, complications as well as patient and surgeon satisfaction. A total of 90 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, between January 2010 and May 2011, were randomized into three equal groups to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum under segmental thoracic (TSA group) or conventional lumbar (LSA group) spinal anesthesia or general anesthesia (GA group). To achieve a T3 sensory level we used (hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg, and fentanyl 25 mg at L2/L3) for LSAgroup, and (hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg, and fentanyl 25 mg at T10/T11) for TSAgroup. Propofol, fentanyl, atracurium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA group. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery and analgesia, complications as well as patient and surgeon satisfaction were compared between the three groups. All procedures were completed laparoscopically by the allocated method of anesthesia with no anesthetic conversions. The time for the blockade to reach T3 level, intraoperative hypotensive and bradycardic events and vasopressor use were significantly lower in (TSA group) than in (LSA group). Postoperative pain scores as assessed throughout any time, postoperative right shoulder pain and hospital stay was lower for both (TSA group) and (LSA group) compared with (GA group). The higher degree of patients satisfaction scores were recorded in patients under segmental TSA. The present study not only confirmed that both segmental TSA and conventional

  13. Circuit Analysis of a Drosophila Dopamine Type 2 Receptor That Supports Anesthesia-Resistant Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz-Kornehl, Sabrina; Schwärzel, Martin

    2016-07-27

    Dopamine is central to reinforcement processing and exerts this function in species ranging from humans to fruit flies. It can do so via two different types of receptors (i.e., D1 or D2) that mediate either augmentation or abatement of cellular cAMP levels. Whereas D1 receptors are known to contribute to Drosophila aversive odor learning per se, we here show that D2 receptors are specific for support of a consolidated form of odor memory known as anesthesia-resistant memory. By means of genetic mosaicism, we localize this function to Kenyon cells, the mushroom body intrinsic neurons, as well as GABAergic APL neurons and local interneurons of the antennal lobes, suggesting that consolidated anesthesia-resistant memory requires widespread dopaminergic modulation within the olfactory circuit. Additionally, dopaminergic neurons themselves require D2R, suggesting a critical role in dopamine release via its recognized autoreceptor function. Considering the dual role of dopamine in balancing memory acquisition (proactive function of dopamine) and its "forgetting" (retroactive function of dopamine), our analysis suggests D2R as central player of either process. Dopamine provides different information; while it mediates reinforcement during the learning act (proactive function), it balances memory performance between two antithetic processes thereafter (retroactive function) (i.e., forgetting and augmentation). Such bidirectional design can also be found at level of dopamine receptors, where augmenting D1 and abating D2 receptors are engaged to balance cellular cAMP levels. Here, we report that consolidated anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM), but not other concomitant memory phases, are sensitive to bidirectional dopaminergic signals. By means of genetic mosaicism, we identified widespread dopaminergic modulation within the olfactory circuit that suggests nonredundant and reiterating functions of D2R in support of ARM. Our results oppose ARM to its concomitant memory phases

  14. Implementation of an Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, James R; Ritter, Melody J

    2011-01-01

    During the administration of anesthesia, the anesthesia provider has historically created a paper record, charted manually, that included extensive patient care-related data (vital signs, other parameters, etc) and commentaries. DocuSys, a proprietary anesthesia information management system (AIMS), creates an electronic version of the anesthesia record and provides additional information. It electronically captures data from clinical monitors and other sources, including scheduling applications and laboratory computers. The AIMS facilitates chart entries such as drug doses and case narratives. Benefits of an AIMS include improved legibility of the anesthesia record and greater efficiency in documentation efforts. Use of the AIMS assists the practitioner with decision support logic, such as the timing of antibiotic administration and the inclusion of legally required documentation. Upon case completion, the AIMS data are immediately available to other information systems, such as billing and medical records. Data can be made available from a single case or, more important, from thousands of cases to analyze variables such as efficiency of services, adherence to best practices, patient outcomes, and clinical research. The AIMS was deployed at the main campus of the Ochsner Health System on March 26, 2009. In this article, we discuss the issues involved in the AIMS implementation process: the successes, surprises, and continued challenges.

  15. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  16. Update on complications in pediatric anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni de Francisci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Complications in pediatric anesthesia can happen, even in our modern hospitals with the most advanced equipment and skilled anesthesiologists. It is important, albeit in a tranquil and reassuring way, to inform parents of the possibility of complications and, in general, of the anesthetic risks. This is especially imperative when speaking to the parents of children who will be operated on for minor procedures: in our experience, they tend to think that the anesthesia will be a light anesthesia without risks. Often the surgeons tell them that the operation is very simple without stressing the fact that it will be done under general anesthesia which is identical to the one we give for major operations. Different is the scenario for the parents of children who are affected by malignant neoplasms: in these cases they already know that the illness is serious. They have this tremendous burden and we choose not to add another one by discussing anesthetic risks, so we usually go along with the examination of the child without bringing up the possibility of complications, unless there is some specific problem such as a mediastinal mass.

  17. A thalamacortical feedback model to explain EEG during anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi , Meysam; Hutt , Axel

    2014-01-01

    General anaesthesia (GA) is a medical procedure which aims to achieve analgesia, amnesia, immobility and skeletal muscle relaxation. Although GA is commonly used in medical care for patients undergoing surgery, its precise underlying mechanisms and the molecular action of anaesthetic agents (AA) remain to be elucidated. A wide variety of drugs are used in modern anaesthetic practice and it has been observed that for many AAs, during the transition from consciousness to unconscious- ness, the ...

  18. Optimization of a Pain Model: Effects of Body Temperature and Anesthesia on Bladder Nociception in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Katelyn E.; Stratton, Jarred M.; DeBerry, Jennifer J.; Kolber, Benedict J.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating urological condition that is resistant to treatment and poorly understood. To determine novel molecular treatment targets and to elucidate the contribution of the nervous system to IC/BPS, many rodent bladder pain models have been developed. In this study we evaluated the effects of anesthesia induction and temperature variation in a mouse model of bladder pain known as urinary bladder distension (UBD). In this model compressed air is used to distend the bladder to distinct pressures while electrodes record the reflexive visceromotor response (VMR) from the overlying abdominal muscle. Two isoflurane induction models are commonly used before UBD: a short method lasting approximately 30 minutes and a long method lasting approximately 90 minutes. Animals were anesthetized with one of the methods then put through three sets of graded bladder distensions. Distensions performed following the short anesthesia protocol were significantly different from one another despite identical testing parameters; this same effect was not observed when the long anesthesia protocol was used. In order to determine the effect of temperature on VMRs, animals were put through three graded distension sets at 37.5 (normal mouse body temperature), 35.5, and 33.5°C. Distensions performed at 33.5 and 35.5°C were significantly lower than those performed at 37.5°C. Additionally, Western blot analysis revealed significantly smaller increases in spinal levels of phosphorylated extracellular-signal regulated kinase 2 (pERK2) following bladder distension in animals whose body temperature was maintained at 33.5°C as opposed to 37.5°C. These results highlight the significance of the dynamic effects of anesthesia on pain-like changes and the importance of close monitoring of temperature while performing UBD. For successful interpretation of VMRs and translation to human disease, body temperature should be maintained at 37.5

  19. Meningitis tras anestesia espinal Meningitis after a spinal anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Vázquez-Martínez; F. Castro; G. Illodo; E. Freiré; M. A. Camba

    2008-01-01

    La meningitis post-punción es una importante complicación de la anestesia espinal. Describimos el caso de un varón de cuarenta y seis años que ingresó para tratamiento quirúrgico de una hernia umbilical, la cirugía se realizó bajo anestesia intradural. Tras la intervención el paciente comenzó con un cuadro clínico compatible con meningitis, que se confirmó tras examen del líquido cefalorraquídeo. Se trató con antibióticos a pesar de la no identificación de gérmenes, siendo la evolución favora...

  20. Pain Experience and Behavior Management in Pediatric Dentistry: A Comparison between Traditional Local Anesthesia and the Wand Computerized Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garret-Bernardin, Annelyse; Cantile, Tiziana; D'Antò, Vincenzo; Galanakis, Alexandros; Fauxpoint, Gabriel; Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio; De Rosa, Sara; Vallogini, Giulia; Romeo, Umberto; Galeotti, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the pain experience and behavior during dental injection, using the Wand computerized delivery system versus conventional local anesthesia in children and adolescents. Methods. An observational crossover split mouth study was performed on 67 patients (aged 7 to 15 years), requiring local anesthesia for dental treatments in both sides of the dental arch. Patients received both types of injections in two separate appointments, one with the use of a Computer Delivery System (the Wand STA system) and one with the traditional syringe. The following data were recorded: pain rating; changes in heart rate; level of collaboration; patient satisfaction. The data were analyzed using ANOVA for quantitative outcomes and nonparametric analysis (Kruskal-Wallis) for qualitative parameters. Results. The use of the Wand system determined significantly lower pain ratings and lower increase of heart rate than the traditional syringe. During injection, the number of patients showing a relaxed behavior was higher with the Wand than with the traditional local anesthesia. The patient level of satisfaction was higher with the Wand compared to the conventional local anesthesia. Conclusions. The Wand system may provide a less painful injection when compared to the conventional local anesthesia and it seemed to be better tolerated with respect to a traditional syringe.

  1. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nandita; Gupta, Sunana; Sharma, Atul; Dar, Mohd Reidwan

    2015-01-01

    Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency.

  2. Pain Experience and Behavior Management in Pediatric Dentistry: A Comparison between Traditional Local Anesthesia and the Wand Computerized Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelyse Garret-Bernardin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pain experience and behavior during dental injection, using the Wand computerized delivery system versus conventional local anesthesia in children and adolescents. Methods. An observational crossover split mouth study was performed on 67 patients (aged 7 to 15 years, requiring local anesthesia for dental treatments in both sides of the dental arch. Patients received both types of injections in two separate appointments, one with the use of a Computer Delivery System (the Wand STA system and one with the traditional syringe. The following data were recorded: pain rating; changes in heart rate; level of collaboration; patient satisfaction. The data were analyzed using ANOVA for quantitative outcomes and nonparametric analysis (Kruskal–Wallis for qualitative parameters. Results. The use of the Wand system determined significantly lower pain ratings and lower increase of heart rate than the traditional syringe. During injection, the number of patients showing a relaxed behavior was higher with the Wand than with the traditional local anesthesia. The patient level of satisfaction was higher with the Wand compared to the conventional local anesthesia. Conclusions. The Wand system may provide a less painful injection when compared to the conventional local anesthesia and it seemed to be better tolerated with respect to a traditional syringe.

  3. Anesthesia and the pediatric cardiac catheterization suite: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer E; Lin, Erica P; Alexy, Ryan; Aronson, Lori A

    2015-02-01

    Advances in technology over the last couple of decades have caused a shift in pediatric cardiac catheterization from a primary focus on diagnostics to innovative therapeutic interventions. These improvements allow patients a wider range of nonsurgical options for treatment of congenital heart disease. However, these therapeutic modalities can entail higher risk in an already complex patient population, compounded by the added challenges inherent to the environment of the cardiac catheterization suite. Anesthesiologists caring for children with congenital heart disease must understand not only the pathophysiology of the disease but also the effects the anesthetics and interventions have on the patient in order to provide a safe perioperative course. It is the aim of this article to review the latest catheterization modalities offered to patients with congenital heart disease, describe the unique challenges presented in the cardiac catheterization suite, list the most common complications encountered during catheterization and finally, to review the literature regarding different anesthetic drugs used in the catheterization lab. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A prospective study on the association between spinal anesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    successful if a bilateral T12 sensory blockage occurred within the first 15 min of injection of intrathecal drug. Parameters ... bupivacaine was longer in the obesity group than in the non-obesity group. ..... in the NO vs O group = T8; T10 - T6 vs.

  5. Topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mritunjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  6. Routine short-term ureteral stent in living donor renal transplantation: introduction of a simple stent removal technique without using anesthesia and cystoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J; Lu, J; Zu, Q; Yang, S; Sun, S; Cai, W; Zhang, L; Zhang, X

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated routine short-time insertion of ureteral stent in living donor renal transplant at a single center. It was easy to remove the stent without cystoscopy and anesthesia. Between October 2007 and July 2010, a single surgeon performed 76 living donor renal transplantations at one institute. All recipients underwent extravesical ureteroneocystostomy with a 2-0 silk suture passed through the venting side hole of the double-J stent into the bladder; a quadruple knot prevented the suture's slippage or distraction from the stent. After removal of the indwelling catheter at 5 days posttransplantation, the 2-0 silk passed with the urinary stream within 72 hours. The double-J stent was removed at 7 to 10 (mean 8.4) days after kidney transplantation by pulling the 2-0 silk out of the urethral orifice without anesthesia or cystoscopy. There was only one case of stenosis, which was resolved by surgery. No patient developed urinary leakage. There were three episodes of urinary tract infection in 70 patients during first 6 months' follow-up. Routine short-term stenting is a safe and effective technique in living donor renal transplantation. Removal of the stent is feasible without cystoscopy or anesthesia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A New Protocol to Evaluate the Effect of Topical Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Thomas; Mojir, Katerina; Svensson, Peter; Pigg, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over clinical experimental study tested the reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of punctuate pain thresholds and self-reported pain on needle penetration. Female subjects without orofacial pain were tested in 2 sessions at 1- to 2-week intervals. The test site was the mucobuccal fold adjacent to the first upper right premolar. Active lidocaine hydrochloride 2% (Dynexan) or placebo gel was applied for 5 minutes, and sensory testing was performed before and after application. The standardized quantitative sensory test protocol included mechanical pain threshold (MPT), pressure pain threshold (PPT), mechanical pain sensitivity (MPS), and needle penetration sensitivity (NPS) assessments. Twenty-nine subjects, mean (SD) age 29.0 (10.2) years, completed the study. Test-retest reliability intraclass correlation coefficient at 10-minute intervals between examinations was MPT 0.69, PPT 0.79, MPS 0.72, and NPS 0.86. A high correlation was found between NPS and MPS (r = 0.84; P < .001), whereas NPS and PPT were not significantly correlated. The study found good to excellent test-retest reliability for all measures. None of the sensory measures detected changes in sensitivity following lidocaine 2% or placebo gel. Electronic von Frey assessments of MPT/MPS on oral mucosa have good validity. PMID:25517548

  8. Regional versus General Anesthesia for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henglong Hu

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness and safety of regional anesthesia (RA and general anesthesia (GA for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL.PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and the Web of Knowledge databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies. After literature screening and data extraction, a meta-analysis was performed using the RevMan 5.3 software.Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs and six non-randomized controlled trials (nRCTs involving 2270 patients were included. Patients receiving RA were associated with shorter operative time (-6.22 min; 95%CI, -9.70 to -2.75; p = 0.0005, lower visual analgesic score on the first and third postoperative day (WMD, -2.62; 95%CI, -3.04 to -2.19; p < 0.00001 WMD, -0.38; 95%CI, -0.58 to -0.18; p = 0.0002, less analgesic requirements (WMD, -59.40 mg; 95%CI, -78.39 to -40.40; p<0.00001, shorter hospitalization (WMD, -0.36d; 95%CI, -0.66 to -0.05; p = 0.02, less blood transfusion (RR, 0.61; 95%CI, 0.41 to 0.93; p = 0.02, fewer modified Clavion-Dindo Grade II (RR, 0.56; 95%CI, 0.37 to 0.83; p = 0.005, Grade III or above postoperative complications (RR, 0.51; 95%CI, 0.33 to 0.77; p = 0.001, and potential benefits of less fever (RR, 0.79; 95%CI, 0.61 to 1.02; p = 0.07, nausea or vomiting (RR, 0.54; 95%CI, 0.20 to 1.46; p = 0.23, whereas more intraoperative hypotension (RR, 3.13; 95%CI, 1.76 to 5.59; p = 0.0001 when compared with patients receiving GA. When nRCTs were excluded, most of the results were stable but the significant differences were no longer detectable in blood transfusion, Grade II and more severe complications. No significant difference in the total postoperative complications and stone-free rate were found.Current evidence suggests that both RA and GA can provide safe and effective anesthesia for PNL in carefully evaluated and selected patients. Each anesthesia technique has its own advantages but some aspects still remain unclear and need to be explored in future studies.

  9. Unusual diagnosis of a persistent third-degree atrioventricular block during anesthesia in a "healthy" pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Alsayegh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual diagnosis of a permanent third-degree atrioventricular block under general anesthesia in an otherwise healthy and asymptomatic child. This diagnosis of unclear causality represented a serious rare finding, requiring judicious management and resulting in the placement of a permanent pacemaker.

  10. Types of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Types of Anesthesia KidsHealth / For Teens / Types of Anesthesia What's in ... Get? Print en español Tipos de anestesia About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: ...

  11. Integrative Literature Review: Ascertaining Discharge Readiness for Pediatrics After Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Deborah R

    2016-02-01

    Unplanned hospital readmissions after the administration of general anesthesia for ambulatory procedures may contribute to loss of reimbursement and assessment of financial penalties. Pediatric patients represent a unique anesthetic risk. The purpose of this integrative literature review was to ascertain specific criteria used to evaluate discharge readiness for pediatric patients after anesthesia. This study is an integrative review of literature. An integrative literature search was conducted and included literature sources dated January 2008 to November 2013. Key words included pediatric, anesthesia, discharge, criteria, standards, assessment, recovery, postoperative, postanesthesia, scale, score, outpatient, and ambulatory. Eleven literature sources that contributed significantly to the research question were identified. Levels of evidence included three systematic reviews, one randomized controlled trial, three cohort studies, two case series, and two expert opinions. This integrative literature review revealed evidence-based discharge criteria endorsing home readiness for postanesthesia pediatric patients should incorporate consideration for physiological baselines, professional judgment with regard to infant consciousness, and professional practice standards/guidelines. Additionally, identifying and ensuring discharge to a competent adult was considered imperative. Nurses should be aware that frequently used anesthesia scoring systems originated in the 1970s, and this review was unable to locate current literature examining the reliability and validity of their use in conjunction with modern anesthesia-related health care practices. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Decision support using anesthesia information management system records and accreditation council for graduate medical education case logs for resident operating room assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Charnin, Jonathan; Driscoll, William D; Bailin, Michael T; Baker, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop decision support systems for resident operating room (OR) assignments using anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs and evaluate the implementations. We developed 2 Web-based systems: an ACGME case-log visualization tool, and Residents Helping in Navigating OR Scheduling (Rhinos), an interactive system that solicits OR assignment requests from residents and creates resident profiles. Resident profiles are snapshots of the cases and procedures each resident has done and were derived from AIMS records and ACGME case logs. A Rhinos pilot was performed for 6 weeks on 2 clinical services. One hundred sixty-five requests were entered and used in OR assignment decisions by a single attending anesthesiologist. Each request consisted of a rank ordered list of up to 3 ORs. Residents had access to detailed information about these cases including surgeon and patient name, age, procedure type, and admission status. Success rates at matching resident requests were determined by comparing requests with AIMS records. Of the 165 requests, 87 first-choice matches (52.7%), 27 second-choice matches (16.4%), and 8 third-choice matches (4.8%) were made. Forty-three requests were unmatched (26.1%). Thirty-nine first-choice requests overlapped (23.6%). Full implementation followed on 8 clinical services for 8 weeks. Seven hundred fifty-four requests were reviewed by 15 attending anesthesiologists, with 339 first-choice matches (45.0%), 122 second-choice matches (16.2%), 55 third-choice matches (7.3%), and 238 unmatched (31.5%). There were 279 overlapping first-choice requests (37.0%). The overall combined match success rate was 69.4%. Separately, we developed an ACGME case-log visualization tool that allows individual resident experiences to be compared against case minimums as well as resident peer groups. We conclude that it is feasible to use ACGME case

  13. Marfan Syndrome: new diagnostic criteria, same anesthesia care? Case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Maria Rita; Marques, Céline; Freitas, Sara; Santa-Bárbara, Rita; Alves, Joana; Xavier, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Marfan's Syndrome (MFS) is a disorder of connective tissue, mainly involving the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and ocular systems. The most severe problems include aortic root dilatation and dissection. Anesthetic management is vital for the improvement on perioperative morbidity. 61-year-old male with MFS, presenting mainly with pectus carinatum, scoliosis, ectopia lens, previous spontaneous pneumothorax and aortal aneurysm and dissection submitted to thoracoabdominal aortic prosthesis placement. Underwent routine laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to lithiasis. Important findings on preoperative examination were thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis, metallic murmur on cardiac exam. Chest radiograph revealed Cobb angle of 70°. Echocardiogram showed evidence of aortic mechanical prosthesis with no deficits. Preoperative evaluation should focus on cardiopulmonary abnormalities. The anesthesiologist should be prepared for a potentially difficult intubation. Proper positioning and limb support prior to induction is crucial in order to avoid joint injuries. Consider antibiotic prophylaxis for subacute bacterial endocarditis. The patient should be carefully positioned to avoid joint injuries. Intraoperatively cardiovascular monitoring is mandatory: avoid maneuvers that can lead to tachycardia or hypertension, control airway pressure to prevent pneumothorax and maintain an adequate volemia to decrease chances of prolapse, especially if considering laparoscopic surgery. No single intraoperative anesthetic agent or technique has demonstrated superiority. Adequate postoperative pain management is vitally important to avoid the detrimental effects of hypertension and tachycardia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Anestesia para cesariana em paciente portadora de cardiomiopatia hipertrófica familiar: relato de caso Anestesia para cesária en paciente portadora de cardiomiopatía hipertrófica familiar: relato de caso Anesthesia for cesarean section in a patient with familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Mestriner Stocche

    2007-12-01

    and reduction in peripheral vascular resistance can aggravate left ventricular outlet obstruction, leading to arrhythmias and cardiac ischemia. The objective of this report was to discuss the anesthetic management of cesarean section in a patient with FHC. CASE REPORT: A patient in the 33rd week of pregnancy and prior diagnosis of FHC presented, on the 24-hour Holter monitor, 22 episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT and 2 episodes of sustained ventricular tachycardia (SVT. She complained of episodes of palpitation, dyspnea, and chest pain of short duration. The patient was medicated with atenolol, with control of symptoms and cardiac arrhythmias. Within 38 weeks and 5 days of gestation, the patient underwent elective cesarean section. Besides the usual monitoring, analysis of the ST segment and invasive blood pressure were also instituted. Anesthesia consisted of combined spinal-epidural technique with subarachnoidal administration of 5 µg of sufentanil followed by the administration of increasing doses of 0.375% bupivacaine until it reached the level of T6 (total of 16 mL. Metaraminol was used as a vasopressor. Perioperative maternal hypotension or other complications were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: General anesthesia is often used for cesarean sections in patients with FHC. Spinal-epidural anesthesia with slow installation of the blockade was a safe alternative. In those patients, one should avoid an increase in myocardial contractility and, if necessary, a a-agonist should be used to treat maternal hypotension.

  15. Use of Propofol for Induction and Maintenance of Anesthesia in a King Penguin ( Aptenodytes patagonicus ) Undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, Sarah E; Carter, Jennifer E; Bauquier, Sébastien; Beths, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Anesthesia protocols for patients with intracranial lesions need to provide hemodynamic stability, preserve cerebrovascular autoregulation, avoid increases in intracranial pressure, and facilitate a rapid recovery. Propofol total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) maintains cerebral blood flow autoregulation and is considered superior to inhalant agents as an anesthetic protocol for patients with intracranial lesions. A propofol-based TIVA subsequent to premedication with medetomidine and diazepam was used in a king penguin ( Aptenodytes patagonicus ) undergoing magnetic resonance imaging of the brain after a new onset of seizures. This protocol provided a rapid and smooth induction and calm recovery in the penguin. When ventilation control is possible, propofol TIVA may be a superior choice to inhalant agents for anesthesia of birds with potential intracranial lesions.

  16. A Pilot Analysis of the Association Between Types of Monitored Anesthesia Care Drugs and Outcomes in Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement Performed Without General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric Y; Sukumar, Nitin; Dai, Feng; Akhtar, Shamsuddin; Schonberger, Robert B

    2018-04-01

    The types of agents used for monitored anesthesia care (MAC) and their possible differential effects on outcomes have received less study despite increased use over general anesthesia (GA) in transfemoral aortic valve replacements (TAVRs). In this pilot analysis of patients undergoing TAVR using MAC, the authors described the anesthetic agents used and sought to investigate the possible association of anesthetic agent choice with outcomes and the extent to which total weight and time-adjusted doses of anesthetics declined with increasing 10-year age increments. Retrospective observational study. Tertiary teaching hospital. Ninety-three participants scheduled to undergo TAVR, with a primary plan of conscious sedation between November 2014 and June 2016, were included. None. Types of MAC were divided into 4 primary groups, but 2 groups were focused: propofol (n = 39) and dexmedetomidine plus propofol (n = 34). Conversion to GA occurred in 6 participants (6.45%) and was not associated with the type of sedation received. The authors also compared patients who received dexmedetomidine with those who did not in accordance with their a priori analytic plan. There were no associations between the use of dexmedetomidine and postoperative delirium or intensive care unit/hospital length of stay. No significant trends in medication dose adjustments were seen across increasing 10-year age increments. A wide breadth of MAC medications is in use among TAVR patients and does not support differences in outcomes. Despite recommendations to reduce anesthetic drug dosing in the elderly, no significant trends in dose reduction with increasing age were noted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a high frequency single-element ultrasound needle transducer for anesthesia delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Son, Jungik; Liang, Jingwei; Foster, F. Stuart; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Peters, Terry M.

    2017-03-01

    Epidural anesthesia is one of the most commonly used and yet challenging techniques employed for pain management and anesthesia delivery. The major complications of this procedure are due to accidental dural puncture, with an incidence of 1-3%, which could lead to both temporary and irreversible permanent neurological complications. Needle placement under ultrasound (US) guidance has received increasing interest for improving needle placement accuracy. However, poor needle visibility in US, difficulties in displaying relevant anatomical structure such as dura mater due to attenuation and bone shadowing, and image interpretation variability among users pose significant hurdles for any US guidance system. As a result, US guidance for epidural injections has not been widely adopted for everyday use for the performance of neuraxial blocks. The difficulties in localizing the ligamentum flavum and dura with respect to the needle tip can be addressed by integrating A-mode US, provided by a single-element transducer at the needle tip, into the B-mode US guidance system. We have taken the first steps towards providing such a guidance system. Our goal is to improve the safety of this procedure with minimal changes to the clinical workflow. This work presents the design and development of a 20 MHz single-element US transducer housed at the tip of a 19 G needle hypodermic tube, which can fit inside an epidural introducer needle. In addition, the results from initial transducer characterization tests and performance evaluation of the transducer in a euthanized porcine model are provided.

  18. Anesthesia for Ambulatory Pediatric Surgery in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pilot Study in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabré, Yvette B; Traoré, Idriss S S; Kaboré, Flavien A R; Ki, Bertille; Traoré, Alain I; Ouédraogo, Isso; Bandré, Emile; Wandaogo, Albert; Ouédraogo, Nazinigouba

    2017-02-01

    Long surgical wait times and limited hospital capacity are common obstacles to surgical care in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Introducing ambulatory surgery might contribute to a solution to these problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of introducing ambulatory surgery into a pediatric hospital in SSA. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study that took place over 6 months. It includes all patients assigned to undergo ambulatory surgery in the Pediatric University Hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Eligibility criteria for the ambulatory surgery program included >1 year of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1 status, surgery with a low risk of bleeding, lasting anesthesia with halothane. Sixty-five percent also received regional or local anesthesia consisting of caudal block in 79.23% or nerve block in 20.77%. The average duration of surgery was 33 ± 17.47 minutes. No intraoperative complications were noted. All the patients received acetaminophen and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the recovery room. Twelve (11.7%) patients had complications in recovery, principally nausea and vomiting. Eight (7.8%) patients were admitted to the hospital. No serious complications were associated with ambulatory surgery. Its introduction could possibly be a solution to improving pediatric surgical access in low-income countries.

  19. Cerebral state index during propofol anesthesia : A Comparison with the Bispectral Index and the A-Line ARX Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, EW; Litvan, H; Revuelta, M; Rodriguez, BE; Caminal, P; Martinez, P; Vereecke, H; Struys, Michel MRF

    Background: The objective of this study was to prospectively test the Cerebral State Index designed for measuring the depth of anesthesia. The Cerebral State Index is calculated using a fuzzy logic combination of four subparameters of the electroencephalographic signal. The performance of the

  20. Effect of clonidine on the efficacy of lignocaine local anesthesia in dentistry: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gowri; Sridharan, Kannan

    2018-05-01

    Alternatives to adrenaline with lignocaine local anesthesia, such as clonidine, have been trialed in various randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, the aim of the present systematic review was to compile the available evidence on using clonidine with lignocaine for dental anesthesia. Electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. A data-extraction form was created, extracted data were analyzed using non-Cochrane mode in RevMan 5.3 software. Heterogeneity between the studies were assessed using the forest plot, I 2 statistics (where >50% was considered to have moderate-to-severe heterogeneity), and χ 2 -test. Random-effects models were used because of moderate heterogeneity. Five studies were included for the final review. While clonidine was found to significantly shorten the onset of local anesthesia when measured subjectively, no significant difference was observed objectively. No significant difference was observed in the duration and postoperative analgesia. Stable hemodynamic parameters within the safe range were observed postoperatively when clonidine was used. Clonidine could be considered as an alternative to adrenaline in cases of contraindications to adrenaline, such as like cardiac abnormalities, hypertension, and diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Anesthesia for peroral endoscopic myotomy: A retrospective case series

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    Nithin Jayan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: For patients with achalasia, POEM offers the efficacy of surgery with the lower cost and morbidity of an endoscopic procedure. Prevention of aspiration and carbon dioxide insufflation-related complications are the two aspects that demand vigilance from the anesthesiologist.

  2. A BARBITURATE ANTIDOTE—Use of Methylethylglutarimide in Barbiturate Intoxication and in Terminating Barbiturate Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmer, Milton J.

    1959-01-01

    Methylethylglutarimide was administered to 488 patients ranging in age from 7 to 89 years, in a study on sleep-reversal after harbiturate anesthesia. Sodium surital or sodium pentothal were the barbiturates used. The drug was administered intravenously in doses varying from 25 to 200 mg. Dosage below 25 mg. was found to be ineffective. Almost all patients showed signs of awakening as evidenced by the return of corneal and conjunctival reflexes, the opening of the eyes, and stirring or moving about. Many responded to questioning. Almost all showed evidence of greater responsiveness within five minutes. No untoward reactions were noted. No convulsions were produced. Five patients ranging in age from 24 to 70 years were treated for barbiturate poisoning with Mikedimide® given intravenously in doses varying from 550 mg. to 1950 mg. All recovered consciousness within 30 minutes to an hour. No convulsions were produced. While it is not known whether Mikedimide is a direct barbiturate antagonist, or whether it is an analeptic, it appears to be a useful drug in reversing the respiratory depression and the cerebral depression produced by harbiturate intoxication and barbiturate anesthesia. PMID:14421358

  3. Referral patterns and general anesthesia in a specialized paediatric dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkilzy, Mohammad; Qadri, Ghalib; Horn, Janina; Takriti, Moutaz; Splieth, Christian

    2015-05-01

    The caries patterns of child populations in Germany have changed during the last 20 years. This affects the referrals and provision of specialist dental care for children. This study has two aims: first, to investigate referrals received by a specialized pediatric dental institution in 1995 and 2008, and second, to assess the treatments performed during full oral rehabilitations under general anesthesia in this institution from 2007 to 2008. All data of referred patients were evaluated for 1995 and 2008 separately. Comparisons were carried out for different socio-demographic, medical, and dental parameters. All patients treated under general anesthesia (GA) between March/2007 and December/2008 were examined retrospectively and their data were analyzed. In 1995 (n = 191), significantly older children were referred to specialized pediatric dental care compared to 2008 (n = 179). In addition, a shift of surgical referrals to very young children with high caries levels was clearly noticed, resulting in considerably more oral rehabilitation performed under GA in 2008 (n = 73). Thus, the mean values of 6.4 fillings and 2.7 extractions per child were quite high. Preventive treatment approaches for primary dentition in Germany need further improvement by focusing on high caries-risk groups, as specialized pediatric dentistry bears the great burden of providing oral rehabilitations under GA in young children. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Knowledge-based errors in anesthesia: a paired, controlled trial of learning and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Sara N; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Rosow, Carl E

    2009-01-01

    Optimizing patient safety by improving the training of physicians is a major challenge of medical education. In this pilot study, we hypothesized that a brief lecture, targeted to rare but potentially dangerous situations, could improve anesthesia practitioners' knowledge levels with significant retention of learning at six months. In this paired controlled trial, anesthesia residents and attending physicians at Massachusetts General Hospital took the same 14-question multiple choice examination three times: at baseline, immediately after a brief lecture, and six months later. The lecture covered material on seven "intervention" questions; the remaining seven were "control" questions. The authors measured immediate knowledge acquisition, defined as the change in percentage of correct answers on intervention questions between baseline and post-lecture, and measured learning retention as the difference between baseline and six months. Both measurements were corrected for change in performance on control questions. Fifty of the 89 subjects completed all three examinations. The post-lecture increase in percentage of questions answered correctly, adjusted for control, was 22.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 16.0-28.4%; P learning at six months. Exposing residents or other practitioners to this type of inexpensive teaching intervention may help them to avoid preventable uncommon errors that are rooted in unfamiliarity with the situation or the equipment. The methods used for this study may also be applied to compare the effect of various other teaching modalities while, at the same time, preserving participant anonymity and making adjustments for ongoing learning.

  5. Fear of going under general anesthesia: A cross-sectional study

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    M E Ruhaiyem

    2016-01-01

    Results: Among 450 questionnaires that were disturbed, 400 questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Eighty-eight percent experienced preoperative fear. The top three causes of their fears were fear of postoperative pain (77.3%, fear of intraoperative awareness (73.7%, and fear of being sleepy postoperatively (69.5%. Patients are less fearful of drains and needles in the operative theater (48%, of revealing personal issues under general anesthesia (55.2%, and of not waking up after surgery (56.4%. Age and gender were significant predictors of the overall fear among preanesthetic patients. Females are 5 times more likely to experience fear before surgery (P = 0.0009. Patients aged more than 40 years old are also at 75% higher risk of being afraid (P = 0.008. Conclusion: The majority of the patients going for surgery experienced a fear of anesthesia. Mostly females, especially those over 40, were at a higher risk of being afraid. Fear can bring anxiety which, in turn, might affect the patient′s surgery.

  6. Manual treatment effects to the upper cervical apophysial joints before, during, and after endotracheal anesthesia: a placebo-controlled comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Johannes; Wende, Klaus; Kundt, Guenther; Haessler, Frank

    2005-04-01

    In this preliminary, placebo-controlled clinical trial, two different manual treatments were compared, spinal manipulation and postisometric relaxation, for dysfunctional motion segments of the upper cervical spinal column. The influence of the muscular portion on the joint-play restriction of a motion segment can be ignored in anesthesia, and the manual evaluation of this joint-play restriction must be focused on nonmuscular structures. By retesting in anesthesia, it is possible to examine whether mobilization and manipulation affect exclusively the muscular structures or also affect the other parts of the motion segment. Conclusions can be drawn about the superiority of one or both treatments and about the structural basis of the restricted joint play and its palpation. A total of 26 inpatients at the surgical or orthopedic department of the University of Rostock were examined manually at four testing times: before and after manual treatment, in anesthesia, and within 24 hrs of completing anesthesia. They were randomized into three groups: postisometric relaxation (mobilization), spinal manipulation (thrust technique), and placebo. A highly significant effect for both treatments was found posttherapeutically (P anesthesia, the treatment effect of spinal manipulation was further significant (P spinal manipulation and postisometric relaxation was not found in anesthesia (P = 0.137). The treatment effect postnarcotically was further significant when compared with placebo only for spinal manipulation (P = 0.011). Both treatments are superior to placebo. Postisometric relaxation seems to affect mainly the muscular parts of the treated segments and less so the other parts, such as the joint capsule or the segmental affiliated ligaments and fascia. Spinal manipulation seems to influence all other segmental parts more effectively, and the treatment effect persists longer. A joint-play restriction cannot be an exclusively muscular tension phenomenon. Segmental motion

  7. Perioperative Respiratory Adverse Events in Pediatric Ambulatory Anesthesia: Development and Validation of a Risk Prediction Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Yeramaneni, Samrat; Hossain, Mohamed Monir; Anneken, Amy M; Varughese, Anna M

    2016-05-01

    Perioperative respiratory adverse events (PRAEs) are the most common cause of serious adverse events in children receiving anesthesia. Our primary aim of this study was to develop and validate a risk prediction tool for the occurrence of PRAE from the onset of anesthesia induction until discharge from the postanesthesia care unit in children younger than 18 years undergoing elective ambulatory anesthesia for surgery and radiology. The incidence of PRAE was studied. We analyzed data from 19,059 patients from our department's quality improvement database. The predictor variables were age, sex, ASA physical status, morbid obesity, preexisting pulmonary disorder, preexisting neurologic disorder, and location of ambulatory anesthesia (surgery or radiology). Composite PRAE was defined as the presence of any 1 of the following events: intraoperative bronchospasm, intraoperative laryngospasm, postoperative apnea, postoperative laryngospasm, postoperative bronchospasm, or postoperative prolonged oxygen requirement. Development and validation of the risk prediction tool for PRAE were performed using a split sampling technique to split the database into 2 independent cohorts based on the year when the patient received ambulatory anesthesia for surgery and radiology using logistic regression. A risk score was developed based on the regression coefficients from the validation tool. The performance of the risk prediction tool was assessed by using tests of discrimination and calibration. The overall incidence of composite PRAE was 2.8%. The derivation cohort included 8904 patients, and the validation cohort included 10,155 patients. The risk of PRAE was 3.9% in the development cohort and 1.8% in the validation cohort. Age ≤ 3 years (versus >3 years), ASA physical status II or III (versus ASA physical status I), morbid obesity, preexisting pulmonary disorder, and surgery (versus radiology) significantly predicted the occurrence of PRAE in a multivariable logistic regression

  8. [No inhibition of intestinal motility following ketamine-midazolam anesthesia. A comparison of anesthesia with enflurane and fentanyl/midazolam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freye, E; Knüfermann, V

    1994-02-01

    weight. Also, the duration of operation was comparable in all three groups. Mean gastro-coecal transit time was 204 (+/- 19.6, SD) min following enflurane, 302 (+/- 32.8 SD) min following fentanyl/-midazolam and 210 (+/- 28.8 SD) min following ketamine/midazolam anaesthesia. The gastro-intestinal inhibition after the opioid-based anaesthetic technique was significantly prolonged (p constipation, is likely to develop postoperatively. In classical neuroleptanaesthesia and in analgosedation in the ICU, the simultaneous use of the butyrophenone droperidol seems to counteract the inhibition of opioid-related gastrointestinal motility. In cases of opioid-related gastrointestinal atonia a gastrokinetic compound may be necessary to overcome this effect on intestinal motility.

  9. A review of the benefits and pitfalls of phantoms in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Graham; Hebard, Simon; Mitchell, Christopher H

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, so has the requirement for training tools to practice needle guidance skills and evaluate echogenic needles. Ethically, skills in ultrasound-guided needle placement should be gained in a phantom before performance of nerve blocks on patients in clinical practice. However, phantom technology is varied, and critical evaluation of the images is needed to understand their application to clinical use. Needle visibility depends on the echogenicity of the needle relative to the echogenicity of the tissue adjacent the needle. We demonstrate this point using images of echogenic and nonechogenic needles in 5 different phantoms at both shallow angles (20 degrees) and steep angles (45 degrees). The echogenicity of phantoms varies enormously, and this impacts on how needles are visualized. Water is anechoic, making all needles highly visible, but does not fix the needle to allow practice placement. Gelatin phantoms and Blue Phantoms provide tactile feedback but have very low background echogenicity, which greatly exaggerates needle visibility. This makes skill acquisition easier but can lead to false confidence in regard to clinical ability. Fresh-frozen cadavers retain much of the textural feel of live human tissue and are nearly as echogenic. Similar to clinical practice, this makes needles inserted at steep angles practically invisible, unless they are highly echogenic. This review describes the uses and pitfalls of phantoms that have been described or commercially produced. Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

  10. Effect of Desflurane versus Sevoflurane in Pediatric Anesthesia: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yong; Xue, Rongliang; Lv, Jianrui; Ding, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhenni

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of desflurane versus sevoflurane in pediatric anesthesia by conducting meta-analysis. Studies were searched from PubMed, Medline, Springer, Elsevier Science Direct, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar up to July 2014. Weighted mean difference (WMD) or risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were considered as effect sizes. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed by Cochran Q test and I2 statistic. The random effects model was performed in the meta-analysis when heterogeneity was observed, or the fixed effect model was used. Review Manager 5.1 software was applied for the meta-analysis. A total of 11 studies (13 comparisons) involving 1,273 objects were included in this meta-analysis. No heterogeneity was observed between studies for any comparison but for postoperative extubation time. The results showed significant differences between desflurane and sevoflurane groups for postoperative extubation time (WMD = -3.87, 95%CI = -6.14 to -1.60, P 0.05) were detected for discharge from the recovery room, oculocardiac reflex, nausea and vomiting and severe pain. Desflurane may have less adverse effects than sevoflurane when used in pediatric anesthesia with significantly shorter postoperative extubation time, eye opening time and awakening time as well as slighter agitation.

  11. A Comparison of the Anesthesia Efficacy of Articaine and Articaine plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahere Aliabadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful local anesthesia is the bedrock of pain control in endodontics. Pain control is essential to reduce fear and anxiety associated with endodontic procedure. The aim of study was, identifying and comparison of the anesthesia efficacy of articaine and articaine plus morphine for buccal infiltration in mandibular posterior teeth with irriversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind clinical trial included 75 patients with symtomatically irreversible pulpitis in mandibular teeth. Patient divided 3 groups randomly received either a buccal infiltration of 4% articaine with 1:100000 epinephrine or articaine morphine with 1:100000 epinephrine or IAN block of 2% lidocaine with 1:800000 epinephrine. Self-reported pain response was recorded on VAS scale before and after local anesthetic injection during access preparation. For statistical analysis were used χ2, t-test, one way ANOVA and Mann Whitney. Results: Statistical analysis result show success rate of articaine (68%, articaine morphine (52% and lidocaine (64%. There was no statistically difference in the success rate between groups. Conclusion: Addition of the morphine to articaine does not increase success rate of buccal infiltration.

  12. Anesthesia and critical-care delivery in weightlessness: A challenge for research in parabolic flight analogue space surgery studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G.; Keaney, Marilyn A.; Chun, Rosaleen; Groleau, Michelle; Tyssen, Michelle; Keyte, Jennifer; Broderick, Timothy J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.

    2010-03-01

    BackgroundMultiple nations are actively pursuing manned exploration of space beyond low-earth orbit. The responsibility to improve surgical care for spaceflight is substantial. Although the use of parabolic flight as a terrestrial analogue to study surgery in weightlessness (0 g) is well described, minimal data is available to guide the appropriate delivery of anesthesia. After studying anesthetized pigs in a 0 g parabolic flight environment, our group developed a comprehensive protocol describing prolonged anesthesia in a parabolic flight analogue space surgery study (PFASSS). Novel challenges included a physically remote vivarium, prolonged (>10 h) anesthetic requirements, and the provision of veterinary operating room/intensive care unit (ICU) equivalency on-board an aircraft with physical dimensions of ethical approval, multiple ground laboratory sessions were conducted with combinations of anesthetic, pre-medication, and induction protocols on Yorkshire-cross specific pathogen-free (SPF) pigs. Several constant rate infusion (CRI) intravenous anesthetic combinations were tested. In each regimen, opioids were administered to ensure analgesia. Ventilation was supported mechanically with blended gradients of oxygen. The best performing terrestrial 1 g regime was flight tested in parabolic flight for its effectiveness in sustaining optimal and prolonged anesthesia, analgesia, and maintaining hemodynamic stability. Each flight day, a fully anesthetized, ventilated, and surgically instrumented pig was transported to the Flight Research Laboratory (FRL) in a temperature-controlled animal ambulance. A modular on-board surgical/ICU suite with appropriate anesthesia/ICU and surgical support capabilities was employed. ResultsThe mean duration of anesthesia (per flight day) was 10.28 h over four consecutive days. A barbiturate and ketamine-based CRI anesthetic regimen supplemented with narcotic analgesia by bolus administration offered the greatest prolonged hemodynamic

  13. Anestesia para cesariana em gestante com hipoplasia de aorta distal: relato de caso Anestesia para cesárea en embarazada con hipoplasia de aorta distal: relato de caso Anesthesia for cesarean section on a pregnant woman with hypoplasia of the distal aorta: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Andrade Reis

    2008-02-01

    ón de fármacos a través del catéter peridural posibilitó alcanzar un nivel anestésico adecuado para la realización de la operación.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Maternal vascular anomalies, potentially severe for the fetus, can jeopardize uterine perfusion, which demands more caution by the anesthesiology team. The objective of this report was to demonstrate the anesthetic conduct for a cesarean section on a pregnant woman with hipoplasia of the distal aorta, just below the renal arteries, with stenosis of the renal artery and absence of the iliac arteries. CASE REPORT: This is a 30-year old patient, weighing 54 kg, on her second pregnancy, with a history of an uncomplicated cesarean section. During the gestational echocardiography on the 12th week, it was observed an interruption of the distal aorta, just below the renal arteries. The patient was referred for coronary angiography, which demonstrated hypoplasia of the distal aorta, just below the renal arteries, and absence of the iliac arteries. During the clinical investigation, the patient remained asymptomatic, except for hypertension and claudication during great efforts. She underwent continuous epidural anesthesia and the dose of the anesthetic was titrated as needed for the cesarean section. Initially, 50 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine without vasoconstrictor and 10 µg of sufentanil were administered. After 15 minutes, anesthesia was complemented with 25 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine, which was enough to achieve an adequate level of blockade. The cesarean section was performed without intercurrences, and the fetus was born in good clinical conditions. CONCLUSION: The use of continuous epidural block in fractionated doses demonstrated to be a safe anesthetic technique for this procedure because it reduces the risks of maternal hypotension, inherent to the spinal block, and also minimized the placentary transference of drugs, which is the case with general anesthesia. Titration of drugs through the epidural catheter allowed

  14. Anestesia venosa total (AVT em lactente com doença de Werdnig-Hoffmann: relato de caso Anestesia general intravenosa (AVT en lactante con enfermedad de Werdnig-Hoffmann: relato de caso Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA in an infant with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Cardoso de Resende

    2010-04-01

    delivery. Symmetrical muscular weakness, areflexia, and fasciculations of the tongue are characteristic. The majority of the infants die before two years of age as a consequence of respiratory failure. The present report presents a case in which total intravenous anesthesia was used. CASE REPORT: This is a 1 year old white female weighing 10 kg, physical status ASA III, with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease diagnosed at two months of age. The patient was a candidate for open gastrostomy, fundus gastroplication, and tracheostomy. After venoclysis, the patient was monitored with cardioscope, non-invasive blood pressure, pulse oximeter, precordial stethoscope, and rectal temperature. She was oxygenated and, after bolus administration of atropine (0.3 mg, boluses of remifentanil (20 µg and propofol (30 mg were administered for anesthetic induction. After tracheal intubation, she was ventilated with manual controlled system without CO2 absorber, Baraka (Mapleson D system, FGF of 4 L.min-1, and FiO2 0.5 (O2/N2O. Anesthesia was maintained with continuous manual infusion of propofol, 250 µg.kg-1.min-1, and remifentanil, 0.3 µg.kg-1.min-1. The surgery lasted 150 minutes. The patient regained consciousness 8 minutes after the end of the infusion, ventilating spontaneously. Two hours later, she was transferred to the pediatric unit, being discharged from the hospital on the fourth postoperative day. CONCLUSIONS: The choice of anesthetic technique gives priority to the safety associated with the familiarity of handling available drugs. In children with neuromuscular diseases, due to the extremely short duration, total intravenous anesthesia with remifentanil and propofol in infusion systems can have a favorable influence on disease evolution.

  15. Anesthesia and cognitive performance in children: No evidence for a causal relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, M.; Althoff, R.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings of an association between anesthesia administration in the first three years of life and later learning disabilities have created concerns that anesthesia has neurotoxic effects on synaptogenesis, causing later learning problems. An alternative hypothesis is that those children who

  16. Reliability and validity of a tool to assess airway management skills in anesthesia trainees

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    Aliya Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The tool designed to assess bag-mask ventilation and tracheal intubation skills in anesthesia trainees demonstrated excellent inter-rater reliability, fair test-retest reliability, and good construct validity. The authors recommend its use for formative and summative assessment of junior anesthesia trainees.

  17. Intravenous granisetron attenuates hypotension during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery: A double-blind, prospective randomized controlled study

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    Ahmed A Eldaba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of intravenous (IV granisetron in the prevention of hypotension and bradycardia during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery. Material and Methods: A total of 200 parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I was given 1 mg granisetron diluted in 10 ml normal saline slowly IV, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Group II was given 10 ml of normal saline, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR were recorded every 3 min until the end of surgery (for 45 min. The total consumption of vasopressors and atropine were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min were also assessed. Results: Serial mean arterial blood pressure and HR values for 45 min after onset of spinal anesthesia were decreased significantly in group II, P < 0.0001. The incidence of hypotension after spinal anesthesia was 64% in group II and 3% in group I (P < 0.0001. The total doses of ephedrine (4.07 ± 3.87 mg vs 10.7 ± 8.9 mg, P < 0.0001, phenylephrine (0.0 microg vs 23.2 ± 55.1 microg, P < 0.0001, and atropine (0.0 mg vs 0.35 ± 0.49 mg P < 0.0001 consumed in both the groups respectively, were significantly less in group I versus group II. Conclusion: Premedication with 1 mg IV granisetron before spinal anesthesia in an elective cesarean section significantly reduces hypotension, bradycardia and vasopressors usage.

  18. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis associated with an ovarian teratoma: two cases report and anesthesia considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyang; Jian, Minyu; Liang, Fa; Yue, Hongli; Han, Ruquan

    2015-10-16

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an immune-mediated syndrome caused by the production of anti-NMDAR receptor antibodies. The syndrome characterised by psychosis, seizures, sleep disorders, hallucinations and short-term memory loss. Ovarian teratoma is the confirmed tumour associated with anti-NMDAR antibodies. The patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis complicated by ovarian teratoma require surgical treatment under general anesthesia. NMDARs are important targets of many anesthetic drugs. The perioperative management and complications of anti-NMDAR encephalitis, including hypoventilation, paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) and epilepsy, are challenging for ansthesiologists. This report described two female patients who presented for resection of the ovarian teratoma, they had confirmed anti-NMDAR encephalitis accompanied by ovarian teratoma. Two patients received gamma globulin treatments and the resection of the ovarian teratoma under total intravenous anesthesia. They were recovered and discharged on the 20(th) and 46(th) postoperative day respectively. There is insufficient evidence about the perioperative management, monitoring and anesthesia management of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. This report was based on the consideration that controversial anesthetics that likely act on NMDARs should be avoided. Additionally, BIS monitoring should to be prudently applied in anti-NMDAR encephalitis because of abnormal electric encephalography (EEG). Anesthesiologists must be careful with regard to central ventilation dysfunctions and PSH due to anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  19. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  20. [Anesthesia in bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremerich, D H

    2000-09-01

    Asthma is defined as a chronic inflammatory airway disease in response to a wide variety of provoking stimuli. Characteristic clinical symptoms of asthma are bronchial hyperreactivity, reversible airway obstruction, wheezing and dyspnea. Asthma presents a major public health problem with increasing prevalence rates and severity worldwide. Despite major advances in our understanding of the clinical management of asthmatic patients, it remains a challenging population for anesthesiologists in clinical practice. The anesthesiologist's responsibility starts with the preoperative assessment and evaluation of the pulmonary function. For patients with asthma who currently have no symptoms, the risk of perioperative respiratory complications is extremely low. Therefore, pulmonary function should be optimized preoperatively and airway obstruction should be controlled by using steroids and bronchodilators. Preoperative spirometry is a simple means of assessing presence and severity of airway obstruction as well as the degree of reversibility in response to bronchodilator therapy. An increase of 15% in FEV1 is considered clinically significant. Most asymptomatic persons with asthma can safely undergo general anesthesia with and without endotracheal intubation. Volatile anesthetics are still recommended for general anesthetic techniques. As compared to barbiturates and even ketamine, propofol is considered to be the agent of choice for induction of anesthesia in asthmatics. The use of regional anesthesia does not reduce perioperative respiratory complications in asymptomatic asthmatics, whereas it is advantageous in symptomatic patients. Pregnant asthmatic and parturients undergoing anesthesia are at increased risk, especially if regional anesthetic techniques are not suitable and prostaglandin and its derivates are administered for abortion or operative delivery. Bronchial hyperreactivity associated with asthma is an important risk factor of perioperative bronchospasm. The

  1. Influence of different anesthesia methods on stress reaction and hemodynamics for elderly orthopedics patients during operations

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    Lin Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of general anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia method on stress reaction and hemodynamics for elderly orthopedics patients during operations. Methods: A total of 90 cases of elder patients who received orthopedic operations were randomly divided to group A, B and C, with 30 cases per group. Three groups of patients were separately given by general anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia for operations; The variations of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH, Cortisol (Cor, β-endorphin (β-EP, Angiotensin- Ⅱ(Ang-Ⅱ, heart rate (HR and blood pressure (SBP, DBP on patients in three groups before anesthesia (T0, during skin incision (T1, after skin incision (T2 and extubation after operation (T3 were compared and analyzed. Results: During T1, T2, ACTH, Cor, β-EP and Ang-Ⅱlevels in 3 groups of patients were significantly higher than those during T0; SBP and DBP were significantly lower than that during T0; HR during T2 was significantly lower than that during T0; During T3, every index in 3 groups were recovered to levels close to that during T0; During T1, T2, ACTH, Cor, β-EP, Ang-Ⅱ levels in group B and C were significantly lower than that in group A. And levels in C was lower than that in B; SBP and DBP in group B and C were significantly higher than A. No HR statistical significance appeared between each group. Conclusions: During clinical anesthesia, we should choose suitable anesthesia method combined with actual situations of patients. Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia had a slight influence on hemodynamics of elder orthopedics patients during operation, and it could effectively alleviate stress reaction during operation.

  2. Emergence from anesthesia in children undergoing ambulatory surgery- a comparison between propofol and sevoflurane using single anesthetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, A.K.; Kazi, W.A.; Farhat, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare emergence from anesthesia using total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and volatile induction maintenance anesthesia (VIMA) with sevoflurane, in children undergoing ambulatory inguinal herniorrhaphy. Study Design: Randomized, controlled trials. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa Hospital of Pakistan Navy, from 1st Mar 2005 to 28th Feb 2006. Patients and Methods: Eighty children, aged 5-10 years of ASA physical status I or II were divided into two groups of 40 each using random numbers table. Group P received propofol 3mg/kg for induction and 100-400 micro g/kg/min infusion for maintenance of anesthesia, while group S received sevoflurane 8% (inspired concentration) in 100% oxygen for induction and 2-3% in oxygen for maintenance of anesthesia. No sedative premedication was given. Analgesia was provided with caudal block using 0.25% bupivacaine. Speed of emergence from anesthesia was assessed by time to extubation, time to eye opening, and time to crying / stating name. A modified aldrete score system was used to evaluate recovery while Pain/Discomfort scale to assess the quality of emergence from anesthesia. These were recorded by a separate consultant anesthetist blind to the anesthetic technique. Results: Emergence from anesthesia occurred significantly quicker in the S group as compared to P group, as evident by times in minutes (mean +- SD) to extubation: 8.3+-6.9 versus 4.7+-2.6(p=0.017), eye opening: 9.1 +- 5.3 vs. 5.6 +- 2.6 (p=0.043) and crying / state name: 14.7 +-7.2 vs.11.3 +- 4.6(p=0.039). Similarly, more patients in the S group scored maximum points in the modified aldrete score at 10 min: 17 (42.5%) vs.7 (17.5%) (p=0.015), 20 min: 32 (80%) vs.23 (57.5%) (p=0.030). Although, number of patients in the S group compared to P group scoring max points in Pain-discomfort scale at 10 min: 8 (20%) vs4 (10%), p=0.210; 20 min: 6 (15%) vs.2 (5%), p=0.136 and 30 min: 4 (10%) vs. 0, p=0.130 were more, these results were not

  3. [A survey of perioperative asthmatic attack among patients with bronchial asthma underwent general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Yoshizawa, Atsuto; Hirano, Satoru; Izumi, Sinyuu; Hojo, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kobayasi, Nobuyuki; Kudou, Kouichirou; Maehara, Yasuhiro; Kawachi, Masaharu; Miyakoshi, Kouichi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the risk factor of perioperative asthmatic attack and effectiveness of preventing treatment for asthmatic attack before operation. We performed retrospective chart review of one hundred eleven patients with asthma underwent general anesthesia and surgical intervention from January 2006 to October 2007 in our hospital. The rate of perioperative asthmatic attack were as follows; 10.2% (5 in 49 cases) in no pretreatment group, 7.5% (3 in 40 cases) in any pretreatments except for systemic steroid, and 4.5% (1 in 22 cases) in systemic steroid pretreatment group. Neither preoperative asthma severity nor duration from the last attack had significant relevancy to perioperative attack rate. The otolaryngological surgery, especially those have nasal polyp and oral surgery had high perioperative asthma attack rate, although there was no significant difference. We recommend the systemic steroid pretreatment for asthmatic patients, especially when they have known risk factor such as administration of the systemic steroid within 6 months, or possibly new risk factor such as nasal polyp, otolaryngological and oral surgery.

  4. Intraoperative non-record-keeping usage of anesthesia information management system workstations and associated hemodynamic variability and aberrancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, David B; Lin, Hung-Mo; Reich, David L

    2012-12-01

    Anesthesia information management system workstations in the anesthesia workspace that allow usage of non-record-keeping applications could lead to distraction from patient care. We evaluated whether non-record-keeping usage of the computer workstation was associated with hemodynamic variability and aberrancies. Auditing data were collected on eight anesthesia information management system workstations and linked to their corresponding electronic anesthesia records to identify which application was active at any given time during the case. For each case, the periods spent using the anesthesia information management system record-keeping module were separated from those spent using non-record-keeping applications. The variability of heart rate and blood pressure were also calculated, as were the incidence of hypotension, hypertension, and tachycardia. Analysis was performed to identify whether non-record-keeping activity was a significant predictor of these hemodynamic outcomes. Data were analyzed for 1,061 cases performed by 171 clinicians. Median (interquartile range) non-record-keeping activity time was 14 (1, 38) min, representing 16 (3, 33)% of a median 80 (39, 143) min of procedure time. Variables associated with greater non-record-keeping activity included attending anesthesiologists working unassisted, longer case duration, lower American Society of Anesthesiologists status, and general anesthesia. Overall, there was no independent association between non-record-keeping workstation use and hemodynamic variability or aberrancies during anesthesia either between cases or within cases. Anesthesia providers spent sizable portions of case time performing non-record-keeping applications on anesthesia information management system workstations. This use, however, was not independently associated with greater hemodynamic variability or aberrancies in patients during maintenance of general anesthesia for predominantly general surgical and gynecologic procedures.

  5. Effectiveness of Ibuprofen Administration on the Depth of Anesthesia in Inflamed Teeth

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    R Mahmodi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Incomplete anesthesia of inflamed teeth is a well known clinical occurrence and the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Ibuprofen as a premedication in improving the quality of anesthesia in patients with inflamed teeth pulps. Methods: Forty patients with the diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis in one mandibular tooth were selected. Two other teeth in the same quadrant were selected as controls. Electric pulp tester (EPT was used in this study to evaluate the quality of anesthesia. The subjects were divided into two groups randomly, and after recording of pulp tester response in each group, one of the two drugs; ibuprofen or placebo was administered 1 hour prior to anesthesia injection. After injection, EPT measurement was recorded. The reversed EPT scale was used for evaluation of the depth of anesthesia. Results : Data was analyzed to statistically compare the results before and after anesthesia and drug administration in cases and control group .Significantly lower TSLs were observed in the ibuprofen group (Pvalue= 0.001. Conclusion: This study concluded that preoperative administration of ibuprofen (if not contraindicated 1 hour before local anesthesia injection is an effective method for achieving deep anesthesia during RCT of teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

  6. Comparison of tramadol and lornoxicam in intravenous regional anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

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    Hande Çelik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Tourniquet pain is one of the major obstacles for intravenous regional anesthesia. We aimed to compare tramadol and lornoxicam used in intravenous regional anesthesia as regards their effects on the quality of anesthesia, tourniquet pain and postoperative pain as well. Methods: After the ethics committee approval 51 patients of ASA physical status I–II aged 18–65 years were enrolled. The patients were divided into three groups. Group P (n = 17 received 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine; group PT (n = 17 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine + 2 mL (100 mg tramadol and group PL (n = 17 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine + 2 mL (8 mg lornoxicam for intravenous regional anesthesia. Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times were noted, as well as tourniquet pains and postoperative analgesic consumptions. Results: Sensory block onset times in the groups PT and PL were shorter, whereas the corresponding recovery times were longer than those in the group P. Motor block onset times in the groups PT and PL were shorter than that in the group P, whereas recovery time in the group PL was longer than those in the groups P and PT. Tourniquet pain onset time was shortest in the group P and longest in the group PL. There was no difference regarding tourniquet pain among the groups. Group PL displayed the lowest analgesic consumption postoperatively. Conclusion: Adding tramadol and lornoxicam to prilocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia produces favorable effects on sensory and motor blockade. Postoperative analgesic consumption can be decreased by adding tramadol and lornoxicam to prilocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: A dor relacionada ao torniquete é um dos maiores obstáculos para a anestesia regional intravenosa (ARIV. Nosso objetivo foi comparar tramadol e lornoxicam usados em ARIV em relação aos seus efeitos sobre a qualidade da anestesia, dor relacionada ao torniquete e dor no p

  7. A novel multivariate STeady-state index during general ANesthesia (STAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ana; de Almeida, Fernando Gomes; Amorim, Pedro; Nunes, Catarina S

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the adequacy of general anesthesia for surgery, namely the nociception/anti-nociception balance, has received wide attention from the scientific community. Monitoring systems based on the frontal EEG/EMG, or autonomic state reactions (e.g. heart rate and blood pressure) have been developed aiming to objectively assess this balance. In this study a new multivariate indicator of patients' steady-state during anesthesia (STAN) is proposed, based on wavelet analysis of signals linked to noxious activation. A clinical protocol was designed to analyze precise noxious stimuli (laryngoscopy/intubation, tetanic, and incision), under three different analgesic doses; patients were randomized to receive either remifentanil 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 ng/ml. ECG, PPG, BP, BIS, EMG and [Formula: see text] were continuously recorded. ECG, PPG and BP were processed to extract beat-to-beat information, and [Formula: see text] curve used to estimate the respiration rate. A combined steady-state index based on wavelet analysis of these variables, was applied and compared between the three study groups and stimuli (Wilcoxon signed ranks, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests). Following institutional approval and signing the informed consent thirty four patients were enrolled in this study (3 excluded due to signal loss during data collection). The BIS index of the EEG, frontal EMG, heart rate, BP, and PPG wave amplitude changed in response to different noxious stimuli. Laryngoscopy/intubation was the stimulus with the more pronounced response [Formula: see text]. These variables were used in the construction of the combined index STAN; STAN responded adequately to noxious stimuli, with a more pronounced response to laryngoscopy/intubation (18.5-43.1 %, [Formula: see text]), and the attenuation provided by the analgesic, detecting steady-state periods in the different physiological signals analyzed (approximately 50 % of the total study time). A new multivariate approach for

  8. Anestesia subaracnóidea para cesariana em paciente portadora de esclerose múltipla: relato de caso Anestesia subaracnoidea para cesárea en paciente portadora de esclerosis múltiple: relato de caso Subarachnoid anesthesia for cesarean section in a patient with multiple sclerosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2007-06-01

    ón de cesárea. Después de la monitorización se realizó anestesia subaracnoidea con bupivacaína a 0,5% hiperbara (12,5 mg asociada a la morfina (0,1 mg. El procedimiento evolucionó sin interferencias y la paciente recibió su alta hospitalaria 48 horas después del parto sin empeoramiento de los síntomas preexistentes. CONCLUSIONES: El presente caso nos sugiere que la anestesia raquidea puede ser administrada en paciente portador de esclerosis múltiple sin la incidencia obligatoria de exacerbaciones agudas de los síntomas en el período postoperatorio.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Multiple sclerosis is an acquired disease characterized by demyelinated areas in the brain and spinal cord. The clinical presentation depends on the anatomical areas involved. The main causes of death are infection, respiratory failure, and status epilepticus. It affects genetically predisposed patients after contact with environmental factors, especially viruses. The objective of this report was to present the anesthetic technique used in a patient with multiple sclerosis undergoing cesarean section. CASE REPORT: A 32-year old patient, 60 kg, with multiple sclerosis, treated with methylprednisolone, was admitted to the obstetric ward for a cesarean section. After monitoring, subarachnoid anesthesia was performed with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12.5 mg associated with morphine (0.1 mg. The procedure evolved without any intercurrences and the patient was discharged from the hospital 48 hours after delivery without worsening of her symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This case suggests that spinal anesthesia can be administered in patients with multiple sclerosis without the acute worsening of their symptoms in the postoperative period.

  9. Anesthesia Methods in Laser Resurfacing

    OpenAIRE

    Gaitan, Sergio; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Laser resurfacing technology offers the ability to treat skin changes that are the result of the aging process. One of the major drawbacks of laser resurfacing technologies is the pain associated with the procedure. The methods of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to help minimize the pain include both noninvasive and invasive procedures. The noninvasive procedures can be divided into topical, cryoanesthesia, and a combination of both. The invasive methods of anesthesia include injected fo...

  10. Preventing Emergence Agitation Using Ancillary Drugs with Sevoflurane for Pediatric Anesthesia: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Deng, Qi; Liu, Bin; Yu, Xiangdi

    2017-11-01

    Using sevoflurane for pediatric anesthesia plays a pivotal role in surgeries. Emergence agitation (EA) is a major adverse event accompanied with pediatric anesthesia. Other anesthetic adjuvants can be combined with sevoflurane in clinical practices for different purposes. However, it is uncertain that such a practice may have substantial influence on the risk of EA. We conducted a literature search in online databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinical Trials. Key data were extracted from eligible randomized control trials (RCTs). Both pairwise and network meta-analysis (NMA) were conducted for synthesizing data from eligible studies. The relative risk of EA was assessed using the odds ratios (ORs) and their corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CI) or credible intervals (CrI). Ranking scheme based on the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) values was produced. Several key assumptions of NMA such as heterogeneity, degree of consistence, and publication bias were validated by different statistical or graphical approaches. Evidence from 67 randomized control trials was synthesized. The relative risk of EA associated with eight anesthetic adjuvants was analyzed, including ketamine, propofol, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, midazolam, fentanyl, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Patients with the following anesthetic adjuvants appeared to have significantly reduced risk of EA in relation to those with placebo: dexmedetomidine (OR = 0.18, 95 % CrI 0.12-0.25), fentanyl (OR = 0.19, 95 % CrI 0.12-0.30), sufentanil (OR = 0.20, 95 % CrI 0.08-0.50), ketamine (OR = 0.21, 95 % CrI 0.13-0.34), clonidine (OR = 0.25, 95 % CrI 0.14-0.46), propofol (OR = 0.32, 95 % CrI 0.18-0.56), midazolam (OR = 0.46, 95 % CrI 0.27-0.77), and remifentanil (OR = 0.29, 95 % CrI 0.13-0.68). The SUCRA values for each anesthetic adjuvant were: dexmedetomidine (73.65 %), fentanyl (68.04 %), sufentanil (60.81 %), ketamine (59.99 %), clonidine

  11. Increasing Regional Anesthesia Use in a Serbian Teaching Hospital through an International Collaboration

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    Curtis L. Baysinger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs report low rates of regional anesthesia (RA use for cesarean delivery (CD, despite its association with lower maternal major morbidity and mortality. Also, the prevalence of neuraxial analgesia for labor (NAL is often low in LMICs. We report on the results of a collaboration in clinical education over a multi-year period between Kybele Inc., an international non-profit organization, and Klinicki Centar Vojvodine (CCV, a teaching hospital in Novi Sad, Serbia, to increase RA use for CD and NAL at CCV. From late 2011 through 2015, teams from Kybele participated in annual to biannual didactic conferences and week-long bedside teaching efforts involving obstetric and anesthesia staff from CCV and surrounding hospitals. Ongoing contact occurred at least weekly between Kybele and the host to discuss progress. De-identified quality improvement data on total deliveries, numbers of elective and non-elective CDs, number of vaginal deliveries, type of anesthesia for CD, and the number of NALs were collected. RA use for CD increased to 25% in year 2015 versus 14% in base year 2011 [odds ratio (OR: 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.73,2.42; p < 0.001]. NAL increased to 10.5% of laboring women in 2015 versus 1.2% in 2011 (OR: 9.6; 95% CI: 7.2, 12.8; p < 0.001. Greater increases for RA use during non-elective CD were observed between 2011 and 2015 (1.4 versus 7.5% of total CD; OR: 5.52; 95% CI: 2.63, 8.41; p < 0.001 relative to elective CD (12.5 versus 17.5% of total CD; OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.77; p < 0.001. Overall, RA for CD increased during the 4 year collaboration but was not as great as reported in other countries with similar health-care demographics utilizing a similar program. Detailed descriptions of program interventions and barriers to change at CCV are presented.

  12. Increasing Regional Anesthesia Use in a Serbian Teaching Hospital through an International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysinger, Curtis L; Pujic, Borislava; Velickovic, Ivan; Owen, Medge D; Serafin, Joanna; Shotwell, Matthew S; Braveman, Ferne

    2017-01-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) report low rates of regional anesthesia (RA) use for cesarean delivery (CD), despite its association with lower maternal major morbidity and mortality. Also, the prevalence of neuraxial analgesia for labor (NAL) is often low in LMICs. We report on the results of a collaboration in clinical education over a multi-year period between Kybele Inc., an international non-profit organization, and Klinicki Centar Vojvodine (CCV), a teaching hospital in Novi Sad, Serbia, to increase RA use for CD and NAL at CCV. From late 2011 through 2015, teams from Kybele participated in annual to biannual didactic conferences and week-long bedside teaching efforts involving obstetric and anesthesia staff from CCV and surrounding hospitals. Ongoing contact occurred at least weekly between Kybele and the host to discuss progress. De-identified quality improvement data on total deliveries, numbers of elective and non-elective CDs, number of vaginal deliveries, type of anesthesia for CD, and the number of NALs were collected. RA use for CD increased to 25% in year 2015 versus 14% in base year 2011 [odds ratio (OR): 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.73,2.42; p  < 0.001]. NAL increased to 10.5% of laboring women in 2015 versus 1.2% in 2011 (OR: 9.6; 95% CI: 7.2, 12.8; p  < 0.001). Greater increases for RA use during non-elective CD were observed between 2011 and 2015 (1.4 versus 7.5% of total CD; OR: 5.52; 95% CI: 2.63, 8.41; p  < 0.001) relative to elective CD (12.5 versus 17.5% of total CD; OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.77; p  < 0.001). Overall, RA for CD increased during the 4 year collaboration but was not as great as reported in other countries with similar health-care demographics utilizing a similar program. Detailed descriptions of program interventions and barriers to change at CCV are presented.

  13. Topical Nasal Anesthesia in Flexible Bronchoscopy--A Cross-Over Comparison between Two Devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Fuehner

    Full Text Available Topical airway anesthesia is known to improve tolerance and patient satisfaction during flexible bronchoscopy (FB. Lidocaine is commonly used, delivered as an atomized spray. The current study assesses safety and patient satisfaction for nasal anesthesia of a new atomization device during outpatient bronchoscopy in lung transplant recipients.Using a prospective, non-blinded, cross-over design, patients enrolled between 01-10-2014 and 24-11-2014 received 2% lidocaine using the standard reusable nasal atomizer (CRNA. Those enrolled between 25-11-2014 and 30-01-2015, received a disposable intranasal mucosal atomization device (DIMAD. After each procedure, the treating physician, their assistant and the patient independently rated side-effects and satisfaction, basing their responses on visual analogue scales (VAS. At their next scheduled bronchoscopy during the study period, patients then received the alternative atomizer. Written consent was obtained prior to the first bronchoscopy, and the study approved by the institutional ethics committee.Of the 252 patients enrolled between 01-10-2014 and 30-01-2015, 80 (32% received both atomizers. Physicians reported better efficacy (p = 0.001 and fewer side effects (p< = 0.001 for DIMAD in patients exposed to both procedures. Among patients with one visit, physicians and their assistants reported improved efficacy (p = 0.018, p = 0.002 and fewer side effects (p< = 0.001, p = 0.029 for the disposable atomizer, whereas patients reported no difference in efficacy or side effects (p = 0.72 and p = 0.20. No severe adverse events were noted. The cost of the reusable device was 4.08€ per procedure, compared to 3.70€ for the disposable device.Topical nasal anesthesia via a disposable intranasal mucosal atomization device (DIMAD offers comparable safety and patient comfort, compared to conventional reusable nasal atomizers (CRNA in lung transplant recipients. Procedural costs were reduced by 0.34€ per

  14. Pediatric anesthesia in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2007-06-01

    To highlight the problems faced in developing countries where healthcare resources are limited, with particular emphasis on pediatric anesthesia. The fact that very few publications address pediatric anesthesia in the developing world is not surprising given that most anesthetics are provided by nonphysicians, nurses or unqualified personnel. In compiling this article information is drawn from pediatric surgical, anesthetic and related texts. In a recent survey more than 80% of anesthesia providers in a poor country acknowledged that with the limited resources available they could not provide basic anesthesia for children less than 5 years. Although many publications could be regarded as anecdotal, the similarities to this survey suggest that the lack of facilities is more generalized than we would like to believe. The real risk of anesthesia in comparison to other major health risks such as human immunodeficiency virus, malaria, tuberculosis and trauma remains undetermined. The critical shortage of manpower remains a barrier to progress. Despite erratic electrical supplies, inconsistent oxygen delivery, paucity of drugs or equipment and on occasion even lack of running water, many provide life-saving anesthesia. Perioperative morbidity and mortality is, however, understandably high by developed world standards.

  15. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  16. Two-Port Pars Plana Anterior and Central Core Vitrectomy (Lam Floaterectomy) in Combination With Phacoemulsification and Intraocular Lens Implantation Under Topical Anesthesia for Patients with Cataract and Significant Floaters: Results of the First 50 Consecutive Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Dennis S C; Leung, Hiu Ying; Liu, Shu; Radke, Nishant; Yuan, Ye; Lee, Vincent Y W

    2017-01-01

    To study the safety and efficacy of 2-port pars plana anterior and central core vitrectomy (Lam floaterectomy) in combination with phacoemulsification (phaco) and intraocular lens implantation (IOL) for patients with cataract and significant floaters under topical anesthesia. Retrospective review of the first 50 consecutive cases. A standardized treatment protocol was used for patients with cataract and significant (moderate to severe) floaters (duration > 3 months). Data analysis included intraoperative and postoperative complications, floater status, and patient satisfaction. There were 50 eyes (38 patients) with a male-to-female ratio of 1 to 2.3. Twelve patients had bilateral eye surgeries. Mean age was 58.10 ± 9.85 years (range, 39-83). All patients completed the 3-month follow-up. One eye had mild vitreous hemorrhage at the end of surgery arising from sclerotomy wound oozing. No other intraoperative compli-cations were encountered. Postoperatively, there was 1 case of transient hypotony and 1 case of congestion at sclerotomy wound. No cases of retinal break or detachment, or clinically significant macular edema, were reported. There were 5 cases (10%) of mild residual floaters and 1 case (2%) of floater recurrence. Total floater clearance rate was 88%. Patient satisfaction rates were 80%, 14%, 6%, and 0% for very satisfied, satis-fied, acceptable, and unsatisfied, respectively. The 3-month results in terms of safety and efficacy of the Lam floaterectomy in combination with phaco and IOLfor patients with cataract and significant floaters under topical anesthesia are encouraging. Further larger-scale, prospective, multicenter studies seem warranted. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  17. Management of temporary urinary retention after arthroscopic knee surgery in low-dose spinal anesthesia: development of a simple algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Thomas J; Garoscio, Ivo; Rehder, Peter; Oberladstätter, Jürgen; Voelckel, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    In practice, trauma and orthopedic surgery during spinal anesthesia are often performed with routine urethral catheterization of the bladder to prevent an overdistention of the bladder. However, use of a catheter has inherent risks. Ultrasound examination of the bladder (Bladderscan) can precisely determine the bladder volume. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify para